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Sample records for ir research glasgow

  1. ARO Research Instrumentation Program - IR Spectrometer Procurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    because chemical interactions at the electrode/electrolyte interface determine the type, rate, and efficiency of electron transfer processes that...changes in potential are lengthened significantly primarily due to ion-ion interactions, hydrogen bonding , et cetera that increase the viscosity. This...as C-C stretching and COH and CCH deformation vibrations are observed at 1000-1300 cm-1. The IR spectrum for processed yarn shows hydrogen bonding

  2. Types of Research Bias Encountered in IR.

    PubMed

    Gabr, Ahmed; Kallini, Joseph Ralph; Desai, Kush; Hickey, Ryan; Thornburg, Bartley; Kulik, Laura; Lewandowski, Robert J; Salem, Riad

    2016-04-01

    Bias is a systemic error in studies that leads to inaccurate deductions. Relevant biases in the field of IR and interventional oncology were identified after reviewing articles published in the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology and CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology. Biases cited in these articles were divided into three categories: preinterventional (health care access, participation, referral, and sample biases), periinterventional (contamination, investigator, and operator biases), and postinterventional (guarantee-time, lead time, loss to follow-up, recall, and reporting biases). Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cormack Research Project: Glasgow University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Susan; Ryan, James M.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this project was to investigate and improve upon existing methods of analysing data from COMITEL on the Gamma Ray Observatory for neutrons emitted during solar flares. In particular, a strategy for placing confidence intervals on neutron energy distributions, due to uncertainties on the response matrix has been developed. We have also been able to demonstrate the superior performance of one of a range of possible statistical regularization strategies. A method of generating likely models of neutron energy distributions has also been developed as a tool to this end. The project involved solving an inverse problem with noise being added to the data in various ways. To achieve this pre-existing C code was used to run Fortran subroutines which performed statistical regularization on the data.

  4. "The Glasgow effect?"- the result of the geographical patterning of deprived areas?

    PubMed

    Livingston, Mark; Lee, Duncan

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this research was to examine whether the excess mortality found in Glasgow, compared to other cities in the UK ("Glasgow effect"), could be attributed to patterns of the distribution of deprived neighbourhoods within the cities. Data on mortality and deprivation at a neighbourhood scale were used to examine the impact of the patterning of neighbourhood deprivation on mortality in Glasgow, Liverpool and Manchester. Analysis using a combination of GIS and statistical approaches, including a Moran׳s I test and Conditional Auto Regressive models to capture residual spatial autocorrelation, was carried out. The pattern of deprivation was found to be more dispersed in Glasgow compared to the other cities. The impact of surrounding deprivation at two different scales shows strong impact on neighbourhood health outcomes in Glasgow and Liverpool but not in Manchester, suggesting that patterning is not a major contribution to the excess mortality in Glasgow.

  5. Development of a radical foster care intervention in Glasgow, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Kathleen Anne; Balogun, Mayowa Oluwatosin; Minnis, Helen

    2016-09-01

    Services for maltreated children are inadequate and lack infant mental health input in many parts of the world. A recent audit of Glasgow services revealed that children frequently 'revolve' between maltreating birth parents and various temporary foster placements for many years. Addressing infant mental health in this population will require radical change to current services. The New Orleans programme developed by the Tulane Infant Team in Louisiana is one such radical programme. Prior to the design of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to test this programme in Glasgow, it was essential that policy-makers had some insight into the local model of service delivery and how a New Orleans model could impact. This article explores the structure and costs of the current Glasgow system and the potential costs and consequence impact of implementing a New Orleans model in Glasgow, using data obtained from the research literature, Glasgow City Council audit data and expert's opinion. A New Orleans-Glasgow model would likely shift resources from social services on to the NHS. The resource intensive nature of this model could increase the cost of an episode in care from £66 300 in the current system to £86 070; however, the probability of repeated episodes in care is likely to fall substantially, making the cost per child fall from £95 500 in the current system to £88 600. This study informed the design of a phase II explorative RCT, identified appropriate outcomes for measurement and areas of uncertainty for further research. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Promoting breast screening in Glasgow.

    PubMed

    Cohen, L; Dobson, H; McGuire, F

    2000-03-01

    To establish whether there is a role for advertising in the promotion of the Breast Screening Programme and what the role of advertising might be. Four hundred and sixty questionnaires were completed by women attending their breast screening appointment. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from the static unit at Calder Street and the mobile unit in Govan. The advertising (budget 30,000 Pounds) campaign ran over an eight week period in the Govan, Paisley Road West and Cardonald areas of Glasgow. Media used included press advertising, The Glasgow Underground, adshells, bus advertising (interiors) and poster distribution via local outlets. Forty-two per cent of the sample were aware of the campaign. Ninety-seven per cent liked the campaign images. Eighty eight per cent felt that breast screening should be advertised more. Screening uptake increased in the areas covered by the advertising campaign. Govan -58%-71% and Ibrox (Paisley Road West and Cardonald) -59%-61%. Women were very supportive of the role of advertising for the Breast Screening Programme. In particular they found the campaign images and messages reassuring, supportive and credible. Their views suggest that the role of advertising should be: To raise awareness of the service To make women more conscious of the benefits of screening To change public perceptions of the screening process However, it is recognised that a fully integrated approach is required for the promotion of the service to account for the improvement in uptake, as advertising cannot be expected to work in isolation.

  7. Territorialities in Scotland: Perceptions of Young People in Glasgow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holligan, Christopher Peter; Deuchar, Ross

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an exploratory, small-scale qualitative research enquiry into the perceptions and experiences of young people in communities afflicted by deprivation in Glasgow, Scotland's largest city. The context within which we address this focus contains a culture reputed to involve sectarianism, territoriality and gangs.…

  8. Territorialities in Scotland: Perceptions of Young People in Glasgow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holligan, Christopher Peter; Deuchar, Ross

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an exploratory, small-scale qualitative research enquiry into the perceptions and experiences of young people in communities afflicted by deprivation in Glasgow, Scotland's largest city. The context within which we address this focus contains a culture reputed to involve sectarianism, territoriality and gangs.…

  9. An EW technology research of jamming IR imaging guided missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiu-qin; Rong, Hua; Liang, Jing-ping; Chen, Qi; Chen, Min-rong

    2009-07-01

    The IR-Imaging-Guided Weapons have been playing an important role in the modern warfare by means of select attacking the vital parts of targets with the features of highly secret attacking, high precision, and excellent anti-jamming capability ,therefore, they are viewed to be one of the promising precisely guided weapons ,receiving great concern through out the world. This paper discusses the characteristics of IR-Imaging guidance systems at the highlight of making a study of correlated technologies of jamming IR-Imaging-Guided Weapons on the basis of elaborating the operational principles of IR-Imaging-guided Weapons.

  10. ED disposition of the Glasgow Coma Scale 13 to 15 traumatic brain injury patient: analysis of the Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in TBI study.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, Jonathan J; Adeoye, Opeolu; Lindsell, Christopher J; Hart, Kimberly W; Pancioli, Arthur; McMullan, Jason T; Yue, John K; Nishijima, Daniel K; Gordon, Wayne A; Valadka, Alex B; Okonkwo, David O; Lingsma, Hester F; Maas, Andrew I R; Manley, Geoffrey T

    2014-08-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients are frequently admitted to high levels of care despite limited evidence suggesting benefit. Such decisions may contribute to the significant cost of caring for mTBI patients. Understanding the factors that drive disposition decision making and how disposition is associated with outcomes is necessary for developing an evidence-base supporting disposition decisions. We evaluated factors associated with emergency department triage of mTBI patients to 1 of 3 levels of care: home, inpatient floor, or intensive care unit (ICU). This multicenter, prospective, cohort study included patients with isolated head trauma, a cranial computed tomography as part of routine care, and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 13 to 15. Data analysis was performed using multinomial logistic regression. Of the 304 patients included, 167 (55%) were discharged home, 76 (25%) were admitted to the inpatient floor, and 61 (20%) were admitted to the ICU. In the multivariable model, admission to the ICU, compared with floor admission, varied by study site, odds ratio (OR) 0.18 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.06-0.57); antiplatelet/anticoagulation therapy, OR 7.46 (95% CI, 1.79-31.13); skull fracture, OR 7.60 (95% CI, 2.44-23.73); and lower GCS, OR 2.36 (95% CI, 1.05-5.30). No difference in outcome was observed between the 3 levels of care. Clinical characteristics and local practice patterns contribute to mTBI disposition decisions. Level of care was not associated with outcomes. Intracranial hemorrhage, GCS 13 to 14, skull fracture, and current antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy influenced disposition decisions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Will IR Staff Stick? An Exploration of Institutional Researchers' Intention to Remain in or Leave Their Jobs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, William E.; Leimer, Christina L.

    2010-01-01

    The study explored the factors that relate to the likelihood of institutional researchers (IRs) to plan to leave their jobs. Learning more about the effects on IR job turnover can serve to improve the employment experience of IR practitioners, the profession of IR, and, indirectly, higher education. 1,264 IRs responded to a national survey…

  12. Will IR Staff Stick? An Exploration of Institutional Researchers' Intention to Remain in or Leave Their Jobs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, William E.; Leimer, Christina L.

    2010-01-01

    The study explored the factors that relate to the likelihood of institutional researchers (IRs) to plan to leave their jobs. Learning more about the effects on IR job turnover can serve to improve the employment experience of IR practitioners, the profession of IR, and, indirectly, higher education. 1,264 IRs responded to a national survey…

  13. Research into the usage of integrated jamming of IR weakening and smoke-screen resisting the IR imaging guided missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Long-tao; Jiang, Ning; Lv, Ming-shan

    2015-10-01

    With the emergence of the anti-ship missle with the capability of infrared imaging guidance, the traditional single jamming measures, because of the jamming mechanism and technical flaws or unsuitable use, greatly reduced the survival probability of the war-ship in the future naval battle. Intergrated jamming of IR weakening + smoke-screen Can not only make jamming to the search and tracking of IR imaging guidance system , but also has feasibility in conjunction, besides , which also make the best jamming effect. The research conclusion has important realistic meaning for raising the antimissile ability of surface ships. With the development of guidance technology, infrared guidance system has expanded by ir point-source homing guidance to infrared imaging guidance, Infrared imaging guidance has made breakthrough progress, Infrared imaging guidance system can use two-dimensional infrared image information of the target, achieve the precise tracking. Which has Higher guidance precision, better concealment, stronger anti-interference ability and could Target the key parts. The traditional single infrared smoke screen jamming or infrared decoy flare interference cannot be imposed effective interference. So, Research how to effectively fight against infrared imaging guided weapons threat measures and means, improving the surface ship antimissile ability is an urgent need to solve.

  14. Independent Research and Development (IR&D): The Challenges Continue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-30

    erode, reducing our ultimate conflict-mitigation strategy of global power projection. With the technological gap between the United States and its...economic growth, continuing U.S. global industrial competiveness, and advancing national priorities” (Shea, 2010). Should a potential adversary engineer...insight into industry IR&D projects” (Defense Innovation Marketplace, 2015). The website, known as the Defense Innovation Marketplace ( DIM ), was

  15. Psychometric properties of Glasgow Sleep Effort Scale in Portuguese language.

    PubMed

    Meia-Via, Mariana Soares; Marques, Daniel Ruivo; Espie, Colin A; da Silva, Carlos Fernandes; Allen Gomes, Ana

    2016-03-01

    Sleep effort is generally defined as the attempt to force and induce sleep in a voluntary manner. This study aimed to document the psychometric properties of a brief measure of sleep effort--the Glasgow Sleep Effort Scale--in its European (Portuguese) version using a large sample (N = 2,995). The results supported the good internal consistency of the overall scale scores (α = .79). Potential construct validity was evaluated with various methods, including criterion validity. There was also a convergent validity indicator. Principal components analysis revealed a 1-dimensional structure that accounted for 45% of the total variance. This preliminary study suggests that this Portuguese version of the Glasgow Sleep Effort Scale is a measure of sleep behavior suitable for research and clinical purposes. However, more studies are needed, particularly with clinical groups.

  16. The experimentation research of IR imaging system capability affected by sapphire window's pneumatic calefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang-peng; Pan, Guo-qing; Zhang, Yun-qiang

    2009-07-01

    In the inclement pneumatic calefaction condition, the window of IR imaging system will be calefied and emit infrared radiation, so that the Signal-to-Noise and quality of target IR image are felled off that are from the imaging system. At this rate the physical characteristic of IR window direct affect capability of imaging system controlled and guided homing by IR tracker and measure precision of target IR characteristics. The properties of sapphire make it an ideal choice for the high speed missile applications compared to other existing or emerging materials. But the research has not been reported about the infrared radiation characteristic of sapphire as the IR window. In this paper, based on an IR imaging system using the sapphire window, the experimentation and conclusions of IR thermal image measurement affected by IR window's pneumatic calefaction have been accomplished. Firstly, the temperatures of sapphire window at supersonic flight extended over 1 km and 15 km from the ground have been estimated by calculating the flow and state variables and the aerodynamic heating into the window. On the base of the results calculated the window static state calefaction experimentation and electric arc wind tunnel experimentation had been designed and completed to validate the effect degree of pneumatic calefaction to the imaging system. With the temperatures of the sapphire window rising, in the image coming from the imaging system, the peak luminance of target image detected is increased, the background average luminance of the image is also increased, and the margin of above two varies in a little range. The data obtained from the different temperature experimentation have demonstrated that the IR flux due to the sapphire window becomes heated by friction with the air and heat transfer to the dome can obscure the target image created by the onboard IR sensor, depress Signal-to-Noise and resolving power of the imaging system, but can not overload the detector.

  17. An Exploration of Smoking Behavior of African Male Immigrants Living in Glasgow

    PubMed Central

    Ezika, Ejiofor Augustine

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this research study was to explore the smoking behavior of adult African male immigrant smokers living in Glasgow to inform and contribute to primary health promotion frameworks. METHODS 25 adult African male immigrant smokers living in Glasgow were recruited via consecutive sampling by soliciting for participation through the use of flyers, posters and word of mouth. Data collection occurred via semi-structured face-to-face interviews. The interviews were audio taped, after which verbatim transcription was carried out and the data analyzed thematically. RESULTS The participants’ smoking habits were influenced by cold weather environment as well as societal norms that appear to make the smoking habit more acceptable in Glasgow than Africa. It appears the more educated the participants were, the fewer cigarettes they smoked. However, there was only a slight difference in the number of cigarettes smoked between participants with a degree and those with a postgraduate degree. CONCLUSION The participants’ smoking habits in Glasgow appear to have increased because of environmental variables associated with living in Glasgow, specifically the cold weather environment and high acceptability of smoking habits in Glasgow. PMID:25741179

  18. Experiment research on infrared targets signature in mid and long IR spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chensheng; Hong, Pu; Lei, Bo; Yue, Song; Zhang, Zhijie; Ren, Tingting

    2013-09-01

    Since the infrared imaging system has played a significant role in the military self-defense system and fire control system, the radiation signature of IR target becomes an important topic in IR imaging application technology. IR target signature can be applied in target identification, especially for small and dim targets, as well as the target IR thermal design. To research and analyze the targets IR signature systematically, a practical and experimental project is processed under different backgrounds and conditions. An infrared radiation acquisition system based on a MWIR cooled thermal imager and a LWIR cooled thermal imager is developed to capture the digital infrared images. Furthermore, some instruments are introduced to provide other parameters. According to the original image data and the related parameters in a certain scene, the IR signature of interested target scene can be calculated. Different background and targets are measured with this approach, and a comparison experiment analysis shall be presented in this paper as an example. This practical experiment has proved the validation of this research work, and it is useful in detection performance evaluation and further target identification research.

  19. Research Ethics Education in Post-Graduate Medical Curricula in I.R. Iran.

    PubMed

    Nikravanfard, Nazila; Khorasanizadeh, Faezeh; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2016-08-16

    Research ethics training during post-graduate education is necessary to improve ethical standards in the design and conduct of biomedical research. We studied quality and quantity of research ethics training in the curricula of post-graduate programs in the medical science in I.R. Iran. We evaluated curricula of 125 post-graduate programs in medical sciences in I.R. Iran. We qualitatively studied the curricula by education level, including the Master and PhD degrees and analyzed the contents and the amount of teaching allocated for ethics training in each curriculum. We found no research ethics training in 72 (58%) of the programs. Among the 53 (42%) programs that considered research ethics training, only 17 programs had specific courses for research ethics and eight of them had detailed topics on their courses. The research ethics training was optional in 25% and mandatory in 76% of the programs. Post-graduate studies that were approved in the more recent years had more attention to the research ethics training. Research ethics training was neglected in most of the medical post-graduate programs. We suggest including sufficient amount of mandatory research ethics training in Master and PhD programs in I.R. Iran. Further research about quality of research ethics training and implementation of curricula in the biomedical institutions is warranted.

  20. Intelligent Vision Systems Independent Research and Development (IR&D) 2006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, Clinton; Chavis, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes results in conduct of research sponsored by the 2006 Independent Research and Development (IR&D) program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. The focus of this IR&D is neural network (NN) technology provided by Imagination Engines, Incorporated (IEI) of St. Louis, Missouri. The technology already has many commercial, military, and governmental applications, and a rapidly growing list of other potential spin-offs. The goal for this IR&D is implementation and demonstration of the technology for autonomous robotic operations, first in software and ultimately in one or more hardware realizations. Testing is targeted specifically to the MSFC Flat Floor, but may also include other robotic platforms at MSFC, as time and funds permit. For the purpose of this report, the NN technology will be referred to by IEI's designation for a subset configuration of its patented technology suite: Self-Training Autonomous Neural Network Object (STANNO).

  1. 76 FR 2353 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; International Research and Studies (IRS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; International Research and Studies (IRS) Program.... Department of Education's list of Less Commonly Taught Languages (LCTLs): Akan (Twi-Fante), Albanian, Amharic...

  2. Drug Issues Affecting Chinese, Indian and Pakistani People Living in Greater Glasgow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, A. J.; Heim, D.; Bakshi, N.; Davies, J. B.; Flatley, K. J.; Hunter, S. C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes research on drug issues affecting Chinese, Indian and Pakistani people living in Greater Glasgow. There were two strands: (i) a questionnaire-based survey of young people and focus groups; (ii) interviews with young people and adults. The primary aims were to gather prevalence data and to investigate perceptions about current…

  3. Central Research Project Report on Superconductivity (1988). Part 1. Materials and IR Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    Ceramic superconductors, Infrared detectors, Bolometers, Superconductor IR detectors, Phase Equilibria , - Ceramic crystal structures...1988 CRP effort, two activities are reported herein: (1) Phase equilibria and crystal structure of known high-temperature super- conductors, and (2... phase equilibria results cited above were preliminary and thought likely to be revised as further research is done. C. Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O AND TI-Ca-Ba-Cu-O

  4. 78 FR 67024 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT AGENCY... a final rule published in the Federal Register of September 30, 2013, that establishes Class E... aid, Glasgow, MT. A favorable comment from the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA)...

  5. Physician knowledge of the Glasgow Coma Scale.

    PubMed

    Riechers, Ronald G; Ramage, Anthony; Brown, William; Kalehua, Audrey; Rhee, Peter; Ecklund, James M; Ling, Geoffrey S F

    2005-11-01

    Appropriate triage is critical to optimizing outcome from battle related injuries. The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is the primary means by which combat casualties, who have suffered head injury, are triaged. For the GCS to be reliable in this critical role, it must be applied accurately. To determine the level of knowledge of the GCS among military physicians with exposure and/or training in the scale we administered a prospective, voluntary, and anonymous survey to physicians of all levels of training at military medical centers with significant patient referral base. The main outcome measures were correct identification of title and categories of the GCS along with appropriate scoring of each category. Overall performance on the survey was marginal. Many were able to identify what "GCS" stands for, but far fewer were able to identify the titles of the specific categories, let alone identify the specific scoring of each category. When evaluated based on medical specialties, those in surgical specialties outperformed those in the medical specialties. When comparing the different levels of training, residents and fellows performed better than attending staff or interns. Finally, those with Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) certification performed significantly better than those without the training. Physician knowledge of the GCS, as demonstrated in this study, is poor, even in a population of individuals with specific training in the use of the scale. It is concluded that, to optimize outcome from combat related head injury, methods for improving accurate quantitation of neurologic state need to be explored.

  6. Research of Recognition Method of Discrete Wavelet Feature Extraction and PNN Classification of Rats FT-IR Pancreatic Cancer Data.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chayan; Cao, Wenqing; Cheng, Cungui

    2014-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats' normal and abnormal pancreatic tissues are determined directly by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FT-IR) spectroscopy method. In order to diagnose earlier stage of SD rats pancreatic cancer rate with FT-IR, a novel method of extraction of FT-IR feature using discrete wavelet transformation (DWT) analysis and classification with the probability neural network (PNN) was developed. The differences between normal pancreatic and abnormal samples were identified by PNN based on the indices of 4 feature variants. When error goal was 0.01, the total correct rates of pancreatic early carcinoma and advanced carcinoma were 98% and 100%, respectively. It was practical to apply PNN on the basis of ATR-FT-IR to identify abnormal tissues. The research result shows the feasibility of establishing the models with FT-IR-DWT-PNN method to identify normal pancreatic tissues, early carcinoma tissues, and advanced carcinoma tissues.

  7. Research of Recognition Method of Discrete Wavelet Feature Extraction and PNN Classification of Rats FT-IR Pancreatic Cancer Data

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Chayan; Cao, Wenqing; Cheng, Cungui

    2014-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats' normal and abnormal pancreatic tissues are determined directly by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FT-IR) spectroscopy method. In order to diagnose earlier stage of SD rats pancreatic cancer rate with FT-IR, a novel method of extraction of FT-IR feature using discrete wavelet transformation (DWT) analysis and classification with the probability neural network (PNN) was developed. The differences between normal pancreatic and abnormal samples were identified by PNN based on the indices of 4 feature variants. When error goal was 0.01, the total correct rates of pancreatic early carcinoma and advanced carcinoma were 98% and 100%, respectively. It was practical to apply PNN on the basis of ATR-FT-IR to identify abnormal tissues. The research result shows the feasibility of establishing the models with FT-IR-DWT-PNN method to identify normal pancreatic tissues, early carcinoma tissues, and advanced carcinoma tissues. PMID:25548717

  8. Is 'excess' mortality in Glasgow an artefact of measurement?

    PubMed

    Stanners, G; Walsh, D; McCartney, G

    2015-06-01

    A previous investigation of Glasgow's excess mortality showed that the (income) deprivation profiles for Glasgow, Liverpool and Manchester were nearly identical. Despite this, premature deaths in Glasgow were found to be more than 30% higher, and all deaths 15% higher, than in the English cities. This study aimed to explore the extent to which Glasgow's higher mortality could be explained by the use of a potentially more sensitive measure of deprivation employed at a suitably small and consistent geographical spatial unit. Analyses of mortality based on the creation of a three-city index of deprivation using rates of 'car/van ownership' deprivation for small areas (average population size: 1600) in Glasgow, Liverpool and Manchester derived from the census. Rates of 'car/van ownership deprivation were calculated for small areas in Glasgow, Liverpool and Manchester. All-cause and cause-specific standardized mortality ratios were calculated for Glasgow relative to Liverpool and Manchester, standardizing for age, gender and deprivation decile. The overall levels of car/van ownership based deprivation in Glasgow, Liverpool and Manchester, in 2001, differed. Glasgow had a higher percentage of its population who did not have access to a car compared with Liverpool and Manchester. All-cause mortality, after adjustment for age, sex and this measure of deprivation, for deaths <65 years were 15% higher and 8% higher for all deaths for males and females respectively. However, this was lower than the excess observed in the previous study. 'Excess' mortality was greatest in the working age groups of 15-44 years and 45-64 years, where it was 23% and 15% higher respectively. For deaths at all ages after adjustment, analysis by deprivation decile showed that excess mortality in Glasgow was seen in half the deciles, including four of the five most deprived deciles. However, the greatest excess was seen in comparison of the least deprived neighbourhoods. For premature mortality

  9. STS-68 radar image: Glasgow, Missouri

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-10-07

    STS068-S-055 (7 October 1994) --- This is a false-color L-Band image of an area near Glasgow, Missouri, centered at about 39.2 degrees north latitude and 92.8 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired using the L-Band radar channel (horizontally transmitted and received and horizontally transmitted and vertically received) polarization's combined. The data were acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on orbit 50 on October 3, 1994. The area shown is approximately 37 by 25 kilometers (23 by 16 miles). The radar data, coupled with pre-flood aerial photography and satellite data and post-flood topographic and field data, are being used to evaluate changes associated with levee breaks in land forms, where deposits formed during the widespread flooding in 1993 along the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers. The distinct radar scattering properties of farmland, sand fields and scoured areas will be used to inventory flood plains along the Missouri River and determine the processes by which these areas return to preflood conditions. The image shows one such levee break near Glasgow, Missouri. In the upper center of the radar image, below the bend of the river, is a region covered by several meters of sand, shown as dark regions. West (left) of the dark areas, a gap in the levee tree canopy shows the area where the levee failed. Radar data such as these can help scientists more accurately assess the potential for future flooding in this region and how that might impact surrounding communities. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses the three microwave wavelengths: the L-Band (24 centimeters), C-Band (6 centimeters) and X-Band (3 centimeters). The multi

  10. 78 FR 41337 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    .../Distance Measuring Equipment (VOR/DME) navigation aid, Glasgow, MT, to facilitate vectoring of Instrument... route domestic airspace extending upward from 1,200 feet above the surface at the Glasgow VOR/DME... controlled airspace the Glasgow VOR/ DME, Glasgow, MT. This proposal will be subject to an...

  11. Multiple target tracking algorithm research on IR fish-eye lens system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Lu, Xuguang; He, Yongqiang; Shen, HongBin; Xu, ChunMei; Wang, Yuanbo

    2009-11-01

    The paper presents the algorithms of data process on multi-target tracking and threat level sequence in large visual area IR (infrared ray) fish-eye system. The targeting information is associated and filtered with the polar coordinates. Firstly,The characteristic point of every target is picked up and tracked with special restriction for each of them. Secondly,the parameters of fairway, which are gained by aberration revising and researching the characters of temperature area, are picked up from serial images. The threat level of attacking objects is sorted by the speed, acceleration and direction of all targets. Finding out the most prior target which is in the certain distance in order to make sure that effective warning information is emitted in time. The algorithms are proved to be quick and effective through simulation and the muiti-target experiment system developed by the writers.

  12. Neutronic safety and transient analyses for potential LEU conversion of the IR-8 research reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Deen, J. R.; Hanan, N. A.; Smith, R. S.; Matos, J. E.; Egorenkov, P. M.; Nasonov, V. A.

    1999-09-27

    Kinetic parameters, isothermal reactivity feedback coefficients and three transients for the IR-8 research reactor cores loaded with either HEU(90%), HEU(36%), or LEU (19.75%) fuel assemblies (FA) were calculated using three dimensional diffusion theory flux solutions, RELAP5/MOD3.2 and PARET. The prompt neutron generation time and effective delayed neutron fractions were calculated for fresh and beginning-of-equilibrium-cycle cores. Isothermal reactivity feedback coefficients were calculated for changes in coolant density, coolant temperature and fuel temperature in fresh and equilibrium cores. These kinetic parameters and reactivity coefficients were used in transient analysis models to predict power histories, and peak fuel, clad and coolant temperatures. The transients modeled were a rapid and slow loss-of-flow, a slow reactivity insertion, and a fast reactivity insertion.

  13. Updates from the British Association of Dermatologists 85th annual meeting, 5-8 July 2005, Glasgow, U.K.

    PubMed

    Eedy, D J; English, J S C; Coulson, I H

    2006-06-01

    The conference highlighted the progress made in understanding recent biological, epidemiological and therapeutic advances in dermatology. Here we provide a synopsis of the main research and clinical findings presented at the meeting of the British Association of Dermatologists (BAD) held during 5-8 July 2005, in Glasgow, U.K., drawing attention to the most important advances and summaries. The BAD meeting was held at the Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre, Glasgow (Fig. 1). The annual dinner was held in the wonderful setting of Stirling Castle, with Dr Robin Graham-Brown as host.

  14. Selective internal migration. Does it explain Glasgow's worsening mortality record?

    PubMed

    Popham, Frank; Boyle, Paul J; O'Reilly, Dermot; Leyland, Alastair H

    2011-11-01

    The mortality difference between Glasgow and the rest of Scotland has been increasing and mortality rates are higher than Glasgow's excess deprivation would suggest. One plausible explanation for this excess is selective migration. A sample of 137,073 individuals aged 15 to 64 in 1991 from the Scottish Longitudinal Study was used to test this explanation. Three geographic areas were compared: Glasgow; Aberdeen, Dundee and Edinburgh cities combined and the rest of Scotland. The impact of selective migration was assessed by calculating age and sex standardised mortality rates for 2001/03 by residence in 2001 and by residence in 1991. Glasgow experienced the greatest loss of population (-7.1%) between 1991 and 2001 but this was not strongly related to deprivation. It had the highest mortality at baseline and the difference between it and the other areas increased over the ten years. This pattern was not significantly affected by calculating death rates according to area of residence at 1991 or in 2001. Our results suggest that the increasing difference in mortality rates between Glasgow and the rest of Scotland over this period was probably not caused by selective migration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. IR radiation characteristics and operating range research for a quad-rotor unmanned aircraft vehicle.

    PubMed

    Gong, Mali; Guo, Rui; He, Sifeng; Wang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    The security threats caused by multi-rotor unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs) are serious, especially in public places. To detect and control multi-rotor UAVs, knowledge of IR characteristics is necessary. The IR characteristics of a typical commercial quad-rotor UAV are investigated in this paper through thermal imaging with an IR camera. Combining the 3D geometry and IR images of the UAV, a 3D IR characteristics model is established so that the radiant power from different views can be obtained. An estimation of operating range to detect the UAV is calculated theoretically using signal-to-noise ratio as the criterion. Field experiments are implemented with an uncooled IR camera in an environment temperature of 12°C and a uniform background. For the front view, the operating range is about 150 m, which is close to the simulation result of 170 m.

  16. Multifrequency high precise subTHz-THz-IR spectroscopy for exhaled breath research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaks, Vladimir L.; Domracheva, Elena G.; Pripolzin, Sergey I.; Chernyaeva, Mariya B.

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays the development of analytical spectroscopy with high performance, sensitivity and spectral resolution for exhaled breath research is attended. The method of two-frequency high precise THz spectroscopy and the method of high precise subTHz-THz-IR spectroscopy are presented. Development of a subTHz-THz-IR gas analyzer increases the number of gases that can be identified and the reliability of the detection by confirming the signature in both THz and MIR ranges. The testing measurements have testified this new direction of analytical spectroscopy to open widespread trends of its using for various problems of medicine and biology. First of all, there are laboratory investigations of the processes in exhaled breath and studying of their dynamics. Besides, the methods presented can be applied for detecting intermediate and short time living products of reactions in exhaled breath. The spectrometers have been employed for investigations of acetone, methanol and ethanol in the breath samples of healthy volunteers and diabetes patients. The results have demonstrated an increased concentration of acetone in breath of diabetes patients. The dynamic of changing the acetone concentration before and after taking the medicines is discovered. The potential markers of pre-cancer states and oncological diseases of gastrointestinal tract organs have been detected. The changes in the NO concentration in exhaled breath of cancer patients during radiotherapy as well as increase of the NH3 concentration at gastrointestinal diseases have been revealed. The preliminary investigations of biomarkers in three frequency ranges have demonstrated the advantages of the multifrequency high precise spectroscopy for noninvasive medical diagnostics.

  17. 48 CFR 931.205-18 - Independent research and development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs. 931.205-18 Section 931.205-18 Federal Acquisition... PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 931.205-18 Independent research and development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs. (c)(2) IR&D costs are recoverable under DOE contracts to the extent...

  18. 48 CFR 931.205-18 - Independent research and development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs. 931.205-18 Section 931.205-18 Federal Acquisition... PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 931.205-18 Independent research and development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs. (c)(2) IR&D costs are recoverable under DOE contracts to the extent...

  19. 48 CFR 931.205-18 - Independent research and development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs. 931.205-18 Section 931.205-18 Federal Acquisition... PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 931.205-18 Independent research and development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs. (c)(2) IR&D costs are recoverable under DOE contracts to the extent...

  20. 48 CFR 931.205-18 - Independent research and development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs. 931.205-18 Section 931.205-18 Federal Acquisition... PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 931.205-18 Independent research and development (IR&D) and bid and proposal (B&P) costs. (c)(2) IR&D costs are recoverable under DOE contracts to the extent...

  1. Surveillance of glaucoma medical therapy in a Glasgow teaching hospital: 26 years' experience.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Q; Montgomery, D M I; Lazaridou, M N

    2009-12-01

    To report the initial findings of a unique database of 956 patients with ocular hypertension (OHT), normal tension glaucoma (NTG) and primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) attending the Glaucoma Clinic at Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. The database contains retrospective data from 1981 and prospective data from 1999. Analyses have been carried out using specially written queries to generate reports relating to prescription trends and reasons for treatment discontinuation. The database included the following numbers of patients: POAG 580; OHT 242; NTG 134. Of 2928 treatment-change episodes recorded, failure to reach or maintain a target intraocular pressure (IOP) accounted for 51.9%, while adverse effects accounted for 22.1%. Use of latanoprost has increased sharply since 1996, and that of brimonidine, betaxolol and dorzolamide has declined significantly. Bimatoprost had a higher rate of discontinuation due to adverse effects (25%) than travoprost (16.3%) or latanoprost (12.4%), but this was only statistically significant between latanoprost and bimatoprost (p = 0.0038). In 2000 the database informed the introduction of a new treatment protocol that resulted in a fall in discontinuations due to adverse effects by almost two-thirds. A large and unique treatment database has been established at the Glaucoma Clinic of Glasgow Royal Infirmary. Containing data spanning a 26-year period, it promises to be an invaluable resource for audit and research. It has already demonstrated its worth by informing changes in prescribing practice that have resulted in direct patient benefit.

  2. The Physical Tourist Physics in Glasgow: A Heritage Tour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Sean F.

    2006-12-01

    I trace the history of the physical and applied sciences, and particularly physics, in Glasgow. Among the notable individuals I discuss are Joseph Black (1728 1799), James Watt (1736 1819), William John Macquorn Rankine (1820 1872), William Thomson, Lord Kelvin (1824 1907), John Kerr (1824 1907), Frederick Soddy (1877 1956), John Logie Baird (1888 1946), and Ian Donald (1910 1987), as well as physics-related businesses.The locations, centering on the city center and University of Glasgow, include sites both recognizable today and transformed from past usage, as well as museums and archives related to the history and interpretation of physics.

  3. NSCA light pollution seminar, Glasgow, 1999 November 25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizon, R.

    2000-04-01

    In July 1999 I was invited to speak at a seminar on 'Light Pollution in Scotland', to be held in Glasgow in November. The event was organised by the National Society for Clean Air and Protection of the Environment (NSCA).The Glasgow Central Hotel saw the gathering of over 100 local authority planners and environmental health officers from all over Scotland, and the CfDS presence included Dennis Proudman, of Taynuilt, Argyll, who has done much to spread awareness of the problem of light pollution in the Argyll area, not least with his series of articles in the Oban Times.

  4. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the IR-8 research reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Deen, J. R.

    1998-10-22

    Equilibrium fuel cycle comparisons for the IR-8 research reactor were made for HEU(90%), HEU(36%), and LEU (19.75%) fuel assembly (FA) designs using three dimensional multi-group diffusion theory models benchmarked to detailed Monte Carlo models of the reactor. Comparisons were made of changes in reactivity, cycle length, average {sup 235}U discharge burnup, thermal neutron flux, and control rod worths for the 90% and 36% enriched IRT-3M fuel assembly and the 19.75% enriched IRT-4M fuel assembly with the same fuel management strategy. The results of these comparisons showed that a uranium density of 3.5 g/cm{sup 3} in the fuel meat would be required in the LEU IRT-4M fuel assembly to match the cycle length of the HEU(90%) IRT-3M FA and an LEU density of 3.7 g/cm{sup 3} is needed to match the cycle length of the HEU(36%) IRT-3M FA.

  5. Ideals of ITE Students at the University of Glasgow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Ruyter, Doret J.; Conroy, James C.; Lappin, Mary; McKinney, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of a questionnaire completed by initial teacher education (ITE) students at the University of Glasgow shows a clear divergence between their personal and professional ideals. The students define their own ideals predominantly in terms of situations, like being married, having children or being happy. Their professional ideals, which…

  6. Emotional and Behavioural Development in Glasgow Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchett, Rachel; Nowek, Gail; Neill, Cróna; Minnis, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Studies examining the well-being of British children find that about 5-10% are at risk of developing problems. This study aimed to examine the emotional and behavioural development of six to eight year olds in an area of socio-economic deprivation in Glasgow (Scotland) and compare this with UK norms. Furthermore, it aimed to look at overlap…

  7. Pure Dead Brilliant?: Evaluating the Glasgow Story Digitisation Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Ian G.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present an evaluation of The Glasgow Story (TGS) digitisation project, funded by the UK's National Lottery's New Opportunities Fund digitisation (NOF-Digi) programme, and a critique of the evaluation process itself. The paper emphasises the need for user impact evaluation and for results to be brought into…

  8. Thrombin Generation in the Glasgow Myocardial Infarction Study

    PubMed Central

    Smid, Machiel; Dielis, Arne W. J. H.; Spronk, Henri M. H.; Rumley, Ann; van Oerle, Rene; Woodward, Mark; ten Cate, Hugo; Lowe, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Background Thrombin is a key protease in coagulation also implicated in complex pathology including atherosclerosis. To address the role of thrombin in relation to myocardial infarction (MI) we explored thrombin generation analysis in plasma from patients and controls that had participated in the Glasgow MI Study (GLAMIS). Methods Thrombin generation at 1 and 2 pM TF and with and without thrombomodulin (TM) was performed on plasmas from 356 subjects (171 cases, 185 age and sex matched controls) from GLAMIS collected between 3 and 9 months after the MI event. Results Although thrombin generation was slightly delayed in cases (lag time increased from 3.3 to 3.6 min) at the highest trigger, the overall potential to generate thrombin was increased by 7% for the ETP and by 15% for the peak height (both at the 1 pM TF trigger) in cases. Addition of TM did not reveal differences. Furthermore, an increased thrombin generation was associated with MI [normalized ETP: adjusted OR for the highest percentile = 2.4 (95% CI 1.3–4.5) and normalized peak height: adjusted OR = 2.6 (1.3–5.0)] at the lowest trigger; normalized ETP and peak height being 2.1 (1.1–3.8) and 2.0 (1.0–4.1) at the higher 2 pM trigger. Conclusion In GLAMIS, patients with a previous MI had an increased thrombin generation compared to controls. The absence of a clear difference in TM reduction suggests an unaltered anticoagulant activity in these patients. Further research is needed in order to unravel the underlying mechanisms of enhanced thrombin generation after MI. PMID:23826181

  9. A Psychological Service Contribution to Nurture: Glasgow's Nurturing City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    March, Sam; Kearney, Maura

    2017-01-01

    This article details the work undertaken in Glasgow to develop a range of nurturing approaches across establishments. Glasgow Psychological Service (GPS), in conjunction with Glasgow education colleagues, used the nurture group principles as developed by the Nurture Group Network, and extended and adapted these to give more detail and direction as…

  10. Appointment, Retention and Promotion of Academic Staff in Higher Education Institutions. A Report to the HEFCE by the Scottish Council for Research in Education, University of Glasgow and Nottingham Trent University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Funding Council for England, Bristol.

    This study addressed the link between policies and practices related to teaching staff and sustaining and improving standards in higher education in the United Kingdom. Evidence from the literature has indicated that teaching is increasingly being given less priority in comparison with research in higher education. It is clear from the data of…

  11. A Framework for Evaluating Digital Library Services; Interdisciplinarity: The Road Ahead for Education in Digital Libraries; Federated Digital Rights Management: A Proposed DRM Solution for Research and Education; Learning Lessons Holistically in the Glasgow Digital Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choudhury, Sayeed; Hobbs, Benjamin; Lorie, Mark; Flores, Nicholas; Coleman, Anita; Martin, Mairead; Kuhlman, David L.; McNair, John H.; Rhodes, William A.; Tipton, Ron; Agnew, Grace; Nicholson, Dennis; Macgregor, George

    2002-01-01

    Includes four articles that address issues related to digital libraries. Highlights include a framework for evaluating digital library services, particularly academic research libraries; interdisciplinary approaches to education about digital libraries that includes library and information science and computing; digital rights management; and the…

  12. Appointment, Retention and Promotion of Academic Staff in Higher Education Institutions. A Report to the HEFCE by the Scottish Council for Research in Education, University of Glasgow and Nottingham Trent University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higher Education Funding Council for England, Bristol.

    This study addressed the link between policies and practices related to teaching staff and sustaining and improving standards in higher education in the United Kingdom. Evidence from the literature has indicated that teaching is increasingly being given less priority in comparison with research in higher education. It is clear from the data of…

  13. FT-IR and FT-NIR Raman spectroscopy in biomedical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumann, D.

    1998-06-01

    FT-IR and FT-NIR Raman spectra of intact microbial, plant animal or human cells, tissues, and body fluids are highly specific, fingerprint-like signatures which can be used to discriminate between diverse microbial species and strains, characterize growth-dependent phenomena and cell-drug interactions, and differentiate between various disease states. The spectral information potentially useful for biomedical characterizations may be distributed over the entire infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum, i.e. over the near-, mid-, and far-infrared. It is therefore a key problem how the characteristic vibrational spectroscopic information can be systematically extracted from the infrared spectra of complex biological samples. In this report these questions are addressed by applying factor and cluster analysis treating the classification problem of microbial infrared spectra as a model task. Particularly interesting applications arise by means of a light microscope coupled to the FT-IR spectrometer. FT-IR spectra of single microcolonies of less than 40 μm in diameter can be obtained from colony replica applying a stamping technique that transfers the different, spatially separated microcolonies from the culture plate to a special IR-sample holder. Using a computer controlled x,y-stage together with mapping and video techniques, the fundamental tasks of microbiological analysis, namely detection, enumeration, and differentiation of micro-organisms can be integrated in one single apparatus. Since high quality, essentially fluorescence free Raman spectra may now be obtained in relatively short time intervals on previously intractable biological specimens, FT-IR and NIR-FT-Raman spectroscopy can be used in tandem to characterize biological samples. This approach seems to open up new horizons for biomedical characterizations of complex biological systems.

  14. Glasgow marathons 1982-1987. A review of medical problems.

    PubMed

    Ridley, S A; Rogers, P N; Wright, I H

    1990-02-01

    The race statistics, whether conditions and incidence of medical problems for the six consecutive years of the Glasgow Marathon are reviewed. The results suggest that the popularity of marathon running is declining but that the competitors are becoming more experienced, seeking medical assistance earlier and, as a result, experiencing fewer and less serious problems at the finish. The effect of weather conditions on the runners' performance is discussed.

  15. Drug related deaths amongst Glasgow city hostel dwellers.

    PubMed

    Seymour, A; Black, M; Simpson, K; Oliver, J S

    2000-12-01

    The problems of homelessness and drug misuse are every day issues encountered in today's society. Over the past 2 years the number of hostel residents overdosing within their rooms in the city of Glasgow was shown to increase. Approximately three-quarters of deaths involved heroin, of which 56% also involved at least one benzodiazepine. This paper demonstrates a dearth in the literature relating to drug misuse amongst the homeless population, highlighting an area in need of address by the appropriate authorities.

  16. Unhealthy Glasgow: a case for ecological public health?

    PubMed

    Hanlon, Phil

    2015-10-01

    Ecological public health has been proposed as an approach appropriate for addressing the multiple transitions that currently affect human health and sustainability. The paper draws on the author's experience in public health in Glasgow to analyse the health challenges faced by this postindustrial Scottish city. Like other such cities, it not only faces multiple health challenges but also demonstrates a currently unexplained excess mortality that has been dubbed the 'Glasgow Effect'. To explore this troubled mixture, the paper outlines four historical waves of public health challenge and response in Glasgow over the last century, and proposes that a fifth is emerging. The challenge now is how to negotiate environmental sustainability with social, political and economic sustainability to enhance health for all. The paper suggests that gains made by past approaches still need to be protected and can be included within ecological public health, but they lack the wider vision, coherence and capacity required if cities are to address the scale and range of contemporary conditions. A number of lessons are offered for the ecological public health perspective. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Research of distortion rectification method for large vision angle IR imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xue-yuan; Ren, Zhen; Zhang, Zheng-hui; Sun, Guang-li

    2013-09-01

    During the large visual angle IR image distortion rectification process there are some difficulties, first pick-up rectifying points is hard, second measuring and rectifying distortion are wasting time, third rectifying screen is difficult to make and it costs much. In order to overcome those disadvantages an IR imaging distortion rectification method, which using asterisk rectifying screen, is proposed. This method takes the image of a special made asterisk rectifying screen at first, then using SIFT operator to detect the real imaging positions of rectifying points in the image. Based on the real positions mean slope is used to compute theoretical imaging positions of those rectifying points. After that least square arithmetic is adopted to calculate the distortion parameters. The experiment result has shown that: the proposed method has the advantages of high precision, low cost, simple process and universal applicability.

  18. The Santa Barbara Research Center multimodule shortwave IR linear array and scene simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cizdziel, Philip; Merlo, Thomas; Kormos, Karen; Fuquay, Ralph

    1988-01-01

    Alignment test results and scene simulator imagery are presented for a 1 x 1280 element linear assembly consisting of 5 end-butted modules. The modules include a Si readout chip, a 256 element photovoltaic HgCdTe detector array, and a Si/sapphire carrier. At 145 K, the operation of the LPE shortwave HgCdTE detector array yielded Resistance Area products of 420,000 ohm-sq cm. The results demonstrate the ability to fabricate high-performance, long linear multimodule shortwave IR focal planes for space applications.

  19. Research of large scale replicate mirror of IR radiant cooler system for satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guoqing; Guo, Xuejian

    2006-02-01

    Aluminum honeycomb mirror is an important component of the IR radiant cooler system employing in the aerospace applications. The radiant cooler system has a great impact on the quality of IR measurements. The quality of the mirror affects that of the radiant cooler. This article mainly introduces the manufacture of a large scale replicate mirror using thin film technology on a honeycomb-shaped aluminum plate. It discusses several technical difficulties, such as requisition of the mother board, selection of the glue and the techniques of replication on large scale aluminum plate. Borosilicate glass, which has low index of thermal expansion, is used as mother board material. It is requested to be processed to a good plane, N < or = -5, ΔN < or = 0.3.. After extensive experiments, the type of resin and solidifier and the ratio of those materials are confirmed. The selection is in consideration of the application in outer space condition and for the favor of processing big replicated mirror.

  20. The effect of health visitors on breastfeeding in Glasgow

    PubMed Central

    Tappin, David; Britten, Jane; Broadfoot, Mary; McInnes, Rhona

    2006-01-01

    Background The UNICEF Baby Friendly Initiative includes a community component to help women who want to breastfeed. This study aimed to document the health visitor role in promoting and supporting breastfeeding in Glasgow during 2000 and the effect it had on breastfeeding rates. Methods Glasgow, UK, has a population of 906,000, with approximately 10,000 births per year. Glasgow has high levels of material deprivation and traditionally low breastfeeding rates. This was a cross-sectional study in January 2000 which used a postal questionnaire to document individual health visitors' interventions, activities and attitude towards breastfeeding. Infant's breastfeeding data collected routinely by the Child Health Surveillance programme from 1 August 1998 to 28 February 1999 was directly matched with interventions, activities and attitudes reported by their own health visitor. Results 146/216 (68%) health visitors completed and returned the questionnaire. 5401 child health records were eligible and 3,294 (58.2%) could be matched with health visitors who returned questionnaires. 2145 infants had the first visit from 8 to 20 days of age and the second 3 to 7 weeks later. At the first postnatal visit 835 of 2145 (39%) infants were breastfed (median age of 13 days) and 646 (30%) continued to breastfeed at the second visit (median age 35 days). Infants being breastfed at the first visit were significantly more likely to be fed infant formula at the second visit if their health visitors had had no breastfeeding training in the previous two years (OR1.74 95%CI 1.13, 2.68). Conclusion It is essential that Health Visitors are specially trained to support breastfeeding postnatally. PMID:16822298

  1. Learning from history: The Glasgow Airport terrorist attack.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Gillies

    Glasgow Airport was the target of a terrorist attack on 30th June, 2007. Many people within Scotland had come to believe that Scotland was immune from terrorism. This perception was in large part informed by Scotland's experience during the protracted Troubles in Northern Ireland, during which the Provisional Irish Republican Army's mainland bombing campaign focused on targets in England, sparing both Scotland and Wales. While Glasgow Airport did not expect such an attack to take place, meticulous planning, organising and testing of plans had taken place to mitigate the unlikely event of such an attack. The attack stands up as a shining example of robust business continuity management, where the airport reopened for business as usual in less than 24 hours from the time of the attack. Little is known about how the airport handled the situation in conjunction with other responding agencies as people tend to want to focus on high-profile disasters only. Yet countless such incidents are happening worldwide on a daily basis, in which there are excellent learning opportunities, and, taken in the spirit of converting hindsight into foresight, the likelihood of similar incidents could potentially be reduced in the future.

  2. Development of an XUV-IR free-electron laser user facility for scientific research and industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Newnam, B.E.; Warren, R.W.; Conradson, S.D.; Goldstein, J.C.; McVey, B.D.; Schmitt, M.J.; Elliott, C.J.; Burns, M.J.; Carlsten, B.E.; Chan, K.C.; Johnson, W.J.; Wang, T.S.; Sheffield, R.L.; Meier, K.L.; Olsher, R.H.; Scott, M.L.; Griggs, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos has designed and proposes to establish an XUV-IR free- electron laser (FEL) user facility for scientific research and industrial applications based on coherent radiation ranging from soft x-rays as short as 1 nm to far-infrared wavelengths as long as 100 {mu}m. As the next-generation light source beyond low-emittance storage rings with undulator insertion devices, this proposed national FEL user facility should make available to researchers broadly tunable, picosecond-pulse, coherent radiation with 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} greater spectral flux and brightness. The facility design is based on two series of FEL oscillators including one regenerative amplifier. The primary series of seven FEL oscillators, driven by a single, 1-GeV rf linac, spans the short-wavelength range from 1 to 600 nm. A second 60-MeV rf linac, synchronized with the first, drives a series of three Vis/IR FEL oscillators to cover the 0. 5 to 100-{mu}m range. This paper presents the motivation for such a facility arising from its inherently high power per unit bandwidth and its potential use for an array of scientific and industrial applications, describes the facility design, output parameters, and user laboratories, makes comparisons with synchrotron radiation sources, and summarizes recent technical progress that supports the technical feasibility. 80 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. A Survey Data Quality Strategy: The Institutional Research Perspective. IR Applications, Volume 34

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Qin

    2012-01-01

    This discussion constructs a survey data quality strategy for institutional researchers in higher education in light of total survey error theory. It starts with describing the characteristics of institutional research and identifying the gaps in literature regarding survey data quality issues in institutional research and then introduces the…

  4. Institutional Researchers as Knowledge Managers in Universities: Envisioning New Roles for the IR Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teodorescu, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Using concepts from Davenport and Prusak's "Working Knowledge" and other recent research on knowledge management, this article discusses the processes through which institutional knowledge is created, managed and transferred throughout the university and ways in which institutional researchers can improve these processes. A special emphasis is…

  5. Outbreak of Legionnaires' disease in Glasgow Royal Infirmary: microbiological aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Timbury, M. C.; Donaldson, J. R.; McCartney, A. C.; Fallon, R. J.; Sleigh, J. D.; Lyon, D.; Orange, G. V.; Baird, D. R.; Winter, J.; Wilson, T. S.

    1986-01-01

    The bacteriological investigation of an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease in Glasgow Royal Infirmary affecting 16 patients is described. Most of the patients had been treated in high-dependency areas on two floors of the hospital supplied by the same two air-conditioned ventilation systems. The source of infection was traced to contamination of a cooling tower from which a plume of spray discharged into the intake vents of the two ventilation systems. Rubber grommets within the cooling tower probably provided a nidus of infection there. The control and management of the outbreak are discussed: a policy of frankness about the course and progress of the investigations was adopted and helped to allay anxiety on the part of both staff and media. PMID:3540109

  6. IR in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haakenaasen, Randi; Lovold, Stian

    2003-01-01

    Infrared technology in Norway started at the Norwegian Defense Research Establishment (FFI) in the 1960s, and has since then spread to universities, other research institutes and industry. FFI has a large, integrated IR activity that includes research and development in IR detectors, optics design, optical coatings, advanced dewar design, modelling/simulation of IR scenes, and image analysis. Part of the integrated activity is a laboratory for more basic research in materials science and semiconductor physics, in which thin films of CdHgTe are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and processed into IR detectors by various techniques. FFI also has a lot of experience in research and development of tunable infrared lasers for various applications. Norwegian industrial activities include production of infrared homing anti-ship missiles, laser rangefinders, various infrared gas sensors, hyperspectral cameras, and fiberoptic sensor systems for structural health monitoring and offshore oil well diagnostics.

  7. Space Radar Image of Missouri River, Glasgow, Missouri

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-05-01

    This is a false-color L-band image of an area near Glasgow, Missouri, centered at about 39.2 degrees north latitude and 92.8 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 50th orbit on October 3, 1994. The false-color composite was made by displaying the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) return in red; the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) return in green; and the sum of the two channels in blue. The area shown is approximately 37 kilometers by 25 kilometers (23 miles by 16 miles). The radar data, coupled with pre-flood aerial photography and satellite data and post-flood topographic and field data, are being used to evaluate changes associated with levee breaks in landforms, where deposits formed during the widespread flooding in 1993 along the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers. The distinct radar scattering properties of farmland, sand fields and scoured areas will be used to inventory floodplains along the Missouri River and determine the processes by which these areas return to preflood conditions. The image shows one such levee break near Glasgow, Missouri. In the upper center of the radar image is a region covered by several meters of sand, shown as blue regions below the bend in the river. West (left) of this dark area, a blue gap in the levee tree canopy can be seen, showing the area where the levee failed. Radar data such as these can help scientists more accurately assess the potential for future flooding in this region and how that might impact surrounding communities. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA01744

  8. Persistence of glaucoma medical therapy in the Glasgow Glaucoma Database.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Q; Abeysinghe, S S; Kelly, S; Roskell, N S; Shannon, P R; Abdlseaed, A A; Montgomery, D M I

    2011-07-01

    To report the persistence of glaucoma medical therapy in a database of 1006 patients with ocular hypertension (OHT), normal tension glaucoma (NTG) and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) attending the Glaucoma Clinic at Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. Analyses have been carried out using specially written queries to generate reports relating to initial treatment choice and persistence for individual drugs. Queries were investigated in the database time period from 16 February 1982 to 11 February 2009. When investigating drug persistence, the results from the database were split into two distinct time periods from 1997 to 2001 and from 2002 to 2009 to reflect the available treatment options used. The number of patients with each diagnosis was as follows: POAG 608; OHT 246; NTG 152. The Kaplan-Meier estimate for mean persistence from 1997 to 2001 (time to treatment discontinuation) of latanoprost was 58.8 ± 1.95 months, timolol was 41.8 ± 3.94 months, brimonidine was 24.1 ± 3.05 months, and betaxolol was 22.9 ± 2.04 months. The Kaplan-Meier estimate for mean persistence from 2002 to 2009 of latanoprost (time to treatment discontinuation) was 52.0 ± 2.26 months, bimatoprost was 25.8 ± 2.89 months, and travoprost was 23.0 ± 1.27 months. The Kaplan-Meier estimate for mean persistence of latanoprost (time to treatment change) was 37.5 ± 2.47 months, travoprost was 30.2 ± 2.70 months, and bimatoprost was 17.5 ± 2.88 months. The introduction of the first prostaglandin analogue, latanoprost, dramatically improved treatment persistence for glaucoma patients. In the current prostaglandin-rich treatment environment, these data do not show any significant differences between prostaglandins with respect to treatment persistence.

  9. 76 FR 30300 - Proposed Modification of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-25

    .... You must identify FAA Docket No. FAA-2011- 0362; Airspace Docket No. 11-ANM-7, at the beginning of... surface of the earth. * * * * * ANM MT E5 Glasgow, MT [Modified] Wokal Field/Glasgow International Airport...., long. 107[deg]07'02'' W., thence to point of beginning. Issued in Seattle, Washington, on May 17, 2011...

  10. Twenty-five years of aerodynamic research with IR imaging: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartenberg, Ehud; Roberts, A. Sidney, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Infrared imaging used in aerodynamic research evolved during the last 25 years into a rewarding experimental technique for investigation of body-flow viscous interactions, such as heat flux determination and boundary layer transition. The technique of infrared imaging matched well its capability to produce useful results, with the expansion of testing conditions in the entire spectrum of wind tunnels, from hypersonic high-enthalpy facilities to cryogenic transonic wind tunnels. With unique achievements credited to its past, the current trend suggests a change in attitude towards this technique: from the perception as an exotic, project-oriented tool, to the status of a routine experimental procedure.

  11. New opportunities for strong-field LPI research in the mid-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, Igor V.; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Skaritka, John; Babzien, Markus; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Dover, Nicholas; Lu, Wei

    2015-05-01

    Over the last two decades, BNL's ATF has pioneered the use of high-peak power CO2 lasers for research in advanced accelerators and radiation sources. Our recent developments in ion acceleration, Compton scattering, and IFELs have further underscored the benefits from expanding the landscape of strong-field laser interactions deeper into the midinfrared (MIR) range of wavelengths. This extension validates our ongoing efforts in advancing CO2 laser technology, which we report here. Our next-generation, multi-terawatt, femtosecond CO2 laser will open new opportunities for studying ultra-relativistic laser interactions with plasma in the MIR spectral domain. We will address new regimes in the particle acceleration of ions and electrons, as well as the radiations sources, ranging from THz to gamma- rays, that are enabled by the emerging ultra-fast CO2 lasers.

  12. MMW/IR beam combiner with graphene IR window for MMW/IR compact range compound test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Li, Yanhong; Pang, Xudong; Zhu, Weihua; Wang, Liquan; Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Tailei; Zhu, Shouzheng

    2017-06-01

    A millimeter wave (MMW)/infrared (IR) beam combiner with a graphene IR window for the MMW/IR compact range (CR) compound test is creatively proposed with comprehensive analysis and simulation. Graphene is used as the IR window material to transfer the IR feed signal behind a perforated MMW CR reflector for it has the unique property of high IR transmissivity and high MMW conductivity. This research shows that graphene IR windows have better IR transmissivity than conducting inductive mesh IR windows when the beam combiner meets the MMW CR test demanding. Graphene IR windows also show a better MMW test bandwidth than dielectric IR windows. Meanwhile, the graphene IR window MMW/IR beam combiner has a circular aperture test zone with which it is sufficient to test a cylindrical unit under test according to the requirement.

  13. Alexander Robertson (1834-1908): Glasgow's pioneer aphasiologist and epileptologist.

    PubMed

    Eadie, Mervyn

    2015-01-01

    Alexander Robertson (1834-1908) was a Glasgow physician whose professional career was involved mainly with institutional-based practice but who published significant insights into the anatomical background to aphasia (1867) and the mechanisms of focal epileptogenesis (1869). His aphasiology ideas, including his suggestion that disconnection between cerebral centers involved in speech was responsible for the phenomenon, made him one of the earliest members of the late-nineteenth-century school of aphasia diagram makers. His view of epileptogenesis was that contralateral convulsing arose from irritation in a local area of pathology on the surface of the cerebral cortex after the irritation spread to a cortical motor center and then down the motor pathway to the striatum, while spreading within the cortex itself caused loss of consciousness. This interpretation contains much of the essence of the present-day understanding of cortical epileptogenesis. The origin of this interpretation is often attributed to John Hughlings Jackson, but Robertson published the idea in full a year or two prior to Jackson. However, Robertson's original insights were hardly noticed at the time they were published and have since almost entirely been ignored.

  14. Glasgow women medical students: some facts and figures.

    PubMed

    Timbury, M C; Timbury, G C

    1971-04-24

    A questionaire was sent to 343 women medical undergraduates at the University of Glasgow, and 317 replied. Of the respondents, 36% had a member of their family in medicine and 15% had either one or both parents a doctor: 45% had a working mother. Half of all the students had doubts about medicine as a career, and the proportion of these rose with seniority. Doubts were mainly due to the length of the medical course but the girls also recognized the difficulty of combining a medical career with family life. There was a significant correlation between having doubts about a medical career and having a mother who worked.Half the girls said they would prefer to work in hospital after qualification-the favourite specialties being paediatrics and obstetrics; only a quarter said they would like to do general practice. The need for careers advice which links actual career openings and the wish of most women to combine medical work with marriage and child-rearing is emphasized. The majority of the students saw a doctor's primary role as the giving of advice and reassurance.

  15. Mite fauna of dust from passenger trains in Glasgow.

    PubMed Central

    Colloff, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    The mite fauna of dust from cloth-covered seats of four passenger trains and bedding from a British Rail linen store in Glasgow was investigated; 22 samples containing 4488 mg of dust from a total surface area of 5.5 m2 were taken. Sixteen samples were positive for mites and 33 specimens belonging to 10 species were found. The most common species were Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Trouessart), Glycyphagus domesticus (De Geer), G. destructor (Schrank) and Euroglyphus maynei (Cooreman). The species composition bore considerable resemblance to that of house dust (although the density of mites was far lower) and the mites have probably been transported from homes via clothing and pets. Only five intact specimens, which may have been alive at the time of sampling, were found. The dust from trains consisted mostly of particles of soot. Very few skin scales, the food source of house dust mites, were detected. The small numbers of intact mites found and the absence of an identifiable food source make it unlikely that permanent populations of mites survive in upholstered seats on trains. PMID:3556435

  16. Phytotoxicity of fungicides, herbicides and insecticides/acaricides on ornamental conifer (division: pinophyta) species in Southeastern U.S. for interregional research program (IR-4).

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Interregional Research Project (IR-4) is a joint USDA-ARS and Land Grant Institution program that evaluates agricultural chemicals and expands sustainable pest management technologies for growers by providing efficacy and phytotoxicity data needed for registered use on specialty crops that inclu...

  17. 78 FR 67218 - CSX Transportation, Inc.-Trackage Rights Exemption-Glasgow Railway Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ..., between milepost 00E-90.85, at Park City, Ky., and milepost 00E-101.00, at Glasgow, Ky., a distance of... motion for protective order, which will be addressed in a separate decision. The transaction is scheduled...

  18. Space Radar Image of Missouri River, Glasgow, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a false-color L-band image of an area near Glasgow, Missouri, centered at about 39.2 degrees north latitude and 92.8 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 50th orbit on October 3, 1994. The false-color composite was made by displaying the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) return in red; the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) return in green; and the sum of the two channels in blue. The area shown is approximately 37 kilometers by 25 kilometers (23 miles by 16 miles). The radar data, coupled with pre-flood aerial photography and satellite data and post-flood topographic and field data, are being used to evaluate changes associated with levee breaks in landforms, where deposits formed during the widespread flooding in 1993 along the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers. The distinct radar scattering properties of farmland, sand fields and scoured areas will be used to inventory floodplains along the Missouri River and determine the processes by which these areas return to preflood conditions. The image shows one such levee break near Glasgow, Missouri. In the upper center of the radar image is a region covered by several meters of sand, shown as blue regions below the bend in the river. West (left) of this dark area, a blue gap in the levee tree canopy can be seen, showing the area where the levee failed. Radar data such as these can help scientists more accurately assess the potential for future flooding in this region and how that might impact surrounding communities. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar(SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm

  19. Space Radar Image of Missouri River, Glasgow, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a false-color L-band image of an area near Glasgow, Missouri, centered at about 39.2 degrees north latitude and 92.8 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 50th orbit on October 3, 1994. The false-color composite was made by displaying the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) return in red; the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) return in green; and the sum of the two channels in blue. The area shown is approximately 37 kilometers by 25 kilometers (23 miles by 16 miles). The radar data, coupled with pre-flood aerial photography and satellite data and post-flood topographic and field data, are being used to evaluate changes associated with levee breaks in landforms, where deposits formed during the widespread flooding in 1993 along the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers. The distinct radar scattering properties of farmland, sand fields and scoured areas will be used to inventory floodplains along the Missouri River and determine the processes by which these areas return to preflood conditions. The image shows one such levee break near Glasgow, Missouri. In the upper center of the radar image is a region covered by several meters of sand, shown as blue regions below the bend in the river. West (left) of this dark area, a blue gap in the levee tree canopy can be seen, showing the area where the levee failed. Radar data such as these can help scientists more accurately assess the potential for future flooding in this region and how that might impact surrounding communities. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar(SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm

  20. Dentoalveolar trauma in Glasgow: an audit of mechanism and injury.

    PubMed

    Wright, Graeme; Bell, Aileen; McGlashan, Gregor; Vincent, Carolyn; Welbury, Richard R

    2007-08-01

    Traumatic dental injuries in children often require multiple follow-up visits to the dentist and may have long-term consequences for the developing dentition. The aim of this audit was to examine age, gender, location, time of year, mechanism of injury and type of injury sustained in relation to dentoalveolar trauma in children attending the paediatric dental trauma clinic at Glasgow Dental Hospital from 2002 to 2004, and to compare our findings with data in the published literature. Males suffered 60% of all dental trauma, 79% of sporting injuries and 85% of assaults. The injuries in males were more severe, representing 65% of enamel dentine and pulp fractures, 100% of crown root fractures and 66% of crown root and pulp fractures. A peak for trauma was seen in the 8-11-year-old group (43%). The majority of injuries in the under four age group resulted from falls (87%). Taken as a whole, falls accounted for 49%, sports related injuries 18%, bicycle and scooter 13%, assault 7%, and road traffic accidents 1.5% of all injuries. They also accounted for a far higher percentage of intrusive luxations (67%). The largest proportion of injuries occurred during the summer months (33%). Sixty-four percent of children suffered trauma to more than one tooth. Fifty-eight percent of injuries involved the dental hard tissues and pulp and the majority of these (82%) were crown fractures. Most subjects (82%) suffered trauma to their periodontal tissues, (26% concussion or subluxation, 26% lateral luxation and 23% avulsion). Injuries to the supporting bone were uncommon. Sixty-six percent of all injuries occurred outdoors. Our findings were similar to a number of published studies, but in contrast to several others. More consistency is required in the collection and reporting of trauma data to be able to draw meaningful conclusions by comparison.

  1. Libraries as 'everyday' settings: the Glasgow MCISS project.

    PubMed

    Whitelaw, Sandy; Coburn, Jonathan; Lacey, Marion; McKee, Martin J; Hill, Carol

    2016-03-22

    A settings-based approach is now well-established in health promotion, initially undertaken in conventional places like schools and workplaces, but more recently being expressed in a wider range of what Torp et al. call 'everyday' settings. In this context, libraries have emerged as another potential setting whose ubiquity and accessibility suggests that they may be particularly effective in addressing health inequalities. Drawing on a case study-the Glasgow Macmillan Cancer Information and Support Services Library project-this paper reports on the potential for seeing 'libraries as settings' and in the context of a set of associated theoretical resources, specifically scrutinizes the nature of initiative implementation. Data were drawn from multiple sources: semi-structured interviews and focus groups with strategic partners and stakeholders, operational staff, project volunteers, service users and members of the general public. Qualitative data were complemented by quantitative insights from surveys with members of the partnership, libraries staff and volunteers. Despite some concerns associated with potentially hostile cultural and financial contexts that might threaten longer term sustainability, insights suggested that in pragmatic terms, the project was attracting sizable 'footfall' and successfully addressing a range of needs. Additionally, the formal implementation processes associated with project implementation were considered to have been highly successful in embedding the model into the library culture. In summary, there is evidence that libraries have the potential to be considered as supportive settings and could act as a model for an emergent vision of what libraries do. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Some new insights into the history of the Glasgow time ball and time guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, David; Kinns, Roger

    2012-03-01

    The 1857 time ball machinery at the Glasgow Sailors' Home was supplied by Alexander McKenzie, mechanist, using a design that had much in common with the 1853 Edinburgh apparatus. It was operated using electrical connections to a mean time clock in the Home. This clock required adjustment by hand each day to compensate for its losing rate. Such manual intervention and lack of independent verification of accuracy under-mined the authority of the signal. The relative prestige of the Glasgow and Edinburgh Observatories was an important issue. There was no telegraphic link between Glasgow Observatory and the City until the end of 1863, but it had been demonstrated as early as October 1855 that a time ball could be dropped by telegraph from Edinburgh. Another Edinburgh initiative in September 1863 using time guns fired from Edinburgh caused offence in Glasgow and the trials were terminated in February 1864. Professor Grant, Director of Glasgow Observatory, argued successfully that a system of slave clocks controlled from Glasgow Observatory would be far superior to either a time ball or time guns which only provided a signal once per day. He won the debate in March 1864.

  3. SWUIS-A: a versatile low-cost UV/VIS/IR imaging system for airborne astronomy and aeronomy research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durda, Daniel D.; Stern, S. Alan; Tomlinson, William; Slater, David C.; Vilas, Faith

    2000-11-01

    We have developed and successfully flight-tested on 14 different airborne missions the hardware and techniques for routinely conducting valuable astronomical and aeronomical observations from high-performance, two-seater military-type aircraft. The SWUIS-A (Southwest Universal Imaging System- Airborne_ system consists of an image-intensified CCD camera with broad band response from the near-UV to the near IR, high-quality foreoptics, a miniaturized video recorder, and aircraft-to-camera power and telemetry interface with associated camera controls, and associated cables, filters, and other minor equipments. SWUIS-A's suite of high-quality foreoptics gives it selectable, variable focal length/variable field-of-view capabilities. The SWUIS-A camera frames at 60Hz video rates, which is a key requirement for both jitter compensation and high time resolution (useful fro occultation, lightning, and auroral studies). Broadband SWUIS-A image coadds can exceed a limiting magnitude of V=10.5 in<1sec with dark sky conditions. A valuable attribute of SWUIS-A airborne observations is the fact that the astronomer flies with the instrument, thereby providing Space Shuttle-like payload specialist capability to close-the-loop in real-time on the research done on each research mission. Key advantages of the small, high-performance aircraft on which we can fly SWUIS-A include significant cost savings over larger, more conventional airborne platforms, worldwide basing obviating the need for expensive, campaign-style movement of specialized large aircraft and their logistics support teams, and ultimately faster reaction times to transient events. Compared to ground-based instruments, airborne research platforms offer superior atmospheric transmission, the mobility to reach remote and often-times otherwise unreachable locations over the Earth, and virtually- guaranteed good weather for observing the sky. Compared to space-based instruments, airborne platforms typically offer substantial

  4. SWUIS-A: A Versatile, Low-Cost UV/VIS/IR Imaging System for Airborne Astronomy and Aeronomy Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durda, Daniel D.; Stern, S. Alan; Tomlinson, William; Slater, David C.; Vilas, Faith

    2001-01-01

    We have developed and successfully flight-tested on 14 different airborne missions the hardware and techniques for routinely conducting valuable astronomical and aeronomical observations from high-performance, two-seater military-type aircraft. The SWUIS-A (Southwest Universal Imaging System - Airborne) system consists of an image-intensified CCD camera with broad band response from the near-UV to the near IR, high-quality foreoptics, a miniaturized video recorder, an aircraft-to-camera power and telemetry interface with associated camera controls, and associated cables, filters, and other minor equipment. SWUIS-A's suite of high-quality foreoptics gives it selectable, variable focal length/variable field-of-view capabilities. The SWUIS-A camera frames at 60 Hz video rates, which is a key requirement for both jitter compensation and high time resolution (useful for occultation, lightning, and auroral studies). Broadband SWUIS-A image coadds can exceed a limiting magnitude of V = 10.5 in <1 sec with dark sky conditions. A valuable attribute of SWUIS-A airborne observations is the fact that the astronomer flies with the instrument, thereby providing Space Shuttle-like "payload specialist" capability to "close-the-loop" in real-time on the research done on each research mission. Key advantages of the small, high-performance aircraft on which we can fly SWUIS-A include significant cost savings over larger, more conventional airborne platforms, worldwide basing obviating the need for expensive, campaign-style movement of specialized large aircraft and their logistics support teams, and ultimately faster reaction times to transient events. Compared to ground-based instruments, airborne research platforms offer superior atmospheric transmission, the mobility to reach remote and often-times otherwise unreachable locations over the Earth, and virtually-guaranteed good weather for observing the sky. Compared to space-based instruments, airborne platforms typically offer

  5. A study of leukaemia in Glasgow in connection with chromium-contaminated land.

    PubMed

    Eizaguirre-García, D; Rodríguez-Andrés, C; Watt, G C; Hole, D

    1999-12-01

    In 1991, soil pollution was found around the site of a former chromium-processing factory in Glasgow, Scotland. Levels of chromium in soil were above limits considered as safe, although a risk assessment concluded that population exposure was likely to be below occupational levels. As an excess incidence of leukaemia has been suspected in the area, it was decided to investigate a possible relationship between the pollutant and the illness. The ensuing study was descriptive-geographical. In the absence of better data, levels of exposure were assumed to decrease with distance from the centre of the polluted area. Leukaemia and population figures were obtained for each of nine concentric rings by aggregation of data available at the Enumeration District level. The null study hypothesis was that relative risk (as measured by Poisson regression) would not follow a definite trend with distance from the centre. Sex, age and levels of deprivation were taken into account. Relative risks by variables other than distance followed previously known patterns for leukaemia. No evident pattern by distance was found. After regroupings inside the variables, a significant excess of leukaemia was found for intermediate distances from the pollutant. No evidence was found of a possible relationship between soil pollution by chromium and leukaemia in the general population. Nonetheless, the excess noticed by the study warrants further research.

  6. The Seventh Annual Bio-Ontologies Meeting Moat House Hotel, Glasgow, 30 July 2004

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The Annual Bio-Ontologies Meeting [1] has now reached its seventh consecutive year, running as a special interest group (SIG) of the much larger ISMB conference. This year's meeting in Glasgow had approximately 100 attendees. Since the advent of the Gene Ontology, which coincided with the first Bio-Ontologies Meeting, we have seen a year-on-year strengthening of the field; bio-ontologies has moved from being dominated by computer science to be led by biological applications; discussion is less about ‘what is an ontology?’ and more about ‘how to build an ontology which is fit for purpose?’. This strengthening of the field can be seen elsewhere. Both the main ISMB conference and this year's Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing (PSB) [2] have seen a large number of submissions to their ontologies track. For the first time a selection of the papers from the SIG is being published in this issue of Comparative and Functional Genomics. We hope that this will complement the publications of the larger conferences, bringing to a wider audience the cutting edge research that characterizes the Bio-Ontologies SIG. PMID:18629147

  7. Cautionary case: low Glasgow Coma Scale scores, brainstem involvement, decompressive craniectomy, full recovery, and one more reason for advocacy/collaboration.

    PubMed

    Kushner, David S

    2015-02-01

    Presurgical selection criteria for decompressive craniectomy (DC) for treatment of severe traumatic brain injury remain controversial. Proposed criteria to improve outcomes include high admission Glasgow Coma Scale scores (≥7) and exclusion of patients having brainstem involvement. Neurosurgeons may be unaware of long-term functional outcomes in their DC patients. Therefore, to underscore an exceptional outcome that may have been facilitated by DC, while highlighting need for caution in development of potentially overly restrictive presurgical selection criteria, this case report of a 21-yr-old premed college student admitted with severe traumatic brain injury, Glasgow Coma Scale score of 3, left fixed dilated pupil, and brainstem signs, who had emergency DC, is presented. Nine years after the trauma, she was employed full time as a physician, and only residual symptom, an occasional headache, remained. Thus, caution is necessary in the development of DC presurgical selection guidelines, as this case had excellent long-term functional outcome that may have been facilitated by DC despite initial low Glasgow Coma Scale scores and signs of brainstem involvement. Also, this case highlights one more reason for multispecialty physician advocacy, collaboration, and comparative effectiveness research.

  8. Prevalence of alcohol related brain damage among homeless hostel dwellers in Glasgow.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Gail; Morrison, David S

    2005-12-01

    Over half of Glasgow's 4000 homeless people drink hazardously but the prevalence of alcohol-related brain damage (ARBD) has not been described. To determine the prevalence of ARBD among homeless hostel dwellers in Glasgow. A representative sample of homeless hostel dwellers was surveyed using validated survey instruments and clinical assessment. From a sample of 266 hostel dwellers, 82% had cognitive impairment and 78% were drinking hazardously. The prevalence of ARBD among homeless hostel dwellers was 21%. ARBD has a high prevalence among homeless hostel dwellers and treatment is usually effective. There is a need to actively identify and treat this population to help them move out of homelessness.

  9. Contested Urban Spaces: Exploring the Analytics of Young Persons' Experiences of Living in Glasgow's Deprived Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holligan, Chris; Deuchar, Ross

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports findings from an exploratory study of mainly young people's verbally articulated perceptions of urban life in Glasgow, Scotland. The focus is upon areas of deprivation where territory and social capital is contested and whose meanings are possibly only partially grasped by our informants. Their personal knowledge of violence and…

  10. [How do physicians code the motoric variable of the Glasgow-Coma-Score?].

    PubMed

    Woischneck, D; Stah, W; Kapapa, T

    2015-06-01

    A mere 14% gave the right answer according the guidelines: Code the "best motoric answer" of the "upper limb". 86% coded the Glasgow-Coma-Score for the motoric variable falsely and inconsistently. Additionally, the rate of correct answers were higher in physicians in training (37.5%) than in qualified and certified emergency doctors (5%). Emergency doctors post training stated in 68% instances that the variable should be coded according to the neurological results at the upper or lower extremity. Furthermore, they stated that the worst neurological result should be coded (43%). From our data, it appears that the coding of the motoric variable is not done according to the guidelines or is done inconsistently. There are compelling reasons for coding the worst result. However, this procedure is contrary to the guidelines presented by literature. These guideline have never been withdrawn. Emergency doctors obviously code the motoric variable of the Glasgow-Coma-Score with knowledge about the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injuries. The Glasgow-Coma-Score is used for coding the level of consciousness at the site of accident, on admission, for prognosis, in clinical studies and in forensic controversies. Its sensitivity for depth of coma depends on the quality of coding the motoric answer. We interviewed 165 emergency doctors (in training and post training) about the guidelines for coding the motoric variable of the Glasgow-Coma-Score.

  11. The changing face of hepatitis B in greater Glasgow: epidemiological trends 1993-2007.

    PubMed

    Barclay, S T; Cameron, S; Mills, P R; Priest, M; Ross, F; Fox, R; Goulding, C; Forrest, E H; Morris, A J; Neilson, M; Stanley, A J

    2010-08-01

    Whilst hepatitis B (HBV) is historically uncommon in Scotland, anecdotal experience suggests an increasing prevalence of chronic infection. We sought to establish whether the incidence of chronic HBV is increasing in Greater Glasgow, and whether patients are assessed in secondary care. The regional virus centre database identified HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) positive samples. For adult patients tested in Glasgow between 1993-2007 the first positive test was identified and classified as acute or chronic infection serologically. Clinic referral and attendance data was then obtained. 1,672 patients tested HBsAg positive; 1051 with chronic infection, 421 acute and 200 indeterminate. New diagnoses of HBV remained stable over time, however falling numbers of acute cases were mirrored by a rise in chronic cases from 40 to 119 per annum between 2000 and 2007. Of 193 patients diagnosed in 2006 and 2007, 51% were not seen in secondary care due to non referral (43%) or non attendance (8%). Chronic HBV trebled in Glasgow between 2000 and 2007. Most patients were not assessed in secondary care. Improved levels of clinic referral and attendance are required to ensure best care for HBV patients in Glasgow.

  12. University of Glasgow at TREC 2012: Experiments with Terrier in Medical Records, Microblog, and Web Tracks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    Univ. of Glasgow, 2003. [2] G. Amati, E. Ambrosi, M. Bianchi, C. Gaibisso, and G. Gambosi. FUB, IASI -CNR and Univ. of Tor Vergata at TREC 2007 Blog track...In Proc. of TREC, 2007. [3] G. Amati, G. Amodeo, M. Bianchi, G. Marcone, C. Gaibisso, A. Celi, C. De Nicola and M. Flammini. FUB, IASI -CNR, UNIVAQ

  13. The Use of Electronic Information Services and Information Literacy: A Glasgow Caledonian University Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, John

    2006-01-01

    The study was undertaken as part of the LIRG/SCONUL Value and Impact study and sought to establish direct evidence of the impact of electronic information services (EIS) on Glasgow Caledonian University students, both past and present. Evidence of the spread of information literacy among students and alumni was also sought. An electronic…

  14. Contested Urban Spaces: Exploring the Analytics of Young Persons' Experiences of Living in Glasgow's Deprived Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holligan, Chris; Deuchar, Ross

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports findings from an exploratory study of mainly young people's verbally articulated perceptions of urban life in Glasgow, Scotland. The focus is upon areas of deprivation where territory and social capital is contested and whose meanings are possibly only partially grasped by our informants. Their personal knowledge of violence and…

  15. A lead isotopic study of the human bioaccessibility of lead in urban soils from Glasgow, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Farmer, John G; Broadway, Andrew; Cave, Mark R; Wragg, Joanna; Fordyce, Fiona M; Graham, Margaret C; Ngwenya, Bryne T; Bewley, Richard J F

    2011-11-01

    The human bioaccessibility of lead (Pb) in Pb-contaminated soils from the Glasgow area was determined by the Unified Bioaccessibility Research Group of Europe (BARGE) Method (UBM), an in vitro physiologically based extraction scheme that mimics the chemical environment of the human gastrointestinal system and contains both stomach and intestine compartments. For 27 soils ranging in total Pb concentration from 126 to 2160 mg kg(-1) (median 539 mg kg(-1)), bioaccessibility as determined by the 'stomach' simulation (pH ~1.5) was 46-1580 mg kg(-1), equivalent to 23-77% (mean 52%) of soil total Pb concentration. The corresponding bioaccessibility data for the 'stomach+intestine' simulation (pH ~6.3) were 6-623 mg kg(-1) and 2-42% (mean 22%) of soil Pb concentration. The soil (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios ranged from 1.057 to 1.175. Three-isotope plots of (208)Pb/(206)Pb against (206)Pb/(207)Pb demonstrated that (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios were intermediate between values for source end-member extremes of imported Australian Pb ore (1.04)--used in the manufacture of alkyl Pb compounds (1.06-1.10) formerly added to petrol--and indigenous Pb ores/coal (1.17-1.19). The (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios of the UBM 'stomach' extracts were similar (<0.01 difference) to those of the soil for 26 of the 27 samples (r=0.993, p<0.001) and lower in 24 of them. A slight preference for lower (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio was discernible in the UBM. However, the source of Pb appeared to be less important in determining the extent of UBM-bioaccessible Pb than the overall soil total Pb concentration and the soil phases with which the Pb was associated. The significant phases identified in a subset of samples were carbonates, manganese oxides, iron-aluminium oxyhydroxides and clays.

  16. Mortality in Glasgow and Edinburgh: a paradigm of inequality in health.

    PubMed Central

    Watt, G C; Ecob, R

    1992-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to describe, predict, and interpret mortality in Glasgow and Edinburgh. DESIGN--The study was an analysis of all cause and cause specific mortality data for quinquennia based on census years between 1931 and 1981, linking age and sex specific mortality rates by year of birth, for people dying between the ages of 25 and 74 years. SETTING--Glasgow and Edinburgh, Scotland. MAIN RESULTS--Age and sex specific mortality rates declined steadily in Edinburgh and Glasgow during the period 1931-1981, with rates always being lower in Edinburgh than in Glasgow. Since 1961 log mortality rates have tended to rise linearly with age in both cities. In 1979-83, the population of Glasgow reached a given all cause mortality rate 3.9 years earlier in men and 3.6 years earlier in women than did the population of Edinburgh. These differences have increased, and are predicted to increase further, especially in men. CONCLUSIONS--The current 40% cross sectional difference in mortality rates between the cities is largely determined by levels of mortality in early adulthood which provide a baseline for the subsequent rise in log mortality. Disease specific epidemiology provides a limited view of inequalities in health, and a partial basis for health promotion. Campaigns to alter disease risk profiles in adults should be complemented by measures operating earlier in life to reduce susceptibility to risk. Maternal and child health require greater priority in public health policy, particularly in areas of socioeconomic disadvantage. PMID:1479319

  17. Exploring the social, emotional and behavioural development of preschool children: is Glasgow different?

    PubMed

    Marryat, Louise; Thompson, Lucy; Minnis, Helen; Wilson, Philip

    2015-01-17

    Glasgow City has poorer adolescent and adult health outcomes in comparison to demographically similar cities in England and the rest of Scotland. Until now, little exploration of differences in child development between Glasgow and other areas has been made. The authors hypothesized that the poorer health outcomes and lifestyle behaviours of adults, coupled with relative economic deprivation, may impact on child social, emotional and behavioural development, compared with children from other parts of Scotland. Data from the Growing Up in Scotland national birth cohort study were used. Differences between Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) scores and child and family characteristics of children living in the Greater Glasgow and Clyde (GGC) Health board vs. other health boards were examined. Logistic regression and linear regression models were fitted in order to explore independent associations between health board and SDQ raw and banded scores, respectively, whilst controlling for other contributing factors. Children in GGC were demographically different from those in other areas of Scotland, being significantly more likely to live in the most deprived areas, yet no difference was found in relation to the mental health of preschool-aged children in GGC. Children in GGC had slightly better SDQ Conduct Problems scores once demographic factors were controlled for. At 46 months, there does not appear to be any difference in Glasgow with regards to social, emotional and behavioural development. Glaswegian children appear to have slightly fewer conduct problems at this age, once demographics are taken into account. A range of theories are put forward as to why no differences were found, including the inclusion of areas adjacent to Glasgow City in the analysis, sleeper effects, and rater bias.

  18. IR Windstreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Windstreaks are features caused by the interaction of wind and topographic landforms. The raised rims and bowls of impact craters causes a complex interaction such that the wind vortex in the lee of the crater can both scour away the surface dust and deposit it back in the center of the lee. If you look closely, you will see evidence of this in a darker 'rim' enclosing a brighter interior.

    This infrared image shows windstreaks in the region between Gordii Dorsum and Amazonis Mensa.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -15.8, Longitude 215 East (145 West). 97 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. IR Windstreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Windstreaks are features caused by the interaction of wind and topographic landforms. The raised rims and bowls of impact craters causes a complex interaction such that the wind vortex in the lee of the crater can both scour away the surface dust and deposit it back in the center of the lee. If you look closely, you will see evidence of this in a darker 'rim' enclosing a brighter interior.

    This infrared image shows windstreaks in the region between Gordii Dorsum and Amazonis Mensa.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -15.8, Longitude 215 East (145 West). 97 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. IR Detectors Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...2 1. Introduction The final report summarizes the results of continuing research and development of CZT substrates for fabrication of IR focal...agreed, that tasks 3 and 4 will be done in the first half of September based on time availability of the polishing lab and the summary will be sent

  1. Making Meaningful Measurement in Survey Research: A Demonstration of the Utility of the Rasch Model. IR Applications. Volume 28

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal, Kenneth D.

    2010-01-01

    Quality measurement is essential in every form of research, including institutional research and assessment. This paper addresses the erroneous assumptions institutional researchers often make with regard to survey research and provides an alternative method to producing more valid and reliable measures. Rasch measurement models are discussed and…

  2. Optimal cut-off values for the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and pre-diabetes screening: Developments in research and prospects for the future.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qi; Li, Xueqin; Song, Peipei; Xu, Lingzhong

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) appears to be increasing rapidly, threatening to reduce life expectancy for humans around the globe. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has estimated that there will be 642 million people living with the disease by 2040 and half as many again who will be not diagnosed. This means that pre-DM screening is a critical issue. Insulin resistance (IR) has emerged as a major pathophysiological factor in the development and progression of DM since it is evident in susceptible individuals at the early stages of DM, and particularly type 2 DM (T2DM). Therefore, assessment of IR via the homeostasis model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR) is a key index for the primary prevention of DM and is thus found in guidelines for screening of high-risk groups. However, the cut-off values of HOMA-IR differ for different races, ages, genders, diseases, complications, etc. due to the complexity of IR. This hampers the determination of specific cut-off values of HOMA-IR in different places and in different situations. China has not published an official index to gauge IR for primary prevention of T2DM in the diabetic and non-diabetic population except for children and adolescents ages 6-12 years. Hence, this article summarizes developments in research on IR, HOMA-IR, and pre-DM screening in order to provide a reference for optimal cut-off values of HOMA-IR for the diagnosis of DM in the Chinese population.

  3. An empirical research in application of dynamic, multispectral-band IR thermal images for investigations of petrochemical furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pregowski, P.; Goleniewski, G.; Komosa, W.; Korytkowski, W.; Zwolenik, Sl.

    2008-09-01

    A few years ago we have developed a patent pending method that allows to increase the reliability of the heater's tube temperature measurements through flames. The applications of this method showed additional potential for investigation of heating medium, i.e. mixture of various gases and aerosols inside flames and flue gases. This paper presents the recently developed, new version of the measuring system based on PtSi IRFPA commercial thermographic type camera. Two additional optical (8 filter wheel) and digital interfaces have been applied. The main special feature of elaborated techniques is the dynamic spectrally matched IR thermography, which bases on forming single images that consist of pixels of chosen statistical value, minimum and maximum, noted during adequately long sequence of thermograms with total independence to the moment of their capture. Sets of these data can be used either directly or as inputs to other artificial images. In this way, additive or suppressed interferences of fluctuating character could be minimized or exhibited, depending on the type of investigations i.e. studying tubes' temperature or energetic features of the flames and flue gases. Some of the results emerged as very promising - in the future they may help in creating a new field of thermal cameras application for furnaces control or steering to further enhance safety and efficiency of furnaces running.

  4. Proceedings of a symposium on the neurobiology of the basal ganglia. Glasgow, United Kingdom, July 1999.

    PubMed

    2000-05-01

    The basal ganglia occupy a commanding place in neuroscience research, in clinical neurology and in biomedical education. The paucity of our understanding of the role of the basal ganglia in normal everyday life combined with our more extensive knowledge of their deficiencies in a variety of clinical syndromes is a potent spur to continuing investigation. That some of these neurodegenerative syndromes-such as Parkinson's disease-are already common only heightens the need for insight in the face of a population with increasing expectations of longevity. About a decade ago an explosion of information on the connectivity and immunocytochemistry of forebrain structures gave rise to concepts which have shaped the fabric of basal ganglia theory-'patch and matrix', 'disinhibition', 'parallel circuits'. Some of these ideas seemed to facilitate an understanding of the basal ganglia, others to render them more complex and impenetrable. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the work of the last decade has tended towards consolidation and refinement. However, several new developments are receiving attention, many of them related to disorders of the basal ganglia. The realisation that some forms of Parkinson's disease have a genetic determinant is gaining strength. The molecular biology of the dopaminergic synapse on the one hand and of the production of insoluble proteins on the other will clearly influence future research into therapeutic options and neuroprotection. The importance of apoptosis, neural plasticity and free radical formation remains unresolved but these are potential areas of promise. Meanwhile, scanning techniques for brain imaging are allowing real time investigation of the working striatum in normal and disordered humans and animals.We believe that the time is opportune for a broad review of current thinking on the basal ganglia in health and disease. The following articles are based on presentations given at a Symposium on the Neurobiology of the Basal Ganglia held at

  5. The JARCC Toolbox: The IR-EP: A Powerful Model for Self-Assessment and Planning in Institutional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polinsky, Tracy L.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an institutional research office's establishment of an outcomes-oriented self-assessment model rooted in the college's mission and goals. Reports that the framework enables institutional research departments to evaluate their effectiveness, and more importantly, to use the results of self-assessment to plan future activities, thereby…

  6. Meeting Report: BAA Out of London Weekend, 2007 August 31 to September 2, Glasgow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clackson, T.

    2008-02-01

    In 2007 the BAA travelled north of the Border to visit 'Bonnie Scotland' for the annual Out-of-London weekend. The BAA last held a weekend in Scotland in 1994 and the offer from the Astronomical Society of Glasgow (ASG) to host the 2007 event was very welcome. The ASG recently celebrated its centenary and is an active society with over 140 members. They were both pleased and a little daunted when their offer was accepted by the BAA.

  7. Disability after severe head injury: observations on the use of the Glasgow Outcome Scale.

    PubMed Central

    Jennett, B; Snoek, J; Bond, M R; Brooks, N

    1981-01-01

    The nature of the neurological and mental disabilities resulting from severe head injuries are analysed in 150 patients. Mental handicap contributed more significantly to overall social disability than did neurological deficits. This social handicap is readily described by the Glasgow Outcome Scale, an extended version of which is described and compared with alternatives. Comments are made about the quality of life in disabled survivors. PMID:6453957

  8. Young adults with acquired brain injury in nursing homes in Glasgow.

    PubMed

    McMillan, T M; Laurie, M

    2004-03-01

    To survey the characteristics, level of disability and services received by young adults with acquired brain injury (ABI) resident in nursing homes in Greater Glasgow. Telephone survey of 75 nursing homes followed by a questionnaire survey and review of medication cardexes. Included were all people under 65 years with ABI resident in nursing homes in Greater Glasgow between 1 February 2000 and 31 January 2001. Twenty-eight nursing homes in Greater Glasgow, Scotland (population 0.9 million). Young adults (16-64) with ABI. Structured questionnaire, Barthel Index, Office of Population Census Survey (OPCS) Disability Form, review of medication cardexes. Information was obtained on all cases identified in 75 nursing homes. There were 92 people with ABI in 28 nursing homes; 43/92 were in three homes. Only 42 had inpatient rehabilitation preadmission. Severe disability (OPCS categories 7-10) was found in 54 cases and minimal/minor disability (OPCS categories 1-2) in 18. Thirty-two exhibited challenging behaviour, nine of these were physically violent. Homes were staffed by unqualified assistants, supervised by nurses. No home itself offered rehabilitation, but some had accessed an NHS physical disability community team (28/92 cases) or other community teams (5/92). Proactive medical review was uncommon. Medication had been reviewed since admission in a minority (21/92). Most had regular visits from relatives. There is a wide range of disability in nursing home residents in Greater Glasgow. Proactive, routine review of medical, rehabilitation and medication needs is rare, as is rehabilitation pre and post discharge. This is serious given the likelihood of reduced intellectual and/or physical capacity in this population. Nursing homes should have hospital discharge reports that inform about immediate preadmission history, rationale for medication and placement. There is a need for regular and ongoing health service review of nursing home residents including potential for

  9. Knowledge of health information and services in a random sample of the population of Glasgow.

    PubMed

    Moynihan, M; Jones, A K; Stewart, G T; Lucas, R W

    1980-01-01

    A RANDOM sample of adults in Glasgow was surveyed by trained interviewers to determine public knowledge on four topics chosen specifically for each of four age groups. The topics were: Welfare rights and services; Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) and individual action that can reduce risk; The dangers of smoking in pregnancy; and fluoride and its functions and the connections between good health and habitual behaviour.

  10. Gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can predict functional recovery in patients with traumatic brain injury☆

    PubMed Central

    Bilgin, Sevil; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Oruckaptan, Hakan; Kose, Nezire; Celik, Bülent

    2012-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with mild (n = 14), moderate (n = 10) and severe traumatic brain injury (n = 27) received early rehabilitation. Level of consciousness was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Score. Functional level was determined using the Glasgow Outcome Score, whilst mobility was evaluated using the Mobility Scale for Acute Stroke. Activities of daily living were assessed using the Barthel Index. Following Bobath neurodevelopmental therapy, the level of consciousness was significantly improved in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury, but was not greatly influenced in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Mobility and functional level were significantly improved in patients with mild, moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Gait recovery was more obvious in patients with mild traumatic brain injury than in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Activities of daily living showed an improvement but this was insignificant except for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Nevertheless, complete recovery was not acquired at discharge. Multiple regression analysis showed that gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can be considered predictors of functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury. PMID:25624828

  11. A case report on near manual strangulation and glasgow coma scale.

    PubMed

    Meel Banwari, L

    2015-09-01

    Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is considered as a gold standard in estimating the prognosis of the comatose patient. The management of the patient relies heavily on this scale. The mechanism of injury must also be included in scoring of the GCS. Survival from strangulation is uncommon, and if it occurs, it is often associated with various complications such as neurological consequences. To highlight a poor correlation with low GCS and ultimate outcome in cases of manual strangulation. This is a case report of young female adult who was raped and manually strangulated by a colleague during a training course for traditional healers. She was admitted with very low (3/15) Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and presumed to have a poor prognosis. She was rigorously ventilated in Intensive Care Unit (ICU), and was discharged from hospital after a week without any complications. The neck and genital injuries are described. This report discusses. A low Glasgow Coma Scale is not a predictive of poor prognosis in cases of manual strangulation.

  12. Oncological Outcomes and Complications After Volume Replacement Oncoplastic Breast Conservations—The Glasgow Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Weiguang; Stallard, Sheila; Doughty, Julie; Mallon, Elizabeth; Romics, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Oncoplastic breast conservation surgery (OBCS) combines the principles of surgical oncology and plastic surgery. OBCS has now become a growing option for the treatment of breast cancer and forms a part of breast-conserving therapy (BCT). We sought to investigate and report our experience in two breast units in Glasgow (Victoria Infirmary and Western Infirmary) on volume replacement OBCS. MATERIALS AND METHODS Details of patients treated with volume replacement OBCS were identified from a prospectively recorded database from November 2010 to October 2015. The clinical records included in the oncoplastic dataset were analyzed for demographics, tumor, treatment characteristics, and recurrences. The data were analyzed for follow-up to determine the pattern and timing of recurrence up to April 2016. The primary outcome of this study was tumor-free margin resection rates, and the secondary outcomes were locoregional and distant recurrence rates as these correlate with the overall oncological safety of volume replacement oncoplastic breast surgery (OPBS). RESULTS A total of 30 volume replacement oncoplastic breast conservation procedures have been carried out in this time period. The mean age of the former group was 51 years. Twice as many patients presented symptomatically than had tumors detected on screening. The mean preoperative tumor size on radiology was 25.4 mm. Patients underwent 13 thoracoepigastric flaps, 5 lateral intercostal artery perforator (LICAP) flaps, 2 thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP) flaps, 1 lateral thoracic artery perforator (LTAP) flap, 1 crescent flap volume replacement surgery, and 8 matrix rotations. Two patients had neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Fourteen patients had adjuvant chemotherapy, and all patients were treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. Twenty-two patients were treated with hormonal therapy and four patients were treated with Herceptin. The rate of incomplete excision was 10%. Median follow-up time was 48.5 months. Only

  13. The health and well-being of children and young people who are looked after: Findings from a face-to-face survey in Glasgow.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Sharon; Jopling, Michael

    2017-09-11

    Evidence suggests children and young people who are looked after (LACYP) may have poorer health outcomes than children and young people in the general population, particularly in relation to mental health. This paper discusses findings from a survey of the health and well-being of LACYP in Glasgow. A structured questionnaire used in the 2010 Glasgow Schools Survey (GSS) was adapted and administered in face-to-face interviews with 130 young people aged 11-18 in 2014-2015 to investigate various aspects of health and well-being including physical activity, diet and sleep, smoking, alcohol and drugs, health feelings and worries, behaviours, attitudes and expectations. LACYP were more likely to report that they had tried drugs, slightly more likely to have scores indicating a high level of difficulties on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and less likely to report that they ate fruit and vegetables, used active transport methods to get to school and expected to go on to further or higher education; however, reported rates of physical activity, smoking and drinking were similar. LACYP were less likely to report that they had engaged in antisocial behaviour, truancy or bullying or been exposed to environmental tobacco smoke, less likely to worry or have low self-esteem, and more likely to rate their health positively. There were some variations according to placement type. The findings of this study present a more positive picture of the health and well-being of LACYP in Glasgow than might have been expected but should be treated with caution due to small sample size. Further research is needed to identify differences in relation to placement type and to determine whether being looked after might be associated with improved health and well-being outcomes for some children and young people. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The Unseen Founders Of Quaternary Science - The Men Of Glasgow, Scotland (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, J.

    2010-12-01

    Louis Agassiz (1807-1873) and Charles Lyell (1797-1875) are widely regarded as the founders of Quaternary Science, and there is no doubt that they played their part: Agassiz in 1840 presented and promoted his case for the wide-scale fluctuations of glaciers, and Lyell, through his books and contacts, did much to introduce the subject which we now know as climate change. However there are a number of individuals who contributed to the founding of Quaternary Science who are not so readily recognised and a remarkable fact is that a significant proportion were men without academic training or background who come from, or worked in Glasgow or the adjacent region of central Scotland. First amongst the Glaswegians was James Smith (1782-1867) who, in 1836 presented a paper to the Geological Society of London (where it was duly ignored) in which he suggested, on the basis of fossils dredged from the bed of the Clyde and experience of sailing around Iceland, that the climate of Scotland had been as cold as that of Iceland in the recent past. In 1841, Charles Maclaren (1782-1866) a journalist from Edinburgh, but using information based on raised shorelines near Glasgow proposed what we now know as the glacio-eustatic theory in which the variations in glacier extent control the level of the sea. Perhaps the most important of all was James Croll (1821- 1890) who worked on the theory of ice ages, based on orbital forcing, while janitor at the Andersonian Institute and Museum in Glasgow between 1859-1867. This work was the true precursor to the Milankovitch theory which provides the explanation for the major predictable elements of climate change. Robert Jack (1845-1921) from Irvine, southwest of Glasgow, while doing fieldwork for the British Geological Survey near Loch Lomond close to Glasgow, described in 1874 evidence for non-glacial conditions between tills and clearly recognised that climate could change from glacial to temperate and then glacial climate, before returning to

  15. The "Spirit of New Orleans": translating a model of intervention with maltreated children and their families for the Glasgow context.

    PubMed

    Minnis, Helen; Bryce, Graham; Phin, Louise; Wilson, Phil

    2010-10-01

    Children in care have higher rates of mental health problems than the general population and placement instability contributes to this. Children are both most vulnerable to the effects of poor quality care and most responsive to treatment in the early weeks and months of life yet, in the UK, permanency decisions are generally not in place until around the age of four. We aimed to understand the components of an innovative system for assessing and intervening with maltreated children and their families developed in New Orleans and to consider how it might be implemented in Glasgow, UK. During and after a visit to New Orleans by a team of Glasgow practitioners, eight key interviews and meetings with New Orleans and Glasgow staff were audio-recorded. Qualitative analysis of verbatim transcripts identified key themes. Themes highlighted shared aspects of the context and attitudes of the two teams, identified gaps in the Glasgow service and steps that would be needed to implement a version of the New Orleans model in Glasgow. Our discussions with the New Orleans team have highlighted concrete steps we can take, in Glasgow, to make better decision-making for vulnerable children a reality.

  16. Optical/IR from ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, Stephen; Sargent, Wallace L. W.; Wolff, Sidney; Ahearn, Michael F.; Angel, J. Roger; Beckwith, Steven V. W.; Carney, Bruce W.; Conti, Peter S.; Edwards, Suzan; Grasdalen, Gary

    1991-01-01

    Optical/infrared (O/IR) astronomy in the 1990's is reviewed. The following subject areas are included: research environment; science opportunities; technical development of the 1980's and opportunities for the 1990's; and ground-based O/IR astronomy outside the U.S. Recommendations are presented for: (1) large scale programs (Priority 1: a coordinated program for large O/IR telescopes); (2) medium scale programs (Priority 1: a coordinated program for high angular resolution; Priority 2: a new generation of 4-m class telescopes); (3) small scale programs (Priority 1: near-IR and optical all-sky surveys; Priority 2: a National Astrometric Facility); and (4) infrastructure issues (develop, purchase, and distribute optical CCDs and infrared arrays; a program to support large optics technology; a new generation of large filled aperture telescopes; a program to archive and disseminate astronomical databases; and a program for training new instrumentalists)

  17. A Comparative Study of Glasgow Coma Scale and Full Outline of Unresponsiveness Scores for Predicting Long-Term Outcome After Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    McNett, Molly M; Amato, Shelly; Philippbar, Sue Ann

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare predictive ability of hospital Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores and scores obtained using a novel coma scoring tool (the Full Outline of Unresponsiveness [FOUR] scale) on long-term outcomes among patients with traumatic brain injury. Preliminary research of the FOUR scale suggests that it is comparable with GCS for predicting mortality and functional outcome at hospital discharge. No research has investigated relationships between coma scores and outcome 12 months postinjury. This is a prospective cohort study. Data were gathered on adult patients with traumatic brain injury admitted to urban level I trauma center. GCS and FOUR scores were assigned at 24 and 72 hours and at hospital discharge. Glasgow Outcome Scale scores were assigned at 6 and 12 months. The sample size was n = 107. Mean age was 53.5 (SD = ±21, range = 18-91) years. Spearman correlations were comparable and strongest among discharge GCS and FOUR scores and 12-month outcome (r = .73, p < .000; r = .72, p < .000). Multivariate regression models indicate that age and discharge GCS were the strongest predictors of outcome. Areas under the curve were similar for GCS and FOUR scores, with discharge scores occupying the largest areas. GCS and FOUR scores were comparable in bivariate associations with long-term outcome. Discharge coma scores performed best for both tools, with GCS discharge scores predictive in multivariate models.

  18. Study on establishment of congenic strains and screening of characteristics in IRS-2 deficient mice to support translational research on type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Haruo

    2011-01-01

    In research into type 2 diabetes, diet-based approaches, i.e., nutritional intake, are important approaches for therapeutic research. We would like to make the following two proposals from the standpoint of laboratory animal science for reproducible animal studies using type 2 diabetes mouse models. These include congenic strains of diabetes mouse models and improvement of diets used in daily care and management. In this research, the Irs2homo-knockout mouse with both impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance, and thus type 2 diabetes, was established as a congenic strain. The effect of the genetic background on the onset of diabetes was examined. Next, we discussed which diets are appropriate for general care and management of mouse models in which the pathophysiology is controlled by nutritional conditions. Therefore, we prepared diets by converting the current Japanese and US diets to mice and adjusting the diet contents accordingly. We compared the insulin signals such as those of the liver, pancreas and white fat. We were thus able to establish an evaluation system closer to diabetes in the current population. Using this data as an example, we should consider the quality and ordinary diet of animals as important factors in animal experiments.

  19. Reinforced Concrete Condition Assessment in Architectural Heritage. The Lion Chambers (Glasgow, UK) and the Theatre E. Duni (Matera, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guida, A.; Dimitrijevic, B.; Pagliuca, A.

    2012-04-01

    The research objective is to provide new qualitative information on the strength of reinforced concrete structures of two prominent examples of modern architecture by using innovative, non-invasive testing techniques. The first one is Lion Chambers in Glasgow (Scotland, United Kingdom) designed by the architects Salmon, Son and Gillespie and completed in 1907. It was the second example of the use of François Hennebique's reinforced concrete system in a building in Glasgow and one of the earliest in Britain. The second example is Duni Theatre in Matera (Southern Italy), designed by the architect Ettore Stella and completed in 1949. The tests on the internal reinforced concrete columns were undertaken by using "SonReb" (SONic + REBound) method that enables assessing the concrete resistance by combining the speed of ultrasound waves and the index of surface bounce through a scleorometric test. In fact, the sclerometer index only gives information regarding the surface layer of the building's structure. In fact, due to the effects of the natural ageing, catalysed by the presence of humidity, surface layers of concrete are affected over time by carbonatation, which increases surface rigidity, providing as a result a greatly "altered" rebound index (much greater than one would have under normal conditions). On the other hand, the ultrasound speed, on the contrary to resistance, is inversely proportional to the age of the concrete (this seems to be due to the cracks that occur and reduce the speed). The hardening process continues over time with a consequent increase in resistance, which diminishes with the passage of time. The paper provides the results of the tests run on the structure of the Lion Chambers and the Duni Theatre. The tests carried out are the basis of a diagnostic project that is possible to implement and monitor to guarantee a deeper knowledge, with the goal of attaining a level of thorough understanding aimed at the preservation of "Modern Architecture

  20. Validation of the Glasgow Facial Palsy Scale for the assessment of smile reanimation surgery in facial paralysis.

    PubMed

    Romeo, M; O'Reilly, B; Robertson, B F; Morley, S

    2012-06-01

      To evaluate the Glasgow Facial Palsy Scale as a tool to assess facial reanimation surgery in facial palsy. Software analysis of digital video data is used to measure facial movements, comparing the affected to the normal side. We present the first use of the Glasgow Facial Palsy Scale following facial re-animation surgery.   A comparison of the Glasgow Facial Palsy Scale against the Nottingham scoring system. Subjects undergoing unilateral surgical smile reanimation procedures were selected. Comparison was made with the Nottingham facial palsy scale and the House-Brackmann Scale pre- and postoperatively.   Patients were recruited in the facial palsy clinic of Canniesburn Plastic Surgery Unit, Glasgow.   Seven consecutive patients were selected who were due to undergo unilateral facial reanimation.   The difference in pre- and post-surgical facial movement as measured using the Glasgow Facial Palsy Scale with this value being compared to that obtained using the Nottingham scoring system. Note was also taken of the correlation with House-Brackmann system and clinical correlation. Statistical analysis indicated a linear relationship between the Glasgow Facial Palsy Scale and the Nottingham System. The Pearson correlation test was used to confirm the relationship between the two methods giving a result of -0.587, which indicates significant correlation between the two methods. We conclude that the Glasgow Facial Palsy Scale is a standardised objective method of assessing the change in facial movement following smile reanimation surgery. We commend it as a useful tool to objectively assess surgical results in this challenging field. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Data analysis and review of radiology services at Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games.

    PubMed

    Bethapudi, Sarath; Ritchie, David; Bongale, Santosh; Gordon, Jonny; MacLean, John; Mendl, Liz

    2015-10-01

    Medical services at the Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games (CWG) were provided though a purpose-built medical polyclinic, which had a fully equipped radiology department along with other services, set up within the main Games Village. Data analysis of radiology services offered at CWG has not been published before. Imaging services within the polyclinic, Athletes Village, Glasgow 2014 CWG. The aim of the paper is to analyse data on radiological investigations and assess the demand and distribution of workload on imaging services at CWG 2014. Data on radiology investigations at the CWG 2014 was retrieved from the Carestream picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and Pharmasys (CWG official centralised electronic database system) and analysed. Six hundred ninety-seven diagnostic and interventional procedures were performed. Of these 37.9% were magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, 22% were diagnostic ultrasound (US) examinations, 33.1% were radiographs, 4.3% were computed tomography (CT) scans and 2.7% were imaging-guided interventional procedures. 88% of imaging was performed on athletes and the remainder were performed on team officials and workforce. Demand on radiology services gradually picked up through the pre-competition period and peaked half way through the CWG. Radiology played a vital role in the successful provision of medical services at the Glasgow 2014 CWG. High demand on imaging services can be expected at major international sporting events and therefore pre-event planning is vital. Having back-up facilities in case of technical failure should be given due importance when planning radiology services at future CWG events.

  2. Skeletal stability after correction of maxillary hypoplasia by the Glasgow extra-oral distraction (GED) device.

    PubMed

    Jayade, C V; Ayoub, A F; Khambay, B S; Walker, F S; Gopalakrishnan, K; Malik, N A; Srivastava, D; Pradhan, R

    2006-08-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis delivers excellent results, particularly in patients with clefts. In the past, devices such as the conventional facemask and the rigid external distraction device have been used to correct maxillary hypoplasia after a Le Fort I osteotomy. We describe a new device, the Glasgow extra-oral distraction device. The extent of skeletal and dental stability of corrections achieved in 10 patients with maxillary hypoplasia associated with clefts was satisfactory. This device costs little, can be produced in developing countries, and provides effective treatment for severe secondary deformity associated with clefts.

  3. Representing the Glasgow Coma Scale in IT: Proper Specification is Required for Assessment Scales.

    PubMed

    Goossen, William; Oemig, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In healthcare a huge amount of assessment scales and score systems are in use to abbreviate and summarize the results of clinical observations to interpret a patient's condition in a valid and reliable manner. It is challenging to convey the information in a semantic interoperable form to other systems. A bad approach would be to invent individual models for each of them. Within this paper we would like to demonstrate that a generic model is sufficient by demonstrating the realization with the Glasgow Coma Scale.

  4. ‘At-risk’ places: inequities in the distribution of environmental stressors and prescription rates of mental health medications in Glasgow, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maantay, Juliana; Maroko, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Using geospatial analytical methods, this study examines the association between one aspect of the built environment, namely, the concentration of vacant and derelict land (VDL), and the prevalence of mental health disorders (using the proxy variable of mental health medication prescription rates) in Glasgow, Scotland. This study builds on our previous research, which demonstrated the spatial correspondence between the locations of VDL in Glasgow and several physical health outcomes. Numerous studies of other locales have found similar correspondence between different elements of the built environment and various health outcomes. This is the first study of its kind to look at the spatial concentration of vacant and derelict land in relation to mental health, socio-economic indicators, environmental justice, and health inequities. The findings of this study demonstrate an inequity with respect to the distribution of vacant and derelict land, as confirmed by Pearson correlations between VDL density and deprivation (r = .521, p < .001). This suggests that many deprived communities are disproportionately burdened with environmental impacts and psycho-social stressors associated with this land use. Regression analyses show a significant positive association between the proportion of the population who were prescribed medication for anxiety, depression, or psychosis and the density of vacant and derelict land while adjusting for socio-demographic characteristics. This indicates that areas with higher VDL densities tend to exhibit higher rates of mental health issues. Based on these findings, strategies for constructive re-use of VDL are proposed.

  5. Assessment of daytime outdoor comfort levels in and outside the urban area of Glasgow, UK.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Eduardo; Drach, Patricia; Emmanuel, Rohinton; Corbella, Oscar

    2013-07-01

    To understand thermal preferences and to define a preliminary outdoor comfort range for the local population of Glasgow, UK, an extensive series of measurements and surveys was carried out during 19 monitoring campaigns from winter through summer 2011 at six different monitoring points in pedestrian areas of downtown Glasgow. For data collection, a Davis Vantage Pro2 weather station equipped with temperature and humidity sensors, cup anemometer with wind vane, silicon pyranometer and globe thermometer was employed. Predictions of the outdoor thermal index PET (physiologically equivalent temperature) correlated closely to the actual thermal votes of respondents. Using concurrent measurements from a second Davis Vantage Pro2 weather station placed in a rural setting approximately 15 km from the urban area, comparisons were drawn with regard to daytime thermal comfort levels and urban-rural temperature differences (∆T(u-r)) for the various sites. The urban sites exhibited a consistent lower level of thermal discomfort during daytime. No discernible effect of urban form attributes in terms of the sky-view factor were observed on ∆Tu-r or on the relative difference of the adjusted predicted percentage of dissatisfied (PPD*).

  6. Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test: applicability and relation with the Glasgow Coma Scale.

    PubMed

    Fürbringer e Silva, Silvia Cristina; de Sousa, Regina Marcia Cardoso

    2007-01-01

    Restrictions in the application of the Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test and questionings about the relationship between conscience and post-traumatic amnesia motivated this study, which aims to identify, through the Glasgow Coma Scale scores, when to initiate the application of this amnesia test, as well to verify the relationship between the results of these two indicators. The longitudinal prospective study was carried at a referral center for trauma care in São Paulo - Brazil. The sample consisted of 73 victims of blunt traumatic brain injury, admitted at this institution between January 03rd and May 03rd 2001. Regarding the applicability, the test could be applied in patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale score > 12; however, the end of post traumatic amnesia was verified in patients who scored > 14 on the scale. A significant relationship (r s = 0.65) was verified between these measures, although different kinds of relationship between the end of the amnesia and changes in consciousness were observed.

  7. Dr. Auzoux's botanical teaching models and medical education at the universities of Glasgow and Aberdeen.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Margaret Maria

    2011-09-01

    In the 1860s, Dr. Louis Thomas Jérôme Auzoux introduced a set of papier-mâché teaching models intended for use in the botanical classroom. These botanical models quickly made their way into the educational curricula of institutions around the world. Within these institutions, Auzoux's models were principally used to fulfil educational goals, but their incorporation into diverse curricula also suggests they were used to implement agendas beyond botanical instruction. This essay examines the various uses and meanings of Dr. Auzoux's botanical teaching models at the universities of Glasgow and Aberdeen in the nineteenth century. The two main conclusions of this analysis are: (1) investing in prestigious scientific collections was a way for these universities to attract fee-paying students so that better medical accommodation could be provided and (2) models were used to transmit different kinds of botanical knowledge at both universities. The style of botany at the University of Glasgow was offensive and the department there actively embraced and incorporated ideas of the emerging new botany. At Aberdeen, the style of botany was defensive and there was some hesitancy when confronting new botanical ideas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Health status and health behaviours in neighbourhoods: A comparison of Glasgow, Scotland and Hamilton, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kathi; Eyles, John; Ellaway, Anne; Macintyre, Sally; Macdonald, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Health status has been demonstrated to vary by neighbourhood socioeconomic status (SES). However, neighbourhood effects may vary between countries. In this study, neighbourhood variations in health outcomes are compared across four socially contrasting neighbourhoods in Glasgow, Scotland and Hamilton, Ontario Canada. Data came from the 2001 wave of the West of Scotland Twenty-07 Longitudinal Study and a 2000/2001 cross-sectional survey conducted in Hamilton. The results of the comparison point to important variations in the relationship between neighbourhood SES and health. While both cities display a socioeconomic gradient with respect to various measures of health and health behaviours, for some outcome measures the high SES neighbourhoods in Glasgow display distributions similar to those found in the low SES neighbourhoods in Hamilton. Our results suggest that a low SES neighbourhood in one country may not mean the same for health as a low SES neighbourhood in another country. As such, country context may explain the distribution of health status and health behaviours among socially contrasting neighbourhoods, and neighbourhood variations in health may be context specific. PMID:20022285

  9. Assessment of daytime outdoor comfort levels in and outside the urban area of Glasgow, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Eduardo; Drach, Patricia; Emmanuel, Rohinton; Corbella, Oscar

    2013-07-01

    To understand thermal preferences and to define a preliminary outdoor comfort range for the local population of Glasgow, UK, an extensive series of measurements and surveys was carried out during 19 monitoring campaigns from winter through summer 2011 at six different monitoring points in pedestrian areas of downtown Glasgow. For data collection, a Davis Vantage Pro2 weather station equipped with temperature and humidity sensors, cup anemometer with wind vane, silicon pyranometer and globe thermometer was employed. Predictions of the outdoor thermal index PET (physiologically equivalent temperature) correlated closely to the actual thermal votes of respondents. Using concurrent measurements from a second Davis Vantage Pro2 weather station placed in a rural setting approximately 15 km from the urban area, comparisons were drawn with regard to daytime thermal comfort levels and urban-rural temperature differences (∆Tu-r) for the various sites. The urban sites exhibited a consistent lower level of thermal discomfort during daytime. No discernible effect of urban form attributes in terms of the sky-view factor were observed on ∆Tu-r or on the relative difference of the adjusted predicted percentage of dissatisfied (PPD*).

  10. Urban heat island and differences in outdoor comfort levels in Glasgow, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Eduardo; Drach, Patricia; Emmanuel, Rohinton; Corbella, Oscar

    2013-04-01

    From extensive outdoor comfort campaigns, preliminary outdoor comfort ranges have been defined for the local population of Glasgow, UK, in terms of two thermal indices: `Temperature Humidity Sun Wind' (THSW) and `Physiological Equivalent Temperature' (PET). A series of measurements and surveys was carried out from winter through summer 2011 during 19 monitoring campaigns. For data collection, a Davis Vantage Pro2 weather station was used, which was equipped with temperature and humidity sensors, cup anemometer with wind vane, silicon pyranometer and globe thermometer. From concurrent measurements using two weather stations, one located close to the city core and another located at a rural setting, approximately at a 15-km distance from the urban area of Glasgow, comparisons were made with regard to thermal comfort levels and to urban-rural temperature differences for different periods of the year. It was found that the two selected thermal indices (THSW and PET) closely correlate to the actual thermal sensation of respondents. Moreover, results show that the urban site will have fewer days of cold discomfort, more days of `neutral' thermal sensation and slightly higher warm discomfort. The most frequent urban heat island intensity was found to be around 3° C, whereas the fraction of cooling to heating degree-hours for a T base of 65 °F was approximately 1/12th.

  11. Selling sex: female street prostitution and HIV risk behaviour in Glasgow.

    PubMed

    McKeganey, N; Barnard, M

    1992-01-01

    Female prostitutes have often been seen as a major source of HIV infection. In this paper we report on a study of HIV-related risk behaviour among street prostitutes in Glasgow. This paper is based on street interviews using a standardized schedule with 68 women. We focus on the extent of HIV testing amongst the women, travel, the sexual services provided, the use of condoms with clients and private partners, and the extent of drug injecting and equipment sharing by the women. It is shown that female street prostitution within Glasgow is, at present, unlikely to be associated with significant heterosexual spread of HIV as most commercial sex is with a condom. However, some risk activities are continuing. Additionally, prostitutes report worrying rates of condom failure with clients. It is suggested that attention should switch away from an exclusive focus on women selling sexual services to target the men who purchase sex. These data indicate that much of the pressure for these women to provide unprotected sex comes from their clients.

  12. The Glasgow Voice Memory Test: Assessing the ability to memorize and recognize unfamiliar voices.

    PubMed

    Aglieri, Virginia; Watson, Rebecca; Pernet, Cyril; Latinus, Marianne; Garrido, Lúcia; Belin, Pascal

    2017-02-01

    One thousand one hundred and twenty subjects as well as a developmental phonagnosic subject (KH) along with age-matched controls performed the Glasgow Voice Memory Test, which assesses the ability to encode and immediately recognize, through an old/new judgment, both unfamiliar voices (delivered as vowels, making language requirements minimal) and bell sounds. The inclusion of non-vocal stimuli allows the detection of significant dissociations between the two categories (vocal vs. non-vocal stimuli). The distributions of accuracy and sensitivity scores (d') reflected a wide range of individual differences in voice recognition performance in the population. As expected, KH showed a dissociation between the recognition of voices and bell sounds, her performance being significantly poorer than matched controls for voices but not for bells. By providing normative data of a large sample and by testing a developmental phonagnosic subject, we demonstrated that the Glasgow Voice Memory Test, available online and accessible from all over the world, can be a valid screening tool (~5 min) for a preliminary detection of potential cases of phonagnosia and of "super recognizers" for voices.

  13. Is proximity to a food retail store associated with diet and BMI in Glasgow, Scotland?

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Laura; Ellaway, Anne; Ball, Kylie; Macintyre, Sally

    2011-06-10

    Access to healthy food is often seen as a potentially important contributor to diet. Policy documents in many countries suggest that variations in access contribute to inequalities in diet and in health. Some studies, mostly in the USA, have found that proximity to food stores is associated with dietary patterns, body weight and socio-economic differences in diet and obesity, whilst others have found no such relationships. We aim to investigate whether proximity to food retail stores is associated with dietary patterns or Body Mass Index in Glasgow, a large city in the UK. We mapped data from a 'Health and Well-Being Survey' (n = 991), and a list of food stores (n = 741) in Glasgow City, using ArcGIS, and undertook network analysis to find the distance from respondents' home addresses to the nearest fruit and vegetable store, small general store, and supermarket. We found few statistically significant associations between proximity to food retail outlets and diet or obesity, for unadjusted or adjusted models, or when stratifying by gender, car ownership or employment. The findings suggest that in urban settings in the UK the distribution of retail food stores may not be a major influence on diet and weight, possibly because most urban residents have reasonable access to food stores.

  14. Is proximity to a food retail store associated with diet and BMI in Glasgow, Scotland?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Access to healthy food is often seen as a potentially important contributor to diet. Policy documents in many countries suggest that variations in access contribute to inequalities in diet and in health. Some studies, mostly in the USA, have found that proximity to food stores is associated with dietary patterns, body weight and socio-economic differences in diet and obesity, whilst others have found no such relationships. We aim to investigate whether proximity to food retail stores is associated with dietary patterns or Body Mass Index in Glasgow, a large city in the UK. Methods We mapped data from a 'Health and Well-Being Survey' (n = 991), and a list of food stores (n = 741) in Glasgow City, using ArcGIS, and undertook network analysis to find the distance from respondents' home addresses to the nearest fruit and vegetable store, small general store, and supermarket. Results We found few statistically significant associations between proximity to food retail outlets and diet or obesity, for unadjusted or adjusted models, or when stratifying by gender, car ownership or employment. Conclusions The findings suggest that in urban settings in the UK the distribution of retail food stores may not be a major influence on diet and weight, possibly because most urban residents have reasonable access to food stores. PMID:21663674

  15. The importance of empathy in the enablement of patients attending the Glasgow Homoeopathic Hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Stewart W; Reilly, David; Watt, Graham C M

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient enablement in general practice is known to be limited by consultation length. However, the processes within the consultation that lead to enablement are not well understood. AIMS: To investigate patient enablement in a setting where time is less of a constraint than in primary care, in order to determine the importance of other factors in enablement. DESIGN OF STUDY: Exploratory questionnaire-based study. SETTING: Two hundred consecutive outpatients attending four doctors at the Glasgow Homoeopathic Hospital, an NHS-funded integrated complementary and orthodox medicine unit. METHOD: Information was collected on enablement and a range of other factors, including the patients expectations, their perception of the doctors empathy, and the doctors own confidence in the doctor-patient relationship. RESULTS: Although there were many factors that correlated with enablement, multi-regression analysis showed patients expectation, doctor's empathy (as perceived by the patient), and doctor's own confidence in the therapeutic relationship to be the three key factors. Together they accounted for 41% of the variation in enablement, with empathy being the single most important factor (66% of the explained variation in enablement). CONCLUSION: Patient enablement at the Glasgow Homoeopathic Hospital is mainly related to the patients perception of the doctor's empathy. PMID:12434958

  16. Patient-perceived benefit of sialendoscopy as measured by the Glasgow Benefit Inventory.

    PubMed

    Meier, Bue A; Holst, René; Schousboe, Lars P

    2015-08-01

    Evaluate the patient-perceived effect of sialendoscopy on patients with obstructive symptoms from the salivary glands. Retrospectively identified cohort used for a prospective study of all consecutive patients at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology at Vejle Hospital, Vejle, Denmark, March 2009 to December 2013. By chart review we recorded the patient's age, gender, date of the sialendoscopy, type of gland, sialolithiasis, successful extraction of sialolithiasis, stenosis of salivary ducts, dilation, type of saliva, and surgeon. The follow-up was done by applying the Glasgow Benefit Inventory questionnaire by letter and telephone. There were 130 sialendoscopies performed on 116 patients. Of these, 24 patients were excluded due to subsequent surgery. Thus, 92 patients were eligible, of whom 80 responded, giving an 87% response rate. The Glasgow Benefit Inventory score had a predicted overall mean of 13.4 (95% confidence interval: 9.9 to 17.2). Significant positive outcomes by multiple regression were the presence of stones (P = 0.015) and examination of the parotid gland (P = 0.041). Overall, there is a significant patient-perceived benefit from sialendoscopy, which is comparable to the benefit from tonsillectomy. The benefit is significantly higher if stones are found than not and for examination of the parotid gland as compared to the submandibular gland. 4 © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  17. Patient-perceived outcome after sialendoscopy using the glasgow benefit inventory.

    PubMed

    Ianovski, Ilia; Morton, Randall P; Ahmad, Zahoor

    2014-04-01

    Sialendoscopy is a technique for investigating and managing obstructive salivary disease that avoids risks associated with the more invasive sialoadenectomy and other open surgery techniques. To date, surgeon-based outcomes have been reported, but only one report of patient-oriented outcomes has appeared in the literature. The objective of this study was to review our experience after introducing sialendoscopy to New Zealand and report the patient-perceived benefit. A prospective observational study of all sialendoscopic procedures performed in the only sialendoscopy-practicing center in New Zealand between June 2010 and June 2012. Clinical and epidemiological data of all patients were recorded. Sialendoscopic findings, complications, and outcomes were noted. The Glasgow Benefit Inventory questionnaire was administered to the patients at their follow-up. Fifty-four patients underwent a total of 66 sialendoscopic procedures, involving 44 parotid and 22 submandibular glands. There was a complete symptom resolution in 54 procedures (82%). Sialolith removal was successful in 67% of cases, with postsialendoscopy symptom resolution in 86% of sialolithiasis cases. Symptoms resolved in 81% of cases with ductal stenosis. The overall mean Glasgow Benefit Inventory score was +31, which compares very favorably with other otolaryngology procedures. This study shows a substantial positive patient-perceived benefit of sialendoscopy for both sialolith- and stenosis-based pathology. The overall rate of symptom resolution is comparable to international literature. 4. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. The preoperative sensitive-modified Glasgow prognostic score is superior to the modified Glasgow prognostic score in predicting long-term survival for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Rui; Zhang, Fei; Sun, Peng; Wu, Jing; Yan, Hong; Wu, Ai-Ran; Zhang, Min; Jiang, Yu-Lu; Lu, Yan-Hong; Xu, Qiu-Yan; Zhan, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Rong-Xin; Qian, Li-Ting; He, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the prognostic significance of the preoperative sensitive-modified Glasgow prognostic score (S-mGPS) and its superiority in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Clinicopathologic characteristics, preoperative albumin and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were retrospectively collected in 442 patients who underwent transthoracic esophagectomy. The S-mGPS was calculated before surgery based on optimal cutoff values of 45.6 g/L for albumin and 10.0 mg/L for CRP. 360, 74 and 8 cases were assigned an mGPS of 0, 1 and 2, respectively. In contrast, the S-mGPS was 0 in 114, 1 in 258 and 2 in 70 patients. Of the 360 patients with an mGPS of 0, 246 migrated to the S-mGPS-1 group. Both mGPS and S-mGPS were significantly correlated with tumor length, depth of invasion, pathological tumor-node-metastasis (pTNM) stage and adjuvant treatment. In addition, they were significantly associated with disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in univariate analysis. Furthermore, multivariate Cox regression analysis identified S-mGPS as an independent prognostic indicator for both DFS [hazard ratio (HR), 1.577; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.149-2.163; P = 0.005] and OS (HR, 1.762; 95% CI, 1.250-2.484; P = 0.001), but not mGPS (HR, 0.957; 95% CI, 0.692-1.323; P = 0.790 for DFS and HR, 1.089; 95% CI, 0.781-1.517; P = 0.615 for OS, respectively). Moreover, subgroup analysis revealed that the prognostic impact of the S-mGPS was especially striking in pTNM stage II patients. The preoperative S-mGPS is superior to the mGPS as a prognostic predictor in patients with resectable ESCC. PMID:27528228

  19. Audit of the Forensic Psychiatry Liaison Service to Glasgow Sheriff Court 1994 to 1998.

    PubMed

    White, T; Ramsay, L; Morrison, R

    2002-01-01

    This study seeks to describe the demographic, offence, and diagnostic details of subjects referred by the Procurator Fiscal at Glasgow Sheriff Court to the Forensic Psychiatry Liaison between 1994 and 1997. The initial outcome of the assessment and an assessment of medical time involved is presented. This study is a retrospective review of audit forms completed between 1993 and 1994 and once more in 1997. The referral criteria, age structure and offence pattern was broadly similar to that reported in court diversion schemes in England. A primary diagnosis of alcohol and/or drug dependence was seen in one third of referrals during both years of the audit. A marked increase (250%) in referrals between 1994 and 1997 resulted in a marked reduction of those admitted to hospital, and an increase in the percentage who had 'no psychiatric diagnosis'. The need for ongoing liaison between the Procurators Fiscal and the Forensic Psychiatrists involved would appear important in modifying referral criteria.

  20. Modelling lead bioaccessibility in urban topsoils based on data from Glasgow, London, Northampton and Swansea, UK.

    PubMed

    Appleton, J D; Cave, M R; Wragg, J

    2012-12-01

    Predictive linear regression (LR) modelling between bioaccessible Pb and a range of total elemental compositions and soil properties was executed for the Glasgow, London, Northampton and Swansea urban areas in order to assess the potential for developing a national urban bioaccessible Pb dataset for the UK. LR indicates that total Pb is the only highly significant independent variable for estimating the bioaccessibility of Pb. Bootstrap resampling shows that the relationship between total Pb and bioaccessible Pb is broadly the same in the four urban areas. The median bioaccessible fraction ranges from 38% in Northampton to 68% in London and Swansea. Results of this study can be used as part of a lines of evidence approach to localised risk assessment but should not be used to replace bioaccessibility testing at individual sites where local conditions may vary considerably from the broad overview presented in this study.

  1. Levi Myers (1767-1822): An eighteenth century Glasgow medical graduate from South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Collins, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    Levi Myers, a native of Georgetown, South Carolina, was the first Jewish medical graduate at the University of Glasgow, obtaining the MD, in 1787. Myers had been registered for studies at the University of Edinburgh for three years, from 1785/1786 to 1787/1788, after some years of training with a physician in Charleston, South Carolina. Recent studies of Jewish life in Edinburgh have revealed the evidence of a settled group of Jewish inhabitants in the city during the last quarter of the eighteenth century, during the time of Myers' sojourn in Edinburgh and thirty years before the formal inauguration of Scotland's first Jewish community. This paper examines the context of Myers' studies in Edinburgh as an American medical student and as a Jew.

  2. Assessment of nurse’s knowledge about Glasgow coma scale at a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Wesley Cajaíba; Vancini-Campanharo, Cássia Regina; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To assess knowledge of nurses of emergency services and intensive care units about Glasgow Coma Scale. Methods This cross-sectional analytical study included 127 nurses of critical units of an university hospital. We used structured interview with 12 questions to evaluate their knowledge about the scale. Association of Knowledge with professionals’ sociodemographic variables were verified by the Fisher-test, χ2 and likelihood ratio. Results Most of participants were women mean aged 31.1 years, they had graduated more than 5 years previously, and had 1 to 3 years of work experience. In the assessment of best score possible for Glasgow scale (question 3) nurses who had graduate more than 5 years ago presented a lower percentage success rate (p=0.0476). However, in the question 7, which evaluated what interval of the scale indicated moderate severity of brain trauma injury, those with more years of experience had higher percentage of correct answers (p=0.0251). In addition, nurses from emergency service had more correct answers than nurses from intensive care unit (p=0.0143) in the same question. Nurses graduated for more than 5 years ago had a lower percentage of correct answers in question 7 (p=0.0161). Nurses with more work experience had a better score (p=0.0119) to identify how assessment of motor response should be started. Conclusion Number of year since graduation, experience, and work at critical care units interfered in nurses’ knowledge about the scale, which indicates the need of training. PMID:27462896

  3. The Drumchapel Project: A Study of ICT Usage by School Pupils and Teachers in a Secondary School in a Deprived Area of Glasgow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLelland, Dorothy; Crawford, John

    2004-01-01

    The Drumchapel Project was a joint exploratory project between Glasgow Caledonian University, a 1992 university, and Drumchapel High School, a secondary school in a deprived area of Glasgow. The initial aim was to explore ICT skill levels among the school pupils but an information literacy agenda emerged in the course of the Project. Focus groups…

  4. The Drumchapel Project: A Study of ICT Usage by School Pupils and Teachers in a Secondary School in a Deprived Area of Glasgow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLelland, Dorothy; Crawford, John

    2004-01-01

    The Drumchapel Project was a joint exploratory project between Glasgow Caledonian University, a 1992 university, and Drumchapel High School, a secondary school in a deprived area of Glasgow. The initial aim was to explore ICT skill levels among the school pupils but an information literacy agenda emerged in the course of the Project. Focus groups…

  5. Hegel in Glasgow: Idealists and the Emergence of Adult Education in the West of Scotland, 1866-1927

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Robert; Turner, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers how Hegel's philosophical idealism influenced the thinking and practical activities of four successive holders of the Chair of Moral Philosophy in the University of Glasgow between 1866 and 1927. It argues that their activities were shaped by Hegelian concepts of citizenship, which engendered a commitment to encouraging the…

  6. Hegel in Glasgow: Idealists and the Emergence of Adult Education in the West of Scotland, 1866-1927

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Robert; Turner, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers how Hegel's philosophical idealism influenced the thinking and practical activities of four successive holders of the Chair of Moral Philosophy in the University of Glasgow between 1866 and 1927. It argues that their activities were shaped by Hegelian concepts of citizenship, which engendered a commitment to encouraging the…

  7. Predicting or Guessing: The Progress of Scottish Wider Access Programme (SWAP) Students at the University of Glasgow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Lynn

    2000-01-01

    Comparison of the first-year performance of 100 adults who entered the University of Glasgow via the Scottish Wider Access Programme (SWAP) with 89 who attended both SWAP and preuniversity summer school found few differences in persistence. However, patterns of prediction emerged, which could form the basis for interventions for those whose…

  8. Case Study: A Distance Education Contribution to a Social Strategy To Combat Poverty: Open University Community Education Courses in Glasgow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnes, N. C.

    This project located in Glasgow, Scotland, is concerned with the use of distance teaching for a non-formal community education program that is a component of a social change strategy to combat poverty. The study shows that the use of distance learning courses in non-formal community education is successful in attracting, at a reasonable cost per…

  9. IOT Overview: IR Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, E.

    In this instrument review chapter the calibration plans of ESO IR instruments are presented and briefly reviewed focusing, in particular, on the case of ISAAC, which has been the first IR instrument at VLT and whose calibration plan served as prototype for the coming instruments.

  10. IR Hot Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  11. Assessment of nurse's knowledge about Glasgow coma scale at a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Santos, Wesley Cajaíba; Vancini-Campanharo, Cássia Regina; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2016-01-01

    To assess knowledge of nurses of emergency services and intensive care units about Glasgow Coma Scale. This cross-sectional analytical study included 127 nurses of critical units of an university hospital. We used structured interview with 12 questions to evaluate their knowledge about the scale. Association of Knowledge with professionals' sociodemographic variables were verified by the Fisher-test, χ2 and likelihood ratio. Most of participants were women mean aged 31.1 years, they had graduated more than 5 years previously, and had 1 to 3 years of work experience. In the assessment of best score possible for Glasgow scale (question 3) nurses who had graduate more than 5 years ago presented a lower percentage success rate (p=0.0476). However, in the question 7, which evaluated what interval of the scale indicated moderate severity of brain trauma injury, those with more years of experience had higher percentage of correct answers (p=0.0251). In addition, nurses from emergency service had more correct answers than nurses from intensive care unit (p=0.0143) in the same question. Nurses graduated for more than 5 years ago had a lower percentage of correct answers in question 7 (p=0.0161). Nurses with more work experience had a better score (p=0.0119) to identify how assessment of motor response should be started. Number of year since graduation, experience, and work at critical care units interfered in nurses' knowledge about the scale, which indicates the need of training. Avaliar o conhecimento de enfermeiros de unidades críticas, serviços de emergência e unidades de terapia intensiva em relação à escala de coma de Glasgow. Estudo transversal e analítico com 127 enfermeiros de unidades críticas de um hospital universitário. Utilizou-se entrevista estruturada com 12 questões que avaliaram conhecimento sobre a escala. Associação do conhecimento com variáveis sociodemográficas dos profissionais foi verificada pelo teste de Fisher, teste χ2 e razão de

  12. The functional intraoral Glasgow scale in floor of mouth carcinoma: longitudinal assessment of 62 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Ellabban, Mohamed A; Shoaib, Taimur; Devine, John; McMahon, Jeremy; Morley, Stephen; Adly, Osama A; Farrag, Sherif H; Moati, Taha A; Soutar, David

    2013-03-01

    The functional integrity of the floor of the mouth (FOM) is essential in maintaining tongue mobility, deglutition, and control and disposal of saliva. The present study focused on reporting oral function using functional intraoral Glasgow scale (FIGS) in patients who had surgical ablation and reconstruction of FOM carcinoma with or without chemo-radiotherapy. The study included patients who had surgical treatment of floor of mouth cancer in two regional head and neck units in Glasgow, UK between January 2006 and August 2007. Patients were assessed using FIGS before surgery, 2 months, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. It is a five-point scale self-questionnaire to allow patients to self-assess speech, chewing and swallowing. The maximum total score is 15 points. The influence of socio-demographic parameters, tumour characteristics and surgical parameters was addressed in the study. A total of 62 consecutive patients were included in the study; 41 (66.1 %) were males and 21 (33.9 %) were females. The patients' mean age at the time of diagnosis was 60.6 years. Fifty (80.6 %) patients had unilateral origin of FOM tumours and 10 (19.4 %) had bilateral origin. Peroral approach was the most common approach used in 35 (56.4 %) patients. The mean preoperative FIGS score was 14. Two months after surgery, it droped to 9.4 then started to increase gradually thereafter and recorded 10.1 at 6 months and 11 at 1 year. Unilateral FOM resection recorded better score than bilateral and lateral FOM tumours than anterior at 1 year postoperatively. Furthermore, direct closure showed better functional outcome than loco-regional and free flaps. The FIGS is a simple and comprehensive way of assessing a patient's functional impairment following surgery in the FOM. Tumour site and size, surgical access, surgical resection and method of reconstruction showed significant influence on oral function following surgical resection. A well-designed rehabilitation programme is required to improve

  13. Cost comparison of orthopaedic fracture pathways using discrete event simulation in a Glasgow hospital.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Gillian H; Jenkins, Paul J; McDonald, David A; Van Der Meer, Robert; Morton, Alec; Nugent, Margaret; Rymaszewski, Lech A

    2017-09-07

    Healthcare faces the continual challenge of improving outcome while aiming to reduce cost. The aim of this study was to determine the micro cost differences of the Glasgow non-operative trauma virtual pathway in comparison to a traditional pathway. Discrete event simulation was used to model and analyse cost and resource utilisation with an activity-based costing approach. Data for a full comparison before the process change was unavailable so we used a modelling approach, comparing a virtual fracture clinic (VFC) with a simulated traditional fracture clinic (TFC). The orthopaedic unit VFC pathway pioneered at Glasgow Royal Infirmary has attracted significant attention and interest and is the focus of this cost study. Our study focused exclusively on patients with non-operative trauma attending emergency department or the minor injuries unit and the subsequent step in the patient pathway. Retrospective studies of patient outcomes as a result of the protocol introductions for specific injuries are presented in association with activity costs from the models. Patients are satisfied with the new pathway, the information provided and the outcome of their injuries (Evidence Level IV). There was a 65% reduction in the number of first outpatient face-to-face (f2f) attendances in orthopaedics. In the VFC pathway, the resources required per day were significantly lower for all staff groups (p≤0.001). The overall cost per patient of the VFC pathway was £22.84 (95% CI 21.74 to 23.92) per patient compared with £36.81 (95% CI 35.65 to 37.97) for the TFC pathway. Our results give a clearer picture of the cost comparison of the virtual pathway over a wholly traditional f2f clinic system. The use of simulation-based stochastic costings in healthcare economic analysis has been limited to date, but this study provides evidence for adoption of this method as a basis for its application in other healthcare settings. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise

  14. Impact of the pretreatment Glasgow prognostic score on treatment tolerance, toxicities, and survival in patients with advanced head and neck cancer undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pei-Hung; Yeh, Kun-Yun; Wang, Cheng-Hsu; Chen, Eric Yen-Chao; Yang, Shih-Wei; Huang, Jen-Seng; Chou, Wen-Chi; Hsieh, Jason Chia-Hsun

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the pretreatment Glasgow prognostic score on treatment-related toxicities, tolerance, and survival in patients with advanced head and neck cancers undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We retrospectively analyzed and compared the clinical characteristics, toxicities, and survival of 143 patients with stages III, IVA, and IVB head and neck cancer treated with concurrent CRT according to their Glasgow prognostic score between 2007 and 2010. The Glasgow prognostic score was correlated with advanced tumor stage and T/N classification. Patients with a higher Glasgow prognostic score were less likely to tolerate concurrent CRT, experienced more weight loss, required tube feeding support more frequently, and had higher percentage of grade ≥3 hematological toxicities, sepsis, and toxic death. Patients with a Glasgow prognostic score of 0 had better overall and recurrence-free survival than those with a Glasgow prognostic score of 1 or 2. Pretreatment Glasgow prognostic score predicts treatment tolerance, toxicity, and survival in patients with advanced head and neck cancer undergoing concurrent CRT. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. IR Linearity Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2012-10-01

    These observations will be used to monitor the signal non-linearity of the IR channel, as well as to update the IR channel non-linearity calibration reference file. The non-linearity behavior of each pixel in the detector will be investigated through the use of full frame and subarray flat fields, while the photometric behavior of point sources will be studied using observations of 47 Tuc. This is a continuation of the Cycle 19 non-linearity monitor, program 12696.

  16. IR linearity monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2013-10-01

    These observations will be used to monitor the signal non-linearity of the IR channel, as well as to update the IR channel non-linearity calibration reference file. The non-linearity behavior of each pixel in the detector will be investigated through the use of full frame and subarray flat fields, while the photometric behavior of point sources will be studied using observations of 47 Tuc. This is a continuation of the Cycle 20 non-linearity monitor, program 13079.

  17. An Exploratory Study Identifying a Possible Response Shift Phenomena of the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Jonathan; Watts, Tessa; Davies, Ruth; Manchaiah, Vinaya; Slater, Julie

    2016-08-23

    A then-test technique was used to investigate the possibility of a response shift in the Glasgow hearing aid benefit profile (GHABP). Following completion of part 1 of the GHABP, 16 adults were invited for hearing-aid follow up appointments. In accordance with then-test technique, participants were asked to think back to before they had their hearing-aids fitted and the GHABP part 1 was completed again to re-establish the disability and handicap scores. These scores were then compared with the initial GHABP part I scores. Paired T testing and Wilcoxon Rank tests were carried out to investigate the statistical significance of the response shift effect. Statistically significant differences were seen between initial and retrospective GHABP (disability) scores using t test. No significant differences could be seen between the initial and retrospective handicap scores. Results suggest participants may have demonstrated a possible response shift phenomenon with the disability construct of the GHABP questionnaire, related to a possible re-calibration effect or a denial of disability effect. This exploratory study suggests that the GHABP questionnaire may be subject to a response shift phenomena. We suggest that further more robust studies are completed to verify this and recommend that this could have psychological impact on participants when explaining the results of the outcome measure and may affect hearing aid use. There is also potential for this phenomenon to affect global GHABP scores specifically when demonstrating to stakeholders the overall success of an audiology service.

  18. A study of issues in administering library services to nursing studies students at Glasgow Caledonian University.

    PubMed

    Crawford, John

    2002-06-01

    Glasgow Caledonian University has had a Scottish Office pre-registration nursing and midwifery contract since 1996. Nursing studies students seemed dissatisfied with the library service and there were frequent complaints. A major study was undertaken during 2000 consisting of: an initial lis-link enquiry, separate analysis of returns from nursing studies students of the Library's annual general satisfaction survey (conducted every February), separate analysis of returns from nursing studies students of the Library's opening hours planning survey, and four focus groups held in October 2000. These studies showed the concerns of nursing studies students to be similar to other students but more strongly felt. The four main issues were textbook availability, journal availability, opening hours and staff helpfulness. Working conditions, placement requirements, study requirements and domestic circumstances were all found to be important factors. IT skill levels tended to be low but there is a growing appreciation of the need for training in this area. Concluded that: Library's services to nursing studies students have become enmeshed with the problems of delivery and assessment of education for nurses. Greatly extended opening hours are essential including evening opening during vacations. The problem of access to textbooks is so severe that conventional solutions are not going to work. Programmes of core text digitization and the promotion of e-books are needed. Reciprocal access programmes with local hospital libraries is essential.

  19. An Exploratory Study Identifying a Possible Response Shift Phenomena of the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Jonathan; Watts, Tessa; Davies, Ruth; Manchaiah, Vinaya; Slater, Julie

    2016-01-01

    A then-test technique was used to investigate the possibility of a response shift in the Glasgow hearing aid benefit profile (GHABP). Following completion of part 1 of the GHABP, 16 adults were invited for hearing-aid follow up appointments. In accordance with then-test technique, participants were asked to think back to before they had their hearing-aids fitted and the GHABP part 1 was completed again to re-establish the disability and handicap scores. These scores were then compared with the initial GHABP part I scores. Paired T testing and Wilcoxon Rank tests were carried out to investigate the statistical significance of the response shift effect. Statistically significant differences were seen between initial and retrospective GHABP (disability) scores using t test. No significant differences could be seen between the initial and retrospective handicap scores. Results suggest participants may have demonstrated a possible response shift phenomenon with the disability construct of the GHABP questionnaire, related to a possible re-calibration effect or a denial of disability effect. This exploratory study suggests that the GHABP questionnaire may be subject to a response shift phenomena. We suggest that further more robust studies are completed to verify this and recommend that this could have psychological impact on participants when explaining the results of the outcome measure and may affect hearing aid use. There is also potential for this phenomenon to affect global GHABP scores specifically when demonstrating to stakeholders the overall success of an audiology service. PMID:27942371

  20. The relation between Glasgow Coma Scale score and later cerebral atrophy in paediatric traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Alokananda; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Hunter, Jill V; Bigler, Erin D; Chu, Zili; Li, Xiaoqi; Vasquez, Ana C; Menefee, Deleene; Yallampalli, Ragini; Levin, Harvey S

    2009-03-01

    To examine initial Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and its relationship with later cerebral atrophy in children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) using Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (QMRI) at 4 months post-injury. It was hypothesized that a lower GCS score would predict later generalized atrophy. As a guide in assessing paediatric TBI patients, the probability of developing chronic cerebral atrophy was determined based on the initial GCS score. The probability model used data from 45 paediatric patients (mean age = 13.6) with mild-to-severe TBI and 41 paediatric (mean age = 12.4) orthopaedically-injured children. This study found a 24% increase in the odds of developing an abnormal ventricle-to-brain ratio (VBR) and a 27% increase in the odds of developing reduced white matter percentage on neuroimaging with each numerical drop in GCS score. Logistic regression models with cut-offs determined by normative QMRI data confirmed that a lower initial GCS score predicts later atrophy. GCS is a commonly used measure of injury severity. It has proven to be a prognostic indicator of cognitive recovery and functional outcome and is also predictive of later parenchymal change.

  1. Referrals to the Glasgow sheriff court liaison scheme since the introduction of referral criteria.

    PubMed

    Orr, Eilidh M; Baker, Melanie; Ramsay, Louise

    2007-10-01

    This study is an audit of a court liaison scheme operating in Glasgow sheriff court. It represents a follow-on of previous work after the introduction of referral criteria to delineate more closely the appropriate population to be seen. Results were compared with the previous audit. The total number of referrals decreased by 66%, however, the proportion with a psychotic illness increased to 33%. A high referral rate of prisoners with addictions continued, although the service was not primarily designed for them. Fewer patients with no psychiatric diagnosis were referred to the scheme. Outcomes were, however, similar with approximately the same admission rate to hospital. The introduction of criteria appears to have reduced the numbers of inappropriate referrals without excluding the population with serious mental disorder. The introduction of referral criteria seems to have been beneficial to the scheme. The scheme has since changed again and so there may be benefit for a further audit to monitor the continuing appropriateness of referrals. The provision of specific interventions targeting prisoners with addictions is also supported by this audit.

  2. Glasgow coma scale score in the prognosis of acute carbamate insecticide intoxication.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong Mi; Chun, Byeong Jo; Lee, Byung Kook

    2012-11-01

    Carbamate is a widely used insecticide, and fatality due to carbamate insecticide intoxication has been reported. However, no studies have addressed the factors associated with outcome of patients poisoned by carbamate insecticide. The present study sought to identify the independent factors that could help predict the development of medical complications as a result of carbamate intoxication. Fifty two patients presenting with acute carbamate insecticide ingestion at Chonnam National University Hospital were enrolled in this retrospective observational case series. The morbidities that needed intensive treatment such as hypotension, respiratory failure, and death were regarded as complications. To identify the associated factors to these complications, objective variables that are easily assessed at presentation, such as age, initial Glasgow coma scale (GSC) and corrected QT (QTc) prolongation, were analyzed by univariate and multivariate stepwise logistic regression analyses. Of the 52 patients, 35 (67.3%) had medical complications within 24 hours after carbamate insecticide intoxication and seven (13.5%) died. Respiratory failure was the most common medical complication. The significant factors determined by univariate analysis were initial GCS, elevated lactate, and QTc prolongation. However, initial GCS (≤13) was the only independent factor determined by multivariate analysis that was associated with serious complications requiring intensive medical treatment. Carbamate insecticide intoxication is not a mild disease, as previously thought, having a mortality rate of 13.8% and a morbidity rate of 67.3%. Initial GCS ≤ 13 can be used as a significant factor to identify carbamate insecticide-intoxicated patients who will experience complications.

  3. Inaccuracy and misjudged factors of Glasgow Coma Scale scores when assessed by inexperienced physicians.

    PubMed

    Namiki, Jun; Yamazaki, Motoyasu; Funabiki, Tomohiro; Hori, Shingo

    2011-06-01

    Appropriate triage of a large number of patients with head injury is crucial in the emergency department (ED) as well as in the field. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is primarily assessed using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) to evaluate consciousness. However, GCS score assignment is far from sufficiently reliable for correct assessment, especially with inexperienced users. The purpose of this study was to reveal what factors are misjudged when assessed by inexperienced medical personnel. We analyzed GCS eye, verbal, and motor response (EVM) scoring profiles conducted by postgraduate year 1 junior residents (n=94) before they began residency in specific departments. GCS assessment was tested using a video simulation that portrayed mock patients with eight different levels of consciousness that are frequently encountered in trauma patients. On average, 26±18% of examinees failed to provide the correct EVM profiles for the eight selected consciousness levels. Primary misjudged GCS factors belonged to two categories: the assessment of "confused conversation (V4)", and the assessment of "withdrawal motor response (M4)". Additional instruction regarding the specific misjudged factors identified in this study may help inexperienced medical personnel improve the reliability of GCS score assignment to casualties with TBI. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A health impact assessment of the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow.

    PubMed

    McCartney, G; Palmer, S; Winterbottom, J; Jones, R; Kendall, R; Booker, D

    2010-08-01

    To influence the planning of the 2014 Commonwealth Games such that the positive impacts are maximized and the negative impacts are mitigated. Participatory health impact assessment (HIA). A participatory HIA was performed using standard World Health Organization methods. A scoping event was held to involve decision makers in the process and to identify the key areas for consideration. A large community engagement exercise and a systematic review were conducted as part of the evidence-gathering phase. The results of the HIA were reported to the key decision makers involved in the Glasgow City Council legacy strategy. The likely net health impact of hosting the Commonwealth Games was uncertain. It was suggested that the main mechanisms through which impacts were likely to be felt were: the economy; civic pride; engagement in decision making; the provision of new infrastructure; and participation in cultural events. A series of recommendations was produced in order to maximize positive health benefits and mitigate negative impacts. HIA is a useful tool for engaging communities and decision makers in the public health agenda. HIAs of major multi-sport events are limited by a lack of quality evidence and the inability to predict impacts reliably. Copyright 2010 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessing Nurses Knowledge of Glasgow Coma Scale in Emergency and Outpatient Department

    PubMed Central

    Basauhra Singh, Harvinderjit Kaur a/p; Thambinayagam, Hari Chandran a/l; Zakaria, Mohd Idzwan bin; Cheng, Siew Ting; Tang, Li Yoong; Azahar, Nurul Hafizan

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of level of consciousness using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is a tool requiring knowledge that is important in detecting early deterioration in a patient's level of consciousness. Critical thinking used with the skill and knowledge in assessing the GCS is the foundation of all nursing practice. This study aims to explore the knowledge and competence in assessing the GCS among staff nurses working in the Emergency and Outpatient Departments. This is a quantitative descriptive cross-sectional study design using the GCS Knowledge Questionnaire. Convenience sampling method was used. Nurses in these Departments were asked to partake in the survey. Data collected was analyzed using the Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. Descriptive and Pearson's chi square was used. Result showed that 55.56% of nurses had poor knowledge followed by 41.48% and 2.96% with satisfactory knowledge and good knowledge, respectively. The result on the association between knowledge and education level showed a significant association between the two variables (X2 = 18.412, df = 3, n = 135, and p < 0.05). There was also a significant correlation between knowledge and age group (X2 = 11.085, df = 2, n = 135, and p < 0.05). Overall, this study supports that good knowledge and skill are important in assessing GCS level. PMID:28044104

  6. Heart rate variability for assessing comatose patients with different Glasgow Coma Scale scores.

    PubMed

    Machado-Ferrer, Yazmina; Estévez, Mario; Machado, Calixto; Hernández-Cruz, Adrián; Carrick, Frederick R; Leisman, Gerry; Melillo, Robert; Defina, Phillip; Chinchilla, Mauricio; Machado, Yanín

    2013-03-01

    To assess the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in coma by heart rate variability (HRV). Sixteen comatose patients and 22 normal subjects with comparable ages and genders were studied. Patients were classified in two subgroups according to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). Time, frequency, and informational HRV domain indices were calculated. A notable reduction of HRV was found in patients. Regarding the time domain indices, the triangular index, and the Delta_RRs, were significantly reduced in the subgroup with GCS=3. Absolute power for the whole frequency spectrum decreased whenever GCS scores were lower. A significant decrement was found for absolute power of the VLF and LF bands in the subgroup of GCS=3, and although it was lower for the HF band in these patients, those changes were not statistically significantly different. The LF/HF ratio and the Shannon´s entropy indices were significantly reduced in the subgroup with GCS=3. Our results are discussed regarding the progressive dysfunction the ANS networks when coma deepens. The HRV procedure is a powerful tool to assess the ANS in comatose patients. HRV is a minimally invasive, low-cost methodology, suitable for assessing the ANS in coma. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Emotional and cognitive consequences of head injury in relation to the glasgow outcome scale.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J T; Pettigrew, L E; Teasdale, G M

    2000-08-01

    There is current debate over the issue of the best way of assessing outcome after head injury. One criticism of scales of disability and handicap such as the Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) is that they fail to capture the subjective perspective of the person with head injury. The aims of the study were to investigate aspects of the validity of structured interviews for the GOS, and address the issue of the relation between the GOS and subjective reports of health outcome. A total of 135 patients with head injury were assessed using the GOS and an extended GOS (GOSE) and other measures of outcome and clinical status at 6 months after injury. There were robust correlations between the GOS and measures of initial injury severity (particularly post-traumatic amnesia) and outcome assessed by disability scales (particularly the disbility rating scale (DRS)); however, associations with cognitive tests were generally modest. There were also strong correlations with self report measures of health outcome: both the GOS and GOSE were related to depression measured by the Beck depression inventory, mental wellbeing assessed by the general health questionnaire, and to all subscales of the short form-36. The GOS scales were also strongly associated with frequency of reported symptoms and problems on the neurobehavioural functioning inventory. The GOS and GOSE show consistent relations with other outcome measures including subjective reports of health outcome; they thus remain useful overall summary assessments of outcome of head injury.

  8. The Glasgow-Maastricht foot model, evaluation of a 26 segment kinematic model of the foot.

    PubMed

    Oosterwaal, Michiel; Carbes, Sylvain; Telfer, Scott; Woodburn, James; Tørholm, Søren; Al-Munajjed, Amir A; van Rhijn, Lodewijk; Meijer, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Accurately measuring of intrinsic foot kinematics using skin mounted markers is difficult, limited in part by the physical dimensions of the foot. Existing kinematic foot models solve this problem by combining multiple bones into idealized rigid segments. This study presents a novel foot model that allows the motion of the 26 bones to be individually estimated via a combination of partial joint constraints and coupling the motion of separate joints using kinematic rhythms. Segmented CT data from one healthy subject was used to create a template Glasgow-Maastricht foot model (GM-model). Following this, the template was scaled to produce subject-specific models for five additional healthy participants using a surface scan of the foot and ankle. Forty-three skin mounted markers, mainly positioned around the foot and ankle, were used to capture the stance phase of the right foot of the six healthy participants during walking. The GM-model was then applied to calculate the intrinsic foot kinematics. Distinct motion patterns where found for all joints. The variability in outcome depended on the location of the joint, with reasonable results for sagittal plane motions and poor results for transverse plane motions. The results of the GM-model were comparable with existing literature, including bone pin studies, with respect to the range of motion, motion pattern and timing of the motion in the studied joints. This novel model is the most complete kinematic model to date. Further evaluation of the model is warranted.

  9. Relationship between nutritional status and the Glasgow Prognostic Score in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Maurício, Sílvia Fernandes; da Silva, Jacqueline Braga; Bering, Tatiana; Correia, Maria Isabel Toulson Davisson

    2013-04-01

    The association between nutritional status and inflammation was assessed in patients with colorectal cancer and to verify their association with complications during anticancer treatment. The agreement between the Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) and different nutritional assessment methods was also evaluated. A cross-sectional, prospective, and descriptive study was performed. The nutritional status was defined by the SGA and the severity of inflammation was defined by the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS). The complications were classified using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3. Anthropometric measurements such as body mass index, triceps skinfold, midarm circumference, midarm muscle area, and adductor pollicis muscle thickness were also performed, as were handgrip strength and phase angle. The chi-square test, Fisher exact test, Spearman correlation coefficient, independent t test, analysis of variance, Gabriel test, and κ index were used for the statistical analysis. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Seventy patients with colorectal cancer (60.4 ± 14.3 y old) were included. The nutritional status according to the SGA was associated with the GPS (P < 0.05), but the SGA and GPS were not related to the presence of complications. When comparing the different nutritional assessment methods with the SGA, there were statistically significant differences. Malnutrition is highly prevalent in patients with colorectal cancer. The nutritional status was associated with the GPS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Modified Glasgow Coma Scale to predict mortality in febrile unconscious children.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, P; Kishore, M

    2001-04-01

    A prospective hospital based study was conducted in the Department of Pediatrics of the Kasturba Hospital, Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sevagram, Wardha to predict the mortality in children admitted with fever and unconsciousness using the Modified Glasgow Coma Scale (MGCS) score. Forty eight children were admitted with fever and unconsciousness; cases of febrile convulsions, epilepsy and cerebral palsy were excluded. MGCS scores were assessed on admission and repeated at 12 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours after admission in each case. Diagnosis in each case was confirmed by history, examinations and investigations. All the cases were regularly followed up till death/discharge. The overall mortality was 29.1% (14/48) out of which 85% (12/14) died within the first 24 hours. Mortality was highest in the toddler age group and in patients with pyogenic meningitis. There was a significant association between death and MGCS scores on admission with a post test probability for discharge being only 10% with a score of less than 5 and 99% with a score of more than 10 respectively. MGCS scores on admission can be used to predict mortality in patients hospitalized with fever and unconsciousness. The scale is simple, easy, can be applied at bed side and does not need any investigations. Its application in developing countries with limited investigative and intensive care facilities can help the treating physician decide regarding referral and counseling the parents regarding the probable clinical outcome.

  11. [Teaching-learning strategies in nursing--analysis using the Glasgow Coma Scale].

    PubMed

    Morita, Ana Beatriz Pinto da Silva; Koizumi, Maria Sumie

    2009-09-01

    Using the Glasgow Coma Scale (ECGI) as a subject, this paper aims to analyze and verify the apprehension of knowledge towards the teaching-learning and self-learning offered to nursing workers, and to check the degree of knowledge acquired during the process and possible results stemming from the nursing student/nursing worker association. This descriptive, quantitative-based study counted on the participation of 62 currently enrolled students in the first semester of the 4th year of nursing. The following teaching-learning strategies were used: expositive classes with the use of slides and videotape, and a basic text. Among participants, 41.9% were nursing workers; 61.3% informed to have taken care of patients with high alteration of the consciousness level, predominantly located in their working group. Statistically, there has been a successful improvement in the percentage of correct actions after the expositive class and videotape. Self-learning results showed no alteration either. Intergroup correlations displayed no disparity in the degree of acquired knowledge.

  12. Disability, handicap and benefit analysis with the bone-anchored hearing aid: the Glasgow hearing aid benefit and difference profiles.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Ann-Louise; Dutt, Sunil N; Tziambazis, Elia; Reid, Andrew P; Proops, David W

    2002-01-01

    The Birmingham bone-anchored hearing aid programme began in 1988 and by autumn 2000 a total of 351 patients had been fitted with such an aid. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of hearing rehabilitation with the bone-anchored hearing aid. This was a prospective interview-based questionnaire study carried out in the autumn 2000. A total of 84 adult patients were interviewed. Each patient had worn their BAHA for more than one year. The questionnaire used during these interviews was the Glasgow hearing aid benefit profile (GHABP) and the Glasgow hearing aid difference profile (GHADP). This was first derived and validated by Gatehouse in 1999. The use of bone-anchored hearing aids was found to reduce the level of disability and handicap and provided the most patient benefit and satisfaction.

  13. University of Glasgow at TREC 2014: Experiments with Terrier in Contextual Suggestion, Temporal Summarisation and Web Tracks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    University of Glasgow at TREC 2014: Experiments with Terrier in Contextual Suggestion, Temporal Summarisation and Web Tracks Richard McCreadie... Web track, building upon our Terrier Information Retrieval Platform. In par- ticular, for the Contextual Suggestion track, we propose a novel bundled...structured nature of news articles to enhance summary coverage. For the TREC Web track, we investigated a novel risk-sensitive learning to rank

  14. Visualizing Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy with Computer Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Charles B.; Fine, Leonard W.

    1996-01-01

    IR Tutor, an interactive, animated infrared (IR) spectroscopy tutorial has been developed for Macintosh and IBM-compatible computers. Using unique color animation, complicated vibrational modes can be introduced to beginning students. Rules governing the appearance of IR absorption bands become obvious because the vibrational modes can be visualized. Each peak in the IR spectrum is highlighted, and the animation of the corresponding normal mode can be shown. Students can study each spectrum stepwise, or click on any individual peak to see its assignment. Important regions of each spectrum can be expanded and spectra can be overlaid for comparison. An introduction to the theory of IR spectroscopy is included, making the program a complete instructional package. Our own success in using this software for teaching and research in both academic and industrial environments will be described. IR Tutor consists of three sections: (1) The 'Introduction' is a review of basic principles of spectroscopy. (2) 'Theory' begins with the classical model of a simple diatomic molecule and is expanded to include larger molecules by introducing normal modes and group frequencies. (3) 'Interpretation' is the heart of the tutorial. Thirteen IR spectra are analyzed in detail, covering the most important functional groups. This section features color animation of each normal mode, full interactivity, overlay of related spectra, and expansion of important regions. This section can also be used as a reference.

  15. Visualizing Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy with Computer Animation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, Charles B.; Fine, Leonard W.

    1996-01-01

    IR Tutor, an interactive, animated infrared (IR) spectroscopy tutorial has been developed for Macintosh and IBM-compatible computers. Using unique color animation, complicated vibrational modes can be introduced to beginning students. Rules governing the appearance of IR absorption bands become obvious because the vibrational modes can be visualized. Each peak in the IR spectrum is highlighted, and the animation of the corresponding normal mode can be shown. Students can study each spectrum stepwise, or click on any individual peak to see its assignment. Important regions of each spectrum can be expanded and spectra can be overlaid for comparison. An introduction to the theory of IR spectroscopy is included, making the program a complete instructional package. Our own success in using this software for teaching and research in both academic and industrial environments will be described. IR Tutor consists of three sections: (1) The 'Introduction' is a review of basic principles of spectroscopy. (2) 'Theory' begins with the classical model of a simple diatomic molecule and is expanded to include larger molecules by introducing normal modes and group frequencies. (3) 'Interpretation' is the heart of the tutorial. Thirteen IR spectra are analyzed in detail, covering the most important functional groups. This section features color animation of each normal mode, full interactivity, overlay of related spectra, and expansion of important regions. This section can also be used as a reference.

  16. Validity of a pediatric version of the Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended.

    PubMed

    Beers, Sue R; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Tian, Ye; Hahner, Thomas; Berger, Rachel P; Bell, Michael J; Adelson, P David

    2012-04-10

    The Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) and its most recent revision, the GOS-Extended (GOS-E), provide the gold standard for measuring traumatic brain injury (TBI) outcome. The GOS-E exhibits validity when used with adults and some adolescents, but validity with younger children is not established. Because the GOS-E lacks the developmental specificity necessary to evaluate children, toddlers, and infants, we modified the original version to create the GOS-E Pediatric Revision (GOS-E Peds), a developmentally appropriate structured interview, to classify younger patients. The criterion, predictive, and discriminant validity of the GOS-E Peds was measured in 159 subjects following TBI (mild: 36%; moderate: 12%; severe: 50%) at 3 and 6 months after injury. Participants were included from two studies completed at the Pediatric Neurotrauma Center at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. We assessed the relationship among GOS-E Peds, the GOS, and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales as well as other standardized measures of functional, behavioral, intellectual, and neuropsychological outcome. Premorbid function was assessed 24-36 h after injury. The GOS-E Peds showed a strong correlation with the GOS at 3 and 6 month time points. Criterion-related validity was also indicated by GOS-E Peds' association with most measures at both time points and at injury severity levels. The 3 month GOS-E Peds was associated with the 6 month GOS-E Peds, everyday function, behavior, and most cognitive abilities. Discriminant validity is suggested by weak correlations between both 3 and 6 month GOS-E Peds and premorbid measures. The GOS-E Peds is sensitive to severity of injury and is associated with changes in TBI sequelae over time. This pediatric revision provides a valid outcome measure in infants, toddlers, children, and adolescents through age 16. Findings support using the GOS-E Peds as the primary outcome variable in pediatric clinical trials.

  17. Effects of Urban Morphology on Intra-Urban Temperature Differences: Two Squares in Glasgow City Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drach, P. R. C.; Emmanuel, R.

    2014-12-01

    The perspective of climate change increases the necessity of tackling the urban over heating effects, by developing strategies to mitigate/adapt to changes. Analysing the influence of urban form on intra-urban temperature dynamics could be a helpful way of reducing its negative consequences. Also, it would help untangle the urban effect from the effect caused by atmospheric conditions. The present paper presents the effect of atmospheric conditions as exemplified by atmospheric stability (modified Pasquill-Gifford-Turner classification system) and urban morphology as measured by the Sky View Factor (SVF) on intra-urban variations in air temperature in a cold climate city, in and around the mature urban area of Glasgow, UK (55° 51' 57.294"N, 4° 15' 0.2628"W). The aim is to highlight their combined importance and to make preliminary investigations on the local warming effect of urban morphology under specific atmospheric stability classes. The present work indicates that the maximum intra-urban temperature differences (i.e. temperature difference between the coolest and the warmest spots in a given urban region) is strongly correlated with atmospheric stability. The spatial patterns in local temperature variations consistently show that water bodies and urban parks have lower temperature variations. Thus, greenery and urban materials could play an important role in influencing the local climate in cold cities. The knowledge of urban morphology's influence on local temperature variations could be an important tool for devising appropriate planning/design strategies to face urban overheating in the coming years as the background climate continues to warm.

  18. Prehospital Glasgow Coma Score Predicts Emergent Intervention following Helicopter Transfer for Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jennifer; Rubino, Sebastian; Lollis, Stuart Scott

    2016-03-01

    Helicopter transport may shorten transport time to neurosurgical intervention; however, there are few data regarding its utility for nontraumatic emergencies. Prehospital and hospital records of all patients transferred via helicopter to Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center for spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage between January 2007 and December 2011 were reviewed. Primary outcome measure was emergent tertiary-level care intervention, defined as ventriculostomy, conventional angiography, endovascular treatment, or craniotomy within 3 hours of arrival. Fifty-one patients met inclusion criteria. Median helicopter transport time, defined as time from telephone referral to arrival, was 97 minutes (range, 61-214 minutes). Fifteen patients underwent intervention within 3 hours of arrival (29%), 19 patients underwent intervention between 3 and 6 hours (37%), 9 patients underwent intervention between 6 to 12 hours (18%), and 11 patients underwent intervention greater than 12 hours after arrival (16%). Univariate analysis of pretransfer clinical and radiographic findings showed significant correlations between Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score less than 15 (odds ratio [OR], 22.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.2-122.5), World Federation of Neurologic Surgeons (WFNS) scale greater than 2 (OR, 46.75; 95% CI, 7.511-290.99), presence of intraparenchymal hemorrhage (OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 1.3-17.5), and intubation (OR, 12.4; 95% CI, 2.9-51.8) with emergent intervention. On logistic multivariate regression analysis, GCS score less than 15 and WFNS scale score greater than 2 independently predicted emergent intervention. A majority of patients with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage who were transferred by interfacility helicopter ambulance did not require emergent intervention. GCS score less than 15 at an outside hospital was independently associated with emergent intervention on multivariate analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Poisoning severity score, Glasgow coma scale, corrected QT interval in acute organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Akdur, Okhan; Durukan, Polat; Ozkan, Seda; Avsarogullari, Levent; Vardar, Alper; Kavalci, Cemil; Ikizceli, Ibrahim

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effectiveness of the poisoning severity score (PSS), Glasgow coma scale (GCS), and corrected QT (QTc) interval in predicting outcomes in acute organophosphates (OP) poisoning. Over a period of 2 years, 62 patients with OP poisoning were admitted to emergency department (ED) of Erciyes University Medical School Hospital. The age, sex, cause of contact, compound involved, time elapsed between exposure and admission to the ED, duration of hospital stay, and cardiac manifestations at the time of presentation were recorded. GCS and poisoning severity score (PSS) was calculated for each patient. Electrocardiogram (ECG) analysis included the rate, rhythm, ST-T abnormalities, conduction defects, and measurement of PR and QT intervals. Sixty-two patients with OP poisoning presented to our ED from January 2007 to December 2008 from which 54 patients were included in the study. The mean age was 34.1 +/- 14.8 years. Of the cases, 53.7% were female. Twenty-six patients had a prolonged QTc interval. Mean PSS of men and women was 1.8 +/- 1.0. No statistically significant correlation was found between the PSS and QTc intervals of the cases. A significant correlation was determined between the GCS and PSS of grade 3 and grade 4 cases. GCS is a parameter that helps clinician to identify advanced grade OP poisoning patients in the initial assessment in the ED. However, ECG findings, such as prolonged QTc interval, are not effective in determination of short-term prognosis and show no relationship with PSS.

  20. Whole-brain apparent diffusion coefficient in traumatic brain injury: correlation with Glasgow Coma Scale score.

    PubMed

    Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanathan; Gullapalli, Rao P; Mirvis, Stuart E; Roys, Steven; Murthy, Prasad

    2004-04-01

    Patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and low Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores may have severe injury associated with cellular disruption that can be studied with whole-brain apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histograms. We retrospectively studied this hypothesis and correlated ADC with GCS. Twenty-one patients (37.81 +/- 41.3 years) with TBI were enrolled: Group A had normal MR imaging findings but low GCS scores (n = 6). Group B had brain stem injury with low GCS scores (n = 6). Group C had cortical lesions with normal GCS scores (n = 5), and group D had cortical lesions with low GCS scores (n = 4). Eleven control subjects were enrolled (32.7 +/- 19.2 years). Whole-brain ADC maps and histograms were generated and normalized for each subject. Mean and peak ADCs were determined. A one-sided t test was performed for each parameter. Average GCS scores and corresponding peak and mean ADCs were correlated. Peak histogram values significantly differed between controls and groups A, B, and D (P <.0019, P <.00129, and P <.0148, respectively). In groups A and D, values were significantly skewed compared with control values. Mean ADC was significantly different between the control ADC and group A (P <.013) but not group C. In each group, peak ADC and GCS score were strongly correlated (R(2) = 0.67). Whole-brain peak ADCs and GCS scores are significantly correlated in patients with TBI. Although conventional MR images were normal, ADC independently indicated TBI and better represents the degree of neurologic dysfunction.

  1. Full Outline of Unresponsiveness score and the Glasgow Coma Scale in prediction of pediatric coma

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Atahar; Sankhyan, Naveen; Jayashree, Murlidharan; Singhi, Sunit; Singhi, Pratibha

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was done to compare the admission Full Outline of Unresponsiveness (FOUR) score and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) as predictors of outcome in children with impaired consciousness. METHODS: In this observational study, children (5–12 years) with impaired consciousness of <7 days were included. Children with traumatic brain injury, on sedatives or neuromuscular blockade; with pre-existing cerebral palsy, mental retardation, degenerative brain disease, vision/hearing impairment; and seizure within last 1 hour were excluded. Primary outcomes: comparison of area under curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes: comparison of AUC of ROC curve for mortality and poor outcome on Pediatric Overall Performance Category Scale at 3 months. RESULTS: Of the 63 children, 20 died during hospital stay. AUC for in-hospital mortality for GCS was 0.83 (CI 0.7 to 0.9) and FOUR score was 0.8 (CI 0.7 to 0.9) [difference between areas –0.0250 (95%CI 0.0192 to 0.0692), Z statistic 1.109, P=0.2674]. AUC for mortality at 3 months for GCS was 0.78 (CI 0.67 to 0.90) and FOUR score was 0.74 (CI 0.62 to 0.87) (P=0.1102) and AUC for poor functional outcome for GCS was 0.82 (CI 0.72 to 0.93) and FOUR score was 0.79 (CI 0.68 to 0.9) (P=0.2377), which were also comparable. Inter-rater reliability for GCS was 0.96 and for FOUR score 0.98. CONCLUSION: FOUR score was as good as GCS in prediction of in-hospital and 3-month mortality and functional outcome at 3 months. FOUR score had a good inter-rater reliability. PMID:28123622

  2. The Glasgow Prognostic Score Predicts Response to Chemotherapy in Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dexing; Duan, Li; Tu, Zhiquan; Yan, Fei; Zhang, Cuicui; Li, Xu; Cao, Yuzhu; Wen, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death in women worldwide. The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), a cumulative prognostic score based on C-reactive protein and albumin, indicates the presence of a systemic inflammatory response. The GPS has been adopted as a powerful prognostic tool for patients with various types of malignant tumors, including breast cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the value of the GPS in predicting the response and toxicity in breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Patients with metastatic breast cancers in a progressive stage for consideration of chemotherapy were eligible. The clinical characteristics and demographics were recorded. The GPS was calculated before the onset of chemotherapy. Data on the response to chemotherapy and progression-free survival (PFS) were also collected. Objective tumor responses were evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Toxicities were graded according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (NCI-CTC) version 3.0 throughout therapy. In total, 106 breast cancer patients were recruited. The GPS was associated with the response rate (p = 0.05), the clinical benefit rate (p = 0.03), and PFS (p = 0.005). The GPS was the only independent predictor of PFS (p = 0.005). The GPS was significantly associated with neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anorexia, nausea and vomiting, fatigue, and mucositis (p = 0.05-0.001). Our data demonstrate that GPS assessment is associated with poor clinical outcomes and severe chemotherapy-related toxicities in patients with metastatic breast cancer who have undergone chemotherapy, without any specific indication regarding the type of chemotherapy applied. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. The prognostic value and pathobiological significance of Glasgow microenvironment score in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi-Hua; Ji, Cheng-Dong; Zhu, Jiang; Xiao, Hua-Liang; Zhao, Hai-Bin; Cui, You-Hong; Bian, Xiu-Wu

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value and pathobiological significance of Glasgow microenvironment score (GMS), a parameter based on tumor stroma percentage and inflammatory cell infiltration, in gastric cancer. A total of 225 cases of gastric cancer were histologically reviewed, and GMS was evaluated for each case. The association between GMS and patients' survival was investigated. Then the relationship between GMS and mismatch repair (MMR) status, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection were determined using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization, and the expression of PD1/PD-L1 was examined. Furthermore, the amount of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the content and maturity of collagen components were detected using IHC, Picrosirius Red staining and second harmonic generation imaging. GMS was significantly associated with clinical outcomes of gastric cancer, and multivariate analysis indicated that GMS was an independent factor (HR 1.725, P = 0.002). Low GMS was a manifestation of better prognosis and inflammatory tumor microenvironment, which was related to MMR deficiency (P = 0.042) and EBV infection (P = 0.032), and within this microenvironment, expression of PD-L1 in carcinoma cells (P = 0.030) or in inflammatory cells (P = 0.029) was significantly higher. In contrast, high GMS linked to a poorer survival and desmoplastic stroma, in which there existed markedly increased CAFs and collagen deposition. GMS can serve as a useful prognostic factor for gastric cancer, and according to GMS, the tumor microenvironment in this cancer type may be partially classified as inflammatory or desmoplastic microenvironment that possesses different pathobiological features.

  4. Quaternary geologic map of the Glasgow 1° x 2° quadrangle, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fullerton, David S.; Colton, Roger B.; Bush, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    The Glasgow quadrangle encompasses approximately 16,084 km2 (6,210 mi2). The northern boundary is the Montana/Saskatchewan (U.S./Canada) boundary. The quadrangle is in the Northern Plains physiographic province and it includes the Boundary Plateau, Peerless Plateau, and Larb Hills. The primary river is the Milk River. The map units are surficial deposits and materials, not landforms. Deposits that comprise some constructional landforms (for example, ground-moraine deposits, end-moraine deposits, and stagnation-moraine deposits, all composed of till) are distinguished for purposes of reconstruction of glacial history. Surficial deposits and materials are assigned to 23 map units on the basis of genesis, age, lithology or composition, texture or particle size, and other physical, chemical, and engineering characteristics. It is not a map of soils that are recognized in pedology or agronomy. Rather, it is a generalized map of soils recognized in engineering geology, or of substrata or parent materials in which pedologic or agronomic soils are formed. Glaciotectonic (ice-thrust) structures and deposits are mapped separately, represented by a symbol. The surficial deposits are glacial, ice-contact, glaciofluvial, alluvial, lacustrine, eolian, colluvial, and mass-movement deposits. Residuum, a surficial material, also is mapped. Till of late Wisconsin age is represented by three map units. Till of Illinoian age is also represented locally but is widespread in the subsurface. This map was prepared to serve as a database for compilation of a Quaternary geologic map of the United States and Canada (scale 1:1,000,000). Letter symbols for the map units are those used for the same units in the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States map series.

  5. Evaluation of Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score for Pancreatic Cancer: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Hara, Kazuo; Hijioka, Susumu; Tajika, Masahiro; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ishihara, Makoto; Yogi, Tatsuji; Tsutsumi, Hideharu; Fujiyoshi, Toshihisa; Sato, Takamitsu; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Niwa, Yasumasa; Yamao, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    The modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS) is known to be useful in determining the prognosis of cancers. However, the utility of mGPS for pancreatic cancer (PC) has been examined based primarily on a surgical series of early-stage cancers. The purpose of this study was to examine the utility of mGPS for PC of all stages using a retrospective cohort design. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using data from a computerized database. A total of 807 patients with pathologically confirmed PC were analyzed (mGPS-0, n = 620; mGPS-1, n = 153; mGPS-2, n = 34). Median overall survival (OS) was significantly worse for the mGPS-1 group than for the mGPS-0 group (5.8 vs 15.8 months, respectively) but was comparable between the mGPS-2 and mGPS-1 groups (4.8 vs 5.8 months, respectively). After adjustment, both mGPS-1 and mGPS-2 were independent predictive factors of OS (mGPS-1: hazard ratio, 1.772; 95% confidence interval, 1.417-2.215; mGPS-2: hazard ratio, 2.033; 95% confidence interval, 1.284-3.219). Subgroup analysis showed that OS was significantly worse in the mGPS-1 and mGPS-2 groups than in the mGPS-0 group for all except the following 2 subgroups: localized disease and curative resection. The present results show that the mGPS is an independent prognostic factor in patients with PC, especially for advanced-stage disease.

  6. Validation of phone interview for follow-up in clinical trials on dyspepsia: evaluation of the Glasgow Dyspepsia Severity Score and a Likert-scale symptoms test.

    PubMed

    Calvet, X; Bustamante, E; Montserrat, A; Roqué, M; Campo, R; Gené, E; Brullet, E

    2000-08-01

    To validate two widely used dyspepsia scores performed by phone interview. Spanish translations of the Glasgow Dyspepsia Severity Score and a Likert-scale symptomatic test were evaluated. Responsiveness to the treatment, validity of the tests, and reproducibility of tests performed by phone interview were assessed. Gastroenterology and endoscopy unit of a county hospital. Group I consisted of 16 ulcer patients undergoing Helicobacter pylori eradication; Group II consisted of 29 healthy volunteers; and Group III consisted of 95 patients undergoing upper endoscopy. Glasgow Severity Dyspepsia Score and Likert test. Both tests showed adequate improvement (responsiveness) after H. pylori eradication. With regard to validity, the Glasgow and Likert test were significantly higher in 95 patients undergoing endoscopy than in 29 healthy controls. Analysis of reproducibility showed that intraobserver variation was low on both the Glasgow and Likert scores. No differences were found between consecutive tests regardless of whether both were performed by phone (24 patients) or one by phone and the other by clinical interview (40 patients). Interobserver variation analysis showed that the Glasgow test remained highly reproducible even when performed by different observers using different methods (clinical interview 8.83, phone 8.44, P = 0.12). By contrast, Likert-scale tests showed significant differences between observers for all symptoms except abdominal pain. (1) The Glasgow score is highly reproducible even when performed by different observers and using different methods. (2) By contrast, Likert tests show greater variability. To be reproducible in different conditions, they need to be performed by the same observer.

  7. IR Gain Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2012-10-01

    The gain of the IR channel of WFC3 will be measured using a series of internal flat fields. Using knowledge gained from ground testing and previous cycles, we propose to collect flat field ramps which will be used to create photon transfer curves and give a measure of the gain.

  8. IR gain monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2013-10-01

    The gain of the IR channel of WFC3 will be measured using a series of internal flat fields. Using knowledge gained from ground testing and previous cycles, we propose to collect flat field ramps which will be used to create photon transfer curves and give a measure of the gain. This continues the strategy of last cycle's gain monitor, in proposal 13080.

  9. Is lead in tap water still a public health problem? An observational study in Glasgow.

    PubMed Central

    Watt, G. C.; Britton, A.; Gilmour, W. H.; Moore, M. R.; Murray, G. D.; Robertson, S. J.; Womersley, J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the relation between tap water lead and maternal blood lead concentrations and assess the exposure of infants to lead in tap water in a water supply area subjected to maximal water treatment to reduce plumbosolvency. DESIGN: Postal questionnaire survey and collection of kettle water from a representative sample of mothers; blood and further water samples were collected in a random sample of households and households with raised water lead concentrations. SETTING: Loch Katrine water supply area, Glasgow. SUBJECTS: 1812 mothers with a live infant born between October 1991 and September 1992. Blood lead concentrations were measured in 342 mothers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean geometric blood lead concentrations and the prevalence of raised tap water lead concentration. RESULTS: 17% of households had water lead concentration of 10 micrograms/l (48.3 nmol/l) or more in 1993 compared with 49% of households in 1981. Tap water lead remained the main correlate or raised maternal blood lead concentrations and accounted for 62% and 76% of cases of maternal blood lead concentrations above 5 and 10 micrograms/dl (0.24 and 0.48 mumol/l) respectively. The geometric mean maternal blood lead concentration was 3.65 micrograms/dl (0.18 mumol/l) in a random sample of mothers and 3.16 micrograms/dl (0.15 mumol/l) in mothers whose tap water lead concentrations were consistently below 2 micrograms/l (9.7 nmol/l). No mother in the study had a blood lead concentration above 25 micrograms/dl (1.21 mumol/l). An estimated 13% of infants were exposed via bottle feeds to tap water lead concentrations exceeding the World Health Organisation's guideline of 10 micrograms/l (48.3 nmol/l). CONCLUSIONS: Tap water lead and maternal blood led concentrations in the Loch Katrine water supply area have fallen substantially since the early 1980s. Maternal blood lead concentrations are well within limits currently considered safe for human health. Tap water lead is still a public health

  10. Jamming effectiveness analysis of IR smoke projectile based on sight optical observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Longtao; Liu, Zhenxing; Wang, Falong

    2013-09-01

    This text makes use of the similar of the principle between IR imaging guided missile detection system and the general sight optics probe. In this text, the synopsis analysis on the jamming effectiveness of the IR smoke projectile resist the IR imaging guided missile is discussed. This research of the jamming technique to IR imaging guided missile have a very realistic meaning.

  11. Pulsed IR inductive lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, A. M.; Churkin, D. S.; Kargapol'tsev, E. S.

    2014-07-01

    Pulsed inductive discharge is a new alternative method of pumping active gas laser media. The work presents results of experimental investigations of near, mid, and far IR inductive gas lasers (H2, HF, and CO2) operating at different transitions of atoms and molecules with different mechanisms of formation of inversion population. The excitation systems of a pulsed inductive cylindrical discharge (pulsed inductively coupled plasma) and pulsed RF inductive discharge in the gases are developed. Various gas mixtures including H2, N2, He, Ne, F2, NF3, and SF6 are used. Characteristics of near IR H2 laser radiation are investigated. Maximal pulse peak power of 7 kW is achieved. The possibility of using a pulsed inductive discharge as a new method of pumping HF laser active medium is demonstrated. The pulsed RF inductive CO2 laser is created and a total efficiency of 17% is achieved.

  12. IR Activities. IR Applications, Volume 12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Stephen; Gerek, Mary Louise

    2007-01-01

    Institutional research is the sum total of all activities directed at describing the full spectrum of functions (educational, administrative, and support) occurring within a college or university. Institutional research activities examine those functions in their broadest definitions, and embrace data collection and analytical strategies in…

  13. ISO FAR-IR Spectroscopy of IR-Bright Galaxies and Ulirgs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    ISO FAR-IR SPECTROSCOPY OF IR-BRIGHT GALAXIES AND ULIRGS J. FISCHER AND M.L. LUHMAN Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC, USA S. SATYAPAL AND...flux ratios than in normal and less luminous IR-bright galaxies by an order of magnitude ( Luhman et al., 1998; 1999). This has been interpreted as an...line ratio is unexpectedly low (Fischer et al., 1997; Luhman et al., 1998). Implicit in this interpretation is the assumption that the [O I]145µm upper

  14. Comparison of the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score and the Glasgow Coma Scale in predicting mortality in critically ill patients*.

    PubMed

    Wijdicks, Eelco F M; Kramer, Andrew A; Rohs, Thomas; Hanna, Susan; Sadaka, Farid; O'Brien, Jacklyn; Bible, Shonna; Dickess, Stacy M; Foss, Michelle

    2015-02-01

    Impaired consciousness has been incorporated in prediction models that are used in the ICU. The Glasgow Coma Scale has value but is incomplete and cannot be assessed in intubated patients accurately. The Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score may be a better predictor of mortality in critically ill patients. Thirteen ICUs at five U.S. hospitals. One thousand six hundred ninety-five consecutive unselected ICU admissions during a six-month period in 2012. Glasgow Coma Scale and Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score were recorded within 1 hour of admission. Baseline characteristics and physiologic components of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation system, as well as mortality were linked to Glasgow Coma Scale/Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score information. None. We recruited 1,695 critically ill patients, of which 1,645 with complete data could be linked to data in the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation system. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of predicting ICU mortality using the Glasgow Coma Scale was 0.715 (95% CI, 0.663-0.768) and using the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score was 0.742 (95% CI, 0.694-0.790), statistically different (p = 0.001). A similar but nonsignificant difference was found for predicting hospital mortality (p = 0.078). The respiratory and brainstem reflex components of the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score showed a much wider range of mortality than the verbal component of Glasgow Coma Scale. In multivariable models, the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score was more useful than the Glasgow Coma Scale for predicting mortality. The Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score might be a better prognostic tool of ICU mortality than the Glasgow Coma Scale in critically ill patients, most likely a result of incorporating brainstem reflexes and respiration into the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score.

  15. Dunes in IR

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-09

    This image captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows an infrared image of Kaiser Crater and the dune field on the crater floor. Brighter tones in the image are warmer surfaces. The basaltic dunes are dark in the visible, but bright in infrared. Orbit Number: 66814 Latitude: -47.0992 Longitude: 19.782 Instrument: IR Captured: 2017-01-05 08:54 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21504

  16. [Is there a place for the Glasgow-Blatchford score in the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding?].

    PubMed

    Jerraya, Hichem; Bousslema, Amine; Frikha, Foued; Dziri, Chadli

    2011-12-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a frequent cause for emergency hospital admission. Most severity scores include in their computation the endoscopic findings. The Glasgow-Blatchford score is a validated score that is easy to calculate based on simple clinical and biological variables that can identify patients with a low or a high risk of needing a therapeutic (interventional endoscopy, surgery and/ or transfusions). To validate retrospectively the Glasgow-Blatchford Score (GBS). The study examined all patients admitted in both the general surgery department as of Anesthesiology of the Regional Hospital of Sidi Bouzid. There were 50 patients, which the mean age was 58 years and divided into 35 men and 15 women. In all these patients, we calculated the GBS. Series were divided into 2 groups, 26 cases received only medical treatment and 24 cases required transfusion and / or surgery. Univariate analysis was performed for comparison of these two groups then the ROC curve was used to identify the 'Cut off point' of GBS. Sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) with confidence interval 95% were calculated. The SGB was significantly different between the two groups (p <0.0001). Using the ROC curve, it was determined that for the threshold of GBS ³ 7, Se = 96% (88-100%), Sp = 69% (51-87%), PPV = 74% (59 -90%) and NPV = 95% (85-100%). This threshold is interesting as to its VPN. Indeed, if GBS <7, we must opt for medical treatment to the risk of being wrong in only 5% of cases. The Glasgow-Blatchford score is based on simple clinical and laboratory variables. It can recognize in the emergency department the cases that require medical treatment and those whose support could need blood transfusions and / or surgical treatment.

  17. The VISTA IR camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Gavin B.; Caldwell, Martin; Ward, Kim; Whalley, Martin S.; Burke, Kevin; Lucas, John M.; Richards, Tony; Ferlet, Marc; Edeson, Ruben L.; Tye, Daniel; Shaughnessy, Bryan M.; Strachan, Mel; Atad-Ettedgui, Eli; Leclerc, Melanie R.; Gallie, Angus; Bezawada, Nagaraja N.; Clark, Paul; Bissonauth, Nirmal; Luke, Peter; Dipper, Nigel A.; Berry, Paul; Sutherland, Will; Emerson, Jim

    2004-09-01

    The VISTA IR Camera has now completed its detailed design phase and is on schedule for delivery to ESO"s Cerro Paranal Observatory in 2006. The camera consists of 16 Raytheon VIRGO 2048x2048 HgCdTe arrays in a sparse focal plane sampling a 1.65 degree field of view. A 1.4m diameter filter wheel provides slots for 7 distinct science filters, each comprising 16 individual filter panes. The camera also provides autoguiding and curvature sensing information for the VISTA telescope, and relies on tight tolerancing to meet the demanding requirements of the f/1 telescope design. The VISTA IR camera is unusual in that it contains no cold pupil-stop, but rather relies on a series of nested cold baffles to constrain the light reaching the focal plane to the science beam. In this paper we present a complete overview of the status of the final IR Camera design, its interaction with the VISTA telescope, and a summary of the predicted performance of the system.

  18. Neighbourhood demolition, relocation and health. A qualitative longitudinal study of housing-led urban regeneration in Glasgow, UK

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Matt; Lawson, Louise; Kearns, Ade; Conway, Ellie; Neary, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a qualitative longitudinal study to explore how adult residents of disadvantaged urban neighbourhoods (Glasgow, UK) experienced neighbourhood demolition and relocation. Data from 23 households was collected in 2011 and 2012. Some participants described moves to new or improved homes in different neighbourhoods as beneficial to their and their families’ wellbeing. Others suggested that longstanding illnesses and problems with the new home and/or neighbourhood led to more negative experiences. Individual-level contextual differences, home and neighbourhood-level factors and variations in intervention implementation influence the experiences of residents involved in relocation programmes. PMID:25814338

  19. Neighbourhood demolition, relocation and health. A qualitative longitudinal study of housing-led urban regeneration in Glasgow, UK.

    PubMed

    Egan, Matt; Lawson, Louise; Kearns, Ade; Conway, Ellie; Neary, Joanne

    2015-05-01

    We conducted a qualitative longitudinal study to explore how adult residents of disadvantaged urban neighbourhoods (Glasgow, UK) experienced neighbourhood demolition and relocation. Data from 23 households was collected in 2011 and 2012. Some participants described moves to new or improved homes in different neighbourhoods as beneficial to their and their families' wellbeing. Others suggested that longstanding illnesses and problems with the new home and/or neighbourhood led to more negative experiences. Individual-level contextual differences, home and neighbourhood-level factors and variations in intervention implementation influence the experiences of residents involved in relocation programmes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Overview of the fast alcohol screening test and some patient characteristics from a regional maxillofacial trauma clinic based in Glasgow, United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Andrew; Brownhill, Andrea

    2012-12-01

    A huge body of evidence exists as to the efficacy of alcohol screening and alcohol brief interventions in a range of settings including maxillofacial trauma clinics. An overview of the Fast Alcohol Screening Test (FAST) and some patient characteristics were gathered from those attending a regional maxillofacial trauma clinic in Glasgow, United Kingdom. A 3-month study was undertaken from March 2011 using the FAST as a means of detecting hazardous or harmful alcohol use. Gender, age, and deprivation were examined from patient records. Descriptive statistics were obtained, and gender, deprivation, and alcohol consumption were analyzed using Spearman's rho to ascertain potential correlations between these variables. Two hundred and eighteen patients (157 men and 61 women) participated in the study. A total of 120 participants were deemed to be FAST positive, with a score of 3 or more. The mean age of all patients was 34 years. Forty-six participants (21.3%) fell into the most deprived category. There was no significant correlation between deprivation and age, and deprivation and alcohol intake, but a significant negative correlation between age and alcohol intake was underscored (r = -.183, n = 218, p = .007, two-tailed). Alcohol screening and alcohol brief interventions appear to be a worthwhile contribution to the service studied. Screening could be utilized more effectively through targeting the young male population. Moreover, additional research needs to be carried out to further ascertain if relationships are present between deprivation and age, deprivation and alcohol intake, and age and alcohol intake.

  1. IR Earth Flats Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Peter

    2009-07-01

    This program is an experimental path finder for Cycle 18 calibration. {The WFC3 UVIS version of this is program 11914 and contains additional detail in its description}. Infrared-wavelength flat fields will be obtained by observing the dark side of the Earth during periods of full moon illumination. The observations will consist of full-frame streaked WFC3 IR imagery: per single "dark-sky" orbit, we anticipate achieving Poisson S/N > 100 per pixel in each of three to five exposures, depending on sample sequence {SPARS25 or SPARS50}.Why not use the Sunlit Earth? It is too bright for WFC3 IR full-frame minimum exposure time of 3 sec. Similarly, for NICMOS the sunlit-Earth is too bright which saturates the detector too quickly and/or induces abnormal behaviors such as super-shading {Gilmore 1998, NIC 098-011}. In the narrowband IR filters the sunlit earth sometimes is faint enough to not saturate immediately, but based upon predictions {Cox et al. 1987 "Standard Astronomical Sources for HST: 6. Spatially Flat Fields."} and observations {Gilmore 1998}, we consider sunlit Earth unlikely to be successful unless it is twilight.Other possibilities? Cox et al.'s Section II.D addresses many other possible sources for flat fields, rejecting them for a variety of reasons. A remaining possibility would be the totally eclipsed moon. Such eclipses provide approximately 2 hours {1 HST orbit} of opportunity per year, so they are too rare to be generically useful. An advantage of the moon over the Earth is that the moon subtends less than 0.25 square degree, whereas the Earth subtends a steradian or more, so scattered light and light prior to the unshuttered exposure presents additional problems for the Earth. Also, we're unsure if HST can point 180 deg from the Sun.

  2. Flame burn admissions and fire fatalities in Scotland with particular reference to the Strathclyde (Glasgow) region, and their prevention.

    PubMed

    Sarhadi, N S; Reid, W H; Murray, G D; Williamson, J

    2001-11-01

    Scotland has the highest rate of fire fatalities in the UK. Nearly 50% of the population and fire deaths in Scotland are in the Strathclyde region. The data from the burns unit at Glasgow Royal Infirmary were studied to find the number of admissions due to flame burns and see how it compared with the fire deaths. During 1981-1993, amongst 2771 admissions to the burns unit, 1181 (43%) were due to flame burns and out of these flame burn victims, 69% were adults, 16% elderly and 15% children. The distribution of cases according to the total body surface area (TBSA) involvement was 866 (73%) with 1-15%, 165 (14%) with 16-30%, and 150 (13%) with > or =31% TBSA burns. The annual number of flame burn admissions declined during 1981-1993. In the Glasgow region 50% of the domestic fires leading to non-fatal burns or to death were started by misuse of smoking materials. Chip pan fires were responsible for 8% of admissions to the burns unit. The annual number of fire fatalities when reviewed for a longer period 1973-1995 also showed a decreasing trend. Further educational and legislative measures to prevent flame burns are discussed.

  3. Who's keeping the code? Compliance with the international code for the marketing of breast-milk substitutes in Greater Glasgow.

    PubMed

    McInnes, Rhona J; Wright, Charlotte; Haq, Shogufta; McGranachan, Margaret

    2007-07-01

    To evaluate compliance with the World Health Organization's International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes in primary care, after the introduction of strict local infant feeding guidelines. An audit form was sent to all community-based health professionals with an infant feeding remit. Walking tours were conducted in a random sample of community care facilities. Greater Glasgow Primary Care Division. (1) Primary-care staff with an infant feeding remit; (2) community health-care facilities. Contact with manufacturers of breast-milk substitutes (BMS) and BMS company personnel, free samples or incentives, and advertising of BMS. Contact with company personnel was minimal, usually unsolicited and was mainly to provide product information. Free samples of BMS or feeding equipment were rare but childcare or parenting literature was more prevalent. Staff voiced concerns about the lack of relevant information for bottle-feeding mothers and the need to support the mother's feeding choice. One-third of facilities were still displaying materials non-compliant with the Code, with the most common materials being weight conversion charts and posters. Contact between personnel from primary care and BMS companies was minimal and generally unsolicited. The presence of materials from BMS companies in health-care premises was more common. Due to the high level of bottle-feeding in Glasgow, primary-care staff stated a need for information about BMS.

  4. Synchrotron IR spectromicroscopy: chemistry of living cells.

    PubMed

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N; Bechtel, Hans A; Hao, Zhao; Martin, Michael C

    2010-11-01

    Advanced analytical capabilities of synchrotron IR spectromicroscopy meet the demands of modern biological research for studying molecular reactions in individual living cells. (To listen to a podcast about this article, please go to the Analytical Chemistry multimedia page at pubs.acs.org/page/ancham/audio/index.html.).

  5. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, data analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.

  6. The IRS-1 signaling system.

    PubMed

    White, M F

    1994-02-01

    IRS-1 is a principal substrate of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. It undergoes multi-site tyrosine phosphorylation and mediates the insulin signal by associating with various signaling molecules containing Src homology 2 domains. Interleukin-4 also stimulates IRS-1 phosphorylation, and it is suspected that a few more growth factors or cytokines will be added to form a select group of receptors that utilize the IRS-1 signaling pathway. More IRS-1-like adapter molecules, such as 4PS (IRS-2), may remain to be found.

  7. The ABCs of the FDA: A Primer on the Role of the United States Food and Drug Administration in Medical Device Approvals and IR Research.

    PubMed

    Adamovich, Ashley; Park, Susie; Siskin, Gary P; Englander, Meridith J; Mandato, Kenneth D; Herr, Allen; Keating, Lawrence J

    2015-09-01

    The role of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in medical device regulation is important to device-driven specialties such as interventional radiology. Whether it is through industry-sponsored trials during the approval process for new devices or investigator-initiated research prospectively evaluating the role of existing devices for new or established procedures, interaction with the FDA is an integral part of performing significant research in interventional radiology. This article reviews the potential areas of interface between the FDA and interventional radiology, as understanding these areas is necessary to continue the innovation that is the hallmark of this specialty.

  8. AIR 1981-82. Forum 1981 Proceedings: Toward 2001: The IR Perspective (Minneapolis, Minnesota, May 17-20). The Association for Institutional Research Directory, 1981-82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Institutional Research.

    Proceedings of the 1981 Association for Institutional Research (AIR) Forum and the 1981-82 AIR Directory are presented in a single volume. General session addresses and authors from the forum are as follows: "Some Possible Revolutions by 2001" (Michael Marien); "Information, the Non-Depletive Resource" (John W. Lacey);…

  9. Coherent IR radar technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschwendtner, A. B.; Harney, R. C.; Hull, R. J.

    Recent progress in the development of coherent IR radar equipment is reviewed, focusing on the Firepond laser radar installation and the more compact systems derived for it. The design and capabilities of Firepond as a long-range satellite-tracking device are outlined. The technological improvements necessary to make laser radar mobile are discussed: a lightweight, stable 5-10-W transmitter laser for both CW and pulsed operation, a 12-element HgCdTe detector array, an eccentric-pupil Ritchey-Chretien telescope, and a combination of near-field phase modification and anamorphic expansion to produce a fan beam of relatively uniform intensity. Sample images obtained with a prototype system are shown, and the applicability of the mobile system to range-resolved coherent DIAL measurement is found to be similar to that of a baseline DIAL system.

  10. Integrated IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Michael; Trujillo, Edward

    1994-06-01

    Integrated infrared (IR) sensors which exploit modular avionics concepts can provide features such as operational flexibility, enhanced stealthiness, and ease of maintenance to meet the demands of tactical, airborne sensor systems. On-board, tactical airborne sensor systems perform target acquisition, tracking, identification, threat warning, missile launch detection, and ground mapping in support of situation awareness, self-defense, navigation, target attack, weapon support, and reconnaissance activities. The use of sensor suites for future tactical aircraft such as US Air Force's multirole fighter require a blend of sensor inputs and outputs that may vary over time. It is expected that special-role units of these tactical aircraft will be formed to conduct tasks and missions such as anti-shipping, reconnaissance, or suppression of enemy air defenses.

  11. The IRS-1 signaling system.

    PubMed

    Myers, M G; Sun, X J; White, M F

    1994-07-01

    Insulin-receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) is a principal substrate of the receptor tyrosine kinase for insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1, and a substrate for a tyrosine kinase activated by interleukin 4. IRS-1 undergoes multisite tyrosine phosphorylation and mediates downstream signals by 'docking' various proteins that contain Src homology 2 domains. IRS-1 appears to be a unique molecule; however, 4PS, a protein found mainly in hemopoietic cells, may represent another member of this family.

  12. Mapping the structural topology of IRS family cascades through computational biology.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Doss, C George Priya; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Sarkar, Bimal Kumar; Haneef, S A Syed

    2013-01-01

    Structural topologies of proteins play significant roles in analyzing their biological functions. Converting the amino acid data in a protein sequence into structural information to outline the function of a protein is a major challenge in post-genome research which can add an extra room in understanding the protein sequence-structure-function relationships. In this study, we performed a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of structural topology of the IRS family members such as IRS-1, IRS-2, IRS-3, IRS-4, IRS-5 and IRS-6. Based on this assessment, we found that IRS-2 encloses the highest number of α helices, β sheets and β turns in the secondary structure topology compared to IRS-1 and IRS-6. IRS family members are rich in serine or leucine residues. Among the IRS family members, the highest percentage of serine and leucine was observed in IRS-1 (15%) and IRS-5 (10%), respectively. Notably, the highest number of disulphide bonds was observed in IRS-1 (10) which is responsible for structural stability of the protein. Hydrogen bond pattern in α helices and β sheet was recorded in IRS-1, IRS-2 and IRS-6. By conservation analysis, the longest protein IRS-3 was found to be highly conserved among the IRS family members. The cluster of sequence logo present in the N terminus of these cascades was noted, and highly conserved residues in N-terminal region help in the formation of the two highly conserved domains such as PH domain and PTB domain. Results generated from this analysis will be more beneficial to researchers in understanding more about insulin signalling mechanism(s) as well as insulin resistance pathway. We discuss here that bioinformatics tools utilized in this study can play a vital role in addressing the complexity of structural topology to understand structure-function relationships in insulin signalling cascades.

  13. WHEN CONSCIENCE ISN'T CLEAR: GREATER GLASGOW HEALTH BOARD v DOOGAN AND ANOTHER [2014] UKSC 68.

    PubMed

    Neal, Mary

    2015-01-01

    The Supreme Court's judgment in Doogan is a judicial review of a decision by Greater Glasgow Health Board regarding the scope of the conscience-based exemption in section 4(1) of the Abortion Act 1967. The case progressed through the Outer and Inner Houses of the Court of Session in Edinburgh before final judgment was delivered in the Supreme Court by Baroness Hale on December 17 2014. The Supreme Court eschewed consideration of the human rights dimension of the case (which had featured in the Outer House decision) and approached its judgment as 'a pure question of statutory construction'. This commentary engages with the judgment on its own terms, assessing it as an exercise in statutory interpretation, and leaves it to others who may wish to do so to comment on the human rights aspects of the case. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press; all rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Evaluation of a pilot peer observation of teaching scheme for chair-side tutors at Glasgow University Dental School.

    PubMed

    Cairns, A M; Bissell, V; Bovill, C

    2013-06-01

    To introduce and examine a pilot peer observation of teaching (POT) scheme within the Department of Paediatric Dentistry at Glasgow Dental School and its associated outreach centres. All tutors teaching paediatric dentistry were invited to be involved in evaluation of the POT scheme. Participants were randomly paired with a peer, who then observed their teaching and provided constructive feedback. For those consenting to be involved in the evaluation of the scheme, semi-structured, one-to-one interviews were carried out by the principal investigator. POT was found by all participants to be a beneficial process, reassuring those of their teaching styles and giving them ideas to adapt their teaching. POT is an effective method for engaging chair-side tutors in the reflection and development of their teaching practice via observations and scholarly discussion.

  15. New Ir Bis-Carbonyl Precursor for Water Oxidation Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Daria L; Beltrán-Suito, Rodrigo; Thomsen, Julianne M; Hashmi, Sara M; Materna, Kelly L; Sheehan, Stafford W; Mercado, Brandon Q; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H

    2016-03-07

    This paper introduces Ir(I)(CO)2(pyalc) (pyalc = (2-pyridyl)-2-propanoate) as an atom-efficient precursor for Ir-based homogeneous oxidation catalysis. This compound was chosen to simplify analysis of the water oxidation catalyst species formed by the previously reported Cp*Ir(III)(pyalc)OH water oxidation precatalyst. Here, we present a comparative study on the chemical and catalytic properties of these two precursors. Previous studies show that oxidative activation of Cp*Ir-based precursors with NaIO4 results in formation of a blue Ir(IV) species. This activation is concomitant with the loss of the placeholder Cp* ligand which oxidatively degrades to form acetic acid, iodate, and other obligatory byproducts. The activation process requires substantial amounts of primary oxidant, and the degradation products complicate analysis of the resulting Ir(IV) species. The species formed from oxidation of the Ir(CO)2(pyalc) precursor, on the other hand, lacks these degradation products (the CO ligands are easily lost upon oxidation) which allows for more detailed examination of the resulting Ir(pyalc) active species both catalytically and spectroscopically, although complete structural analysis is still elusive. Once Ir(CO)2(pyalc) is activated, the system requires acetic acid or acetate to prevent the formation of nanoparticles. Investigation of the activated bis-carbonyl complex also suggests several Ir(pyalc) isomers may exist in solution. By (1)H NMR, activated Ir(CO)2(pyalc) has fewer isomers than activated Cp*Ir complexes, allowing for advanced characterization. Future research in this direction is expected to contribute to a better structural understanding of the active species. A diol crystallization agent was needed for the structure determination of 3.

  16. Seeking to Institutionally Embed Lessons from a Funded Project: Experiences from the Digital Libraries in the Classroom Spoken Word Project at Glasgow Caledonian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donald, David; Wallace, Iain

    2007-01-01

    The Joint Information Systems Committee and the National Science Foundation programme, Digital Libraries in the Classroom (DLiC), addresses implications for the learning of the revolution in scholarly communication. What are the obstacles to undergraduates "'writing' on and for the Internet"? Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) is a…

  17. Libraries for Life: Democracy, Diversity, Delivery. IFLA Council and General Conference: Conference Programme and Proceedings (68th, Glasgow, Scotland, August 18-24, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    This document presents the program and proceedings from the 68th International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) Conference held in Glasgow, Scotland, August 18-24, 2002. Topics of presentations include: library services for parliaments; needs assessment; the effects of September 11th on information provision and privacy;…

  18. Place the Book in Their Hands: Grace Paterson's Contribution to the Health and Welfare Policies of the School Board of Glasgow, 1885-1906

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermid, Jane

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the role of Grace Paterson (1843-1925) in education, health and social welfare in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Glasgow. Integral to her efforts to improve the health of the city's poor was her emphasis on the need to raise the standards of the domestic education of working-class girls and women, both in the…

  19. SPEECH PATHOLOGY, DIAGNOSIS--THEORY AND PRACTICE, REPORT OF THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE COLLEGE OF SPEECH THERAPISTS (GLASGOW, JULY 25-29, 1966).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1967

    TWENTY ARTICLES AND ABSTRACTS ON THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF DIAGNOSIS ARE INCLUDED IN THIS REPORT OF THE NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE COLLEGE OF SPEECH THERAPISTS IN GLASGOW IN 1966. FOUR PAPERS ON STAMMERING CONSIDER TONGUE THRUSTING, THE NEUROSES INVOLVED, PROGNOSIS, AND DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS IN DISORDERS OF FLUENCY. OTHER ARTICLES DISCUSS AREAS…

  20. Reliability and Validity of the Dutch Version of the Glasgow Anxiety Scale for People with an Intellectual Disability (GAS-ID)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermans, H.; Wieland, J.; Jelluma, N.; Van der Pas, F.; Evenhuis, H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands, no self-report screening questionnaire for anxiety in people with intellectual disabilities (ID) was available yet. Therefore, we have translated the Glasgow Anxiety Scale for people with an Intellectual Disability (GAS-ID) into Dutch and studied its reliability and validity in adults with borderline, mild or…

  1. Reliability and Validity of the Dutch Version of the Glasgow Anxiety Scale for People with an Intellectual Disability (GAS-ID)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermans, H.; Wieland, J.; Jelluma, N.; Van der Pas, F.; Evenhuis, H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands, no self-report screening questionnaire for anxiety in people with intellectual disabilities (ID) was available yet. Therefore, we have translated the Glasgow Anxiety Scale for people with an Intellectual Disability (GAS-ID) into Dutch and studied its reliability and validity in adults with borderline, mild or…

  2. Seeking to Institutionally Embed Lessons from a Funded Project: Experiences from the Digital Libraries in the Classroom Spoken Word Project at Glasgow Caledonian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donald, David; Wallace, Iain

    2007-01-01

    The Joint Information Systems Committee and the National Science Foundation programme, Digital Libraries in the Classroom (DLiC), addresses implications for the learning of the revolution in scholarly communication. What are the obstacles to undergraduates "'writing' on and for the Internet"? Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) is a…

  3. Do poorer people have poorer access to local resources and facilities? The distribution of local resources by area deprivation in Glasgow, Scotland☆

    PubMed Central

    Macintyre, Sally; Macdonald, Laura; Ellaway, Anne

    2008-01-01

    It has commonly been suggested that in modern cities individual or household deprivation (for example, low income or education) is amplified by area level deprivation (for example, lack of jobs or good schools), in ways which damage the health of the poorest and increase health inequalities. The aim of this study was to determine the location of a range of resources and exposures by deprivation in a UK city. We examined the location of 42 resources in Glasgow City, Scotland, in 2005–2006, by quintile of small area deprivation. Measures included number per 1000 population, network distance to nearest resource, and percentage of data zones containing at least one of each type of resource. Twelve resources had higher density in, and/or were closer to or more common in, more deprived neighbourhoods: public nurseries, public primary schools, police stations, pharmacies, credit unions, post offices, bus stops, bingo halls, public swimming pools, public sports centres, outdoor play areas, and vacant and derelict land/buildings. Sixteen had higher density in, and/or were closer to, or more common in, more affluent neighbourhoods: public secondary schools, private schools, banks, building societies, museums/art galleries, railway stations, subway stations, tennis courts, bowling greens, private health clubs, private swimming pools, colleges, A & E hospitals, parks, waste disposal sites, and tourist attractions. Private nurseries, Universities, fire stations, general, dental and ophthalmic practices, pawn brokers, ATMs, supermarkets, fast food chains, cafes, public libraries, golf courses, and cinemas showed no clear pattern by deprivation. Thus it appears that in the early 21st century access to resources does not always disadvantage poorer neighbourhoods in the UK. We conclude that we need to ensure that theories and policies are based on up-to-date and context-specific empirical evidence on the distribution of neighbourhood resources, and to engage in further research

  4. Do poorer people have poorer access to local resources and facilities? The distribution of local resources by area deprivation in Glasgow, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Macintyre, Sally; Macdonald, Laura; Ellaway, Anne

    2008-09-01

    It has commonly been suggested that in modern cities individual or household deprivation (for example, low income or education) is amplified by area level deprivation (for example, lack of jobs or good schools), in ways which damage the health of the poorest and increase health inequalities. The aim of this study was to determine the location of a range of resources and exposures by deprivation in a UK city. We examined the location of 42 resources in Glasgow City, Scotland, in 2005-2006, by quintile of small area deprivation. Measures included number per 1000 population, network distance to nearest resource, and percentage of data zones containing at least one of each type of resource. Twelve resources had higher density in, and/or were closer to or more common in, more deprived neighbourhoods: public nurseries, public primary schools, police stations, pharmacies, credit unions, post offices, bus stops, bingo halls, public swimming pools, public sports centres, outdoor play areas, and vacant and derelict land/buildings. Sixteen had higher density in, and/or were closer to, or more common in, more affluent neighbourhoods: public secondary schools, private schools, banks, building societies, museums/art galleries, railway stations, subway stations, tennis courts, bowling greens, private health clubs, private swimming pools, colleges, A & E hospitals, parks, waste disposal sites, and tourist attractions. Private nurseries, Universities, fire stations, general, dental and ophthalmic practices, pawn brokers, ATMs, supermarkets, fast food chains, cafes, public libraries, golf courses, and cinemas showed no clear pattern by deprivation. Thus it appears that in the early 21st century access to resources does not always disadvantage poorer neighbourhoods in the UK. We conclude that we need to ensure that theories and policies are based on up-to-date and context-specific empirical evidence on the distribution of neighbourhood resources, and to engage in further research on

  5. Low-cost infrared glass for IR imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Amy G.; LeBlanc, Richard A.; Hilton, Ray A., Sr.

    2003-09-01

    With the advent of the uncooled detectors, the fraction of infrared (IR) imaging system cost due to lens elements has risen to the point where work was needed in the area of cost. Since these IR imaging systems often have tight packaging requirements which drive the optical elements to have complex surfaces, typical IR optical elements are costly to manufacture. The drive of our current optical material research is to lower the cost of the materials as well as the element fabrication for IR imaging systems. A low cost, moldable amorphous material, Amtir-4, has been developed and characterized. Ray Hilton Sr., Amorphous Materials Inc., Richard A. LeBlanc, Amy Graham and Others at Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control Orlando (LMMFC-O) and James Johnson, General Electric Global Research Center (GE-GRC), along with others have been doing research for the past three years characterizing and designing IR imaging systems with this material. These IR imaging systems have been conventionally fabricated via diamond turning and techniques required to mold infrared optical elements have been developed with this new material, greatly reducing manufacturing costs. This paper will outline efforts thus far in incorporating this new material into prototype IR imaging systems.

  6. VIS-IR transmitting windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayya, S. S.; Chin, G. D.; Villalobos, G.; Sanghera, J. S.; Aggarwal, I. D.

    2005-05-01

    The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has developed two unique materials with excellent properties for various military and commercial applications in the UV-Vis-IR wavelength range. These materials are: an amorphous Barium Gallo-Germanate (BGG) glass and a polycrystalline Magnesium Aluminate Spinel. The BGG glass is made using traditional glass melting techniques, and was developed as a low cost alternative to the currently used window materials. Large prototype windows have been fabricated for a Navy reconnaissance program. BGG windows have been successfully tested for environmental ruggedness (MIL-F-48616) and rain erosion durability up to 300 mph. BGG glass is currently under development and evaluation for High Energy Laser (HEL) applications. A new process has been developed to sinter spinel to clear transparency with very high yields. This process has been used to make various sizes and shapes (flats and domes) and is readily scalable to industrial sizes to produce large windows & domes for various applications. NRL has also developed modified BGG glasses, which are compatible with Spinel and ALON substrates for bonding.

  7. Methane Line Intensities: Near and Far IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Linda R.; Devi, V. Malathy; Wishnow, Edward H.; Sung, Keeyoon; Crawford, Timothy J.; Mantz, Arlan W.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Predoi-Cross, Adriana; Benner, D. Chris

    2014-11-01

    Accurate knowledge of line intensities is crucial input for radiance calculations to interpret atmospheric observations of planets and moons. We have therefore undertaken extensive laboratory studies to measure the methane spectrum line-by-line in order to improve theoretical quantum mechanical modeling for molecular spectroscopy databases (e. g. HITRAN and GEISA) used by planetary astronomers. Preliminary results will be presented for selected ro-vibrational transitions in both the near-IR (1.66 and 2.2 - 2.4 microns) and the far-IR (80 - 120 microns) regions. For this, we have recorded high-resolution spectra (instrumental resolving power: 1,300,000 (NIR) and 10,000 (FIR)) with the Bruker 125HR Fourier transform spectrometer at JPL using isotopically-enriched 12CH4 and 13CH4, as well as normal methane samples. For the NIR wavelengths, three different absorption cells have been employed to achieve sample temperatures ranging from 78 K to 299 K: 1) a White cell set to a path length of 13.09 m for room temperature data, 2) a single-pass 0.2038 m cold cell and 3) a new coolable Herriott cell with a fixed 20.941 m optical path and configured for the first time to a FT-IR spectrometer. For the Far-IR, another coolable absorption chamber set to a 52 m optical path has been used. These new experiments and intensity measurements will be presented and discussed.Part of the research described in this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, the University of California, Berkeley, Connecticut College, and NASA Langley under contracts and grants with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. A. Predoi-Cross and her research group have been supported by the National Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  8. Modelling shallow urban geology using reservoir modelling techniques: voxel-based lithology and physical properties of the greater Glasgow area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingdon, Andrew; Williams, John D. O.; Williamson, J. Paul; Lark, R. Murray; Dobbs, Marcus R.; Kearsey, Timothy; Finlayson, Andrew; Campbell, S. Diarmad G.

    2013-04-01

    Conventional 3D geological models of lithostratigraphy undertaken by BGS have facilitated a significant step forward in understanding of the 3D sedimentological and structural controls in the subsurface of the UK. However, when lithostratigraphic units are mapped or modelled in 3D, intra-unit variability is often not recognized and may be substantial, particularly in sedimentologically heterogeneous successions. Because of this BGS has been testing voxel grid-based approaches in urban areas with high borehole density. A city-scale lithology model of shallow, unconsolidated sediments in Glasgow, Scotland has been developed as a test of the applicability of these techniques to aid geological understanding and possible future applications. This is of particular significance in this location due to the complex fluvial and glacial history of the superficial geology which alternates between inter-fingering sedimentary packages and short-scale variability of subsurface materials. The model has been created by developing a stochastic model of clastic geology on a voxel support, based on upscaling of observed borehole lithology, independent of lithostratigraphy. Multiple realisations of lithology were generated, each honouring the borehole observations. Lithology information has therefore been used to both develop a model of the distribution of lithology throughout the grid, but also to develop an understanding of the associated uncertainty by providing estimates of the probability with which a particular lithology occurs at a given node. This lithological model compares well with 'traditional' deterministic lithostratigraphic 3D models created in the same area, and with field-based geological maps. This lithological voxel model has been used as a matrix through which physical property data can be attributed within the grid by stochastic modelling and simulation of the variability of properties within the lithological units. Several different property datasets have been

  9. Evaluation of the Glasgow Prognostic Score in patients receiving chemoradiotherapy for stage III and IV esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kimura, J; Kunisaki, C; Makino, H; Oshima, T; Ota, M; Oba, M; Takagawa, R; Kosaka, T; Ono, H A; Akiyama, H; Endo, I

    2016-11-01

    High Glasgow Prognostic scores (GPSs) have been associated with poor outcomes in various tumors, but the values of GPS and modified GPS (mGPS) in patients with advanced esophageal cancer receiving chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has not yet been reported. We have evaluated these with respect to predicting responsiveness to CRT and long-term survival. Between January 2002 and December 2011, tumor responses in 142 esophageal cancer patients (131 men and 11 women) with stage III (A, B and C) and IV receiving CRT were assessed. We assessed the value of the GPS as a predictor of a response to definitive CRT and also as a prognostic indicator in patients with esophageal cancer receiving CRT. We found that independent predictors of CRT responsiveness were Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, GPS and cTNM stage. Independent prognostic factors were ECOG performance status and GPS for progression-free survival and ECOG performance status, GPS and cTNM stage IV for disease-specific survival. GPS may be a novel predictor of CRT responsiveness and a prognostic indicator for progression-free and disease-specific survival in patients with advanced esophageal cancer. However, a multicenter study as same regime with large number of patients will be needed to confirm these outcomes. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  10. The relationship between nutritional status and the Glasgow prognostic score in patients with cancer of the esophagus and stomach.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jacqueline Braga; Maurício, Sílvia Fernandes; Bering, Tatiana; Correia, Maria Isabel T D

    2013-01-01

    A relationship between weight loss and inflammation has been described in patients with cancer. In the present study, the relationship between subjective global assessment (SGA) and the severity of inflammation, as defined by Glasgow prognostic score (GPS), as well as the relationship of both of these measures with the presence of complications and survival time, was assessed. In addition, we compared the diagnosis given by SGA with parameters of nutritional assessment, such as body mass index, triceps skinfold, midarm circumference (MAC), midarm muscle circumference (MAMC), phase angle (PA), adductor pollicis muscle thickness (APMT), and handgrip strength (HGS). According to the SGA, the nutritional status was associated with the GPS (P < 0.05), and both the SGA and GPS were associated with the presence of complications. However, the GPS [area under the curve (AUC): 0.77, P < 0.05, confidence interval (CI) = 0.580, 0.956] seems to be more accurate in identifying complications than the SGA (AUC: 0.679, P < 0.05, CI = 0.426, 0.931). Only GPS was associated with survival time. Comparing the different nutritional assessment methods with the SGA suggested that the MAC, MAMC, APMT, PA, and HGS parameters may be helpful in differentiating between nourished and malnourished patients, if new cutoffs are adopted.

  11. [Interobserver reliability of the Glasgow coma scale in critically ill patients with neurological and/or neurosurgical disease].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, M M; Sánchez-Izquierdo, R; Sánchez-Muñoz, E I; Martínez-Yegles, I; Fraile-Gamo, M P; Arias-Rivera, S

    2014-01-01

    The Glasgow coma scale (GCS) is a common tool used for neurological assessment of critically ill patients. Despite its widespread use, the GCS has some limitations, as sometimes different observers may value differently the same response. To evaluate the interobserver agreement, among intensive care nurses with a minimum of 3 years experience, both in the overall estimate of GCS and for each of its components. Prospective observational study including 110 neurological and/or neurosurgical patients conducted in a critical care unit of 18 beds, from October 2010 until December 2012. Registered variables: Demographic characteristics, reason for admission, overall GCS and its components. The neurological evaluation was conducted by a minimum of 3 nurses. One of them applied an algorithm and consensual assessment technique and all, independently, valued response to stimuli. Interobserver agreement was measured using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for a confidence interval (CI) of 95%. The study was approved by the Ethics Committee for Clinical Trails. The intraclass correlation coefficient (confident interval) for scale was: Overall GCS: 0.989 (0.985-0.992); ocular response: 0.981 (0.974-0.986); verbal response: 0.971 (0.960-0.979); motor response: 0.987 (0.982-0.991). In our cohort of patients we observed a high level of consistency in the application of both the GCS as in each of its components. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  12. Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) can be a useful indicator to determine prognosis of patients with colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nozoe, Tadahiro; Matono, Rumi; Ijichi, Hideki; Ohga, Takefumi; Ezaki, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), an inflammation-based score, has been used to predict the biologic behavior of malignant tumors. The aim of the current study was to elucidate a further significance of GPS in colorectal carcinoma. Correlation of GPS and modified GPS (mGPS), which are composed of combined score provided for serum elevation of C-reactive protein and hypoalbuminemia examined before surgical treatment, with clinicopathologic features was investigated in 272 patients with colorectal carcinoma. Survival of GPS 1 patients was significantly worse than that of GPS 0 patients (P= 0.009), and survival of GPS 2 patients was significantly worse than that of GPS 1 patients (P < 0.0001). Similarly, survival of mGPS 1 patients was significantly worse than that of mGPS 0 patients (P = 0.009), and survival of mGPS 2 patients was significantly worse than that of mGPS 1 patients (P = 0.0006). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that GPS (P < 0.0001) as well as tumor stage (P= 0.004) and venous invasion (P = 0.011) were factors independently associated with worse prognosis. Both GPS and mGPS could classify outcome of patients with a clear stratification, and could be applied as prognostic indicators in colorectal carcinoma.

  13. Possibilities for Implementing Fracture Liaison Service in Poland in the Light of a Visit to Glasgow Western Infirmary.

    PubMed

    Amarowicz, Jarosław; Czerwiński, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis remains one of the top challenges for health services all over the world. Osteoporotic changes in bone structure along with the aging of society result in rapid growth of osteoporotic fractures. Statistics show that approximately 25% of women and 20% of men will suffer a subsequent fracture within 5 years of an initial one. In order to deal with the problem, a novel program in secondary fracture prevention was developed in Scotland in the late 1990's. The system was based on a coordinator and focused on identifying, diagnosing and treating patients with osteoporotic fractures. After just a few years, the system, known as Fracture Liaison Services (FLS), proved to be a cost-effective success. For the last several years, FLS has been implemented in countries all over the world. The Glasgow Western Infirmary, where the program started, continues to be one of the top exemplary facilities in the United Kingdom. Each year the Bone Metabolism Unit proves its effectiveness by providing 4000 DXA scans and taking care of 2500 fractures a year. In 2015, the European Foundation of Osteoporosis and Musculoskeletal Diseases successfully implemented a coordinator-based Fracture Liaison Service in Poland.

  14. The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) is a novel prognostic indicator in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer: a multicenter retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiayu; Wang, Hua; Liu, Cheng-Cheng; Lu, Yue; Tang, Hailin

    2016-11-01

    The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), an inflammation-based prognostic score systems composed of C-reactive protein and albumin, has been reported to be predictive of survival in several types of malignancies. The prognostic significance of GPS in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) remains unclear. We conducted this study to assess the prognostic value of GPS in a cohort of patients with advanced EOC receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) followed by debulking surgery. Six hundred and seventy-two patients newly diagnosed with advanced EOC were retrospectively analyzed. High GPS was significantly related to Eastern Cooperative Group performance status, histological type, histological grade and the size of residual tumor after the debulking surgery. In addition, patients with higher GPS at diagnosis achieved lower complete remission rates after NAC (P < 0.05) and had shorter progression-free survival (PFS; P < 0.001) and overall survival (OS; P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed high GPS was independent adverse predictors of PFS and OS. Our data demonstrated that GPS at diagnosis is a powerful independent prognostic factor for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. However, further studies are needed to prospectively validate this prognostic model and investigate the mechanisms underlying the correlation between high GPS and poor prognosis in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

  15. Attitudes towards health inequalities amongst GP trainers in Glasgow, and their ideas for changes in training.

    PubMed

    Blane, David N; Hesselgreaves, Hannah; McLean, Gary; Lough, Murray; Watt, Graham C M

    2013-02-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN IN THIS AREA: Recent government policy has emphasised the important role that GPs have to play in addressing health inequalities. The RCGP curriculum asserts the importance of gaining a better understanding of health inequalities during GP training. GP training in Scotland continues to take place in disproportionately affluent areas. WHAT THIS WORK ADDS: This is the first study to look at attitudes of GP trainers towards health inequalities and to explore their ideas for changes in training that may address health inequalities. There were noticeable differences in the views of GP trainers--both in terms of the causes of health inequalities and the role of primary care in tackling inequalities--depending on whether they were based in more affluent or more deprived practices. Practice rotations were suggested by all groups as a means to give GP trainees exposure to the particular challenges of both affluent and deprived practice populations. SUGGESTIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH: Pilot studies of practice rotations between deprived and affluent areas would be of value. Evaluation of nMRCGP assessments (particularly the Clinical Skills Assessment, CSA) with regard to representativeness of general practice in deprived areas should be considered. Further qualitative research into the attitudes of GP trainees towards health inequalities, and GP trainers from different--less deprived--practice areas, would also be of interest. [corrected].

  16. Complementarity of NGST, ALMA, and far IR Space Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) will both start operations long before a new far IR observatory in space can be launched. What will be unknown even after they are operational, and what will a far IR space observatory be able to add? I will compare the telescope design concepts and capabilities and the advertised scientific programs for the projects and attempt to forecast the research topics that will be at the forefront in 2010.

  17. Bond strength and electronic structures of coherent Ir /Ir3Zr interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, H. R.; Liu, Yong; Tang, Hui Ping; Xiang, Chang Shu

    2008-05-01

    First principles calculation reveals that the coherent Ir /Ir3Zr interfaces possess high values of bond strength and that interface orientation and atomic configuration have important effects on interface bonding and interface energy. Calculation also shows that the interface dipole is formed in the Ir /Ir3Zr interface due to an unequal loss of the electrons from Ir and Ir3Zr atoms, and density of states suggests that a stronger covalent bonding is formed in the interface than corresponding Ir or Ir3Zr bulks, which results in the strengthening effect of the Ir3Zr precipitation in the Ir-base superalloys from experimental observations in the literature.

  18. Illumination analysis of LAPAN's IR micro bolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustanul, A.; Irwan, P.; Andi M., T.

    2016-10-01

    We have since 2 years ago been doing a research in term of an IR Micrometer Bolometer which aims to fulfill our office, LAPAN, desire to put it as one of payloads into LAPAN's next micro satellite project, either at LAPAN A4 or at LAPAN A5. Due to the lack of experience on the subject, everything had been initiated by spectral radiance analysis adjusted by catastrophes sources in Indonesia, mainly wild fire (forest fire) and active volcano. Based on the result of the appropriate spectral radiance wavelength, 3.8 - 4 μm, and field of view (FOV), we, then, went through the further analysis, optical analysis. Focusing in illumination matter, the process was done by using Zemax software. Optical pass Interference and Stray light were two things that become our concern throughout the work. They could also be an evaluation of the performance optimization of illumination analysis of our optical design. The results, graphs, show that our design performance is close diffraction limited and the image blur of the geometrical produced by Lapan's IR Micro Bolometer lenses is in the pixel area range. Therefore, our optical design performance is relatively good and will produce image with high quality. In this paper, the Illumination analysis and process of LAPAN's Infra Red (IR) Micro Bolometer is presented.

  19. Infant feeding attitudes and knowledge among socioeconomically disadvantaged women in Glasgow.

    PubMed

    Dungy, Claibourne I; McInnes, Rhona J; Tappin, David M; Wallis, Anne Baber; Oprescu, Florin

    2008-05-01

    This study: (1) investigated infant feeding attitudes and knowledge among socioeconomically disadvantaged mothers in an urban community with historically low breastfeeding rates, (2) examined the influence of women's social networks on infant feeding attitudes and decisions, and (3) validated a measure of infant feeding attitudes and knowledge in this population (Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale, IIFAS). Women attending a prenatal clinic (n=49) reported on: (1) demographics, (2) infant feeding attitudes and knowledge (IIFAS), (3) feeding intent, (4) opinions about breastfeeding in public, and (5) social networks. Feeding method at discharge was abstracted from hospital charts. Social network members (n=47) identified by the prenatal sample completed interviews covering: (1) demographics, (2) infant feeding attitudes and knowledge (IIFAS), (3) prior infant feeding methods and recommendations, and (4) opinions about breastfeeding in public. Mean IIFAS scores were low in both groups, indicating neutral to negative breastfeeding attitudes; mothers' scores were lower than social network members. Higher maternal IIFAS score was significantly associated with intended and actual breastfeeding. A social network positive towards breastfeeding was significantly associated with mothers' positive attitude towards breastfeeding. Both mothers and social network members support breastfeeding in public. IIFAS internal consistency was robust for both mothers and social network members. Predictive validity was demonstrated by significant positive association between score and intended and actual feeding methods. Knowledge and attitude predict breastfeeding initiation in this population. Social network members may influence mothers' feeding choices. This research is important because attitudes and knowledge derived from the IIFAS can be used to develop and evaluate breastfeeding promotion programs.

  20. Resonant tunneling IR detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodall, Jerry M.; Smith, T. P., III

    1990-01-01

    Researchers propose a novel semiconductor heterojunction photodetector which would have a very low dark current and would be voltage tunable. A schematic diagram of the device and its band structure are shown. The two crucial components of the device are a cathode (InGaAs) whose condition band edge is below the conduction band edge of the quantum wells and a resonant tunneling filter (GaAs-AlGaAs). In a standard resonant tunneling device the electrodes are made of the same material as the quantum wells, and this device becomes highly conducting when the quantum levels in the wells are aligned with the Fermi level in the negatively biased electrode. In contrast, the researchers device is essentially non-conducting under the same bias conditions. This is because the Fermi Level of the cathode (InGaAs) is still well below the quantum levels so that no resonant transport occurs and the barriers (AlGaAs) effectively block current flow through the device. However, if light with the same photon energy as the conduction-band discontinuity between the cathode and the quantum wells, E sub c3-E sub c1, is shone on the sample, free carriers will be excited to an energy corresponding to the lowest quantum level in the well closest to the cathode (hv plue E sub c1 = E sub o). These electrons will resonantly tunnel through the quantum wells and be collected as a photocurrent in the anode (GaAs). To improve the quantum efficiency, the cathode (InGaAs) should be very heavily doped and capped with a highly reflective metal ohmic contact. The thickness of the device should be tailored to optimize thin film interference effects and afford the maximum absorption of light. Because the device relies on resonant tunneling, its response should be very fast, and the small voltages needed to change the responsivity should allow for very high frequency modulation of the photocurrent. In addition, the device is tuned to a specific photon energy so that it can be designed to detect a fairly

  1. Advances in handheld FT-IR instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnó, Josep; Cardillo, Len; Judge, Kevin; Frayer, Maxim; Frunzi, Michael; Hetherington, Paul; Levy, Dustin; Oberndorfer, Kyle; Perec, Walter; Sauer, Terry; Stein, John; Zuidema, Eric

    2012-06-01

    FT-IR spectroscopy is the technology of choice to identify solid and liquid phase unknown samples. The challenges of ConOps (Concepts of Operation) in emergency response and military field applications require a significant redesign of the stationary FT-IR bench-top instruments typically used in laboratories. Specifically, field portable units require high levels of resistance against mechanical shock and chemical attack, ease of use in restrictive gear, quick and easy interpretation of results, and reduced size. In the last 20 years, FT-IR instruments have been re-engineered to fit in small suitcases for field portable use and recently further miniaturized for handheld operation. This article introduces the advances resulting from a project designed to overcome the challenges associated with miniaturizing FT-IR instruments. The project team developed a disturbance-corrected permanently aligned cube corner interferometer for improved robustness and optimized opto-mechanical design to maximize optical throughput and signal-to-noise ratios. Thermal management and heat flow were thoroughly modeled and studied to isolate sensitive components from heat sources and provide the widest temperature operation range. Similarly, extensive research on mechanical designs and compensation techniques to protect against shock and vibration will be discussed. A user interface was carefully created for military and emergency response applications to provide actionable information in a visual, intuitive format. Similar to the HazMatID family of products, state-of-the-art algorithms were used to quickly identify the chemical composition of complex samples based on the spectral information. This article includes an overview of the design considerations, tests results, and performance validation of the mechanical ruggedness, spectral, and thermal performance.

  2. What is the relationship between the Glasgow coma scale and airway protective reflexes in the Chinese population?

    PubMed

    Rotheray, K R; Cheung, P S Y; Cheung, C S K; Wai, A K C; Chan, D Y S; Rainer, T H; Graham, C A

    2012-01-01

    To describe the relationship of gag and cough reflexes to Glasgow coma score (GCS) in Chinese adults requiring critical care. Prospective observational study of adult patients requiring treatment in the trauma or resuscitation rooms of the Emergency Department, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong. A long cotton bud to stimulate the posterior pharyngeal wall (gag reflex) and a soft tracheal suction catheter were introduced through the mouth to stimulate the laryngopharynx and elicit the cough reflex. Reflexes were classified as normal, attenuated or absent. A total of 208 patients were recruited. Reduced gag and cough reflexes were found to be significantly related to reduced GCS (p=0.014 and 0.002, respectively). Of 33 patients with a GCS≤8, 12 (36.4%) had normal gag reflexes and 8 (24.2%) had normal cough reflexes. 23/62 (37.1%) patients with a GCS of 9-14 had absent gag reflexes, and 27 (43.5%) had absent cough reflexes. In patients with a normal GCS, 22.1% (25/113) had absent gag reflexes and 25.7% (29) had absent cough reflexes. Our study has shown that in a Chinese population with a wide range of critical illness (but little trauma or intoxication), reduced GCS is significantly related to gag and cough reflexes. However, a considerable proportion of patients with a GCS≤8 have intact airway reflexes and may be capable of maintaining their own airway, whilst many patients with a GCS>8 have impaired airway reflexes and may be at risk of aspiration. This has important implications for airway management decisions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Association between pretreatment Glasgow prognostic score and gastric cancer survival and clinicopathological features: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Shu-Yi; Chen, Shuang-Qian; Yang, Shuai-Long; Wan, Lu; Xiong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background Glasgow prognostic score (GPS) is widely known as a systemic inflammatory-based marker. The relationship between pretreatment GPS and gastric cancer (GC) survival and clinicopathological features remains controversial. The aim of the study was to conduct a meta-analysis of published studies to evaluate the association between pretreatment GPS and survival and clinicopathological features in GC patients. Methods We searched PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE, and BioMed databases for relevant studies. Combined analyses were used to assess the association between pretreatment GPS and overall survival, disease-free survival, and clinicopathological parameters by Stata Version 12.0. Results A total of 14 studies were included in this meta-analysis, including 5,579 GC patients. The results indicated that pretreatment high GPS (HGPS) predicted poor overall survival (hazard ratio =1.51, 95% CI: 1.37–1.66, P<0.01) and disease-free survival (hazard ratio =1.45, 95% CI: 1.26–1.68, P<0.01) in GC patients. Pretreatment HGPS was also significantly associated with advanced tumor–node–metastasis stage (odds ratio [OR] =3.09, 95% CI: 2.11–4.53, P<0.01), lymph node metastasis (OR =4.60, 95% CI: 3.23–6.56, P<0.01), lymphatic invasion (OR =3.04, 95% CI: 2.00–4.62, P<0.01), and venous invasion (OR =3.56, 95% CI: 1.81–6.99, P<0.01). Conclusion Our meta-analysis indicated that pretreatment HGPS could be a predicative factor of poor survival outcome and clinicopathological features for GC patients. PMID:27390529

  4. Vitamin D status and 3-month Glasgow Outcome Scale scores in patients in neurocritical care: prospective analysis of 497 patients.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jian; Karsy, Michael; Brock, Andrea A; Eli, Ilyas M; Manton, Gabrielle M; Ledyard, Holly K; Hawryluk, Gregory W J; Park, Min S

    2017-08-11

    OBJECTIVE Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with a variety of negative outcomes in critically ill patients, but little focused study on the effects of hypovitaminosis D has been performed in the neurocritical care population. In this study, the authors examined the effect of vitamin D deficiency on 3-month outcomes after discharge from a neurocritical care unit (NCCU). METHODS The authors prospectively analyzed 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels in patients admitted to the NCCU of a quaternary care center over a 6-month period. Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores were used to evaluate their 3-month outcome, and univariate and multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the effects of vitamin D deficiency. RESULTS Four hundred ninety-seven patients met the inclusion criteria. In the binomial logistic regression model, patients without vitamin D deficiency (> 20 ng/dl) were significantly more likely to have a 3-month GOS score of 4 or 5 than those who were vitamin D deficient (OR 1.768 [95% CI 1.095-2.852]). Patients with a higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS II) (OR 0.925 [95% CI 0.910-0.940]) and those admitted for stroke (OR 0.409 [95% CI 0.209-0.803]) or those with an "other" diagnosis (OR 0.409 [95% CI 0.217-0.772]) were significantly more likely to have a 3-month GOS score of 3 or less. CONCLUSIONS Vitamin D deficiency is associated with worse 3-month postdischarge GOS scores in patients admitted to an NCCU. Additional study is needed to determine the role of vitamin D supplementation in the NCCU population.

  5. The predictive and prognostic value of the Glasgow Prognostic Score in metastatic colorectal carcinoma patients receiving bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Marianne; Dréanic, Johann; Dhooge, Marion; Mir, Olivier; Brezault, Catherine; Goldwasser, François; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2014-11-01

    The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), based on C-reactive protein and albumin levels, has shown its prognostic value in metastatic colorectal carcinoma (mCRC) patients receiving conventional cytotoxic therapy. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody to vascular epidermal growth factor, improves the overall survival in mCRC. The aim of the present study was to assess the prognostic value of GPS in mCRC patients receiving antivascular epidermal growth factor therapy. From August 2005 to August 2012, consecutive patients with mCRC who received chemotherapy plus bevacizumab were eligible for the present analysis. The clinical stage, C-reactive protein, albumin and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status were recorded at the time of initiation of bevacizumab. Patients received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy plus bevacizumab in accordance with the digestive oncology multidisciplinary staff proposal and in line with the French recommendations for the treatment of mCRC. Eighty patients were eligible (colon n = 59, rectum n = 21), with a median follow-up of 14 months (range 1-58 months). Chemotherapy given with bevacizumab and 5-fluorouracil was oxaliplatin (n = 41, 51%) or irinotecan (n = 27, 34%). At baseline, 56, 31 and 13% of patients had a GPS of 0 (n = 45), 1 (n = 25) and 2 (n = 10), respectively. The median progression-free survival in these groups was 10.1, 6.5 and 5.6 months (P = 0.16), respectively. The median overall survival was 20.1, 11.4 and 6.5 months, respectively (P = 0.004). Our study confirmed the prognostic value of GPS in mCRC patients receiving chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. Given the poor survival observed in patients with an GPS of 2, studies dedicated to these patients could identify optimal treatment modalities.

  6. Prognostic value of the Glasgow Prognostic Score in metastatic colorectal cancer in the era of anti-EGFR therapies.

    PubMed

    Dréanic, Johann; Maillet, Marianne; Dhooge, Marion; Mir, Olivier; Brezault, Catherine; Goldwasser, François; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2013-01-01

    The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), combination of C-reactive protein and albumin, has proven its prognostic value in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients receiving conventional cytotoxic therapy. More recently, anti-EGFR therapies have been validated in mCRC and roll forward the patients' overall survival (OS). We aimed to evaluate the prognostic accuracy of the GPS in patients receiving anti-EGFR therapy in addition to conventional chemotherapy. From January 2007 to February 2012, consecutive mCRC patients who received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy plus cetuximab were included in the present analysis. Patients were eligible for the study if they met the following criteria: advanced pathologically proven MCRC, age >18 years, adequate renal function (creatinine clearance >40 ml/min), C-reactive protein and albumin and performance status evaluation before treatment initiation. A total of 49 patients received cetuximab plus 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy (colon, n = 34; rectum, n = 15) and were treated with a median follow-up of 35 months (16.5-74.7). Median age was 48 years old. In addition to cetuximab, patients received oxaliplatin- (n = 34, 60%) or irinotecan (n = 15, 30%)-based chemotherapy. At time of diagnosis, 55, 29 and 16% of patients had a GPS of 0 (n = 27), 1 (n = 14) and 2 (n = 8), respectively. Fifty-five, 29 and 14 % of patients add one, two or ≥3 metastatic sites, respectively. Considering two groups (GPS = 0 and GPS ≥1), median progression-free survivals were significantly different (p = 0.0084). Median OS in the GPS 0, 1 and 2 groups were 38.2, 14 and 12.1 months, respectively (p = 0.0093). The results of the present study confirm that the GPS is still a simple and effective prognostic factor in the era of cetuximab therapy in mCRC patients.

  7. Theoretical studies of Ir5Th and Ir5Ce nanoscale precipitates in Ir

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, James R; Averill, Frank; Cooper, Valentino R

    2014-01-01

    Experimentally, it is known that very small amounts of thorium and/or cerium added to iridium metal form a precipitate, Ir5Th / Ir5Ce, which improves the high temperature mechanical properties of the resulting alloys. We demonstrate that there are low-energy configurations for nano-scale precipitates of these phases in Ir, and that these coherent arrangements may assist in producing improved mechanical properties. One precipitate/matrix orientation gives a particularly low interfacial energy, and a low lattice misfit. Nanolayer precipitates with this orientation are found to be likely to form, with little driving force to coarsen. The predicted morphology of the precipitates and their orientation with the matrix phase provide a potential experiment that could be used to test these predictions.

  8. Dust content in compact HII regions (NGC 7538-IRS1, IRS2, and IRS3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akabane, K.; Kuno, N.

    2005-02-01

    The luminosity of the central star of the compact HII regions of NGC 7538 was estimated from the solid angle of the IR sources subtended relative to the central star, and was found to be 5˜ 10 times as intense as that of IR sources. Under the single central star approximation, the luminosity gives a stellar UV photon rate NU(*) (s-1) of ˜3.0 × 1048, ˜1.5 × 1049, ˜5.1 × 1049, and ˜1.7 × 1047 for the compact HII regions of NGC 7538-IRS1(A/2), B, IRS2, and IRS3, respectively. NU (*) and the observed electron density, ne, provide the dust opacity of the ionizing photon, τSd, for the optical path out to the Strömgren sphere radius rS, assuming a gas with standard dust content. Ionizing photon opacity over the same optical path but with the actual dust content τSda is also derived from ri / rS, where ri is the radius of the ionized sphere, which is estimated from NU(*) and the observed volume emission measure ne2 (4 π ri3/3) (Spitzer \\cite{Spitzer1978}). An observational trend of γ NU(*) / 4π ri2 1/2 ˜ constant, where γ = τSda / τSd}, was obtained for the 4 compact HII regions of the NGC 7538(N). Fourteen selected compact HII regions from data catalogued by VLA observations were examined for this trend, and a similar result was obtained. A limit of γ as 15 ≥ γ ≥ 0.1 was given for the 14 selected sources. The size of the dust-depleted cavity of the NGC 7538(N) suggested by Chini et al. (\\cite{Chini1986}) coincides with that of the ionized sphere of the IRS2 of the region.

  9. Compact IR synchrotron beamline design.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Thierry

    2017-03-01

    Third-generation storage rings are massively evolving due to the very compact nature of the multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice which allows amazing decreases of the horizontal electron beam emittance, but leaves very little place for infrared (IR) extraction mirrors to be placed, thus prohibiting traditional IR beamlines. In order to circumvent this apparent restriction, an optimized optical layout directly integrated inside a SOLEIL synchrotron dipole chamber that delivers intense and almost aberration-free beams in the near- to mid-IR domain (1-30 µm) is proposed and analyzed, and which can be integrated into space-restricted MBA rings. Since the optics and chamber are interdependent, the feasibility of this approach depends on a large part on the technical ability to assemble mechanically the optics inside the dipole chamber and control their resulting stability and thermo-mechanical deformation. Acquiring this expertise should allow dipole chambers to provide almost aberration-free IR synchrotron sources on current and `ultimate' MBA storage rings.

  10. IR Variability of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2008-02-01

    Every 5.5 years, η Carinae experiences a dramatic ``spectroscopic event'' when high-excitation lines in its UV, optical, and IR spectrum disappear, and its hard X-ray and radio continuum flux crash. This periodicity has been attributed to an eccentric binary system with a shell ejection occurring at periastron, and the next periastron event will occur at the very end of 2008. In addition, η Car shows long term changes as it is still recovering from its giant 19th century outburst. Both types of variability are directly linked to the current mass-loss rate and dust formation in its wind. Mid-IR images and spectra with T-ReCS provide a direct measure of changes in the current bolometric luminosity and a direct measure of the massw in dust formation episodes that may occur at periastron in the colliding wind shock. Near-IR emission lines trace related changes in the post-event wind and ionization changes in the circumstellar environment needed to test specific models for the cause of η Car's variability as it recovers from its recent ``event''. High resolution near-IR spectra with Phoenix will continue the important work of HST/STIS, investigating changes in the direct and reflected spectrum of the stellar wind, and ionization changes in the nebula.

  11. IR Variability of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2007-02-01

    Every 5.5 years, η Carinae experiences a dramatic ``spectroscopic event'' when high-excitation lines in its UV, optical, and IR spectrum disappear, and its hard X-ray and radio continuum flux crash. This periodicity has been attributed to an eccentric binary system with a shell ejection occurring at periastron. In addition, η Car shows long term changes as it is still recovering from its giant 19th century outburst. Both types of variability are directly linked to the current mass-loss rate and dust formation in its wind. Mid-IR images and spectra with T-ReCS provide a direct measure of changes in the current bolometric luminosity and trace dust formation episodes. This will provide a direct measurement of the mass ejected. Near-IR emission lines trace related changes in the post-event wind and ionization changes in the circumstellar environment needed to test specific models for the cause of η Car's variability as it recovers from its recent ``event''. High resolution near-IR spectra with GNIRS will continue the important work of HST/STIS, investigating changes in the direct and reflected spectrum of the stellar wind, and ionization changes in the nebula.

  12. The IR-EP: A Powerful Model for Self-Assessment and Planning in IR. AIR 2002 Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polinsky, Tracy L.

    While institutional researchers commonly evaluate the programs and services provided by their colleges, they rarely evaluate their own effectiveness with as much gusto. If Institutional Research (IR) is to serve as the bedrock of an institution's effectiveness, it must be effective in itself and continually improving. It must make certain that the…

  13. Shaped Ir-Ni bimetallic nanoparticles for minimizing Ir utilization in oxygen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jinkyu; Yang, Sungeun; Kim, Chanyeon; Roh, Chi-Woo; Kwon, Yongwoo; Kim, Yong-Tae; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-04-25

    Shaped Ir-Ni bimetallic nanoparticles were synthesized and used for electrocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The obtained bimetallic nanoparticles showed significantly enhanced Ir mass activity and durability compared with Ir nanoparticles.

  14. Performance of the Pediatric Glasgow Coma Scale Score in the Evaluation of Children With Blunt Head Trauma.

    PubMed

    Borgialli, Dominic A; Mahajan, Prashant; Hoyle, John D; Powell, Elizabeth C; Nadel, Frances M; Tunik, Michael G; Foerster, Adele; Dong, Lydia; Miskin, Michelle; Dayan, Peter S; Holmes, James F; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2016-08-01

    The objective was to compare the accuracy of the pediatric Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score in preverbal children to the standard GCS score in older children for identifying those with traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) after blunt head trauma. This was a planned secondary analysis of a large prospective observational multicenter cohort study of children with blunt head trauma. Clinical data were recorded onto case report forms before computed tomography (CT) results or clinical outcomes were known. The total and component GCS scores were assigned by the physician at initial emergency department evaluation. The pediatric GCS was used for children <2 years old and the standard GCS for those ≥2 years old. Outcomes were TBI visible on CT and clinically important TBI (ciTBI), defined as death from TBI, neurosurgery, intubation for more than 24 hours for the head injury, or hospitalization for 2 or more nights for the head injury in association with TBI on CT. We compared the areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves between age cohorts for the association of GCS and the TBI outcomes. We enrolled 42,041 patients, of whom 10,499 (25.0%) were <2 years old. Among patients <2 years, 313/3,329 (9.4%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.4% to 10.4%) of those imaged had TBIs on CT and 146/10,499 (1.4%, 95% CI = 1.2% to 1.6%) had ciTBIs. In patients ≥2 years, 773/11,977 (6.5%, 95% CI = 6.0% to 6.9%) of those imaged had TBIs on CT and 572/31,542 (1.8%, 95% CI = 1.7% to 2.0%) had ciTBIs. For the pediatric GCS in children <2 years old, the area under the ROC curve was 0.61 (95% CI = 0.59 to 0.64) for TBI on CT and 0.77 (95% CI = 0.73 to 0.81) for ciTBI. For the standard GCS in older children, the area under the ROC curve was 0.71 (95% CI = 0.70 to 0.73) for TBI on CT scan and 0.81 (95% CI = 0.79 to 0.83) for ciTBI. The pediatric GCS for preverbal children was somewhat less accurate than the standard GCS for older children in identifying those with TBI on CT

  15. Determination of the bioaccessibility of chromium in Glasgow soil and the implications for human health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Broadway, Andrew; Cave, Mark R; Wragg, Joanna; Fordyce, Fiona M; Bewley, Richard J F; Graham, Margaret C; Ngwenya, Bryne T; Farmer, John G

    2010-12-15

    The Unified Bioaccessibility Method (UBM), which simulates the fluids of the human gastrointestinal tract, was used to assess the oral bioaccessibility of Cr in 27 Glasgow soils. These included several contaminated with Cr(VI), the most toxic form of Cr, from the past disposal of chromite ore processing residue (COPR). The extraction was employed in conjunction with the subsequent determination of the bioaccessible Cr by ICP-OES and Cr(VI) by the diphenylcarbazide complexation colorimetric procedure. In addition, Cr(III)-containing species were determined by (i) HPLC-ICP-MS and (ii) ICP-OES analysis of gel electrophoretically separated components of colloidal and dissolved fractions from centrifugal ultrafiltration of extracts. Similar analytical procedures were applied to the determination of Cr and its species in extracts of the <10 μm fraction of soils subjected to a simulated lung fluid test to assess the inhalation bioaccessibility of Cr. The oral bioaccessibility of Cr was typically greater by a factor of 1.5 in the 'stomach' (pH ~1.2) compared with the 'stomach+intestine' (pH ~6.3) simulation. On average, excluding two COPR-contaminated soil samples, the oral bioaccessibility ('stomach') was 5% of total soil Cr and, overall, similar to the soil Cr(VI) concentration. Chromium(VI) was not detected in the extracts, a consequence of pH- and soil organic matter-mediated reduction in the 'stomach' to Cr(III)-containing species, identified as predominantly Cr(III)-humic complexes. Insertion of oral bioaccessible fraction data into the SNIFFER human health risk assessment model identified site-specific assessment criteria (for residential land without plant uptake) that were exceeded by the soil total Cr (3680 mg kg(-1)) and Cr(VI) (1485 mg kg(-1)) concentration at only the most COPR-Cr(VI)-contaminated location. However, the presence of measurable Cr(VI) in the <10 μm fraction of the two most highly Cr(VI)-contaminated soils demonstrated that inhalation of Cr

  16. Identifying posttraumatic amnesia in individuals with a Glasgow Coma Scale of 15 after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Meares, Susanne; Shores, E Arthur; Smyth, Tracy; Batchelor, Jennifer; Murphy, Margaret; Vukasovic, Matthew

    2015-05-01

    To examine the utility of the Abbreviated Westmead Post-traumatic Amnesia Scale, which includes the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and 3 picture cards used to measure amnesia, in identifying the presence or absence of posttraumatic amnesia in individuals with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Prospective study using data from the Abbreviated Westmead Post-traumatic Amnesia Scale. Trauma hospital. Individuals with possible mTBI who presented between April and September 2011 (N=252; age range, 18-65y; mean age, 37.4±13.9y; 77% men). Administration of the Abbreviated Westmead Post-traumatic Amnesia Scale. GCS and Abbreviated Westmead Post-traumatic Amnesia Scale pass/fail rates. Of the individuals, 169 (mean age, 35.1±13.6y; 77% men) received the scale. A pass/fail performance was achieved a median 121 minutes (interquartile range, 89-205min) after triage. Of the 45 who failed, 31 (69%) had a GCS score of 15. The likelihood of failing was associated with being older (odds ratio [OR], 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.06; P<.05), having consumed alcohol (OR, 3.09; 95% CI, 1.42-6.74; P<.01), and the scale being administered closer to the time of the injury (OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.99-1.00; P<.05). Nineteen (42%) of those who failed had consumed alcohol, 11 had a GCS score of 15, and 8 had a GCS score of 14. A GCS score of 15 does not always signify return to normative cognitive function. Individuals with a GCS score of 15 who are acutely cognitively impaired are at risk of not being accurately identified. The addition of an amnesia score to the GCS in the Abbreviated Westmead Post-traumatic Amnesia Scale will assist in making a diagnosis of mTBI. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Passive IR polarization sensors: a new technology for mine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbour, Blair A.; Jones, Michael W.; Barnes, Howard B.; Lewis, Charles P.

    1998-09-01

    The problem of mine and minefield detection continues to provide a significant challenge to sensor systems. Although the various sensor technologies (infrared, ground penetrating radar, etc.) may excel in certain situations there does not exist a single sensor technology that can adequately detect mines in all conditions such as time of day, weather, buried or surface laid, etc. A truly robust mine detection system will likely require the fusion of data from multiple sensor technologies. The performance of these systems, however, will ultimately depend on the performance of the individual sensors. Infrared (IR) polarimetry is a new and innovative sensor technology that adds substantial capabilities to the detection of mines. IR polarimetry improves on basic IR imaging by providing improved spatial resolution of the target, an inherent ability to suppress clutter, and the capability for zero (Delta) T imaging. Nichols Research Corporation (Nichols) is currently evaluating the effectiveness of IR polarization for mine detection. This study is partially funded by the U.S. Army Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD). The goal of the study is to demonstrate, through phenomenology studies and limited field trials, that IR polarizaton outperforms conventional IR imaging in the mine detection arena.

  18. Optimized IR synchrotron beamline design.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    Synchrotron infrared beamlines are powerful tools on which to perform spectroscopy on microscopic length scales but require working with large bending-magnet source apertures in order to provide intense photon beams to the experiments. Many infrared beamlines use a single toroidal-shaped mirror to focus the source emission which generates, for large apertures, beams with significant geometrical aberrations resulting from the shape of the source and the beamline optics. In this paper, an optical layout optimized for synchrotron infrared beamlines, that removes almost totally the geometrical aberrations of the source, is presented and analyzed. This layout is already operational on the IR beamline of the Brazilian synchrotron. An infrared beamline design based on a SOLEIL bending-magnet source is given as an example, which could be useful for future IR beamline improvements at this facility.

  19. Ir/IrSi3/Si Schottky-Barrier Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, True-Lon

    1991-01-01

    Quantum efficiency increased. Proposed Schottky-barrier infrared detector has double metallic layer of Ir and IrSi3 instead of single metallic layer of Ir, IrSi, or IrSi3. Offers advantages of both relatively high infrared absorption in thin film of Ir and stability and reproducibility of layer of IrSi3 in contact with Si. Also serves as barrier to chemical reactions between Ir overlayer and Si substrate. Detectors used to form focal-plane array integrated with charge-coupled-device-addressing and image-processing circuitry.

  20. An initial assessment of spatial relationships between respiratory cases, soil metal content, air quality and deprivation indicators in Glasgow, Scotland, UK: relevance to the environmental justice agenda.

    PubMed

    Morrison, S; Fordyce, F M; Scott, E Marian

    2014-04-01

    There is growing interest in links between poor health and socio-environmental inequalities (e.g. inferior housing, crime and industrial emissions) under the environmental justice agenda. The current project assessed associations between soil metal content, air pollution (NO2/PM10) and deprivation and health (respiratory case incidence) across Glasgow. This is the first time that both chemical land quality and air pollution have been assessed citywide in the context of deprivation and health for a major UK conurbation. Based on the dataset 'averages' for intermediate geography areas, generalised linear modelling of respiratory cases showed significant associations with overall soil metal concentration (p = 0.0367) and with deprivation (p < 0.0448). Of the individual soil metals, only nickel showed a significant relationship with respiratory cases (p = 0.0056). Whilst these associations could simply represent concordant lower soil metal concentrations and fewer respiratory cases in the rural versus the urban environment, they are interesting given (1) possible contributions from soil to air particulate loading and (2) known associations between airborne metals like nickel and health. This study also demonstrated a statistically significant correlation (-0.213; p < 0.05) between soil metal concentration and deprivation across Glasgow. This highlights the fact that despite numerous regeneration programmes, the legacy of environmental pollution remains in post-industrial areas of Glasgow many decades after heavy industry has declined. Further epidemiological investigations would be required to determine whether there are any causal links between soil quality and population health/well-being. However, the results of this study suggest that poor soil quality warrants greater consideration in future health and socio-environmental inequality assessments.

  1. The inappropriateness of psycho-social models of risk behaviour for understanding HIV-related risk practices among Glasgow male prostitutes.

    PubMed

    Bloor, M J; McKeganey, N P; Finlay, A; Barnard, M A

    1992-01-01

    Much the most common models of HIV-related risk behaviour are those psychosocial models derived from studies of health behaviour and tested on large interview samples of American gay men. These models were not appropriate for understanding risk behaviour among 32 Glasgow male prostitutes. Whereas psycho-social models conceive of risk behaviour as volitional and individualistic, ethnographic data indicate that the male prostitutes' risk practices were constrained and emergent from the immediate circumstances of the sexual encounter. Unsafe sex was associated with client control. Safer sex was associated with countervailing prostitute strategies of influence. These data confirm the utility of self-empowerment approaches to health education.

  2. Preliminary development of a GIS-tool to assess threats to shallow groundwater quality from soil pollutants in Glasgow, UK (GRASP).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dochartaigh, B. É. Ó.; Fordyce, F. M.; Ander, E. L.; Bonsor, H. C.

    2009-04-01

    The protection of groundwater and related surface water quality is a key aspect of the European Union Water Framework Directive and environmental legislation in many countries worldwide. Globally, the protection of urban groundwater resources and related ecosystem services is of growing concern as urbanisation increases. Although urban areas are often where groundwater resources are most in need of protection, there is frequently a lack of information about threats to groundwater quality. Most studies of soil and groundwater contamination, although detailed, are site-specific, and city-wide overviews are generally lacking. The British Geological Survey (BGS) is currently undertaking the Clyde Urban Super-Project (CUSP), delivering multi-disciplinary geoscience products for the Glasgow conurbation. Under this project, a GIS-based prioritisation tool known as GRASP (GRoundwater And Soil Pollutants) has been trialled to aid urban planning and sustainable development by providing a broad-scale assessment of threats to groundwater quality across the conurbation. GRASP identifies areas where shallow groundwater quality is at greatest threat from the leaching and downward movement of potentially harmful metals in the soil. Metal contamination is a known problem in many urban centres including Glasgow, which has a long industrial heritage and associated contamination legacy, notably with respect to Cr. GRASP is based primarily upon an existing British Standard - International Standards Organisation methodology to determine the leaching potential of metals from soils, which has been validated for 11 metals: Al, Fe, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Mn, Pb and Zn (BS-ISO 15175:2004). However, the GRASP tool is innovative as it combines assessments of soil leaching potential with soil metal content data to highlight threats to shallow groundwater quality. The input parameters required for GRASP (soil pH, clay, organic matter, sesquioxide and metal content) are based upon a systematic

  3. Lithostratigraphy does not always equal lithology: lessons learned in communicating uncertainty from stochastic modelling glacial and post glacial deposits in Glasgow U.K.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearsey, Tim; Williams, John; Finlayson, Andrew; Williamson, Paul; Dobbs, Marcus; Kingdon, Andrew; Campbell, Diarmad

    2014-05-01

    Geological maps and 3D models usually depict lithostragraphic units which can comprise of many different types of sediment (lithologies). The lithostratigraphic units shown on maps and 3D models of glacial and post glacial deposits in Glasgow are substantially defined by the method of the formation and age of the unit rather than its lithological composition. Therefore, a simple assumption that the dominant lithology is the most common constituent of any stratigraphic unit is erroneous and is only 58% predictive of the actual sediment types seen in a borehole. This is problematic for non-geologist such as planners, regulators and engineers attempting to use these models to inform their decisions and can lead to such users viewing maps and models as of limited use in such decision making. We explore the extent to which stochastic modelling can help to make geological models more predictive of lithology in heterolithic units. Stochastic modelling techniques are commonly used to model facies variations in oil field models. The techniques have been applied to an area containing >4000 coded boreholes to investigate the glacial and fluvial deposits in the centre of the city of Glasgow. We test the predictions from this method by deleting percentages of the control data and re-running the simulations to determine how predictability varies with data density. We also explore the best way of displaying such stochastic models to and suggest that displaying the data as probability maps rather than a single definitive answer better illustrates the uncertainties inherent in the input data. Finally we address whether is it possible truly to be able to predict lithology in such geological facies. The innovative Accessing Subsurface Knowledge (ASK) network was recently established in the Glasgow are by the British Geological Survey and Glasgow City Council to deliver and exchange subsurface data and knowledge. This provides an idea opportunity to communicate and test a range of

  4. Discrimination of five species of Fritillaria and its extracts by FT-IR and 2D-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan; Jin, Zhexiong; Zhou, Qun; Chen, Jianbo; Lei, Yu; Sun, Suqin

    2010-06-01

    Bulbus Fritillariae (in Chinese named Beimu), referred to the bulbs of several Fritillaria species ( Liliaceae), is a commonly used anti-tussive and expectorant herb in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for more than 2000 years. The objective of this study is to discriminate five species of Beimu herbs and their total alkaloid extracts by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), second derivative infrared spectroscopy, and two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy (2D-IR) under thermal perturbation. The structural information of the samples indicated that, Beimu and their extract residues contain a large amount of starch, since some characteristic absorption peaks of the starch, such as 1158, 1080, 1015 and 987 cm -1 can be observed. Further more, the characteristic absorption peaks of the sulfate which arouse at 1120 ± 5 and 618 cm -1 in the IR spectra of Beimu aqueous extracts can be find. This validated that people used the sulfur fumigation method in the processing. The macroscopical fingerprint characters of FT-IR and 2D-IR spectra can not only provide the information of main chemical constituents in medicinal materials and their different extracts, but also compare the components differences among the similar samples. In conclusion, the multi-steps IR macro-fingerprint method is rapid, effective, visual and accurate for pharmaceutical research.

  5. High temperature Ir segregation in Ir-B ceramics: Effect of oxygen presence on stability of IrB2 and other Ir-B phases

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Zhilin; Terracciano, Anthony C.; Cullen, David A.; ...

    2015-05-13

    The formation of IrB2, IrB1.35, IrB1.1 and IrB monoboride phases in the Ir–B ceramic nanopowder was confirmed during mechanochemical reaction between metallic Ir and elemental B powders. The Ir–B phases were analysed after 90 h of high energy ball milling and after annealing of the powder for 72 h at 1050°C in vacuo. The iridium monoboride (IrB) orthorhombic phase was synthesised experimentally for the first time and identified by powder X-ray diffraction. Additionally, the ReB2 type IrB2 hexagonal phase was also produced for the first time and identified by high resolution transmission electron microscope. Ir segregation along disordered domains ofmore » the boron lattice was found to occur during high temperature annealing. Furthermore, these nanodomains may have useful catalytic properties.« less

  6. The Rise of Institutional Effectiveness: IR Competitor, Customer, Collaborator, or Replacement? Professional File. Number 120, Spring 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leimer, Christina

    2011-01-01

    As Institutional Research (IR) moves beyond its fiftieth anniversary, a new profession, called Institutional Effectiveness (IE), is emerging. In some respects, IR and IE are similar. IE, though, appears to be taking the leadership role. What are the structure, purpose, and responsibilities of IE offices? What are the implications for the IR field…

  7. Diffraction-limited IR Microspectroscopy with IRENI

    Treesearch

    J. Sedlmair; B. Illman; M. Unger; C. Hirschmugl

    2012-01-01

    In a unique way, IRENI (Infrared environmental Imaging), operated at the Synchrotron Radiation Center in Madison, combines IR spectroscopy and IR imaging, revealing the chemical morphology of a sample. Most storage ring based IR confocal microscopes have to overcome a trade-off between spatial resolution versus...

  8. Using Graded Relevance Assessments in IR Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kekalalainen, Jaana; Jarvelin, Kalervo

    2002-01-01

    Proposes evaluation methods based on the use of nondichotomous relevance judgements in information retrieval (IR) experiments. Argues that evaluation methods should credit IR methods for their ability to retrieve highly relevant documents. This is desirable from the user point of view in modern large IR environments. (Author/AEF)

  9. IR susceptibility of naval ships using ShipIR/NTCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitekunas, David A.

    2010-04-01

    Methods of analysing the signature and susceptibility of naval platforms to infrared detection are described. An unclassified ShipIR destroyer model is used to illustrate the primary sources of infrared signature and detection: the exhaust system, solar-heating, and operating climate. The basic detection algorithm used by the Naval Threat Countermeasure Simulator (NTCS) component of ShipIR is described and used to analyse the effectiveness of various stealth technologies: stack suppression, low solar absorptive (LSA) paints, and Active Hull Cooling (AHC). Standard marine climate statistics are used to determine a minimum (5%), average (50%) and maximum (95%) signature condition for each operating region. The change in detection range of two wave-band sensors (3-5μm, 8-12 μm) operating at different altitudes (10m, 270m) in each of four climatic conditions is used to assess the effectiveness of each stealth solution, providing a more integral approach to infrared stealth design. These tools and methods form the basis on which future platform designs are being evaluated.

  10. Comparison of APACHE II, MEES and Glasgow Coma Scale in patients with nontraumatic coma for prediction of mortality

    PubMed Central

    Grmec, Štefek; Gašparovic, Vladimir

    2001-01-01

    Introduction: There are numerous prehosital descriptive scoring systems, and it is uncertain whether they are efficient in assessing of the severity of illness and whether they have a prognostic role in the estimation of the illness outcome (in comparison with that of the prognostic scoring system Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation [APACHE] II). The purpose of the present study was to assess the value of the various scoring systems in predicting outcome in nontraumatic coma patients and to evaluate the importance of mental status measurement in relation to outcome. Patients and methods: In a prehospital setting, postintervention values of the Mainz Emergency Evaluation System (MEES) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) were measured for each patient. The APACHE II score was recorded on the day of admission to the hospital. This study was undertaken over a 2-year period (from January 1996 to October 1998), and included 286 consecutive patients (168 men, 118 women) who were hospitalized for nontraumatic coma. Patients younger than 16 years were not included. Their age varied from 16 to 87 years, with mean ± standard deviation of 51.8 ± 16.9 years. Sensitivity, specificity and correct prediction of outcome were measured using the χ2 method, with four severity scores. The best cutoff point in each scoring system was determined using the Youden index. The difference in Youden index was calculated using the Z score. For each score, the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was obtained. The difference in ROC was calculated using the Z score. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: For prediction of mortality, the best cutoff points were 19 for APACHE II, 18 for MEES and 5 for GCS. The best cutoffs for the Youden index were 0.63 for APACHE II, 0.61 for MEES and 0.65 for GCS. The correct prediction of outcome was achieved in 79.9% for APACHE II, 78.3% for MEES and 81.9% for GCS. The area under the ROC curve (mean ± standard error) was 0

  11. Examining the Audit Guidelines: Insight into the IRS's Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Cornelius

    1995-01-01

    This article reviews and comments on various issues addressed by the 1994 Internal Revenue Service (IRS) audit guidelines for nonprofit organizations. It focuses on topics especially relevant to colleges and universities, such as unrelated business income, employment taxes, fringe benefits, fund raising, research and contracts, scholarships and…

  12. The IR-4 Program - how it can benefit nurseries

    Treesearch

    J. Ray Frank

    2002-01-01

    The Interregional Research Project 4 (IR-4) was initiated in 1963 to obtain national pesticide label regsitrations for use on food and fiber. This program has an emphasis on minor uses or specialty crops. In this arena in the United States today it includes 600 crops.

  13. The Community College IR Shop and Accreditation: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, George

    2011-01-01

    This article presents results of a study the author recently conducted on the role of traditional institutional research (IR) offices in support of accreditation activities and institutional effectiveness. The purpose of the study was to confirm or disconfirm the utility of a theoretical model developed by Brittingham, O'Brien, and Alig (2008) of…

  14. The seroprevalence of hepatitis C virus infection among children and their mothers attending for dental care in Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Maureen; Bagg, Jeremy; Welbury, Richard; Hutchinson, Sharon J; Hague, Rosie; Geary, Isabella; Roy, Kirsty M

    2016-08-24

    This paper describes a voluntary anonymous survey to investigate the seroprevalence of Hepatitis C (HCV) in children in Glasgow, UK attending a Dental Hospital and the proportion of HCV positive mothers who have a child who is HCV seropositive. The study was undertaken among children and accompanying parents and household contacts attending a general anaesthetic assessment clinic at Glasgow Dental Hospital and School. Children were asked to provide an oral fluid specimen for HCV testing. Accompanying adults were asked to provide demographic data on the child and information on familial risk factors for HCV infection using a standardised questionnaire. Birth mothers were also asked to provide an oral fluid specimen. Specimens and questionnaires were linked by a unique anonymous study number. Between June 2009 and December 2011, samples were collected from 2141 children and 1698 mothers. None of the samples from the children were HCV seropositive but 16 (0.9%, 95% CI 0.6-1.5%) of the specimens from mothers were HCV antibody positive. In summary, the prevalence of HCV seropositivity in the birth mothers of the children was similar to that estimated in the general population served by the hospital and showed no evidence of mother-to-child transmission of HCV.

  15. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  16. Moisture map by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinzato, E.; Cadelano, G.; Bison, P.

    2010-10-01

    A new approach to moisture detection in buildings by an optical method is presented. Limits of classical and new methods are discussed. The state of the art about the use of IR thermography is illustrated as well. The new technique exploits characteristics of the materials and takes into account explicitly the heat and mass exchange between surface and environment. A set of experiments in controlled laboratory conditions on different materials is used to better understand the physical problem. The testing procedure and the data reduction are illustrated. A case study on a heritage building points up the features of this technique.

  17. Complementarity of NGST, ALMA, and Far IR Space Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) will both start operations long before a new far IR observatory to follow SIRTF into space can be launched. What will be unknown even after they are operational, and what will a far IR space observatory be able to add? I will compare the telescope design concepts and capabilities and the advertised scientific programs for the projects and attempt to forecast the research topics that will be at the forefront in 2010.

  18. Coprates Chasma Landslides in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Today's daytime IR image is of a portion of Coprates Chasma, part of Valles Marineris. As with yesterday's image, this image shows multiple large landslides.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.2, Longitude 300.2 East (59.8 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Xanthe Terra Landslide in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This is a daytime IR image of a chaos region within Xanthe Terra. As with earlier images, the landslide in this image is caused by the failure of steep slopes releasing material to form the landslide deposit.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 3.1, Longitude 309.7 East (50.3 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Xanthe Terra Landslide in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This is a daytime IR image of a chaos region within Xanthe Terra. As with earlier images, the landslide in this image is caused by the failure of steep slopes releasing material to form the landslide deposit.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 3.1, Longitude 309.7 East (50.3 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Coprates Chasma Landslides in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Today's daytime IR image is of a portion of Coprates Chasma, part of Valles Marineris. As with yesterday's image, this image shows multiple large landslides.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.2, Longitude 300.2 East (59.8 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. The Use of Microscopes and Telescopes in IR Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton

    2011-01-01

    A wide selection of lenses is very useful to the thermographer working in a research environment, where applications can vary from week to week. Both wide angle and telephoto infrared lenses are widely used alternatives to the standard lenses typically supplied by IR camera manufacturers. However, in some extreme applications the need arises for additional image magnification. In these cases, the thermographer must rely on an IR microscope for close-up work with a field of view on the order of 1.3 to 15.8 mm, or a telescope for working at a distance on the order of meters or kilometers. The advantages of using an IR microscope and reflecting telescope will be discussed, as well as the challenges and characteristics of using these instruments.

  3. IR FPA sensor characterization and analysis using Matlab tm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Michael J.; Wan, William H.

    1998-08-01

    This paper documents the Matlab routines used to conduct infrared focal plane array (IR-FPA) sensor data analysis. Matlab is a commercially available software package that enables users to conduct a multitude of data analysis, file I/O, and generation of graphics with little or no computer programming skills. This effort was conducted in support of the US Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command-Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center's (TACOM-ARDEC) 120 mm Precision Guided Mortar Munition (PGMM). PGMM's sensor included a 256 X 256 mid-band IR-FPA. This paper summarizes a primer generated to help train PGMM sensor engineers to use Matlab for conducting IR-FPA image analysis. A brief system description of the PGMM IR sensor will be presented, and follow by discussion on the Matlab IR-FPA image analysis, such as measurement of; FPA operability, Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference, temporal noise, spatial noise, as well as gain and offset calibration for non-uniformity correction.

  4. GO-IRS: GTC Optical Intermediate-Resolution Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, J. A.; Ge, J.; Moles, M.; Alfaro, E.; Montes, D.; Jing, Y. P.; Chu, J.; González, A. H.; Wang, T. G.; Hao, L.

    2011-11-01

    GO-IRS stands for "GTC Optical Intermediate Resolution Spectrograph". It is the answer of a big team of over 100 experienced researchers and engineersin the United States, China and Spain to the recent call for new instrumentationfor the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias. The GO-IRS main facts are: 1000 MOS fibres in a 15 arcmin circular field of view; 4 x 400 IFU fibres in the central 2 arcmin; two channels: blue Δλ = 0.37 - 0.60 μ m) and red (Δλ = 0.60 - 1.00 μ m); R= 20k, 10k, 5k (red), 2k (blue) and intermediate spectral resolutions; and use of telescope-proof technology (e.g. LAMOST, MARVELS). The GO-IRS Science Team is developing three design reference cases on near-fieldcosmology in the Milky Way, kinematics and abundances in galaxies of the LocalGroup and of the local Universe, and astrophysical properties and clustering ofdistant galaxies at z=1-4. We open our GO-IRS Science Team to all Spanish astronomers interested in workingwith us. Visit our URL at http://marvels.astro.ufl.edu/GO-IRS

  5. DRDC's approach to IR scene generation for IRCM simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepage, Jean-François; Labrie, Marc-André; Rouleau, Eric; Richard, Jonathan; Ross, Vincent; Dion, Denis; Harrison, Nathalie

    2011-06-01

    An object oriented simulation framework, called KARMA, was developed over the last decade at Defence Research and Development Canada - Valcartier (DRDC Valcartier) to study infrared countermeasures (IRCM) methods and tactics. It provides a range of infrared (IR) guided weapon engagement services from constructive to HWIL simulations. To support the increasing level of detail of its seeker models, DRDC Valcartier recently developed an IR scene generation (IRSG) capacity for the KARMA framework. The approach relies on Open-Source based rendering of scenes composed of 3D models, using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) graphics processing units (GPU) of standard PCs. The objective is to produce a high frame rate and medium fidelity representation of the IR scene, allowing to properly reproduce the spectral, spatial, and temporal characteristics of the aircraft's and flare's signature. In particular, the OpenSceneGraph library is used to manage the 3D models, and to send high-level rendering commands. The atmospheric module allows for accurate, run-time computation of the radiative components using a spectrally correlated wide-band mode. Advanced effects, such as surface reflections and zoom anti-aliasing, are computed by the GPU through the use of shaders. Also, in addition to the IR scene generation module, a signature modeling and analysis tool (SMAT) was developed to assist the modeler in building and validating signature models that are independent of a particular sensor type. Details of the IR scene generation module and the associated modeling tool will be presented.

  6. Results from the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory survey catalog. [IR astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, S. D.; Walker, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    Results of an IR survey program designed to obtain the spatial and brightness distributions of a representative sample of IR-emitting objects in the 3-30 micron range are analyzed. Small cryogenically cooled telescopes carried above the atmosphere on sounding rockets were employed in the research. Minimization of sky noise and photon background, experimental equipment, and data reduction techniques are discussed.

  7. Determination of several physical properties of light petroleum products using IR

    SciTech Connect

    Rashid, H.A.; Dekran, S.B.; Fakhri, N.A.; Aziz, H.J.; Hamoudi, N.A.

    1989-04-01

    In the present study IR spectrometric analysis was used to determine clear research octane number, heat of formation, specific gravity and mole fraction of methyl group, simultaneously in hydrocarbon mixtures. IR absorption spectrum can be used to provide information, that can be obtained by several existing test methods.

  8. Mechanism and implementation of bidirectional IR scene simulation system based on the Peltier effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yun-song; Lu, Yuan; Shen, Jia

    2011-08-01

    The IR scene simulation technique is an effective method to test the responsivity, the precision and the anti-interference capability of the IR detector during its research and development; thus the technique may reduce the cost and research time. Currently, the IR scene simulation technique based on MOS-Resistance arrays is one of the most popular IR scene simulation techniques. However, resistance arrays can only be heated, but not refrigerated. Moreover, other simulation techniques also have the problem of one-direction IR scene simulation. In this paper, the IR simulation mechanism is studied in detail. According to the analysis of the characteristic of the semiconductor device based on the Peltier effect , the bidirectional IR scene simulation technique based on semiconductor refrigeration device with the Peltier effect and the computer controlling technology is put forward. Moreover, a prototype machine is designed ,and the shortcoming of the IR scene simulation system based on MOS-Resistance arrays which can only be heated is avoided. Finally, the performance of the prototype machine is tested by experiments. The results show that the system can realize bidirectional IR scene simulation perfectly by the means of increasing and reducing the temperature.

  9. Underrepresentation of Women and Minorities in the United States IR Academic Physician Workforce.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Mikhail C S S; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Richard, Chase; Chapman, Christina H; Laporte, Angelique; Both, Stefan; Thomas, Charles R; Deville, Curtiland

    2016-12-01

    To assess the United States interventional radiology (IR) academic physician workforce diversity and comparative specialties. Public registries were used to assess demographic differences among 2012 IR faculty and fellows, diagnostic radiology (DR) faculty and residents, DR subspecialty fellows (pediatric, abdominal, neuroradiology, and musculoskeletal), vascular surgery and interventional cardiology trainees, and 2010 US medical school graduates and US Census using binomial tests with .001 significance level (Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons). Significant trends in IR physician representation were evaluated from 1992 to 2012. Women (15.4%), blacks (2.0%), and Hispanics (6.2%) were significantly underrepresented as IR fellows compared with the US population. Women were underrepresented as IR (7.3%) versus DR (27.8%) faculty and IR fellows (15.4%) versus medical school graduates (48.3%), DR residents (27.8%), pediatric radiology fellows (49.4%), and vascular surgery trainees (27.7%) (all P < .001). IR ranked last in female representation among radiologic subspecialty fellows. Blacks (1.8%, 2.1%, respectively, for IR faculty and fellows); Hispanics (1.8%, 6.2%); and combined American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (1.8%, 0) showed no significant differences in representation as IR fellows compared with IR faculty, DR residents, other DR fellows, or interventional cardiology or vascular surgery trainees. Over 20 years, there was no significant increase in female or black representation as IR fellows or faculty. Women, blacks, and Hispanics are underrepresented in the IR academic physician workforce relative to the US population. Given prevalent health care disparities and an increasingly diverse society, research and training efforts should address IR physician workforce diversity. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of new motorway infrastructure on active travel in the local population: a retrospective repeat cross-sectional study in Glasgow, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Jonathan R; Mitchell, Richard; Ogilvie, David

    2016-07-07

    Promoting active travel is an important part of increasing population physical activity, which has both physical and mental health benefits. A key benefit described by the then Scottish Government of the five-mile M74 motorway extension, which opened during June 2011 in the south of Glasgow, was that the forecast reduction in motor traffic on local streets would make these streets safer for walking and cycling, thus increasing active travel by the local population. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of new motorway infrastructure on the proportion of journey stages made actively (cycling or on foot) by individuals travelling in and out of the local area. Data for the periods 2009-10 and 2012-13 were extracted from the Scottish Household Survey (SHS) travel diaries, which record each journey stage made during the previous day by a representative sample of the Scottish population aged 16 and over. Each individual journey stage was assigned to one of the following study areas surrounding existing and new transport infrastructure: (1) an area surrounding the new M74 motorway extension (n = 435 (2009-10), 543 (2012-13)), (2) a comparator area surrounding an existing motorway (n = 477 (2009-10), 560 (2012-13)), and (3) a control area containing no comparable motorway infrastructure (n = 541 (2009-10), 593 (2012-13)). Multivariable, multi-level regression analysis was performed to determine any between-area differences in change in active travel over time, which might indicate an intervention effect. Reference populations were defined using two alternative definitions, (1) Glasgow City and (2) Glasgow and surrounding local authorities. The results showed an increase in the proportion of journey stages using active travel in all study areas compared to both reference populations. However, there were no significant between-area differences to suggest an effect attributable the M74 motorway extension. There was no clear evidence that the M74 motorway

  11. IR Thermography NDE of ISS Radiator Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay; Winfree, William; Morton, Richard; Wilson, Walter; Reynolds, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The presentation covers an active and a passive infrared (IR) thermography for detection of delaminations in the radiator panels used for the International Space Station (ISS) program. The passive radiator IR data was taken by a NASA astronaut in an extravehicular activity (EVA) using a modified FLIR EVA hand-held camera. The IR data could be successfully analyzed to detect gross facesheet disbonds. The technique used the internal hot fluid tube as the heat source in analyzing the IR data. Some non-flight ISS radiators were inspected using an active technique of IR flash thermography to detect disbond of face sheet with honeycomb core, and debonds in facesheet overlap areas. The surface temperature and radiated heat emission from flight radiators is stable during acquisition of the IR video data. This data was analyzed to detect locations of unexpected surface temperature gradients. The flash thermography data was analyzed using derivative analysis and contrast evolutions. Results of the inspection are provided.

  12. Activities at the Smart Structures Research Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Peter T.

    1991-12-01

    Smart Structures and Materials technology will undoubtedly yield a wide range of new materials plus new sensing and actuation technologies and this will have a radical effect on current approaches to structural design. To meet the multi-disciplinary research challenge posed by this technology, the Smart Structures Research Institute (SSRI) has been established at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow. This paper describes the background, current and planned activities and progress made in developing this new and very promising technology.

  13. Obstacle-avoiding robot with IR and PIR motion sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, R.; Omar, Z.; Suaibun, S.

    2016-10-01

    Obstacle avoiding robot was designed, constructed and programmed which may be potentially used for educational and research purposes. The developed robot will move in a particular direction once the infrared (IR) and the PIR passive infrared (PIR) sensors sense a signal while avoiding the obstacles in its path. The robot can also perform desired tasks in unstructured environments without continuous human guidance. The hardware was integrated in one application board as embedded system design. The software was developed using C++ and compiled by Arduino IDE 1.6.5. The main objective of this project is to provide simple guidelines to the polytechnic students and beginners who are interested in this type of research. It is hoped that this robot could benefit students who wish to carry out research on IR and PIR sensors.

  14. HST WFC3/IR Calibration Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, Meredith; Brammer, Gabriel; Long, Knox S.; Pirzkal, Norbert; Ryan, Russell E.; McCullough, Peter R.; Baggett, Sylvia M.; Gosmeyer, Catherine; Bourque, Matthew; HST WFC3 Team

    2016-01-01

    We report on several improvements to the characterization, monitoring, and calibration of the HST WFC3/IR detector. The detector performance has remained overall stable since its installation during HST Servicing Mission 4 in 2009. We present an updated persistence model that takes into account effects of exposure time and spatial variations in persistence across the detector, new grism wavelength solutions and master sky images, and a new SPARS sample sequence. We also discuss the stability of the IR gain, the time evolution and photometric properties of IR "snowballs," and the effect of IR "blobs" on point-source photometry.

  15. ATR-FT-IR spectral collection of conservation materials in the extended region of 4000-80 cm⁻¹.

    PubMed

    Vahur, Signe; Teearu, Anu; Peets, Pilleriin; Joosu, Lauri; Leito, Ivo

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a spectral collection of over 150 ATR-FT-IR spectra of materials related to cultural heritage and conservation science has been presented that have been measured in the extended region of 4000-80 cm(-1) (mid-IR and far-IR region). The applicability of the spectra and, in particular, the extended spectral range, for investigation of art-related materials is demonstrated on a case study. This collection of ATRFT-IR reference spectra is freely available online (http://tera.chem.ut.ee/IR_spectra/) and is meant to be a useful tool for researchers in the field of conservation and materials science.

  16. [Power and everyday life in a lunatic asylum environment - a case example from Glasgow at the beginning of the 20th century].

    PubMed

    Gründler, Jens

    In this article the focus of analysis lies on power relations in everyday life in one of Glasgow's Pauper Lunatic Asylums at the turn of the twentieth century. Taking a sample of patient case files I examine the daily processes of negotiation between inmates and their relatives, physicians, attendants and nurses as well as the poor law administration. Some cases especially exemplify the complex relationships between the actors. They show which opportunities and boundaries existed for "power brokering" for the more powerless. At the same time these cases illustrate the formal and practical limits of enforcement by doctors and nursing staff. Without turning a blind eve to hierarchies and power imbalances the analysis shows that even in settings like "total institutions" power remains volatile. Even there the more powerful actors have to actualize, seize and prevail on a regular basis.

  17. Highlights from the 13th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases in Glasgow, Scotland, May 10-13, 2003. The complex world of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Jack, David

    2003-01-01

    At the 13th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, held in Glasgow, Scotland, May 10-13, 2003, the latest developments in clinical microbiology and the treatment of infectious diseases were presented alongside recent progress on molecular aspects of diagnosis and emerging patterns of infection. Around 5,000 delegates from more than 80 countries attended the congress, which saw the presentation of more than 400 oral communications and 1,700 posters. In addition to a historical session looking at Scotland's own contribution to the control of infectious diseases, the meeting involved up to six parallel sessions a day, looking at all the major aspects of infectious diseases, treatment, surveillance, epidemiology and drug pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics. The organizers also organized a Late Breaker symposium on severe acute respiratory syndrome. The topics likely to be of most interest to Drug News and Perspectives readers are described here.

  18. Analysis of blood trace elements and biochemical indexes levels in severe craniocerebral trauma adults with Glasgow Coma Scale and injury severity score.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guangtao; Hu, Bo; Chen, Guiqian; Yu, Xiaojun; Luo, Jianming; Lv, Junyao; Gu, Jiang

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the correlation between the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), the injury severity score (ISS) and serum levels of trace elements (TE) in severe trauma patients to analyze alteration of the levels of trace elements and serum biochemical indexes in the period of admission from 126 adult cases of severe brain trauma with traffic accidents. Multi-trace elements for patients in the trauma-TE groups were used. The results indicated that all patients presented an acute trace elements deficiency syndrome (ATEDs) after severe trauma, and the correlation between ISS and serum levels of Fe, Zn, and Mg was significant. Compared to the normal control group, levels of the trace elements in serum were significantly decreased after trauma, suggesting that enhancement of immunity to infection and multiple organ failure (MOF) via the monitoring and supplement of trace elements will be a good strategy to severe traumatic patients in clinics.

  19. Atmospheric Entry Experiments at IRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auweter-Kurtz, M.; Endlich, P.; Herdrich, G.; Kurtz, H.; Laux, T.; Löhle, S.; Nazina, N.; Pidan, S.

    2002-01-01

    Entering the atmosphere of celestial bodies, spacecrafts encounter gases at velocities of several km/s, thereby being subjected to great heat loads. The thermal protection systems and the environment (plasma) have to be investigated by means of computational and ground facility based simulations. For more than a decade, plasma wind tunnels at IRS have been used for the investigation of TPS materials. Nevertheless, ground tests and computer simulations cannot re- place space flights completely. Particularly, entry mission phases encounter challenging problems, such as hypersonic aerothermodynamics. Concerning the TPS, radiation-cooled materials used for reuseable spacecrafts and ablator tech- nologies are of importance. Besides the mentioned technologies, there is the goal to manage guidance navigation, con- trol, landing technology and inflatable technologies such as ballutes that aim to keep vehicles in the atmosphere without landing. The requirement to save mass and energy for planned interplanetary missions such as Mars Society Balloon Mission, Mars Sample Return Mission, Mars Express or Venus Sample Return mission led to the need for manoeuvres like aerocapture, aero-breaking and hyperbolic entries. All three are characterized by very high kinetic vehicle energies to be dissipated by the manoeuvre. In this field flight data are rare. The importance of these manoeuvres and the need to increase the knowledge of required TPS designs and behavior during such mission phases point out the need of flight experiments. As result of the experience within the plasma diagnostic tool development and the plasma wind tunnel data base, flight experiments like the PYrometric RE-entry EXperiment PYREX were developed, fully qualified and successfully flown. Flight experiments such as the entry spectrometer RESPECT and PYREX on HOPE-X are in the conceptual phase. To increase knowledge in the scope of atmospheric manoeuvres and entries, data bases have to be created combining both

  20. Prognostic value of time-related Glasgow coma scale components in severe traumatic brain injury: a prospective evaluation with respect to 1-year survival and functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Kouloulas, Efthimios J; Papadeas, Alexandros G; Michail, Xanthi; Sakas, Damianos E; Boviatsis, Efstathios J

    2013-09-01

    The severity of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is determined by many variables, the complexity of which has made prediction of functional outcome an elusive target. To evaluate whether the three components of the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and their alterations over time can serve as predictors of functional outcome after a severe TBI at 12 months after the TBI insult, we carried out a prospective study of patients with severe TBI. Seventy patients were initially enrolled. Data were retrieved from the emergency department records and the patients' intensive care unit, neurosurgical, and rehabilitation unit records. All patients underwent follow-up at 3, 6, and 12 months after injury. GCS components were evaluated on the day of injury and 2 weeks after injury. Functional outcome was estimated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale and the Functional Independence Measure motor scale. It was evaluated during rehabilitation and at 12 months after injury. Fifty-one patients were alive and followed up until 12 months. Logistic regression and receiver-operator characteristic curve analyses were carried out. In terms of functional outcome at 12 months, only GCS on day 15 was found to be a prognostic factor, with all its subscales being related to outcome 12 months later, whereas a higher GCS score on day 15 was also related to survival. A higher motor and verbal response on day 15 was strongly associated with a patient's functional independence, whereby the motor response was a better predictor. The GCS motor score 2 weeks after injury was statistically significantly associated with the 12-month functional outcome in TBI survivors. Motor response was the most useful predictor among the GCS components with respect to the long-term functional outcome in patients with severe TBI.

  1. Better Glasgow outcome score, cerebral perfusion pressure and focal brain oxygenation in severely traumatized brain following direct regional brain hypothermia therapy: A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Zenian, Mohd Sofan; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Hamid, Wan Zuraida Wan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Induced hypothermia for treatment of traumatic brain injury is controversial. Since many pathways involved in the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury are temperature dependent, regional brain hypothermia is thought capable to mitigate those processes. The objectives of this study are to assess the therapeutic effects and complications of regional brain cooling in severe head injury with Glasgow coma scale (GCS) 6-7. Materials and Methods: A prospective randomized controlled pilot study involving patients with severe traumatic brain injury with GCS 6 and 7 who required decompressive craniectomy. Patients were randomized into two groups: Cooling and no cooling. For the cooling group, analysis was made by dividing the group into mild and deep cooling. Brain was cooled by irrigating the brain continuously with cold Hartmann solution for 24-48 h. Main outcome assessments were a dichotomized Glasgow outcome score (GOS) at 6 months posttrauma. Results: A total of 32 patients were recruited. The cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling. There were 63.2% of patients in cooling group attained good GOS at 6 months compared to only 15.4% in noncooling group (P = 0.007). Interestingly, the analysis at 6 months post-trauma disclosed mild-cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling (70% vs. 15.4% attained good GOS, P = 0.013) and apparently, the deep-cooling-treated patients failed to be better than either no cooling (P = 0.074) or mild cooling group (P = 0.650). Conclusion: Data from this pilot study imply direct regional brain hypothermia appears safe, feasible and maybe beneficial in treating severely head-injured patients. PMID:25685201

  2. Predictive power of UKCAT and other pre-admission measures for performance in a medical school in Glasgow: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) and its four subtests are currently used by 24 Medical and Dental Schools in the UK for admissions. This longitudinal study examines the predictive validity of UKCAT for final performance in the undergraduate medical degree programme at one Medical School and compares this with the predictive validity of the selection measures available pre-UKCAT. Methods This was a retrospective observational study of one cohort of students, admitted to Glasgow Medical School in 2007. We examined the associations which UKCAT scores, school science grades and pre-admissions interview scores had with performance indicators, particularly final composite scores that determine students’ postgraduate training opportunities and overall ranking (Educational Performance Measure - EPM, and Honours and Commendation – H&C). Analyses were conducted both with and without adjustment for potential socio-demographic confounders (gender, age, ethnicity and area deprivation). Results Despite its predictive value declining as students progress through the course, UKCAT was associated with the final composite scores. In mutually adjusted analyses (also adjusted for socio-demographic confounders), only UKCAT total showed independent relationships with both EPM (p = 0.005) and H&C (p = 0.004), school science achievements predicted EPM (p = 0.009), and pre-admissions interview score predicted neither. UKCAT showed less socio-demographic variation than did TSS. Conclusion UKCAT has a modest predictive power for overall course performance at the University of Glasgow Medical School over and above that of school science achievements or pre-admission interview score and we conclude that UKCAT is the most useful predictor of final ranking. PMID:24919950

  3. Predictive power of UKCAT and other pre-admission measures for performance in a medical school in Glasgow: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sartania, Nana; McClure, John D; Sweeting, Helen; Browitt, Allison

    2014-06-11

    The UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) and its four subtests are currently used by 24 Medical and Dental Schools in the UK for admissions. This longitudinal study examines the predictive validity of UKCAT for final performance in the undergraduate medical degree programme at one Medical School and compares this with the predictive validity of the selection measures available pre-UKCAT. This was a retrospective observational study of one cohort of students, admitted to Glasgow Medical School in 2007. We examined the associations which UKCAT scores, school science grades and pre-admissions interview scores had with performance indicators, particularly final composite scores that determine students' postgraduate training opportunities and overall ranking (Educational Performance Measure - EPM, and Honours and Commendation - H&C). Analyses were conducted both with and without adjustment for potential socio-demographic confounders (gender, age, ethnicity and area deprivation). Despite its predictive value declining as students progress through the course, UKCAT was associated with the final composite scores. In mutually adjusted analyses (also adjusted for socio-demographic confounders), only UKCAT total showed independent relationships with both EPM (p = 0.005) and H&C (p = 0.004), school science achievements predicted EPM (p = 0.009), and pre-admissions interview score predicted neither. UKCAT showed less socio-demographic variation than did TSS. UKCAT has a modest predictive power for overall course performance at the University of Glasgow Medical School over and above that of school science achievements or pre-admission interview score and we conclude that UKCAT is the most useful predictor of final ranking.

  4. Reshaping Care for Older People: Trends in emergency admissions to hospital during a period of simultaneous interventions in Glasgow City, April 2011-March 2015.

    PubMed

    Levin, Kate A; Crighton, Emilia M

    2016-12-01

    This study describes trends in emergency admissions (EAs) in Glasgow City during a period when interventions were designed and implemented, aimed at shifting the balance from institutional to community-based care. Standardised monthly rates of EAs between April 2011 and March 2015 were calculated, for residents of Glasgow City aged 65 years and over. Multilevel zero-inflated Negative Binomial models for EAs nested by datazone were created, adjusting for sex, 5-year age group, area-level deprivation (SIMD quintile), season, month and month squared. Models were also run for EAs by cause, for three causes: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), falls and dementia. The rate of EAs first rose then fell during the study period. When modelled, RRs for month (RR for month 12 relative to month 1 and 95% CI=1.02 (0.99, 1.06)) and month squared (RR=0.999 (0.998, 0.999)) indicated a rise in admissions until February 2012, followed by a fall. Risk of admission was greater for males and increased with increasing age group. The risk of going into hospital for those from SIMD 5 (most affluent) was 0.58 (0.56, 0.59) relative to those from SIMD 1 (most deprived). Socioeconomic inequalities were particularly great for COPD-related admissions, where RR for SIMD 5 was 0.25 (0.23, 0.28) times that of SIMD 1. An interaction term between month and SIMD was not significant for any outcome. For dementia-related EAs there was a suggestion that inequalities may be reducing over time. EAs for those aged 65 years and more reduced during the Change Fund period, with similar relative reductions observed across all deprivation quintiles.

  5. Northern Polar Spring in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 March 2004

    The Odyssey spacecraft has completed a full Mars year of observations of the red planet. For the next several weeks the Image of the Day will look back over this first mars year. It will focus on four themes: 1) the poles - with the seasonal changes seen in the retreat and expansion of the caps; 2) craters - with a variety of morphologies relating to impact materials and later alteration, both infilling and exhumation; 3) channels - the clues to liquid surface flow; and 4) volcanic flow features. While some images have helped answer questions about the history of Mars, many have raised new questions that are still being investigated as Odyssey continues collecting data as it orbits Mars.

    Infrared images taken during the daytime exhibit both the morphological and thermophysical properties of the surface of Mars. Morphologic details are visible due to the effect of sun-facing slopes receiving more energy than antisun-facing slopes. This creates a warm (bright) slope and cool (dark) slope appearance that mimics the light and shadows of a visible wavelength image. Thermophysical properties are seen in that dust heats up more quickly than rocks. Thus dusty areas are bright and rocky areas are dark.

    This image was collected October 19, 2002 during the northern spring season. The top half of this daytime IR image shows the North Polar sand sea.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 76.2, Longitude 226.8 East (133.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in

  6. Northern Polar Spring in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 12 March 2004

    The Odyssey spacecraft has completed a full Mars year of observations of the red planet. For the next several weeks the Image of the Day will look back over this first mars year. It will focus on four themes: 1) the poles - with the seasonal changes seen in the retreat and expansion of the caps; 2) craters - with a variety of morphologies relating to impact materials and later alteration, both infilling and exhumation; 3) channels - the clues to liquid surface flow; and 4) volcanic flow features. While some images have helped answer questions about the history of Mars, many have raised new questions that are still being investigated as Odyssey continues collecting data as it orbits Mars.

    Infrared images taken during the daytime exhibit both the morphological and thermophysical properties of the surface of Mars. Morphologic details are visible due to the effect of sun-facing slopes receiving more energy than antisun-facing slopes. This creates a warm (bright) slope and cool (dark) slope appearance that mimics the light and shadows of a visible wavelength image. Thermophysical properties are seen in that dust heats up more quickly than rocks. Thus dusty areas are bright and rocky areas are dark.

    This image was collected October 19, 2002 during the northern spring season. The top half of this daytime IR image shows the North Polar sand sea.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 76.2, Longitude 226.8 East (133.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in

  7. The Ionotropic Receptors IR21a and IR25a mediate cool sensing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lina; Klein, Mason; Svec, Kathryn V; Budelli, Gonzalo; Chang, Elaine C; Ferrer, Anggie J; Benton, Richard; Samuel, Aravinthan Dt; Garrity, Paul A

    2016-04-29

    Animals rely on highly sensitive thermoreceptors to seek out optimal temperatures, but the molecular mechanisms of thermosensing are not well understood. The Dorsal Organ Cool Cells (DOCCs) of the Drosophila larva are a set of exceptionally thermosensitive neurons critical for larval cool avoidance. Here, we show that DOCC cool-sensing is mediated by Ionotropic Receptors (IRs), a family of sensory receptors widely studied in invertebrate chemical sensing. We find that two IRs, IR21a and IR25a, are required to mediate DOCC responses to cooling and are required for cool avoidance behavior. Furthermore, we find that ectopic expression of IR21a can confer cool-responsiveness in an Ir25a-dependent manner, suggesting an instructive role for IR21a in thermosensing. Together, these data show that IR family receptors can function together to mediate thermosensation of exquisite sensitivity.

  8. The Ionotropic Receptors IR21a and IR25a mediate cool sensing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Lina; Klein, Mason; Svec, Kathryn V; Budelli, Gonzalo; Chang, Elaine C; Ferrer, Anggie J; Benton, Richard; Samuel, Aravinthan DT; Garrity, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    Animals rely on highly sensitive thermoreceptors to seek out optimal temperatures, but the molecular mechanisms of thermosensing are not well understood. The Dorsal Organ Cool Cells (DOCCs) of the Drosophila larva are a set of exceptionally thermosensitive neurons critical for larval cool avoidance. Here, we show that DOCC cool-sensing is mediated by Ionotropic Receptors (IRs), a family of sensory receptors widely studied in invertebrate chemical sensing. We find that two IRs, IR21a and IR25a, are required to mediate DOCC responses to cooling and are required for cool avoidance behavior. Furthermore, we find that ectopic expression of IR21a can confer cool-responsiveness in an Ir25a-dependent manner, suggesting an instructive role for IR21a in thermosensing. Together, these data show that IR family receptors can function together to mediate thermosensation of exquisite sensitivity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13254.001 PMID:27126188

  9. CO excitation in four IR luminous galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radford, Simon J. E.; Solomon, P. M.; Downes, Dennis

    1990-07-01

    The correlation between the CO and far infrared luminosities of spiral galaxies is well established. The luminosity ration, LFIR/L sub CO in IR luminous active galaxies is, however, systematically five to ten times higher than in ordinary spirals and molecular clouds in our Galaxy. Furthermore, the masses of molecular hydrogen in luminous galaxies are large, M (H2) approx. equals 1010 solar magnitude, which indicates the observed luminosity ratios are due to an excess of infrared output, rather than a deficiency of molecular gas. These large amounts of molecular gas may fuel luminous galaxies through either star formation or nuclear activity. This interpretation rests on applying the M (H2)/LCO ratio calibrated in our Galaxy to galaxies with strikingly different luminosity ratios. But are the physical conditions of the molecular gas different in galaxies with different luminosity ratios. And, if so, does the proportionality between CO and H2 also vary among galaxies. To investigate these questions researchers observed CO (2 to 1) and (1 to 0) emission from four luminous galaxies with the Institute for Radio Astronomy in the Millimeter range (IRAM) 30 m telescope. Researchers conclude that most of the CO emission from these Arp 193, Arp 220, and Mrk 231 arises in regions with moderate ambient densities similar to the clouds in the Milky Way molecular ring. The emission is neither from dense hot cloud cores nor from the cold low density gas characteristic of the envelopes of dark clouds.

  10. CO excitation in four IR luminous galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radford, Simon J. E.; Solomon, P. M.; Downes, Dennis

    1990-01-01

    The correlation between the CO and far infrared luminosities of spiral galaxies is well established. The luminosity ration, L sub FIR/L sub CO in IR luminous active galaxies is, however, systematically five to ten times higher than in ordinary spirals and molecular clouds in our Galaxy. Furthermore, the masses of molecular hydrogen in luminous galaxies are large, M (H2) approx. equals 10(exp 10) solar magnitude, which indicates the observed luminosity ratios are due to an excess of infrared output, rather than a deficiency of molecular gas. These large amounts of molecular gas may fuel luminous galaxies through either star formation or nuclear activity. This interpretation rests on applying the M (H2)/L sub CO ratio calibrated in our Galaxy to galaxies with strikingly different luminosity ratios. But are the physical conditions of the molecular gas different in galaxies with different luminosity ratios. And, if so, does the proportionality between CO and H2 also vary among galaxies. To investigate these questions researchers observed CO (2 to 1) and (1 to 0) emission from four luminous galaxies with the Institute for Radio Astronomy in the Millimeter range (IRAM) 30 m telescope. Researchers conclude that most of the CO emission from these Arp 193, Arp 220, and Mrk 231 arises in regions with moderate ambient densities similar to the clouds in the Milky Way molecular ring. The emission is neither from dense hot cloud cores nor from the cold low density gas characteristic of the envelopes of dark clouds.

  11. IR line scanner on UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shi-chao; Qin, Jie-xin; Qi, Hong-xing; Xiao, Gong-hai

    2011-08-01

    This paper introduces the designing principle and method of the IR line scanner on UAV in three aspects of optical-mechanical system, electronics system and processing software. It makes the system achieve good results in practical application that there are many features in the system such as light weight, small size, low power assumption, wide field of view, high instantaneous field of view, high noise equivalent temperature difference, wirelessly controlled and so on. The entire system is designed as follows: Multi-element scanner is put into use for reducing the electrical noise bandwidth, and then improving SNR; Square split aperture scanner is put into use for solving the image ratation distortion, besides fit for large velocity to height ratio; DSP is put into use for non-uniformity correction and background nosie subtraction, and then improving the imagery quality; SD card is put into use as image data storage media instead of the hard disk; The image data is stored in SD card in FAT32 file system, easily playbacked by processing software on Windows and Linux operating system; wireless transceiver module is put into use for wirelessly controlled.

  12. Recent catalysis measurements at IRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massuti-Ballester, B.; Pidan, S.; Herdrich, G.; Fertig, M.

    2015-08-01

    At the Institute of Space Systems (IRS), experiments have been performed using the high enthalpy, inductively heated plasma generator (IPG) in plasma wind tunnel 3 (PWK3), in order to assess the catalytic behaviour of different materials. Utilising the Upwind Relaxation Algorithm for Non-equilibrium Flows of the University of Stuttgart (URANUS), a methodology for determining catalytic efficiencies by obtaining atomic recombination probabilities γ for high temperature materials, has been developed. This method eliminates the inherent uncertainties produced when using catalytic properties of previously tested materials to infer those of new materials. In this work, eight different candidates for the Thermal Protection System (TPS) of an entry vehicle have been studied, of which six are ceramic materials and the other two are metallic alloys. Thermochemical properties of these specimens are given for surface temperatures between 1000 and 2000 K in pure oxygen and pure nitrogen plasmas. The high enthalpies and relatively low pressure conditions in which these material samples have been tested in PWK3 are relevant for entry applications from Low Earth Orbit (LEO).

  13. IR detection with uncooled sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissot, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    The emergence of uncooled detectors has opened new opportunities for IR detection for both military and commercial applications. Development of such devices involves a lot of trade-offs between the different parameters that define the technological stack. These trade-offs explain the number of different architectures that are under worldwide development. The Laboratoire d'Electronique, de Technologies et d'Information (LETI) and ULIS have chosen to develop uncooled infrared sensor using a silicon technology. This silicon approach has the greatest potential for reducing infrared detector manufacturing cost. LETI and ULIS are now working to facilitate the infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) integration into equipment in order to address a very large market. Achievement of this goal needs the development of smart sensors with on-chip advanced functions and the decrease of manufacturing cost of IRFPA by decreasing the pixel pitch and simplifying the vacuum package. We present in this paper the new designs for readout circuit and packages that will be used for 384 × 288 and 160 × 120 arrays with a pitch of 35 μm and advanced results on 35 μm pixel pitch arrays. Thermographic application needs high stability infrared detector with a precise determination of the amount of absorbed infrared flux. Hence, infrared detector with internal temperature stabilized shield has been developed and characterized. The results will be presented.

  14. Jefferson Laboratory IR Demo project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, Michelle D.

    1997-05-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (formerly known as CEBAF) has embarked on the construction of a 1 kW free-electron laser operating initially at 5 microns that is designed for laser-material interaction experiments and to explore the feasibility of scaling the system in power for Navy defense and industrial applications. The accelerator system for this IR demo includes a 10 MeV photocathode-based injector, a 32 MeV CEBAF-style superconducting radio-frequency linac, and single-pass transport that accelerates the beam from injector to wiggler, followed by energy-recovery deceleration to a dump. The initial optical configuration is a conventional near-concentric resonator with transmissive outcoupling. Following commissioning, the laser output will be extended to an operating range of 3-to-6.6 microns, and distributed to six labs in a user facility built with funds from the Commonwealth of Virginia. A description of the machine and facility and the project status are presented.

  15. Hydrogen intercalation under graphene on Ir(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grånäs, Elin; Gerber, Timm; Schröder, Ulrike A.; Schulte, Karina; Andersen, Jesper N.; Michely, Thomas; Knudsen, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Using high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy we study the intercalation of hydrogen under graphene/Ir(111). The hydrogen intercalated graphene is characterized by a component in C 1s that is shifted -0.10 to -0.18 eV with respect to pristine graphene and a component in Ir 4f at 60.54 eV. The position of this Ir 4f component is identical to that of the Ir(111) surface layer with hydrogen atoms adsorbed, indicating that the atomic hydrogen adsorption site on bare Ir(111) and beneath graphene is the same. Based on co-existence of fully- and non-intercalated graphene, and the inability to intercalate a closed graphene film covering the entire Ir(111) surface, we conclude that hydrogen dissociatively adsorbs at bare Ir(111) patches, and subsequently diffuses rapidly under graphene. A likely entry point for the intercalating hydrogen atoms is identified to be where graphene crosses an underlying Ir(111) step.

  16. High temperature Ir segregation in Ir-B ceramics: Effect of oxygen presence on stability of IrB2 and other Ir-B phases

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zhilin; Terracciano, Anthony C.; Cullen, David A.; Blair, Richard G.; Orlovskaya, Nina

    2015-05-13

    The formation of IrB2, IrB1.35, IrB1.1 and IrB monoboride phases in the Ir–B ceramic nanopowder was confirmed during mechanochemical reaction between metallic Ir and elemental B powders. The Ir–B phases were analysed after 90 h of high energy ball milling and after annealing of the powder for 72 h at 1050°C in vacuo. The iridium monoboride (IrB) orthorhombic phase was synthesised experimentally for the first time and identified by powder X-ray diffraction. Additionally, the ReB2 type IrB2 hexagonal phase was also produced for the first time and identified by high resolution transmission electron microscope. Ir segregation along disordered domains of the boron lattice was found to occur during high temperature annealing. Furthermore, these nanodomains may have useful catalytic properties.

  17. Status Of Sofradir IR-CCD Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribolet, Philippe; Radisson, Patrick

    1988-05-01

    The topics of this paper deal with the IR-CCD detectors manufactured by SOFRADIR the new French joint venture. Description of the IRCCD technology and the advantages of this approach are given. In conclusion, some IR-CCD typical results are given.

  18. The WFC3 IR "Blobs" Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirzkal, N.; Hilbert, B.

    2012-11-01

    We present new results on the WFC3 IR "Blobs" based on analysis of data acquired using the WFC3 IR channel from 2010 to 2012. In particular, we trace the date of appearance of each of the Blobs we identified in our deep IR sky flats. The number of Blobs identified in the WFC3 IR channel is now 40, and increase of a factor of 2 from our earlier 2010 ISR. We also discuss the color of the blobs, as measured using the F105W, F125W and F160W filters. We find Blobs to be more opaque to bluer light and their effect is therefore slightly stronger in the F105W and F125W filters when comparing these to the F160W filter. We find that the IR Blobs have appeared during somewhat discrete events and that there was a period a little over one year long when no new Blobs appeared.

  19. Using The Cornell Atlas of Spitzer/IRS Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonyan, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    I summarize my research studying details of the emission line profiles of the mid infrared [NeII] 12.8 microns and [NeIII] 15.6 microns emission lines. Observations are from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) (Houck et al. 2004), so I illustrate use of the archive of these spectra. The IRS team developed the Cornell Atlas of Spitzer IRS Sources (CASSIS) found at cassis.sirtf.com. At present, all low resolution (Lebouteiller et al. 2011) and high resolution (Lebouteiller et al. 2015) staring observations with the IRS are available (more than 20,000 spectra of about 15,000 distinct sources). Spectra are provided in various formats to enable easy viewing or measurements. Spectra cover 5 microns to 37 microns in low resolution (R ˜ 60 to 125) and 10 microns to 37 microns in high resolution (R ˜ 600) modes. CASSIS is intended as a long term resource for the astronomical community so that this fundamental data base of mid-infrared spectra will be easily usable perpetually, and I demonstrate some examples of its use.

  20. A Near-IR Uncaging Strategy Based on Cyanine Photochemistry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The development of photocaging groups activated by near-IR light would enable new approaches for basic research and allow for spatial and temporal control of drug delivery. Here we report a near-IR light-initiated uncaging reaction sequence based on readily synthesized C4′-dialkylamine-substituted heptamethine cyanines. Phenol-containing small molecules are uncaged through sequential release of the C4′-amine and intramolecular cyclization. The release sequence is initiated by a previously unexploited photochemical reaction of the cyanine fluorophore scaffold. The uncaging process is compatible with biological milieu and is initiated with low intensity 690 nm light. We show that cell viability can be inhibited through light-dependent release of the estrogen receptor antagonist, 4-hydroxycyclofen. In addition, through uncaging of the same compound, gene expression is controlled with near-IR light in a ligand-dependent CreERT/LoxP-reporter cell line derived from transgenic mice. These studies provide a chemical foundation that we expect will enable specific delivery of small molecules using cytocompatible, tissue penetrant near-IR light. PMID:25211609

  1. A near-IR uncaging strategy based on cyanine photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Gorka, Alexander P; Nani, Roger R; Zhu, Jianjian; Mackem, Susan; Schnermann, Martin J

    2014-10-08

    The development of photocaging groups activated by near-IR light would enable new approaches for basic research and allow for spatial and temporal control of drug delivery. Here we report a near-IR light-initiated uncaging reaction sequence based on readily synthesized C4'-dialkylamine-substituted heptamethine cyanines. Phenol-containing small molecules are uncaged through sequential release of the C4'-amine and intramolecular cyclization. The release sequence is initiated by a previously unexploited photochemical reaction of the cyanine fluorophore scaffold. The uncaging process is compatible with biological milieu and is initiated with low intensity 690 nm light. We show that cell viability can be inhibited through light-dependent release of the estrogen receptor antagonist, 4-hydroxycyclofen. In addition, through uncaging of the same compound, gene expression is controlled with near-IR light in a ligand-dependent CreER(T)/LoxP-reporter cell line derived from transgenic mice. These studies provide a chemical foundation that we expect will enable specific delivery of small molecules using cytocompatible, tissue penetrant near-IR light.

  2. Demonstration of KHILS two-color IR projection capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lawrence E.; Coker, Jason S.; Garbo, Dennis L.; Olson, Eric M.; Murrer, Robert Lee, Jr.; Bergin, Thomas P.; Goldsmith, George C., II; Crow, Dennis R.; Guertin, Andrew W.; Dougherty, Michael; Marler, Thomas M.; Timms, Virgil G.

    1998-07-01

    For more than a decade, there has been considerable discussion about using different IR bands for the detection of low contrast military targets. Theory predicts that a target can have little to no contrast against the background in one IR band while having a discernible signature in another IR band. A significant amount of effort has been invested towards establishing hardware that is capable of simultaneously imaging in two IR bands to take advantage of this phenomenon. Focal plane arrays (FPA) are starting to materialize with this simultaneous two-color imaging capability. The Kinetic Kill Vehicle Hardware-in-the-loop Simulator (KHILS) team of the Air Force Research Laboratory and the Guided Weapons Evaluation Facility (GWEF), both at Eglin AFB, FL, have spent the last 10 years developing the ability to project dynamic IR scenes to imaging IR seekers. Through the Wideband Infrared Scene Projector (WISP) program, the capability to project two simultaneous IR scenes to a dual color seeker has been established at KHILS. WISP utilizes resistor arrays to produce the IR energy. Resistor arrays are not ideal blackbodies. The projection of two IR colors with resistor arrays, therefore, requires two optically coupled arrays. This paper documents the first demonstration of two-color simultaneous projection at KHILS. Agema cameras were used for the measurements. The Agema's HgCdTe detector has responsivity from 4 to 14 microns. A blackbody and two IR filters (MWIR equals 4.2 t 7.4 microns, LWIR equals 7.7 to 13 microns) were used to calibrate the Agema in two bands. Each filter was placed in front of the blackbody one at a time, and the temperature of the blackbody was stepped up in incremental amounts. The output counts from the Agema were recorded at each temperature. This calibration process established the radiance to Agema output count curves for the two bands. The WISP optical system utilizes a dichroic beam combiner to optically couple the two resistor arrays. The

  3. From Ultrafast Structure Determination to Steering Reactions: Mixed IR/Non-IR Multidimensional Vibrational Spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2015-09-28

    Ultrafast multidimensional infrared spectroscopy is a powerful method for resolving features of molecular structure and dynamics that are difficult or impossible to address with linear spectroscopy. Augmenting the IR pulse sequences by resonant or nonresonant UV, Vis, or NIR pulses considerably extends the range of application and creates techniques with possibilities far beyond a pure multidimensional IR experiment. These include surface-specific 2D-IR spectroscopy with sub-monolayer sensitivity, ultrafast structure determination in non-equilibrium systems, triggered exchange spectroscopy to correlate reactant and product bands, exploring the interplay of electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom, investigation of interactions between Raman- and IR-active modes, imaging with chemical contrast, sub-ensemble-selective photochemistry, and even steering a reaction by selective IR excitation. We give an overview of useful mixed IR/non-IR pulse sequences, discuss their differences, and illustrate their application potential.

  4. Detecting explosive substances by the IR spectrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuula, J.; Rinta, Heikki J.; Pölönen, I.; Puupponen, H.-H.; Haukkamäki, Marko; Teräväinen, T.

    2014-05-01

    Fast and safe detection methods of explosive substances are needed both before and after actualized explosions. This article presents an experiment of the detection of three selected explosives by the ATR FTIR spectrometer and by three different IR hyperspectral imaging devices. The IR spectrometers give accurate analyzing results, whereas hyperspectral imagers can detect and analyze desired samples without touching the unidentified target at all. In the controlled explosion experiment TNT, dynamite and PENO were at first analyzed as pure substances with the ATR FTIR spectrometer and with VNIR, SWIR and MWIR cameras. After three controlled explosions also the residues of TNT, dynamite and PENO were analyzed with the same IR devices. The experiments were performed in arctic outdoor conditions and the residues were collected on ten different surfaces. In the measurements the spectra of all three explosives were received as pure substances with all four IR devices. Also the explosion residues of TNT were found on cotton with the IR spectrometer and with VNIR, SWIR and MWIR hyperspectral imagers. All measurements were made directly on the test materials which had been placed on the explosion site and were collected for the analysis after each blast. Measurements were made with the IR spectrometer also on diluted sample. Although further tests are suggested, the results indicate that the IR spectrography is a potential detection method for explosive subjects, both as pure substances and as post-blast residues.

  5. Quantifying Flaw Characteristics from IR NDE Data

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W; Philips, N R; Burke, M W; Robbins, C L

    2003-02-14

    Work is presented which allows flaw characteristics to be quantified from the transient IR NDE signature. The goal of this effort was to accurately determine the type, size and depth of flaws revealed with IR NDE, using sonic IR as the example IR NDE technique. Typically an IR NDE experiment will result in a positive qualitative indication of a flaw such as a cold or hot spot in the image, but will not provide quantitative data thereby leaving the practitioner to make educated guesses as to the source of the signal. The technique presented here relies on comparing the transient IR signature to exact heat transfer analytical results for prototypical flaws, using the flaw characteristics as unknown fitting parameters. A nonlinear least squares algorithm is used to evaluate the fitting parameters, which then provide a direct measure of the flaw characteristics that can be mapped to the imaged surface for visual reference. The method uses temperature data for the heat transfer analysis, so radiometric calibration of the IR signal is required. The method provides quantitative data with a single thermal event (e.g. acoustic pulse or flash), as compared to phase-lock techniques that require many events. The work has been tested with numerical data but remains to be validated by experimental data, and that effort is underway.

  6. Corrosion detection on pipelines by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bison, P.; Marinetti, S.; Cuogo, G.; Molinas, B.; Zonta, P.; Grinzato, E.

    2011-05-01

    IR thermography is applied to detect hidden corrosion on carbon steel pipelines for oil transportation. The research is oriented to set up a robust technique to carry out in situ the early detection of corroded zones that may evolve either towards leakage or failure. The use of thermography associated with a transient thermal technique is investigated on 12.2 mm thick samples, machined to artificially create a reduction of wall thickness that simulates the effect of real corrosion in pipes. The extension and depth of the artificial defects is controlled by ultrasounds which represents the reference for the results obtained by thermography. Two approaches are proposed: the first is based on the processing of a single thermogram taken at the optimum time after a finite pulse heating of a large area of the external surface; the second technique is carried out by scanning the pipeline by means of a device composed of a linear lamp and a thermographic camera which move jointly over the surface to test. A suitable reconstruction provides a map of the tested surface with possible hot spots in correspondence with the corroded areas. The analysis of the thermal problem by Finite Element Method is used to optimize the experimental parameters. The experimental results demonstrate a detection capability starting from 15 % of wall thickness reduction.

  7. Basaltic Crater in Color IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 6, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image near Nili Fosse in the the Isidis region of Mars. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations. In many cases craters trap sand in their topographic depressions, interrupting the sand's migration across the Martian surface. This image is particularly interesting because there appears to be more than 1 type of sand in the bottom of this crater and in the hummocky terrain near the bottom of the image. The pink/magenta areas are characteristic of a basaltic composition, but there are also orange areas that are likely caused by the presence of andesite. These two compositions, basalt and andesite, are some of the most common found on Mars.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 24, Longitude 80.7 East (297.3 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip

  8. Basaltic Crater in Color IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 6, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image near Nili Fosse in the the Isidis region of Mars. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations. In many cases craters trap sand in their topographic depressions, interrupting the sand's migration across the Martian surface. This image is particularly interesting because there appears to be more than 1 type of sand in the bottom of this crater and in the hummocky terrain near the bottom of the image. The pink/magenta areas are characteristic of a basaltic composition, but there are also orange areas that are likely caused by the presence of andesite. These two compositions, basalt and andesite, are some of the most common found on Mars.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 24, Longitude 80.7 East (297.3 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip

  9. Atmospheric Effects in IR Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 3, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image covering parts of Ius Chasma and Oudemans Crater. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    This image is dominated by atmospheric effects. The pink/magenta colors inside the canyon show areas with a large amount of atmospheric dust. In the bottom half of the image, the patchy blue/cyan colors indicate the presence of water ice clouds out on the plains. Water ice clouds and high amounts of dust do not generally occur at the same place and time on Mars because the dust absorbs sunlight and heats the atmosphere. The more dust that is present, the warmer the atmosphere becomes, sublimating the water ice into water vapor and dissipating any clouds.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.2, Longitude 267.9 East (92.1.West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is

  10. Melas Chasma in IR Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 11, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image over Melas Chasma. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    There is a distinct purple/blue layer present in the northern wall of the Chasma. Although this layer likely has a composition different than the surrounding areas, it is difficult to interpret its specific composition due to the high variability of sunlit and shaded surfaces in this area, which cause a wide range of temperatures to be present within each pixel of the image. It is possible that this layer has a unique composition due to differences in the volcanic or sedimentary environment at the time that the rock formed, or it could be a layer of magma injected between two previously existing rock layers. Another possibility is that the wall is mostly covered by dust and debris, and this portion contains the only exposed bedrock. The light blue colors present in many other areas of the Chasma are due to water ice clouds.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.9, Longitude 282 East (78 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey

  11. Ice Clouds in Color IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 9, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image in the Elysium region of Mars. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    The light blue area in the center of this image is a very nice example of a water ice cloud. Water ice is frequently present in the Martian atmosphere as a thin haze. Clouds such as this one can be difficult to identify in a temperature image, but are easy to spot in the DCS images. In this case, the water ice is relatively confined and concentrated which may be due to the topography of the Elysium volcanic construct.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 23.2, Longitude 150.1 East (209.9 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed

  12. Atmospheric Effects in IR Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 3, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image covering parts of Ius Chasma and Oudemans Crater. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    This image is dominated by atmospheric effects. The pink/magenta colors inside the canyon show areas with a large amount of atmospheric dust. In the bottom half of the image, the patchy blue/cyan colors indicate the presence of water ice clouds out on the plains. Water ice clouds and high amounts of dust do not generally occur at the same place and time on Mars because the dust absorbs sunlight and heats the atmosphere. The more dust that is present, the warmer the atmosphere becomes, sublimating the water ice into water vapor and dissipating any clouds.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.2, Longitude 267.9 East (92.1.West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is

  13. Gale Crater in IR Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released August 4, 2004 This image shows two representations of the same infra-red image of Gale Crater. On the left is a grayscale image showing surface temperature, and on the right is a false-color composite made from 3 individual THEMIS bands. The false-color image is colorized using a technique called decorrelation stretch (DCS), which emphasizes the spectral differences between the bands to highlight compositional variations.

    In the bottom of the crater, surrounding the central mound, there are extensive basaltic sand deposits. The basaltic sand spectral signature combined with the warm surface (due to the low albedo of basaltic sand) produces a very strong pink/magenta color. This color signature contrasts with the green/yellow color of soil and dust in the top of the image, and the cyan color due to the presence of water ice clouds at the bottom of the image. This migrating sand may be producing the erosional features seen on the central mound.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -4.4, Longitude 137.4 East (222.6 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University

  14. Plasma thruster development program at the IRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auweter-Kurtz, M.

    1992-08-01

    The current status of the plasma thruster development program at the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) of the University of Stuttgart is reviewed. Continuously running MPD thrusters up to the megawatt level are currently under development. The objective of this work at IRS is to identify and avoid critical regimes of operation and predict the performance of high-power MPD thrusters. The development program for thermal arcjets is more flight oriented. The discussion includes a description of the IRS facilities and highlights of the MPD thruster and thermal arcjet development programs.

  15. IR Excesses of Four Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilikova, Jana; Chu, Y.; Gruendl, R. A.; Su, K. Y. L.

    2008-03-01

    An infrared excess of a star indicates the presence of an additional object that is cooler and dimmer and therefore undetectable at optical wavelengths, such as a low-mass companion, a planet, or a dust disk. Dust disks have been detected around post-AGB stars and a number of white dwarfs (WDs). An intermediate stage between these two, the central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNs), have been neglected in the search for dust disks. PN researches focus more on the nebulosity than the CSPN, and any detected excess is usually assumed to originate from stellar ejecta without further investigation. The Helix Nebula's central star was the first one found to exhibit IR excess after careful subtraction of nebular emission, and the origin of this excess was found to be a dust continuum. To search for more cases of IR excess of CSPNs, we have surveyed 40 resolved PNe in the Spitzer archive. For the PNe with resolved central stars, we carried out photometric measurements, and combined them with supplemental optical and near-IR data to construct their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We further modeled stellar emission using appropriate stellar temperature, distance, and de-reddened V or B magnitude. We find four CSPNs that exhibit IR excess - NGC 2346, NGC 2438, NGC 6804 and NGC 7139. The nature and the origin of the IR excess in these CSPNs is still unclear and needs to be verified spectroscopically. If it is indeed continuous in nature, it is likely due to the presence of a dust disk, which could be produced in a common-envelope binary evolution, or result from tidal breakup of asteroids or collisions among Kuiper-Belt-like objects.

  16. Impact of Glasgow Coma Scale score and pupil parameters on mortality rate and outcome in pediatric and adult severe traumatic brain injury: a retrospective, multicenter cohort study.

    PubMed

    Emami, Pedram; Czorlich, Patrick; Fritzsche, Friederike S; Westphal, Manfred; Rueger, Johannes M; Lefering, Rolf; Hoffmann, Michael

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Prediction of death and functional outcome is essential for determining treatment strategies and allocation of resources for patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of this study was to evaluate, by using pupillary status and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, if patients with severe TBI who are ≤ 15 years old have a lower mortality rate and better outcome than adults with severe TBI. METHODS A retrospective cohort analysis of patients suffering from severe TBI registered in the Trauma Registry of the German Society for Trauma Surgery between 2002 and 2013 was undertaken. Severe TBI was defined as an Abbreviated Injury Scale of the head (AIShead) score of ≥ 3 and an AIS score for any other part of the body that does not exceed the AIShead score. Only patients with complete data (GCS score, age, and pupil parameters) were included. To assess the impact of GCS score and pupil parameters, the authors also used the recently introduced Eppendorf-Cologne Scale and divided the study population into 2 groups: children (0-15 years old) and adults (16-55 years old). Each patient's outcome was measured at discharge from the trauma center by using the Glasgow Outcome Scale. RESULTS A total of 9959 patients fulfilled the study inclusion criteria; 888 (8.9%) patients were ≤ 15 years old (median 10 years). The overall mortality rate and the mortality rate for patients with a GCS of 3 and bilaterally fixed and dilated pupils (19.9% and 16.3%, respectively) were higher for the adults than for the pediatric patients (85% vs 80.9%, respectively), although cardiopulmonary resuscitation rates were significantly higher in the pediatric patients (5.6% vs 8.8%, respectively). In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, no motor response (OR 3.490, 95% CI 2.240-5.435) and fixed pupils (OR 4.197, 95% CI 3.271-5.386) and bilateral dilated pupils (OR 2.848, 95% CI 2.282-3.556) were associated with a higher mortality rate. Patients ≤ 15 years old had a

  17. NaIrO{sub 3}-A pentavalent post-perovskite

    SciTech Connect

    Bremholm, M.; Dutton, S.E.; Stephens, P.W.; Cava, R.J.

    2011-03-15

    Sodium iridium (V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3,} was synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions. It is found to be isostructural with CaIrO{sub 3}, the much-studied structural analog of the high-pressure post-perovskite phase of MgSiO{sub 3}. Among the oxide post-perovskites, NaIrO{sub 3} is the first example with a pentavalent cation. The structure consists of layers of corner- and edge-sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra separated by layers of NaO{sub 8} bicapped trigonal prisms. NaIrO{sub 3} shows no magnetic ordering and resistivity measurements show non-metallic behavior. The crystal structure, electrical and magnetic properties are discussed and compared to known post-perovskites and pentavalent perovskite metal oxides. -- Graphical abstract: Sodium iridium(V) oxide, NaIrO{sub 3}, synthesized by a high pressure solid state method and recovered to ambient conditions is found to crystallize as the post-perovskite structure and is the first example of a pentavalent ABO{sub 3} post-perovskite. Research highlights: {yields} NaIrO{sub 3} post-perovskite stabilized by pressure. {yields} First example of a pentavalent oxide post-perovskite. {yields} Non-metallic and non-magnetic behavior of NaIrO{sub 3}.

  18. The recent and prospective developments of cooled IR FPAs for double application at Electron NRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutunov, V. A.; Vasilyev, I. S.; Ivanov, V. G.; Prokofyev, A. E.

    2003-09-01

    The recent and prospective developments of monolithic silicon IR-Schottky-barrier staring focal plane arrays (IR SB FPAs), photodetector assembly, and digital thermal imaging cameras (TICs) at Electron National Research Institute (Electron NRI) are considered. Basic parameters for IR SB FPAs with 256x256 and 512x512 pixels, and TICs based on these arrays are presented. The problems emerged while proceeding from the developments of IR SB FPAs for the wavelength range from 3 μm to 5 μm to the developments of those ones for xLWIR range are indicated (an abrupt increase in the level of background architecture). Possibility for further improvement in basic parameters of IR SB FPAs are discussed (a decrease in threshold signal power down to 0.5-1.0"1013 W/element with an increase in quantum efficiency, a decrease in output noise and proceeding to Schottky barriers of degenerated semiconductor/silicon heterojunction, and implementation of these array parameters in photodetector assembly with improved thermal background shielding taking into consideration an optical structure of TIC for concrete application). It is concluded that relative simplicity of the technology and expected low cost of monolithic silicon IR SB FPAs with basic parameters compared with hybrid IR FPAs for the wavelength ranges from 3 μm to 5 μm and from 8 μm to 12 μm maintain large monolithic IR SB FPAs as a basis for developments of double application digital TICs in the Russian Federation.

  19. Is religion or culture the key feature in changes in substance use after leaving school? Young Punjabis and a comparison group in Glasgow.

    PubMed

    Bradby, Hannah; Williams, Rory

    2006-08-01

    To establish levels of use of tobacco, alcohol and illegal drugs among 18-20 year old men and women of Asian (Punjabi) and non-Asian origin compared with levels four years earlier and consider the role of religion and culture in abstinent behaviour. Structured self-complete questionnaire used with 94% of pupils with South Asian names recorded by the Greater Glasgow education department in 1991 and a proportionate random sample of pupils in the same years who did not have South Asian names. Followed up in 1996 in an interviewer-led structured questionnaire in their own homes. Greater Glasgow, largest city in the west of Scotland. Eight hundred and twenty-four overwhelmingly British-born 14-15 year olds in 1992, 492 followed up aged 18-20 years in 1996. Self-report measures of ever having tried alcohol, tobacco and drugs and the quantities consumed at age 14-15 and 18-20. Indication of reasons for abstinence from substance use at age 18-20. Asians were much more abstinent from all these substances at both ages (p < 0.001), except for smoking at 18-20. However, religiously specific patterns of abstinence were particularly strong for alcohol (Muslim odds ratio 7- to 9-fold lower at 14-15, 16- to 25-fold lower at 18-20) and smoking (Sikh/Hindu odds ratio 10-fold lower than Muslims, 20-fold than Christians at 18-20), though there is a shared Asian tendency for women to observe these patterns more than men at 18-20. At age 14-15 abstinence was high in the largely British-born generation of Asians mainly for cultural reasons common to religious groups. Four years later culturally determined abstinence has atrophied, and abstinence reflects the specific influence of ascetic religious traditions, though some cultural influence remains in that women are more affected. Intergenerational changes are similar. The erosion of constraints on smoking presents a threat to health.

  20. PKC{delta}-mediated IRS-1 Ser24 phosphorylation negatively regulates IRS-1 function

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Michael W. . E-mail: michael.greene@bassett.org; Ruhoff, Mary S.; Roth, Richard A.; Kim, Jeong-a; Quon, Michael J.; Krause, Jean A.

    2006-10-27

    The IRS-1 PH and PTB domains are essential for insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation and insulin signaling, while Ser/Thr phosphorylation of IRS-1 disrupts these signaling events. To investigate consensus PKC phosphorylation sites in the PH-PTB domains of human IRS-1, we changed Ser24, Ser58, and Thr191 to Ala (3A) or Glu (3E), to block or mimic phosphorylation, respectively. The 3A mutant abrogated the inhibitory effect of PKC{delta} on insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation, while reductions in insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation, cellular proliferation, and Akt activation were observed with the 3E mutant. When single Glu mutants were tested, the Ser24 to Glu mutant had the greatest inhibitory effect on insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation. PKC{delta}-mediated IRS-1 Ser24 phosphorylation was confirmed in cells with PKC{delta} catalytic domain mutants and by an RNAi method. Mechanistic studies revealed that IRS-1 with Ala and Glu point mutations at Ser24 impaired phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate binding. In summary, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that Ser24 is a negative regulatory phosphorylation site in IRS-1.

  1. PKCdelta-mediated IRS-1 Ser24 phosphorylation negatively regulates IRS-1 function.

    PubMed

    Greene, Michael W; Ruhoff, Mary S; Roth, Richard A; Kim, Jeong-A; Quon, Michael J; Krause, Jean A

    2006-10-27

    The IRS-1 PH and PTB domains are essential for insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation and insulin signaling, while Ser/Thr phosphorylation of IRS-1 disrupts these signaling events. To investigate consensus PKC phosphorylation sites in the PH-PTB domains of human IRS-1, we changed Ser24, Ser58, and Thr191 to Ala (3A) or Glu (3E), to block or mimic phosphorylation, respectively. The 3A mutant abrogated the inhibitory effect of PKCdelta on insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation, while reductions in insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation, cellular proliferation, and Akt activation were observed with the 3E mutant. When single Glu mutants were tested, the Ser24 to Glu mutant had the greatest inhibitory effect on insulin-stimulated IRS-1 Tyr phosphorylation. PKCdelta-mediated IRS-1 Ser24 phosphorylation was confirmed in cells with PKCdelta catalytic domain mutants and by an RNAi method. Mechanistic studies revealed that IRS-1 with Ala and Glu point mutations at Ser24 impaired phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate binding. In summary, our data are consistent with the hypothesis that Ser24 is a negative regulatory phosphorylation site in IRS-1.

  2. Increasing Medical Student Exposure to IR through Integration of IR into the Gross Anatomy Course.

    PubMed

    DePietro, Daniel M; Kiefer, Ryan M; Redmond, Jonas W; Workman, Alan D; Nadolski, Gregory J; Gade, Terence P; Trerotola, Scott O; Hunt, Stephen J

    2017-10-01

    To compare medical student knowledge of and interest in interventional radiology (IR) before and after the integration of an IR lecture series within the gross anatomy course. Four elective IR lectures were scheduled to coincide with the relevant anatomy dissection curriculum. Anonymous surveys were distributed to 146 students before and after the lectures regarding students' knowledge of and interest in IR, responsibilities of an IR physician, and IR training pathways. Those who did not attend served as controls. Response rates were 67% (n = 98) in the prelecture group, 55% (n = 22) in the group who attended the lecture, and 28% (n = 30) in the control group. A total of 73% of the prelecture group reported little knowledge of IR compared with other specialties. This decreased to 27% in those who attended the lecture (P < .001). A total of 32% of those who attended believed they had more knowledge of IR than any other specialty, compared with 7% of controls (P value not significant) and 2% of the prelecture group (P < .001). Those in attendance could name a significantly greater number of IR procedures (mean, 1.82) than the prelecture group (mean, 0.57; P < .001). A total of 64% of those who attended would consider a career in IR, compared with 24% in the prelecture group and 33% in the control group (P < .05). A total of 68% of those who attended had knowledge of the IR residency, compared with 5% in the prelecture group and 33% in the control group (P < .05). Integration of IR education into the gross anatomy course proved to be a highly effective way of teaching preclinical students about IR and generating interest in the field. Copyright © 2017 SIR. All rights reserved.

  3. Occupational radiodermatitis from Ir192 exposure.

    PubMed

    Condé-Salazar, L; Guimaraens, D; Romero, L V

    1986-10-01

    3 cases of occupational radiodermatitis from Ir192 exposure in personnel handling a gamma ray projector in industrial radiography are presented. The diagnosis was confirmed histologically. The nature and use of the industrial machines are described.

  4. Far-IR selected star formation regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, D. T.; Hildebrand, R. H.; Keene, J.; Harper, D. A.; Loewenstein, R. F.; Moran, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed far-IR observations and complemenary submillimeter, 5 GHz continuum and c(18)0 observations of a sample of far-IR selected luminous regions of star formation. The clouds and that the exciting stars lie deep within these condensations. The far-IR sources have diversely shaped 40 micron to 180 micron spectra even through their 60 micron to 100 micron color temperatures are similar. The radio and far-IR results together show that the exciting stars are in clusters containing either zero-age main sequence and pre-main sequence stars or consisting entirely of premain sequence objects. C(18)0 and submillimeter observations imply gas densities approximately .00005 - high enough to make t(sub dust) approximately t(sub gas).

  5. IR heating of the cometary atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marconi, M. L.; Mendis, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    The transfer of radiation, solar and IR dust, in the cometary atmosphere is analyzed using a six-band radiative transfer model. The first five bands correlate with the strongest IR band of H2O and the sixth corresponds to the bulk of solar energy. The radiation field for each band is calculated as a function of the cometocentric distance using the three-stream approximation. It is observed that the mean intensity of the IR radiation field generated by the dust and the cometary nucleus drops from a very large value of about 40,000 erg/sq cm sec at the surface to 400 erg/sq cm sec at 7 km, rises to a peak value of 500 erg/sq cm sec at 100 km and then falls off monotonically. The causes of these changes in radiation field intensity are discussed. The effect of variation of the IR radiation field on the gas temperature is studied.

  6. Near-IR Photoluminescence of C60().

    PubMed

    Strelnikov, Dmitry V; Kern, Bastian; Kappes, Manfred M

    2017-10-05

    We have observed that C60(+) ions isolated in cryogenic matrices show distinct near-IR photoluminescence upon excitation in the near-IR range. By contrast, UV photoexcitation does not lead to measurable luminescence. Near-IR C60(+) photoluminescence is a one-photon process. The emission is mainly concentrated in one band and corresponds to (2)A1u ← (2)E1g relaxation. We present experimental data for the Stokes shift, power, and temperature dependencies as well as the quantum efficiency of the photoluminescence. Our findings may be relevant for astronomy, considering recent unequivocal assignment of five diffuse interstellar bands to near-IR absorption bands of C60(+).

  7. IR Optimization, DID and anti-DID

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, Andrei; Maruyama, Takashi; Parker, Brett; /Brookhaven

    2006-02-03

    In this paper, we discuss optimization of the larger crossing angle Interaction Region of the Linear Collider, where specially shaped transverse field of the Detector Integrated Dipole can be reversed and adjusted to optimize trajectories of the low energy pairs, so that their majority would be directed into the extraction exit hole. This decreases the backscattering and makes background in 14mrad IR to be similar to background in 2mrad IR.

  8. IR diver vision for turbidity mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milam, Jerry A.

    2010-04-01

    Commercial, forensic, and military divers often encounter turbid conditions which reduce visibility to zero. Under such conditions, work must be performed completely blind. The darkness resulting from high levels of turbidity is complete, and can be dangerous as well as disorienting. Such darkness can even occur near the surface on a bright and sunny day. Artificial underwater lighting is of no use in such situations, as it only makes matters worse (similar to the use of high beam headlights in dense fog). Certain wavelengths of infrared (IR) light have the ability to penetrate this underwater "fog," and thus form the basis of the current development. Turbidity results from clay, silt, finely divided organic and inorganic matter, soluble colored organic compounds, plankton and microscopic organisms suspended in water. The IR Diver Vision system described herein consists of a standard commercial diving mask of any of several configurations whereby an IR light source, IR video camera, video display, and power source may be integrated within or attached to the mask. The IR light source wavelength is compatible with the spectral bandwidth of the video camera. The camera field-of-view (FOV) is matched to the video display in order to provide a unity magnification and hence prevent diver ocular fatigue. The IR video camera, video display, power source and controls are compatible with extended use in a submarine environment. Some such masks will incorporate tilt/heading sensors and video indicators. 3-D Imaging, Inc. has developed prototypes and has patents pending on such devices.

  9. Measuring the IR solar corona during the 2017 eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryans, Paul; Hannigan, James; Philip, Judge; Larson, Brandon; Sewell, Scott; McIntire, Lauren

    2016-05-01

    On 21 August 2017 a total solar eclipse will pass across the continental United States, offering a unique opportunity to conduct scientific research of the solar atmosphere. With the light from the Sun eclipsed, the solar corona becomes visible in a way not possible when swamped by the light from the photosphere. The infrared (IR) spectrum of the corona, in particular, is predicted to contain some of the most magnetically sensitive spectral lines. However, no comprehensive survey of this spectral range has been carried out to date. Here, we describe a Fourier Transform Spectrometer, currently under construction at NCAR, to measure the IR spectrum from 2 to 12 microns. We will discuss the operation of the experiment, which will be deployed along the path of totality in Wyoming, and the scientific results we hope to obtain.

  10. Brain death epidemiology in Uruguay and utilization of the Glasgow coma score in acute brain injured patients as a predictor of brain death.

    PubMed

    Mizraji, R; Perez-Protto, S; Etchegaray, A; Castro, A; Lander, M; Buccino, E; Severo, L; Alvarez, I

    2009-10-01

    The knowledge of brain death (BD) epidemiology and the acute brain injury (ABI) progression profile are relevant to improve public health programs, organ procurement strategies, as well as intensive care unit (ICU) protocols aiming to increase the detection of potential donors. The aim of this study was to analyze the BD epidemiology and the ABI progression profile among subjects admitted to ICUs with a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) < or = 8. This was a prospective, observational study of BD reported to the National Institute of Donation and Transplantation from 2000-2006. The patients with ABI and GCS < or = 8 who were admitted to 5 ICUs with In-hospital Transplant Coordination were analyzed over the period of 2005-2007. The BD detection increased from 28.7 in 2000 to 58.5 BD pmp in 2006. The real donor global rate increased from 10 to 24.6 pmp from 2000 to 2006. The ABI patients with GCS < or = 8 had a global mortality rate of 56%, including 23.4% who evolved to BD. This study showed a 200% increment of detected BD and 150% of real donors, although these results are still below the international figures. GCS follow-up appeared to be a good tool to predict the BD outcome. The follow-up of patients with ABI allowed us to improve our BD detection strategy.

  11. [Comparative study using AAO-HNS guidelines for conductive hearing loss and Glasgow Benefit Plot to evaluate results of stapes surgery for otosclerosis: results of 129 cases].

    PubMed

    Caces, F; Braccini, F

    2007-01-01

    For surgery of otosclerosis, broughting to the fore interest of crossing informations achieved by using AAO-HNS guidelines for conductive hearing loss and Glasgow Benefit Plot (GBP). Secondary aim: compare stapedotomy with and without veinous interposition. INSTITUTIONS: Referential otologic center in semi-country-side general hospital and private institution in urban zone. retrospective bi-centric study comparing 129 cases of primary surgery for otosclerosis between 1998 and 2004. 3 groups: stapedotomy without veinous interposition (92 cases), stapedotomy with veinous interposition (27 cases), stapedectomy (10 cases). Results given following AAO-HNS guidelines and GBP. variance analysis test and t-Student test (p < 0,05), graphic analysis of inter-aural difference before and after surgery. Main benefit in air conduction (AC) threshold is 23 to 25 dB, no statistical difference between both techniques of stapedotomy. Stapedotomy gives better results than stapedectomy in this serie. Stereophony is achieved in 75% of overall cases with stapedotomy but normal hearing is achieved in only 53% of unilateral pre operative hearing loss. Stapedotomy is a more effective technique in this serie. Crossing informations achieved using AAO-HNS guidelines and GBP leads to give a more realistic and comprehensive understanding to patients who will undergo surgery for otosclerosis.

  12. Pretreatment Modified Glasgow Prognostic Score Predicts Clinical Outcomes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Takahiro; Matsuo, Yukinori Ueki, Nami; Iizuka, Yusuke; Nakamura, Akira; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Data from 165 patients who underwent SBRT for stage I NSCLC with histologic confirmation from January 1999 to September 2010 were collected retrospectively. Factors, including age, performance status, histology, Charlson comorbidity index, mGPS, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class based on sex and T stage, were evaluated with regard to overall survival (OS) using the Cox proportional hazards model. The impact of the mGPS on cause of death and failure patterns was also analyzed. Results: The 3-year OS was 57.9%, with a median follow-up time of 3.5 years. A higher mGPS correlated significantly with poor OS (P<.001). The 3-year OS of lower mGPS patients was 66.4%, whereas that of higher mGPS patients was 44.5%. On multivariate analysis, mGPS and RPA class were significant factors for OS. A higher mGPS correlated significantly with lung cancer death (P=.019) and distant metastasis (P=.013). Conclusions: The mGPS was a significant predictor of clinical outcomes for SBRT in NSCLC patients.

  13. A cross sectional study of the prevalence and risk factors for owner misperception of canine body shape in first opinion practice in Glasgow.

    PubMed

    Courcier, E A; Mellor, D J; Thomson, R M; Yam, P S

    2011-10-01

    The objectives of the study were to investigate whether owners were able to assign the correct body shape to their dog and to assess the dog and owner level factors associated with incorrect owner assessment of dog body shape. Six hundred and eighty questionnaires were administered to dog owners in 5 first opinion practices around Glasgow during July 2007. At the same time, the interviewer and owner assessed the body shape of each dog. The interviewer assessment of body shape was taken as the gold standard. Incorrect owner assessment of dog body shape (misperception) was divided into two groups: underestimation and overestimation. Multinomial logistic regression and classification and regression trees (CART) were used to assess risk factors associated with each type of misperception. Misperception of dog body shape was present in 44.1% of owners with underestimation (i.e. the owner considered the animal to have a leaner body shape from the gold standard assessment) being the most common form of misperception. Risk factors identified by both multinomial logistic regression and CART were gender of owner, age of the dog and dog body shape. The classification tree appeared to have improved predictive ability when compared to the multinomial model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) as a novel and significant predictor of extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Jun; Jiang, Wen-Qi; Huang, Jia-Jia; Xia, Zhong-Jun; Huang, Hui-Qiang; Li, Zhi-Ming

    2013-05-01

    The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), an inflammation-based prognostic score including C-reactive protein and albumin, shows significant prognostic value in several types of solid tumors. The prognostic value of GPS in lymphoma remains unclear. We performed this study to evaluate the prognostic significance of GPS in extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (ENKL). We retrospectively analyzed 164 patients with newly diagnosed ENKL. The prognostic value of GPS was evaluated and compared with that of International Prognostic Index (IPI), Prognostic Index for Peripheral T-cell lymphoma unspecified (PIT), and Korean Prognostic Index (KPI). Patients with higher GPS tended to have more adverse clinical characteristics, lower rates of complete remission (P < 0.001), inferior progression-free survival (PFS, P < 0.001), and inferior overall survival (OS, P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that high GPS, age > 60 years, and elevated LDH were independent adverse predictors of OS. GPS was found superior to IPI, PIT, and KPI in discriminating patients with different outcomes in low-risk groups (all P < 0.05). GPS is an independent predictor of survival outcomes in ENKL. Inflammatory response might play an important role in the progression of ENKL and survival of patients with ENKL.

  15. The B'Active programme for overweight primary school children in Glasgow: determining the prevalence of overweight and obesity and piloting an activity intervention.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adrienne R; McLaughlin, Ruth; McKay, Jane; Lafferty, Kevin; McKay, Tony; Mutrie, Nanette

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of overweight and obesity in primary school children in Glasgow and to evaluate a pilot activity programme for overweight and obese children. BMI was measured in 1548 children. Overweight, obesity and severe obesity were defined as BMI > or =85th, 95th and 98th centile, respectively. Overweight and obese children were then invited to participate in a 10-week school-based activity programme. The programme was evaluated by recording weekly attendance, intensity (using the Children's Effort Rating Scale) and enjoyment (scale 1-10). Focus groups were used to explore the experiences and views of the children, teachers, coaches and parents. Of the 1548 children, 31.4% were overweight, 19.1% were obese and 12.4% were severely obese; 38% of those invited attended the activity programme. Weekly programme attendance was 83% (range 56-99%). Mean enjoyment rating (scale 1-10) was 8 for boys and 9 for girls. The intensity of activity sessions were rated 'very easy' by boys and 'just feeling a strain' by girls. Common themes emerging from the focus groups related to perceived positive and negative aspects of the programme (fun, concerns about stigmatising children); physical and psychological outcomes (fitter, more confident); and future recommendations (involve parents). In summary, the prevalence of overweight and obesity was high. The activity programme was successful in terms of attendance and enjoyment, and overall views of the initiative were positive and there was compelling support for its continuation.

  16. Modified glasgow prognostic score predicting high conversion ratio in opioid switching from oral oxycodone to transdermal fentanyl in patients with cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Shu-Shan; Shang, Li; Li, Ming-E; Zhao, Dong-Mei; Xu, Wen-Hua; Wang, Yao-Qi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify predictive factors for higher conversion ratio in opioid switching from oral oxycodone to transdermal fentanyl (TDF) in patients with cancer pain. The participants of this study were 156 hospitalized cancer patients who underwent opioid switching from oral oxycodone to TDF at the Affiliated Hospital of Binzhou Medical University between January 1st, 2010 and March 31st, 2014. Patient characteristics, modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS), daily oxycodone dose, and reasons for opioid switching were retrospectively collected. The effect of variables on the conversion ratio was analyzed by multiple regression analysis to identify the predictive factors for higher conversion ratio in opioid switching from oral oxycodone to TDF. The results showed that the mGPS (odds ratio [OR], 2.358; 95% CI 1.379-4.031; P = 0.002), the reason for opioid switching (OR, 0.497; 95% CI, 0.298-0.828; P = 0.007) and equivalent oral morphine dose (OR, 1.700; 95% CI, 1.008-2.867; P = 0.046) were found to be significant predictors requiring higher conversion ratio in opioid switching. This study indicates that higher mGPS, poor pain control before switching and higher equivalent oral morphine dose are significant predictors of a need for higher conversion ratio in opioid switching from oral oxycodone to TDF. These results could contribute to the establishment of evidence-based medicine in cancer pain relief. PMID:26221306

  17. The comparison of modified early warning score and Glasgow coma scale-age-systolic blood pressure scores in the assessment of nontraumatic critical patients in Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Köksal, Ö; Torun, G; Ahun, E; Sığırlı, D; Güney, S B; Aydın, M O

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess and compare the discriminatory ability of the Glasgow coma scale (GCS)-age-systolic blood pressure (GAP) score and modified early warning scoring system (mEWS) score for 4-week mortality, for the patients being in the triage category 1 and 2 who refer to Emergency Department (ED). Five hundred and two nontraumatic cases being in the triage category 1 and 2 who were ≥18-year-old and who referred to ED were assessed prospectively. Reason of referral, fashion of referral, age, gender, vital signs, GCS/alert/verbal/painful/unresponsive scores, consultations, diagnoses, and treatments and final outcome (hospitalization, transfer, discharge, treatment rejection, and exitus) were recorded. The mEWS and GAP scores and the mortality ratios of the cases were calculated by observing both in ED and 4-week survivals of the patients. When the mEWS and GAP scores were compared in the prediction of 4-week mortality, no statistically significant difference was found between them (P > 0.05). The power of mortality estimation was found significant for both scoring systems (for both; P< 0.001). GAP score with a simple use being a score developed for the estimation of mortality of trauma patients seems to be usable also for the nontraumatic patients with triage category 1-2 in the ED.

  18. Iridium Interfacial Stack - IrIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David

    2012-01-01

    Iridium Interfacial Stack (IrIS) is the sputter deposition of high-purity tantalum silicide (TaSi2-400 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm)/iridium (Ir-200 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm) in an ultra-high vacuum system followed by a 600 C anneal in nitrogen for 30 minutes. IrIS simultaneously acts as both a bond metal and a diffusion barrier. This bondable metallization that also acts as a diffusion barrier can prevent oxygen from air and gold from the wire-bond from infiltrating silicon carbide (SiC) monolithically integrated circuits (ICs) operating above 500 C in air for over 1,000 hours. This TaSi2/Pt/Ir/Pt metallization is easily bonded for electrical connection to off-chip circuitry and does not require extra anneals or masking steps. There are two ways that IrIS can be used in SiC ICs for applications above 500 C: it can be put directly on a SiC ohmic contact metal, such as Ti, or be used as a bond metal residing on top of an interconnect metal. For simplicity, only the use as a bond metal is discussed. The layer thickness ratio of TaSi2 to the first Pt layer deposited thereon should be 2:1. This will allow Si from the TaSi2 to react with the Pt to form Pt2Si during the 600 C anneal carried out after all layers have been deposited. The Ir layer does not readily form a silicide at 600 C, and thereby prevents the Si from migrating into the top-most Pt layer during future anneals and high-temperature IC operation. The second (i.e., top-most) deposited Pt layer needs to be about 200 nm to enable easy wire bonding. The thickness of 200 nm for Ir was chosen for initial experiments; further optimization of the Ir layer thickness may be possible via further experimentation. Ir itself is not easily wire-bonded because of its hardness and much higher melting point than Pt. Below the iridium layer, the TaSi2 and Pt react and form desired Pt2Si during the post-deposition anneal while above the iridium layer remains pure Pt as desired to facilitate easy and strong wire-bonding to the Si

  19. Narcissus analysis for cooled staring IR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Feng-Yun; Cui, Ji-Cheng; Feng, Shu-Long; Zhang, Xin

    2007-12-01

    Narcissus can have a deleterious effect on image quality for cooled infrared imaging systems. Therefore, analysis of narcissus is important for designing both scanning and staring optics. Narcissus is generally assumed to be negligible in staring IR optical designs because the shading effects can be removed by calibration of the detector array data. However, the calibration usually decreases sensitiveness of the system and Narcissus variation may be noticeable for sensors when the conditions changes as follows: 1. warming and cooling the optical housing, 2. zooming optical elements, 3. movement of lenses for focus. In that case, it will result in shading and other image defects even after calibration. To minimize these effects, narcissus should be assessed and controlled during the design of staring array IR system. We provided a direct and fast method for analyzing the narcissus variation in the presence of software such as LightTools, TracePro and ASAP, and proposed the principles in optical design of staring IR systems to reduce narcissus. A cooled staring IR system with serious narcissus was estimated and reoptimized. Narcissus analysis of this IR system confirmed the efficiency of the analysis method.

  20. Clusterin: an IR-inducible protein determining life and death

    SciTech Connect

    DAVID A. BOOTHMAN, Ph.D.

    2006-07-11

    The roles of ionizing radiation (IR)-inducible genes/proteins are now being elucidated and the research team will focus on the functions of the clusterin (CLU) proteins after low dose IR exposures. With funding from the DOE, we discovered that x-ray-inducible transcript/protein #8 (xip8) bound to the Ku70 DNA double strand break repair protein using various molecular biology techniques. We showed that translation of the CLU/xip8 transcript was complicated, leading to two classes of proteins separated by their intracellular processing. One set of CLU proteins (a secreted and precursor protein, sCLU and psCLU, respectively) were induced by very low doses of IR (>2.0 cGy) and subsequently secreted from the cell. The functions of sCLU, particularly in bystander effects, are not known; sCLU does not bind Ku70, but can interact with the TGF-ß II receptor. Another intracellular class of CLU proteins was targeted to the cytoplasm and existed in a dormant precursor nuclear form (pnCLU). After higher IR doses (>1.0 Gy), pnCLU was activated via post-translational modification, and translocated to the nucleus, where nuclear CLU (nCLU) interacted with Ku70/Ku80, and signaled cell death. The mechanism(s) of how cells die following nCLU accumulation are unknown. Recent data from our lab indicate that CLU gene transcription is also complicated. Thus far, the data suggest that: (a) p53 is a negative regulator of CLU transcription, however, the mechanisms by which it exerts this negative pressure are not known; and (b) IR induces transcription of the CLU promoter, independent of p53, at regulatory elements that lie between -1403 and -325 bps 5'-from the TATAA box. In this renewal, the research team will investigate three separate, but interrelated hypotheses: (1) p53 negatively regulates the CLU promoter via distinct head to tail p53 half sites, and induction is mediated by the combination of retinoblatoma control elements (RCEs) and NF-∫B sites; (2) sCLU is cytoprotective and

  1. ALLFlight: detection of moving objects in IR and ladar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doehler, H.-U.; Peinecke, Niklas; Lueken, Thomas; Schmerwitz, Sven

    2013-05-01

    Supporting a helicopter pilot during landing and takeoff in degraded visual environment (DVE) is one of the challenges within DLR's project ALLFlight (Assisted Low Level Flight and Landing on Unprepared Landing Sites). Different types of sensors (TV, Infrared, mmW radar and laser radar) are mounted onto DLR's research helicopter FHS (flying helicopter simulator) for gathering different sensor data of the surrounding world. A high performance computer cluster architecture acquires and fuses all the information to get one single comprehensive description of the outside situation. While both TV and IR cameras deliver images with frame rates of 25 Hz or 30 Hz, Ladar and mmW radar provide georeferenced sensor data with only 2 Hz or even less. Therefore, it takes several seconds to detect or even track potential moving obstacle candidates in mmW or Ladar sequences. Especially if the helicopter is flying with higher speed, it is very important to minimize the detection time of obstacles in order to initiate a re-planning of the helicopter's mission timely. Applying feature extraction algorithms on IR images in combination with data fusion algorithms of extracted features and Ladar data can decrease the detection time appreciably. Based on real data from flight tests, the paper describes applied feature extraction methods for moving object detection, as well as data fusion techniques for combining features from TV/IR and Ladar data.

  2. Tuning the Graphene on Ir(111) adsorption regime by Fe/Ir surface-alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brede, Jens; Sławińska, Jagoda; Abadia, Mikel; Rogero, Celia; Ortega, J. Enrique; Piquero-Zulaica, Ignacio; Lobo-Checa, Jorge; Arnau, Andres; Iribas Cerdá, Jorge

    2017-03-01

    A combined scanning tunneling microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, and density functional theory study of graphene on a Fe-Ir(111) alloy with variable Ir concentration is presented. Starting from an intercalated Fe layer between the graphene and Ir(111) surface we find that graphene-substrate interaction can be fine-tuned by Fe-Ir alloying at the interface. When a critical Ir-concentration close to 0.25 is reached in the Fe layer, the Dirac cone of graphene is largely restored and can thereafter be tuned across the Fermi level by further increasing the Ir content. Indeed, our study reveals an abrupt transition between a chemisorbed phase at small Ir concentrations and a physisorbed phase above the critical concentration. The latter phase is highly reminiscent of the graphene on the clean Ir(111) surface. Furthermore, the transition is accompanied by an inversion of the graphene’s induced magnetization due to the coupling with the Fe atoms from antiferromagnetic when chemisorbed to weakly ferromagnetic in the physisorption regime, with spin polarizations whose magnitude may be tuned with the amount of Fe content.

  3. Experimental bandstructure of the 5 d transition metal oxide IrO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Jason; Nie, Yuefeng; Uchida, Masaki; Schlom, Darrell; Shen, Kyle

    2015-03-01

    In the 5 d iridium oxides the close energy scales of spin-orbit coupling and electron-electron correlations lead to emergent quantum phenomena. Much research has focused on the ternary iridium oxides, e.g. the Ruddlesden-Poppers An + 1BnO3 n + 1 , which exhibit behavior from metal to antiferromagnetic insulator ground states, share common features with the cuprates, and may host a number of topological phases. The binary rutile IrO2 is another important 5 d oxide, which has technological importance for spintronics due to its large spin Hall effect and also applications in catalysis. IrO2 is expected to share similar physics as its perovskite-based cousins; however, due to bond-length distortions of the IrO6 octahedra in the rutile structure, the extent of similarities remains an open question. Here we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to perform momentum-resolved measurements of the electronic structure of IrO2 . IrO2 thin films were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on TiO2 (110) substrates using an Ir e-beam source and distilled ozone. Films were subsequently transferred through ultrahigh vacuum to a connected ARPES system. Combined with first-principles calculations we explore the interplay of spin-orbit coupling and correlations in IrO2 .

  4. Intelligent multi-spectral IR image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Thomas; Luong, Andrew; Heim, Stephen; Patel, Maharshi; Chen, Kang; Chao, Tien-Hsin; Chow, Edward; Torres, Gilbert

    2017-05-01

    This article presents a neural network based multi-spectral image segmentation method. A neural network is trained on the selected features of both the objects and background in the longwave (LW) Infrared (IR) images. Multiple iterations of training are performed until the accuracy of the segmentation reaches satisfactory level. The segmentation boundary of the LW image is used to segment the midwave (MW) and shortwave (SW) IR images. A second neural network detects the local discontinuities and refines the accuracy of the local boundaries. This article compares the neural network based segmentation method to the Wavelet-threshold and Grab-Cut methods. Test results have shown increased accuracy and robustness of this segmentation scheme for multi-spectral IR images.

  5. IR signature management for the modern navy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitekunas, David A.; Kim, Yoonsik

    2013-06-01

    A methodology for analysing the infrared (IR) signature and susceptibility of naval platforms using ShipIR/NTCS was presented by Vaitekunas (2010). This paper provides three key improvements: use of a larger climatic data set (N=100), a new target sub-image algorithm eliminating false detections from pixel-aliasing at the horizon, and a new seeker model interfacing with a line-by-line background clutter model. Existing commercial stealth technologies (exhaust stack suppression, low solar absorptive paints, extended hull film-cooling) are re-analysed using the new models and methods to produce a more rigorous and comprehensive analysis of their effectiveness based on the statistics of reduction in IR susceptibility. These methods and results combined with the cost of each stealth option should allow platform managers to select an appropriate level of infrared suppression and establish the design criteria for a new ship.

  6. Tunable mid IR plasmon in GZO nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Hamza, M K; Bluet, J-M; Masenelli-Varlot, K; Canut, B; Boisron, O; Melinon, P; Masenelli, B

    2015-07-28

    Degenerate metal oxide nanoparticles are promising systems to expand the significant achievements of plasmonics into the infrared (IR) range. Among the possible candidates, Ga-doped ZnO nanocrystals are particularly suited for mid IR, considering their wide range of possible doping levels and thus of plasmon tuning. In the present work, we report on the tunable mid IR plasmon induced in degenerate Ga-doped ZnO nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are produced by a plasma expansion and exhibit unprotected surfaces. Tuning the Ga concentration allows tuning the localized surface plasmon resonance. Moreover, the plasmon resonance is characterized by a large damping. By comparing the plasmon of nanocrystal assemblies to that of nanoparticles dispersed in an alumina matrix, we investigate the possible origins of such damping. We demonstrate that it partially results from the self-organization of the naked particles and also from intrinsic inhomogeneity of dopants.

  7. Ir-induced activation of Au towards CO adsorption: Ir films deposited on Au{111}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianfu; Driver, Stephen M.; Pratt, Stephanie J.; Jenkins, Stephen J.; King, David A.

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the interaction of CO with Ir/Au{111} bimetallic surfaces, and the influence of morphology changes as Ir moves sub-surface into the Au bulk, using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). The presence of Ir stabilises CO on exposed regions of the Au surface at temperatures up to around 200 K: we attribute this to low-coordinated Au sites, probably associated with lifting of the clean-surface 'herringbone' reconstruction by Ir deposition. The highest density of active Au sites is obtained after annealing the bimetallic surface to 500-600 K: we attribute this to morphology changes associated with the movement of Ir into bulk Au.

  8. The mid-IR and near-IR interferometry of AGNs: key results and their implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, M.

    2015-09-01

    Infrared interferometry has been very productive in directly probing the structure of AGNs at sub-pc scales. With tens of objects already probed in the mid-IR and near-IR, I will summarize the key results and im- plications from this direct exploration. The Keck interferometry in the near-IR and VLTI in the mid-IR shaped the luminosity dependence of the torus size and structure, while the latter also revealed an equatorial structure at several Rsub (dust sublimation radius), and a polar-elongated region at a few tens of Rsub. Notably, this polar component seems to dominate the compact mid-IR flux. This component can persuasively be attributed to a polar outflow. However, interferometry, through emissivity estimations, also indicates that it is not a UV-optically-thin cloud but participating in the obscuration of the nucleus. I will discuss how to accommodate all these facts to build a consistent picture.

  9. IR Spectroscopy of PAHs in Dense Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allamandola, Louis; Bernstein, Max; Mattioda, Andrew; Sandford, Scott

    2007-05-01

    Interstellar PAHs are likely to be a component of the ice mantles that form on dust grains in dense molecular clouds. PAHs frozen in grain mantles will produce IR absorption bands, not IR emission features. A couple of very weak absorption features in ground based spectra of a few objects embedded in dense clouds may be due to PAHs. Additionally spaceborne observations in the 5 to 8 ?m region, the region in which PAH spectroscopy is rich, reveal unidentified new bands and significant variation from object to object. It has not been possible to properly evaluate the contribution of PAH bands to these IR observations because the laboratory absorption spectra of PAHs condensed in realistic interstellar mixed-molecular ice analogs is lacking. This experimental data is necessary to interpret observations because, in ice mantles, the interaction of PAHs with the surrounding molecules effects PAH IR band positions, widths, profiles, and intrinsic strengths. Furthermore, PAHs are readily ionized in pure H2O ice, further altering the PAH spectrum. This laboratory proposal aims to remedy the situation by studying the IR spectroscopy of PAHs frozen in laboratory ice analogs that realistically reflect the composition of the interstellar ices observed in dense clouds. The purpose is to provide laboratory spectra which can be used to interpret IR observations. We will measure the spectra of these mixed molecular ices containing PAHs before and after ionization and determine the intrinsic band strengths of neutral and ionized PAHs in these ice analogs. This will enable a quantitative assessment of the role that PAHs can play in determining the 5-8 ?m spectrum of dense clouds and will directly address the following two fundamental questions associated with dense cloud spectroscopy and chemistry: 1- Can PAHs be detected in dense clouds? 2- Are PAH ions components of interstellar ice?

  10. IGF-IR Targeted Therapy: Past, Present and Future.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Joseph A M J L; Varewijck, Aimee J

    2014-01-01

    The IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) has been studied as an anti-cancer target. However, monotherapy trials with IGF-IR targeted antibodies or with IGF-IR specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors have, overall, been very disappointing in the clinical setting. This review discusses potential reasons why IGF-I R targeted therapy fails to inhibit growth of human cancers. It has become clear that intracellular signaling pathways are highly interconnected and complex instead of being linear and simple. One of the most potent candidates for failure of IGF-IR targeted therapy is the insulin receptor isoform A (IR-A). Activation of the IR-A by insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) bypasses the IGF-IR and its inhibition. Another factor may be that anti-cancer treatment may reduce IGF-IR expression. IGF-IR blocking drugs may also induce hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, which may further stimulate cell growth. In addition, circulating IGF-IRs may reduce therapeutic effects of IGF-IR targeted therapy. Nevertheless, it is still possible that the IGF-IR may be a useful adjuvant or secondary target for the treatment of human cancers. Development of functional inhibitors that affect the IGF-IR and IR-A may be necessary to overcome resistance and to make IGF-IR targeted therapy successful. Drugs that modify alternative downstream effects of the IGF-IR, so called "biasing agonists," should also be considered.

  11. Noise analysis of spaceborne IR spatial interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, R. H., Jr.; Simpson, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis is performed to determine the relationship between the signal-to-noise ratio and the integration time for a spaceborne IR heterodyne spatial interferometer. The analysis includes consideration of the transformation of the interferogram to obtain the angular intensity distribution. The results presented show that for an IR source such as IRC + 10216, an integration time of 50 seconds per interferogram point will yield a signal-to-noise ratio greater than 10 dB in the angular intensity profile obtained from a 30-point transformation.

  12. FT-IR analysis of phosphorylated protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Katsunori; Yoshihashi, Sachiko S.; Chihara, Kunihiro; Awazu, Kunio

    2004-09-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, which are the most remarkable posttranslational modifications, are considered to be important chemical reactions that control the activation of proteins. We examine the phosphorylation analysis method by measuring the infrared absorption peak of phosphate group that observed at about 1070cm-1 (9.4μm) with Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FT-IR). This study indicates that it is possible to identify a phosphorylation by measuring the infrared absorption peak of phosphate group observed at about 1070 cm-1 with FT-IR method. As long as target peptides have the same amino acid sequence, it is possible to identify the phosphorylated sites (threonine, serine and tyrosine).

  13. Hematoma Shape, Hematoma Size, Glasgow Coma Scale Score and ICH Score: Which Predicts the 30-Day Mortality Better for Intracerebral Hematoma?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih-Wei; Liu, Yi-Jui; Lee, Yi-Hsiung; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Yang, Fu-Chi; Hsueh, Chun-Jen; Kao, Hung-Wen; Juan, Chun-Jung; Hsu, Hsian-He

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the performance of hematoma shape, hematoma size, Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score, and intracerebral hematoma (ICH) score in predicting the 30-day mortality for ICH patients. To examine the influence of the estimation error of hematoma size on the prediction of 30-day mortality. Materials and Methods This retrospective study, approved by a local institutional review board with written informed consent waived, recruited 106 patients diagnosed as ICH by non-enhanced computed tomography study. The hemorrhagic shape, hematoma size measured by computer-assisted volumetric analysis (CAVA) and estimated by ABC/2 formula, ICH score and GCS score was examined. The predicting performance of 30-day mortality of the aforementioned variables was evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, paired t test, nonparametric test, linear regression analysis, and binary logistic regression. The receiver operating characteristics curves were plotted and areas under curve (AUC) were calculated for 30-day mortality. A P value less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results The overall 30-day mortality rate was 15.1% of ICH patients. The hematoma shape, hematoma size, ICH score, and GCS score all significantly predict the 30-day mortality for ICH patients, with an AUC of 0.692 (P = 0.0018), 0.715 (P = 0.0008) (by ABC/2) to 0.738 (P = 0.0002) (by CAVA), 0.877 (P<0.0001) (by ABC/2) to 0.882 (P<0.0001) (by CAVA), and 0.912 (P<0.0001), respectively. Conclusion Our study shows that hematoma shape, hematoma size, ICH scores and GCS score all significantly predict the 30-day mortality in an increasing order of AUC. The effect of overestimation of hematoma size by ABC/2 formula in predicting the 30-day mortality could be remedied by using ICH score. PMID:25029592

  14. Tripartite Stratification of the Glasgow Coma Scale in Children with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury and Mortality: An Analysis from a Multi-Center Comparative Effectiveness Study.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sarah; Thomas, Neal J; Gertz, Shira J; Beca, John; Luther, James F; Bell, Michael J; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Hartman, Adam L; Tasker, Robert C

    2017-02-27

    The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score has not been validated in children younger than 5 years and the clinical circumstances at the time of assignment can limit its applicability. This study describes the distribution of GCS scores in the population, the relationship between injury characteristics with the GCS score, and the association between the tripartite stratification of the GCS on mortality in children with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The first 200 children from a multi-center comparative effectiveness study in severe TBI (inclusion criteria: age 0-18 years, GCS ≤8 at the time of intracranial pressure [ICP] monitoring) were analyzed. After tripartite stratification of GCS scores (Group A, GCS 3; Group B, GCS 4 - 5; and Group C, GCS 6 - 8), analyses of variance and chi-square testing were performed. Mean age was 7.61 years ±5.33 and mortality was 19.1%. There was no difference in etiology or type/mechanism of injury between groups. However, groups demonstrated differences in neuromuscular blockade, endotracheal intubation, pre-hospital events (cardiac arrest and apnea), coagulopathy, and pupil response. Mortality between groups was different (42.2% Group A, 22.6% Group B, and 3.8% Group C; p < 0.001), and adding pupil response improved mortality associations. In children younger than 5 years of age, a similar relationship between GCS and mortality was observed. Overall, GCS score at the time of ICP monitor placement is strongly associated with mortality across the pediatric age range. Development of models with GCS and other factors may allow identification of subtypes of children after severe TBI for future studies.

  15. Smoking and intention to quit in deprived areas of Glasgow: is it related to housing improvements and neighbourhood regeneration because of improved mental health?

    PubMed

    Bond, Lyndal; Egan, Matt; Kearns, Ade; Clark, Julie; Tannahill, Carol

    2013-04-01

    People living in areas of multiple deprivation are more likely to smoke and less likely to quit smoking. This study examines the effect on smoking and intention to quit smoking for those who have experienced housing improvements (HI) in deprived areas of Glasgow, UK, and investigates whether such effects can be explained by improved mental health. Quasi-experimental, 2-year longitudinal study, comparing residents' smoking and intention to quit smoking for HI group (n=545) with non-HI group (n=517), adjusting for baseline (2006) sociodemographic factors and smoking status. SF-12 mental health scores were used to assess mental health, along with self-reported experience of, and General Practitioner (GP) consultations for, anxiety and depression in the last 12 months. There was no relationship between smoking and HI, adjusting for baseline rates (OR=0.97, 95% CI 0.57 to 1.67, p=0.918). We found an association between intention to quit and HI, which remained significant after adjusting for sociodemographics and previous intention to quit (OR 2.16, 95% CI 1.12 to 4.16, p=0.022). We found no consistent evidence that this association was attenuated by improvement in our three mental health measures. Providing residents in disadvantaged areas with better housing may prompt them to consider quitting smoking. However, few people actually quit, indicating that residential improvements or changes to the physical environment may not be sufficient drivers of personal behavioural change. It would make sense to link health services to housing regeneration projects to support changes in health behaviours at a time when environmental change appears to make behavioural change more likely.

  16. Reliability of a telephone-based Glasgow Outcome Scale assessment using a structured interview in a heterogenous population of patients and examiners.

    PubMed

    LeGrand, Scott A; Hindman, Bradley J; Dexter, Franklin; Moss, Linda G; Todd, Michael M

    2007-09-01

    A reliable telephone-based Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) assessment would be advantageous to both patients and investigators. Using a previously published structured GOS interview and scoring system, the aim of this study was to assess the reliability of telephone-based GOS scores compared to those obtained face-to-face in a heterogenous population of patients and examiners. Sixty-six patients hospitalized for a variety of acute neurological injuries underwent two GOS interviews approximately 90 days after injury. From a pool of six examiners, structured interviews were conducted using a standardized data form containing nine yes/no questions. One interview was conducted face-to-face and the other interview was conducted by telephone, the order being randomly selected. A different examiner conducted the second interview, and was unaware of the findings of the first interview. From this data, a separate investigator assigned GOS scores using standardized criteria. Concordant GOS scores were obtained in 71% (47/66) of patients and discordant scores in 29% (19/66); kappa = 0.56 +/- 0.08 (SE) (95% CI kappa = 0.40-0.73). Patient-, examiner-, and interview-related characteristics had no significant associations with GOS concordance, although patient sex had a significant association with discrepant responses to one specific question (work at previous capacity). When used by multiple examiners to assess patients with diverse neurological conditions, use of a structured GOS examination does not guarantee a reliable telephone-based GOS score. Determination of whether patient sex influences the validity of the structured face-to-face GOS interview is worthy of future study.

  17. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism in children with severe head injury. Part 1: Relation to age, Glasgow coma score, outcome, intracranial pressure, and time after injury.

    PubMed Central

    Sharples, P M; Stuart, A G; Matthews, D S; Aynsley-Green, A; Eyre, J A

    1995-01-01

    Understanding the pathophysiology of paediatric head trauma is essential for rational acute management. It has been proposed that the response to severe head injury in children differs from that in adults, with increased cerebral blood flow (cerebral hyperaemia) representing the most common cause of raised intracranial pressure, but this has recently been disputed. The relation between the pathophysiological response and time after injury has not been defined in children. This paper describes 151 serial measurements of cerebral blood flow, arteriojugular venous oxygen difference (AJVDO2), and cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2) that were performed in 21 children with severe head injury, mean age 8 (range 2-16) years, Glasgow coma score < or = 8. Absolute cerebral hyperaemia was uncommon, only 10 (7%) of the 151 cerebral blood flow values being at or above the upper limit of the range published in normal children. There was an inverse correlation between cerebral blood flow and intracranial pressure. (r = -0.24, p = 0.009). Contrary to the widespread assumption that cerebral metabolic rate in patients with head injury is always low, CMRO2 was initially within the normal range in 17/21 (81%) children. Both CMRO2 and AJVDO2 fell significantly between the first and third days after injury. There was a non-significant rise in cerebral blood flow over time. These data represent the first evidence that the temporal change in cerebral metabolic rate reported in experimental models of traumatic brain injury also occurs in patients with head injury. The changes in the pathophysiological response over time suggest that the management may need to be modified accordingly. If cerebral metabolic rate and cerebral oxygen extraction are maximal shortly after injury in children with severe head injury then the children are most likely to sustain secondary damage during this period. Images PMID:7876842

  18. The Glasgow Prognostic Score and its variants predict mortality in living donor but not in deceased donor liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma: A double-center validation study.

    PubMed

    Kaltenborn, Alexander; Schrem, Harald; Reichert, Benedikt; Braun, Felix; Emmanouilidis, Nikos; Klempnauer, Jürgen; Becker, Thomas; Heits, Nils

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether the Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) and its variants are able to predict mortality in live donor and deceased donor liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma. Data of 29 live donor and 319 deceased donor transplantations from two German transplant centers was analyzed. The GPS, modified GPS, hepatic GPS, and Abe score were investigated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was carried out to calculate the sensitivity, specificity, and overall model correctness of the investigated scores as a predictive model. Study end-points were 1-year, 3-year, and long-term mortality. A 1-year mortality of 19.1% (n = 61), 3-year mortality of 26.3% (n = 84), and overall mortality of 37.3% (n = 119) was observed. All investigated scores failed to predict outcome in deceased donor liver transplantation (areas under ROC curves <0.700), whereas GPS, hepatic GPS, modified GPS, and the Abe score reached areas under ROC curves >0.700 for the prediction of 1-year mortality in live donor transplantation. The GPS and Abe score were also able to predict 3-year mortality. None of the investigated scores was a reliable predictor of long-term mortality. Systemic inflammation-based scores have great prognostic potential in live donor transplantation. Abe score could be successfully externally validated in the current study for the first time. In deceased donor transplantation, none of the analyzed scores was able to allow reliable prediction for the investigated study end-points. © 2016 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  19. Anti-epidermal or anti-vascular endothelial growth factor as first-line metastatic colorectal cancer in modified Glasgow prognostic score 2' patients

    PubMed Central

    Dréanic, Johann; Dhooge, Marion; Barret, Maximilien; Brezault, Catherine; Mir, Olivier; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Background In metastatic colorectal cancer, the modified Glasgow prognostic score (mGPS) has been approved as an independent prognostic indicator of survival. No data existed on poor prognosis patients treated with molecular-targeted agents. Methods From January 2007 to February 2012, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer and poor predictive survival score (mGPS = 2), treated with 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy in addition to an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anti-vascular epidermal growth factor (VEGF) therapy, were included to assess the interest of targeted therapy within mGPS = 2' patients. Results A total of 27 mGPS = 2' patients were included and received a 5-fluorouracil-based systemic chemotherapy in addition to an anti-EGFR treatment (cetuximab; n = 18) or an anti-VEGF treatment (bevacizumab; n = 9). Median follow-up was 12.1 months (interquartile range 4.9–22). Patients were Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) Performance Status 1, 2, and 3 in 66% (n = 18), 26% (n = 7), and 8% (n = 2), respectively. Comparing anti-EGFR and anti-VEGF groups, median progression-free survival was 3.9 and 15.4 months, respectively, and was significantly different (P = 0.046). Conversely, the median overall survival was not significantly different between the two groups (P = 0.15). Conclusion Our study confirmed the poor survival of patients with mGPS = 2 despite the use of targeted therapy and identified the superiority of an anti-VEGF treatment in progression-free survival, without a significant benefit in the overall survival compared with the anti-EGFR therapy. Our results deserved confirmation by a prospective clinical trial. PMID:26401469

  20. Chemical profiling and adulteration screening of Aquilariae Lignum Resinatum by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Lei; Chen, Jian-bo; Zhang, Gui-Jun; Sun, Su-qin; Zheng, Jing

    2017-03-01

    As a kind of expensive perfume and valuable herb, Aquilariae Lignum Resinatum (ALR) is often adulterated for economic motivations. In this research, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is employed to establish a simple and quick method for the adulteration screening of ALR. First, the principal chemical constituents of ALR are characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy at room temperature and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy with thermal perturbation. Besides the common cellulose and lignin compounds, a certain amount of resin is the characteristic constituent of ALR. Synchronous and asynchronous 2D-IR spectra indicate that the resin (an unstable secondary metabolite) is more sensitive than cellulose and lignin (stable structural constituents) to the thermal perturbation. Using a certified ALR sample as the reference, the infrared spectral correlation threshold is determined by 30 authentic samples and 6 adulterated samples. The spectral correlation coefficient of an authentic ALR sample to the standard reference should be not less than 0.9886 (p = 0.01). Three commercial adulterated ALR samples are identified by the correlation threshold. Further interpretation of the infrared spectra of the adulterated samples indicates the common adulterating methods - counterfeiting with other kind of wood, adding ingredient such as sand to increase the weight, and adding the cheap resin such as rosin to increase the content of resin compounds. Results of this research prove that FT-IR spectroscopy can be used as a simple and accurate quality control method of ALR.

  1. Photofunctional triplet excited states of cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes: beyond electroluminescence.

    PubMed

    You, Youngmin; Nam, Wonwoo

    2012-11-07

    The development of cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes has enabled important breakthroughs in electroluminescence because such complexes permit the efficient population of triplet excited states that give rise to luminescent transitions. The triplet states of Ir(III) complexes are advantageous over those of other transition metal complexes in that their electronic transitions and charge-transfer characteristics are tunable over wide ranges. These favorable properties suggest that Ir(III) complexes have significant potential in a variety of photofunctions other than electroluminescence. In this critical review, we describe recent photonic applications of novel Ir(III) complexes. Ir(III) complexes have been shown to affect the exciton statistics in the active layers of organic photovoltaic cells, thereby improving the photon-to-current conversion efficiencies. Nonlinear optical applications that take advantage of the strong charge-transfer properties of triplet transitions are also discussed. The tunability of the electrochemical potentials facilitates the development of efficient photocatalysis in the context of water photolysis or organic syntheses. The photoredox reactivities of Ir(III) complexes have been employed in studies of charge migration along DNA chains. The photoinduced cytotoxicity of Ir(III) complexes on live cells suggests that the complexes may be useful in photodynamic therapy. Potential biological applications of the complexes include phosphorescence labeling and sensing. Intriguing platforms based on cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes potentially provide novel protein tagging and ratiometric detection. We envision that future research into the photofunctionality of Ir(III) complexes will provide important breakthroughs in a variety of photonic applications.

  2. IRS issues guidance on tax-exempt bond requirements.

    PubMed

    Kalick, L

    1998-07-01

    Enforcing compliance with rules governing facilities financed with tax-exempt bonds recently has become an IRS priority. Integrated delivery systems (IDSs) that include such facilities, therefore, should take steps to ensure that the private business use of those facilities does not exceed the legal threshold amount, thereby jeopardizing the tax-exempt status of the bonds. Management contracts, research agreements, and leases are arrangements with the greatest potential to result in noncompliance. Instituting a compliance program to monitor the use of bond proceeds and minimize the amount of private business use of facilities over the bond term can reduce an organization's risk of penalty.

  3. Early fire sensing using near-IR diode laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomse, David S.; Hovde, D. Christian; Chen, Shin-Juh; Silver, Joel A.

    2002-09-01

    We describe research leading to a trace gas detection system based on optical absorption using near-IR diode lasers that is intended to provide early warning of incipient fires. Applications include "high loss" structures such as office buildings, hospitals, hotels and shopping malls as well as airplanes and manned spacecraft where convention smoke detectors generate unacceptably high false alarm rates. Simultaneous or near-simultaneous detection of several gases (typically carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, acetylene and hydrogen cyanide) provides high sensitivity while reducing the chance of false alarms. Continuous measurement of carbon dioxide concentrations also provides an internal check of instrument performance because ambient levels will not drop below ~350 ppm.

  4. Optoelectronic Workshops (14th). Ferroelectric Liquid Crystal IR chopper.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-21

    James E. Miller B. Center for Opto-Electronic Systems Research Organizer -- Stephen Jacobs IR Shutter-Chopper Employing Ferroelectric Liquid Crystals...Marshall and S. D. Jacobs 3I 1. INTRODUCTION This workshop is a follow-up to Workshop IV: Liquid Crystals for Laser Applications, which was held at...703-664-1585 Edward J. Sharp L-LRT 703-664-5767 University of Rochester Stephen D. Jacobs * LLE 716-275-5105 Ronald Antos Optics 716-275-4179 Nicholas

  5. Comparison of Heat Flux Gages for High Enthalpy Flows - NASA Ames and IRS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loehle, Stefan; Nawaz, Anuscheh; Herdrich, Georg; Fasoulas, Stefanos; Martinez, Edward; Raiche, George

    2016-01-01

    This article is a companion to a paper on heat flux measurements as initiated under a Space Act Agreement in 2011. The current focus of this collaboration between the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) of the University of Stuttgart and NASA Ames Research Center is the comparison and refinement of diagnostic measurements. A first experimental campaign to test different heat flux gages in the NASA Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) and the Plasmawindkanaele (PWK) at IRS was established. This paper focuses on the results of the measurements conducted at IRS. The tested gages included a at face and hemispherical probe head, a 4" hemispherical slug calorimeter, a null-point calorimeter from Ames and a null-point calorimeter developed for this purpose at IRS. The Ames null-point calorimeter was unfortunately defective upon arrival. The measured heat fluxes agree fairly well with each other. The reason for discrepancies can be attributed to signal-to-noise levels and the probe geometry.

  6. Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors IR64a and IR8a Form a Functional Odorant Receptor Complex In Vivo in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Blais, Steven; Park, Jin-Yong; Min, Soohong; Neubert, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons express either odorant receptors or ionotropic glutamate receptors (IRs). The sensory neurons that express IR64a, a member of the IR family, send axonal projections to either the DC4 or DP1m glomeruli in the antennal lobe. DC4 neurons respond specifically to acids/protons, whereas DP1m neurons respond to a broad spectrum of odorants. The molecular composition of IR64a-containing receptor complexes in either DC4 or DP1m neurons is not known, however. Here, we immunoprecipitated the IR64a protein from lysates of fly antennal tissue and identified IR8a as a receptor subunit physically associated with IR64a by mass spectrometry. IR8a mutants and flies in which IR8a was knocked down by RNAi in IR64a+ neurons exhibited defects in acid-evoked physiological and behavioral responses. Furthermore, we found that the loss of IR8a caused a significant reduction in IR64a protein levels. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, IR64a and IR8a formed a functional ion channel that allowed ligand-evoked cation currents. These findings provide direct evidence that IR8a is a subunit that forms a functional olfactory receptor with IR64a in vivo to mediate odor detection. PMID:23804096

  7. Ionotropic glutamate receptors IR64a and IR8a form a functional odorant receptor complex in vivo in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ai, Minrong; Blais, Steven; Park, Jin-Yong; Min, Soohong; Neubert, Thomas A; Suh, Greg S B

    2013-06-26

    Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons express either odorant receptors or ionotropic glutamate receptors (IRs). The sensory neurons that express IR64a, a member of the IR family, send axonal projections to either the DC4 or DP1m glomeruli in the antennal lobe. DC4 neurons respond specifically to acids/protons, whereas DP1m neurons respond to a broad spectrum of odorants. The molecular composition of IR64a-containing receptor complexes in either DC4 or DP1m neurons is not known, however. Here, we immunoprecipitated the IR64a protein from lysates of fly antennal tissue and identified IR8a as a receptor subunit physically associated with IR64a by mass spectrometry. IR8a mutants and flies in which IR8a was knocked down by RNAi in IR64a+ neurons exhibited defects in acid-evoked physiological and behavioral responses. Furthermore, we found that the loss of IR8a caused a significant reduction in IR64a protein levels. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, IR64a and IR8a formed a functional ion channel that allowed ligand-evoked cation currents. These findings provide direct evidence that IR8a is a subunit that forms a functional olfactory receptor with IR64a in vivo to mediate odor detection.

  8. Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program, Inc. Research and Development in Career Education. Mountain-Plains Briefing Memo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orrie, W. Y.

    Described is the Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Project, a Federally-funded project for residential, multi-problemed, rural, disadvantaged family rehabilitation. The project, testing the Fourth National Career Education Research and Development Model (Model 4), is located at Glasgow AF 8, Montana, and serves about 180 families…

  9. IR LASER BASED CHEMICAL SENSOR FOR THE COOPERATIVE MONITORING PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Edward A Whitaker

    2005-08-08

    The purpose of this project was to investigate the device properties of the quantum cascade laser (QCL), a type of laser invented at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies in the device physics research lab of Dr. Federico Capasso and more specifically to determine the remote sensing capability of this device. The PI and Stevens Institute of Technology collaborated with Dr. Capasso and Bell Laboratories to carry out this research project. The QCL is a unique laser source capable of generating laser radiation in the middle-infrared spectral region that overlaps the most important molecular absorption bands. With appropriate modulation techniques it is possible to use the laser to measure the concentration of many molecules of interest to the remote sensing community. In addition, the mid-IR emission wavelength is well suited to atmospheric transmission as mid-IR experiences much less scattering due to dust and fog. At the onset of this project little was known about several key device performance parameters of this family of lasers and the NNSA supported research enabled them to determine values of several of these characteristics.

  10. Model for simulation of IR countermeasure effect on IR-seeker/missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berggren, Jan; Kihlen, Ralf G.

    2004-12-01

    TACSI (TACtical SImulation) is an existing simulator used as a tactical environment for manned simulators at Saab Aerosystems. TACSI can also be used as a stand-alone desktop development and simulation tool. TACSI simulates a large number of entities and functions such as platforms, sensors, weapons, signatures, communication, multisensor fusion, decision support etc. TACSI has a rule based pilot model and uses High Level Architecture (HLA) for interfacing with other simulation models. This model, a development of TACSI, simulates the flight dynamics, IR-signature and IR-seeker operation. The dynamic behaviour of the aircraft, the IRCM, the missile and the IR-seeker are modelled. The IR-contrast seen by the seeker through the atmosphere in front of the aircraft and the IRCM are spectrally and dynamically modelled. The seeker operation behaviour and function are also modelled. To implement this in a real-time simulation system simplifications are necessary. This paper describes the simplifications to model the IR-contrast and the seeker function. This model is used to analyse the effect of IR countermeasures (IRCM) on a missile IR-seeker.

  11. Systematic modeling for the insulin signaling network mediated by IRS(1) and IRS(2).

    PubMed

    Huang, Can; Wu, Ming; Du, Jun; Liu, Di; Chan, Christina

    2014-08-21

    The hepatic insulin signaling mediated by insulin receptor substrates IRS1 and IRS2 plays a central role in maintaining glucose homeostasis under different physiological conditions. Although functions of individual components in the signaling network have been extensively studied, our knowledge is still limited with regard to how the signals are integrated and coordinated in the complex network to render their functional roles. In this study, we construct systematic models for the insulin signaling network mediated by IRS1 and IRS2, through the integration of current knowledge in the literature into mathematical models of insulin signaling pathways. We hypothesize that the specificity of the IRS signaling mechanisms emerges from the wiring and kinetics of the entire network. A discrete dynamic model is first constructed to account for the numerous dynamic features in the system, i.e., complex feedback circuits, different regulatory time-scales and cross-talks between pathways. Our simulation shows that the wiring of the network determines different functions of IRS1 and IRS2. We further collate and reconstruct a kinetic model of the network as a system of ordinary differential equations to provide an informative model for predicting phenotypes. A sensitivity analysis is applied to identify essential regulators for the signaling process.

  12. IR laser-induced protein crystal transformation

    PubMed Central

    Kiefersauer, Reiner; Grandl, Brigitte; Krapp, Stephan; Huber, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A method and the design of instrumentation, and its preliminary practical realisation, including test experiments, with the object of inducing phase changes of biomolecular crystals by controlled dehydration through heating with infrared (IR) light are described. The aim is to generate and select crystalline phases through transformation in the solid state which have improved order (higher resolution in X-ray diffraction experiments) and reduced mosaic spread (more uniformly aligned mosaic blocks) for diffraction data collection and analysis. The crystal is heated by pulsed and/or constant IR laser irradiation. Loss of crystal water following heating and its reabsorption through equilibration with the environment is measured optically by a video system. Heating proved superior to traditional controlled dehydration by humidity change for the test cases CODH (carbon monoxide dehydrogenase) and CLK2 (a protein kinase). Heating with IR light is experimentally simple and offers an exploration of a much broader parameter space than the traditional method, as it allows the option of varying the rate of phase changes through modification of the IR pulse strength, width and repeat frequency. It impacts the crystal instantaneously, isotropically and homogeneously, and is therefore expected to cause less mechanical stress. PMID:24816092

  13. IR "Snowballs": Long-Term Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, M. J.; Bourque, M.; Baggett, S.

    2015-03-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the properties of the WFC3/IR anomalies known as "snowballs", using all in- ight WFC3/IR data through July 2014. The source of snowballs is unclear at present, but is hypothesized to be radionuclides in the detector or bonding material. Nearly 7400 unique snowball events have been identied from the search of 5 years of WFC3/IR images (over 6200 hours of exposure time), translating to a mean rate of about 1.2 snowballs per hour of IR exposure time. Typical snowballs a ect about 10 pixels and saturate 2-5 of those, and deposit about 200,000 to 500,000 electrons on the detector. We nd no trend over 5 years in the rates of snowball occurrences, consistent with the hypothesis that the uranium-238 decay chain is the source of snowballs. We also publish a table of all hitherto identied snowballs, available at http://www.stsci.edu/hst/wfc3/insperformance/anomalies/irsnowballtable.txt.

  14. Panel discussion: The future of IR astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caroff, Lawrence J.

    1995-01-01

    A panel discussion was held on the future of IR astronomy. The chairman gave a brief introduction to current planned programs for NASA and other space agencies, followed by short contributions from the six panel members on a variety of special topics. After that, a short question and answer session was held.

  15. IR-radiation detection by ultrasonic thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, D. V.; Genin, D. E.; Korolkov, V. A.

    2017-05-01

    A method based on ultrasonic thermometry for detecting radiation in the IR range is described. The first results of experimental verification of this method are presented using the example of CO2-laser-radiation detection, and ways to improve its threshold sensitivity are described.

  16. Interactive Response Systems (IRS) Socrative Application Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aslan, Bilge; Seker, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    In globally developing education system, technology has made instructional improved in many ways. One of these improvements is the Interactive Response Systems (IRS) that are applied in classroom activities. Therefore, it is "smart" to focus on interactive response systems in learning environment. This study was conducted aiming to focus…

  17. Wide-angle conformal IR transceiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liepmann, Till W.; Randall, Michael R.; Shapiro, Alan R.

    1993-08-01

    Accessing a large field-of-regard (FOR) from an aircraft-mounted infrared system imposes significant structural and aerodynamic penalties. A novel conformal infrared (IR) transceiver concept is presented which is currently under development. A trial design of this concept can access a 160 deg FOR without a gimbal mirror or 'fish eye' lens. A fiber optic bundle is used to allow a wide range of beamsteering technologies with small steering angles (i.e., +/- 5 degree(s)) to access the large FOR (+/- 80 deg) through a single, conformal aperture. The output lens size is less than a factor of three times larger than the input/output IR beam, yet provides near diffraction limited polychromatic collimation over the full FOR. The concept is applicable over a wide spectral band (ultraviolet to far IR), however, it is being developed for the mid-IR (2 - 6 micron) band. The challenging technical aspects of the fiber optics in this spectral band are discussed.

  18. Laser reflexotherapy in UV and IR wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokretsov, V. V.; Utz, Sergei R.; Vinichenko, N. V.; Barabanov, Alexander Y.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this work was the investigation of the effects of UV and IR laser irradiation on the central and regional hemodynamics of agricultural mechanization workers with border limited arterial hypertension, whose arterial pressure was within the limits from 140 to 90 mm of mercury column up to 159 and 94 mm mercury column.

  19. IR laser-induced protein crystal transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefersauer, Reiner Grandl, Brigitte; Krapp, Stephan; Huber, Robert

    2014-05-01

    A novel method and the associated instrumentation for improving crystalline order (higher resolution of X-ray diffraction and reduced mosaicity) of protein crystals by precisely controlled heating is demonstrated. Crystal transformation is optically controlled by a video system. A method and the design of instrumentation, and its preliminary practical realisation, including test experiments, with the object of inducing phase changes of biomolecular crystals by controlled dehydration through heating with infrared (IR) light are described. The aim is to generate and select crystalline phases through transformation in the solid state which have improved order (higher resolution in X-ray diffraction experiments) and reduced mosaic spread (more uniformly aligned mosaic blocks) for diffraction data collection and analysis. The crystal is heated by pulsed and/or constant IR laser irradiation. Loss of crystal water following heating and its reabsorption through equilibration with the environment is measured optically by a video system. Heating proved superior to traditional controlled dehydration by humidity change for the test cases CODH (carbon monoxide dehydrogenase) and CLK2 (a protein kinase). Heating with IR light is experimentally simple and offers an exploration of a much broader parameter space than the traditional method, as it allows the option of varying the rate of phase changes through modification of the IR pulse strength, width and repeat frequency. It impacts the crystal instantaneously, isotropically and homogeneously, and is therefore expected to cause less mechanical stress.

  20. IR sensors and imagers in networked operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breiter, Rainer; Cabanski, Wolfgang

    2005-05-01

    "Network-centric Warfare" is a common slogan describing an overall concept of networked operation of sensors, information and weapons to gain command and control superiority. Referring to IR sensors, integration and fusion of different channels like day/night or SAR images or the ability to spread image data among various users are typical requirements. Looking for concrete implementations the German Army future infantryman IdZ is an example where a group of ten soldiers build a unit with every soldier equipped with a personal digital assistant (PDA) for information display, day photo camera and a high performance thermal imager for every unit. The challenge to allow networked operation among such a unit is bringing information together and distribution over a capable network. So also AIM's thermal reconnaissance and targeting sight HuntIR which was selected for the IdZ program provides this capabilities by an optional wireless interface. Besides the global approach of Network-centric Warfare network technology can also be an interesting solution for digital image data distribution and signal processing behind the FPA replacing analog video networks or specific point to point interfaces. The resulting architecture can provide capabilities of data fusion from e.g. IR dual-band or IR multicolor sensors. AIM has participated in a German/UK collaboration program to produce a demonstrator for day/IR video distribution via Gigabit Ethernet for vehicle applications. In this study Ethernet technology was chosen for network implementation and a set of electronics was developed for capturing video data of IR and day imagers and Gigabit Ethernet video distribution. The demonstrator setup follows the requirements of current and future vehicles having a set of day and night imager cameras and a crew station with several members. Replacing the analog video path by a digital video network also makes it easy to implement embedded training by simply feeding the network with

  1. Growth and termination of a rutile IrO2(100) layer on Ir(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Rahul; Li, Tao; Liang, Zhu; Kim, Minkyu; Asthagiri, Aravind; Weaver, Jason F.

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the oxidation of Ir(111) by gas-phase oxygen atoms at temperatures between 500 and 625 K using temperature programmed desorption (TPD), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), low energy ion scattering spectroscopy (LEISS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that a well-ordered surface oxide with (√ 3 × √ 3)R30° periodicity relative to Ir(111) develops prior to the formation of a rutile IrO2(100) layer. The IrO2(100) layer reaches a saturation thickness of about four oxide layers under the oxidation conditions employed, and decomposes during TPD to produce a single, sharp O2 desorption peak at 770 K. Favorable lattice matching at the oxide-metal interface is likely responsible for the preferential growth of the IrO2(100) facet during the initial oxidation of Ir(111), with the resulting coincidence lattice generating a clear (6 × 1) moiré pattern in LEED. Temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy (TPRS) experiments reveal that CO and H2O molecules bind only weakly on the IrO2(100) surface and LEISS measurements show that the oxide surface is highly enriched in O-atoms. These characteristics provide strong evidence that the rutile IrO2(100) layer is oxygen-terminated, and thus lacks reactive Ir atoms that can strongly bind molecular adsorbates. Oxygen binding energies predicted by DFT suggest that on-top O-atoms will remain adsorbed on IrO2(100) at temperatures up to 625 K, thus supporting the conclusion that the rutile IrO2 layer grown in our experiments is oxygen-terminated. As such, the appearance of only a single O2 TPD peak indicates that the singly coordinate, on-top O-atoms remain stable on the IrO2(100) surface up to temperatures at which the oxide layer begins to thermally decompose.

  2. Interactive Research and Development on Schooling: Executive Summary of the Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Gary A.; And Others

    This document presents the findings of a two-year investigation of Interactive Research and Development on Schooling (IR&DS). IR&DS is an alternate means of conducting school-based research and development and an extension of Interactive Research and Development on Teaching (IR&DT). IR&DS is seen as a means to: (1) involve school personnel in…

  3. Recent Results in Satellite Precipitation Estimation Using Geosynchronous IR and Low-Orbit Microwave Data in Combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert F.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes recent results of research to produce various precipitation data products using low-orbit microwave and geosynchronous IR measurements. Emphasis is placed on products with instantaneous rain estimates, although some examples of monthly products are shown.

  4. Dealing confidently with IRS, Part II: IRS audit and postaudit procedures.

    PubMed

    Holub, S F; Walker, S R

    1978-11-01

    Preparation enables an administrator to control the hospital's participation in IRS audit procedures, to fulfill the requirements essential to the institution's tax-exempt status, and to choose the most appropriate alternative at the postaudit conference.

  5. Independent Research (IR) and Independent Exploratory Development (IED)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    Journal of Applied Social Psychology , 23, 508-536. Pedhazur, E. J. (1982). Multiple regression in... Journal of Applied Social Psychology , 23, 508-536. (Work done in FY85/86). Riemer, R. A. (1993, August). The effects of productivity gain sharing and... Journal of Applied Social Psychology , 23, 508-536. (Work done in FY85/86). Riemer, R. A. (1993, August). The effects of productivity gain sharing

  6. Role of IRS1 and IRS2 in Modulating ErbB-induced Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    cancer, BMS-754807, IGF, small molecule inhibitor 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...IGF-IR signaling (Months 12-24) i) Correlate levels of IRSs with response to IGF-I and insulin in a large panel of breast cancer cell lines...i) Use transcriptomic profiling of a large panel of breast cancer cell lines to identify markers of sensitivity and resistance to an IGF-IR

  7. Tax-deferred annuity plans: meeting the IRS audit challenge.

    PubMed

    Schussler, M

    1997-01-01

    A growing number of nonprofit organizations are being fined for violations of IRS regulations following IRS audits of their tax-deferred annuity (TDA) plans. To ensure that their organizations can withstand the scrutiny of an IRS audit, TDA plan administrators must ensure that plans meet IRS regulations and be prepared for IRS audits. Documentation--particularly of the TDA plan itself, and procedures related to salary reduction programs, compensation limits, excess deferrals and other excess contributions, loans, and distributions--must be comprehensive and in compliance with IRS regulations.

  8. A comparison of the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) score and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) in predictive modelling in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Burzynska, Malgorzata; Melcer, Tomasz; Kübler, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    To compare the performance of multivariate predictive models incorporating either the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) score or Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) in order to test whether substituting GCS with the FOUR score in predictive models for outcome in patients after TBI is beneficial. A total of 162 TBI patients were prospectively enrolled in the study. Stepwise logistic regression analysis was conducted to compare the prediction of (1) in-ICU mortality and (2) unfavourable outcome at 3 months post-injury using as predictors either the FOUR score or GCS along with other factors that may affect patient outcome. The areas under the ROC curves (AUCs) were used to compare the discriminant ability and predictive power of the models. The internal validation was performed with bootstrap technique and expressed as accuracy rate (AcR). The FOUR score, age, the CT Rotterdam score, systolic ABP and being placed on ventilator within day one (model 1: AUC: 0.906 ± 0.024; AcR: 80.3 ± 4.8%) performed equally well in predicting in-ICU mortality as the combination of GCS with the same set of predictors plus pupil reactivity (model 2: AUC: 0.913 ± 0.022; AcR: 81.1 ± 4.8%). The CT Rotterdam score, age and either the FOUR score (model 3) or GCS (model 4) equally well predicted unfavourable outcome at 3 months post-injury (AUC: 0.852 ± 0.037 vs. 0.866 ± 0.034; AcR: 72.3 ± 6.6% vs. 71.9%±6.6%, respectively). Adding the FOUR score or GCS at discharge from ICU to predictive models for unfavourable outcome increased significantly their performances (AUC: 0.895 ± 0.029, p = 0.05; AcR: 76.1 ± 6.5%; p < 0.004 when compared with model 3; and AUC: 0.918 ± 0.025, p < 0.05; AcR: 79.6 ± 7.2%, p < 0.009 when compared with model 4), but there was no benefit from substituting GCS with the FOUR score. Results showed that FOUR score and GCS perform equally well in multivariate predictive modelling in TBI.

  9. Aggressive operative neurosurgical management in patients with extra-axial mass lesion and Glasgow Coma Scale of 3 is associated with survival benefit: A propensity matched analysis.

    PubMed

    Salottolo, Kristin; Carrick, Matthew; Levy, A Stewart; Morgan, Brent C; Mains, Charles W; Slone, Denetta S; Bar-Or, David

    2016-01-01

    Prognosis in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 3 is poor, raising concern regarding the utility of aggressive operative neurosurgical management. Our purpose was to describe outcomes in a propensity matched population with TBI and GCS3 treated with operative neurosurgical procedures of craniotomy or craniectomy (CRANI). We conducted a five-year, multicenter retrospective cohort study of patients with an ED GCS 3 and a positive head CT identified by ICD-9CM diagnosis codes. Two populations were examined: (1) patients with extra-axial mass lesion (subdural or epidural haematoma), (2) patients without mass lesion (subarachnoid and intraparenchymal haemorrhage including contusion, other intracerebral haemorrhage or intracranial injury including diffuse axonal injury). In patients with extra-axial mass lesion, propensity score techniques were used to match patients 1:1 by CRANI, and the following outcomes were analysed with conditional logistic regression: survival, favourable hospital disposition to home or rehabilitation, and development of complications. There were 541 patients with TBI and GCS3; 19% had a CRANI, 83% were initiated within 4h. In those with mass lesion, 27% (91/338) had a CRANI; after matching, a significant survival benefit was observed with CRANI vs. without CRANI (65% vs. 34% survival, OR: 3.9 (1.6-10.5) p<0.001). There was borderline increased odds of favourable disposition (43% vs. 26%, OR: 2.4 (0.99-6.3, p=0.052) with CRANI vs. without CRANI, and no difference in developing a complication (58% vs. 48%, OR: 1.5 (0.7-3.4), p=0.30). Survival was achieved in 65% of patients that underwent surgical intervention for subdural and epidural haematoma, despite a presenting GCS of 3. These results demonstrate prompt operative neurosurgical management of mass lesion is warranted for selected patients with a GCS of 3, contributing to a significant 4-fold survival benefit. In the absence of mass lesion the effect

  10. Does the choice of neighbourhood supermarket access measure influence associations with individual-level fruit and vegetable consumption? A case study from Glasgow.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Lukar E; Pearce, Jamie R; Macdonald, Laura; Lamb, Karen E; Ellaway, Anne

    2012-07-27

    Previous studies have provided mixed evidence with regards to associations between food store access and dietary outcomes. This study examines the most commonly applied measures of locational access to assess whether associations between supermarket access and fruit and vegetable consumption are affected by the choice of access measure and scale. Supermarket location data from Glasgow, UK (n = 119), and fruit and vegetable intake data from the 'Health and Well-Being' Survey (n = 1041) were used to compare various measures of locational access. These exposure variables included proximity estimates (with different points-of-origin used to vary levels of aggregation) and density measures using three approaches (Euclidean and road network buffers and Kernel density estimation) at distances ranging from 0.4 km to 5 km. Further analysis was conducted to assess the impact of using smaller buffer sizes for individuals who did not own a car. Associations between these multiple access measures and fruit and vegetable consumption were estimated using linear regression models. Levels of spatial aggregation did not impact on the proximity estimates. Counts of supermarkets within Euclidean buffers were associated with fruit and vegetable consumption at 1 km, 2 km and 3 km, and for our road network buffers at 2 km, 3 km, and 4 km. Kernel density estimates provided the strongest associations and were significant at a distance of 2 km, 3 km, 4 km and 5 km. Presence of a supermarket within 0.4 km of road network distance from where people lived was positively associated with fruit consumption amongst those without a car (coef. 0.657; s.e. 0.247; p0.008). The associations between locational access to supermarkets and individual-level dietary behaviour are sensitive to the method by which the food environment variable is captured. Care needs to be taken to ensure robust and conceptually appropriate measures of access are used and these should be

  11. Does the choice of neighbourhood supermarket access measure influence associations with individual-level fruit and vegetable consumption? A case study from Glasgow

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have provided mixed evidence with regards to associations between food store access and dietary outcomes. This study examines the most commonly applied measures of locational access to assess whether associations between supermarket access and fruit and vegetable consumption are affected by the choice of access measure and scale. Method Supermarket location data from Glasgow, UK (n = 119), and fruit and vegetable intake data from the ‘Health and Well-Being’ Survey (n = 1041) were used to compare various measures of locational access. These exposure variables included proximity estimates (with different points-of-origin used to vary levels of aggregation) and density measures using three approaches (Euclidean and road network buffers and Kernel density estimation) at distances ranging from 0.4 km to 5 km. Further analysis was conducted to assess the impact of using smaller buffer sizes for individuals who did not own a car. Associations between these multiple access measures and fruit and vegetable consumption were estimated using linear regression models. Results Levels of spatial aggregation did not impact on the proximity estimates. Counts of supermarkets within Euclidean buffers were associated with fruit and vegetable consumption at 1 km, 2 km and 3 km, and for our road network buffers at 2 km, 3 km, and 4 km. Kernel density estimates provided the strongest associations and were significant at a distance of 2 km, 3 km, 4 km and 5 km. Presence of a supermarket within 0.4 km of road network distance from where people lived was positively associated with fruit consumption amongst those without a car (coef. 0.657; s.e. 0.247; p0.008). Conclusions The associations between locational access to supermarkets and individual-level dietary behaviour are sensitive to the method by which the food environment variable is captured. Care needs to be taken to ensure robust and conceptually appropriate measures of

  12. New honeycomb iridium(V) oxides: NaIrO3 and Sr3CaIr2O9.

    PubMed

    Wallace, David C; McQueen, Tyrel M

    2015-12-21

    We report the structures and physical properties of two new iridates, NaIrO3 and Sr3CaIr2O9, both of which contain continuous two-dimensional honeycomb connectivity. NaIrO3 is produced by room temperature oxidative deintercalation of sodium from Na2IrO3, and contains edge-sharing IrO6 octahedra that form a planar honeycomb lattice. Sr3CaIr2O9, produced via conventional solid-state synthesis, hosts a buckled honeycomb lattice with novel corner-sharing connectivity between IrO6 octahedra. Both of these new compounds are comprised of Ir(5+) (5d(4)) and exhibit negligible magnetic susceptibility. They are thus platforms to investigate the origin of the nonmagnetic behavior exhibited by Ir(5+) oxides, and provide the first examples of a J = 0 state on a honeycomb lattice.

  13. Studying the nonlinearity in Sonic IR NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qiuye; Obeidat, Omar; Han, Xiaoyan

    2017-02-01

    Sonic IR Imaging combines pulsed ultrasound excitation and infrared imaging to detect defects in materials. The sound pulse causes rubbing due to non--unison motion between faces of defects, and infrared sensors image the temperature map over the target to identify defects. It works in various materials, including metal/metal alloy, ceramics, and composite materials. Its biggest advantage is that it's a fast, wide area NDE technique. It takes only a fraction of a second or a few seconds, depending on the thermal properties of the target, for one test over a few square feet. However, due to the nonlinearity in the coupling between the ultrasound transducer and the target, the repeatability has been an issue, which affects its application. In this paper, we present our study on this issue in Sonic IR.

  14. Automated IR-weld seam control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balle, Michel

    1990-03-01

    In 1975 the concept of visualizing, measuring and studying the thermal condition of welded seams was investigated by a laboratory of the French ministry of defense (at the request of a metal constructor). Gilbert Gaussorgues, the founding father of the company HGH was at the time in charge of the infrared laboratory in question, a department of the general administration of Armament in Toulon, France. His idea was to apply military IR-Technology to above mentioned welding application. Having developed a prototype, tests readily confirmed the validity of using IR-emission from the weld seam close to the actual moment of welding as an indicator of the quality of the fmal assembly. Nearly ten years later, in 1984, HGH decided, due to an increasing demand, to develop above preliminary tests to a complete product/application package designed specifically for welding process-control. The inspection oftubing and of the integrity welds of barrels with hazardous content, were the first applications.

  15. Theoretical IR spectra of ionized naphthalene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauzat, F.; Talbi, D.; Miller, M. D.; DeFrees, D. J.; Ellinger, Y.

    1992-01-01

    We report the results of a theoretical study of the effect of ionization on the IR spectrum of naphthalene, using ab initio molecular orbital theory. For that purpose we determined the structures, band frequencies, and intensities of neutral and positively ionized naphthalene. The calculated frequencies and intensities allowed an assignment of the most important bands appearing in the newly reported experimental spectrum of the positive ion. Agreement with the experimental spectrum is satisfactory enough to take into consideration the unexpected and important result that ionization significantly affects the intensities of most vibrations. A possible consequence on the interpretation of the IR interstellar emission, generally supposed to originate from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), is briefly presented.

  16. Infrared Measurements of Possible IR Filter Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, Daniel; Ediss, G. A.; Mihaly, Laszlo; Carr, G. L.

    A Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTS) was used to obtain the transmission spectra of candidate materials for use as infrared (IR) filters in cryogenic receivers. The data cover the range from 50 cm-1 (~1.5 THz), well below the peak of the 300 K black body spectrum, to 5000 cm-1 (~150 THz). Z-cut quartz, Goretex, Zitex G and Zitex A, High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), Teflon (PTFE), Fluorogold and Black Polyethylene were measured. The relative effectiveness of each material as a filter is determined by integrating the transmission spectrum multiplied by the Planck distribution to obtain a normalized attenuation for the mid-IR band. Measurements at both room temperature and 8 K are compared.

  17. Infrared Measurements of Possible IR Filter Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Koller,D.; Ediss, G.; Mihaly, L.; Carr, G.

    2006-01-01

    A Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTS) was used to obtain the transmission spectra of candidate materials for use as infrared (IR) filters in cryogenic receivers. The data cover the range from 50 cm-1 ({approx}1.5 THz), well below the peak of the 300 K black body spectrum, to 5000 cm-1 ({approx}150 THz), Z-cut quartz, Gore-Tex, Zitex G and Zitex A, High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), Teflon (PTFE), Fluorogold and Black Polyethylene were measured. The relative effectiveness of each material as a filter is determined by integrating the transmission spectrum multiplied by the Planck distribution to obtain a normalized attenuation for the mid-IR band. Measurements at both room temperature and 8 K are compared.

  18. Flexible high-performance IR camera systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoelter, Theodore R.; Petronio, Susan M.; Carralejo, Ronald J.; Frank, Jeffery D.; Graff, John H.

    1999-07-01

    Indigo Systems Corporation has developed a family of standard readout integrated circuits (ROIC) for use in IR focal plane arrays (FPAs) imaging systems. These standard ROICs are designed to provide a compete set of operating features for camera level FPA control, while also providing high performance capability with any of several detector materials. By creating a uniform electrical interface for FPAs, these standard ROICs simplify the task of FPA integration with imaging electronics and physical packages. This paper begins with a brief description of the features of four Indigo standard ROICs and continues with a description of the features, design, and measured performance of indium antimonide, quantum well IR photo- detectors and indium gallium arsenide imaging system built using the described standard ROICs.

  19. Theoretical IR spectra of ionized naphthalene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauzat, F.; Talbi, D.; Miller, M. D.; DeFrees, D. J.; Ellinger, Y.

    1992-01-01

    We report the results of a theoretical study of the effect of ionization on the IR spectrum of naphthalene, using ab initio molecular orbital theory. For that purpose we determined the structures, band frequencies, and intensities of neutral and positively ionized naphthalene. The calculated frequencies and intensities allowed an assignment of the most important bands appearing in the newly reported experimental spectrum of the positive ion. Agreement with the experimental spectrum is satisfactory enough to take into consideration the unexpected and important result that ionization significantly affects the intensities of most vibrations. A possible consequence on the interpretation of the IR interstellar emission, generally supposed to originate from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), is briefly presented.

  20. Applications of IR imagery to thermal evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocchicchio, Richard L.

    1992-07-01

    Three successful applications of IR imagery to thermal measurements and analysis are presented: (1) turbo-prop engine exhaust heating measurements, (2) temperature measurements of the gun (a 20-mm cannon) port area, and (3) tailpipe bellows temperature measurements. IR measurements were made with a dual-band scanner system incorporating a shortwave scanner covering the 3- to 5.6-micron spectral band and a longwave scanner covering the 8- to 14-micron spectral band. The output of the electronics was fed to a computer that has been adapted to the imager display and analysis software. Real-time images were displayed continuously (approximately 25/sec) and were recorded on the internal hard disk every 4 to 5 sec or continuously on tape.

  1. IRS1 and IRS2: molecular characterization, tissue expression and transcriptional regulation by insulin in yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Mei-Qin; Pan, Ya-Xiong; Wu, Kun; Xu, Yi-Huan; Zhang, Li-Han; Luo, Zhi

    2017-04-01

    The insulin receptor substrate (IRS) proteins, in particular, IRS1 and IRS2, are the key downstream players of insulin signaling pathway and the regulation of lipid metabolism. In the present study, two genes of IRS (IRS1 and IRS2) were isolated and characterized from yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco. Their molecular characterizations, tissue expressions, and transcriptional levels by insulin both in vivo and in vitro were determined. The validated complementary DNAs encoding for IRS1 and IRS2 were 3693 and 3177 bp in length, encoding proteins of 1230 and 1058 amino acid residues, respectively. Similarly to mammals, amino acid sequence alignment revealed that IRSs contained an N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, a phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain, and several C-terminal multiple sites of tyrosine phosphorylation. Both IRS1 and IRS2 were widely expressed across the ten tissues (liver, white muscle, spleen, brain, gill, mesenteric fat, anterior intestine, heart, mid-kidney, and ovary), but at the variable levels. Insulin injection at 1 μg/g in vivo significantly stimulated the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of IRS2, but not IRS1 mRNA expression levels in the liver of yellow catfish after 48 h. In hepatocytes of yellow catfish, insulin incubation significantly stimulated the IRS1 (at a 1000 nM insulin group) and IRS2 (at both 100 and 1000 nM insulin groups) mRNA expressions, which indicated that IRS2 was more sensitive than IRS1 to insulin stimulation in the liver of yellow catfish, and IRS2 played a more important role in mediating insulin's effects on the liver metabolism. The present study serves to increase our understanding into the function of IRS in fish.

  2. Overview of IRS Plasma Wind Tunnel Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    Saturn system with the 80- 30, 40, Cassini spacecraft, which was designed, built and 120 h launched by NASA [30]. During the entry into Titan’s i 60...launched in 1995, a ring reentry for landing in Cayenne and the re- first experiment was conducted to determine whether quired mass flow within the PWK... formation . In the IRS MPG facility continuous The operating times range typically from several operation with methane components up to 10%, as minutes to

  3. Broadband Near IR Laser Hazard Filters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-10

    the first quarter of this program, we procured high quality gelatin and ammonium dichromate . It is well known that there are several kinds of...composition of gelatin, ammonium dichromate and water. We attempted to find the optimum coating thickness for 50 nm and 90 nm bandwidth range filters. Annual...fabrication is based on volume Bragg holography using photopolymers and dichromated gelatins. The successful performance of broad- band IR filters

  4. Medical Applications of IR Focal Plane Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    vascular disorders, arthritis and rheumatism , pain (management and control), surgery, neonatology, oncology, tissue viability, emergency...specific areas of IR imaging uses are: neurology, vascular disorders, arthritis and rheumatism , pain management and control, tissue viability, oncological...Inflammatory Arthritis ", Clinics in Rheumatic Diseases- Piagnosis and Treatment, Vol.2, p.51-65, 1976 11. Balcerak,R., Jenkins,D.P., Diakides,N.A

  5. Symbolic fusion of MMW and IR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, Peter A.; Kohl, Charles A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the software architecture used to construct a multisensor knowledge-based Autonomous Target Recognizer (ATR). An Intermediate Symbolic Representation (SR) of processed data is employed to provide a very powerful method of associative access over data events and their features, thereby supporting data fusion algorithms at the symbolic level. This architecture supports data fusion from multiple sensors, and its operation is described here using MMW range and IR intensity data.

  6. Symbolic Fusion Of MMW And IR Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleston, Peter A.; Kohl, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the software architecture used to construct a multi-sensor knowledge-based Autonomous Target Recognizer (ATR). An Intermediate Symbolic Representation (ISR) of processed data is employed to provide a very powerful method of associative access over data events and their features, thereby supporting data fusion algorithms at the symbolic level. This architecture supports data fusion from multiple sensors, and its operation is described here using MMW range and IR intensity data.

  7. Ir spectra of preparations of ozonized pyrocatechin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khovratovich, N. N.; Novikova, T. M.; Khmel'Nitskii, A. I.; Cherenkevich, S. N.; Loban, V. A.

    1998-03-01

    We investigate IR spectra of the solid phase of products obtained at different stages in the process of ozonizing aqueous solutions of pyrocatechin. We found that melanin structures are formed in the process of pyrocatechin ozonization. The existence of intra- and intermolecular interactions in the melanin preparations formed, leading to the formation of molecular associates, is shown. Thorough treatment of preparations with ozone leads to destruction of polymer systems and formation of water-soluble products of acid type.

  8. CUBISM: CUbe Builder for IRS Spectra Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sings Irs Team; Smith, J. D.; Armus, Lee; Bot, Caroline; Buckalew, Brent; Dale, Danny; Helou, George; Jarrett, Tom; Roussel, Helene; Sheth, Kartik

    2011-11-01

    CUBISM, written in IDL, constructs spectral cubes, maps, and arbitrary aperture 1D spectral extractions from sets of mapping mode spectra taken with Spitzer's IRS spectrograph. CUBISM is optimized for non-sparse maps of extended objects, e.g. the nearby galaxy sample of SINGS, but can be used with data from any spectral mapping AOR (primarily validated for maps which are designed as suggested by the mapping HOWTO).

  9. Modeling Dead OH/IR stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz-Martins, S.; Ortiz, R.; Khouri, T.; de Araujo, F. X.

    2007-11-01

    OH/IR stars present several OH maser emission lines which are formed in the outer regions of their circumstellar dust envelopes. These stars can be recognized at large distances, based only on radio and infrared observations. They can therefore be used as kinematic tracers in galaxies. The emission at 1612 MHz is the strongest line and presents a double profile (Δv = 20--50 km/s), although in the planetary nebulae phase this line is sometimes no longer detected. In this work we calculate radiative transfer models to describe the dust envelopes of a sample of OH/IR stars. In this sample, the maser emission at 1612 MHz has disappeared. We also included some OH/IR stars in which this maser emission was recently detected. The results show that the physical parameters of the dust envelopes of almost the whole sample are those expected for normal oxygen-rich AGB stars. However, three sources have a different pattern: they present a double-peaked energy dustribution which may be due to an evolved dust envelope.

  10. Tumor diagnostics using fiber optical IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Harald; Bindig, Uwe; Waesche, Wolfgang; Liebold, K.; Roggan, Andre; Frege, P.; Gross, U. M.; Mueller, G.

    1999-04-01

    Aim of the project is the development of an in vivo endoscopic method to differentiate between cancerous from healthy tissue. The method is based on IR spectra in which each diseased state of the tissue has its own characteristic pattern as already shown in previous experiments. Two regions (1245 - 1195) cm-1 and (1045 - 995) cm-1 within the fingerprint (less than 1500 cm-1) region were selected for analysis. This paper will present the technical design of the laboratory set up and outcome of the development as well as the experiments. Two lead-salt diode lasers were used as excitation sources. The IR-radiation was transmitted via silverhalide fibers to the tissue to be investigated. On the detection side another IR fiber was used to transmit the signal to an MCT-detector (Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride). Measurement modes are Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) and diffuse Reflection/Remission. Spatial resolution was 100 X 100 micrometer2. The tissue used for these experiments was human colon carcinoma under humidity conditions. Samples were mapped using a stepper motor powered x/y/z-translation stage with a resolution of 1 micrometer. Results were compared with measurements carried out using a FTIR-interferometer and an FTIR-microscope in the region from 4000 - 900 cm-1. Soft- and Hardware control of the experiment is done using Labwindows/CVI (National Instruments, USA).

  11. Choices for Tissue Visualization with IR Microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gough,K.; Rak, M.; Bookatz, A.; Del Bigio, M.; Mai, S.; Westaway, D.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we address some of the issues associated with infrared (IR) imaging, with reference to our work on brain tissue from the TgCRND8 mouse, a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is the most common cause of dementia in the aging population. One of the characteristic hallmarks of this chronic neurodegenerative disorder is the accumulation of plaques in the brain, usually visualized with histochemistry and immunostaining. Although these methods are extremely useful, they illustrate only certain aspects of the sample, require a great amount of tissue processing, and are highly dependent on experimental protocols and reagent quality. IR imaging provides information on multiple components, with a minimal amount of sample processing. However, in order to interpret the data successfully, the issues of spectral acquisition parameters, pre-processing, and spectral artifacts need to be considered. The methods commonly used to process the data, such as uni- and bi-variate spectral analysis, and multivariate methods, such as hierarchical cluster analysis, and some issues concerning the use of second derivatives of IR spectra are discussed.

  12. Which clinical variable influences health-related quality of life the most after spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage? Hunt and Hess scale, Fisher score, World Federation of Neurosurgeons score, Brussels coma score, and Glasgow coma score compared.

    PubMed

    Kapapa, Thomas; Tjahjadi, Martin; König, Ralph; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Woischneck, Dieter

    2013-12-01

    To determine the strength of the correlation between the Hunt and Hess scale, Fisher score, Brussels coma score, World Federation of Neurosurgeons score, and Glasgow coma score and health-related quality of life. Evaluable questionnaires from 236 patients (5.6 years [± standard deviation, 2.854 years] on average after hemorrhage) were included in the analysis. Quality of life was documented using the MOS-36 item short form health survey. Because of the ordinal nature of the variables, Kendall tau was used for calculation. Significance was established as P ≤ 0.05. Weak and very weak correlations were found in general (r ≤ 0.28). The strongest correlations were found between the Glasgow coma score and quality of life (r = 0.236, P = 0.0001). In particular, the "best verbal response" achieved the strongest correlations in the comparison, at r = 0.28/P = 0.0001. The Fisher score showed very weak correlations (r = -0.148/P = 0.012). The Brussels coma score (r = -0.216/P = 0.0001), Hunt and Hess scale (r = -0.197/P = 0.0001), and the World Federation of Neurosurgeons score (r = -0.185/P = 0.0001) revealed stronger correlations, especially in terms of the physical aspects of quality of life. The Glasgow coma scale revealed the strongest, and the Fisher score showed the weakest correlations. Thus the Fisher score, as an indicator of the severity of a hemorrhage, has little significance in terms of health-related quality of life. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Looking at Art in the IR and UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falco, Charles

    2013-03-01

    Starting with the very earliest cave paintings art has been created to be viewed by the unaided eye and, until very recently, it wasn't even possible to see it at wavelengths outside the visible spectrum. However, it is now possible to view paintings, sculptures, manuscripts, and other cultural artifacts at wavelengths from the x-ray, through the ultraviolet (UV), to well into the infrared (IR). Further, thanks to recent advances in technology, this is becoming possible with hand-held instruments that can be used in locations that were previously inaccessible to anything but laboratory-scale image capture equipment. But, what can be learned from such ``non-visible'' images? In this talk I will briefly describe the characteristics of high resolution UV and IR imaging systems I developed for this purpose by modifying high resolution digital cameras. The sensitivity of the IR camera makes it possible to obtain images of art ``in situ'' with standard museum lighting, resolving features finer than 0.35 mm on a 1.0x0.67 m painting. I also have used both it and the UV camera in remote locations with battery-powered illumination sources. I will illustrate their capabilities with images of various examples of Western, Asian, and Islamic art in museums on three continents, describing how these images have revealed important new information about the working practices of artists as famous as Jan van Eyck. I also will describe what will be possible for this type of work with new capabilities that could be developed within the next few years. This work is based on a collaboration with David Hockney, and benefitted from image analys research supported by ARO grant W911NF-06-1-0359-P00001.

  14. Distorted IR target detection and tracking using composite filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iftekharuddin, Khan M.; Shaik, Jahangheer S.

    2003-12-01

    The automatic target recognition (ATR), often time, is limited by the presence of background clutter and distortions such as scale, translation and rotation (both in-plane and out-of-plane) in both single and multi object cases. Such distortion invariant ATR and image understanding have been the subject of intense research in animal and machine vision. In a previous work, we have demonstrated the usefulness of an amplitude-coupled minimum-average correlation energy (AC-MACE) filter in in-plane rotated SAR image ATR. The AC-MACE filter outperforms the regular MACE filter in rotation-related cases. Motion tracking is also an important task in computer vision, especially, when objects are subjected to certain viewing transformation. There are many problems in which very small objects undergoing motion must be detected and then tracked. For example, one of the most difficult goals of ATR is to spot incoming objects at long range, where the motion seems small and the signal to noise ratio (SNR) is poor. The system must be able to track such targets long enough to identify whether the object is a friend or foe. In this work, we are interested in locating both long-range and short-range moving objects in IR images wherein the object may vary from a few pixels in size to a large number of pixels in a sequence of IR images. The targets are submerged in background noise and clutter. Additionally, the tracking problem also involves out-of-plane rotation of the target. Thus, we investigate both MACE and AC-MACE filter for rotation and size invariant target detection and tracking using realistic IR images.

  15. Development of IR Contrast Data Analysis Application for Characterizing Delaminations in Graphite-Epoxy Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havican, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Develop infrared (IR) flash thermography application based on use of a calibration standard for inspecting graphite-epoxy laminated/honeycomb structures. Background: Graphite/Epoxy composites (laminated and honeycomb) are widely used on NASA programs. Composite materials are susceptible for impact damage that is not readily detected by visual inspection. IR inspection can provide required sensitivity to detect surface damage in composites during manufacturing and during service. IR contrast analysis can provide characterization of depth, size and gap thickness of impact damage. Benefits/Payoffs: The research provides an empirical method of calibrating the flash thermography response in nondestructive evaluation. A physical calibration standard with artificial flaws such as flat bottom holes with desired diameter and depth values in a desired material is used in calibration. The research devises several probability of detection (POD) analysis approaches to enable cost effective POD study to meet program requirements.

  16. Fabrication and properties of silicene and silicene-graphene layered structures on Ir (111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Lei; Wang, Ye-Liang; Zhang, Li-Zhi; Du, Shi-Xuan; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2015-08-01

    Silicene, a two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb structure similar to graphene, has been successfully fabricated on various substrates. This work will mainly review the syntheses and the corresponding properties of silicene and silicene-graphene layered structures on Ir (111) substrates. For silicene on Ir (111), the buckled silicene/ Ir (111) configuration and its electronic structure are fully discussed. For silicene-graphene layered structures, silicene layer can be constructed underneath graphene layer by an intercalation method. These results indicate the possibility of integrating silicene with graphene and may link up with potential applications in nanoelectronics and related areas. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013CBA01600 and 2011CB932700), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61222112, 61390501, 51325204, 11334006, and 61306114), the Science Fund from Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. 1731300500015 and XDB07030100), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China.

  17. IR decoys modeling method based on particle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun-yu; Wu, Kai-feng; Dong, Yan-bing

    2016-10-01

    Due to the complexity in combustion processes of IR decoys, it is difficult to describe its infrared radiation characteristics by deterministic model. In this work, the IR decoys simulation based on particle system was found. The measured date of the IR decoy is used to analyze the typical characteristic of the IR decoy. A semi-empirical model of the IR decoy motion law has been set up based on friction factors and a IR decoys simulation model has been build up based on particle system. The infrared imaging characteristic and time varying characteristic of the IR decoy were simulated by making use of the particle feature such as lifetime, speed and color. The dynamic IR decoys simulation is realized with the VC++6.0 and OpenGL.

  18. Monitoring Persistence in WFC3/IR after scanned grism observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbi, Elena

    2013-10-01

    This is a calibration program designed to put full frame IR darks exposures immediately following ALL visits with WFC3/IR spatially scanned spectra. This will allow us to measure the persistence and its early decay characteristics.

  19. Is the ``IR Coincidence'' Just That?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Michael A.; Wilms, Jörn; Heinz, Sebastian; Pooley, Guy; Pottschmidt, Katja; Corbel, Stephane

    2005-06-01

    Previous work by Motch et al. suggested that in the low/hard state of GX 339-4 the soft X-ray power law extrapolated backward in energy agrees with the IR flux level. Corbel & Fender later showed that the typical hard-state radio power law extrapolated forward in energy meets the backward-extrapolated X-ray power law at an IR spectral break, which was explicitly observed twice in GX 339-4. This IR coincidence has been cited as further evidence that synchrotron radiation from a jet might make a significant contribution to the observed X-rays in hard-state black hole systems. We quantitatively explore this hypothesis with a series of simultaneous radio/X-ray observations of GX 339-4, taken during its 1997, 1999, and 2002 hard states. We fit these spectra, in detector space, with a simple, but remarkably successful, doubly broken power-law model that indeed requires an IR spectral break. For these observations, the break position and the integrated radio/IR flux have stronger dependences upon the X-ray flux than the simplest jet model predictions. If one allows for a softening of the X-ray power law with increasing flux, then the jet model can agree with the observed correlation. We also find evidence that the radio flux-X-ray flux correlation previously observed in the 1997 and 1999 GX 339-4 hard states shows a parallel track for the 2002 hard state. The slope of the 2002 correlation is consistent with observations taken in prior hard states; however, the radio amplitude is reduced. We then examine the radio flux-X-ray flux correlation in Cyg X-1 through the use of 15 GHz radio data obtained with the Ryle radio telescope and Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer data from the All-Sky Monitor and pointed observations. We again find evidence of parallel tracks, and here they are associated with ``failed transitions,'' or the beginning of a transition, to the soft state. We also find that for Cyg X-1 the radio flux is more fundamentally correlated with the hard, rather than the

  20. Is the `IR Coincidence' Just That?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, M.

    2005-09-01

    Previous work by Motch (1985) suggested that in the low/hard state of GX 339-4 the soft X-ray power-law extrapolated backward in energy agrees with the IR flux level. Corbel & Fender (2002) later showed that the typical hard state radio power-law extrapolated forward in energy meets the backward extrapolated X-ray power-law at an IR spectral break, which was explicitly observed twice in GX 339-4. This `IR coincidence' has been cited as further evidence that synchrotron radiation from a jet might make a significant contribution to the observed X-rays in hard state black hole systems. We quantitatively explore this hypothesis with a series of simultaneous radio/X-ray observations of GX 339-4, taken during its 1997, 1999, and 2002 hard states. We fit these spectra, in detector space, with a simple, but remarkably successful, doubly broken power-law model that indeed requires an IR spectral break. For these observations, the break position and the integrated radio/IR flux have stronger dependences upon the X-ray flux than the simplest jet model predictions. If one allows for a softening of the X-ray power law with increasing flux, then the jet model can agree with the observed correlation. We also find evidence that the radio flux/X-ray flux correlation previously observed in the 1997 and 1999 GX 339-4 hard states shows a `parallel track' for the 2002 hard state. The slope of the 2002 correlation is consistent with observations taken in prior hard states; however, the radio amplitude is reduced. We then examine the radio flux/X-ray flux correlation in Cyg X-1 through the use of 15 GHz radio data, obtained with the Ryle radio telescope, and Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data, from the All Sky Monitor and pointed observations. We again find evidence of `parallel tracks', and here they are associated with `failed transitions' to, or the beginning of a transition to, the soft state. We also find that for Cyg X-1 the radio flux is more fundamentally correlated with the hard

  1. HOMA1-IR and HOMA2-IR indexes in identifying insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome: Brazilian Metabolic Syndrome Study (BRAMS).

    PubMed

    Geloneze, Bruno; Vasques, Ana Carolina Junqueira; Stabe, Christiane França Camargo; Pareja, José Carlos; Rosado, Lina Enriqueta Frandsen Paez de Lima; Queiroz, Elaine Cristina de; Tambascia, Marcos Antonio

    2009-03-01

    To investigate cut-off values for HOMA1-IR and HOMA2-IR to identify insulin resistance (IR) and metabolic syndrome (MS), and to assess the association of the indexes with components of the MS. Nondiabetic subjects from the Brazilian Metabolic Syndrome Study were studied (n = 1,203, 18 to 78 years). The cut-off values for IR were determined from the 90th percentile in the healthy group (n = 297) and, for MS, a ROC curve was generated for the total sample. In the healthy group, HOMA-IR indexes were associated with central obesity, triglycerides and total cholesterol (p < 0.001). The cut-off values for IR were: HOMA1-IR > 2.7 and HOMA2-IR > 1.8; and, for MS were: HOMA1-IR > 2.3 (sensitivity: 76.8%; specificity: 66.7%) and HOMA2-IR > 1.4 (sensitivity: 79.2%; specificity: 61.2%). The cut-off values identified for HOMA1-IR and HOMA2-IR indexes have a clinical and epidemiological application for identifying IR and MS in Westernized admixtured multi-ethnic populations.

  2. Structure and elementary properties of the new Ir hollandite Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Schoop, Leslie M.; Krizan, Jason W.; Gibson, Quinn D.; Cava, R.J.

    2014-01-15

    We report the synthesis and structural characterization of the new Ir holladite, Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2}. Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2} crystallizes in the tetragonal hollandite structure. In contrast to the previously reported monoclinic Ir hollandite K{sub 0.25}IrO{sub 2}, we do not observe a difference in Ir–O bond lengths in Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2} and thus find Ir in an average oxidation state of + 3.83. We also report and compare the electronic and magnetic properties of Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2} and K{sub 0.25}IrO{sub 2}, finding that they are both metallic and Pauli paramagnets further supporting that the electrons are delocalized in the Ir 5d states. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2} (right), and the SEM image of Rb{sub 0.17}IrO{sub 2}, showing the growth of thin needles (left). Display Omitted - Highlights: • New iridium hollandite. • Naturally grows in very thin wires. • Elementary physical properties of Ir holladites reported for the first time metallic conductor and paramagnetic.

  3. Expression of insulin receptor (IR) A and B isoforms, IGF-IR, and IR/IGF-IR hybrid receptors in vascular smooth muscle cells and their role in cell migration in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Beneit, N; Fernández-García, C E; Martín-Ventura, J L; Perdomo, L; Escribano, Ó; Michel, J B; García-Gómez, G; Fernández, S; Díaz-Castroverde, S; Egido, J; Gómez-Hernández, A; Benito, M

    2016-12-01

    Abnormal proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is a major contributor to the development of atherosclerotic process. In a previous work, we demonstrated that the insulin receptor isoform A (IRA) and its association with the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) confer a proliferative advantage to VSMCs. However, the role of IR and IGF-IR in VSMC migration remains poorly understood. Wound healing assays were performed in VSMCs bearing IR (IRLoxP(+/+) VSMCs), or not (IR(-/-) VSMCs), expressing IRA (IRA VSMCs) or expressing IRB (IRB VSMCs). To study the role of IR isoforms and IGF-IR in experimental atherosclerosis, we used ApoE(-/-) mice at 8, 12, 18 and 24 weeks of age. Finally, we analyzed the mRNA expression of total IR, IRB isoform, IGF-IR and IGFs by qRT-PCR in the medial layer of human aortas. IGF-I strongly induced migration of the four cell lines through IGF-IR. In contrast, insulin and IGF-II only caused a significant increase of IRA VSMC migration which might be favored by the formation of IRA/IGF-IR receptors. Additionally, a specific IGF-IR inhibitor, picropodophyllin, completely abolished insulin- and IGF-II-induced migration in IRB, but not in IRA VSMCs. A significant increase of IRA and IGF-IR, and VSMC migration were observed in fibrous plaques from 24-week-old ApoE(-/-) mice. Finally, we observed a marked increase of IGF-IR, IGF-I and IGF-II in media from fatty streaks as compared with both healthy aortas and fibrolipidic lesions, favoring the ability of medial VSMCs to migrate into the intima. Our data suggest that overexpression of IGF-IR or IRA isoform, as homodimers or as part of IRA/IGF-IR hybrid receptors, confers a stronger migratory capability to VSMCs as might occur in early stages of atherosclerotic process.

  4. TAX ADMINISTRATION: IRS Undercover Operations Management Oversight Should Be Strengthened.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    stemmed from concerns with IRS’ management of an undercover operation, called Project Layoff , carried out in 1984 and 1985 during which IRS agents... Layoff more specifically in a separate report. An undercover operation is a potentially risky investigative technique. IRS’ Criminal Investigation

  5. IR Cards: Inquiry-Based Introduction to Infrared Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Jacqueline; Forster, Tabetha

    2010-01-01

    As infrared spectroscopy (IR) is frequently used in undergraduate organic chemistry courses, an inductive introduction to IR spectroscopy that uses index cards printed with spectra, structures, and chemical names is described. Groups of students are given an alphabetized deck of these "IR cards" to sort into functional groups. The students then…

  6. Arbitrage Rebate Compliance: Recent IRS Scrutiny of School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Given, Lynda K.; Gurrola, George E.; Richardson, James R.

    2002-01-01

    Describes rules and procedures school districts must follow to comply with IRS arbitrage and rebate rules and exceptions on profits derived from investing yields of tax-exempt bonds in a higher yielding account. Describes consequences of noncompliance and seven ways to be prepared for an IRS audit--for example, answering the IRS promptly. (PKP)

  7. IR Cards: Inquiry-Based Introduction to Infrared Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Jacqueline; Forster, Tabetha

    2010-01-01

    As infrared spectroscopy (IR) is frequently used in undergraduate organic chemistry courses, an inductive introduction to IR spectroscopy that uses index cards printed with spectra, structures, and chemical names is described. Groups of students are given an alphabetized deck of these "IR cards" to sort into functional groups. The students then…

  8. OHANA: Eta Carinae's Variability in the Near-IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehner, Andrea; de Wit, Willem-Jan; Rivinius, Thomas; Rivinius

    2015-01-01

    Near-IR photometry of η Car since 1972 revealed a long-term trend towards hotter temperatures and a cycloidal behavior of its near-IR colors around periastron passages. Both effects are likely triggered by the companion. We used VLTI AMBER observations from 2004-2014 to investigate η Car's variabilities in the near-IR.

  9. Molecular tectonics: heterometallic (Ir,Cu) grid-type coordination networks based on cyclometallated Ir(III) chiral metallatectons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chaojie; Guenet, Aurélie; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Planeix, Jean-Marc; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2015-10-11

    A chiral-at-metal Ir(III) organometallic metallatecton was synthesised as a racemic mixture and as enantiopure complexes and combined with Cu(II) to afford a heterobimetallic (Ir,Cu) grid-type 2D coordination network.

  10. Nonlinear analysis for image stabilization in IR imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhan-lei; Lu, Jin; Luo, Yong-hong; Zhang, Mei-sheng

    2009-07-01

    In order to acquire stabilization image for IR imaging system, an image stabilization system is required. Linear method is often used in current research on the system and a simple PID controller can meet the demands of common users. In fact, image stabilization system is a structure with nonlinear characters such as structural errors, friction and disturbances. In up-grade IR imaging system, although conventional PID controller is optimally designed, it cannot meet the demands of higher accuracy and fast responding speed when disturbances are present. To get high-quality stabilization image, nonlinear characters should be rejected. The friction and gear clearance are key factors and play an important role in the image stabilization system. The friction induces static error of system. When the system runs at low speed, stick-slip and creeping induced by friction not only decrease resolution and repeating accuracy, but also increase the tracking error and the steady state error. The accuracy of the system is also limited by gear clearance, and selfexcited vibration is brought on by serious clearance. In this paper, effects of different nonlinear on image stabilization precision are analyzed, including friction and gear clearance. After analyzing the characters and influence principle of the friction and gear clearance, a friction model is established with MATLAB Simulink toolbox, which is composed of static friction, Coulomb friction and viscous friction, and the gear clearance non-linearity model is built, providing theoretical basis for the future engineering practice.

  11. Limewashed mural paintings as seen by VIS-IR reflectography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, R.; Striova, J.; Barucci, M.; Pampaloni, E.; Raffaelli, M.; Pezzati, L.; Mariotti, P.

    2015-06-01

    Near-Infrared (NIR) reflectography is a well-established technique for painting diagnostics, offering a fundamental contribution to the conservation of paintings. Since the '80s it has been routinely applied to study the execution technique of the author, as well as the presence of pentimenti, retouches, integrations or underdrawing. In the last decades IR reflectography has been extended to the visible (VIS) spectral range, providing information about the pigment composition. Up to now the multispectral analysis is still applied at an experimental level, as the processing of the image set is not straightforward. Rarely multispectral VIS-IR application has been applied to frescos, probably due to the lack, in most cases, of a scattering background. In this work we present the results provided by a multispectral scanning device based on single sensor acquisition, working in the 380-2500 nm spectral range, that is a laboratory prototype specifically built for research-grade imaging. The technique have been applied on a mock up simulating a mural painting substrate where an underdrawing, made of either carbon or iron-gall ink, was covered by different surface layers of limewash, the so-called scialbo.

  12. High-performance MCT and QWIP IR detectors at Sofradir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reibel, Yann; Rubaldo, Laurent; Manissadjian, Alain; Billon-Lanfrey, David; Rothman, Johan; de Borniol, Eric; Destéfanis, Gérard; Costard, E.

    2012-11-01

    Cooled IR technologies are challenged for answering new system needs like compactness and reduction of cryo-power which is key feature for the SWaP (Size, Weight and Power) requirements. This paper describes the status of MCT IR technology in France at Leti and Sofradir. A focus will be made on hot detector technology for SWAP applications. Sofradir has improved its HgCdTe technology to open the way for High Operating Temperature systems that release the Stirling cooler engine power consumption. Solutions for high performance detectors such as dual bands, much smaller pixel pitch or megapixels will also be discussed. In the meantime, the development of avalanche photodiodes or TV format with digital interface is key to bringing customers cutting-edge functionalities. Since 1997, Sofradir has been working with Thales and Research Technologies (TRT) to develop and produce Quantum Well Infrared Photodetectors (QWIP) as a complementary offer with MCT, to provide large LW staring arrays. A dualband MW-LW QWIP detector (25μm pitch 384×288 IDDCA) is currently under development. We will present in this paper its latest results.

  13. 75 FR 56657 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Cognitive and Psychological Research Coordinated by...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-16

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Cognitive and Psychological Research...)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Cognitive and Psychological Research Coordinated by....Durbala@irs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Cognitive and Psychological Research Coordinated...

  14. ToO IRS Observations of Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Charles; Black, John; Bode, Michael; Evans, Aneuryn; Geballe, Thomas; Gehrz, Robert; Greenhouse, Matthew; Hauschildt, Peter; Helton, Andrew; Krautter, Joachim; Liller, William; Lyke, James; Lynch, David; Rudy, Richard; Salama, Alberto; Schwarz, Greg; Shore, Steve; Starrfield, Sumner; Truran, Jim; Vanlandingham, Karen; Wagner, R. Mark

    2006-05-01

    Stars are the engines of energy production and chemical evolution in our Universe. They deposit radiative and mechanical energy into their environments and enrich the ambient interstellar medium with elements synthesized in their interiors and dust grains condensed in their atmospheres. Classical novae (CN) contribute to this cycle of chemical enrichment through explosive nucleosynthesis and the violent ejection of material dredged from the white dwarf progenitor and mixed with the accreted surface layers. Using Spitzer (+IRS), we propose a 25.8 hrs no-impact ToO program to study (in temporal detail) the evolutionary stages of CN by targeting 4 Galactic and 2 Magellanic Cloud (MC) novae. Spitzer is a unique facility that enables us to investigate aspects of the CN phenomenon including the in situ formation and astromineralogy of nova dust, the elemental abundances resulting from thermonuclear runaway, the correlation of ejecta masses with progenitor type, the bolometric luminosities of the outburst, and the kinematics and structure of the ejected envelopes. Synoptic, high signal-to-noise IRS spectra permit: 1) determination of the grain size distribution and mineral composition of nova dust; 2) estimation of chemical abundances of nova ejecta from coronal and other emission line spectroscopy; 3) measurement of the density and masses of the ejecta; 4) characterization of the geometry and structure of ejected shells at early stages during which the initial mixing of the chemical abundances can be studied in detail; and 5) exploration of the characteristics of CN in low metallicity systems (MC) at mid- to far-IR wavelengths. Observations of CN with Spitzer will be complemented by extensive ground-based, as well as space-based (e.g., Chandra, Swift, XMM-Newton), DDT and ToO programs led by team CoIs.

  15. High-fidelity synthetic IR imaging model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegener, Michael; Drake, Richard

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes a High Fidelity Synthetic IR Imaging Model which attempts to generate accurate static images as would be seen by a defined IR sensor given the target type and the atmospheric conditions. The model attempts to be quite general in its accommodation of physical processes yet maintain radiometric accuracy. Its main application are to assist in the validation of real-time IR scene generation software, and as a tool which can be used for range performance studies of electro-optical systems. The software model allows facet modeling of targets including temperature profiles and material properties. LOWTRAN/MODTRAN is used to provide atmospheric data for transmittance and self-radiation. Optical systems are described in terms of their transmittance and point spread function, both as functions of wavelength, and a self radiation term having temperature and material properties. At each wavelength desired the model generates descriptions of the flux distribution falling on the focal plane of the sensor system. The flux from different sources is added together to form the total flux distribution on the focal plane. Pixels on the focal plane are modeled by groups of facets with associated material properties allowing the shape and wavelength sensitivity to be expressed. The raw pixel output is obtained by integrating the flux distribution over the component facets and across wavelengths. Following non-uniformity modeling a convolution is applied which models readout smearing. Bandlimited noise is then added. The model is also able to generate and apply a matched filter to the output image. The model is designed to use common commercial software tools such as Multigen for target modeling and Open GL for the rendering. The model currently executes on Silicon Graphics hardware.

  16. Understanding Preprocedure Patient Flow in IR.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Abdul Mueed; Suri, Rajeev; Nguyen, Tran Khanh; Petrash, Carson Cope; Fazal, Zanira

    2016-08-01

    To quantify preprocedural patient flow in interventional radiology (IR) and to identify potential contributors to preprocedural delays. An administrative dataset was used to compute time intervals required for various preprocedural patient-flow processes. These time intervals were compared across on-time/delayed cases and inpatient/outpatient cases by Mann-Whitney U test. Spearman ρ was used to assess any correlation of the rank of a procedure on a given day and the procedure duration to the preprocedure time. A linear-regression model of preprocedure time was used to further explore potential contributing factors. Any identified reason(s) for delay were collated. P < .05 was considered statistically significant. Of the total 1,091 cases, 65.8% (n = 718) were delayed. Significantly more outpatient cases started late compared with inpatient cases (81.4% vs 45.0%; P < .001, χ(2) test). The multivariate linear regression model showed outpatient status, length of delay in arrival, and longer procedure times to be significantly associated with longer preprocedure times. Late arrival of patients (65.9%), unavailability of physicians (18.4%), and unavailability of procedure room (13.0%) were the three most frequently identified reasons for delay. The delay was multifactorial in 29.6% of cases (n = 213). Objective measurement of preprocedural IR patient flow demonstrated considerable waste and highlighted high-yield areas of possible improvement. A data-driven approach may aid efficient delivery of IR care. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Stabilizing Ir(001) Epitaxy on Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Using a Thin Ir Seed Layer Grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Lisha; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Eres, Gyula

    2016-11-18

    In this paper, we demonstrate the reproducible epitaxial growth of 100 nm thick Ir(001) films on a heteroepitaxial stack consisting of 5 nm Ir and 100 nm yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) grown on Si(001) substrates. It is shown that a 5 nm thick Ir layer grown by pulsed laser deposition in the same chamber as the YSZ film without breaking the vacuum is the key to stabilizing Ir(001) epitaxial growth. Growth of the Ir seed layer with pure (001) orientation occurs only in a narrow growth temperature window from 550 to 750 °C, and the fraction of Ir(111) increases at substrate temperatures outside of this window. The Ir seed layer prevents exposure of the YSZ film to air during sample transfer and enables highly reproducible Ir(001) heteroepitaxy on YSZ buffered Si(001). In contrast, if Ir is grown directly on a bare YSZ layer that was exposed to ambient conditions, the films are prone to change orientation to (111). These results reveal that preserving the chemical and structural purity of the YSZ surface is imperative for achieving Ir(001) epitaxy. The narrow range of the mosaic spread values from eight experiments demonstrates the high yield and high reproducibility of Ir(001) heteroepitaxy by this approach. Lastly, the improved Ir(001) epitaxial growth method is of great significance for integrating a variety of technologically important materials such as diamond, graphene, and functional oxides on a Si platform.

  18. Stabilizing Ir(001) Epitaxy on Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Using a Thin Ir Seed Layer Grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Fan, Lisha; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; ...

    2016-11-18

    In this paper, we demonstrate the reproducible epitaxial growth of 100 nm thick Ir(001) films on a heteroepitaxial stack consisting of 5 nm Ir and 100 nm yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) grown on Si(001) substrates. It is shown that a 5 nm thick Ir layer grown by pulsed laser deposition in the same chamber as the YSZ film without breaking the vacuum is the key to stabilizing Ir(001) epitaxial growth. Growth of the Ir seed layer with pure (001) orientation occurs only in a narrow growth temperature window from 550 to 750 °C, and the fraction of Ir(111) increases at substratemore » temperatures outside of this window. The Ir seed layer prevents exposure of the YSZ film to air during sample transfer and enables highly reproducible Ir(001) heteroepitaxy on YSZ buffered Si(001). In contrast, if Ir is grown directly on a bare YSZ layer that was exposed to ambient conditions, the films are prone to change orientation to (111). These results reveal that preserving the chemical and structural purity of the YSZ surface is imperative for achieving Ir(001) epitaxy. The narrow range of the mosaic spread values from eight experiments demonstrates the high yield and high reproducibility of Ir(001) heteroepitaxy by this approach. Lastly, the improved Ir(001) epitaxial growth method is of great significance for integrating a variety of technologically important materials such as diamond, graphene, and functional oxides on a Si platform.« less

  19. Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teaching, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Implications for teachers from Piagetian-oriented piagetian-oriented research on problem solving reported in an article by Eleanor Duckworth are presented. Edward de Bono's Children Solve Problems,'' a collection of examples, is also discussed. (MS)

  20. Non-Linear Optical Studies of IR Materials with Infrared Femtosecond Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-15

    Final Report APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION IS UNLIMITED. AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY Directed Energy Directorate 3550...matter interaction, Non-linear optics, Laser induced periodic structure, high energy MID-IR short pulse lasers 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...SPP) with the incoming light and generate periodic energy density profiles, which results in material removal and forms the LSFL morphology on the

  1. Best Visual Presentation--Observations from the Award Committee. IR Applications. Volume 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Trudy

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, the Association for Institutional Research (AIR) initiated the Best Visual Presentation (BVP) award to acknowledge the contributions made through new ways of professional communication, in addition to those made through more traditional scholarly formats. The purpose of this "IR Applications" is to provide observations from the BVP Award…

  2. Standoff imaging of chemicals using IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George; Morales Rodriguez, Marissa E

    2011-01-01

    Here we report on a standoff spectroscopic technique for identifying chemical residues on surfaces. A hand-held infrared camera was used in conjunction with a wavelength tunable mid-IR quantum cascade laser (QCL) to create hyperspectral image arrays of a target with an explosive residue on its surface. Spectral signatures of the explosive residue (RDX) were extracted from the hyperspectral image arrays and compared with a reference spectrum. Identification of RDX was achieved for residue concentrations of 20 g per cm2 at a distance of 1.5 m, and for 5 g per cm2 at a distance of 15 cm.

  3. IR Spectroscopy of PANHs in Dense Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allamandola, Louis; Mattioda, Andrew; Sandford, Scott

    2008-03-01

    Interstellar PAHs are likely to be frozen into ice mantles on dust grains in dense clouds. These PAHs will produce IR absorption bands, not emission features. A couple of very weak absorption features in ground based spectra of a few objects in dense clouds may be due to PAHs. It is now thought that aromatic molecules in which N atoms are substituted for a few of the C atoms in a PAH's hexagonal skeletal network (PANHs) may well be as abundant and ubiquitous throughout the interstellar medium as PAHs. Spaceborne observations in the 5 to 8 um region, the region in which PAH spectroscopy is rich, reveal unidentified new bands and significant variation from object to object. It is not possible to analyze these observations because lab spectra of PANHs and PAHs condensed in realistic interstellar ice analogs are lacking. This lab data is necessary to interpret observations because, in ice mantles, the surrounding molecules affect PANH and PAH IR band positions, widths, profiles, and intrinsic strengths. Further, PAHs (and PANHs?) are readily ionized in pure H2O ice, further altering the spectrum. This proposal starts to address this situation by studying the IR spectra of PANHs frozen in laboratory ice analogs that reflect the composition of the interstellar ices observed in dense clouds. Thanks to Spitzer Cycle-4 support, we are now measuring the spectra of PAHs in interstellar ice analogs to provide laboratory spectra that can be used to interpret IR observations. Here we propose to extend this work to PANHs. We will measure the spectra of these interstellar ice analogs containing PANHs before and after ionization and determine the band strengths of neutral and ionized PANHs in these ices. This will enable a quantitative assessment of the role that PANHs can play in the 5-8 um spectrum of dense clouds and address the following two fundamental questions associated with dense cloud spectroscopy and chemistry: 1- Can PANHs be detected in dense clouds? 2- Are PANH ions

  4. Gated IR Images of Shocked Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    S. S. Lutz; W. D. Turley; P. M. Rightley; L. E. Primas

    2001-06-01

    Gated infrared (IR) images have been taken of a series of shocked surface geometries in tin. Metal coupons machined with steps and flats were mounted directly to the high explosive. The explosive was point-initiated and 500-ns to 1-microsecond-wide gated images of the target were taken immediately following shock breakout using a Santa Barbara Focalplane InSb camera (SBF-134). Spatial distributions of surface radiance were extracted from the images of the shocked samples and found to be non-single-valued. Several geometries were modeled using CTH, a two-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode.

  5. Gated IR images of shocked surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, S. S.; Turley, W. D.; Rightley, P. M.; Primas, L. E.

    2001-01-01

    Gated infrared (IR) images have been taken of a series of shocked surface geometries in tin. Metal coupons machined with steps and flats were mounted directly to the high explosive. The explosive was point-initiated and 500-ns to 1-microsecond-wide gated images of the target were taken immediately following shock breakout using a Santa Barbara Focalplane InSb camera (SBF-134). Spatial distributions of surface radiance were extracted from the images of the shocked samples and found to be non-single-valued. Several geometries were modeled using CTH, a two-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode.

  6. IR laser ablation of dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Daniel

    2000-03-01

    An overview of the basic mechanisms of IR laser ablation of dental enamel is presented. Enamel is a highly structured tissue consisting of an heterogeneous distribution of water, mineral, protein and lipid. Absorption bands of water and carbonated hydroxyapatite can be selectively targeted from 2.7 to 11-micrometer via several laser wavelengths. Mechanistic differences in the nature of ablation and the varying surface morphology produced can be explained by the microstructure of the tissue. Suggested criteria for the choice of the optimum laser parameters for clinical use, the influence of plasma shielding and the role of exogenous water on the mechanism of ablation are discussed.

  7. IR beamline at the Swiss Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ph, Lerch; L, Quaroni; J, Wambach; J, Schneider; B, Armstrong D.; D, Rossetti; L, Mueller F.; P, Peier; V, Schlott; L, Carroll; P, Friedli; H, Sigg; S, Stutz; M, Tran

    2012-05-01

    The infrared beamline at the Swiss light source uses dipole radiation and is designed to transport light to four experimental stations, A, B, C, D. Branch A is dedicated to far IR work in vacuum; branch B is a micro-spectrometer; branch C is dedicated to high resolution spectroscopy in the gas phase; branch D is a pump and probe set-up. This contribution describes the optical layout and provides a brief survey of currently available experimental stations. The beamline is in regular user operation since 2009.

  8. Low Power Polysilicon Sources for IR Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, N. C.; Jhabvala, M.; Shu, P.

    1998-01-01

    We have designed and fabricated polysilicon thin film infrared (IR) sources by micromachining technology. These sources are made with a lightly doped middle region for light emission and heavy doping of the supporting legs. The sources are fabricated on a 10 mm thick, low temperature process parameters in the fabrication of these silicon dioxide layer. Different doping levels were used to achieve various source resistances. From the power requirement to reach the required light emission versus source resistance curve it is seen that there exists a resistance value which minimizes the necessary input power.

  9. IR Spectroscopic signs of malignant neoplasms in the thyroid gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Butra, V. A.

    2012-03-01

    We use Fourier transform IR spectroscopy to study thyroid tumor tissues which were removed during surgery. The IR spectra of the tissues with pathological foci are compared with data from histologic examination. In the region of N-H, C-H, and C = O stretching vibrations, the IR spectra of the tissues for thyroid cancer are different from the IR spectra of tissues without malignant formations. We identify the spectral signs of thyroid cancer. We show that IR analysis is promising for identification of thyroid pathology at the molecular level.

  10. Role of IRS1 and IRS2 in Modulating ErbB-induced Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    moderate I C50 between 4 µM a nd 14µM, r esistant: IC50>14µM Table 1 . Summary of the effect of BMS-754807 on cells lines with an unknown IC50 Cell...Number: W81XWH-08- 1 -0220 TITLE: Role of IRS1 and IRS2 in Modulating ErbB-induced Tumorigenesis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Beate Litzenburger...DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response

  11. Optical/IR Characteristics of Alkali Halide Aerosol Clouds over the Ocean.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    AD-Ri58 446 OPTICAL/IR ClIRACTERISTICS OF ALKALI HALIDE AEROSOL i/l CLOUDS OVER THE OCEAN(IJ) NAVAL RESEARCH LAB WASHINGTON DC S G GATHMAN ET AL 05...SEP 85 NRL-MR-5622 UNCLASSIFIED F/G 206 N ~H~..A.2 1112. 2.2. NRL Memorandum Report 5622 Optical/IR Characteristics of Alkali Halide If) Aerosol Clouds ...Alkali Halide Aerosol Clouds Over the Ocean 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Gathman, S.G. and Larson, R.E. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT I13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF

  12. An IR Navigation System for Pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Timothy; Liang, Xing; Kim, Michele; Finlay, Jarod; Dimofte, Andreea; Rodriguez, Carmen; Simone, Charles; Friedberg, Joseph; Cengel, Keith

    2015-03-01

    Pleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment with lung-sparing surgical treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). In the current pleural PDT protocol, a moving fiber-based point source is used to deliver the light. The light fluences at multiple locations are monitored by several isotropic detectors placed in the pleural cavity. To improve the delivery of light fluence uniformity, an infrared (IR) navigation system is used to track the motion of the light source in real-time at a rate of 20 - 60 Hz. A treatment planning system uses the laser source positions obtained from the IR camera to calculate light fluence distribution to monitor the light dose uniformity on the surface of the pleural cavity. A novel reconstruction algorithm is used to determine the pleural cavity surface contour. A dual-correction method is used to match the calculated fluences at detector locations to the detector readings. Preliminary data from a phantom shows superior light uniformity using this method. Light fluence uniformity from patient treatments is also shown with and without the correction method.

  13. An IR Navigation System for Pleural PDT.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Timothy C; Liang, Xing; Kim, Michele M; Finlay, Jarod C; Dimofte, Andreea; Rodriguez, Carmen; Simone, Charles B; Friedberg, Joseph S; Cengel, Keith A

    2015-03-01

    Pleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment with lung-sparing surgical treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). In the current pleural PDT protocol, a moving fiber-based point source is used to deliver the light. The light fluences at multiple locations are monitored by several isotropic detectors placed in the pleural cavity. To improve the delivery of light fluence uniformity, an infrared (IR) navigation system is used to track the motion of the light source in real-time at a rate of 20 - 60 Hz. A treatment planning system uses the laser source positions obtained from the IR camera to calculate light fluence distribution to monitor the light fluence uniformity on the surface of the pleural cavity. A novel reconstruction algorithm is used to determine the pleural cavity surface contour. A dual-correction method is used to match the calculated fluences at detector locations to the detector readings. Preliminary data from a phantom shows superior light uniformity using this method. Light fluence uniformity from patient treatments is also shown with and without the correction method.

  14. Qualification tests for 192Ir sealed sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iancso, Georgeta; Iliescu, Elena; Iancu, Rodica

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the results of qualification tests for 192Ir sealed sources, available in Testing and Nuclear Expertise Laboratory of National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering "Horia Hulubei" (I.F.I.N.-HH), Romania. These sources had to be produced in I.F.I.N.-HH and were tested in order to obtain the authorization from The National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN). The sources are used for gammagraphy procedures or in gammadefectoscopy equipments. Tests, measurement methods and equipments used, comply with CNCAN, AIEA and International Quality Standards and regulations. The qualification tests are: 1. Radiological tests and measurements: dose equivalent rate at 1 m; tightness; dose equivalent rate at the surface of the transport and storage container; external unfixed contamination of the container surface. 2. Mechanical and climatic tests: thermal shock; external pressure; mechanic shock; vibrations; boring; thermal conditions for storage and transportation. Passing all tests, it was obtained the Radiological Security Authorization for producing the 192Ir sealed sources. Now IFIN-HH can meet many demands for this sealed sources, as the only manufacturer in Romania.

  15. Active IR-applications in civil engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggenhauser, H.

    2002-06-01

    Applications of IR-thermography in civil engineering are not limited to the identification of heat losses in building envelopes. As it is well known from other areas of non-destructive testing, active IR-thermographic methods such as cooling down or lock-in thermography improves the results in many investigations. In civil engineering these techniques have not been used widely. Mostly thermography is used in a quasi-static manner. The interpretation of moisture measurements with thermography on surfaces can be very difficult due to several overlapping effects: emissivity changes due to composition, heat transfer through wet sections of the specimen, cooling through air flow or reflected spurious radiation sources. These effects can be reduced by selectively measuring the reflection in two wavelength windows, one on an absorption band of water and another in a reference band and then combining the results in a moisture index image. Cooling down thermography can be used to identify subsurface structural deficiencies. For building materials like concrete these measurements are performed on a much longer time scale than in flash lamp experiments. A quantitative analysis of the full cooling down process over several minutes can reliably identify defects at different depths. Experiments at BAM have shown, that active thermography is capabale of identifying structural deficiencies or moist areas in building materials much more reliable than quasi-static thermography.

  16. An IR Navigation System for Pleural PDT

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Liang, Xing; Kim, Michele M.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Rodriguez, Carmen; Simone, Charles B.; Friedberg, Joseph S.; Cengel, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Pleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment with lung-sparing surgical treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). In the current pleural PDT protocol, a moving fiber-based point source is used to deliver the light. The light fluences at multiple locations are monitored by several isotropic detectors placed in the pleural cavity. To improve the delivery of light fluence uniformity, an infrared (IR) navigation system is used to track the motion of the light source in real-time at a rate of 20 – 60 Hz. A treatment planning system uses the laser source positions obtained from the IR camera to calculate light fluence distribution to monitor the light fluence uniformity on the surface of the pleural cavity. A novel reconstruction algorithm is used to determine the pleural cavity surface contour. A dual-correction method is used to match the calculated fluences at detector locations to the detector readings. Preliminary data from a phantom shows superior light uniformity using this method. Light fluence uniformity from patient treatments is also shown with and without the correction method. PMID:25995987

  17. MEMS-based IR-sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, Sebastian; Steinbach, Bastian; Biermann, Steffen

    2016-03-01

    The series JSIR350 sources are MEMS based infrared emitters. These IR sources are characterized by a high radiation output. Thus, they are excellent for NDIR gas analysis and are ideally suited for using with our pyro-electric or thermopile detectors. The MEMS chips used in Micro-Hybrid's infrared emitters consist of nano-amorphous carbon (NAC). The MEMS chips are produced in the USA. All Micro-Hybrid Emitter are designed and specified to operate up to 850°C. The improvements we have made in the source's packaging enable us to provide IR sources with the best performance on the market. This new technology enables us to seal the housings of infrared radiation sources with soldered infrared filters or windows and thus cause the parts to be impenetrable to gases. Micro-Hybrid provide various ways of adapting our MEMS based infrared emitter JSIR350 to customer specifications, like specific burn-in parameters/characteristic, different industrial standard housings, producible with customized cap, reflector or pin-out.

  18. Earth's Atmospheric CO2 Saturated IR Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Ernst

    2008-10-01

    Using the on-line SpectraCalc IR absorption simulator, the amount of IR absorption by the 15 μ line of the current atmospheric CO2 was obtained and compared with that of twice the amount of CO2. The simulation required a fixed density equivalent for the atmospheric path length. This was obtained by numerically integrating the NOAA Standard Atmospheric model. While the current line is saturated, doubling the CO2 will cause a slight width increase. Using this and the blackbody radiation curve plus considering the effects of water vapor, the temperature rise of the Earth will be less than 2.5 deg. C. Integrating a NASA Martian atmospheric model, we find that the Martian atmosphere has 45 times more CO2 to penetrate than Earth, and yet, the Martian diurnal temperature swings exceed those of the Sahara desert. I.e., large amounts of CO2 alone do not necessarily cause planetary warming. As the oceans warm from any cause, more CO2 is boiled out, but if they cool, they will absorb more CO2 just as a carbonated drink does, so that temperature and CO2 density will correlate. It is to be noted that the Earth's known petroleum reserves contain only enough CO2 to increase the atmospheric CO2 by some 15%.

  19. FT-IR microspectroscopy for microbiological studies.

    PubMed

    Orsini, F; Ami, D; Villa, A M; Sala, G; Bellotti, M G; Doglia, S M

    2000-09-01

    In this article we present an infrared microspectroscopic investigation on Candida albicans microcolonies, taken as a model system for studies on other microorganisms. Excellent Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectra from 4000 to 850 cm(-1) have been collected in only 20 s from sampling areas of 100x100 microm(2) in microcolonies, which had been transferred from the agar plate onto zinc selenide (ZnSe) windows. When different regions within a single microcolony were investigated, absorption spectra with important differences in the carbohydrate absorption (from 1200 to 850 cm(-1)) were detected for the cells in the center and in the periphery of the colony. Results obtained on microcolonies grown on solid agar with increasing dextrose concentrations indicated that the observed spectral heterogeneity was related to differences in dextrose uptake, which was lower for the old cells in the center of the colony than for the metabolically active cells at the periphery. Although it is otherwise difficult to quantitatively evaluate the dextrose uptake in a microcolony, FT-IR absorption microspectroscopy offers a new and rapid method for the analysis of this process. The possibility of studying highly absorbing colonies by attenuated total reflection (ATR) by means of an ATR microscope germanium objective is also presented here for the first time. An evaluation of the contact area sampled by this technique is reported with a discussion of the spatial resolution, the quality and the potential of the ATR measurements.

  20. IR DIAGNOSTICS FOR DYNAMIC FAILURE OF MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    McElfresh, M; DeTeresa, S

    2006-02-13

    This project explores the thermodynamics of dynamic deformation and failure of materials using high-speed spatially-resolved infrared (IR) measurements of temperature. During deformation mechanical work is converted to different forms of energy depending on the deformation processes. For example, it can be dissipated as heat in purely plastic deformation, stored as strain energy in dislocations in metals and in oriented polymeric molecular structures, and expended during the generation of new surfaces during damage and fracture. The problem of how this work is converted into these various forms is not well understood. In fact, there exists a controversy for the relatively simple case regarding the amount of work dissipated as heat during uniform plastic deformation. The goals of this work are to develop dynamic IR temperature measurement techniques and then apply them to gain a better understanding of the dynamic failure processes in both metals and polymeric composite materials. The experimental results will be compared against predictions of existing constitutive models and guide the development of higher fidelity models if needed.

  1. Multiview: a novel multispectral IR imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soel, Michael A.; Rudman, Stanley; Ryan, Robert; Fonneland, Nils J.; Milano, Steve J.

    1997-06-01

    The Surveillance Sciences Directorate of the Northrop Grumman Advanced Systems and Technology organization is developing a novel Multispectral IR camera known as Multiview. This prototype system is capable of simultaneously acquiring 4-color SWIR/MWIR 2D imagery that is both spatially and temporally registered utilizing a single 2562 HgCdTe snapshot IR FPA capable of frame rates in excess of 240 Hz. The patented design offers an extremely compact package that contains the entire optomechanical assembly (lenses, interchangeable filters, and cold shield) in less than a 3 in3 volume. The unique imagery collected with this camera has the potential to significantly improve the effectiveness of clutter suppression algorithms, multi-color target detection and target-background discrimination for a wide variety of mission scenarios. This paper describes the key aspects of the Multiview prototype camera design and operation. Multiview's ability to dynamically manage flux imbalances between the four subbands is discussed. Radiometric performance predictions are presented along with laboratory validation of many of these performance metrics. Several examples of field collected imagery is shown including examples of transient rocket plume data measured at 240 Hz sample rate. The importance and utility of spatio-temporal multi-band imagery is also discussed.

  2. Wafer level test solutions for IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giessmann, Sebastian; Werner, Frank-Michael

    2014-05-01

    Wafer probers provide an established platform for performing electrical measurements at wafer level for CMOS and similar process technologies. For testing IR sensors, the requirements are beyond the standard prober capabilities. This presentation will give an overview about state of the art IR sensor probing systems reaching from flexible engineering solutions to automated production needs. Cooled sensors typically need to be tested at a target temperature below 80 K. Not only is the device temperature important but also the surrounding environment is required to prevent background radiation from reaching the device under test. To achieve that, a cryogenic shield is protecting the movable chuck. By operating that shield to attract residual gases inside the chamber, a completely contamination-free test environment can be guaranteed. The use of special black coatings are furthermore supporting the removal of stray light. Typically, probe card needles are operating at ambient (room) temperature when connecting to the wafer. To avoid the entrance of heat, which can result in distorted measurements, the probe card is fully embedded into the cryogenic shield. A shutter system, located above the probe field, is designed to switch between the microscope view to align the sensor under the needles and the test relevant setup. This includes a completely closed position to take dark current measurements. Another position holds a possible filter glass with the required aperture opening. The necessary infrared sources to stimulate the device are located above.

  3. Spin orientations of the spin-half Ir4+ ions in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4, and Na2IrO3: Density functional, perturbation theory, and Madelung potential analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Elijah E.; Xiang, Hongjun; Köhler, Jürgen; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2016-03-01

    The spins of the low-spin Ir4+ (S = 1/2, d5) ions at the octahedral sites of the oxides Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4, and Na2IrO3 exhibit preferred orientations with respect to their IrO6 octahedra. We evaluated the magnetic anisotropies of these S = 1/2 ions on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC), and probed their origin by performing perturbation theory analyses with SOC as perturbation within the LS coupling scheme. The observed spin orientations of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4 are correctly predicted by DFT calculations, and are accounted for by the perturbation theory analysis. As for the spin orientation of Na2IrO3, both experimental studies and DFT calculations have not been unequivocal. Our analysis reveals that the Ir4+ spin orientation of Na2IrO3 should have nonzero components along the c- and a-axis directions. The spin orientations determined by DFT calculations are sensitive to the accuracy of the crystal structures employed, which is explained by perturbation theory analyses when interactions between adjacent Ir4+ ions are taken into consideration. There are indications implying that the 5d electrons of Na2IrO3 are less strongly localized compared with those of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. This implication was confirmed by showing that the Madelung potentials of the Ir4+ ions are less negative in Na2IrO3 than in Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. Most transition-metal S = 1/2 ions do have magnetic anisotropies because the SOC induces interactions among their crystal-field split d-states, and the associated mixing of the states modifies only the orbital parts of the states. This finding cannot be mimicked by a spin Hamiltonian because this model Hamiltonian lacks the orbital degree of freedom, thereby leading to the spin-half syndrome. The spin-orbital entanglement for the 5d spin-half ions Ir4+ is not as strong as has been assumed.

  4. Spin orientations of the spin-half Ir4+ ions in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4 and Na2IrO3: Density functional, perturbation theory and Madelung potential analyses

    DOE PAGES

    Gordon, Elijah E.; Xiang, Hongjun; Koehler, Jurgen; ...

    2016-03-01

    The spins of the low-spin Ir4+ (S = 1/2, d5) ions at the octahedral sites of the oxides Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4 and Na2IrO3 exhibit preferred orientations with respect to their IrO6 octahedra. We evaluated the magnetic anisotropies of these S = 1/2 ions on the basis of DFT calculations including spin-orbit coupling (SOC), and probed their origin by performing perturbation theory analyses with SOC as perturbation within the LS coupling scheme. The observed spin orientations of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4 are correctly predicted by DFT calculations, and are accounted for by the perturbation theory analysis. As for the spin orientation of Na2IrO3,more » both experimental studies and DFT calculations have not been unequivocal. Our analysis reveals that the Ir4+ spin orientation of Na2IrO3 should have nonzero components along the c- and a-axes directions. The spin orientations determined by DFT calculations are sensitive to the accuracy of the crystal structures employed, which is explained by perturbation theory analyses when interactions between adjacent Ir4+ ions are taken into consideration. There are indications implying that the 5d electrons of Na2IrO3 are less strongly localized compared with those of Sr3NiIrO6 and Sr2IrO4. This implication was confirmed by showing that the Madelung potentials of the Ir4+ ions are less negative in Na2IrO3 than in Sr3NiIrO6, Sr2IrO4. Most transition-metal S = 1/2 ions do have magnetic anisotropies because the SOC induces interactions among their crystal-field split d-states, and the associated mixing of the states modifies only the orbital parts of the states. This finding cannot be mimicked by a spin Hamiltonian because this model Hamiltonian lacks the orbital degree of freedom, thereby leading to the spin-half syndrome. As a result, the spin-orbital entanglement for the 5d spin-half ions Ir4+ is not as strong as has been assumed lately.« less

  5. Chemical profiling and adulteration screening of Aquilariae Lignum Resinatum by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qu, Lei; Chen, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Gui-Jun; Sun, Su-Qin; Zheng, Jing

    2017-03-05

    As a kind of expensive perfume and valuable herb, Aquilariae Lignum Resinatum (ALR) is often adulterated for economic motivations. In this research, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy is employed to establish a simple and quick method for the adulteration screening of ALR. First, the principal chemical constituents of ALR are characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy at room temperature and two-dimensional correlation infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy with thermal perturbation. Besides the common cellulose and lignin compounds, a certain amount of resin is the characteristic constituent of ALR. Synchronous and asynchronous 2D-IR spectra indicate that the resin (an unstable secondary metabolite) is more sensitive than cellulose and lignin (stable structural constituents) to the thermal perturbation. Using a certified ALR sample as the reference, the infrared spectral correlation threshold is determined by 30 authentic samples and 6 adulterated samples. The spectral correlation coefficient of an authentic ALR sample to the standard reference should be not less than 0.9886 (p=0.01). Three commercial adulterated ALR samples are identified by the correlation threshold. Further interpretation of the infrared spectra of the adulterated samples indicates the common adulterating methods - counterfeiting with other kind of wood, adding ingredient such as sand to increase the weight, and adding the cheap resin such as rosin to increase the content of resin compounds. Results of this research prove that FT-IR spectroscopy can be used as a simple and accurate quality control method of ALR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Precision FT-IR laboratory measurements of atmospheric molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, K.; Brown, L. R.; Crawford, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    Spectroscopic information is crucial a priori input to interpret atmospheric spectroscopic observations through radiative transfer modeling. The spectroscopic observations lead us to determine the physical and chemical conditions (e.g., atmospheric pressure, temperatures, composition, abundances …). In order to avoid false interpretations of the observed spectra, the molecular spectroscopic information (either line parameters or cross sections) must be sufficiently accurate and complete. To achieve this goal, we employ a broad-band Fourier transform spectrometer, Bruker IFS-125HR equipped with multiple detectors (He-cooled bolometers, N2-cooled MCT and InSb, warm InGaAs, Boron-doped silicates, photodiode) and beamsplitters (Mylars, KBr, CaF2, Quartz) sufficient to cover entire infrared spectra region from 20 to 15000 cm-1. We vacuum-couple up to 15 different absorption cells to the FT-IR, including five coolable cells with optical path lengths ranging from 0.02 m to 52 m; three of them are capable of reaching temperatures down to 50 K. We also have one heatable cell reaching 400 K. Finally, an extra vacuum chamber newly implemented to the Bruker 125HR enables both emission and absorption spectroscopy utilizing the emission port of the FT-IR. Recently, several studies of atmospheric molecules have been completed using the FT-IR at JPL in support of the Earth, terrestrial and planetary atmospheric remote sensing. These include analyses of C3H8 (propane) and 16O12C17O mid- and near-infrared regions, 13C12CH6 and 12C2H6 at longer wavelengths. In addition, we are studying the O2(A) line mixing and collision-induced absorption in the O2 A-band at 0.76 μm, as well as temperature-dependent cross sections of C6H6 (benzene) and C3H6 (propene) in the mid-infrared region. We will present an overview of results and work in progress. [Research described in this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Connecticut College, and

  7. IR-NLI: an expert natural language interface to online data bases

    SciTech Connect

    Guida, G.; Tasso, C.

    1983-01-01

    Constructing natural language interfaces to computer systems often requires achievement of advanced reasoning and expert capabilities in addition to basic natural language understanding. In this paper the above issues are faced in the context of an actual application concerning the design of a natural language interface for access to online information retrieval systems. After a short discussion of the peculiarities of this application, which requires both natural language understanding and reasoning capabilities, the general architecture and fundamental design criteria of IR-NLI, a system presently being developed at the University of Udine, are presented. Attention is then focused on the basic functions of IR-NLI, namely, understanding and dialogue, strategy generation, and reasoning. Knowledge representation methods and algorithms adopted are also illustrated. A short example of interaction with IR-NLI is presented. Perspectives and directions for future research are also discussed. 15 references.

  8. Photon-electron-ion momentum transfer in high intensityIR laser pulse ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrauk, Andre D.; Chelkowski, Szczefan; Corkum, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Photon momentum sharing between electrons and parent ions in high intensityIR multiphoton ionization requires going beyond the traditional perturbative dipole approximation. Using numerical solutions of the 2-D TDSE(Time dependent Schroedinger equation) for one electron atom models, we show that the radiation pressure on photoelectrons is sensitive to the ionization mechanism, either direct or by recollision. A complex electron-ion response is obtained due to the interplay between the Lorentz force and Coulomb attraction of the ion.The influence of the photon momentum sharing is shown to be discernible in IR high intensity atomic and/or molecular holographic patterns thus suggesting a new research subject in IR strong field physics.

  9. Near-IR fluorescence and reflectance confocal microscopy for imaging of quantum dots in mammalian skin

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Luke J.; Glazowski, Christopher E.; Zavislan, James M.; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the skin penetration of nanoparticles (NPs) is an important concern due to the increasing presence of NPs in consumer products, including cosmetics. Technical challenges have slowed progress in evaluating skin barrier and NP factors that contribute to skin penetration risk. To limit sampling error and other problems associated with histological processing, many researchers are implementing whole tissue confocal or multiphoton microscopies. This work introduces a fluorescence and reflectance confocal microscopy system that utilizes near-IR excitation and emission to detect near-IR lead sulfide quantum dots (QDs) through ex vivo human epidermis. We provide a detailed prediction and experimental analysis of QD detection sensitivity and demonstrate detection of QD skin penetration in a barrier disrupted model. The unique properties of near-IR lead-based QDs will enable future studies that examine the impact of further barrier-disrupting agents on skin penetration of QDs and elucidate mechanistic insight into QD tissue interactions at the cellular level. PMID:21698023

  10. Diagnosing benign and malignant lesions in breast tissue sections by using IR-microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fabian, Heinz; Thi, Ngoc Anh Ngo; Eiden, Michael; Lasch, Peter; Schmitt, Jürgen; Naumann, Dieter

    2006-07-01

    The collection of IR spectra through microscope optics and the visualization of the IR data by IR imaging represent a visualization approach, which uses infrared spectral features as a native intrinsic contrast mechanism. To illustrate the potential of this spectroscopic methodology in breast cancer research, we have acquired IR-microspectroscopic data from benign and malignant lesions in breast tissue sections by point microscopy with spot sizes of 30-40 microm. Four classes of distinct breast tissue spectra were defined and stored in the data base: fibroadenoma (a total of 1175 spectra from 14 patients), ductal carcinoma in situ (a total of 1349 spectra from 8 patients), connective tissue (a total of 464 spectra), and adipose tissue (a total of 146 spectra). Artifical neural network analysis, a supervised pattern recognition method, was used to develop an automated classifier to separate the four classes. After training the artifical neural network classifier, infrared spectra of independent external validation data sets ("unknown spectra") were analyzed. In this way, all spectra (a total of 386) taken from micro areas inside the epithelium of fibroadenomas from 4 patients were correctly classified. Out of the 421 spectra taken from micro areas of the in situ component of invasive ductal carcinomas of 3 patients, 93% were correctly identified. Based on these results, the potential of the IR-microspectroscopic approach for diagnosing breast tissue lesions is discussed.

  11. IrBurst Modeling and Performance Evaluation for Large Data Block Exchange over High-Speed IrDA Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mohammad Shah; Shawkat, Shamim Ara; Kitazumi, Gontaro; Matsumoto, Mitsuji

    IrBurst, recently proposed by IrDA, is a high speed information transmission protocol. In this paper, a mathematical model is developed which leads to derivation of the IrBurst throughput over the IrDA protocol stack. Based on this model, we compare the performance of IrBurst and existing OBEX protocol in order to investigate the suitability of IrBurst protocol for exchange of large data blocks over high-speed IrDA links. Furthermore, the model allows the evaluation of the impact of the link layer parameters, such as window size and frame length, and physical layer parameters, such as minimum turnaround time, on system through-put for high-speed IrDA links and in the presence of transmission errors. Consequently, an effective Automatic Repeat Request (ARQ) scheme is proposed at link layer to maximize the throughput efficiency for IrBurst protocol as well as for next generation high speed IrDA links. Simulation result indicates that employment of our proposed ARQ scheme results in significant improvement of IrBurst throughput efficiency at high bit error rates.

  12. IR camera temperature resolution enhancing using computer processing of IR image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Trofimov, Vladislav V.

    2016-05-01

    As it is well-known, application of the IR camera for the security problems is very promising way. In previous papers, we demonstrate new possibility of the passive THz camera using for a temperature difference observing on the human skin if this difference is caused by different temperatures inside the body. For proof of validity of our statement we make the similar physical experiment using the IR camera. We show a possility of viewing the temperature trace on a human body skin, caused by temperature changing inside the human body due to water drinking. We use new approach, based on usung a correlation function, for computer processing of IR images. Its application results in a temperature resolution enhancing of cameras. We analyze IR images of a person, which drinks water. We follow a temperature trace on human body skin, caused by changing of temperature inside the human body. Some experiments were made with measurements of a body temperature covered by shirt. We try to see a human body temperature changing in physical experiments under consideration. Shown phenomena are very important for the detection of forbidden objects, cancelled under clothes or inside the human body, by using non-destructive control without using X-rays.

  13. Intercalation of IR absorber into layered double hydroxides: Preparation, thermal stability and selective IR absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Haifeng; Tang, Pinggui; Feng, Yongjun; Wang, Lijing; Li, Dianqing

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PMIDA anions were intercalated into Mg{sub 2}Al-NO{sub 3} LDH by anion-exchange method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The prepared material has highly selective IR absorption property in 9-11 {mu}m. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained material has practical applications as heat-retaining additive. -- Abstract: N-phosphonomethyl aminodiacetic acid (PMIDA) was intercalated into the interlayer spacing of layered double hydroxides (LDH) by an anion-exchange method. The intercalated LDHs were characterized by various techniques such as powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and simultaneous thermogravimetric and mass spectrometry (TG-MS) in details. The results show the formation of Mg{sub 2}Al-PMIDA LDH based on the expansion of d-spacing from 0.89 nm to 1.22 nm and the disappearance of the characteristic IR absorption band at 1384 cm{sup -1} for NO{sub 3}{sup -} anions. The incorporation of Mg{sub 2}Al-PMIDA LDH into the low density polyethylene (LDPE) as an additive enhances the selectivity of IR absorption in the main wavelength region 9-11 {mu}m for radiant heat loss at night. Mg{sub 2}Al-PMIDA LDH as a heat-retaining additive has practical application in agricultural plastic films.

  14. IR: A Look towards the 1980's and Institutional Research and Student Aid. Proceedings, Sixth Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research and the Drive-In Conference, Charlotte, November 1-2, 1978, and Southern Pines, August 10-11, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.; Sanford, Timothy R., Ed.

    Highlights of the Sixth Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (NCAIR) and of the Drive-In Conference held prior to the annual meeting are presented. The major emphasis of the annual meeting was to look toward the 1980's and project the role that institutional research might play in higher education. The…

  15. IR: A Look towards the 1980's and Institutional Research and Student Aid. Proceedings, Sixth Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research and the Drive-In Conference, Charlotte, November 1-2, 1978, and Southern Pines, August 10-11, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.; Sanford, Timothy R., Ed.

    Highlights of the Sixth Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (NCAIR) and of the Drive-In Conference held prior to the annual meeting are presented. The major emphasis of the annual meeting was to look toward the 1980's and project the role that institutional research might play in higher education. The…

  16. Electronic structure, local magnetism, and spin-orbit effects of Ir(IV)-, Ir(V)-, and Ir(VI)-based compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Laguna-Marco, M. A.; Kayser, P.; Alonso, J. A.; Martinez-Lope, M. J.; van Veenendaal, M.; Choi, Y.; Haskel, D.

    2015-06-29

    Element- and orbital-selective x-ray absorption and magnetic circular dichroism measurements are carried out to probe the electronic structure and magnetism of Ir 5d electronic states in double perovskite Sr2MIrO6 (M = Mg, Ca, Sc, Ti, Ni, Fe, Zn, In) and La2NiIrO6 compounds. All the studied systems present a significant influence of spin-orbit interactions in the electronic ground state. In addition, we find that the Ir 5d local magnetic moment shows different character depending on the oxidation state despite the net magnetization being similar for all the compounds. Ir carries an orbital contribution comparable to the spin contribution for Ir4+ (5d(5)) and Ir5+ (5d(4)) oxides, whereas the orbital contribution is quenched for Ir6+ (5d(3)) samples. Incorporation of a magnetic 3d atom allows getting insight into the magnetic coupling between 5d and 3d transition metals. Together with previous susceptibility and neutron diffractionmeasurements, the results indicate that Ir carries a significant local magnetic moment even in samples without a 3d metal. The size of the (small) net magnetization of these compounds is a result of predominant antiferromagnetic interactions between local moments coupled with structural details of each perovskite structure

  17. High-performance supported Ir-oxohydroxide water oxidation electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Massue, Cyriac; Pfeifer, Verena; Huang, Xing; Noack, Johannes; Tarasov, Andrey; Cap, Sebastien; Schlögl, Robert

    2017-02-05

    The synthesis of a highly active and yet stable electrocatalyst for the anodic oxygen evolution reaction (OER) remains a major challenge for acidic water splitting on an industrial scale. Addressing this challenge, we obtained an outstanding high-performance OER-electrocatalyst by loading Ir on conductive antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO)-nanoparticles via a microwave (MW)-supported hydrothermal route. The obtained Ir-phase was identified as an XRD-amorphous, highly hydrated Ir(III/IV)-oxohydroxide. In order to identify chemical and structural features responsible for the high activity and exceptional stability under acidic OER-conditions at loadings as low as 20 μg(Ir) cm-2, we used stepwise thermal treatment to gradually alter the XRD-amorphous Ir-phase via dehydroxylation and crystallization of IrO2. This resulted in dramatic depletion of OER-performance, indicating that the outstanding electrocatalytic properties of the MW-produced Ir(III/IV)-oxohydroxide are prominently linked to the nature of the produced Ir-phase. This finding is in contrast with the often reported stable but poor OER-performance of crystalline IrO2-based compounds produced via more classical calcination routes. Our investigation demonstrates the immense potential of Ir-oxohydroxide-based OER electrocatalysts for stable high-current water electrolysis under acidic conditions.

  18. Raman scattering of IrTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Alexander; Thorsmolle, Verner; Artyukhin, Sergey; Yang, Jun; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Blumberg, Girsh

    2014-03-01

    IrTe2 presents a layered compound with a triangular lattice. It is known to exhibit a first order structural phase transition at approximately 260 K which is of a first order, corresponding to a formation of a superstructure with a period of five unit cells. Using polarized Raman spectroscopy we have studied the temperature dependence of 14 observed Raman allowed phononic modes. These phonons couple strongly to this transition and one additional first order transition at approximately 170 K. In the high-temperature phase only 3 modes are observed, while below approximately 280 K all 14 modes become visible. Below approximately 170 K only 11 modes are observed. Our results shed light on the possible mechanism driving the transitions. ACL, VKT and GB acknowledge support by NSF DMR-1104884.

  19. Camouflage in thermal IR: spectral design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Anna; Fagerström, Jan; Kariis, Hans; Lindell, Roland; Hallberg, Tomas; Högström, Herman

    2016-10-01

    In this work a spectral designed coating from SPECTROGON is evaluated. Spectral design in this case means that the coating has a reflectivity equal to one at 3-5 and 8-12 microns were sensors operate and a much lower reflectivity in the other wave length regions. Three boxes are evaluated: one metallic, one black-body and one with a spectral designed surface, all with a 15 W radiator inside the box. It is shown that the box with the spectral designed surface can combine the two good characteristics of the other boxes: low signature from the metallic box and reasonable inside temperature from the black-body box. The measurements were verified with calculations using RadThermIR.

  20. Tellurium halide IR fibers for remote spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xhang H.; Ma, Hong Li; Blanchetiere, Chantal; Le Foulgoc, Karine; Lucas, Jacques; Heuze, Jean; Colardelle, P.; Froissard, P.; Picque, D.; Corrieu, G.

    1994-07-01

    The new family of IR transmitting glasses, the TeX glasses, based on the association of tellurium and halide (Cl, Br, or I) are characterized by a wide optical window extending from 2 to 18 micrometers and a strong stability towards devitrification. Optical fibers drawn from these glasses exhibit low losses in the 7 - 10 micrometers range (less than 1 dB/m for single index fibers, 1 - 2 dB/m for fibers having a core-clad structure). The TeX glass fibers have been used in a remote analysis set-up which is mainly composed of a FTIR spectrometer coupled with a HgCdTe detector. This prototype system permits qualitative and quantitative analysis in a wide wavelength region lying from 3 to 13 micrometers , covering the fundamental absorption of more organic species. The evolution of a lactic and an alcoholic fermentation has been monitored by means of this set-up.