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Sample records for ir transmission diffraction

  1. Efficient IR Transmission Diffraction Grating for Circularly Polarized Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Helen; Chambers, Diana

    1999-01-01

    Numerical methods, using rigorous coupled wave theory, are used to design rectangular relief diffraction gratings for an infrared application which requires comparable first order efficiencies in the TE and TM polarization states. The depth, period, and fill factor of the grating are varied to identify optimal two level binary lamellar grating profiles which predict efficiencies for individual TM and TE polarizations above 75 percent, while keeping the difference between the two efficiencies within 10 percent. The application at hand is a rotating, transmissive diffractive scanner for space-based coherent lidar. The operating wavelength is 2.0 microns. A collimated, circularly polarized beam is incident on the diffractive scanner at the Bragg angle; 30 and 45 degree beam deflection angles being studied. Fused silica is the substrate material of choice. Selected designs are fabricated on 3 inch fused silica substrates using lithographic methods. The performance of the test pieces is measured and compared to theoretical predictions.

  2. Diffraction-limited IR Microspectroscopy with IRENI

    Treesearch

    J. Sedlmair; B. Illman; M. Unger; C. Hirschmugl

    2012-01-01

    In a unique way, IRENI (Infrared environmental Imaging), operated at the Synchrotron Radiation Center in Madison, combines IR spectroscopy and IR imaging, revealing the chemical morphology of a sample. Most storage ring based IR confocal microscopes have to overcome a trade-off between spatial resolution versus...

  3. Transmissive Diffractive Optical Element Solar Concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baron, Richard; Moynihan, Philip; Price, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Solar-thermal-radiation concentrators in the form of transmissive diffractive optical elements (DOEs) have been proposed as alternatives to mirror-type solar concentrators now in use. In comparison with functionally equivalent mirror-type solar concentrators, the transmissive, diffractive solar concentrators would weigh and cost less, and would be subject to relaxed mechanical tolerances. A DOE concentrator would be made from a thin, flat disk or membrane of a transmissive material having a suitable index of refraction. By virtue of its thinness, the DOE concentrator would have an areal mass density significantly less than that of a functionally equivalent conventional mirror. The DOE concentrator would have a relatively wide aperture--characterized by a focal-length/aperture-diameter ratio ('f number') on the order of 1. A kinoform (a surface-relief phase hologram) of high diffractive order would be microfabricated onto one face of the disk. The kinoform (see figure) would be designed to both diffract and refract incident solar radiation onto a desired focal region, without concern for forming an image of the Sun. The high diffractive order of this kinoform (in contradistinction to the low diffractive orders of some other kinoforms) would be necessary to obtain the desired f number of 1, which, in turn, would be necessary for obtaining a desired concentration ratio of 2,500 or greater. The design process of optimizing the concentration ratio of a proposed DOE solar concentrator includes computing convolutions of the optical bandwidth of the Sun with the optical transmission of the diffractive medium. Because, as in the cases of other non-imaging, light-concentrating optics, image quality is not a design requirement, the process also includes trading image quality against concentration ratio. A baseline design for one example calls for an aperture diameter of 1 m. This baseline design would be scalable to a diameter as large as 10 m, or to a smaller diameter for a

  4. Diffractive wave transmission in dispersive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lescarret, Vincent

    The aim of this paper is to study the reflection-transmission of diffractive geometrical optic rays described by semi-linear symmetric hyperbolic systems such as the Maxwell-Lorentz equations with the anharmonic model of polarization. The framework is that of P. Donnat's thesis [P. Donnat, Quelques contributions mathématiques en optique non linéaire, chapters 1 and 2, thèse, 1996] and V. Lescarret [V. Lescarret, Wave transmission in dispersive media, M3AS 17 (4) (2007) 485-535]: we consider an infinite WKB expansion of the wave over long times/distances O(1/ɛ) and because of the boundary, we decompose each profile into a hyperbolic (purely oscillating) part and elliptic (evanescent) part as in M. William [M. William, Boundary layers and glancing blow-up in nonlinear geometric optics, Ann. Sci. École Norm. Sup. 33 (2000) 132-209]. Then to get the usual sublinear growth on the hyperbolic part of the profiles, for every corrector, we consider E, the space of bounded functions decomposing into a sum of pure transports and a "quasi compactly" supported part. We make a detailed analysis on the nonlinear interactions on E which leads us to make a restriction on the set of resonant phases. We finally give a convergence result which justifies the use of "quasi compactly" supported profiles.

  5. Near diffraction limited mid-IR spectromicroscopy using frequency upconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Nicolai; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2014-02-01

    Mid-infrared microscopy and spectroscopy is interesting due to its medical, biological and chemical applications. Spectromicroscopy can be used for histopathology, sample analysis and diagnosis. The ability to do spectromicroscopy in the 2.5 to 4.5 μm wavelength range where many organic molecules have their fundamental vibrations, with the addition of sufficient spectroscopic resolution to resolve these bands, can e.g. potentially allow for diagnostics without the need for staining of the sample. On a longer timeframe, mid-IR spectromicroscopy has the potential for in-vivo diagnostics, combining morphological and spectral imaging. Recent developments in nonlinear frequency upconversion, have demonstrated the potential to perform both imaging and spectroscopy in the mid-IR range at unparalleled low levels of illumination, the low upconversion detector noise being orders of magnitude below competing technologies. With these applications in mind, we have incorporated microscopy optics into an image upconversion system, achieving near diffraction limited spatial resolution in the 3 μm range. Spectroscopic information is further acquired by appropriate control of the phase match condition of the upconversion process. Multispectral images for a region of interest can be obtained by XY-scanning this region of interest within the field of view of the mid-IR upconversion system. Thus, the whole region of interest can be imaged with all available converter wavelengths, and the spectral representation becomes equal for all points in the image. In addition, the range of converted/imaged wavelengths can be tuned continuously by changing the temperature of the crystal, or discretely by using a different poling channel in the PPLN crystal.

  6. Single-order diffraction grating designed by trapezoidal transmission function.

    PubMed

    Fan, Quanping; Liu, Yuwei; Wang, Chuanke; Yang, Zuhua; Wei, Lai; Zhu, Xiaoli; Xie, Changqing; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Qian, Feng; Yan, Zhuoyang; Gu, Yuqiu; Zhou, Weimin; Jiang, Gang; Cao, Leifeng

    2015-06-01

    Diffraction grating is a widely used dispersion element in spectral analysis from the infrared to the x-ray region. Traditionally, it has a square-wave transmission function, suffering from high-order diffraction contamination. Single-order diffraction can be achieved by sinusoidal amplitude transmission grating, but the fabrication is difficult. Here, we propose a novel idea to design a grating based on trapezoidal transmission function, which makes traditional grating a special case. Grating designed by this idea can not only suppress higher order diffraction by several orders of magnitude as sinusoidal amplitude grating does but also greatly reduce the fabrication difficulty to the level of processing for traditional grating. It offers a new opportunity for fabrication of grating with single-order diffraction and measurement of spectrum without contamination of high-order harmonic components. This idea can easily extend to varied-line-space grating, concave grating with single-order diffraction, or zone plates with single foci and will bring great changes in the field of grating applications.

  7. Evaluation of narcissus for multilayer diffractive optical elements in IR systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Cui, Qingfeng; Yang, Liangliang; Xue, Changxi; Sun, Jian

    2011-11-20

    The influence of narcissus effect for multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) is evaluated from the viewpoint of diffraction efficiency and the narcissus intensity. A modified paraxial evaluation criterion for the reflected narcissus radiation of MLDOEs has been deduced. A practical 8-12 μm IR optical system designed with one two-layer diffractive element has been given to illustrate the distribution of incident narcissus energy among various diffraction orders in the waveband. The narcissus intensities of the two diffractive surfaces have been calculated for those diffraction orders that have the maximum diffraction efficiency. This method can be used in the process of evaluation and control of the narcissus influence in IR optical systems with MLDOEs.

  8. Transmission Kikuchi diffraction and transmission electron forescatter imaging of electropolished and FIB manufactured TEM specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Zieliński, W. Płociński, T.; Kurzydłowski, K.J.

    2015-06-15

    We present a study of the efficiency of the utility of scanning electron microscope (SEM)-based transmission methods for characterizing grain structure in thinned bulk metals. Foils of type 316 stainless steel were prepared by two methods commonly used for transmission electron microscopy — double-jet electropolishing and focused ion beam milling. A customized holder allowed positioning of the foils in a configuration appropriate for both transmission electron forward scatter diffraction, and for transmission imaging by the use of a forescatter detector with two diodes. We found that both crystallographic orientation maps and dark-field transmitted images could be obtained for specimens prepared by either method. However, for both methods, preparation-induced artifacts may affect the quality or accuracy of transmission SEM data, especially those acquired by the use of transmission Kikuchi diffraction. Generally, the quality of orientation data was better for specimens prepared by electropolishing, due to the absence of ion-induced damage. - Highlights: • The transmission imaging and diffraction techniques are emerging in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as promising new field of materials characterization. • The manuscript titled: “Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction and Transmission Electron Forescatter Imaging of Electropolished and FIB Manufactured TEM Specimens” documents how different specimen thinning procedures can effect efficiency of transmission Kikuchi diffraction and transmission electron forescatter imaging. • The abilities to make precision crystallographic orientation maps and dark-field images in transmission was studied on electropolished versus focus ion beam manufactured TEM specimens. • Depending on the need, electropolished and focused ion beam technique may produce suitable specimens for transmission imaging and diffraction in SEM.

  9. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Exploring transmission Kikuchi diffraction using a Timepix detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vespucci, S.; Winkelmann, A.; Mingard, K.; Maneuski, D.; O'Shea, V.; Trager-Cowan, C.

    2017-02-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a well-established scanning electron microscope (SEM)-based technique [1]. It allows the non-destructive mapping of the crystal structure, texture, crystal phase and strain with a spatial resolution of tens of nanometers. Conventionally this is performed by placing an electron sensitive screen, typically consisting of a phosphor screen combined with a charge coupled device (CCD) camera, in front of a specimen, usually tilted 70° to the normal of the exciting electron beam. Recently, a number of authors have shown that a significant increase in spatial resolution is achievable when Kikuchi diffraction patterns are acquired in transmission geometry; that is when diffraction patterns are generated by electrons transmitted through an electron-transparent, usually thinned, specimen. The resolution of this technique, called transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD), has been demonstrated to be better than 10 nm [2,3]. We have recently demonstrated the advantages of a direct electron detector, Timepix [4,5], for the acquisition of standard EBSD patterns [5]. In this article we will discuss the advantages of Timepix to perform TKD and for acquiring spot diffraction patterns and more generally for acquiring scanning transmission electron microscopy micrographs in the SEM. Particularly relevant for TKD, is its very compact size, which allows much more flexibility in the positioning of the detector in the SEM chamber. We will furthermore show recent results using Timepix as a virtual forward scatter detector, and will illustrate the information derivable on producing images through processing of data acquired from different areas of the detector. We will show results from samples ranging from gold nanoparticles to nitride semiconductor nanorods.

  11. Crystallization and diffraction analysis of the serpin IRS-2 from the hard tick Ixodes ricinus.

    PubMed

    Kovářová, Zuzana; Chmelař, Jindřich; Sanda, Miloslav; Brynda, Jiří; Mareš, Michael; Rezáčová, Pavlína

    2010-11-01

    IRS-2 from the hard tick Ixodes ricinus belongs to the serpin family of protease inhibitors. It is produced in the salivary glands of the tick and its anti-inflammatory activity suggests that it plays a role in parasite-host interaction. Recombinant IRS-2 prepared by heterologous expression in a bacterial system was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to the primitive tetragonal space group P4(3) and diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution. Mass-spectrometric and electrophoretic analyses revealed that IRS-2 was cleaved by contaminating proteases during crystallization. This processing of IRS-2 mimicked the specific cleavage of the serpin by its target protease and resulted in a more stable form (the so-called relaxed conformation), which produced well diffracting crystals. Activity profiling with specific substrates and inhibitors demonstrated traces of serine and cysteine proteases in the protein stock solution.

  12. Fresnel equations and transmission line analogues for diffraction gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Kaushik, S.

    1995-08-01

    A simple and intuitive formalism is presented to describe diffraction in multi-layered periodic structures. We use the well known results from scalar analysis (wave propagation in homogeneous layered media) and show that they can be generalized rather readily to vector problems such as diffraction analysis. Specifically, we derive: (1) generalized Fresnel equations appropriate for reflection and transmission from an infinitely thick grating, (2) a generalized Airy formula for thin-film to describe reflection and transmission of light through a lamellar grating and (3) a matrix propagation method akin to that used for multi-layer thin film analysis. The results developed here complement the recent work on R-matrix and S-matrix propagation algorithms that have been used in connection with modal and differential grating theories. These algorithms have proven to be numerically stable for calculating diffraction efficiencies from deep groove gratings. The formalism developed here expands upon the earlier literature by providing important details that are hitherto unavailable.

  13. Implementing Transmission Electron Backscatter Diffraction for Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Rice, Katherine P; Chen, Yimeng; Prosa, Ty J; Larson, David J

    2016-06-01

    There are advantages to performing transmission electron backscattering diffraction (tEBSD) in conjunction with focused ion beam-based specimen preparation for atom probe tomography (APT). Although tEBSD allows users to identify the position and character of grain boundaries, which can then be combined with APT to provide full chemical and orientation characterization of grain boundaries, tEBSD can also provide imaging information that improves the APT specimen preparation process by insuring proper placement of the targeted grain boundary within an APT specimen. In this report we discuss sample tilt angles, ion beam milling energies, and other considerations to optimize Kikuchi diffraction pattern quality for the APT specimen geometry. Coordinated specimen preparation and analysis of a grain boundary in a Ni-based Inconel 600 alloy is used to illustrate the approach revealing a 50° misorientation and trace element segregation to the grain boundary.

  14. Photoacoustic FT-IR depth imaging of polymeric surfaces: overcoming IR diffraction limits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Urban, Marek W

    2004-11-23

    It is well established that the photoacoustic effect based on absorption of electromagnetic radiation into thermal waves allows surface depth profiling. However, limited knowledge exists concerning its spatial resolution. The spiral-stepwise (SSW) approach combined with phase rotational analysis is utilized to determine surface depth profiling of homogeneous and nonhomogeneous multilayered polymeric surfaces in a step-scan photoacoustic FT-IR experiment. In this approach, the thermal wave propagating to the surface is represented as the integral of all heat wave vectors propagating across the sampling depth xn, and the spiral function K'beta(lambda)e(-beta)(lambda)xne(-x)n/mu(th)e(i)(omegat-(xn/mu(th))) represents the amplitude and phase of the heat wave vector propagating to the surface. The SSW approach can be applied to heterogeneous surfaces by representing thermal waves propagating to the surface as the sum of the thermal waves propagating through homogeneous layers that are integrals of all heat vectors from a given sampling depth. The proposed model is tested on multilayered polymeric surfaces and shows that the SSW approach allows semiquantitative surface imaging with the spatial resolution ranging from micrometer to 500 nm levels, and the spatial resolution is a function of the penetration depth.

  15. Transmission Electron Diffraction Studies of Xenon Adsorbed on Graphite.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faisal, A. Q. D.

    1987-09-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Adsorption studies of xenon on graphite were performed using the Hitachi HU-11B Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). It has been used as a Transmission High Energy Electron Diffraction (THEED) camera. This has been modified to include an Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) environmental chamber. This chamber was isolated from the microscope vacuum by two 400 μm diameter differentially pumped apertures. Pressures of {~}10 ^{-6} torr and {~ }10^{-9} torr were achieved inside the microscope column and the environmental chamber respectively. The chamber was fitted with a new sample holder designed with double "O" rings. The sample was cooled with liquid helium. Previous THEED experiments by Venables et al and Schabes-Retchkiman and Venables revealed the presence of a 2D-solid incommensurate (I)-commensurate (C) phase transition as the temperature is lowered. These results were confirmed and extended in the present work. Hong et al have recently interpreted their X-ray diffraction experiments as showing an incommensurate-striped domain phase transition at {~}65rm K. No evidence was found for the existence of a striped domain structure on any part of the xenon phase diagram studied. Experiments of xenon adsorbed on the basal plane (0001) of graphite were carried out at pressures from {~}1.5 times 10^{-5} torr to {~}1.8 times 10^{-8} torr over a temperature range from 55K^.90K. A set of lattice parameter (misfit) measurements were made as a function of temperature at constant pressure with an accuracy of +/-0.1% rather than +/-0.3% previously obtained. The misfit data was fitted to a power law formula, i.e. misfit m = B_{rm o} (rm T - rm T_{rm o})^{rm A} , where A is a constant and equal to 0.8. It was found that B_{rm o} and T_{rm o} are functions of log(P). The data fell into two groups corresponding to two phase transitions. The same power law was used for both sets of data. Two transitions were found, one is I-C and

  16. Correlating Atom Probe Crystallographic Measurements with Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Data.

    PubMed

    Breen, Andrew J; Babinsky, Katharina; Day, Alec C; Eder, K; Oakman, Connor J; Trimby, Patrick W; Primig, Sophie; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2017-03-14

    Correlative microscopy approaches offer synergistic solutions to many research problems. One such combination, that has been studied in limited detail, is the use of atom probe tomography (APT) and transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) on the same tip specimen. By combining these two powerful microscopy techniques, the microstructure of important engineering alloys can be studied in greater detail. For the first time, the accuracy of crystallographic measurements made using APT will be independently verified using TKD. Experimental data from two atom probe tips, one a nanocrystalline Al-0.5Ag alloy specimen collected on a straight flight-path atom probe and the other a high purity Mo specimen collected on a reflectron-fitted instrument, will be compared. We find that the average minimum misorientation angle, calculated from calibrated atom probe reconstructions with two different pole combinations, deviate 0.7° and 1.4°, respectively, from the TKD results. The type of atom probe and experimental conditions appear to have some impact on this accuracy and the reconstruction and measurement procedures are likely to contribute further to degradation in angular resolution. The challenges and implications of this correlative approach will also be discussed.

  17. Dynamical Diffraction Simulation of Transmission X-ray Phase Retarders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrander, A. T.; Lang, J. C.; Srajer, G.

    1996-03-01

    Circularly polarized photons couple with magnetic moments which makes them a useful probe of the magnetic properties of condensed matter. Circularly polarized photon beams can be created from linearly polarized undulator beams at the Advanced Photon Source using thin single-crystal transmission phase retarders. Tests of such phase retarders have been made and have been compared to dynamical diffraction calculations. (J.C. Lang and G. Srajer, Rev. Sci. Instrumen. 66,1540(1995).) In addition, a phase retarder was successfully used in a circular magnetic x-ray dichroism experiment. (J.C. Lang, G. Srajer, C. Detliefs, A.I. Goldman, H. Konig, X. Wang, B.N. Harmon, and R.W. McCallum, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74,4935(1995).) The focus of this talk is on the calculations that were made using matrix techniques. ( D.W. Berreman and A.T. Macrander, Phys. Rev. B 37,6030(1988).) Such calculations are possible because not only the amplitude but also the phase of the fields are calculated. This work supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy, BES-Materials Sciences, under contract no. W-31-109-ENG-38.

  18. IR performance study of an adaptive coded aperture "diffractive imaging" system employing MEMS "eyelid shutter" technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalanobis, A.; Reyner, C.; Patel, H.; Haberfelde, T.; Brady, David; Neifeld, Mark; Kumar, B. V. K. Vijaya; Rogers, Stanley

    2007-09-01

    Adaptive coded aperture sensing is an emerging technology enabling real time, wide-area IR/visible sensing and imaging. Exploiting unique imaging architectures, adaptive coded aperture sensors achieve wide field of view, near-instantaneous optical path repositioning, and high resolution while reducing weight, power consumption and cost of air- and space born sensors. Such sensors may be used for military, civilian, or commercial applications in all optical bands but there is special interest in diffraction imaging sensors for IR applications. Extension of coded apertures from Visible to the MWIR introduces the effects of diffraction and other distortions not observed in shorter wavelength systems. A new approach is being developed under the DARPA/SPO funded LACOSTE (Large Area Coverage Optical search-while Track and Engage) program, that addresses the effects of diffraction while gaining the benefits of coded apertures, thus providing flexibility to vary resolution, possess sufficient light gathering power, and achieve a wide field of view (WFOV). The photonic MEMS-Eyelid "sub-aperture" array technology is currently being instantiated in this DARPA program to be the heart of conducting the flow (heartbeat) of the incoming signal. However, packaging and scalability are critical factors for the MEMS "sub-aperture" technology which will determine system efficacy as well as military and commercial usefulness. As larger arrays with 1,000,000+ sub-apertures are produced for this LACOSTE effort, the available Degrees of Freedom (DOF) will enable better spatial resolution, control and refinement on the coding for the system. Studies (SNR simulations) will be performed (based on the Adaptive Coded Aperture algorithm implementation) to determine the efficacy of this diffractive MEMS approach and to determine the available system budget based on simulated bi-static shutter-element DOF degradation (1%, 5%, 10%, 20%, etc..) trials until the degradation level where it is

  19. IR sensitivity enhancement of CMOS Image Sensor with diffractive light trapping pixels.

    PubMed

    Yokogawa, Sozo; Oshiyama, Itaru; Ikeda, Harumi; Ebiko, Yoshiki; Hirano, Tomoyuki; Saito, Suguru; Oinoue, Takashi; Hagimoto, Yoshiya; Iwamoto, Hayato

    2017-06-19

    We report on the IR sensitivity enhancement of back-illuminated CMOS Image Sensor (BI-CIS) with 2-dimensional diffractive inverted pyramid array structure (IPA) on crystalline silicon (c-Si) and deep trench isolation (DTI). FDTD simulations of semi-infinite thick c-Si having 2D IPAs on its surface whose pitches over 400 nm shows more than 30% improvement of light absorption at λ = 850 nm and the maximum enhancement of 43% with the 540 nm pitch at the wavelength is confirmed. A prototype BI-CIS sample with pixel size of 1.2 μm square containing 400 nm pitch IPAs shows 80% sensitivity enhancement at λ = 850 nm compared to the reference sample with flat surface. This is due to diffraction with the IPA and total reflection at the pixel boundary. The NIR images taken by the demo camera equip with a C-mount lens show 75% sensitivity enhancement in the λ = 700-1200 nm wavelength range with negligible spatial resolution degradation. Light trapping CIS pixel technology promises to improve NIR sensitivity and appears to be applicable to many different image sensor applications including security camera, personal authentication, and range finding Time-of-Flight camera with IR illuminations.

  20. Focusing single-order diffraction transmission grating with a focusing plane perpendicular to the grating surface.

    PubMed

    Fan, Quanping; Liu, Yuwei; Yang, Zuhua; Wei, Lai; Zhang, Qiangqiang; Chen, Yong; Hu, Feng; Wang, Chuanke; Gu, Yuqiu; Zhou, Weimin; Jiang, Gang; Cao, Leifeng

    2015-06-15

    By combining the single-order dispersion properties of quasi-sinusoidal single-order diffraction transmission gratings (QSTG) and the single-foci focusing properties of annulus-sector-shaped-element binary Gabor zone plate (ASZP), we propose a novel focusing single-order diffraction transmission grating (FSDTG). Different from the diffraction patterns of a normal transmission grating (TG), it has a focusing plane perpendicular to the grating surface. Numerical simulations are carried out to verify its diffraction patterns in the framework of Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction. Higher-order diffraction components of higher harmonics can be effectively suppressed by the FSDTG we designed. And we find that the focal depth and resolving power are only determined by the structure parameters of our FSDTG by theoretical estimations.

  1. X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy and thermal characterization of partially hydrolyzed guar gum.

    PubMed

    Mudgil, Deepak; Barak, Sheweta; Khatkar, B S

    2012-05-01

    Guar gum was hydrolyzed using cellulase from Aspergillus niger at 5.6 pH and 50°C temperature. Hydrolyzed guar gum sample was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, dilute solution viscometry and rotational viscometry. Viscometry analysis of native guar gum showed a molecular weight of 889742.06, whereas, after enzymatic hydrolysis, the resultant product had a molecular weight of 7936.5. IR spectral analysis suggests that after enzymatic hydrolysis of guar gum there was no major transformation of functional group. Thermal analysis revealed no major change in thermal behavior of hydrolyzed guar gum. It was shown that partial hydrolysis of guar gum could be achieved by inexpensive and food grade cellulase (Aspergillus niger) having commercial importance and utilization as a functional soluble dietary fiber for food industry.

  2. Diffraction Revisited: Position of Diffraction Spots upon Rotation of a Transmission Grating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are often used in the laboratory to determine the wavelength of laser light. What happens to the spots on the screen if the grating is rotated in this set-up? The answer is nontrivial and instructive.

  3. Diffraction Revisited: Position of Diffraction Spots upon Rotation of a Transmission Grating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Diffraction gratings are often used in the laboratory to determine the wavelength of laser light. What happens to the spots on the screen if the grating is rotated in this set-up? The answer is nontrivial and instructive.

  4. Electron diffraction from free-standing, metal-coated transmission gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronniger, Glen; Barwick, Brett; Batelaan, Herman; Savas, Tim; Pritchard, Dave; Cronin, Alex

    2005-09-01

    Electron diffraction from a free-standing nanofabricated transmission grating was demonstrated, with energies ranging from 125 eV to 25 keV. Observation of 21 diffraction orders highlights the quality of the gratings. The image charge potential due to one electron was measured by rotating the grating. These gratings may pave the way to low-energy electron interferometry.

  5. Electron diffraction from free-standing, metal-coated transmission gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Gronniger, Glen; Barwick, Brett; Batelaan, Herman; Savas, Tim; Pritchard, Dave; Cronin, Alex

    2005-09-19

    Electron diffraction from a free-standing nanofabricated transmission grating was demonstrated, with energies ranging from 125 eV to 25 keV. Observation of 21 diffraction orders highlights the quality of the gratings. The image charge potential due to one electron was measured by rotating the grating. These gratings may pave the way to low-energy electron interferometry.

  6. Design and fabrication of transmission gratings with high diffraction efficiency for pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chaoming; Chen, Xinrong; Li, Lin; Li, Xiaoyang; Zha, Hang; Yu, Jian; Hu, Zuyuan; Zou, Wenlong; Wu, Jianhong; Chang, Zenghu

    2016-11-01

    Fused silica transmission grating plays an important role in the ultra-short laser pulse compression system. Fused silica transmission grating have the advantages of high diffraction efficiency, high damage threshold, long life and no shelter. The design and fabrication of pulse compression grating are investigated theoretically and experimentally in this paper. Rigorous coupled wave theory is used for design transmission grating with trapezoidal structure. The trapezoidal structure has better diffraction efficiency than that of the rectangular structure. The deep-etched fused silica transmission grating (1250lp/mm) is fabricated by holographic recording and ion beam etching. The aperture of transmission grating is Φ65mm, and its thickness is 1mm.The absolute -1st diffraction efficiency is about to 98%(@808nm). Experimental results are coincident with the theoretical analysis.

  7. Diffractive Optics in the Infrared (DiOptIR) LDRD 67109 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, Charles Fred; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Wendt, Joel Robert; Kemme, Shanalyn A.; Samora, Sally; Carter, Tony Ray; Peters, David William; Shields, Eric A.

    2005-10-01

    This diffractive optical element (DOE) LDRD is divided into two tasks. In Task 1, we develop two new DOE technologies: (1) a broad wavelength band effective anti-reflection (AR) structure and (2) a design tool to encode dispersion and polarization information into a unique diffraction pattern. In Task 2, we model, design, and fabricate a subwavelength polarization splitter. The first technology is an anti-reflective (AR) layer that may be etched into the DOE surface. For many wavelengths of interest, transmissive silicon DOEs are ideal. However, a significant portion of light (30% from each surface) is lost due to Fresnel reflection. To address this issue, we investigate a subwavelength, surface relief structure that acts as an effective AR coating. The second DOE component technology in Task 1 is a design tool to determine the optimal DOE surface relief structure that can encode the light's degree of dispersion and polarization into a unique spatial pattern. Many signals of interest have unique spatial, temporal, spectral, and polarization signatures. The ability to disperse the signal into a unique diffraction pattern would result in improved signal detection sensitivity with a simultaneous reduction in false alarm. Task 2 of this LDRD project is to investigate the modeling, design, and fabrication of subwavelength birefringent devices for polarimetric spectral sensing and imaging applications. Polarimetric spectral sensing measures the spectrum of the light and polarization state of light at each wavelength simultaneously. The capability to obtain both polarization and spectral information can help develop target/object signature and identify the target/object for several applications in NP&MC and national security.

  8. Tunable external-cavity diode laser at 650 nm based on a transmission diffraction grating.

    PubMed

    Laurila, Toni; Joutsenoja, Timo; Hernberg, Rolf; Kuittinen, Markku

    2002-09-20

    A tunable external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) based on a transmission diffraction grating in a Littrow mount has been developed and characterized. A single-transverse-mode diode laser at 650 nm is used in an external-cavity configuration in which the transmission grating is used as a dispersive element to select the single longitudinal mode. The transmission diffraction grating is made with electron-beam lithography. A tunable true single-mode cw output power of >20 mW is obtained from the ECDL. The total wavelength tuning range is 12 nm, and the mode-hop-free continuous tunability is >20 GHz.

  9. Diffraction analysis of blazed transmission gratings with a modified extended scalar theory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaijun; Kuang, Dengfeng; Fang, Zhiliang

    2008-06-01

    An alternative interpretation of the diffraction of blazed transmission gratings with moderate structure period is proposed according to a modified extended scalar theory (MEST). The diffraction field on the bottom facet of the grating is considered to be the interference of four subfields investigated in the problem of diffraction of a plane wave by an infinite half-plane. It is observed that MEST gives the total field that agrees with rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA), and the result is more reliable than that of extended scalar theory (EST). The MEST is still a ray-optical-based approximation approach, and the region of validity is compared with EST and RCWA.

  10. Investigation of Some New Nonlinear Optical Crystals by Means of NQR, IR and X-Ray Diffraction Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, A. M.; Terzyan, S. S.; Burbelo, V. M.; Sukiasyan, R. P.

    1998-07-01

    Some new analogues of the nonlinear optical crystal L-arginine phosphate monohydrate (LAP) (Arg • HIO3 , Arg • 2HIO3 , Lys • HIO3 , Lys • 2HIO3 , Lys • 3HIO3 , Bet • 3HIO3) were obtained and investigated by means of IR, NQR, X-ray diffraction and SHG methods. The importance of this class of crystals for revealing new nonlinear optical crystals is pointed out.

  11. Transmission X-ray diffraction grating alignment using a photoelastic modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Erik H.; Levine, Alan M.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    1988-01-01

    A high-resolution alignment technique which utilizes the partial polarization property of fine period transmission gratings has been developed. It is especially useful when the grating period is sufficiently small so that there are no visible diffracted orders. This technique uses a photoelastic modulator (PEM) to produce an intensity signal that is proportional to the sine of twice the angle between the grating lines and the PEM crystal axis. The experimentally demonstrated resolution of this technique on 200-nm period gold transmission gratings is better than 1 arc sec. This technique was developed to align X-ray transmission gratings for spectroscopy and interferometry applications.

  12. Transmission X-ray diffraction grating alignment using a photoelastic modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Erik H.; Levine, Alan M.; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    1988-01-01

    A high-resolution alignment technique which utilizes the partial polarization property of fine period transmission gratings has been developed. It is especially useful when the grating period is sufficiently small so that there are no visible diffracted orders. This technique uses a photoelastic modulator (PEM) to produce an intensity signal that is proportional to the sine of twice the angle between the grating lines and the PEM crystal axis. The experimentally demonstrated resolution of this technique on 200-nm period gold transmission gratings is better than 1 arc sec. This technique was developed to align X-ray transmission gratings for spectroscopy and interferometry applications.

  13. Synergy between transmission electron microscopy and powder diffraction: application to modulated structures.

    PubMed

    Batuk, Dmitry; Batuk, Maria; Abakumov, Artem M; Hadermann, Joke

    2015-04-01

    The crystal structure solution of modulated compounds is often very challenging, even using the well established methodology of single-crystal X-ray crystallography. This task becomes even more difficult for materials that cannot be prepared in a single-crystal form, so that only polycrystalline powders are available. This paper illustrates that the combined application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder diffraction is a possible solution to the problem. Using examples of anion-deficient perovskites modulated by periodic crystallographic shear planes, it is demonstrated what kind of local structural information can be obtained using various TEM techniques and how this information can be implemented in the crystal structure refinement against the powder diffraction data. The following TEM methods are discussed: electron diffraction (selected area electron diffraction, precession electron diffraction), imaging (conventional high-resolution TEM imaging, high-angle annular dark-field and annular bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy) and state-of-the-art spectroscopic techniques (atomic resolution mapping using energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and electron energy loss spectroscopy).

  14. Comparative study of the accuracy of the PSM and Kogelnik models of diffraction in reflection and transmission holographic gratings.

    PubMed

    Brotherton-Ratcliffe, David; Shi, Lishen; Osanlou, Ardie; Excell, Peter

    2014-12-29

    Calculated diffractive efficiencies in the visible spectral band from lossless planar holographic gratings are studied using the PSM and Kogelnik models of diffraction for the case of the σ-polarization. The results are numerically compared with rigorous coupled wave calculations over a wide parameter space covering both transmission and reflection geometries. For most reflection gratings, the PSM model is shown to consistently provide a marginally superior estimation of the diffractive efficiency. This is particularly evident in a clearly superior description of the diffractive sideband structure for most gratings, both in terms of angle and wavelength. For the transmission grating, the PSM model continues to provide a relatively good description of diffraction at low permittivity modulations and lower incidence angles with respect to the grating plane normal. However, overall Kogelnik's theory is shown to provide a somewhat superior estimation of diffractive efficiency and a clearly superior description of the diffractive side-band structure in the transmission case.

  15. Line-of-sight data transmission system based on mid IR quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taslakov, M.; Simeonov, V.; van den Bergh, H.

    2008-02-01

    We report on an application of a pulsed distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (QCL) for an open path data transmission. A pulse QCL in the 1046 cm -1 range (28.7 THz) is used as a carrier signal source. The QCL is modulated with 50 ns pulses at repetition rate of 100 kHz, used as a sub-carrier. This sub-carrier is frequency modulated with a low frequency signal with bandwidth of 20 kHz (high quality sound signal). Data transmission experiments over 6 km open path were successfully completed. Pulse frequency modulation (PFM) technique instead of the usually used amplitude modulation was chosen because of its high immunity against amplitude noise and amplitude instabilities caused by atmospheric turbulence and aerosols. The quality of the demodulated signal is good enough, characterized by low distortion, low noise, high dynamic range and wide frequency band, even for detected signal variation of more than thousand times. The haze immunity of the Mid IR communication channel was studied in a laboratory and in a real open path conditions. The QCL beam was transmitted through a 60 cm cell, filled with water aerosol with high optical density in the visible. Despite the high aerosol optical density, sufficient to suppress completely a probe 20 mW 532 nm beam at a 5 cm distance, no distortion in the IR transmission was observed passing full 60 cm. The real 6 km open path transmission in a fog confirms the high haze immunity of IR beam propagation. The distance could be increased up to a few tens of kilometers. The bandwidth can be increased significantly up to a MHz range using a higher sub-carrier or up to a GHz range performing a direct frequency modulation of the laser frequency using CW QCL.

  16. Site-isolated iridium complexes on MgO powder: individual Ir atoms imaged by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Alper; Ortalan, Volkan; Browning, Nigel D; Gates, Bruce C

    2009-08-21

    Iridium complexes were synthesized on MgO powder by adsorption of Ir(C(2)H(4))(2)(acac) [acac = acetonylacetonate]; images determined by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy show individual Ir atoms, demonstrating that the supported complexes were site-isolated.

  17. Determining Projections of Grain Boundaries from Diffraction Data in Transmission Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Ákos K; Lábár, János L

    2016-06-01

    Grain boundaries (GB) are characterized by disorientation of the neighboring grains and the direction of the boundary plane between them. A new approach presented here determines the projection of GB that can be used to determine the latter one. The novelty is that an additional parameter of GB is quantified in addition to the ones provided by the orientation maps, namely the width of the projection of the GB is measured from the same set of diffraction patterns that were recorded for the orientation map, without the need to take any additional images. The diffraction patterns are collected in nanobeam diffraction mode in a transmission electron microscope, pixel-by-pixel, from an area containing two neighboring grains and the boundary between them. In our case, the diffraction patterns were recorded using the beam scanning function of a commercially available system (ASTAR). Our method is based on non-negative matrix factorization applied to the mentioned set of diffraction patterns. The method is encoded in a MATLAB environment, making the results easy to interpret and visualize. The measured GB-projection width is used to determine the orientation of the GB-plane, as given in the study by Kiss et al.

  18. Design of plastic diffractive-refractive compact zoom lenses for visible-near-IR spectrum.

    PubMed

    Greisukh, Grigoriy I; Ezhov, Evgeniy G; Sidyakina, Zoya A; Stepanov, Sergei A

    2013-08-10

    The requirements for selecting the initial scheme for a compact plastic zoom lens are formulated. The main stages of the initial scheme of the transformation, incorporating the diffractive lens and replacement of the lenses' glasses by optical plastics, are presented. The efficiency of the suggested techniques of the optical layout process are demonstrated by using the example of the design and analysis of a zoom lens intended for use in security cameras for day or night vision.

  19. Predesign of diamond turned refractive/diffractive elements for IR objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedl, Max J.

    1993-01-01

    Diffractive lenses have arrived. Literally hundreds of papers have been published and technology impact reports have been written about the exciting addition of a new tool for the lens designer. Sophisticated computer programs have been developed to aid in the optimization of these diffractive phase profiles for a wide variety of applications. Now, several fabrication methods are being pursued to produce these diffractive elements economically. The best known process is the etching of a multi-level relief grating, known as binary optics. This process uses sets of computer generated lithographic masks. Another, more recently developed method is Dry Photopolymer Embossing (DPE). This replication process uses master holograms. And now, diamond turning is being applied for the machining of these elements. Diamond turning is especially well suited for infrared optics. As any process has advantages and limitations, so has diamond turning. These advantages and limitations are discussed and general guidelines are presented to aid the designer and systems engineer in the project predesign stage.

  20. Fabrication of Efficient, Large Aperture Transmission Diffraction Gratings by Ion-Beam Etching

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H T; Bryan, S R; Britten, J A; Perry, M D

    2000-09-14

    The utilization of high-power short pulse laser employing chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) for material processing and inertial confinement research is widely increasing. The performance of these high-power CPA laser system continues to be limited by the ability of the pulse compression gratings to hold up to the high-average-power or high-peak-power of the laser. Pulse compression gratings used in transmission and fabricated out of bulk fused silica have intrinsically the highest laser damage threshold when compared with metal or multilayer dielectric gratings that work in reflection. LLNL has developed processing capability to produce high efficiency fused silica transmission gratings at sizes useful to future Petawatt-class systems, and has demonstrated high efficiency at smaller aperture. This report shows that fused silica diffraction exhibiting >95% efficiency into the -1 diffraction order in transmission (90{sup o} deflection of the incident light, at an incidence angle of 45{sup o} to the grating face). The microstructure of this grating consisted of grooves ion-beam etched to a depth of 1.6 microns with a pitch of 0.75 microns, using a holographically produced photoresist mask that was subsequently stripped away in significance to the fabrication of the small scale high efficiency grating was the development of the processing technology and infrastructure for production of such gratings at up to 65 cm diameter. LLNL is the currently the only location in the world with the ability to coat, interferometrically expose, and ion etch diffractive optics at this aperture. Below, we describe the design, fabrication, performance and, the scaleup process for a producing a high-efficiency transmission grating on a 65 cm fused silica substrate.

  1. Characterizing the dealumination of environmentally relevant zeolites using IR, NMR and neutron diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Paffett, M.T.; Szanyi, J.; Jacubinas, R.M.; Ott, K.C.; VonDreele, R.; Hughes, C.D.; Earl, W.L.

    1997-07-01

    Results of characterization studies monitoring the sequential chemical bond breaking events, local site symmetry, and long range structural modifications of specific zeolites (H-ZSM-5, TS-1) during hydrothermal treatment of these catalyst materials are described. These characterization techniques include infrared spectroscopy of selected probe molecules, magic angle spinning NMR spectroscopy, and powder neutron diffraction. Information regarding selected examples from each of these techniques is presented and the inherent strengths of each is discussed. The experimental insight into the chemical and structural modifications of high surface area microporous catalyst materials as a function of deactivation conditions (hydrothermal conditioning) is highlighted.

  2. Low-energy transmission electron diffraction and imaging of large-area graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Xia, Bingyu; Lin, Li; Xiao, Xiaoyang; Liu, Peng; Lin, Xiaoyang; Peng, Hailin; Zhu, Yuanmin; Yu, Rong; Lei, Peng; Wang, Jiangtao; Zhang, Lina; Xu, Yong; Zhao, Mingwen; Peng, Lianmao; Li, Qunqing; Duan, Wenhui; Liu, Zhongfan; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2017-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted interest because of their excellent properties and potential applications. A key step in realizing industrial applications is to synthesize wafer-scale single-crystal samples. Until now, single-crystal samples, such as graphene domains up to the centimeter scale, have been synthesized. However, a new challenge is to efficiently characterize large-area samples. Currently, the crystalline characterization of these samples still relies on selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) or low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), which is more suitable for characterizing very small local regions. This paper presents a highly efficient characterization technique that adopts a low-energy electrostatically focused electron gun and a super-aligned carbon nanotube (SACNT) film sample support. It allows rapid crystalline characterization of large-area graphene through a single photograph of a transmission-diffracted image at a large beam size. Additionally, the low-energy electron beam enables the observation of a unique diffraction pattern of adsorbates on the suspended graphene at room temperature. This work presents a simple and convenient method for characterizing the macroscopic structures of 2D materials, and the instrument we constructed allows the study of the weak interaction with 2D materials.

  3. Low-energy transmission electron diffraction and imaging of large-area graphene

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Xia, Bingyu; Lin, Li; Xiao, Xiaoyang; Liu, Peng; Lin, Xiaoyang; Peng, Hailin; Zhu, Yuanmin; Yu, Rong; Lei, Peng; Wang, Jiangtao; Zhang, Lina; Xu, Yong; Zhao, Mingwen; Peng, Lianmao; Li, Qunqing; Duan, Wenhui; Liu, Zhongfan; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2017-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted interest because of their excellent properties and potential applications. A key step in realizing industrial applications is to synthesize wafer-scale single-crystal samples. Until now, single-crystal samples, such as graphene domains up to the centimeter scale, have been synthesized. However, a new challenge is to efficiently characterize large-area samples. Currently, the crystalline characterization of these samples still relies on selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) or low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), which is more suitable for characterizing very small local regions. This paper presents a highly efficient characterization technique that adopts a low-energy electrostatically focused electron gun and a super-aligned carbon nanotube (SACNT) film sample support. It allows rapid crystalline characterization of large-area graphene through a single photograph of a transmission-diffracted image at a large beam size. Additionally, the low-energy electron beam enables the observation of a unique diffraction pattern of adsorbates on the suspended graphene at room temperature. This work presents a simple and convenient method for characterizing the macroscopic structures of 2D materials, and the instrument we constructed allows the study of the weak interaction with 2D materials. PMID:28879233

  4. A transmission Kikuchi diffraction study of cementite in a quenched and tempered steel

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, Ahmed A.; Casillas, Gilberto; Pereloma, Elena V.; Carpenter, Kristin R.; Killmore, Christopher R.; Gazder, Azdiar A.

    2016-04-15

    This is the first transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) study to report the indexing of nano-sized cementite as distinct structures and its orientation relationship with the body-centered cubic matrix in a quenched and tempered steel. Crystallographic analysis via TKD and selected area diffraction returned the well-known Bagaryatskii and Isaichev orientation relationships. However, the indexing of nano-sized cementite via TKD was sensitive to the thickness of the electron transparent region such that TEM remains the most precise method to characterise such precipitates. - Highlights: • Nano-sized cementite in a QT steel has been investigated by TKD and TEM. • Cementite has been indexed as distinct structures via TKD. • Crystallographic analysis returned the Bagaryatskii and Isaichev ORs. • Success of TKD is sensitive to the thickness of the electron transparent region. • TEM remains the most precise technique to characterise nano-sized precipitates.

  5. Transmission Spectra Of Extrasolar Giant Planets In The Mid-ir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Liang, M.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Ehrenreich, D.; Lecavelier des Etangs, A.; Yung, Y. L.

    2006-09-01

    We present here simulations of transmission spectra in the mid-IR of two extrasolar giant planets, HD209458b and HD189733b, during their transit in front of their parent star (Tinetti et al., 2006). If H2O and CO are abundant as estimated by our photochemical model (Liang et al., 2004), we expect they can be detected with the IRAC and MIPS cameras on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, and with future space-based observatories, such as James Webb Space Telescope. If water vapor were far less abundant, due to a C/O ratio different from solar, other species might be observable: among them CH4, CO2 and C2H2 are the best candidates. According to our simulations, transmission spectra of EGPs in the MIR are very sensitive to molecular abundances and less to temperature. Temperature influences the spectra above all by way of its effects on the atmospheric scale height and absorption coefficients. These considerations make transmission spectroscopy, linked with primary eclipse, an approach worth considering and complementary to emission spectroscopy, linked with secondary eclipse.

  6. Transmission windows in Titan's lower troposphere: Implications for IR spectrometers aboard future aerial and surface missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, George D.; Corlies, Paul M.; Wray, James J.; Hofgartner, Jason D.; Hörst, Sarah M.; Hayes, Alexander G.; Liuzzo, Lucas R.; Buffo, Jacob J.

    2015-11-01

    Titan's thick atmosphere contains a 1.5 - 5.7% methane mole fraction. Methane's possession of fundamental, overtone, and combination bands across much of the near and mid IR results in significant absorption in the atmosphere across this spectral region. The consequence is spectral windowing, such that Titan's surface can only be observed at a handful of methane transmission windows. The narrow width of these windows for observations from the top of the atmosphere (ToA) make only multispectral imaging of the surface possible. This limits the information that can be gleaned about the surface composition, which remains largely unknown. From ToA, there is effectively zero transmission at most wavelengths between the windows, so that improvements to the detectors or telescopes of IR spectrometers aboard orbital or flyby missions would not result in any appreciable widening of the windows. Only decreasing the methane column through which observations are made, with a future mission operating near or on the surface, would result in any widening of the windows. We present a new line-by-line radiative transfer model to quantify the window widths for an IR spectrometer aboard an aerial or surface mission to Titan. We take spectral line parameters from the HITRAN database (Rothmann et al. 2013) for methane and six trace gases, include N2-N2 and N2-H2 collision-induced absorptions as measured by McKellar 1989, and the haze extinction measured in situ by Huygens DISR. The number of vertical layers in the model is chosen to correspond with the high cadence of measurements of the physical conditions of Titan's atmosphere by Huygens HASI. We find that the transmission windows do not widen appreciably for an aerial mission operating at altitudes on the order of kilometers above the surface. For surface missions observing at distances of order 10 m, the windows widen considerably to encompass regions where absorptions from hydrated minerals, sulfates, and pentane and higher order

  7. Characterization of Ultra-fine Grained and Nanocrystalline Materials Using Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Proust, Gwénaëlle; Trimby, Patrick; Piazolo, Sandra; Retraint, Delphine

    2017-04-01

    One of the challenges in microstructure analysis nowadays resides in the reliable and accurate characterization of ultra-fine grained (UFG) and nanocrystalline materials. The traditional techniques associated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), such as electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), do not possess the required spatial resolution due to the large interaction volume between the electrons from the beam and the atoms of the material. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has the required spatial resolution. However, due to a lack of automation in the analysis system, the rate of data acquisition is slow which limits the area of the specimen that can be characterized. This paper presents a new characterization technique, Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD), which enables the analysis of the microstructure of UFG and nanocrystalline materials using an SEM equipped with a standard EBSD system. The spatial resolution of this technique can reach 2 nm. This technique can be applied to a large range of materials that would be difficult to analyze using traditional EBSD. After presenting the experimental set up and describing the different steps necessary to realize a TKD analysis, examples of its use on metal alloys and minerals are shown to illustrate the resolution of the technique and its flexibility in term of material to be characterized.

  8. Characterization of Ultra-fine Grained and Nanocrystalline Materials Using Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Proust, Gwénaëlle; Trimby, Patrick; Piazolo, Sandra; Retraint, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    One of the challenges in microstructure analysis nowadays resides in the reliable and accurate characterization of ultra-fine grained (UFG) and nanocrystalline materials. The traditional techniques associated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), such as electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), do not possess the required spatial resolution due to the large interaction volume between the electrons from the beam and the atoms of the material. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has the required spatial resolution. However, due to a lack of automation in the analysis system, the rate of data acquisition is slow which limits the area of the specimen that can be characterized. This paper presents a new characterization technique, Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD), which enables the analysis of the microstructure of UFG and nanocrystalline materials using an SEM equipped with a standard EBSD system. The spatial resolution of this technique can reach 2 nm. This technique can be applied to a large range of materials that would be difficult to analyze using traditional EBSD. After presenting the experimental set up and describing the different steps necessary to realize a TKD analysis, examples of its use on metal alloys and minerals are shown to illustrate the resolution of the technique and its flexibility in term of material to be characterized. PMID:28447998

  9. Comprehensive Study of Hydrated IDPs: X-Ray Diffraction, IR Spectroscopy and Electron Microscopic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, K.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Nozaki, W.; Tomeoka, K.

    2003-01-01

    Chondritic hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) comprise up to 50% of all IDPs collected in the stratosphere(1). Although much is known about the mineralogy, chemistry and carbon abundance of hydrated IDPs (2-4) controversies still exist regarding their formation, history, and relationship to other primitive solar system materials. Hydrated IDPs are generally believed to be derived from asteroidal sources that have undergone some degree of aqueous alteration. However, the high C contents of hydrated IDPs (by 2 to 6X CI levels (3,4) indicate that they are probably not derived from the same parent bodies sampled by the known chondritic meteorites. We report the comprehensive study of individual hydrated IDPs. The strong depletion in Ca (I) has been used as a diagnostic feature of hydrated IDPs. The particles are embedded in elemental sulfur or low viscosity epoxy and ultramicrotomed thin sections are observed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray detector (EDX) followed by other measurements including: 1) FTIR microspectroscopy to understand the significant constraints on the organic functionality and the nature of the C-bearing phases and 2) powder X-ray difiaction using a synchrotron X-ray source to understand the bulk mineralogy of the particles.

  10. Comprehensive Study of Hydrated IDPs: X-Ray Diffraction, IR Spectroscopy and Electron Microscopic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, K.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Nozaki, W.; Tomeoka, K.

    2003-01-01

    Chondritic hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) comprise up to 50% of all IDPs collected in the stratosphere(1). Although much is known about the mineralogy, chemistry and carbon abundance of hydrated IDPs (2-4) controversies still exist regarding their formation, history, and relationship to other primitive solar system materials. Hydrated IDPs are generally believed to be derived from asteroidal sources that have undergone some degree of aqueous alteration. However, the high C contents of hydrated IDPs (by 2 to 6X CI levels (3,4) indicate that they are probably not derived from the same parent bodies sampled by the known chondritic meteorites. We report the comprehensive study of individual hydrated IDPs. The strong depletion in Ca (I) has been used as a diagnostic feature of hydrated IDPs. The particles are embedded in elemental sulfur or low viscosity epoxy and ultramicrotomed thin sections are observed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray detector (EDX) followed by other measurements including: 1) FTIR microspectroscopy to understand the significant constraints on the organic functionality and the nature of the C-bearing phases and 2) powder X-ray difiaction using a synchrotron X-ray source to understand the bulk mineralogy of the particles.

  11. Effect of microscope parameter and specimen thickness of spatial resolution of transmission electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Z; Kong, M G; Liu, Z W; Lin, C C; Zeng, Y

    2016-10-01

    The spatial resolution of transmission electron backscatter diffraction (t-EBSD) with a standard conventional EBSD detector was evaluated quantitatively based on the calculation of the correlation coefficient of transmission patterns which were acquired across a twin boundary in the sample of austenitic steel. The results showed that the resolution of t-EBSD improved from tens of nanometres to below 10 nm with increasing accelerating voltage and thinning of specimen thickness. High voltage could enhance the penetration depth and reduce the scattering angle. And the thinning of specimen thickness would result in decreasing of the scattering events according to the theory of thermal diffuse scattering (TDS). In addition, the transmission patterns were found to be weak and noisy if the specimen was too thin, because of the decreasing intensity detected by the screen. Consequently, in this work, the best spatial resolution of 7 nm was achieved at 30 kV and 41 nm thickness. Moreover, the specimen thickness range was also discussed using Monte-Carlo simulation. This approach was helpful to account for the differences of measured spatial resolutions, by t-EBSD, of lamellas with different thickness. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  12. Diffraction grating transmission efficiencies for XUV and soft X rays. [for HEAO-B extrasolar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnopper, H. W.; Van Speybroeck, L. P.; Delvaille, J. P.; Epstein, A.; Kaellne, E.; Bachrach, R. Z.; Dijkstra, J.; Lantward, L.

    1977-01-01

    The manufacture and properties of a grating intended for extrasolar X-ray studies are described. The manufacturing process uses a split laser beam exposing an interference pattern on the photoresist-coated glass plated with a nickel parting layer. The grating, supporting structure, and mounting frame are electrodeposited on the nickel parting layer, and the final product is lifted from the glass substrate by selective etching of the nickel. A model was derived which relates the number of counts received in a given order m as a function of photon wavenumber. A 4-deg beam line was used to measure the efficiencies of gold transmission gratings for diffraction of X-rays in the range of 45 to 275 eV. The experimental results are in good agreement with model calculations.

  13. Diffraction grating transmission efficiencies for XUV and soft X rays. [for HEAO-B extrasolar astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnopper, H. W.; Van Speybroeck, L. P.; Delvaille, J. P.; Epstein, A.; Kaellne, E.; Bachrach, R. Z.; Dijkstra, J.; Lantward, L.

    1977-01-01

    The manufacture and properties of a grating intended for extrasolar X-ray studies are described. The manufacturing process uses a split laser beam exposing an interference pattern on the photoresist-coated glass plated with a nickel parting layer. The grating, supporting structure, and mounting frame are electrodeposited on the nickel parting layer, and the final product is lifted from the glass substrate by selective etching of the nickel. A model was derived which relates the number of counts received in a given order m as a function of photon wavenumber. A 4-deg beam line was used to measure the efficiencies of gold transmission gratings for diffraction of X-rays in the range of 45 to 275 eV. The experimental results are in good agreement with model calculations.

  14. In Operando X-ray diffraction and transmission X-ray microscopy of lithium sulfur batteries.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Johanna; Misra, Sumohan; Yang, Yuan; Jackson, Ariel; Liu, Yijin; Wang, Hailiang; Dai, Hongjie; Andrews, Joy C; Cui, Yi; Toney, Michael F

    2012-04-11

    Rechargeable lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries hold great potential for high-performance energy storage systems because they have a high theoretical specific energy, low cost, and are eco-friendly. However, the structural and morphological changes during electrochemical reactions are still not well understood. In this Article, these changes in Li-S batteries are studied in operando by X-ray diffraction and transmission X-ray microscopy. We show recrystallization of sulfur by the end of the charge cycle is dependent on the preparation technique of the sulfur cathode. On the other hand, it was found that crystalline Li(2)S does not form at the end of discharge for all sulfur cathodes studied. Furthermore, during cycling the bulk of soluble polysulfides remains trapped within the cathode matrix. Our results differ from previous ex situ results. This highlights the importance of in operando studies and suggests possible strategies to improve cycle life.

  15. Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Analysis of an Austenitic Stainless Steel Subjected to Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment and Plasma Nitriding.

    PubMed

    Proust, Gwénaëlle; Retraint, Delphine; Chemkhi, Mahdi; Roos, Arjen; Demangel, Clemence

    2015-08-01

    Austenitic 316L stainless steel can be used for orthopedic implants due to its biocompatibility and high corrosion resistance. Its range of applications in this field could be broadened by improving its wear and friction properties. Surface properties can be modified through surface hardening treatments. The effects of such treatments on the microstructure of the alloy were investigated here. Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment (SMAT) is a surface treatment that enhances mechanical properties of the material surface by creating a thin nanocrystalline layer. After SMAT, some specimens underwent a plasma nitriding process to further enhance their surface properties. Using electron backscatter diffraction, transmission Kikuchi diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, the microstructural evolution of the stainless steel after these different surface treatments was characterized. Microstructural features investigated include thickness of the nanocrystalline layer, size of the grains within the nanocrystalline layer, and depth of diffusion of nitrogen atoms within the material.

  16. Unusual thermal expansion of Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4}: A variable temperature synchrotron X-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjbar, Ben; Kennedy, Brendan J.

    2015-12-15

    The structure of Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} has been studied between 20 and 1273 K using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} undergoes an apparently continuous transition from I4{sub 1}/acd to I4/mmm near 1123 K. The cooperative tilting of the corner sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra in I4{sub 1}/acd results in highly anisotropic and unusual thermal expansion behavior with negative thermal expansion along the c-axis. - Graphical abstract: The progressive reduction in the magnitude of the tilting of the corner sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra in Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} results in negative thermal expansion along the c-axis before undergoing an apparently continuous transition from I4{sub 1}/acd to I4/mmm near 1123 K. - Highlights: • Thermal expansion of Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} was studied using Synchrotron-XRD. • Unusual negative thermal expansion along c-axis observed. • I4{sub 1}/acd→I4/mmm phase transition detected near 1120 K. • Tilting of the corner sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra related to the observed NTE.

  17. Multimodal Spectral Imaging of Cells Using a Transmission Diffraction Grating on a Light Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Isailovic, Dragan; Xu, Yang; Copus, Tyler; Saraswat, Suraj; Nauli, Surya M.

    2011-01-01

    A multimodal methodology for spectral imaging of cells is presented. The spectral imaging setup uses a transmission diffraction grating on a light microscope to concurrently record spectral images of cells and cellular organelles by fluorescence, darkfield, brightfield, and differential interference contrast (DIC) spectral microscopy. Initially, the setup was applied for fluorescence spectral imaging of yeast and mammalian cells labeled with multiple fluorophores. Fluorescence signals originating from fluorescently labeled biomolecules in cells were collected through triple or single filter cubes, separated by the grating, and imaged using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Cellular components such as nuclei, cytoskeleton, and mitochondria were spatially separated by the fluorescence spectra of the fluorophores present in them, providing detailed multi-colored spectral images of cells. Additionally, the grating-based spectral microscope enabled measurement of scattering and absorption spectra of unlabeled cells and stained tissue sections using darkfield and brightfield or DIC spectral microscopy, respectively. The presented spectral imaging methodology provides a readily affordable approach for multimodal spectral characterization of biological cells and other specimens. PMID:21639978

  18. Nanostructure characterisation of flow-formed Cr-Mo-V steel using transmission Kikuchi diffraction technique.

    PubMed

    Birosca, S; Ding, R; Ooi, S; Buckingham, R; Coleman, C; Dicks, K

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays flow-forming has become a desired near net shape manufacturing method as it provides excellent mechanical properties with improved surface finish and significant manufacturing cost reduction. However, the material is subjected to excessive plastic deformation during flow-forming process, generating a very fine and complex microstructure. In addition, the intense dislocation density and residual stress that is generated in the component during processing makes the microstructure characterisation using conventional micro-analytical tools challenging. Thus, the microstructure/property relationship study in such a material is rather difficult. In the present study a flow-formed Cr-Mo-V steel nanostructure and crystallographic texture were characterised by means of Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD). Here, TKD is shown to be a powerful technique in revealing very fine martensite laths within an austenite matrix. Moreover, fine precipitates in the order of 20-70 nm on the martensite lath boundaries were clearly imaged and characterised. This greatly assisted in understanding the preferable site formation of the carbides in such a complex microstructure. The results showed that the actual TKD spatial resolution was in the range of 5-10 nm using 25 kV for flow-formed Cr-Mo-V steel.

  19. Coupling Automated Electron Backscatter Diffraction with Transmission Electron and Atomic Force Microscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A.J.; Kumar, M.; Bedrossian, P.J.; King, W.E.

    2000-01-26

    Grain boundary network engineering is an emerging field that encompasses the concept that modifications to conventional thermomechanical processing can result in improved properties through the disruption of the random grain boundary network. Various researchers have reported a correlation between the grain boundary character distribution (defined as the fractions of special and random grain boundaries) and dramatic improvements in properties such as corrosion and stress corrosion cracking, creep, etc. While much early work in the field emphasized property improvements, the opportunity now exists to elucidate the underlying materials science of grain boundary network engineering. Recent investigations at LLNL have coupled automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to elucidate these fundamental mechanisms. This investigation provides evidence that grain boundary network engineering and the formation of annealing twins disrupt the connectivity of the random grain boundary network and is likely responsible for the experimentally observed improvement in properties. This work illustrates that coupling of automated EBSD with other microstructural probes such as TEM and AFM provides data of greater value than any single technique in isolation. The coupled techniques have been applied to aid in understanding the underlying mechanisms of grain boundary network engineering and the corrosion properties of individual boundaries.

  20. On the optimum resolution of transmission-electron backscattered diffraction (t-EBSD).

    PubMed

    van Bremen, R; Ribas Gomes, D; de Jeer, L T H; Ocelík, V; De Hosson, J Th M

    2016-01-01

    The work presented aims at determining the optimum physical resolution of the transmission-electron backscattered diffraction (t-EBSD) technique. The resolution depends critically on intrinsic factors such as the density, atomic number and thickness of the specimen but also on the extrinsic experimental set-up of the electron beam voltage, specimen tilt and detector position. In the present study, the so-called physical resolution of a typical t-EBSD set-up was determined with the use of Monte Carlo simulations and confronted to experimental findings. In the case of a thin Au film of 20 nm, the best resolution obtained was 9 nm whereas for a 100 nm Au film the best resolution was 66 nm. The precise dependence of resolution on thickness was found to vary differently depending on the specific elements involved. This means that the resolution of each specimen should be determined individually. Experimentally the median probe size of the t-EBSD for a 140 nm thick AuAg specimen was measured to be 87 nm. The first and third quartiles of the probe size measurements were found to be 60 nm and 118 nm. Simulation of this specimen resulted in a resolution of 94 nm which fits between these quartiles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. New neutron diffraction results on magnetic properties of the cubic rare earth compounds HoP and PrX2 (X=Ru, Rh, Ir, Pt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.; Hälg, W.; Kaldis, E.; Greidanus, F. J. A. M.; Buschow, K. H. J.

    1982-09-01

    Neutron diffraction studies performed on polycrystalline, NaCl type HoP in external magnetic fields yield <100> as easy directions of magnetization in the ferromagnetic state. The magnetic ordering of the MgCu2 type Laves phase systems PrX2 (X=Ru, Rh, Ir, Pt) was investigated on powdered samples by means of neutron diffraction. Simple ferromagnetic structures were observed. The determined Curie temperatures confirm bulk measurements, and the values of the ordered magnetic moments indicate crystal field effects.

  2. Order-disorder transition in Sr/sub 2/IrD/sub 5/: evidence for square pyramidal IrD/sub 5/ units from powder neutron diffraction data

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, J.; Hastings, J.M.; Corliss, L.M.; Bau, R.; Wei, C.Y.; Moyer, R.O. Jr.

    1981-12-01

    Neutron diffraction data have been collected on a powdered sample of Sr/sub 2/IrD/sub 6/ over a range of temperatures. The compound, which is cubic at room temperature, has been found to exhibit a gradual transformation to a tetragonal phase in the temperature range 200 to 140 K. As a result of the transition, deuterium atoms which randomly occupy sixfold positions in the cubic phase, become tetragonally ordered. A small fraction of the cubic phase remained untransformed at 4.2 K. Both the cubic and tetragonal structures are consistent with square pyramidal IrD/sub 5/ units with average Ir-D distances of 1.714 and 1.718 A, respectively. Agreement factors, R/sub 1/, for the two structural analyses are 3.44 and 4.94%.

  3. Elimination of X-Ray Diffraction through Stimulated X-Ray Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, B.; Wang, T.; Graves, C. E.; Zhu, D.; Schlotter, W. F.; Turner, J. J.; Hellwig, O.; Chen, Z.; Dürr, H. A.; Scherz, A.; Stöhr, J.

    2016-07-01

    X-ray diffractive imaging with laterally coherent x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses is increasingly utilized to obtain ultrafast snapshots of matter. Here we report the amazing disappearance of single-shot charge and magnetic diffraction patterns recorded with resonantly tuned, narrow bandwidth XFEL pulses. Our experimental results reveal the exquisite sensitivity of single-shot charge and magnetic diffraction patterns of a magnetic film to the onset of field-induced stimulated elastic x-ray forward scattering. The loss in diffraction contrast, measured over 3 orders of magnitude in intensity, is in remarkable quantitative agreement with a recent theory that is extended to include diffraction.

  4. Beyond the diffraction limit of optical/IR interferometers. I. Angular diameter and rotation parameters of Achernar from differential phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domiciano de Souza, A.; Hadjara, M.; Vakili, F.; Bendjoya, P.; Millour, F.; Abe, L.; Carciofi, A. C.; Faes, D. M.; Kervella, P.; Lagarde, S.; Marconi, A.; Monin, J.-L.; Niccolini, G.; Petrov, R. G.; Weigelt, G.

    2012-09-01

    Context. Spectrally resolved long-baseline optical/IR interferometry of rotating stars opens perspectives to investigate their fundamental parameters and the physical mechanisms that govern their interior, photosphere, and circumstellar envelope structures. Aims: Based on the signatures of stellar rotation on observed interferometric wavelength-differential phases, we aim to measure angular diameters, rotation velocities, and orientation of stellar rotation axes. Methods: We used the AMBER focal instrument at ESO-VLTI in its high-spectral resolution mode to record interferometric data on the fast rotator Achernar. Differential phases centered on the hydrogen Br γ line (K band) were obtained during four almost consecutive nights with a continuous Earth-rotation synthesis during ~5 h/night, corresponding to ~60° position angle coverage per baseline. These observations were interpreted with our numerical code dedicated to long-baseline interferometry of rotating stars. Results: By fitting our model to Achernar's differential phases from AMBER, we could measure its equatorial radius Req = 11.6 ± 0.3 R⊙, equatorial rotation velocity Veq = 298 ± 9 km s-1, rotation axis inclination angle i = 101.5 ± 5.2°, and rotation axis position angle (from North to East) PArot = 34.9 ± 1.6°. From these parameters and the stellar distance, the equatorial angular diameter ⌀eq of Achernar is found to be 2.45 ± 0.09 mas, which is compatible with previous values derived from the commonly used visibility amplitude. In particular, ⌀eq and PArot measured in this work with VLTI/AMBER are compatible with the values previously obtained with VLTI/VINCI. Conclusions: The present paper, based on real data, demonstrates the super-resolution potential of differential interferometry for measuring sizes, rotation velocities, and orientation of rotating stars in cases where visibility amplitudes are unavailable and/or when the star is partially or poorly resolved. In particular, we showed

  5. External-Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser Spectroscopy for Mid-IR Transmission Measurements of Proteins in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Alcaráz, Mirta R; Schwaighofer, Andreas; Kristament, Christian; Ramer, Georg; Brandstetter, Markus; Goicoechea, Héctor; Lendl, Bernhard

    2015-07-07

    In this work, we report mid-IR transmission measurements of the protein amide I band in aqueous solution at large optical paths. A tunable external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) operated in pulsed mode at room temperature allowed one to apply a path length of up to 38 μm, which is four times larger than that applicable with conventional FT-IR spectrometers. To minimize temperature-induced variations caused by background absorption of the ν2-vibration of water (HOH-bending) overlapping with the amide I region, a highly stable temperature control unit with relative temperature stability within 0.005 °C was developed. An advanced data processing protocol was established to overcome fluctuations in the fine structure of the emission curve that are inherent to the employed EC-QCL due to its mechanical instabilities. To allow for wavenumber accuracy, a spectral calibration method has been elaborated to reference the acquired IR spectra to the absolute positions of the water vapor absorption bands. Employing this setup, characteristic spectral features of five well-studied proteins exhibiting different secondary structures could be measured at concentrations as low as 2.5 mg mL(-1). This concentration range could previously only be accessed by IR measurements in D2O. Mathematical evaluation of the spectral overlap and comparison of second derivative spectra confirm excellent agreement of the QCL transmission measurements with protein spectra acquired by FT-IR spectroscopy. This proves the potential of the applied setup to monitor secondary structure changes of proteins in aqueous solution at extended optical path lengths, which allow experiments in flow through configuration.

  6. Diffraction of 0.5 keV electrons from free-standing transmission gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMorran, Ben; Perreault, John; Savas, Tim; Cronin, Alex

    2006-05-01

    A nanostructured grating was used to diffract a low-energy (500 eV) electron beam, and the current transmitted into the zeroth diffraction order was greater than 5% of the incident beam current. This diffraction efficiency indicates that the 55-nm-wide grating bars absorb electrons but the 45-nm-wide slots between bars transmit electron de Broglie waves coherently. The diffraction patterns can be asymmetric, and can be explained by a model that incorporates an electrostatic potential energy for electrons within 20 nm of the grating structure calculated by the method of images.

  7. Precession electron diffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy: phase, orientation and strain mapping at the nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, T. G.

    2015-12-01

    Precession electron diffraction is a technique used in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to collect electron diffraction patterns while precessing the beam in a cone around the optic axis of the microscope. Electrons are strongly scattered by matter, resulting in dynamical diffraction effects and complex intensity distributions. Precession diffraction produces patterns that are nearly kinematical and lack the complicated intensity distributions of dynamical scattering. These patterns are readily indexed by computer, which allows for the structural characterization of the sample at each pixel. This technique is analogous to electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), but with higher spatial resolution. Like EBSD, precession diffraction is used to make phase and orientation maps in polycrystalline aggregates and deformed crystals. The technique also provides quantitative strain mapping at the nanometer scale for characterization of defects and coherent interfaces. This technique is especially useful for characterizing nano-scale intergrowths that are produced in high-pressure experiments and in naturally shocked samples. We are using this technique on our aberration corrects JEOL ARM200F STEM. Examples of experimentally and naturally transformed olivine will be presented.

  8. High temperature Ir segregation in Ir-B ceramics: Effect of oxygen presence on stability of IrB2 and other Ir-B phases

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Zhilin; Terracciano, Anthony C.; Cullen, David A.; ...

    2015-05-13

    The formation of IrB2, IrB1.35, IrB1.1 and IrB monoboride phases in the Ir–B ceramic nanopowder was confirmed during mechanochemical reaction between metallic Ir and elemental B powders. The Ir–B phases were analysed after 90 h of high energy ball milling and after annealing of the powder for 72 h at 1050°C in vacuo. The iridium monoboride (IrB) orthorhombic phase was synthesised experimentally for the first time and identified by powder X-ray diffraction. Additionally, the ReB2 type IrB2 hexagonal phase was also produced for the first time and identified by high resolution transmission electron microscope. Ir segregation along disordered domains ofmore » the boron lattice was found to occur during high temperature annealing. Furthermore, these nanodomains may have useful catalytic properties.« less

  9. Near diffraction-limited performance of an OPA pumped acetylene-filled hollow-core fiber laser in the mid-IR.

    PubMed

    Dadashzadeh, Neda; Thirugnanasambandam, Manasadevi P; Weerasinghe, H W Kushan; Debord, Benoit; Chafer, Matthieu; Gerome, Frederic; Benabid, Fetah; Washburn, Brian R; Corwin, Kristan L

    2017-06-12

    We investigate the mid-IR laser beam characteristics from an acetylene-filled hollow-core optical fiber gas laser (HOFGLAS) system. The laser exhibits near-diffraction limited beam quality in the 3 μm region with M(2) = 1.15 ± 0.02 measured at high pulse energy, and the highest mid-IR pulse energy from a HOFGLAS system of 1.4 μJ is reported. Furthermore, the effects of output saturation with pump pulse energy are reduced through the use of longer fibers with low loss. Finally, the slope efficiency is shown to be nearly independent of gas pressure over a wide range, which is encouraging for further output power increase.

  10. Modification of nanostructured fused silica for use as superhydrophobic, IR-transmissive, anti-reflective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Darryl A.; Frantz, Jesse A.; Bayya, Shyam S.; Busse, Lynda E.; Kim, Woohong; Aggarwal, Ishwar; Poutous, Menelaos; Sanghera, Jasbinder S.

    2016-04-01

    In order to mimic and enhance the properties of moth eye-like materials, nanopatterned fused silica was chemically modified to produce self-cleaning substrates that have anti-reflective and infrared transmissive properties. The characteristics of these substrates were evaluated before and after chemical modification. Furthermore, their properties were compared to fused silica that was devoid of surface features. The chemical modification imparted superhydrophobic character to the substrates, as demonstrated by the average water contact angles which exceeded 170°. Finally, optical analysis of the substrates revealed that the infrared transmission capabilities of the fused silica substrates (nanopatterned to have moth eye on one side) were superior to those of the regular fused silica substrates within the visible and near-infrared region of the light spectrum, with transmission values of 95% versus 92%, respectively. The superior transmission properties of the fused silica moth eye were virtually unchanged following chemical modification.

  11. Current and Emerging Materials for 3-5 Micron IR Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentilman, Richard L.

    1986-12-01

    New, more durable windows and domes will be required for future 3-5 micron IR systems. Various oxide and oxynitride crystalline materials are candidates for these new requirements, including sapphire, spinel, ALON, yttria, and MgO. These materials are compared with respect to optical properties, durability, and fabrication costs. Two extrinsic properties, thermal conductivity and fracture strength, have strong effects on thermal shock resistance. Birefringent polycrystalline materials will not have adequate optical resolution for future systems.

  12. Applications of Fresnel diffraction from the edge of a transparent plate in transmission.

    PubMed

    Tavassoly, M Taghi; Hosseini, Seyed Roohollah; Fard, Ali Motazedi; Naraghi, Roxana Rezvani

    2012-10-20

    When a transparent plane-parallel plate is illuminated at the edge region by a quasi-monochromatic parallel beam of light, diffraction fringes appear on a plane perpendicular to the transmitted beam direction. The sharp change in the refractive index at the plate boundary imposes an abrupt change on the phase of the illuminating beam that leads to the Fresnel diffraction. The visibility of the diffraction fringes depends on the plate thickness, refractive index, light wavelength, and angle of incidence. In this report we show that, by recording the visibility repetition versus incident angle, one can measure the plate refractive index, its thickness, and light wavelength very accurately. It is also shown that the technique is indispensable for specifying color dispersion in plate shape samples. The technique is applied to the measurement of dispersion in a fused silica plate and the refractive indices of soda lime slides.

  13. Comparison of diffractive and refractive effects in two-wavelength adaptive transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, E. P.

    1984-07-01

    Holmes and Rao (1983) have analyzed the performance of an adaptive optical system in which the optical path differences caused by atmospheric turbulence are measured at one wavelength and used to compensate an outgoing laser beam of another wavelength. The wavelength dependence of diffraction led to imperfect correction. Earlier, Wallner (1976) had shown that the wavelength dependence of the index of refraction of air also leads to imperfect correction for beams that are not directed vertically. The refractive and diffractive effects are presently compared, and it is shown that either may be more important, depending on the geometry in question and the wavelengths used.

  14. Toward the diffraction limit with transmissive x-ray lenses in astronomy.

    PubMed

    Braig, Christoph; Predehl, Peter

    2012-07-10

    We develop an analytical approach to refractive, blazed diffractive, and achromatic x-ray lenses of scalable dimensions for energies from 1 to 20 keV. Based on the parabolic wave equation, their wideband imaging properties are compared and optimized for a given spectral range. Low-Z lens materials for massive cores and rugged alternatives, such as polycarbonate or Si for flat Fresnel components, are investigated with respect to their suitability for diffraction-limited high-energy astronomy. Properly designed "hybrid" combinations can serve as an approach to x-ray telescopes with an enhanced efficiency throughout the whole considered band, nearly regardless of their inherent absorption.

  15. Calculated efficiencies of three-material low stress coatings for diffractive x-ray transmission optics

    SciTech Connect

    Kubec, Adam Braun, Stefan; Gawlitza, Peter; Menzel, Maik; Leson, Andreas

    2016-07-27

    Diffractive X-ray optical elements made by thin film coating techniques such as multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) and multilayer zone plates (MZP) are promising approaches to achieve resolutions in hard X-ray microscopy applications of less than 10 nm. The challenge is to make a lens with a large numerical aperture on the one hand and a decent working distance on the other hand. One of the limiting factors with the coated structures is the internal stress in the films, which can lead to significant bending of the substrate and various types of unwanted diffraction effects. Several approaches have been discussed to overcome this challenge. One of these is a three-material combination such as Mo/MoSi{sub 2}/Si, where four single layers per period are deposited. Mo and Si represent the absorber and spacer in this case while MoSi{sub 2} forms a diffusion barrier; in addition the thicknesses of absorber and spacer are chosen to minimize residual stress of the overall coating. Here the diffraction efficiency as well as the profile of the beam in the focal plane are discussed in order to find a tradeoff between lowest residual stress and best diffraction properties.

  16. Nonlinear absorption and transmission properties of Ge, Te and InAs using tuneable IR FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Amirmadhi, F.; Becker, K.; Brau, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Nonlinear absorption properties of Ge, Te and InAs are being investigated using the transmission of FEL optical pulses through these semiconductors (z-scan method). Wavelength, intensity and macropulse dependence are used to differentiate between two-photon and free-carrier absorption properties of these materials. Macropulse dependence is resolved by using a Pockles Cell to chop the 4-{mu}s macropulse down to 100 ns. Results of these experiments will be presented and discussed.

  17. Analytical theory of extraordinary transmission through metallic diffraction screens perforated by small holes.

    PubMed

    Marqués, R; Mesa, F; Jelinek, L; Medina, F

    2009-03-30

    In this letter, the problem of extraordinary (ET) transmission of electromagnetic waves through opaque screens perforated with subwave-length holes is addressed from an analytical point of view. Our purpose was to find a closed-form expression for the transmission coefficient in a simple case in order to explore and clarify, as much as possible, the physical background of the phenomenon. The solution of this canonical example, apart from matching quite well with numerical simulations given by commercial solvers, has provided new insight in extraordinary transmission as well as Wood's anomaly. Thus, our analysis has revealed that one of the key factors behind ET is the continuous increase of excess electric energy around the holes as the frequency approaches the onset of some of the higher-order modes associated with the periodicity of the screen. The same analysis also helps to clarify the role of surface modes -or spoof plasmons- in the onset of ET.

  18. Silver/polymer coated hollow glass waveguides for mid-IR transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Wesley; Harrington, James A.

    2017-02-01

    Hollow glass waveguides (HGWs) have been successfully employed in surgical lasers, temperature and chemical sensors, and other applications requiring transmission of broadband, high-power infrared radiation. The design ofHGWsallows for fine-tuning of the optical response through the deposition of high-quality thin films within the hollowcore. One method of fabricatingHGWs for effective transmission in the infrared is to deposit a reflective metallic layer of silver, and then one or several dielectric layers on top of the silver layer. The addition of appropriate dielectric, or highly transmissive, layers to the HGW has shown to improve throughput and fibers can be modified to transmit optimally at particular wavelengths by altering the types of dielectrics used as well as their individual thicknesses. Increasingly, research in dielectric thin films for HGWs has gravitated towards polymers due to their inertness, ease of deposition, and thickness of film adjusted with concentration of solution instead of deposition kinetics. Poly (methyl methacrylate), polyethylene, and Chemours™ Teflon™ AF are three polymers previously untested as dielectric films in hollow waveguides in the mid-infrared. This work aims to assess the feasibility of these polymers as viable dielectric films in dichroic and multilayer thin-film stack waveguide applications. The three polymers were implemented as HGW dielectric thin films, and the resulting waveguides' straight and bending losses were measured at CO2 (λ= 10.6 μm) and Er:YAG (λ= 2.94μm) laser wavelengths.

  19. The Complete Transmission Spectrum Of An Exoplanet From UV To IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pont, Frederic

    2011-09-01

    Transmission spectroscopy of transiting planets is one tool to obtain atmospheric spectra of planets outside the solar system. Using four different instruments on the HST - STIS, ACS, NICMOS and WF3 - we combined wide-band and narrow-band spectrophotometry over dozens of HST orbits to piece together the complete transmission spectrum of the hot Jupiter prototype HD 189733b. These observations paint a very different picture of the atmosphere of this planet than predicted by the models. The transmission spectrum is dominated by Rayleigh scattering over the whole visible and near-infrared range, with narrow sodium and potassium lines, and excess absorption in the UV. This is interpreted as indicating an atmosphere dominated by haze over at least six scale heights, with residual alkali metal absorption above the haze, and possible opacity from photochemical products in the UV. Altogether the atmosphere of HD 189733b seems to be more dominated by hazes or/and clouds than expected for hot Jupiters, not unlike Solar System planets like Venus or Titan. The only other well-studied case, the planet HD 209458b, has a transparent, absorbing atmosphere, suggesting the existence of at least two families of hot gas giant planet atmospheres.

  20. The complete transmission spectrum of an exoplanet from UV to IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pont, F.; Sing, D.; Huitson, C.; Gibson, N.; Gilliland, R.; Knutson, H.; Charbonneau, D.; Desert, J.-M.

    2011-10-01

    Transmission spectroscopy of transiting planets is one tool to obtain atmospheric spectra of planets outside the solar system. Using four different instruments on the HST - STIS, ACS, NICMOS and WF3 - we combined wide-band and narrow-band spectrophotometry over dozens of HST orbits to piece together the complete transmission spectrum of the hot Jupiter prototype HD 189733b. These observations paint a very different picture of the atmosphere of this planet than predicted by the models. The transmission spectrum is dominated by Rayleigh scattering over the whole visible and nearinfrared range, with narrow sodium and potassium lines, and excess absorption in the UV. This is interpreted as indicating an atmosphere dominated by haze over at least six scale heights, with residual alkali metal absorption above the haze, and possible opacity from photochemical products in the UV. Altogether the atmosphere of HD 189733b seems to be more dominated by hazes or/and clouds than expected for hot Jupiters, not unlike Solar System planets like Venus or Titan. The only other well-studied case, the planet HD 209458b, has a transparent, absorbing atmosphere, suggesting the existence of at least two families of hot gas giant planet atmospheres.

  1. Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction in Transmission Mode for Mapping Crystal Grain Structures.

    PubMed

    Cereser, Alberto; Strobl, Markus; Hall, Stephen A; Steuwer, Axel; Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Tremsin, Anton S; Knudsen, Erik B; Shinohara, Takenao; Willendrup, Peter K; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos; Iyengar, Srinivasan; Larsen, Peter M; Hanashima, Takayasu; Moyoshi, Taketo; Kadletz, Peter M; Krooß, Philipp; Niendorf, Thomas; Sales, Morten; Schmahl, Wolfgang W; Schmidt, Søren

    2017-08-25

    The physical properties of polycrystalline materials depend on their microstructure, which is the nano- to centimeter scale arrangement of phases and defects in their interior. Such microstructure depends on the shape, crystallographic phase and orientation, and interfacing of the grains constituting the material. This article presents a new non-destructive 3D technique to study centimeter-sized bulk samples with a spatial resolution of hundred micrometers: time-of-flight three-dimensional neutron diffraction (ToF 3DND). Compared to existing analogous X-ray diffraction techniques, ToF 3DND enables studies of samples that can be both larger in size and made of heavier elements. Moreover, ToF 3DND facilitates the use of complicated sample environments. The basic ToF 3DND setup, utilizing an imaging detector with high spatial and temporal resolution, can easily be implemented at a time-of-flight neutron beamline. The technique was developed and tested with data collected at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Complex (J-PARC) for an iron sample. We successfully reconstructed the shape of 108 grains and developed an indexing procedure. The reconstruction algorithms have been validated by reconstructing two stacked Co-Ni-Ga single crystals, and by comparison with a grain map obtained by post-mortem electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD).

  2. IR laser power transmission through silver halide crystals and polycrystalline fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Nagli, L.; Burstein, D.; Shalem, S.; German, A.

    1997-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown (LIB) thresholds in AgC{sub x},Br{sub 1-x} crystals and fibers were studied under CO{sub 2} laser pulsed and CW excitation. The value of LIB threshold P{sub c} of the bulk crystals is about 7.2{center_dot}10{sup 8} W/cm{sup 2} for AgCl and 4{center_dot}10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2} for AgBr under 60 ns TEA laser excitation. The LIB threshold in fibers is much smaller; about 2{center_dot}10{sup 8} W/cm{sup 2}. The absorption of the crystals at 10.6 {mu}m changes from 8{center_dot}10{sup -5} cm{sup -1} for AgCl to 2{center_dot}10{sup -5 }cm{sup -1} for AgBr; for fibers with the same composition absorption is much greater (3{center_dot}10{sup -4 }cm{sup -1} for AgCl; 2{center_dot}10{sup -4} cm{sup -1} for AgBr). The dependence of the LIB and IR absorption on composition, and mechanical and temperature treatments suggests that the LIB in silver halide crystals and fibers is due to the avalanche electrons in a high electric field. The initial free electrons for this process are supplied by ionization of the cation vacancy - charged dislocation complexes. The relatively lower optical stability of the fibers is due to the increased concentration of defects formed in the hot extrusion of the crystal. A simple thermal annealing method for reduction of the IR absorption is proposed.

  3. Hubble space telescope near-ir transmission spectroscopy of the super-Earth HD 97658B

    SciTech Connect

    Knutson, Heather A.; Dragomir, Diana; Kreidberg, Laura; Bean, Jacob L.; Kempton, Eliza M.-R.; McCullough, P. R.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gillon, Michael; Homeier, Derek; Howard, Andrew W.

    2014-10-20

    Recent results from the Kepler mission indicate that super-Earths (planets with masses between 1-10 times that of the Earth) are the most common kind of planet around nearby Sun-like stars. These planets have no direct solar system analogue, and are currently one of the least well-understood classes of extrasolar planets. Many super-Earths have average densities that are consistent with a broad range of bulk compositions, including both water-dominated worlds and rocky planets covered by a thick hydrogen and helium atmosphere. Measurements of the transmission spectra of these planets offer the opportunity to resolve this degeneracy by directly constraining the scale heights and corresponding mean molecular weights of their atmospheres. We present Hubble Space Telescope near-infrared spectroscopy of two transits of the newly discovered transiting super-Earth HD 97658b. We use the Wide Field Camera 3's (WFC3) scanning mode to measure the wavelength-dependent transit depth in 30 individual bandpasses. Our averaged differential transmission spectrum has a median 1σ uncertainty of 23 ppm in individual bins, making this the most precise observation of an exoplanetary transmission spectrum obtained with WFC3 to date. Our data are inconsistent with a cloud-free solar metallicity atmosphere at the 10σ level. They are consistent at the 0.4σ level with a flat line model, as well as effectively flat models corresponding to a metal-rich atmosphere or a solar metallicity atmosphere with a cloud or haze layer located at pressures of 10 mbar or higher.

  4. Strain mapping at the nanoscale using precession electron diffraction in transmission electron microscope with off axis camera

    SciTech Connect

    Vigouroux, M. P.; Delaye, V.; Bernier, N.; Lafond, D.; Audoit, G.; Bertin, F.; Cipro, R.; Baron, T.; Martin, M.; Rouvière, J. L.; Chenevier, B.

    2014-11-10

    Precession electron diffraction is an efficient technique to measure strain in nanostructures by precessing the electron beam, while maintaining a few nanometre probe size. Here, we show that an advanced diffraction pattern treatment allows reproducible and precise strain measurements to be obtained using a default 512 × 512 DigiSTAR off-axis camera both in advanced or non-corrected transmission electron microscopes. This treatment consists in both projective geometry correction of diffraction pattern distortions and strain Delaunay triangulation based analysis. Precision in the strain measurement is improved and reached 2.7 × 10{sup −4} with a probe size approaching 4.2 nm in diameter. This method is applied to the study of the strain state in InGaAs quantum-well (QW) devices elaborated on Si substrate. Results show that the GaAs/Si mismatch does not induce in-plane strain fluctuations in the InGaAs QW region.

  5. High precision two-dimensional strain mapping in semiconductor devices using nanobeam electron diffraction in the transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Frieder H.

    2014-06-30

    A classical method used to characterize the strain in modern semiconductor devices is nanobeam diffraction (NBD) in the transmission electron microscope. One challenge for this method lies in the fact that the smaller the beam becomes, the more difficult it becomes to analyze the resulting diffraction spot pattern. We show that a carefully designed fitting algorithm enables us to reduce the sampling area for the diffraction patterns on the camera chip dramatically (∼1/16) compared to traditional settings without significant loss of precision. The resulting lower magnification of the spot pattern permits the presence of an annular dark field detector, which in turn makes the recording of images for drift correction during NBD acquisition possible. Thus, the reduced sampling size allows acquisition of drift corrected NBD 2D strain maps of up to 3000 pixels while maintaining a precision of better than 0.07%. As an example, we show NBD strain maps of a modern field effect transistor (FET) device. A special filtering feature used in the analysis makes it is possible to measure strain in silicon devices even in the presence of other crystalline materials covering the probed area, which is important for the characterization of the next generation of devices (Fin-FETs).

  6. Optical Determination of Lead Chrome Green in Green Tea by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Transmission Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoli; Xu, Kaiwen; Zhang, Yuying; Sun, Chanjun; He, Yong

    2017-01-01

    The potential of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) transmission spectroscopy for determination of lead chrome green in green tea was investigated based on chemometric methods. Firstly, the qualitative analysis of lead chrome green in tea was performed based on partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), and the correct rate of classification was 100%. And then, a hybrid method of interval partial least squares (iPLS) regression and successive projections algorithm (SPA) was proposed to select characteristic wavenumbers for the quantitative analysis of lead chrome green in green tea, and 19 wavenumbers were obtained finally. Among these wavenumbers, 1384 (C = C), 1456, 1438, 1419(C = N), and 1506 (CNH) cm-1 were the characteristic wavenumbers of lead chrome green. Then, these 19 wavenumbers were used to build determination models. The best model was achieved by least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM)algorithm with high coefficient of determination and low root-mean square error of prediction set (R2p = 0.864 and RMSEP = 0.291). All these results indicated the feasibility of IR spectra for detecting lead chrome green in green tea.

  7. Optical Determination of Lead Chrome Green in Green Tea by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Transmission Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoli; Xu, Kaiwen; Zhang, Yuying; Sun, Chanjun; He, Yong

    2017-01-01

    The potential of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) transmission spectroscopy for determination of lead chrome green in green tea was investigated based on chemometric methods. Firstly, the qualitative analysis of lead chrome green in tea was performed based on partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), and the correct rate of classification was 100%. And then, a hybrid method of interval partial least squares (iPLS) regression and successive projections algorithm (SPA) was proposed to select characteristic wavenumbers for the quantitative analysis of lead chrome green in green tea, and 19 wavenumbers were obtained finally. Among these wavenumbers, 1384 (C = C), 1456, 1438, 1419(C = N), and 1506 (CNH) cm-1 were the characteristic wavenumbers of lead chrome green. Then, these 19 wavenumbers were used to build determination models. The best model was achieved by least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM)algorithm with high coefficient of determination and low root-mean square error of prediction set (R2p = 0.864 and RMSEP = 0.291). All these results indicated the feasibility of IR spectra for detecting lead chrome green in green tea. PMID:28068348

  8. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies of the detonation soot of high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashkarov, A. O.; Pruuel, E. R.; Ten, K. A.; Rubtsov, I. A.; Gerasimov, E. Yu; Zubkov, P. I.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the results of electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction studies of the recovered carbonaceous residue (soot) from the detonation of some high explosives: TNT, a mixture of TNT and RDX (50/50), benzotrifuroxane, and triaminotrinitrobenzene. The use of the same experimental setup allowed a qualitative and quantitative comparison of the detonation products formed under similar conditions. The results clearly show differences in the morphology of graphite-like and diamond inclusions and in the quantitative content of nanodiamonds for the explosives used in this study.

  9. Turbine engine exhaust gas measurements using in-situ FT-IR emission/transmission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marran, David F.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Neira, Jorge; Markham, James R.; Rutka, Ronald; Strange, Richard R.

    2001-02-01

    12 An advanced multiple gas analyzer based on in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy has been used to successfully measure the exhaust plume composition and temperature of an operating gas turbine engine at a jet engine test stand. The sensor, which was optically coupled to the test cell using novel broadband hollow glass waveguides, performed well in this harsh environment (high acoustical noise and vibration, considerable temperature swings in the ambient with engine operation), providing quantitative gas phase information. Measurements were made through the diameter of the engine's one meter exhaust plume, about 0.7 meters downstream of the engine exit plane. The sensor performed near simultaneous infrared transmission and infrared emission measurements through the centerline of the plume. Automated analysis of the emission and transmission spectra provided the temperature and concentration information needed for engine tuning and control that will ensure optimal engine operation and reduced emissions. As a demonstration of the utility and accuracy of the technique, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, water, and carbon dioxide were quantified in spite of significant variations in the exhaust gas temperature. At some conditions, unburned fuel, particulates (soot/fuel droplets), methane, ethylene and aldehydes were identified, but not yet quantified.

  10. Magnetic properties of PrX 2 compounds (X = Pt, Rh, Ru, Ir) studied by hyperfine specific heat, magnetization and neutron-diffraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greidanus, F. J. A. M.; de Jongh, L. J.; Huiskamp, W. J.; Fischer, P.; Furrer, A.; Buschow, K. H. J.

    1983-04-01

    Magnetic ordering phenomena in rare-earth intermetallic compounds can be unravelled most advantageously in the case of simple crystallographic structure and when a combination of microscopic techniques is applied. Here we shall present the temperature and magnetic field dependence of the magnetic moment of the cubic PrX 2 compounds (X = Pt, Rh, Ru, Ir), as inferred from hyperfine specific-heat, magnetization and neutron-diffraction measurements. The results are compared with a mean-field calculation, taking crystalline electric field and bilinear (dipolar) exchange interactions into account. Adopting experimental values of the Lea, Leask and Wolf parameters x and W from inelastic neutron scattering results, we find satisfactory agreement between our magnetic data and the mean-field theory. An observed discrepancy of about 15% between the calculated and measured saturation values of the spontaneous magnetization can be explained by the presence of quadrupolar interactions.

  11. Molecular structure of actein: 13C CPMAS NMR, IR, X-ray diffraction studies and theoretical DFT-GIAO calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamróz, Marta K.; Bąk, Joanna; Gliński, Jan A.; Koczorowska, Agnieszka; Wawer, Iwona

    2009-09-01

    Actein is a prominent triterpene glycoside occurring in Actaea racemosa. The triterpene glycosides are believed to be responsible for the estrogenic activity of an extract prepared from this herb. We determined in the crystal structure of actein by X-ray crystallography to be monoclinic P2(1) chiral space group. Refining the disorder, we determined 70% and 30% of contributions of ( S)- and ( R)-actein, respectively. The IR and Raman spectra suggest that actein forms at least four different types of hydrogen bonds. The 13C NMR spectra of actein were recorded both in solution and solid state. The 13C CPMAS spectrum of actein displays multiplet signals, in agreement with the crystallographic data. The NMR shielding constants were calculated for actein using GIAO approach and a variety of basis sets: 6-31G**, 6-311G**, 6-31+G**, cc-pVDZ, cc-pVDZ-su1 and 6-31G**-su1, as well as IGLO approach combined with the IGLO II basis set. The best results (RMSD of 1.6 ppm and maximum error of 3.4 ppm) were obtained with the 6-31G**-su1 basis set. The calculations of the shielding constants are helpful in the interpretation of the 13C CPMAS NMR spectra of actein and actein's analogues.

  12. Transmission X-ray Diffraction (XRD) Patterns Relevant to the MSL Chemin Amorphous Component: Sulfates And Silicates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. V.; Rampe, E. B.; Graff, T. G.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Le, L.; Ming, D. W.; Sutter, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) CheMin instrument on the Curiosity rover is a transmission X-ray diffractometer (Co-Kalpha radiation source and a approx.5deg to approx.52deg 2theta range) where the analyzed powder samples are constrained to have discrete particle diameters <150 microns by a sieve. To date, diffraction patterns have been obtained for one basaltic soil (Rocknest (RN)) and four drill fines of coherent rock (John Klein (JK), Cumberland (CB), Windjana (WJ), and Confidence Hills (CH)). The CheMin instrument has detected and quantified the abundance of both primary igneous (e.g., feldspar, olivine, and pyroxene) and secondary (e.g., Ca-sulfates, hematite, akaganeite, and Fe-saponite) minerals. The diffraction patterns of all CheMin samples are also characterized by a broad diffraction band centered near 30deg 2theta and by increasing diffraction intensity (scattering continuum) from approx.15deg to approx.5deg, the 2theta minimum. Both the broad band and the scattering continuum are attributed to the presence of an XRD amorphous component. Estimates of amorphous component abundance, based on the XRD data itself and on mass-balance calculations using APXS data crystalline component chemistry derived from XRD data, martian meteorites, and/or stoichiometry [e.g., 6-9], range from approx.20 wt.% to approx.50 wt.% of bulk sample. The APXSbased calculations show that the amorphous component is rich in volatile elements (esp. SO3) and is not simply primary basaltic glass, which was used as a surrogate to model the broad band in the RN CheMin pattern. For RN, the entire volatile inventory (except minor anhydrite) is assigned to the amorphous component because no volatile-bearing crystalline phases were reported within detection limits [2]. For JK and CB, Fesaponite, basanite, and akaganeite are volatile-bearing crystalline components. Here we report transmission XRD patterns for sulfate and silicate phases relevant to interpretation of MSL-CheMin XRD amorphous

  13. Coded aperture x-ray diffraction imaging with transmission computed tomography side-information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odinaka, Ikenna; Greenberg, Joel A.; Kaganovsky, Yan; Holmgren, Andrew; Hassan, Mehadi; Politte, David G.; O'Sullivan, Joseph A.; Carin, Lawrence; Brady, David J.

    2016-03-01

    Coded aperture X-ray diffraction (coherent scatter spectral) imaging provides fast and dose-efficient measurements of the molecular structure of an object. The information provided is spatially-dependent and material-specific, and can be utilized in medical applications requiring material discrimination, such as tumor imaging. However, current coded aperture coherent scatter spectral imaging system assume a uniformly or weakly attenuating object, and are plagued by image degradation due to non-uniform self-attenuation. We propose accounting for such non-uniformities in the self-attenuation by utilizing an X-ray computed tomography (CT) image (reconstructed attenuation map). In particular, we present an iterative algorithm for coherent scatter spectral image reconstruction, which incorporates the attenuation map, at different stages, resulting in more accurate coherent scatter spectral images in comparison to their uncorrected counterpart. The algorithm is based on a spectrally grouped edge-preserving regularizer, where the neighborhood edge weights are determined by spatial distances and attenuation values.

  14. Multiscale phase mapping of LiFePO4-based electrodes by transmission electron microscopy and electron forward scattering diffraction.

    PubMed

    Robert, Donatien; Douillard, Thierry; Boulineau, Adrien; Brunetti, Guillaume; Nowakowski, Pawel; Venet, Denis; Bayle-Guillemaud, Pascale; Cayron, Cyril

    2013-12-23

    LiFePO4 and FePO4 phase distributions of entire cross-sectioned electrodes with various Li content are investigated from nanoscale to mesoscale, by transmission electron microscopy and by the new electron forward scattering diffraction technique. The distributions of the fully delithiated (FePO4) or lithiated particles (LiFePO4) are mapped on large fields of view (>100 × 100 μm(2)). Heterogeneities in thin and thick electrodes are highlighted at different scales. At the nanoscale, the statistical analysis of 64 000 particles unambiguously shows that the small particles delithiate first. At the mesoscale, the phase maps reveal a core-shell mechanism at the scale of the agglomerates with a preferential pathway along the electrode porosities. At larger scale, lithiation occurs in thick electrodes "stratum by stratum" from the surface in contact with electrolyte toward the current collector.

  15. An x-ray diffraction and TEM (transmission electron microscopy) study of subsurface recovery during abrasion

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, C.M.; Kosel, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    The subsurface dislocation structures and the extent of dynamic recovery and recrystallization in pure metals subjected to low-stress abrasion have been examined. Pure copper and aluminum were chosen to provide a range of melting and therefore recrystallization temperatures. The materials were strain annealed before abrasion in order to produce extremely large initial grain sizes. Back-reflection x-ray pinhole photographs of the original specimens produced single crystal Laue patterns, whereas the abraded specimens produced Debye rings. In the case of aluminum the Debye rings contained distinct individual spots, whereas the copper produced smooth, continuous rings. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to examine subsurface sections parallel to the war tracks to provide more direct evidence of the subsurface microstructural changes. In all cases, at greater depths below the worn surface, the materials showed dislocation cells typical of a high degree of room temperature deformation, with the degree of deformation decreasing with depth. Closer to the surface, the copper exhibited a fine, high-misorientations subgrain structure which is believed to be responsible for the continuous Debye rings seen in the x-ray pattern. In the case of aluminum, there appeared to be a mixture of fine subgrains and larger dynamically recrystallized grains which are believed to have produced the spotty Debye rings. 29 refs., 14 figs.

  16. Beyond the diffraction limit of optical/IR interferometers. II. Stellar parameters of rotating stars from differential phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjara, M.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; Vakili, F.; Jankov, S.; Millour, F.; Meilland, A.; Khorrami, Z.; Chelli, A.; Baffa, C.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Lagarde, S.; Robbe-Dubois, S.

    2014-09-01

    , PArot = 65.6° ± 5°, for Fomalhaut. They were found to be compatible with previously published values from differential phase and visibility measurements, while we were able to determine, for the first time, the inclination angle i of Fomalhaut (i = 90° ± 9°) and δ Aquilae (i = 81° ± 13°), and the rotation-axis position angle PArot of δ Aquilae. Conclusions: Beyond the theoretical diffraction limit of an interferometer (ratio of the wavelength to the baseline), spatial super resolution is well suited to systematically estimating the angular diameters of rotating stars and their fundamental parameters with a few sets of baselines and the Earth-rotation synthesis provided a high enough spectral resolution. Based on observations performed at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, under ESO AMBER-consortium GTO program IDs 084.D-0456 081.D-0293 and 082.C-0376.Figure 5 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Induced magnetic anisotropy in Si-free nanocrystalline soft magnetic materials: A transmission x-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, R. Suzuki, K.; Yanai, T.; Kishimoto, H.; Kato, A.; Ohnuma, M.

    2015-05-07

    In order to better understand the origin of field-induced anisotropy (K{sub u}) in Si-free nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloys, the lattice spacing of the bcc-Fe phase in nanocrystalline Fe{sub 94−x}Nb{sub 6}B{sub x} (x = 10, 12, 14) alloys annealed under an applied magnetic field has been investigated by X-ray diffraction in transmission geometry (t-XRD) with the diffraction vector parallel and perpendicular to the field direction. The saturation magnetostriction (λ{sub s}) of nanocrystalline Fe{sub 94−x}Nb{sub 6}B{sub x} was found to increase linearly with the volume fraction of the residual amorphous phase and is well described by taking into account the volume-weighted average of two local λ{sub s} values for the bcc-Fe nanocrystallites (−5 ± 2 ppm) and the residual amorphous matrix (+8 ± 2 ppm). The lattice distortion required to produce the measured K{sub u} values (∼100 J/m{sup 3}) was estimated via the inverse magnetostrictive effect using the measured λ{sub s} values and was compared to the lattice spacing estimations made by t-XRD. The lattice strain required to produce K{sub u} under the magnetoelastic model was not observed by the t-XRD experiments and so the findings of this study suggest that the origin of magnetic field induced K{sub u} cannot be explained through the magnetoelastic effect.

  18. Puzzling Intergrowth in Cerium Nitridophosphate Unraveled by Joint Venture of Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy and Synchrotron Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Kloß, Simon D; Neudert, Lukas; Döblinger, Markus; Nentwig, Markus; Oeckler, Oliver; Schnick, Wolfgang

    2017-09-13

    Thorough investigation of nitridophosphates has rapidly accelerated through development of new synthesis strategies. Here we used the recently developed high-pressure metathesis to prepare the first rare-earth metal nitridophosphate, Ce4Li3P18N35, with a high degree of condensation >1/2. Ce4Li3P18N35 consists of an unprecedented hexagonal framework of PN4 tetrahedra and exhibits blue luminescence peaking at 455 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed two intergrown domains with slight structural and compositional variations. One domain type shows extremely weak superstructure phenomena revealed by atomic-resolution scanning TEM (STEM) and single-crystal diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The corresponding superstructure involves a modulated displacement of Ce atoms in channels of tetrahedra 6-rings. The displacement model was refined in a supercell as well as in an equivalent commensurate (3 + 2)-dimensional description in superspace group P63(α, β, 0)0(-α - β, α, 0)0. In the second domain type, STEM revealed disordered vacancies of the same Ce atoms that were modulated in the first domain type, leading to sum formula Ce4-0.5xLi3P18N35-1.5xO1.5x (x ≈ 0.72) of the average structure. The examination of these structural intricacies may indicate the detection limit of synchrotron diffraction and TEM. We discuss the occurrence of either Ce displacements or Ce vacancies that induce the incorporation of O as necessary stabilization of the crystal structure.

  19. Curcumin-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex: stability, solubility, characterisation by FT-IR, FT-Raman, X-ray diffraction and photoacoustic spectroscopy, and food application.

    PubMed

    Mangolim, Camila Sampaio; Moriwaki, Cristiane; Nogueira, Ana Claudia; Sato, Francielle; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Neto, Antônio Medina; Matioli, Graciette

    2014-06-15

    Curcumin was complexed with β-CD using co-precipitation, freeze-drying and solvent evaporation methods. Co-precipitation enabled complex formation, as indicated by the FT-IR and FT-Raman techniques via the shifts in the peaks that were assigned to the aromatic rings of curcumin. In addition, photoacoustic spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, with the disappearance of the band related to aromatic rings, by Gaussian fitting, and modifications in the spectral lines, respectively, also suggested complex formation. The possible complexation had an efficiency of 74% and increased the solubility of the pure colourant 31-fold. Curcumin-β-CD complex exhibited a sunlight stability 18% higher than the pure colourant. This material was stable to pH variations and storage at -15 and 4°C. With an isothermal heating at 100 and 150°C for 2h, the material exhibited a colour retention of approximately 99%. The application of curcumin-β-CD complex in vanilla ice creams intensified the colour of the products and produced a great sensorial acceptance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Synthesis and structural study of precursors of novel methylsilanediols by IR and Raman spectroscopies, single-crystal X-ray diffraction and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Ortega, M P G; Docampo, M L; Thomas, L H; Montejo, M; Marchal Ingraín, A; Wilson, C C; López González, J J

    2014-01-24

    On the way towards the development of a synthetic route aimed at obtaining new methylsilanediol derivatives with an aminocarbonyl group in β to silicon (which may have a potential biological interest), we have synthesized, isolated and purified five diphenylic possible precursors, namely chloromethyl(methyl)diphenylsilane, 2-{[methyl(diphenyl)silyl]methyl}-1H-isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione, N-[(methyl(diphenyl) silanyl)-methyl]-benzamide, N-[(methyl(diphenyl)silyl)-methyl]-acetamide and N-[(methyl(diphenyl)silyl)-methyl]-formamide. The conformational landscape of the five species in this study are explored by means of DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(∗∗) level. The theoretical molecular structures predicted are confirmed by the reproduction of their respective IR and Raman spectral profiles, that are completely assigned. Some evidence in the vibrational spectra points to the occurrence of conformational mixtures in the samples. Further, single-crystal X-ray diffraction has allowed the elucidation of the crystalline structure of 2-{[methyl(diphenyl)silyl]methyl}-1H-isoindole-1,3(2H)-dione.

  1. A novel approach for site-specific atom probe specimen preparation by focused ion beam and transmission electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Babinsky, K; De Kloe, R; Clemens, H; Primig, S

    2014-09-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is a suitable technique for chemical analyses with almost atomic resolution. However, the time-consuming site-specific specimen preparation can be improved. Recently, transmission electron backscatter diffraction (t-EBSD) has been established for high resolution crystallographic analyses of thin foils. In this paper we present the first successful application of a combined focused ion beam (FIB)/t-EBSD preparation of site-specific APT specimens using the example of grain boundary segregation in technically pure molybdenum. It will be shown that the preparation of a grain boundary can be substantially accelerated by t-EBSD analyses in-between the annular milling FIB procedure in the same microscope. With this combined method, a grain boundary can easily be recognized and positioned in the first 220nm of an APT sample much faster than e.g. with complementary investigations in a transmission electron microscope. Even more, the high resolution technique of t-EBSD gives the opportunity to get crystallographic information of the mapped area and, therefore, an analysis of the grain boundary character to support the interpretation of the APT data files. To optimize this newly developed technique for the application on needle-shaped APT specimens, a parameter study on enhanced background correction, acceleration voltage, and tilt angle was carried out. An acceleration voltage of 30kV at specimen surface tilt angles between -45° and -35° from horizontal plane leads to the best results. Even for molybdenum the observation of crystal orientation data up to about 200nm specimen thickness is possible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Diffraction efficiency of 200-nm-period critical-angle transmission gratings in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet wavelength bands

    SciTech Connect

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Ahn, Minseung; Bruccoleri, Alex; Chang, Chih-Hao; Gullikson, Eric M.; Mukherjee, Pran; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2011-04-01

    We report on measurements of the diffraction efficiency of 200-nm-period freestanding blazed transmission gratings for wavelengths in the 0.96 to 19.4 nm range. These critical-angle transmission (CAT) gratings achieve highly efficient blazing over a broad band via total external reflection off the sidewalls of smooth, tens of nanometer thin ultrahigh aspect-ratio silicon grating bars and thus combine the advantages of blazed x-ray reflection gratings with those of more conventional x-ray transmission gratings. Prototype gratings with maximum depths of 3.2 and 6 {mu}m were investigated at two different blaze angles. In these initial CAT gratings the grating bars are monolithically connected to a cross support mesh that only leaves less than half of the grating area unobstructed. Because of our initial fabrication approach, the support mesh bars feature a strongly trapezoidal cross section that leads to varying CAT grating depths and partial absorption of diffracted orders. While theory predicts broadband absolute diffraction efficiencies as high as 60% for ideal CAT gratings without a support mesh, experimental results show efficiencies in the range of {approx}50-100% of theoretical predictions when taking the effects of the support mesh into account. Future minimization of the support mesh therefore promises broadband CAT grating absolute diffraction efficiencies of 50% or higher.

  3. Diphosphine- and CO-Induced Fragmentation of Chloride-bridged Dinuclear Complex and Cp*Ir(mu-Cl)(3)Re(CO)(3) and Attempted Synthesis of Cp*Ir(mu-Cl)(3)Mn(CO)(3): Spectroscopic Data and X-ray Diffraction Structures of the Pentamethylcyclopentadienyl Compounds [Cp*IrCl{(Z)-Ph2PCH = CHPPh2}][Cl]center dot 2CHCl(3) and Cp*Ir(CO)Cl-2

    SciTech Connect

    Hammons, Casey; Wang, Xiaoping; Nesterov, Vladimir; Richmond, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    The confacial bioctahedral compound Cp*Ir(mu-Cl)(3)Re(CO)(3) (1) undergoes rapid fragmentation in the presence of the unsaturated diphosphine ligand (Z)-Ph2PCH = CHPPh2 to give the mononuclear compounds [Cp*IrCl {(Z)-Ph2PCH = CHPPh2}][Cl] (2) and fac-ClRe(CO)(3)[(Z)-Ph2PCH = CHPPh2] (3). 2 has been characterized by H-1 and P-31 NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. 2 center dot 2CHCl(3) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/c, a = 35.023 (8) angstrom, b = 10.189 (2) angstrom, c = 24.003 (6) angstrom, b = 103.340 (3), V = 8,335 (3) angstrom 3, Z = 8, and d(calc) = 1.647 Mg/m(3); R = 0.0383, R-w = 0.1135 for 8,178 reflections with I> 2 sigma(I). The Ir(III) center in 2 exhibits a six-coordinate geometry and displays a chelating diphosphine group. Compound 1 reacts with added CO with fragmentation to yield the known compounds Cp*Ir(CO)Cl-2 (4) and ClRe(CO)(5) (5) in near quantitative yield by IR spectroscopy. Using the protocol established by our groups for the synthesis of 1, we have explored the reaction of [Cp*IrCl2](2) with ClMn(CO)(5) as a potential route to Cp*Ir(mu-Cl)(3)Mn(CO)(3); unfortunately, 4 was the only product isolated from this reaction. The solid-state structure of 4 was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. 4 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P-1, a = 7.4059 (4) angstrom, b = 7.8940 (4) angstrom, c = 11.8488 (7) angstrom, alpha = 80.020 (1), beta = 79.758 (1), gamma = 68.631 (1), V = 630.34 (6) angstrom(3), Z = 2, and d(calc) = 2.246 Mg/m(3); R = 0.0126, R-w = 0.0329 for 2,754 reflections with I> 2 sigma(I). The expected three-legged piano-stool geometry in 4 has been crystallographically confirmed.

  4. Good performances but short lasting efficacy of Actellic 50 EC Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS) on malaria transmission in Benin, West Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The National Malaria Control Program (NMCP) has been using pirimiphos methyl for the first time for indoor residual spraying (IRS) in Benin. The first round was a success with a significant decrease of entomological indicators of malaria transmission in the treated districts. We present the results of the entomological impact on malaria transmission. Entomologic parameters in the control area were compared with those in intervention sites. Methods Mosquito collections were carried out in three districts in the Atacora-Dongo region of which two were treated with pirimiphos methyl (Actellic 50EC) (Tanguiéta and Kouandé) and the untreated (Copargo) served as control. Anopheles gambiae s.l. populations were sampled monthly by human landing catch. In addition, window exit traps and pyrethrum spray catches were performed to assess exophagic behavior of Anopheles vectors. In the three districts, mosquito collections were organized to follow the impact of pirimiphos methyl IRS on malaria transmission and possible changes in the behavior of mosquitoes. The residual activity of pirimiphos methyl in the treated walls was also assessed using WHO bioassay test. Results A significant reduction (94.25%) in human biting rate was recorded in treated districts where an inhabitant received less than 1 bite of An. gambiae per night. During this same time, the entomological inoculation rate (EIR) dramatically declined in the treated area (99.24% reduction). We also noted a significant reduction in longevity of the vectors and an increase in exophily induced by pirimiphos methyl on An. gambiae. However, no significant impact was found on the blood feeding rate. Otherwise, the low residual activity of Actellic 50 EC, which is three months, is a disadvantage. Conclusion Pirimiphos methyl was found to be effective for IRS in Benin. However, because of the low persistence of Actellic 50EC used in this study on the treated walls, the recourse to another more residual formulation

  5. Good performances but short lasting efficacy of Actellic 50 EC Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS) on malaria transmission in Benin, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Aïkpon, Rock; Sèzonlin, Michel; Tokponon, Filémon; Okè, Mariam; Oussou, Olivier; Oké-Agbo, Frédéric; Beach, Raymond; Akogbéto, Martin

    2014-05-30

    The National Malaria Control Program (NMCP) has been using pirimiphos methyl for the first time for indoor residual spraying (IRS) in Benin. The first round was a success with a significant decrease of entomological indicators of malaria transmission in the treated districts. We present the results of the entomological impact on malaria transmission. Entomologic parameters in the control area were compared with those in intervention sites. Mosquito collections were carried out in three districts in the Atacora-Dongo region of which two were treated with pirimiphos methyl (Actellic 50EC) (Tanguiéta and Kouandé) and the untreated (Copargo) served as control. Anopheles gambiae s.l. populations were sampled monthly by human landing catch. In addition, window exit traps and pyrethrum spray catches were performed to assess exophagic behavior of Anopheles vectors. In the three districts, mosquito collections were organized to follow the impact of pirimiphos methyl IRS on malaria transmission and possible changes in the behavior of mosquitoes. The residual activity of pirimiphos methyl in the treated walls was also assessed using WHO bioassay test. A significant reduction (94.25%) in human biting rate was recorded in treated districts where an inhabitant received less than 1 bite of An. gambiae per night. During this same time, the entomological inoculation rate (EIR) dramatically declined in the treated area (99.24% reduction). We also noted a significant reduction in longevity of the vectors and an increase in exophily induced by pirimiphos methyl on An. gambiae. However, no significant impact was found on the blood feeding rate. Otherwise, the low residual activity of Actellic 50 EC, which is three months, is a disadvantage. Pirimiphos methyl was found to be effective for IRS in Benin. However, because of the low persistence of Actellic 50EC used in this study on the treated walls, the recourse to another more residual formulation of pirimiphos methyl is required.

  6. High temperature Ir segregation in Ir-B ceramics: Effect of oxygen presence on stability of IrB2 and other Ir-B phases

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zhilin; Terracciano, Anthony C.; Cullen, David A.; Blair, Richard G.; Orlovskaya, Nina

    2015-05-13

    The formation of IrB2, IrB1.35, IrB1.1 and IrB monoboride phases in the Ir–B ceramic nanopowder was confirmed during mechanochemical reaction between metallic Ir and elemental B powders. The Ir–B phases were analysed after 90 h of high energy ball milling and after annealing of the powder for 72 h at 1050°C in vacuo. The iridium monoboride (IrB) orthorhombic phase was synthesised experimentally for the first time and identified by powder X-ray diffraction. Additionally, the ReB2 type IrB2 hexagonal phase was also produced for the first time and identified by high resolution transmission electron microscope. Ir segregation along disordered domains of the boron lattice was found to occur during high temperature annealing. Furthermore, these nanodomains may have useful catalytic properties.

  7. Diffraction properties of transmission photorefractive volume gratings in a cerium-doped potassium sodium strontium barium niobate crystal.

    PubMed

    Liang, B L; Wang, Z Q; Mu, G G; Guan, J H; Cartwright, C M

    1999-09-10

    The diffraction efficiency of volume gratings written by two-wave mixing in a cerium-doped potassium sodium strontium barium niobate (Ce:KNSBN) photorefractive crystal is studied. It is found that the diffraction efficiency strongly depends on the polarization of writing beams and exhibits loop behavior with respect to the fringe modulation. The fringe modulations before and behind the crystal are compared. Modified coupled-wave theory is used to fit the experimental data. This research presents data that are relevant to the application of Ce:KNSBN crystals to holographic recording and optical information processing.

  8. Computation of relative dose distribution and effective transmission around a shielded vaginal cylinder with {sup 192}Ir HDR source using MCNP4B

    SciTech Connect

    Sureka, Chandra Sekaran; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Sunny, Chirayath Sunil; Subbaiah, Kamatam Venkata

    2006-06-15

    The present work is primarily focused on the estimation of relative dose distribution and effective transmission around a shielded vaginal cylinder with an {sup 192}Ir source using the Monte Carlo technique. The MCNP4B code was used to evaluate the dose distribution around a tungsten shielded vaginal cylinder as a function of thickness and angular shielding. The dose distribution and effective transmission of {sup 192}Ir by 0.8 cm thickness tungsten were also compared with that for gold and lead. Dose distributions were evaluated for different distances starting from 1.35 cm to 10.15 cm from the center of the cylinder. Dose distributions were also evaluated sequentially from 0 deg.to 180 deg.for every 5 deg.interval. Studies show that all the shielding material at 0.8 cm thickness contribute tolerable doses to normal tissues and also protect the critical organs such as the rectum and bladder. However, the computed dose values are in good agreement with the reported experimental values. It was also inferred that the higher the shielding angles, the more the protection of the surrounding tissues. Among the three shielding materials, gold has been observed to have the highest attenuation and hence contribute lowest transmission in the shielded region. Depending upon the shielding angle and thickness, it is possible to predict the dose distribution using the MCNP4B code. In order to deliver the higher dose to the unshielded region, lead may be considered as the shielding material and further it is highly economic over other materials.

  9. Effect of triple junctions on deformation twinning in a nanostructured Cu–Zn alloy: A statistical study using transmission Kikuchi diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Silu; Ma, Xiaolong; Li, Lingzhen; Zhang, Liwen; Trimby, Patrick W; Liao, Xiaozhou; Li, Yusheng

    2016-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy transmission Kikuchi diffraction is able to identify twins in nanocrystalline material, regardless of their crystallographic orientation. In this study, it was employed to characterize deformation twins in Cu/10 wt % Zn processed by high-pressure torsion. It was found that in 83% of grains containing twins, at least one twin intersects with a triple junction. This suggests that triple junctions could have promoted the nucleation of deformation twins. It should be cautioned that this technique might be unable to detect extremely small nanoscale twins thinner than its step size. PMID:28144500

  10. Modeling of growth, evaporation and sedimentation effects on transmission of visible and IR laser beams in artificial fogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Deepak, A.

    1980-01-01

    The dense polydisperse aerosol particles in a quiet chamber may spontaneously go through different microphysical processes including gravitational sedimentation, thermal coagulation, and growth or evaporation. In an earlier paper, we presented the results of a parametric study of the combined and separate effects of thermal coagulation and sedimentation on the time dependence of extinction of four visible and IR laser beams traversing an aerosol medium. As a continuation of this series of studies, the separate and combined effects of growth or evaporation and gravitational sedimentation on the time dependence of extinction of the same four visible and IR laser beams traversing in artificial fogs will be reported in this paper. The method of numerically modeling the change of water droplet size distribution with time due to growth/evaporation and the cutoff of larger aerosols due to gravitational sedimentation is described in detail. Factors governing the relative importance of these two processes are discussed. Results of this study show that the relative humidity or ambient temperature is a crucial parameter in determining the optical depth of the water droplet and aerosol media undergoing microphysical processes.

  11. Multilayer graphene stacks grown by different methods-thickness measurements by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and optical transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarczyk, M. Kowalski, G.; Kępa, H.; Grodecki, K.; Drabińska, A.; Strupiński, W.

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Optical absorption estimates of the thickness of graphene multi layer stacks (number of graphene layers) are presented for three different growth techniques. The objective of this work was focused on comparison and reconciliation of the two already widely used methods for thickness estimates (Raman and Absorption) with the calibration of the X-ray method as far as Scherer constant K is concerned and X-ray based Wagner-Aqua extrapolation method.

  12. Fine structure characterization of martensite/austenite constituent in low-carbon low-alloy steel by transmission electron forward scatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Li, C W; Han, L Z; Luo, X M; Liu, Q D; Gu, J F

    2016-11-01

    Transmission electron forward scatter diffraction and other characterization techniques were used to investigate the fine structure and the variant relationship of the martensite/austenite (M/A) constituent of the granular bainite in low-carbon low-alloy steel. The results demonstrated that the M/A constituents were distributed in clusters throughout the bainitic ferrite. Lath martensite was the main component of the M/A constituent, where the relationship between the martensite variants was consistent with the Nishiyama-Wassermann orientation relationship and only three variants were found in the M/A constituent, suggesting that the variants had formed in the M/A constituent according to a specific mechanism. Furthermore, the Σ3 boundaries in the M/A constituent were much longer than their counterparts in the bainitic ferrite region. The results indicate that transmission electron forward scatter diffraction is an effective method of crystallographic analysis for nanolaths in M/A constituents. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  13. Comparative investigation of Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) in the determination of cotton fiber crystallinity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite considerable efforts in developing the curve-fitting protocol to evaluate the crystallinity index (CI) from the X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement, in its present state XRD procedure can only provide a qualitative or semi-quantitative assessment of the amounts of crystalline or amorphous po...

  14. LO-TO splittings, effective charges and interactions in electro-optic meta-nitroaniline crystal as studied by polarized IR reflection and transmission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szostak, M. M.; Le Calvé, N.; Romain, F.; Pasquier, B.

    1994-10-01

    The polarized IR reflection spectra of the meta-nitroaniline ( m-NA) single crystal along the a, b and c crystallographic axes as well as the b and c polarized transmission spectra have been measured in the 100-400 cm -1 region. The LO-TO splitting values have been calculated from the reflection spectra by fitting them with the four parameter dielectric function. The dipole moment derivatives, relevant to dynamic effective charges, of the vibrations have also been calculated and used to check the applicability of the oriented gas model (OGM) to reflection spectra. The discrepancies from the OGM have been discussed in terms of vibronic couplings, weak hydrogen bondings (HB) and intramolecular charge transfer.

  15. Third-dimension information retrieval from a single convergent-beam transmission electron diffraction pattern using an artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, Robert S.; Van den Broek, Wouter; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-05-01

    We have reconstructed third-dimension specimen information from convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns simulated using the stacked-Bloch-wave method. By reformulating the stacked-Bloch-wave formalism as an artificial neural network and optimizing with resilient back propagation, we demonstrate specimen orientation reconstructions with depth resolutions down to 5 nm. To show our algorithm's ability to analyze realistic data, we also discuss and demonstrate our algorithm reconstructing from noisy data and using a limited number of CBED disks. Applicability of this reconstruction algorithm to other specimen parameters is discussed.

  16. Correcting the effect of refraction and dispersion of light in FT-IR spectroscopic imaging in transmission through thick infrared windows.

    PubMed

    Chan, K L Andrew; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2013-01-15

    Transmission mode is one of the most common sampling methods for FT-IR spectroscopic imaging because the spectra obtained generally have a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. However, dispersion and refraction of infrared light occurs when samples are sandwiched between infrared windows or placed underneath a layer of liquid. Dispersion and refraction cause infrared light to focus with different focal lengths depending on the wavelength (wavenumber) of the light. As a result, images obtained are in focus only at a particular wavenumber while they are defocused at other wavenumber values. In this work, a solution to correct this spread of focus by means of adding a lens on top of the infrared transparent window, such that a pseudo hemisphere is formed, has been investigated. Through this lens (or pseudo hemisphere), refraction of light is removed and the light across the spectral range has the same focal depth. Furthermore, the lens acts as a solid immersion objective and an increase of both magnification and spatial resolution (by 1.4 times) is demonstrated. The spatial resolution was investigated using an USAF resolution target, showing that the Rayleigh criterion can be achieved, as well as a sample with a sharp polymer interface to indicate the spatial resolution that can be expected in real samples. The reported approach was used to obtain chemical images of cross sections of cancer tissue and hair samples sandwiched between infrared windows showing the versatility and applicability of the method. In addition to the improved spatial resolution, the results reported herein also demonstrate that the lens can reduce the effect of scattering near the edges of tissue samples. The advantages of the presented approach, obtaining FT-IR spectroscopic images in transmission mode with the same focus across all wavenumber values and simultaneous improvement in spatial resolution, will have wide implications ranging from studies of live cells to sorption of drugs into tissues.

  17. HfO2/SiO2 multilayer based reflective and transmissive optics from the IR to the UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jue; Hart, Gary A.; Oudard, Jean Francois; Wamboldt, Leonard; Roy, Brian P.

    2016-05-01

    HfO2/SiO2 multilayer based reflective optics enable threat detection in the short-wave/middle-wave infrared and high power laser targeting capability in the near infrared. On the other hand, HfO2/SiO2 multilayer based transmissive optics empower early missile warning by taking advantage of the extremely low noise light detection in the deep-ultraviolet region where solar irradiation is strongly absorbed by the ozone layer of the earth's atmosphere. The former requires high laser damage resistance, whereas the latter needs a solar-blind property, i.e., high transmission of the radiation below 290 nm and strong suppression of the solar background from 300 nm above. The technical challenges in both cases are revealed. The spectral limits associated with the HfO2 and SiO2 films are discussed and design concepts are schematically illustrated. Spectral performances are realized for potential A and D and commercial applications.

  18. A collimated focused ultrasound beam of high acoustic transmission and minimum diffraction achieved by using a lens with subwavelength structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhou; Tu, Juan; Cheng, Jianchun; Guo, Xiasheng E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn; Wu, Junru; Huang, Pingtong; Zhang, Dong E-mail: dzhang@nju.edu.cn

    2015-09-14

    An acoustic focusing lens incorporated with periodically aligned subwavelength grooves corrugated on its spherical surface has been developed. It is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that acoustic focusing achieved by using the lens can suppress the relative side-lobe amplitudes, enhance the focal gain, and minimize the shifting of the focus. Use of the lens coupled with a planar ultrasound transducer can generate an ultrasound beam with enhanced acoustic transmission and collimation effect, which offers the capability of improving the safety, efficiency, and accuracy of targeted surgery implemented by high intensity focused ultrasound.

  19. Fe-Co metal-carbon nanocomposite based on IR pyrolized polyvinyl alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, A. A.; Dzidziguri, E. L.; Muratov, D. G.; Karpacheva, G. P.

    2017-05-01

    Powders of metal-carbon nanocomposites consisting of nanosized bimetallic Fe-Co particles dispersed in a carbon matrix are obtained via the IR pyrolysis of a precursor based on polyvinyl alcohol and metal-containing compounds. The obtained samples are investigated by X-ray diffraction and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The morphology and dispersity of FeCo nanoparticles are studied, depending on the intensity of IR annealing.

  20. In search of the elusive IrB{sub 2}: Can mechanochemistry help?

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zhilin; Blair, Richard G.; Orlovskaya, Nina; Cullen, David A.; Lapidus, Saul H.; Kata, Dariusz; Rutkowski, Paweł; Lis, Jerzy

    2016-01-15

    The previously unknown hexagonal ReB{sub 2}-type IrB{sub 2} diboride and orthorhombic IrB monoboride phases were produced by mechanochemical syntheses. High energy ball milling of elemental Ir and B powder for 30 h, followed by annealing of the powder at 1050 °C for 48 h, resulted in the formation of the desired phases. Both traditional laboratory and high resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used for phase identification of the synthesized powder. In addition to XRD, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed to further characterize the microstructure of the phases produced. - Graphical abstract: ReB{sub 2}-type IrB{sub 2} and a new IrB have been successfully synthesized for the first time using mechanochemical method. Crystal structures of IrB{sub 2} and IrB were studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Microstructures of the new phases were characterized by SEM and TEM. - Highlights: • ReB{sub 2}-type IrB{sub 2} and a new IrB have been synthesized by mechanochemical method. • Crystal structures of IrB{sub 2} and IrB were studied by synchrotron XRD. • Microstructures of the new phases were characterized by SEM and TEM.

  1. Microstructural changes in CdSe-coated ZnO nanowires evaluated by in situ annealing in transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Majidi, Hasti; Winkler, Christopher R; Taheri, Mitra L; Baxter, Jason B

    2012-07-05

    We report on the crystallite growth and phase change of electrodeposited CdSe coatings on ZnO nanowires during annealing. Both in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) reveal that the nanocrystal size increases from ∼3 to ∼10 nm upon annealing at 350 °C for 1 h and then to more than 30 nm during another 1 h at 400 °C, exhibiting two distinct growth regimes. Nanocrystal growth occurs together with a structural change from zinc blende to wurtzite. The structural transition begins at 350 °C, which results in the formation of stacking faults. Increased crystallite size, comparable to the coating thickness, can improve charge separation in extremely thin absorber solar cells. We demonstrate a nearly two-fold improvement in power conversion efficiency upon annealing.

  2. Anharmonic Computations Meet Experiments (IR, Raman, Neutron Diffraction) for Explaining the Behavior of 1,3,5-Tribromo-2,4,6-trimethylbenzene.

    PubMed

    Meinnel, Jean; Latouche, Camille; Ghanemi, Soumia; Boucekkine, Abdou; Barone, Vincenzo; Moréac, Alain; Boudjada, Ali

    2016-02-25

    In the present paper we first show the experimental Raman, infrared, and neutron INS spectra of tribromomesitylene (TBM) measured in the range 50-3200 cm(-1) using crystalline powders at 6 or 4 K. Then, the bond lengths and angles determined by neutron diffraction using a TBM single crystal at 14 K are compared to the computed ones at different levels of theory. Anharmonic computations were then performed on the relaxed structure using the VPT2 approach, and for the lowest normal modes, the HRAO model has led to a remarkable agreement for the assignment of the experimental signatures. A particularity appears for frequencies below 150 cm(-1), and in particular for those concerning the energy levels of "hindered rotation" of the three methyl groups, they must be calculated for one-dimensional symmetrical tops independent of the frame vibrations. This fact is consistent with the structure established by neutron diffraction: the protons of the methyl groups undergoing huge "libration" motions are widely spread in space. The values of the transitions between the librational levels determined by inelastic neutron scattering indicate that the hindering potentials are mainly due to intermolecular interactions different for each methyl group in the triclinic cell.

  3. Acquisition parameters optimization of a transmission electron forward scatter diffraction system in a cold-field emission scanning electron microscope for nanomaterials characterization.

    PubMed

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Demers, Hendrix; Trudeau, Michel; Gauvin, Raynald

    2013-01-01

    Transmission electron forward scatter diffraction (t-EFSD) is a new technique providing crystallographic information with high resolution on thin specimens by using a conventional electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) system in a scanning electron microscope. In this study, the impact of tilt angle, working distance, and detector distance on the Kikuchi pattern quality were investigated in a cold-field emission scanning electron microscope (CFE-SEM). We demonstrated that t-EFSD is applicable for tilt angles ranging from -20° to -40°. Working distance (WD) should be optimized for each material by choosing the WD for which the EBSD camera screen illumination is the highest, as the number of detected electrons on the screen is directly dependent on the scattering angle. To take advantage of the best performances of the CFE-SEM, the EBSD camera should be close to the sample and oriented towards the bottom to increase forward scattered electron collection efficiency. However, specimen chamber cluttering and beam/mechanical drift are important limitations in the CFE-SEM used in this work. Finally, the importance of t-EFSD in materials science characterization was illustrated through three examples of phase identification and orientation mapping. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Optical and structural properties in type-II InAlAs/AlGaAs quantum dots observed by photoluminescence, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Daly, A.; Craciun, D.; Laura Ursu, E.; Lemaître, A.; Maaref, M. A.; Iacomi, F.; Vasile, B. S.; Craciun, V.

    2017-10-01

    We present the effects of AlGaAs alloy composition on InAlAs quantum dots (QDs) optical and structural properties. Photoluminescence (PL) analysis of samples having a variety of aluminium composition values covering type-II transitions clearly in QDs showed the presence of two transitions X-Sh and X-Ph. High-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) investigations showed that the layers grew epitaxially on the GaAs substrate, with no relaxation regardless the Al content of AlGaAs layer. From the reciprocal space map (RSM) investigation around (004) and (115) diffraction peaks, it was shown that the InAlAs layer is fully strained, the in-plane lattice parameters (a and b, a = b) being identical to those of GaAs substrate, while the c lattice parameter was dependent on the In and Al concentrations, being larger than that of the substrate. High-resolution transmission electronic microscopy (HRTEM) investigations confirmed that films grew epitaxially on the GaAs substrate with no visible dislocations or other major defects within the InAlAs/GaAlAs QDs structure.

  5. Adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation of acetone on TiO{sub 2}: An in situ transmission FT-IR study

    SciTech Connect

    El-Maazawi, M.; Finken, A.N.; Nair, A.B.; Grassian, V.H.

    2000-04-01

    In situ transmission Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy has been used to study the mechanistic details of adsorption and photocatalytic oxidation of acetone on TiO{sub 2} surfaces at 298 K. The adsorption of acetone has been followed as a function of coverage on clean TiO{sub 2} surfaces (dehydrated TiO{sub 2}). Infrared spectra at low acetone coverages ({theta} < 0.05 ML) show absorption bands at 2,973, 2,931, 1,702, 1,448, and 1,363 cm{sup {minus}1} which are assigned to the vibrational modes of molecularly adsorbed acetone. At higher coverages, the infrared spectra show that adsorbed acetone can undergo an Aldol condensation reaction followed by dehydration to yield (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}C{double_bond}CHCOCH{sub 3}, 4-methyl-3-penten-2-one or, more commonly called, mesityl oxide. The ratio of surface-bound mesityl oxide to acetone depends on surface coverage. At saturation coverage, nearly 60% of the adsorbed acetone has reacted to yield mesityl oxide on the surface. In contrast, on TiO{sub 2} surfaces with preadsorbed water (hydrated TiO{sub 2}), very little mesityl oxide forms. Infrared spectroscopy was also used to monitor the photocatalytic oxidation of adsorbed acetone as a function of acetone coverage, oxygen pressure, and water adsorption. Based on the dependence of the rate of the reaction on oxygen pressure, acetone coverage, and water adsorption, it is proposed that there are potentially three mechanisms for the photooxidation of adsorbed acetone on TiO{sub 2}. In the absence of preadsorbed H{sub 2}O, one mechanism involves the formation of a reactive O{sup {minus}}(ads) species, from gas-phase O{sub 2}, which reacts with adsorbed acetone molecules. The second mechanism involves TiO{sub 2} lattice oxygen. In the presence of adsorbed H{sub 2}O, reactive hydroxyl radicals are proposed to initiate the photooxidation of acetone.

  6. Detailed consideration of physicochemical properties of CO3apatites as biomaterials in relation to carbonate content using ICP, X-ray diffraction, FT-IR, SEM, and HR-TEM.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Rie; Hayashi, Hidetaka; Hirata, Isao; Miake, Yasuo; Yanagisawa, Takaaki; Okazaki, Masayuki

    2006-09-01

    CO3apatites with different carbonate contents were synthesized at 60 +/- 1 degrees C and pH 7.4 +/- 0.2 under different carbonate concentrations (0-0.3 mol/L) in the supplied solutions. Their physicochemical properties were analyzed using various methods. Inductively coupled plasma gave accurate chemical analysis data for calcium and phosphate contents. X-ray diffraction analysis showed a clear chemical shift at high carbonate content. A CO3(2-) absorption peak area approximately proportional to carbonate content was observed through Fourier transmission infrared spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed a dramatic change of the crystal shape. Osteoblast proliferation at the surface of each CO3apatite-collagen sponge indicated that osteoblasts deformed to expand and cover the surface of the sponge, and appeared to adhere well to the sponge.

  7. Transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Sugano, K.

    1988-12-27

    A transmission is described which consists of: an input shaft; an output shaft; a first planetary gear set including a first sun gear selectively connectable by a first clutch to the input shaft, a first carrier selectively connectable by a second clutch to the input shaft and a first ring gear connected to the output shaft. The first sun gear selectively held stationary by a first brake, the first carrier is allowed to rotate in the same forward direction as the input shaft when the second clutch is engaged, but prevented from rotating in a reverse direction opposite to the forward direction by a first one-way clutch, the first carrier being selectively held stationary by a second brake; a second planetary gear set including a second sun gear connected to the input shaft, a second carrier connected to the first ring gear and also the the output shaft, and a second ring gear.

  8. High-energy transmission Laue micro-beam X-ray diffraction: a probe for intra-granular lattice orientation and elastic strain in thicker samples.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Felix; Song, Xu; Abbey, Brian; Jun, Tea-Sung; Korsunsky, Alexander M

    2012-05-01

    An understanding of the mechanical response of modern engineering alloys to complex loading conditions is essential for the design of load-bearing components in high-performance safety-critical aerospace applications. A detailed knowledge of how material behaviour is modified by fatigue and the ability to predict failure reliably are vital for enhanced component performance. Unlike macroscopic bulk properties (e.g. stiffness, yield stress, etc.) that depend on the average behaviour of many grains, material failure is governed by `weakest link'-type mechanisms. It is strongly dependent on the anisotropic single-crystal elastic-plastic behaviour, local morphology and microstructure, and grain-to-grain interactions. For the development and validation of models that capture these complex phenomena, the ability to probe deformation behaviour at the micro-scale is key. The diffraction of highly penetrating synchrotron X-rays is well suited to this purpose and micro-beam Laue diffraction is a particularly powerful tool that has emerged in recent years. Typically it uses photon energies of 5-25 keV, limiting penetration into the material, so that only thin samples or near-surface regions can be studied. In this paper the development of high-energy transmission Laue (HETL) micro-beam X-ray diffraction is described, extending the micro-beam Laue technique to significantly higher photon energies (50-150 keV). It allows the probing of thicker sample sections, with the potential for grain-level characterization of real engineering components. The new HETL technique is used to study the deformation behaviour of individual grains in a large-grained polycrystalline nickel sample during in situ tensile loading. Refinement of the Laue diffraction patterns yields lattice orientations and qualitative information about elastic strains. After deformation, bands of high lattice misorientation can be identified in the sample. Orientation spread within individual scattering volumes is

  9. Synthesis, crystal structure analysis, spectral IR, NMR UV-Vis investigations, NBO and NLO of 2-benzoyl-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-oxo-3-phenylpropanamide with use of X-ray diffractions studies along with DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Sibel; Sarioğlu, Ahmet Oral; Güler, Semih; Dege, Necmi; Sönmez, Mehmet

    2016-08-01

    The title compound, 2-benzoyl-N-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-oxo-3-phenylpropanamide compound (C22H16NO3Cl) has been synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, IR, 1H and 13C NMR and UV-Vis spectra. Optimized geometrical structure, harmonic vibrational frequencies and chemical shifts were computed using hybrid-DFT (B3LYP and B3PW91) methods and 6-311G(d,p) as the basis set. The results of the optimized molecular structure are presented and compared with the experimental X-ray diffraction. The calculated optimized geometries, vibrational frequencies and 1H NMR chemical shift values are in strong agreement with experimentally measured values. UV-Vis spectrum of the title compound, was also recorded and the electronic properties, such as calculated energies, excitation energies, oscillator strengths, dipole moments and frontier orbital energies and band gap energies were computed with TDDFT-B3LYP methodolgy and using 6-311G(d,p) as the basis set. Furthermore, frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), natural bond orbital (NBO) and non linear optical (NLO) properties were performed by using B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level for the title compound.

  10. MMW/IR beam combiner with graphene IR window for MMW/IR compact range compound test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Li, Yanhong; Pang, Xudong; Zhu, Weihua; Wang, Liquan; Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Tailei; Zhu, Shouzheng

    2017-06-01

    A millimeter wave (MMW)/infrared (IR) beam combiner with a graphene IR window for the MMW/IR compact range (CR) compound test is creatively proposed with comprehensive analysis and simulation. Graphene is used as the IR window material to transfer the IR feed signal behind a perforated MMW CR reflector for it has the unique property of high IR transmissivity and high MMW conductivity. This research shows that graphene IR windows have better IR transmissivity than conducting inductive mesh IR windows when the beam combiner meets the MMW CR test demanding. Graphene IR windows also show a better MMW test bandwidth than dielectric IR windows. Meanwhile, the graphene IR window MMW/IR beam combiner has a circular aperture test zone with which it is sufficient to test a cylindrical unit under test according to the requirement.

  11. Epitaxial growth of iridate pyrochlore Nd2Ir2O7 films

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, J. C.; Esser, B. D.; Morrow, R.; Dunsiger, S. R.; Williams, R. E. A.; Woodward, P. M.; McComb, D. W.; Yang, F. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Epitaxial films of the pyrochlore Nd2Ir2O7 have been grown on (111)-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates by off-axis sputtering followed by post-growth annealing. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results demonstrate phase-pure epitaxial growth of the pyrochlore films on YSZ. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) investigation of an Nd2Ir2O7 film with a short post-annealing provides insight into the mechanism for crystallization of Nd2Ir2O7 during the post-annealing process. STEM images reveal clear pyrochlore ordering of Nd and Ir in the films. The epitaxial relationship between the YSZ and Nd2Ir2O7 is observed clearly while some interfacial regions show a thin region with polycrystalline Ir nanocrystals. PMID:26923862

  12. Epitaxial growth of iridate pyrochlore Nd2Ir2O7 films

    DOE PAGES

    Gallagher, J. C.; Esser, B. D.; Morrow, R.; ...

    2016-02-29

    Epitaxial films of the pyrochlore Nd2Ir2O7 have been grown on (111)-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates by off-axis sputtering followed by post-growth annealing. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results demonstrate phase-pure epitaxial growth of the pyrochlore films on YSZ. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) investigation of an Nd2Ir2O7 film with a short post-annealing provides insight into the mechanism for crystallization of Nd2Ir2O7 during the post-annealing process. STEM images reveal clear pyrochlore ordering of Nd and Ir in the films. As a result, the epitaxial relationship between the YSZ and Nd2Ir2O7 is observed clearly while some interfacial regions show a thin region with polycrystallinemore » Ir nanocrystals.« less

  13. EC-QCL mid-IR transmission spectroscopy for monitoring dynamic changes of protein secondary structure in aqueous solution on the example of β-aggregation in alcohol-denaturated α-chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Alcaráz, Mirta R; Schwaighofer, Andreas; Goicoechea, Héctor; Lendl, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a novel EC-QCL-based setup for mid-IR transmission measurements in the amide I region is introduced for monitoring dynamic changes in secondary structure of proteins. For this purpose, α-chymotrypsin (aCT) acts as a model protein, which gradually forms intermolecular β-sheet aggregates after adopting a non-native α-helical structure induced by exposure to 50 % TFE. In order to showcase the versatility of the presented setup, the effects of varying pH values and protein concentration on the rate of β-aggregation were studied. The influence of the pH value on the initial reaction rate was studied in the range of pH 5.8-8.2. Results indicate an increased aggregation rate at elevated pH values. Furthermore, the widely accessible concentration range of the laser-based IR transmission setup was utilized to investigate β-aggregation across a concentration range of 5-60 mg mL(-1). For concentrations lower than 20 mg mL(-1), the aggregation rate appears to be independent of concentration. At higher values, the reaction rate increases linearly with protein concentration. Extended MCR-ALS was employed to obtain pure spectral and concentration profiles of the temporal transition between α-helices and intermolecular β-sheets. Comparison of the global solutions obtained by the modelled data with results acquired by the laser-based IR transmission setup at different conditions shows excellent agreement. This demonstrates the potential and versatility of the EC-QCL-based IR transmission setup to monitor dynamic changes of protein secondary structure in aqueous solution at varying conditions and across a wide concentration range. Graphical abstract EC-QCL IR spectroscopy for monitoring protein conformation change.

  14. In search of the elusive IrB2: Can mechanochemistry help?

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Zhilin; Blair, Richard G.; Orlovskaya, Nina; ...

    2015-10-20

    We produced hexagonal ReB2-type IrB2 diboride and orthorhombic IrB monoboride phases, that were previously unknown and saw them produced by mechanochemical syntheses. High energy ball milling of elemental Ir and B powder for 30 h, followed by annealing of the powder at 1050 °C for 48 h, resulted in the formation of the desired phases. Both traditional laboratory and high resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used for phase identification of the synthesized powder. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed, along with XRD, to further characterize the microstructure of the phases produced.

  15. Structure refinement of the δ1p phase in the Fe-Zn system by single-crystal X-ray diffraction combined with scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Norihiko L; Tanaka, Katsushi; Yasuhara, Akira; Inui, Haruyuki

    2014-04-01

    The structure of the δ1p phase in the iron-zinc system has been refined by single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction combined with scanning transmission electron microscopy. The large hexagonal unit cell of the δ1p phase with the space group of P63/mmc comprises more or less regular (normal) Zn12 icosahedra, disordered Zn12 icosahedra, Zn16 icosioctahedra and dangling Zn atoms that do not constitute any polyhedra. The unit cell contains 52 Fe and 504 Zn atoms so that the compound is expressed with the chemical formula of Fe13Zn126. All Fe atoms exclusively occupy the centre of normal and disordered icosahedra. Iron-centred normal icosahedra are linked to one another by face- and vertex-sharing forming two types of basal slabs, which are bridged with each other by face-sharing with icosioctahedra, whereas disordered icosahedra with positional disorder at their vertex sites are isolated from other polyhedra. The bonding features in the δ1p phase are discussed in comparison with those in the Γ and ζ phases in the iron-zinc system.

  16. Structure and Composition of Isolated Core-Shell (In ,Ga )N /GaN Rods Based on Nanofocus X-Ray Diffraction and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Thilo; Hanke, Michael; Nicolai, Lars; Cheng, Zongzhe; Niehle, Michael; Trampert, Achim; Kahnt, Maik; Falkenberg, Gerald; Schroer, Christian G.; Hartmann, Jana; Zhou, Hao; Wehmann, Hergo-Heinrich; Waag, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Nanofocus x-ray diffraction is used to investigate the structure and local strain field of an isolated (In ,Ga )N /GaN core-shell microrod. Because the high spatial resolution of the x-ray beam is only 80 ×90 nm2, we are able to investigate several distinct volumes on one individual side facet. Here, we find a drastic increase in thickness of the outer GaN shell along the rod height. Additionally, we performed high-angle annular dark-field scanning-transmission-electron-microscopy measurements on several rods from the same sample showing that (In,Ga)N double-quantum-well and GaN barrier thicknesses also increase strongly along the height. Moreover, plastic relaxation is observed in the top part of the rod. Based on the experimentally obtained structural parameters, we simulate the strain-induced deformation using the finite-element method, which serves as the input for subsequent kinematic scattering simulations. The simulations reveal a significant increase of elastic in-plane relaxation along the rod height. However, at a certain height, the occurrence of plastic relaxation yields a decrease of the elastic strain. Because of the experimentally obtained structural input for the finite-element simulations, we can exclude unknown structural influences on the strain distribution, and we are able to translate the elastic relaxation into an indium concentration which increases by a factor of 4 from the bottom to the height where plastic relaxation occurs.

  17. Structure refinement of the δ1p phase in the Fe–Zn system by single-crystal X-ray diffraction combined with scanning transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Norihiko L.; Tanaka, Katsushi; Yasuhara, Akira; Inui, Haruyuki

    2014-01-01

    The structure of the δ1p phase in the iron−zinc system has been refined by single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction combined with scanning transmission electron microscopy. The large hexagonal unit cell of the δ1p phase with the space group of P63/mmc comprises more or less regular (normal) Zn12 icosahedra, disordered Zn12 icosahedra, Zn16 icosioctahedra and dangling Zn atoms that do not constitute any polyhedra. The unit cell contains 52 Fe and 504 Zn atoms so that the compound is expressed with the chemical formula of Fe13Zn126. All Fe atoms exclusively occupy the centre of normal and disordered icosahedra. Iron-centred normal icosahedra are linked to one another by face- and vertex-sharing forming two types of basal slabs, which are bridged with each other by face-sharing with icosioctahedra, whereas disordered icosahedra with positional disorder at their vertex sites are isolated from other polyhedra. The bonding features in the δ1p phase are discussed in comparison with those in the Γ and ζ phases in the iron−zinc system. PMID:24675597

  18. Photon diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, John

    2009-11-01

    In current light models, a particle-like model of light is inconsistent with diffraction observations. A model of light is proposed wherein photon inferences are combined with the cosmological scalar potential model (SPM). That the photon is a surface with zero surface area in the travel direction is inferred from the Michelson-Morley experiment. That the photons in slits are mathematically treated as a linear antenna array (LAA) is inferred from the comparison of the transmission grating interference pattern and the single slit diffraction pattern. That photons induce a LAA wave into the plenum is inferred from the fractal model. Similarly, the component of the photon (the hod) is treated as a single antenna radiating a potential wave into the plenum. That photons are guided by action on the surface of the hod is inferred from the SPM. The plenum potential waves are a real field (not complex) that forms valleys, consistent with the pilot waves of the Bohm interpretation of quantum mechanics. Therefore, the Afshar experiment result is explained, supports Bohm, and falsifies Copenhagen. The papers may be viewed at http://web.citcom.net/˜scjh/.

  19. Calculating cellulose diffraction patterns

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although powder diffraction of cellulose is a common experiment, the patterns are not widely understood. The theory is mathematical, there are numerous different crystal forms, and the conventions are not standardized. Experience with IR spectroscopy is not directly transferable. An awful error, tha...

  20. Mass analysis by scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction validate predictions of stacked beta-solenoid model of HET-s prion fibrils.

    PubMed

    Sen, Anindito; Baxa, Ulrich; Simon, Martha N; Wall, Joseph S; Sabate, Raimon; Saupe, Sven J; Steven, Alasdair C

    2007-02-23

    Fungal prions are infectious filamentous polymers of proteins that are soluble in uninfected cells. In its prion form, the HET-s protein of Podospora anserina participates in a fungal self/non-self recognition phenomenon called heterokaryon incompatibility. Like other prion proteins, HET-s has a so-called "prion domain" (its C-terminal region, HET-s-(218-289)) that is responsible for induction and propagation of the prion in vivo and for fibril formation in vitro. Prion fibrils are thought to have amyloid backbones of polymerized prion domains. A relatively detailed model has been proposed for prion domain fibrils of HET-s based on a variety of experimental constraints (Ritter, C., Maddelein, M. L., Siemer, A. B., Luhrs, T., Ernst, M., Meier, B. H., Saupe, S. J., and Riek, R. (2005) Nature 435, 844-848). To test specific predictions of this model, which envisages axial stacking of beta-solenoids with two coils per subunit, we examined fibrils by electron microscopy. Electron diffraction gave a prominent meridional reflection at (0.47 nm)(-1), indicative of cross-beta structure, as predicted. STEM (scanning transmission electron microscopy) mass-per-unit-length measurements yielded 1.02 +/- 0.16 subunits per 0.94 nm, in agreement with the model prediction (1 subunit per 0.94 nm). This is half the packing density of approximately 1 subunit per 0.47 nm previously obtained for fibrils of the yeast prion proteins, Ure2p and Sup35p, whence it follows that the respective amyloid architectures are basically different.

  1. PtIr-WO3 nanostructured alloy for electrocatalytic oxidation of ethylene glycol and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Murawska, Magdalena; Cox, James A; Miecznikowski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we characterized tungsten oxide-decorated carbon-supported PtIr nanoparticles and tested it for the electrooxidation reactions of ethylene glycol and ethanol. Phase and morphological evaluation of the proposed electrocatalytic materials are investigated employing various characterization techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Electrochemical diagnostic measurements such as cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and linear sweep voltammetry revealed that the tungsten oxide-modified PtIr/Vulcan nanoparticles have higher catalytic activity for ethylene glycol and ethanol electrooxidation than that of PtIr/Vulcan. A significant enhancement for electrooxidation of CO-adsorbate monolayers occurred in the presence of a transition metal oxide relative to that of pure PtIr/Vulcan electrocatalyst. The likely reasons for this are modification on the Pt center electronic structure and/or increasing the population of reactive oxo groups at the PtIr/Vulcan electrocatalytic interface in different potential regions.

  2. Preparation of IrO2 nanoparticles with SBA-15 template and its supported Pt nanocomposite as bifunctional oxygen catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Fan-Dong; Liu, Jing; Ling, Ai-Xia; Xu, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Hui-Yun; Kong, Qing-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, we report the syntheses of IrO2 nanoparticles with SBA-15 template (s-IrO2), and s-IrO2 supported Pt nanocomposite (Pt/s-IrO2) as bifunctional oxygen catalyst. Physical characterizations including X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy demonstrate that s-IrO2 catalyst has excellent uniformity and regularity in particle shape and much ordered distribution in geometric space, and Pt/s-IrO2 catalyst shows a uniform Pt dispersion on the surface of the s-IrO2 particles. Electrochemical analyses prove that s-IrO2 catalyst possesses superior OER activity at operating potentials; and that Pt/s-IrO2 catalyst, in comparison to Pt/commercial IrO2, has higher ESA value and ORR catalytic performance with a mechanism of four-electron pathway and a high ORR efficiency. And as a bifunctional oxygen catalyst, Pt/s-IrO2 also exhibits more remarkable OER performance than the commercial one. The s-IrO2 nanoparticles will be a promising active component (for OER), and suitable for Pt support (for ORR).

  3. New electrocatalysts for unitized regenerative fuel cell: Pt-Ir alloy deposited on the proton exchange membrane surface by impregnation-reduction method.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chieh-Hao; Wu, Chun-Lin; Lin, Meng-Tsun; Shih, Chihhsiong

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, a modified technique to prepare Pt-Ir catalyst layer on the proton exchange membrane (PEM) surface using the impregnation-reduction (IR) method is proposed to improve the electrocatalytic activity as well as the life cycle of the bifunctional oxygen electrode (BOE). The resulted electrocatalysts were characterized by the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Electron Probe Micro-Analysis (EPMA), and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The electrocatalytic properties of the Pt-Ir layer on PEM surface for the oxygen reduction and water oxidation reactions as well as the life cycle of MEA were investigated. Experimental results showed that the Ir particles were dispersed densely in the platinum layer through the modified IR technique. The atomic ratio of Pt over Ir elements was 9:1, and the resulted thickness of the obtained Pt-Ir catalyst layer was about 1.0 microm. The Pt-Ir catalyst layer was composed of Pt layer doped with Ir nano-particles comprising nano Pt-Ir alloy phase. The large surface area of Ir core with Pt shell particles and the presence of nano Pt-Ir alloy phase led to a higher electrocatalytic activity of BOE. Due to the good binding between the Nafion membrane and the Pt-Ir alloy catalyst, as well as the composite structure of the resulted Pt-Ir, the life cycle of Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell (URFC) is improved through this novel BOE.

  4. Spin crossover in iron(II) tris(2-(2 '-pyridyl)benzimidazole) complex monitored by variable temperature methods: synchrotron powder diffraction, DSC, IR spectra, Mössbauer spectra, and magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boča, R.; Boča, M.; Ehrenberg, H.; Fuess, H.; Linert, W.; Renz, F.; Svoboda, I.

    2003-09-01

    The thermal expansion of the spin crossover system [Fe(pybzim) 3](ClO 4) 2 · H 2O (pybzim=2-(2 '-pyridyl)benzimidazole) has been determined from powder X-ray data between 50 and 250 K; the wavelength of the synchrotron source was 1.21888(1) Å. The unit cell parameters of the triclinic crystal system were a=12.091 Å, b=12.225 Å, c=14.083 Å, α=77.70°, β=80.35°, γ=74.35°, and V=1944.9 Å 3 at 250 K. In addition to the linear thermal expansion of the unit cell volume, an extra expansion due to the low-spin (LS) to high-spin (HS) transition is observed. The V( T) function shows a sudden increase comparable with the step in the effective magnetic moment at the transition region (140 K). A similar behavior is obtained on the basis of the infrared spectra. The absorption bands corresponding to the metal-ligand stretching modes change their intensities upon heating: the bands corresponding to the low-spin molecules (at ca. 409, 430, 443, and 460 cm -1) disappear in the gain of the high-spin bands (at 259 and 285 cm -1). The variable-temperature data obtained by different techniques (powder diffraction, EXAFS, IR spectra, Mössbauer spectra, magnetic susceptibility, DSC) have been transformed to a common basis - the temperature dependence of the high-spin mole fraction xHS( T). The application of the Ising-like (two-level) model of the spin crossover led to the thermodynamic data Δ H=2.6 kJ mol -1 and Δ S=19 J K -1 mol -1 as well as to the cooperativeness J/ k≈110 K (subtracted from the susceptibility data) that characterizes the abruptness of the spin crossover in the solid state.

  5. Molecular beam epitaxial growth mechanism of ZnSe epilayers on (100) GaAs as determined by reflection high-energy electron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landwehr, G.; Wagg, A.; Heinke, H.; Behr, T.; Hommel, D.; Ruppert, P.

    1994-04-01

    The properties of the molecular beam epitaxial ZnSe epilayers deposited directly on a GaAs substrate are compared to those grown on a GaAs buffer layer. The superior quality of the latter is confirmed by RHEED, TEM and X-ray diffraction. Based on RHEED oscillation studies, a model explaining the dependence of the ZnSe growth rate on Zn and Se fluxes and the substrate temperature is developed taking into account physi- and chemisorbed states. For partially relaxed epilayers, the correlation between the relaxation state and the crystalline mosaicity, as found by high resolution X-ray diffraction, is discussed.

  6. Evolution of titania nanotubes-supported WO{sub x} species by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cortes-Jacome, M.A.; Angeles-Chavez, C.; Morales, M.; Lopez-Salinas, E.; Toledo-Antonio, J.A.

    2007-10-15

    Structural evolution of WO{sub x} species on the surface of titania nanotubes was followed by in situ thermo-Raman spectroscopy. A total of 15 wt% of W atoms were loaded on the surface of a hydroxylated titania nanotubes by impregnation with ammonium metatungstate solution and then, the sample was thermally treated in a Linkam cell at different temperatures in nitrogen flow. The band characteristic of the W=O bond was observed at 962 cm{sup -1} in the dried sample, which vanished between 300 and 700 deg. C, and reappear again after annealing at 800 deg. C, along with a broad band centered at 935 cm{sup -1}, attributed to the v{sub 1} vibration of W=O in tetrahedral coordination. At 900 and 1000 deg. C, the broad band decomposed into four bands at 923, 934, 940 and 950 cm{sup -1}, corresponding to the symmetric and asymmetric vibration of W=O bonds in Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}W{sub 2}O{sub 7} phases as determined by X-ray diffraction and High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The structure of the nanotubular support was kept at temperatures below 450 deg. C, thereafter, it transformed into anatase being stabilized at temperatures as high as 900 deg. C. At 1000 deg. C, anatase phase partially converted into rutile. After annealing at 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell of ca. 5 nm thickness, composed of sodium tungstate nanoclusters, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase. - Graphical abstract: Titania nanotubes loaded with 15 wt% W atoms were characterized from room temperature (rt) to 1000 deg. C by thermo-Raman spectroscopy in N{sub 2}. At 1000 deg. C, a core-shell model material was obtained, with a shell thickness of ca. 5 nm composed by nanoclusters of sodium tungstate, and a core composed mainly of rutile TiO{sub 2} phase.

  7. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Nguyen, Hoang T.; Boyd, Robert; Shore, Bruce W.

    1999-01-01

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described.

  8. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, M.D.; Britten, J.A.; Nguyen, H.T.; Boyd, R.; Shore, B.W.

    1999-05-25

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described. 7 figs.

  9. Physical and electrochemical evaluation of ATO supported IrO2 catalyst for proton exchange membrane water electrolyser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthiyapura, Vinod Kumar; Mamlouk, Mohammed; Pasupathi, Sivakumar; Pollet, Bruno G.; Scott, Keith

    2014-12-01

    Antimony doped tin oxide (ATO) was studied as a support material for IrO2 in proton exchange membrane water electrolyser (PEMWE). Adams fusion method was used to prepare the IrO2-ATO catalysts. The physical and electrochemical characterisation of the catalysts were carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder conductivity, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and membrane electrode assembly (MEA) polarisation. The BET surface area and electronic conductivity of the supported catalysts were found to be predominantly arisen from the IrO2. Supported catalyst showed higher active surface area than the pristine IrO2 in CV analysis with 85% H3PO4 as electrolyte. The MEA performance using Nafion®-115 membrane at 80 °C and atmospheric pressure showed a better performance for IrO2 loading ≥60 wt.% than the pristine IrO2 with a normalised current density of 1625 mA cm-2 @1.8 V for the 60% IrO2-ATO compared to 1341 mA cm-2 for the pristine IrO2 under the same condition. The higher performance of the supported catalysts was mainly attributed to better dispersion of active IrO2 on electrochemically inactive ATO support material, forming smaller IrO2 crystallites. A 40 wt.% reduction in the IrO2 was achieved by utilising the support material.

  10. A pseudo-tetragonal tungsten bronze superstructure: a combined solution of the crystal structure of K6.4(Nb,Ta)(36.3)O94 with advanced transmission electron microscopy and neutron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Paria Sena, Robert; Babaryk, Artem A; Khainakov, Sergiy; Garcia-Granda, Santiago; Slobodyanik, Nikolay S; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Abakumov, Artem M; Hadermann, Joke

    2016-01-21

    The crystal structure of the K6.4Nb28.2Ta8.1O94 pseudo-tetragonal tungsten bronze-type oxide was determined using a combination of X-ray powder diffraction, neutron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy techniques, including electron diffraction, high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), annular bright field STEM (ABF-STEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray compositional mapping (STEM-EDX). The compound crystallizes in the space group Pbam with unit cell parameters a = 37.468(9) Å, b = 12.493(3) Å, c = 3.95333(15) Å. The structure consists of corner sharing (Nb,Ta)O6 octahedra forming trigonal, tetragonal and pentagonal tunnels. All tetragonal tunnels are occupied by K(+) ions, while 1/3 of the pentagonal tunnels are preferentially occupied by Nb(5+)/Ta(5+) and 2/3 are occupied by K(+) in a regular pattern. A fractional substitution of K(+) in the pentagonal tunnels by Nb(5+)/Ta(5+) is suggested by the analysis of the HAADF-STEM images. In contrast to similar structures, such as K2Nb8O21, also parts of the trigonal tunnels are fractionally occupied by K(+) cations.

  11. Phononic crystal diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Herbison, Sarah; Declercq, Nico F.; Laude, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    When a phononic crystal is interrogated by an external source of acoustic waves, there is necessarily a phenomenon of diffraction occurring on the external enclosing surfaces. Indeed, these external surfaces are periodic and the resulting acoustic diffraction grating has a periodicity that depends on the orientation of the phononic crystal. This work presents a combined experimental and theoretical study on the diffraction of bulk ultrasonic waves on the external surfaces of a 2D phononic crystal that consists of a triangular lattice of steel rods in a water matrix. The results of transmission experiments are compared with theoretical band structures obtained with the finite-element method. Angular spectrograms (showing frequency as a function of angle) determined from diffraction experiments are then compared with finite-element simulations of diffraction occurring on the surfaces of the crystal. The experimental results show that the diffraction that occurs on its external surfaces is highly frequency-dependent and has a definite relation with the Bloch modes of the phononic crystal. In particular, a strong influence of the presence of bandgaps and deaf bands on the diffraction efficiency is found. This observation opens perspectives for the design of efficient phononic crystal diffraction gratings.

  12. Successful synthesis and thermal stability of immiscible metal Au-Rh, Au-Ir andAu-Ir-Rh nanoalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubin, Yury; Plyusnin, Pavel; Sharafutdinov, Marat; Makotchenko, Evgenia; Korenev, Sergey

    2017-05-01

    We successfully prepared face-centred cubic nanoalloys in systems of Au-Ir, Au-Rh and Au-Ir-Rh, with large bulk miscibility gaps, in one-run reactions under thermal decomposition of specially synthesised single-source precursors, namely, [AuEn2][Ir(NO2)6], [AuEn2][Ir(NO2)6] х [Rh(NO2)6]1-х and [AuEn2][Rh(NO2)6]. The precursors employed contain all desired metals ‘mixed’ at the atomic level, thus providing significant advantages for obtaining alloys. The observations using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy show that the nanoalloy structures are composed of well-dispersed aggregates of crystalline domains with a mean size of 5 ± 3 nm. Еnergy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) measurements confirm the formation of AuIr, AuRh, AuIr0.75Rh0.25, AuIr0.50Rh0.50 and AuIr0.25Rh0.75 metastable solid solutions. In situ high-temperature synchrotron XRD (HTXRD) was used to study the formation mechanism of nanoalloys. The observed transformations are described by the ‘conversion chemistry’ mechanism characterised by the primary development of particles comprising atoms of only one type, followed by a chemical reaction resulting in the final formation of a nanoalloy. The obtained metastable nanoalloys exhibit essential thermal stability. Exposure to 180 °C for 30 h does not cause any dealloying process.

  13. Preparation of Pt/Irx(IrO2)10 - x bifunctional oxygen catalyst for unitized regenerative fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Fan-Dong; Zhang, Sheng; Yin, Ge-Ping; Zhang, Na; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Du, Chun-Yu

    2012-07-01

    Bifunctional Pt/Irx(IrO2)10 - x (x < 10) catalyst for unitized regenerative fuel cell (URFC) has been prepared by depositing Pt on Irx(IrO2)10 - x support which is obtained initially from Adams fusion method. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy show that ultrafine and narrow distributed Pt/Ir3(IrO2)7 nanocomposites are formed. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that among the series of catalysts studied, Pt/Ir3(IrO2)7 catalyst possesses the highest electrochemical surface area (24.74 m2 g-1) and the highest activity towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) (21.71 mA mg-1 at 0.85 V). Meanwhile, considerably high activity towards oxygen evolution reaction (OER) (42.35 mA mg-1 at 1.55 V) is also observed for Pt/Ir3(IrO2)7 catalyst. Kinetic analyses indicate that ORR on Pt/Ir3(IrO2)7 catalyst follows four-electron mechanism. This work opens a new way to fabricate efficient bifunctional oxygen catalyst for URFC.

  14. Stoichiometry of alloy nanoparticles from laser ablation of PtIr in acetone and their electrophoretic deposition on PtIr electrodes.

    PubMed

    Jakobi, Jurij; Menéndez-Manjón, Ana; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Kienle, Lorenz; Wagener, Philipp; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2011-04-08

    Charged Pt-Ir alloy nanoparticles are generated through femtosecond laser ablation of a Pt₉Ir target in acetone without using chemical precursors or stabilizing agents. Preservation of the target's stoichiometry in the colloidal nanoparticles is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX), high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM)-EDX elemental maps, high resolution TEM and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) measurements. Results are discussed with reference to thermophysical properties and the phase diagram. The nanoparticles show a lognormal size distribution with a mean Feret particle size of 26 nm. The zeta potential of -45 mV indicates high stability of the colloid with a hydrodynamic diameter of 63 nm. The charge of the particles enables electrophoretic deposition of nanoparticles, creating nanoscale roughness on three-dimensional PtIr neural electrodes within a minute. In contrast to coating with Pt or Ir oxides, this method allows modification of the surface roughness without changing the chemical composition of PtIr.

  15. Crumpled rGO-supported Pt-Ir bifunctional catalyst prepared by spray pyrolysis for unitized regenerative fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In Gyeom; Nah, In Wook; Oh, In-Hwan; Park, Sehkyu

    2017-10-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) crumpled reduced graphene oxide supported Pt-Ir alloys that served as bifunctional oxygen catalysts for use in untized regenerative fuel cells were synthesized by a facile spray pyrolysis method. Pt-Ir catalysts supported on rGO (Pt-Ir/rGOs) were physically characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to observe change in composition by heat treatment, alloying, and morphological transition of the catalysts. Their catalytic activities and stabilities for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) conditions were electrochemically investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), potential cycling and hold tests on the rotating disk electrode (RDE). Pt-Ir/rGO with no post heat-treatment (Pt-Ir/rGO_NP) showed a lower activity for ORR and OER although metal nanoparticles decorated on the support are relatively small. However, Pt-Ir/rGO showed remarkably enhanced activity following heat treatment, depending on temperature. Pt-Ir/rGO heat-treated at 600 °C after spray pyrolysis (Pt-Ir/rGO_P600) exhibited a higher activity and stability than a commercially available Pt/C catalyst kept under the ORR condition, and it also revealed a comparable OER activity and durability versus the commercial unsupported Ir catalyst.

  16. Combining 2 nm Spatial Resolution and 0.02% Precision for Deformation Mapping of Semiconductor Specimens in a Transmission Electron Microscope by Precession Electron Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Cooper, David; Bernier, Nicolas; Rouvière, Jean-Luc

    2015-08-12

    Precession electron diffraction has been used to provide accurate deformation maps of a device structure showing that this technique can provide a spatial resolution of better than 2 nm and a precision of better than 0.02%. The deformation maps have been fitted to simulations that account for thin specimen relaxation. By combining the experimental deformation maps and simulations, we have been able to separate the effects of the stressor and recessed sources and drains and show that the Si3N4 stressor increases the in-plane deformation in the silicon channel from 0.92 to 1.52 ± 0.02%. In addition, the stress in the deposited Si3N4 film has been calculated from the simulations, which is an important parameter for device design.

  17. Ionic strength and composition govern the elasticity of biological membranes. A study of model DMPC bilayers by force- and transmission IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Šegota, Suzana; Vojta, Danijela; Pletikapić, Galja; Baranović, Goran

    2015-02-01

    Infrared (IR) spectroscopy was used to quantify the ion mixture effect of seawater (SW), particularly the contribution of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) as dominant divalent cations, on the thermotropic phase behaviour of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-posphocholine (DMPC) bilayers. The changed character of the main transition at 24 °C from sharp to gradual in films and the 1 °C shift of the main transition temperature in dispersions reflect the interactions of lipid headgroups with the ions in SW. Force spectroscopy was used to quantify the nanomechanical hardness of a DMPC supported lipid bilayer (SLB). Considering the electrostatic and ion binding equilibrium contributions while systematically probing the SLB in various salt solutions, we showed that ionic strength had a decisive influence on its nanomechanics. The mechanical hardness of DMPC SLBs in the liquid crystalline phase linearly increases with the increasing fraction of all ion-bound lipids in a series of monovalent salt solutions. It also linearly increases in the gel phase but almost three times faster (the corresponding slopes are 4.9 nN/100 mM and 13.32 nN/100 mM, respectively). We also showed that in the presence of divalent ions (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) the bilayer mechanical hardness was unproportionally increased, and that was accompanied with the decrease of Na(+) ion and increase of Cl(-) ion bound lipids. The underlying process is a cooperative and competitive ion binding in both the gel and the liquid crystalline phase. Bilayer hardness thus turned out to be very sensitive to ionic strength as well as to ionic composition of the surrounding medium. In particular, the indicated correlation helped us to emphasize the colligative properties of SW as a naturally occurring complex ion mixture.

  18. Dislocation Substructure in the Cold-Rolled Ni-20 Mass Pct Cr Alloy Analyzed by X-ray Diffraction, Positron Annihilation Lifetime, and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemura, Mitsuharu; Inoue, Koji

    2016-12-01

    The systematic change in the dislocation density and characteristics that develop under cold rolling as a simulated deformation was studied in order to examine the fundamental behavior of dislocations in terms of the dislocation substructure formation. In particular, the dislocation density was quantified by X-ray line profile analysis (XLPA), which is effective for quantifying the dislocation density and character; positron annihilation lifetime (PAL), which is sensitive to vacancy-type lattice defects; the Bailey-Hirsch equation from the hardness (Hv); and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The strain dependency of the dislocation density analyzed by XLPA, PAL, TEM, and Hv showed a similar tendency with an increase in the dislocation. In particular, the dislocation density by XLPA had good agreement with the results of TEM at low strain levels and with PAL at high strain levels. As a result, a combination of these techniques successfully showed the behavior of the dislocation substructure.

  19. Component analyses of urinary nanocrystallites of uric acid stone formers by combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fast Fourier transformation, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Xue, Jun-Fa; Xia, Zhi-Yue; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to analyse the components of nanocrystallites in urines of patients with uric acid (UA) stones. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of HRTEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed to analyse the components of these nanocrystallites. XRD and FFT showed that the main component of urinary nanocrystallites was UA, which contains a small amount of calcium oxalate monohydrate and phosphates. EDS showed the characteristic absorption peaks of C, O, Ca and P. The formation of UA stones was closely related to a large number of UA nanocrystallites in urine. A combination of HRTEM, FFT, EDS and XRD analyses could be performed accurately to analyse the components of urinary nanocrystallites.

  20. In search of the elusive IrB2: Can mechanochemistry help?

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zhilin; Blair, Richard G.; Orlovskaya, Nina; Cullen, David A.; Lapidus, Saul H.; Kata, Dariusz; Rutkowski, Paweł; Lis, Jerzy

    2015-10-20

    We produced hexagonal ReB2-type IrB2 diboride and orthorhombic IrB monoboride phases, that were previously unknown and saw them produced by mechanochemical syntheses. High energy ball milling of elemental Ir and B powder for 30 h, followed by annealing of the powder at 1050 °C for 48 h, resulted in the formation of the desired phases. Both traditional laboratory and high resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were used for phase identification of the synthesized powder. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed, along with XRD, to further characterize the microstructure of the phases produced.

  1. Photoelectron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadley, Charles S.

    1987-01-01

    The use of core-level photoelectron diffraction for structural studies of surfaces and epitaxial overlayers is discussed. Photoelectron diffraction is found to provide several direct and rather unique types of structural information, including the sites and positions of adsorbed atoms; the orientations of small molecules or fragments bound to surfaces; the orientations, layer thicknesses, vertical lattice constants, and degrees of short-range order of epitaxial or partially-epitaxial overlayers; and the presence of short-range spin order in magnetic materials. Specific systems considered are the reaction of oxygen with Ni(001), the growth of epitaxial Cu on Ni(001), the well-defined test case S on Ni(001), and short-range spin order in the antiferromagnet KMnF3. A rather straightforward single scattering cluster (SSC) model also proves capable of quantitatively describing such data, particularly for near-surface species and with corrections for spherical-wave scattering effects and correlated vibrational motion. Promising new directions in such studies also include measurements with high angular resolution and the expanded use of synchrotron radiation.

  2. Measuring Collimator Infrared (IR) Spectral Transmission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    looking down a collimator and a standalone large surface blackbody. They were both focused and had the same total atmospheric path length between...3 3. Setup of SR5000 With Atmospheric Paths Equal at 4 m...standalone large surface blackbody. The total atmospheric path length between source and sensor were the same, yet discrepancies were noticed

  3. IR Windstreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Windstreaks are features caused by the interaction of wind and topographic landforms. The raised rims and bowls of impact craters causes a complex interaction such that the wind vortex in the lee of the crater can both scour away the surface dust and deposit it back in the center of the lee. If you look closely, you will see evidence of this in a darker 'rim' enclosing a brighter interior.

    This infrared image shows windstreaks in the region between Gordii Dorsum and Amazonis Mensa.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -15.8, Longitude 215 East (145 West). 97 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. IR Windstreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Windstreaks are features caused by the interaction of wind and topographic landforms. The raised rims and bowls of impact craters causes a complex interaction such that the wind vortex in the lee of the crater can both scour away the surface dust and deposit it back in the center of the lee. If you look closely, you will see evidence of this in a darker 'rim' enclosing a brighter interior.

    This infrared image shows windstreaks in the region between Gordii Dorsum and Amazonis Mensa.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -15.8, Longitude 215 East (145 West). 97 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. Growth and characterization of V-shaped IrO(2) nanowedges via metal-organic vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Chen, C A; Chen, Y M; Huang, Y S; Tsai, D S; Tiong, K K; Du, C H

    2008-11-19

    We report in detail the synthesis and characterization of V-shaped IrO(2) nanowedges (NWs) with an angle of 110° between the two arms. The NWs were grown on top of rutile (R) phase TiO(2) nanorods (NRs) sitting on a sapphire (SA)(100) substrate via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) by using (C(6)H(7))(C(8)H(12))Ir and titanium-tetraisopropoxide (TTIP, Ti[OCH(CH(3))(2)](4)) as the source reagents. The surface morphology, structural, and spectroscopic properties of the as-deposited nanocrystals (NCs) were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), micro-Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and selected-area electron diffractometry (SAED). The FESEM images and XRD patterns indicated growth of V-shaped IrO(2)(101) NWs on top of R-TiO(2) NRs. The Raman spectrum showed the nanosize induced redshift and peak broadening of the IrO(2) and rutile phase of TiO(2) signatures with respect to that of the bulk counterparts. TEM and SAED characterizations of IrO(2) NCs showed that the nanowedges were crystalline IrO(2) with a twin plane of (101) and twin direction of [Formula: see text] at the V-junction. The probable mechanisms for the formation of well-aligned IrO(2) NWs are discussed.

  6. Growth and characterization of V-shaped IrO2 nanowedges via metal-organic vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. A.; Chen, Y. M.; Huang, Y. S.; Tsai, D. S.; Tiong, K. K.; Du, C. H.

    2008-11-01

    We report in detail the synthesis and characterization of V-shaped IrO2 nanowedges (NWs) with an angle of 110° between the two arms. The NWs were grown on top of rutile (R) phase TiO2 nanorods (NRs) sitting on a sapphire (SA)(100) substrate via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) by using (C6H7)(C8H12)Ir and titanium-tetraisopropoxide (TTIP, Ti[OCH(CH3)2]4) as the source reagents. The surface morphology, structural, and spectroscopic properties of the as-deposited nanocrystals (NCs) were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), micro-Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and selected-area electron diffractometry (SAED). The FESEM images and XRD patterns indicated growth of V-shaped IrO2(101) NWs on top of R-TiO2 NRs. The Raman spectrum showed the nanosize induced redshift and peak broadening of the IrO2 and rutile phase of TiO2 signatures with respect to that of the bulk counterparts. TEM and SAED characterizations of IrO2 NCs showed that the nanowedges were crystalline IrO2 with a twin plane of (101) and twin direction of [\\bar {1} 01] at the V-junction. The probable mechanisms for the formation of well-aligned IrO2 NWs are discussed.

  7. Two-dimensional X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy study on the effect of magnetron sputtering atmosphere on GaN/SiC interface and gallium nitride thin film crystal structure

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Huaxiang; Zhu, Guo-Zhen; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Kitai, Adrian

    2015-03-21

    The growth mechanisms of high quality GaN thin films on 6H-SiC by sputtering were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The XRD θ-2θ scans show that high quality (0002) oriented GaN was deposited on 6H-SiC by reactive magnetron sputtering. Pole figures obtained by 2D-XRD clarify that GaN thin films are dominated by (0002) oriented wurtzite GaN and (111) oriented zinc-blende GaN. A thin amorphous silicon oxide layer on SiC surfaces observed by STEM plays a critical role in terms of the orientation information transfer from the substrate to the GaN epilayer. The addition of H{sub 2} into Ar and/or N{sub 2} during sputtering can reduce the thickness of the amorphous layer. Moreover, adding 5% H{sub 2} into Ar can facilitate a phase transformation from amorphous to crystalline in the silicon oxide layer and eliminate the unwanted (33{sup ¯}02) orientation in the GaN thin film. Fiber texture GaN thin films can be grown by adding 10% H{sub 2} into N{sub 2} due to the complex reaction between H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}.

  8. Synthesis, spectroscopy (IR, multinuclear NMR, ESI-MS), diffraction, density functional study and in vitro antiproliferative activity of pyrazole-beta-diketone dihalotin(IV) compounds on 5 melanoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Pettinari, Claudio; Caruso, Francesco; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Villa, Raffaella; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Riccardo; Phillips, Christine; Tanski, Joseph; Rossi, Miriam

    2006-01-01

    Novel 4-acylpyrazolon-5-ato-dihalotin(IV) complexes, [Q2SnX2], (X = F, Cl, Br or I); HQ = HQ(CHPh2) (1,2-dihydro-3-methyl-1-phenyl-4-(2,2-diphenylacetyl)pyrazol-5-one), HQ(Bn) (1,2-dihydro-3-methyl-1-phenyl-4-(2-phenylacetyl)pyrazol-5-one) or HQ(CF3,py) (4-(2,2,2-trifluoroacetyl)-1,2-dihydro-3-methyl-1-(pyridin-2-yl)pyrazol-5-one) have been synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic (IR, 1H, 13C, 19F and 119Sn NMR, electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS)), analytical and structural methods (X-ray and density functional theory). 119Sn chemical shifts depend on the nature of the halides bonded to tin. Isomer conversion, detected in solution by NMR spectroscopy, is related to the acyl moiety bulkiness while the cis(Cl)-cis(acyl)-trans(pyrazolonato) scheme is found in the solid state. The in vitro antiproliferative tests of three derivatives on three human melanoma cell lines (JR8, SK-MEL-5, MEL501) and two melanoma cell clones (2/21 and 2/60) show dose-dependent decrease of cell proliferation in all cell lines. The activity correlates with the nature of the substituent on position 1 of pyrazole, decreasing in the order pyridyl>Ph>methyl. The activity for (Q(CF3,py))2SnCl2 on the SK-MEL-5 cell line is IC50 = 50 microM.

  9. Mid-IR laser source using hollow waveguide beam combining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elder, Ian F.; Thorne, Daniel H.; Lamb, Robert A.; Jenkins, R. M.

    2016-03-01

    Hollow waveguide technology is a route to efficient beam combining of multiple laser sources in a compact footprint. It is a technology appropriate for combining free-space or fibre-coupled beams generated by semiconductor, fibre or solidstate laser sources. This paper will present results of a breadboard mid-IR system comprising four laser sources combined using a hollow waveguide optical circuit. In this approach the individual dichroic beam combiner components are held in precision alignment slots in the hollow waveguide circuit and the different input wavelengths are guided between the components to a common output port. The hollow waveguide circuit is formed in the surface of a Macor (machinable glass-ceramic) substrate using precision CNC machining techniques. The hollow waveguides have fundamentally different propagation characteristics to solid core waveguides leading to transmission characteristics close to those of the atmosphere while still providing useful light guidance properties. The transmission efficiency and power handling of the hollow waveguide circuit can be designed to be very high across a broad waveband range. Three of the sources are quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), a semiconductor laser technology providing direct generation of midwave IR output. The combined beams provide 4.2 W of near diffraction-limited output co-boresighted to better than 20 µrad. High coupling efficiency into the waveguides is demonstrated, with negligible waveguide transmission losses. The overall transmission of the hollow waveguide beam combining optical circuit, weighted by the laser power at each wavelength, is 93%. This loss is dominated by the performance of the dichroic optics used to combine the beams.

  10. The effective method based on IR annealing for manufacturing novel carbon nanocrystalline material and multifunctional metal-polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhitov, L. V.; Kozlov, V. V.; Kostishyn, V. G.; Morchenko, A. T.; Muratov, D. G.

    2009-09-01

    Metal-containing polymeric nanomaterials were prepared by the two methods: infrared-irradiation pyrolysis and metals reduction from their salts in hydrazine on substrates. The composite consist of polymer matrix with 3d-metal nanoparticles. The structure and morphology of nanocomposites were investigated for the powder samples using X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS). It is shown that technology of preparing the nanocomposite under IR-irradiation is more effective than a thermal treatment under resistance-type heating, as the synergetic effect of influencing IR-radiation and heat leads to faster polymer transformations. The results of MS data comparison for the samples prepared by IR-radiation-stimulated pyrolysis and by means of salt reduction in hydrazine are discussed.

  11. Structure, properties, and disorder in the new distorted-Hollandite PbIr4Se8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trump, Benjamin A.; McQueen, Tyrel M.

    2016-10-01

    The synthesis and physical properties of the new distorted-Hollandite PbIr4Se8 are reported. Powder X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy show that the structure consists of edge- and corner-sharing IrSe6 octahedra, with one-dimensional channels occupied by Pb. The structure contains Se-Se anion-anion bonding, leading to an electron count of Pb2+(Ir3+)4(Se2)2-(Se2-)6, confirmed by bond-valence sums and diamagnetic behavior. Structural and heat capacity measurements demonstrate disorder on the Pb site, due to the combination of lone-pair effects and the large size of the one-dimensional channels. Comparisons are made to known Hollandite and pseudo-Hollandite structures, which demonstrates that the anion-anion bonding in PbIr4Se8 distorts its structure, to accommodate the Ir3+ state. An electronic structure calculation indicates semiconductor character with a band gap of 0.76(11) eV.

  12. Size dependent behavior of Fe3O4 crystals during electrochemical (de)lithiation: an in situ X-ray diffraction, ex situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Bock, David C; Pelliccione, Christopher J; Zhang, Wei; Timoshenko, Janis; Knehr, K W; West, Alan C; Wang, Feng; Li, Yan; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Takeuchi, Esther S; Takeuchi, Kenneth J; Marschilok, Amy C

    2017-08-09

    The iron oxide magnetite, Fe3O4, is a promising conversion type lithium ion battery anode material due to its high natural abundance, low cost and high theoretical capacity. While the close packing of ions in the inverse spinel structure of Fe3O4 enables high energy density, it also limits the kinetics of lithium ion diffusion in the material. Nanosizing of Fe3O4 to reduce the diffusion path length is an effective strategy for overcoming this issue and results in improved rate capability. However, the impact of nanosizing on the multiple structural transformations that occur during the electrochemical (de)lithiation reaction in Fe3O4 is poorly understood. In this study, the influence of crystallite size on the lithiation-conversion mechanisms in Fe3O4 is investigated using complementary X-ray techniques along with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and continuum level simulations on electrodes of two different Fe3O4 crystallite sizes. In situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were utilized to track the changes to the crystalline phases during (de)lithiation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements at multiple points during the (de)lithiation processes provided local electronic and atomic structural information. Tracking the crystalline and nanocrystalline phases during the first (de)lithiation provides experimental evidence that (1) the lithiation mechanism is non-uniform and dependent on crystallite size, where increased Li(+) diffusion length in larger crystals results in conversion to Fe(0) metal while insertion of Li(+) into spinel-Fe3O4 is still occurring, and (2) the disorder and size of the Fe metal domains formed when either material is fully lithiated impacts the homogeneity of the FeO phase formed during the subsequent delithiation.

  13. Diffraction encoded position measuring apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tansey, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    When a lightwave passes through a transmission grating, diffracted beams appear at the output or opposite side of the grating that are effectively Doppler shifted in frequency (phase) whereby a detector system can compare the phase of the zero order and higher order beams to obtain an indication of position. Multiple passes through the grating increase resolution for a given wavelength of a laser signal. The resolution can be improved further by using a smaller wavelength laser to generate the grating itself. Since the grating must only have a pitch sufficient to produce diffracted orders, inexpensive, ultraviolet wavelength lasers can be utilized and still obtain high resolution detection.

  14. Diffraction encoded position measuring apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tansey, R.J.

    1991-09-24

    When a lightwave passes through a transmission grating, diffracted beams appear at the output or opposite side of the grating that are effectively Doppler shifted in frequency (phase) whereby a detector system can compare the phase of the zero order and higher order beams to obtain an indication of position. Multiple passes through the grating increase resolution for a given wavelength of a laser signal. The resolution can be improved further by using a smaller wavelength laser to generate the grating itself. Since the grating must only have a pitch sufficient to produce diffracted orders, inexpensive, ultraviolet wavelength lasers can be utilized and still obtain high resolution detection. 3 figures.

  15. The Effect of Interface Texture on Exchange Biasing in Ni(80)Fe(20)/Ir(20)Mn(80) System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan-Tsung

    2009-01-01

    Exchange-biasing phenomenon can induce an evident unidirectional hysteresis loop shift by spin coupling effect in the ferromagnetic (FM)/antiferromagnetic (AFM) interface which can be applied in magnetoresistance random access memory (MRAM) and recording-head applications. However, magnetic properties are the most important to AFM texturing. In this work, top-configuration exchange-biasing NiFe/IrMn(x A) systems have been investigated with three different conditions. From the high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HR X-TEM) and X-ray diffraction results, we conclude that the IrMn (111) texture plays an important role in exchange-biasing field (H(ex)) and interfacial exchange energy (J(k)). H(ex) and J(k) tend to saturate when the IrMn thickness increases. Moreover, the coercivity (H(c)) dependence on IrMn thickness is explained based on the coupling or decoupling effect between the spins of the NiFe and IrMn layers near the NiFe/IrMn interface. In this work, the optimal values for H(ex) and J(k) are 115 Oe and 0.062 erg/cm(2), respectively.

  16. The Effect of Interface Texture on Exchange Biasing in Ni80Fe20/Ir20Mn80System

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Exchange-biasing phenomenon can induce an evident unidirectional hysteresis loop shift by spin coupling effect in the ferromagnetic (FM)/antiferromagnetic (AFM) interface which can be applied in magnetoresistance random access memory (MRAM) and recording-head applications. However, magnetic properties are the most important to AFM texturing. In this work, top-configuration exchange-biasing NiFe/IrMn(x Å) systems have been investigated with three different conditions. From the high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HR X-TEM) and X-ray diffraction results, we conclude that the IrMn (111) texture plays an important role in exchange-biasing field (Hex) and interfacial exchange energy (Jk).HexandJktend to saturate when the IrMn thickness increases. Moreover, the coercivity (Hc) dependence on IrMn thickness is explained based on the coupling or decoupling effect between the spins of the NiFe and IrMn layers near the NiFe/IrMn interface. In this work, the optimal values forHexandJkare 115 Oe and 0.062 erg/cm2, respectively. PMID:20596365

  17. Individual speckle diffraction based 1D and 2D Random Grating Fabrication for detector and solar energy harvesting applications.

    PubMed

    Bingi, Jayachandra; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-02-04

    Laser speckles and speckle patterns, which are formed by the random interference of scattered waves from optically rough surfaces, have found tremendous applications in a wide range of metrological and biomedical fields. Here, we demonstrate a novel edge diffraction phenomenon of individual speckle for the fabrication of 1D and 2D micron and sub-micron size random gratings. These random gratings exhibit broadband response with interesting diffusive diffraction patterns. As an immediate application for solar energy harvesting, significant reduction in transmission and enhanced absorption in thin "Si-random grating-Si" sandwich structure is demonstrated. This work has multifaceted significance where we exploited the individual speckle diffraction properties for the first time. Besides the solar harvesting applications, random gratings are suitable structures for fabrication of theoretically proposed random quantum well IR detectors and hence expected that this work will augur well for such studies in the near future.

  18. Individual speckle diffraction based 1D and 2D Random Grating Fabrication for detector and solar energy harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingi, Jayachandra; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-02-01

    Laser speckles and speckle patterns, which are formed by the random interference of scattered waves from optically rough surfaces, have found tremendous applications in a wide range of metrological and biomedical fields. Here, we demonstrate a novel edge diffraction phenomenon of individual speckle for the fabrication of 1D and 2D micron and sub-micron size random gratings. These random gratings exhibit broadband response with interesting diffusive diffraction patterns. As an immediate application for solar energy harvesting, significant reduction in transmission and enhanced absorption in thin “Si-random grating-Si” sandwich structure is demonstrated. This work has multifaceted significance where we exploited the individual speckle diffraction properties for the first time. Besides the solar harvesting applications, random gratings are suitable structures for fabrication of theoretically proposed random quantum well IR detectors and hence expected that this work will augur well for such studies in the near future.

  19. Individual speckle diffraction based 1D and 2D Random Grating Fabrication for detector and solar energy harvesting applications

    PubMed Central

    Bingi, Jayachandra; Murukeshan, Vadakke Matham

    2016-01-01

    Laser speckles and speckle patterns, which are formed by the random interference of scattered waves from optically rough surfaces, have found tremendous applications in a wide range of metrological and biomedical fields. Here, we demonstrate a novel edge diffraction phenomenon of individual speckle for the fabrication of 1D and 2D micron and sub-micron size random gratings. These random gratings exhibit broadband response with interesting diffusive diffraction patterns. As an immediate application for solar energy harvesting, significant reduction in transmission and enhanced absorption in thin “Si-random grating-Si” sandwich structure is demonstrated. This work has multifaceted significance where we exploited the individual speckle diffraction properties for the first time. Besides the solar harvesting applications, random gratings are suitable structures for fabrication of theoretically proposed random quantum well IR detectors and hence expected that this work will augur well for such studies in the near future. PMID:26842242

  20. Enhanced monolithic diffraction gratings with high efficiency and reduced polarization sensitivity for remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triebel, Peter; Diehl, Torsten; Moeller, Tobias; Gatto, Alexandre; Pesch, Alexander; Erdmann, Lars H.; Burkhardt, Matthias; Kalies, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Spectral imaging systems lead to enhanced sensing properties when the sensing system provides sufficient spectral resolution to identify materials from its spectral reflectance signature. The performance of diffraction gratings provides an initial way to improve instrumental resolution. Thus, subsequent manufacturing techniques of high quality gratings are essential to significantly improve the spectral performance. The ZEISS unique technology of manufacturing real-blazed profiles and as well as lamellar profiles comprising transparent substrates is well suited for the production of transmission gratings. In order to reduce high order aberrations, aspherical and free-form surfaces can be alternatively processed to allow more degrees of freedom in the optical design of spectroscopic instruments with less optical elements and therefore size and weight advantages. Prism substrates were used to manufacture monolithic GRISM elements for UV to IR spectral range. Many years of expertise in the research and development of optical coatings enable high transmission anti-reflection coatings from the DUV to the NIR. ZEISS has developed specially adapted coating processes (Ion beam sputtering, ion-assisted deposition and so on) for maintaining the micro-structure of blazed gratings in particular. Besides of transmission gratings, numerous spectrometer setups (e.g. Offner, Rowland circle, Czerny-Turner system layout) working on the optical design principles of reflection gratings. This technology steps can be applied to manufacture high quality reflection gratings from the EUV to the IR applications with an outstanding level of low stray light and ghost diffraction order by employing a combination of holography and reactive ion beam etching together with the in-house coating capabilities. We report on results of transmission gratings on plane and curved substrates and GRISM elements with enhanced efficiency of the grating itself combined with low scattered light in the angular

  1. Fingerprinting ordered diffractions in multiply diffracted waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meles, Giovanni Angelo; Curtis, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    We show how to `fingerprint' individual diffractors inside an acoustic medium using interrogative wave energy from arrays of sources and receivers. For any recorded multiply diffracted wave observed between any source and any receiver, the set of such fingerprints is sufficient information to identify all diffractors involved in the corresponding diffraction path, and the sequential order in which diffractors are encountered. The method herein thus decomposes complex, multiply diffracted wavefields into constituent, single-diffraction interactions.

  2. Diffractive Imaging Using Partially Coherent X Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, L. W.; Williams, G. J.; Quiney, H. M.; Vine, D. J.; Dilanian, R. A.; Flewett, S.; Nugent, K. A.; Peele, A. G.; Balaur, E.; McNulty, I.

    2009-12-11

    The measured spatial coherence characteristics of the illumination used in a diffractive imaging experiment are incorporated in an algorithm that reconstructs the complex transmission function of an object from experimental x-ray diffraction data using 1.4 keV x rays. Conventional coherent diffractive imaging, which assumes full spatial coherence, is a limiting case of our approach. Even in cases in which the deviation from full spatial coherence is small, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the quality of wave field reconstructions. Our formulation is applicable to x-ray and electron diffraction imaging techniques provided that the spatial coherence properties of the illumination are known or can be measured.

  3. IR laser-induced protein crystal transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefersauer, Reiner Grandl, Brigitte; Krapp, Stephan; Huber, Robert

    2014-05-01

    A novel method and the associated instrumentation for improving crystalline order (higher resolution of X-ray diffraction and reduced mosaicity) of protein crystals by precisely controlled heating is demonstrated. Crystal transformation is optically controlled by a video system. A method and the design of instrumentation, and its preliminary practical realisation, including test experiments, with the object of inducing phase changes of biomolecular crystals by controlled dehydration through heating with infrared (IR) light are described. The aim is to generate and select crystalline phases through transformation in the solid state which have improved order (higher resolution in X-ray diffraction experiments) and reduced mosaic spread (more uniformly aligned mosaic blocks) for diffraction data collection and analysis. The crystal is heated by pulsed and/or constant IR laser irradiation. Loss of crystal water following heating and its reabsorption through equilibration with the environment is measured optically by a video system. Heating proved superior to traditional controlled dehydration by humidity change for the test cases CODH (carbon monoxide dehydrogenase) and CLK2 (a protein kinase). Heating with IR light is experimentally simple and offers an exploration of a much broader parameter space than the traditional method, as it allows the option of varying the rate of phase changes through modification of the IR pulse strength, width and repeat frequency. It impacts the crystal instantaneously, isotropically and homogeneously, and is therefore expected to cause less mechanical stress.

  4. New generation IR instrument components ready for NGST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; Debes, John H.; McDavitt, Daniel L.; Miller, Shane; Bernecker, John L.

    2003-03-01

    At Penn State, two new instrument component technologies, namely silicon gratings and gaussian-shaped pupil masks, have been developed and are ready for producing high quality components for all three NGST IR instruments. Fabrication of silicon grisms with sizes up to 2 inches in dimension has become a routine process at Penn State thanks to newly developed techniques in chemical etching, lithography, and post-processing. The newly etched silicon grisms have a typical rms surface roughness of ~ 9 nm with the lowest of 0.9 nm, significantly lower than our previous ones (~ 20-30 nm) and have ~ 0.035 wave wavefront distortion at 0.6328 μm, indicating diffraction-limited performance in the entire infrared wavelengths (1.2 10 μm) where silicon has excellent transmission. These processes have also significantly eliminated visible defects due to grating mask break during chemical etching. For the best grisms, we have less than 1 defect per cm2. The measured total integrated scatter is less than 1% at 0.6238 mm, indicating similar or lower scatter in the IR when grisms are operated in transmission. Silicon grisms and silicon immersion gratings will both boost spectral resolving power by more than 3 times for NGST near-IR MOS and mid-IR camera and spectrograph without pushing current instrument design. The higher dispersed spectra can be selected either by a filter or a low resolution grism cross-disperser. Our current grating techniques allow us to make gratings with a groove period from a few microns to more than 100 microns. For the first order grism, the theoretical grating efficiency is beyond 80% with a single layer of AR coating. The immersion gratings will have similar grating efficiency. Based on our previous measurements of a silicon echelle grism, this kind of grism can provide ~ 60% efficiency when they are operated in high orders. We have also developed Gaussian-shaped pupil masks for high contrast imaging with the NGST IR cameras. Depending on its final

  5. Diffractive variable attenuator for femtosecond laser radiation control.

    PubMed

    Poleshchuk, Alexander G; Nasyrov, Ruslan K; Cherkashin, Vadim V; Dubov, Mykhaylo V; Mezentsev, Vladimir M; Bennion, Ian

    2009-02-01

    We present a diffractive phase variable attenuator for femtosecond laser radiation control. It allows the control of beam power up to 0.75.10(13) W/cm(2) without introducing serious distortions in spectra and beam shape while it operates in zero order diffraction. The attenuator can operate with wavelengths from DUV to IR.

  6. IrBurst Modeling and Performance Evaluation for Large Data Block Exchange over High-Speed IrDA Links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mohammad Shah; Shawkat, Shamim Ara; Kitazumi, Gontaro; Matsumoto, Mitsuji

    IrBurst, recently proposed by IrDA, is a high speed information transmission protocol. In this paper, a mathematical model is developed which leads to derivation of the IrBurst throughput over the IrDA protocol stack. Based on this model, we compare the performance of IrBurst and existing OBEX protocol in order to investigate the suitability of IrBurst protocol for exchange of large data blocks over high-speed IrDA links. Furthermore, the model allows the evaluation of the impact of the link layer parameters, such as window size and frame length, and physical layer parameters, such as minimum turnaround time, on system through-put for high-speed IrDA links and in the presence of transmission errors. Consequently, an effective Automatic Repeat Request (ARQ) scheme is proposed at link layer to maximize the throughput efficiency for IrBurst protocol as well as for next generation high speed IrDA links. Simulation result indicates that employment of our proposed ARQ scheme results in significant improvement of IrBurst throughput efficiency at high bit error rates.

  7. Diffraction by dual-period gratings.

    PubMed

    Skigin, Diana C; Depine, Ricardo A

    2007-03-20

    The dynamical characteristics of dual-period perfectly conducting gratings are explored. Gratings with several grooves (reflection) or slits (transmission) within each period are considered. A scalar approach is proposed to derive the general characteristics of the diffracted response. It was found that compound gratings can be designed to cancel as well as to intensify a given diffraction order. These preliminary estimations for finite gratings are validated by numerical examples for infinitely periodic reflection and transmission gratings with finite thickness, performed using an extension of the rigorous modal method to compound gratings, for both polarization cases.

  8. Neutron Diffraction Investigation of Langanite Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kuz'micheva, G. M. Kaurova, I. A.; Rybakov, V. B.; Dubovsky, A. B.; Cousson, A.

    2010-11-15

    The upper and lower parts of a single crystal with a nominal composition La{sub 3}Ga{sub 5.5}Nb{sub 0.5}O{sub 14}grown by the Czochralski method (Ir crucible, 99%Ar + 1%O{sub 2}, growth direction) have been studied by neutron diffraction for the first time. The compositions of the upper and lower parts are found to differ ((La{sub 2.935(2)}{open_square}{sub 0.065})(Ga{sub 0.450}Nb{sub 0.550(3)})Ga{sub 3}(Ga{sub 1.965(4)} {open_square}{sub 0.035})(O{sub 13.90(1)} {open_square}{sub 0.10}) and (La{sub 2.940(1)} {open_square}{sub 0.060})(Ga{sub 0.590}Nb{sub 0.410(2)})Ga{sub 5}(O{sub 13.82(1)} {open_square}{sub 0.18}), respectively), and microtwin formation was observed in the upper part, with two unit cells related by the translation 1/2Z. Based on a comparison of the refined crystal composition and optical transmission spectra, the absorption bands at 30 000, 24 500, and 20 500 cm{sub -1} were assigned to divacancies (2 V{sub La}{sup '''}, 3 V{sub O}{sup ..}), oxygen vacancies, and color centers, respectively. A relationship between the crystal color and oxygen content is established.

  9. Epitaxial growth of iridate pyrochlore Nd2Ir2O7 films

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, J. C.; Esser, B. D.; Morrow, R.; Dunsiger, S. R.; Williams, R. E. A.; Woodward, P. M.; McComb, D. W.; Yang, F. Y.

    2016-02-29

    Epitaxial films of the pyrochlore Nd2Ir2O7 have been grown on (111)-oriented yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates by off-axis sputtering followed by post-growth annealing. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results demonstrate phase-pure epitaxial growth of the pyrochlore films on YSZ. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) investigation of an Nd2Ir2O7 film with a short post-annealing provides insight into the mechanism for crystallization of Nd2Ir2O7 during the post-annealing process. STEM images reveal clear pyrochlore ordering of Nd and Ir in the films. As a result, the epitaxial relationship between the YSZ and Nd2Ir2O7 is observed clearly while some interfacial regions show a thin region with polycrystalline Ir nanocrystals.

  10. Controlled double-slit electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Roger; Pope, Damian; Liou, Sy-Hwang; Batelaan, Herman

    2013-03-01

    Double-slit diffraction is a corner stone of quantum mechanics. It illustrates key features of quantum mechanics: interference and the particle-wave duality of matter. In 1965, Richard Feynman presented a thought experiment to show these features. Here we demonstrate the full realization of his famous thought experiment. By placing a movable mask in front of a double-slit to control the transmission through the individual slits, probability distributions for single- and double-slit arrangements were observed. Also, by recording single electron detection events diffracting through a double-slit, a diffraction pattern was built up from individual events.

  11. X-Ray Diffraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, D. K.; Smith, K. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews applications in research and analytical characterization of compounds and materials in the field of X-ray diffraction, emphasizing new developments in applications and instrumentation in both single crystal and powder diffraction. Cites 414 references. (CS)

  12. IR laser-induced protein crystal transformation

    PubMed Central

    Kiefersauer, Reiner; Grandl, Brigitte; Krapp, Stephan; Huber, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A method and the design of instrumentation, and its preliminary practical realisation, including test experiments, with the object of inducing phase changes of biomolecular crystals by controlled dehydration through heating with infrared (IR) light are described. The aim is to generate and select crystalline phases through transformation in the solid state which have improved order (higher resolution in X-ray diffraction experiments) and reduced mosaic spread (more uniformly aligned mosaic blocks) for diffraction data collection and analysis. The crystal is heated by pulsed and/or constant IR laser irradiation. Loss of crystal water following heating and its reabsorption through equilibration with the environment is measured optically by a video system. Heating proved superior to traditional controlled dehydration by humidity change for the test cases CODH (carbon monoxide dehydrogenase) and CLK2 (a protein kinase). Heating with IR light is experimentally simple and offers an exploration of a much broader parameter space than the traditional method, as it allows the option of varying the rate of phase changes through modification of the IR pulse strength, width and repeat frequency. It impacts the crystal instantaneously, isotropically and homogeneously, and is therefore expected to cause less mechanical stress. PMID:24816092

  13. IOT Overview: IR Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, E.

    In this instrument review chapter the calibration plans of ESO IR instruments are presented and briefly reviewed focusing, in particular, on the case of ISAAC, which has been the first IR instrument at VLT and whose calibration plan served as prototype for the coming instruments.

  14. IR Hot Wave

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01

    The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace is a breakthrough heat treatment system for manufacturing metal components. Near-infrared (IR) radiant energy combines with IR convective heating for heat treating. Heat treatment is an essential process in the manufacture of most components. The controlled heating and cooling of a metal or metal alloy alters its physical, mechanical, and sometimes chemical properties without changing the object's shape. The IR Hot Wave{trademark} furnace offers the simplest, quickest, most efficient, and cost-effective heat treatment option for metals and metal alloys. Compared with other heat treatment alternatives, the IR Hot Wave{trademark} system: (1) is 3 to 15 times faster; (2) is 2 to 3 times more energy efficient; (3) is 20% to 50% more cost-effective; (4) has a {+-}1 C thermal profile compared to a {+-}10 C thermal profile for conventional gas furnaces; and (5) has a 25% to 50% smaller footprint.

  15. IR in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haakenaasen, Randi; Lovold, Stian

    2003-01-01

    Infrared technology in Norway started at the Norwegian Defense Research Establishment (FFI) in the 1960s, and has since then spread to universities, other research institutes and industry. FFI has a large, integrated IR activity that includes research and development in IR detectors, optics design, optical coatings, advanced dewar design, modelling/simulation of IR scenes, and image analysis. Part of the integrated activity is a laboratory for more basic research in materials science and semiconductor physics, in which thin films of CdHgTe are grown by molecular beam epitaxy and processed into IR detectors by various techniques. FFI also has a lot of experience in research and development of tunable infrared lasers for various applications. Norwegian industrial activities include production of infrared homing anti-ship missiles, laser rangefinders, various infrared gas sensors, hyperspectral cameras, and fiberoptic sensor systems for structural health monitoring and offshore oil well diagnostics.

  16. Geometric Structure of Magnetic Domains in CoPd/IrMn Multilayer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Run; Roy, Sujoy; Seu, Keoki; Parks, Daniel; Kan, Jimmy; Fullerton, Eric; Kevan, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    Using coherent x-ray resonant scattering in a transmission geometry, we collected magnetic scattering signal from CoPd/IrMn exchange biased multilayer films. The incident photon energy was tuned to the Co L3 edge allowing the magnetic domain configuration in Q space to be probed. Rotational autocorrelation functions of the resulting speckle diffraction patterns manifest the local geometric character of domain structure in Q-dependent fashion. These results are compared to microscopic magnetic domain memory probed by cross correlating different patterns. The memory under two different cooling conditions, with saturating field or with zero field was investigated, as well as the dependence of memory on external parameters, such as applied magnetic field and temperature. This research used the Lawrencium computational cluster resource provided by the IT Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  17. IR Linearity Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2012-10-01

    These observations will be used to monitor the signal non-linearity of the IR channel, as well as to update the IR channel non-linearity calibration reference file. The non-linearity behavior of each pixel in the detector will be investigated through the use of full frame and subarray flat fields, while the photometric behavior of point sources will be studied using observations of 47 Tuc. This is a continuation of the Cycle 19 non-linearity monitor, program 12696.

  18. IR linearity monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2013-10-01

    These observations will be used to monitor the signal non-linearity of the IR channel, as well as to update the IR channel non-linearity calibration reference file. The non-linearity behavior of each pixel in the detector will be investigated through the use of full frame and subarray flat fields, while the photometric behavior of point sources will be studied using observations of 47 Tuc. This is a continuation of the Cycle 20 non-linearity monitor, program 13079.

  19. Fabrication of (111)-oriented Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}IrO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} superlattices—A designed playground for honeycomb physics

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Daigorou; Matsuno, Jobu; Takagi, Hidenori

    2015-04-01

    We report the fabrication of (111)-oriented superlattice structures with alternating 2m-layers (m = 1, 2, and 3) of Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}IrO{sub 3} perovskite and two layers of SrTiO{sub 3} perovskite on SrTiO{sub 3}(111) substrates. In the case of m = 1 bilayer films, the Ir sub-lattice is a buckled honeycomb, where a topological state may be anticipated. The successful growth of superlattice structures on an atomic level along the [111] direction was clearly demonstrated by superlattice reflections in x-ray diffraction patterns and by atomically resolved transmission electron microscope images. The ground states of the superlattice films were found to be magnetic insulators, which may suggest the importance of electron correlations in Ir perovskites in addition to the much discussed topological effects.

  20. Infrared Measurements of Possible IR Filter Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, Daniel; Ediss, G. A.; Mihaly, Laszlo; Carr, G. L.

    A Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTS) was used to obtain the transmission spectra of candidate materials for use as infrared (IR) filters in cryogenic receivers. The data cover the range from 50 cm-1 (~1.5 THz), well below the peak of the 300 K black body spectrum, to 5000 cm-1 (~150 THz). Z-cut quartz, Goretex, Zitex G and Zitex A, High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), Teflon (PTFE), Fluorogold and Black Polyethylene were measured. The relative effectiveness of each material as a filter is determined by integrating the transmission spectrum multiplied by the Planck distribution to obtain a normalized attenuation for the mid-IR band. Measurements at both room temperature and 8 K are compared.

  1. Infrared Measurements of Possible IR Filter Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Koller,D.; Ediss, G.; Mihaly, L.; Carr, G.

    2006-01-01

    A Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTS) was used to obtain the transmission spectra of candidate materials for use as infrared (IR) filters in cryogenic receivers. The data cover the range from 50 cm-1 ({approx}1.5 THz), well below the peak of the 300 K black body spectrum, to 5000 cm-1 ({approx}150 THz), Z-cut quartz, Gore-Tex, Zitex G and Zitex A, High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), Teflon (PTFE), Fluorogold and Black Polyethylene were measured. The relative effectiveness of each material as a filter is determined by integrating the transmission spectrum multiplied by the Planck distribution to obtain a normalized attenuation for the mid-IR band. Measurements at both room temperature and 8 K are compared.

  2. Eyeglass. 1. Very large aperture diffractive telescopes.

    PubMed

    Hyde, R A

    1999-07-01

    The Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25-100-m) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope s large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently launchable (lightweight, packagable, and deployable) it and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope s eyepiece; the Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band (Deltalambda/lambda approximately 0.1), multiband, or continuous spectral coverage.

  3. Eyeglass. 1. Very large aperture diffractive telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R.A.

    1999-07-01

    The Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25{endash}100-m) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope{close_quote}s large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently launchable (lightweight, packagable, and deployable) it and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope{close_quote}s eyepiece; the Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band ({Delta}{lambda}/{lambda}{approximately}0.1), multiband, or continuous spectral coverage. {copyright} 1999 Optical Society of America

  4. Fiber diffraction without fibers.

    PubMed

    Poon, H-C; Schwander, P; Uddin, M; Saldin, D K

    2013-06-28

    Postprocessing of diffraction patterns of completely randomly oriented helical particles, as measured, for example, in so-called "diffract-and-destroy" experiments with an x-ray free electron laser can yield "fiber diffraction" patterns expected of fibrous bundles of the particles. This will allow "single-axis alignment" to be performed computationally, thus obviating the need to do this by experimental means such as forming fibers and laser or flow alignment. The structure of such particles may then be found by either iterative phasing methods or standard methods of fiber diffraction.

  5. Robustness of Cantor diffractals.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rupesh; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Banerjee, Varsha; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam

    2013-04-08

    Diffractals are electromagnetic waves diffracted by a fractal aperture. In an earlier paper, we reported an important property of Cantor diffractals, that of redundancy [R. Verma et. al., Opt. Express 20, 8250 (2012)]. In this paper, we report another important property, that of robustness. The question we address is: How much disorder in the Cantor grating can be accommodated by diffractals to continue to yield faithfully its fractal dimension and generator? This answer is of consequence in a number of physical problems involving fractal architecture.

  6. In situ construction of Ir@Pt/C nanoparticles in the cathode layer of membrane electrode assemblies with ultra-low Pt loading and high Pt exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Dai; Zhang, Lei; Zeng, Xiaoyuan; Tian, Xinlong; Qu, Chong; Nan, Haoxiong; Shu, Ting; Hou, Sanying; Yang, Lijun; Zeng, Jianhuang; Liao, Shijun

    2017-07-01

    A novel membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) with ultra-low Pt loadings and high Pt exposure in the cathode layer is prepared by spraying Ir/C catalyst ink on the membrane surface to form a substrate layer, followed by in situ pulse electrochemical deposition of a Pt shell layer on the Ir core nanoparticles in the substrate layer. It makes the Pt loadings on cathode lower to 0.044 mg/cm2. In our system, the MEA with our novel cathode exhibits excellent performance in a H2/air single fuel cell, which is comparable to that of the MEA prepared with commercial Pt/C catalyst (Johnson Matthey 40% Pt) with Pt loadings of 0.1 mg/cm2. The electrode with core-shell structured catalysts is characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, EDS line-scan, and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Based on the characterization results, it is found that the Pt is highly dispersed on the Ir NPs, and the electronic feature of Pt at shell layer can be tuned by the Ir core particle. Furthermore, the DFT calculation results also reveal the interaction between Pt at shell layer and Ir core. This work may provide a novel pathway to realize low Pt and high Pt utilization in low temperature fuel cells.

  7. Simplified optical image encryption approach using single diffraction pattern in diffractive-imaging-based scheme.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yi; Gong, Qiong; Wang, Zhipeng

    2014-09-08

    In previous diffractive-imaging-based optical encryption schemes, it is impossible to totally retrieve the plaintext from a single diffraction pattern. In this paper, we proposed a new method to achieve this goal. The encryption procedure can be completed by proceeding only one exposure, and the single diffraction pattern is recorded as ciphertext. For recovering the plaintext, a novel median-filtering-based phase retrieval algorithm, including two iterative cycles, has been developed. This proposal not only extremely simplifies the encryption and decryption processes, but also facilitates the storage and transmission of the ciphertext, and its effectiveness and feasibility have been demonstrated by numerical simulations.

  8. Light diffraction features in an ordered monolayer of spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, S. G.

    2017-07-01

    The structure and optical diffraction properties of monolayers of monodisperse spheres crystallized on transparent dielectric substrates are studied. Two types of diffraction phenomena are considered: surface light diffraction on the lattice of spheres and waveguide resonances in the monolayer plane. For experimental study of these phenomena, optical retroreflection and transmission spectra are measured as functions of the light incidence angle and azimuthal orientation of the incidence plane. The monolayer structures determined by scanning electron microscopy and light diffraction methods are in quantitative agreement. It is concluded that one-dimensional Fraunhofer diffraction is applicable to describe surface diffraction in the hexagonal lattice of spheres. In the case of oblique light incidence, anisotropy of diffraction and transmission spectra depending on the light incidence plane orientation with respect to the sphere lattice and linear polarization of incident light is detected. Waveguide resonances of the planar two-dimensional photonic crystal are approximated within the light diffraction model in the "empty" hexagonal lattice. The best approximation of the waveguide resonance dispersion is achieved using the effective refractive index, depending on the wavelength. Surface diffraction suppression by waveguide resonances of the photonic crystal is demonstrated. Surface diffraction orders are identified as diffraction at singular points of the Brillouin zone of the planar twodimensional photonic crystal.

  9. Full characterization of planar infrared metamaterials from far field diffraction pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanté, Boubacar; Burokur, Shah Nawaz; Gadot, Frédérique; de Lustrac, André

    2008-04-01

    Since the event of metamaterials, a considerable effort has been performed to fabricate them in the infrared and optical regimes. However, apart from the experimental demonstration and observation of H. J. Lezec et al based on surface plasma polariton, direct visualisation of negative refraction based on metal-dielectric resonances have not been performed experimentally so far in the infrared or visible regime (photonic crystals with periodicity on the order of the wavelength are not considered here). Very often only simulations have given the needed phase information for the retrieval methods in optical experiments. In this paper, a metamaterial composed of SRR (Split Ring Resonators) and a continuous wire is considered. We extract the phase information from the transmission and the reflection measurements through a diffraction grating made of the metamaterial to be characterized and silicon or gold. This retrieval allows a unambiguous retrieval of the effective parameters under conditions discussed in the paper at IR and visible wavelengths.

  10. Diffraction analysis for digital micromirror device scene projectors in the long-wave infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qing; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Jianzhong; Sun, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Diffraction effects play a significant role in scene projectors by digital micromirror devices (DMDs) in the long-wave infrared (IR) band (8 to 12 μm). The contrast provided by these projector systems can become noticeably worse because of the diffraction characteristics of the DMD. The actual diffraction characteristics of the DMD deviate significantly from the predictions of scalar diffraction theory in the long-wave IR. To address this issue, we built a vector diffraction-grating model of the DMD; the diffraction grating model is simulated with MATLAB. Furthermore, we analyze the effect of incident angle and polarization, which are the main factors that decrease the contrast of DMD-based scene projectors in the long-wave IR. Finally, an effective method to improve the contrast of the scene projector system is given, and the maximum contrast of the scene projector system is ˜0.7.

  11. Diffraction Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2012-04-01

    We present final results by the CDF II collaboration on diffractive W and Z production, report on the status of ongoing analyses on diffractive dijet production and on rapidity gaps between jets, and briefly summarize results obtained on exclusive production pointing to their relevance to calibrating theoretical models used to predict exclusive Higgs-boson production at the LHC.

  12. Growth and termination of a rutile IrO2(100) layer on Ir(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Rahul; Li, Tao; Liang, Zhu; Kim, Minkyu; Asthagiri, Aravind; Weaver, Jason F.

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the oxidation of Ir(111) by gas-phase oxygen atoms at temperatures between 500 and 625 K using temperature programmed desorption (TPD), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), low energy ion scattering spectroscopy (LEISS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that a well-ordered surface oxide with (√ 3 × √ 3)R30° periodicity relative to Ir(111) develops prior to the formation of a rutile IrO2(100) layer. The IrO2(100) layer reaches a saturation thickness of about four oxide layers under the oxidation conditions employed, and decomposes during TPD to produce a single, sharp O2 desorption peak at 770 K. Favorable lattice matching at the oxide-metal interface is likely responsible for the preferential growth of the IrO2(100) facet during the initial oxidation of Ir(111), with the resulting coincidence lattice generating a clear (6 × 1) moiré pattern in LEED. Temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy (TPRS) experiments reveal that CO and H2O molecules bind only weakly on the IrO2(100) surface and LEISS measurements show that the oxide surface is highly enriched in O-atoms. These characteristics provide strong evidence that the rutile IrO2(100) layer is oxygen-terminated, and thus lacks reactive Ir atoms that can strongly bind molecular adsorbates. Oxygen binding energies predicted by DFT suggest that on-top O-atoms will remain adsorbed on IrO2(100) at temperatures up to 625 K, thus supporting the conclusion that the rutile IrO2 layer grown in our experiments is oxygen-terminated. As such, the appearance of only a single O2 TPD peak indicates that the singly coordinate, on-top O-atoms remain stable on the IrO2(100) surface up to temperatures at which the oxide layer begins to thermally decompose.

  13. Wide-angle conformal IR transceiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liepmann, Till W.; Randall, Michael R.; Shapiro, Alan R.

    1993-08-01

    Accessing a large field-of-regard (FOR) from an aircraft-mounted infrared system imposes significant structural and aerodynamic penalties. A novel conformal infrared (IR) transceiver concept is presented which is currently under development. A trial design of this concept can access a 160 deg FOR without a gimbal mirror or 'fish eye' lens. A fiber optic bundle is used to allow a wide range of beamsteering technologies with small steering angles (i.e., +/- 5 degree(s)) to access the large FOR (+/- 80 deg) through a single, conformal aperture. The output lens size is less than a factor of three times larger than the input/output IR beam, yet provides near diffraction limited polychromatic collimation over the full FOR. The concept is applicable over a wide spectral band (ultraviolet to far IR), however, it is being developed for the mid-IR (2 - 6 micron) band. The challenging technical aspects of the fiber optics in this spectral band are discussed.

  14. The sequence measurement system of the IR camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Ai-hui; Han, Hong-xia; Zhang, Hai-bo

    2011-08-01

    Currently, the IR cameras are broadly used in the optic-electronic tracking, optic-electronic measuring, fire control and optic-electronic countermeasure field, but the output sequence of the most presently applied IR cameras in the project is complex and the giving sequence documents from the leave factory are not detailed. Aiming at the requirement that the continuous image transmission and image procession system need the detailed sequence of the IR cameras, the sequence measurement system of the IR camera is designed, and the detailed sequence measurement way of the applied IR camera is carried out. The FPGA programming combined with the SignalTap online observation way has been applied in the sequence measurement system, and the precise sequence of the IR camera's output signal has been achieved, the detailed document of the IR camera has been supplied to the continuous image transmission system, image processing system and etc. The sequence measurement system of the IR camera includes CameraLink input interface part, LVDS input interface part, FPGA part, CameraLink output interface part and etc, thereinto the FPGA part is the key composed part in the sequence measurement system. Both the video signal of the CmaeraLink style and the video signal of LVDS style can be accepted by the sequence measurement system, and because the image processing card and image memory card always use the CameraLink interface as its input interface style, the output signal style of the sequence measurement system has been designed into CameraLink interface. The sequence measurement system does the IR camera's sequence measurement work and meanwhile does the interface transmission work to some cameras. Inside the FPGA of the sequence measurement system, the sequence measurement program, the pixel clock modification, the SignalTap file configuration and the SignalTap online observation has been integrated to realize the precise measurement to the IR camera. Te sequence measurement

  15. Diffraction at Hera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collard, C.

    2003-02-01

    At the electron-proton collider HERA, diffractive interactions represent ~ 10% of the deep inelastic scattering. The production of diffractive events, characterised by the presence of a gap in rapidity or angular region without particle production, can be explained in the framework of the Regge model by the exchange of a colorless object, named the Pomeron. Describing the nature of the pomeron is a challenge for Quantum Chromodynamics. Results from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations on exclusive vector meson production and on inclusive diffractive processes are presented.

  16. Calibrating IR optical densities for the Gemini Planet Imager extreme adaptive optics coronagraph apodizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Soummer, Rémi; Carr, G. Lawrence; Dorrer, Christophe; Bolognesi, Allen; Zimmerman, Neil; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Roberts, Robin; Greenbaum, Alexandra

    2009-08-01

    High contrast imaging sometimes uses apodized masks in coronagraphs to suppress diffracted starlight from a bright source in order to observe its environs. Continuously graded opacity material and metallic half-tone dots are two possible apodizers fabrication techniques. In the latter approach if dot sizes are comparable to the wavelength of the light, surface plasmon effects can complicate the optical density (OD) vs. superficial dot density relation. OD can also be a complicated function of wavelength. We measured half-tone microdot screens' and continuous materials' transmissions. Our set-up replicated the f/ 64 optical configuration of the Gemini Planet Imager's Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraph pupil plane, where we plan to place our pupil plane masks. Our half-tone samples were fabricated with 2, 5, and 10 micron dot sizes, our continuous greyscale was High Energy Electron Beam Sensitive (HEBS) glass (Canyon Materials Inc.). We present optical density (OD) vs. wavelength curves for our half-tone and continuous greyscale samples 1.1 - 2.5 μm wavelength range. Direct measurements of the beam intensity in the far field using a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrograph on Beamline U4IR at Brookhaven National Laboratory's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) provided transmission spectra of test patches and apodizers. We report the on-axis IR transmission spectra through screens composed of metallic dots that are comparable in size with the wavelength of the light used, over a range of optical densities. We also measured departures from simple theory describing the array of satellite spots created by thin periodic grids in the pupil of the system. Such spots are used for photometry and astrometry in coronagraphic situations. Our results pertain to both ground and space based coronagraphs that use spatially variable attenuation, typically in focal plane or pupil plane masks.

  17. IR Gain Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2012-10-01

    The gain of the IR channel of WFC3 will be measured using a series of internal flat fields. Using knowledge gained from ground testing and previous cycles, we propose to collect flat field ramps which will be used to create photon transfer curves and give a measure of the gain.

  18. IR gain monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbert, Bryan

    2013-10-01

    The gain of the IR channel of WFC3 will be measured using a series of internal flat fields. Using knowledge gained from ground testing and previous cycles, we propose to collect flat field ramps which will be used to create photon transfer curves and give a measure of the gain. This continues the strategy of last cycle's gain monitor, in proposal 13080.

  19. Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G. J.; Quiney, H. M.; Dhal, B. B.; Tran, C. Q.; Nugent, K. A.; Peele, A. G.; Paterson, D.; Jonge, M. D. de

    2006-07-14

    We present an x-ray coherent diffractive imaging experiment utilizing a nonplanar incident wave and demonstrate success by reconstructing a nonperiodic gold sample at 24 nm resolution. Favorable effects of the curved beam illumination are identified.

  20. Fraunhofer Diffraction and Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortin, E.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment for the intermediate undergraduate optics laboratory designed to illustrate simultaneously some aspects of the phenomena of diffraction; interference, coherence, apodization, the Fresnel-Arago law; as well as of the interrelations between these concepts. (HM)

  1. Diffraction with CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Antonio Vilela

    2011-07-15

    The observation of diffraction at LHC with the CMS detector at {radical}(s) = 900 and 2360 GeV is presented, along with a comparison of the data with the predictions of the PYTHIA and PHOJET generators.

  2. Diffraction as tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nussenzveig, H. M.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    A new approximation to the short-wavelength scattering amplitude from an impenetrable sphere is presented. It is uniform in the scattering angle and it is more accurate than previously known approximations (including Fock's theory of diffraction) by up to several orders of magnitude. It remains valid in the transition to long-wavelength scattering. It leads to a new physical picture of diffraction, as tunneling through an inertial barrier.

  3. Reflective diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce C.

    2003-06-24

    Reflective diffraction grating. A focused ion beam (FIB) micromilling apparatus is used to store color images in a durable medium by milling away portions of the surface of the medium to produce a reflective diffraction grating with blazed pits. The images are retrieved by exposing the surface of the grating to polychromatic light from a particular incident bearing and observing the light reflected by the surface from specified reception bearing.

  4. Anomalous diffraction approximation limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videen, Gorden; Chýlek, Petr

    It has been reported in a recent article [Liu, C., Jonas, P.R., Saunders, C.P.R., 1996. Accuracy of the anomalous diffraction approximation to light scattering by column-like ice crystals. Atmos. Res., 41, pp. 63-69] that the anomalous diffraction approximation (ADA) accuracy does not depend on particle refractive index, but instead is dependent on the particle size parameter. Since this is at odds with previous research, we thought these results warranted further discussion.

  5. FT-IR microscopical analysis with synchrotron radiation: The microscope optics and system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Reffner, J.A.; Martoglio, P.A.; Williams, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    When a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrometer was first interfaced with the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in September 1993, there was an instant realization that the performance at the diffraction limit had increased 40-100 times. The synchrotron source transformed the IR microspectrometer into a true IR microprobe, providing high-quality IR spectra for probe diameters at the diffraction limit. The combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful new tool for molecular spectroscopy. The ability to perform IR microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is still under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory, but several initial studies have been completed that demonstrate the broad-ranging applications of this technology and its potential for materials characterization.

  6. Status of the Neutron Imaging and Diffraction Instrument IMAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kockelmann, Winfried; Burca, Genoveva; Kelleher, Joe F.; Kabra, Saurabh; Zhang, Shu-Yan; Rhodes, Nigel J.; Schooneveld, Erik M.; Sykora, Jeff; Pooley, Daniel E.; Nightingale, Jim B.; Aliotta, Francesco; Ponterio, Rosa C.; Salvato, Gabriele; Tresoldi, Dario; Vasi, Cirino; McPhate, Jason B.; Tremsin, Anton S.

    A cold neutron imaging and diffraction instrument, IMAT, is currently being constructed at the ISIS second target station. IMAT will capitalize on time-of-flight transmission and diffraction techniques available at a pulsed neutron source. Analytical techniques will include neutron radiography, neutron tomography, energy-selective neutron imaging, and spatially resolved diffraction scans for residual strain and texture determination. Commissioning of the instrument will start in 2015, with time-resolving imaging detectors and two diffraction detector prototype modules. IMAT will be operated as a user facility for material science applications and will be open for developments of time-of-flight imaging methods.

  7. Linear-dichroic infrared spectral (IR-LD) analysis of codeine and its derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleva, Bojidarka; Kolev, Tsonko; Bakalska, Rumyana

    2007-05-01

    By means of IR-LD spectroscopy of oriented as suspension in nematic liquid crystal solids, a detailed IR-bands assignment and a stereo-structural prediction of codeine, codeinone and N-norcodeine have been carried out. The data are compared with known crystallographic ones of codeine and codeinone obtained by single crystal X-ray diffraction.

  8. Diffraction pattern study for cell type identification.

    PubMed

    Mihailescu, M; Costescu, J

    2012-01-16

    This paper presents our study regarding diffracted intensity distribution in Fresnel and Fraunhofer approximation from different cell types. Starting from experimental information obtained through digital holographic microscopy, we modeled the cell shapes as oblate spheroids and built their phase-only transmission functions. In Fresnel approximation, the experimental and numerical diffraction patterns from mature and immature red blood cells have complementary central intensity values at different distances. The Fraunhofer diffraction patterns of deformed red blood cells were processed in the reciprocal space where, the isoamplitude curves were formed independently for each degree of cell deformation present within every sample; the values on each separate isoamplitude curve are proportional with the percentage of the respective cell type within the sample.

  9. Inverse electromagnetic diffraction by biperiodic dielectric gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xue; Li, Peijun

    2017-08-01

    Consider the incidence of a time-harmonic electromagnetic plane wave onto a biperiodic dielectric grating, where the surface is assumed to be a small and smooth perturbation of a plane. The diffraction is modeled as a transmission problem for Maxwell’s equations in three dimensions. This paper concerns the inverse diffraction problem which is to reconstruct the grating surface from either the diffracted field or the transmitted field. A novel approach is developed to solve the challenging nonlinear and ill-posed inverse problem. The method requires only a single incident field and is realized via the fast Fourier transform. Numerical results show that it is simple, fast, and stable to reconstruct biperiodic dielectric grating surfaces with super-resolved resolution.

  10. Microstructural investigation of plastically deformed Ti{sub 20}Zr{sub 20}Hf{sub 20}Nb{sub 20}Ta{sub 20} high entropy alloy by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dirras, G.; Gubicza, J.; Heczel, A.; Lilensten, L.; Couzinié, J.-P.; Perrière, L.; Guillot, I.; Hocini, A.

    2015-10-15

    The microstructure evolution in body-centered cubic (bcc) Ti{sub 20}Zr{sub 20}Hf{sub 20}Nb{sub 20}Ta{sub 20} high entropy alloy during quasi-static compression test was studied by X-ray line profile analysis (XLPA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The average lattice constant and other important parameters of the microstructure such as the mean crystallite size, the dislocation density and the edge/screw character of dislocations were determined by XLPA. The elastic anisotropy factor required for XLPA procedure was determined by nanoindentation. XLPA shows that the crystallite size decreased while the dislocation density increased with strain during compression, and their values reached about 39 nm and 15 × 10{sup 14} m{sup −2}, respectively, at a plastic strain of ~ 20%. It was revealed that with increasing strain the dislocation character became more screw. This can be explained by the reduced mobility of screw dislocations compared to edge dislocations in bcc structures. These observations are in line with TEM investigations. The development of dislocation density during compression was related to the yield strength evolution. - Highlights: • Ti{sub 20}Zr{sub 20}Hf{sub 20}Nb{sub 20}Ta{sub 20} high entropy alloy was processed by arc-melting. • The mechanical was evaluated by RT compression test. • The microstructure evolution was studied by XLPA and TEM. • With increasing strain the dislocation character became more screw. • The yield strength was related to the development of the dislocation density.

  11. Diffraction analysis for DMD-based scene projectors in the long-wave infrared.

    PubMed

    Han, Qing; Zhang, Jianzhong; Wang, Jian; Sun, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    Diffraction effects play a significant role in the digital micromirror device (DMD)-based scene projectors in the long-wave infrared (IR) band (8-12 μm). The contrast provided by these projector systems can become noticeably worse because of the diffraction characteristics of the DMD. We apply a diffraction grating model of the DMD based on the scalar diffraction theory and the Fourier transform to address this issue. In addition, a simulation calculation is conducted with MATLAB. Finally, the simulation result is verified with an experiment. The simulation and experimental results indicate that, when the incident azimuth angle is 0° and the zenith angle is between 42°and 46°, the scene projectors will have a good imaging contrast in the long-wave IR. The diffraction grating model proposed in this study provides a method to improve the contrast of DMD-based scene projectors in the long-wave IR.

  12. Confocal diffraction phase microscopy of live cells.

    PubMed

    Lue, Niyom; Choi, Wonshik; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S; Popescu, Gabriel

    2008-09-15

    We present a new quantitative phase microscopy technique, confocal diffraction phase microscopy, which provides quantitative phase measurements from localized sites on a sample with high sensitivity. The technique combines common-path interferometry with confocal microscopy in a transmission geometry. The capability of the technique for static imaging is demonstrated by imaging polystyrene microspheres and live HT29 cells, while dynamic imaging is demonstrated by quantifying the nanometer scale fluctuations of red blood cell membranes.

  13. Fabrication of integrated diffractive micro-optics for MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senesac, Larry R.; Farahi, R. H.; Corbeil, James L.; Earl, Dennis D.; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskos, Panos G.

    2001-12-01

    We investigated the fabrication of integrated diffractive micro-optical features on MEMS structures for the purpose of motion detection. The process of producing the diffractive features and the MEMS structures by focused ion beam milling is described in detail, as is the ion beam sputtering process used to produce coatings on these structures. The diffractive features of the circular Fresnel zone plate (FZP) and spiral FZP were fabricated on MEMS structures and the relevant diffraction theory is discussed. The spiral FZP diffractive features produced well defined foci whose intensity varies with distance from the FZP. Observation of these intensity variations enable us to detect the motion of the MEMS structure, and the resulting device was used to scan an IR image of a hot object.

  14. Pulsed IR inductive lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, A. M.; Churkin, D. S.; Kargapol'tsev, E. S.

    2014-07-01

    Pulsed inductive discharge is a new alternative method of pumping active gas laser media. The work presents results of experimental investigations of near, mid, and far IR inductive gas lasers (H2, HF, and CO2) operating at different transitions of atoms and molecules with different mechanisms of formation of inversion population. The excitation systems of a pulsed inductive cylindrical discharge (pulsed inductively coupled plasma) and pulsed RF inductive discharge in the gases are developed. Various gas mixtures including H2, N2, He, Ne, F2, NF3, and SF6 are used. Characteristics of near IR H2 laser radiation are investigated. Maximal pulse peak power of 7 kW is achieved. The possibility of using a pulsed inductive discharge as a new method of pumping HF laser active medium is demonstrated. The pulsed RF inductive CO2 laser is created and a total efficiency of 17% is achieved.

  15. Diffraction light analysis method for a diffraction grating imaging lens.

    PubMed

    Ando, Takamasa; Korenaga, Tsuguhiro; Suzuki, Masa-aki; Tanida, Jun

    2014-04-10

    We have developed a new method to analyze the amount and distribution of diffraction light for a diffraction grating lens. We have found that diffraction light includes each-order diffraction light and striped diffraction light. In this paper, we describe characteristics of striped diffraction light and suggest a way to analyze diffraction light. Our analysis method, which considers the structure of diffraction grating steps, can simulate the aberrations of an optical system, each-order diffraction light, and striped diffraction light simultaneously with high accuracy. A comparison between the simulation and experimental results is presented, and we also show how our analysis method can be used to optimize a diffraction grating lens with low flare light.

  16. Dunes in IR

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-09

    This image captured by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft shows an infrared image of Kaiser Crater and the dune field on the crater floor. Brighter tones in the image are warmer surfaces. The basaltic dunes are dark in the visible, but bright in infrared. Orbit Number: 66814 Latitude: -47.0992 Longitude: 19.782 Instrument: IR Captured: 2017-01-05 08:54 http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21504

  17. IR Detectors Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...2 1. Introduction The final report summarizes the results of continuing research and development of CZT substrates for fabrication of IR focal...agreed, that tasks 3 and 4 will be done in the first half of September based on time availability of the polishing lab and the summary will be sent

  18. The VISTA IR camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Gavin B.; Caldwell, Martin; Ward, Kim; Whalley, Martin S.; Burke, Kevin; Lucas, John M.; Richards, Tony; Ferlet, Marc; Edeson, Ruben L.; Tye, Daniel; Shaughnessy, Bryan M.; Strachan, Mel; Atad-Ettedgui, Eli; Leclerc, Melanie R.; Gallie, Angus; Bezawada, Nagaraja N.; Clark, Paul; Bissonauth, Nirmal; Luke, Peter; Dipper, Nigel A.; Berry, Paul; Sutherland, Will; Emerson, Jim

    2004-09-01

    The VISTA IR Camera has now completed its detailed design phase and is on schedule for delivery to ESO"s Cerro Paranal Observatory in 2006. The camera consists of 16 Raytheon VIRGO 2048x2048 HgCdTe arrays in a sparse focal plane sampling a 1.65 degree field of view. A 1.4m diameter filter wheel provides slots for 7 distinct science filters, each comprising 16 individual filter panes. The camera also provides autoguiding and curvature sensing information for the VISTA telescope, and relies on tight tolerancing to meet the demanding requirements of the f/1 telescope design. The VISTA IR camera is unusual in that it contains no cold pupil-stop, but rather relies on a series of nested cold baffles to constrain the light reaching the focal plane to the science beam. In this paper we present a complete overview of the status of the final IR Camera design, its interaction with the VISTA telescope, and a summary of the predicted performance of the system.

  19. Multipath analysis diffraction calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statham, Richard B.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes extensions of the Kirchhoff diffraction equation to higher edge terms and discusses their suitability to model diffraction multipath effects of a small satellite structure. When receiving signals, at a satellite, from the Global Positioning System (GPS), reflected signals from the satellite structure result in multipath errors in the determination of the satellite position. Multipath error can be caused by diffraction of the reflected signals and a method of calculating this diffraction is required when using a facet model of the satellite. Several aspects of the Kirchhoff equation are discussed and numerical examples, in the near and far fields, are shown. The vector form of the extended Kirchhoff equation, by adding the Larmor-Tedone and Kottler edge terms, is given as a mathematical model in an appendix. The Kirchhoff equation was investigated as being easily implemented and of good accuracy in the basic form, especially in phase determination. The basic Kirchhoff can be extended for higher accuracy if desired. A brief discussion of the method of moments and the geometric theory of diffraction is included, but seems to offer no clear advantage in implementation over the Kirchhoff for facet models.

  20. Newton's diffraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2004-05-01

    This year marks the tercentenary of the publication of Newton's Opticks which contains his celebrated theory and experiments of light and colors as it evolved from the first published version in 1672. It is still fairly unknown, however, that in this book Newton also reported his experiments on diffraction fringes obtained from various "slender" objects placed in a beam of sunlight. These experiments posed an insurmountable difficulty to Newton's corpuscular theory of light, which failed to account for his observations. This failure explains the long delay in the publication of this book. In my talk I will compare Newton's experimental results on diffraction with the predictions of Fresnel's wave theory to demonstrate that his measurements were remarkable accurate. Eventually these measurements paved the way for Young's correct explanation of the diffraction fringes as a wave interference phenomenon.

  1. Resonant diffraction gratings for spatial differentiation of optical beams

    SciTech Connect

    Golovastikov, N V; Bykov, D A; Doskolovich, L L

    2014-10-31

    Diffraction of a two-dimensional optical beam from a resonant diffraction grating is considered. It is shown that at certain resonance parameters the diffraction grating allows for spatial differentiation and integration of the incident beam. The parameters of the diffraction grating for spatial differentiation of optical beams in the transmission geometry are calculated. It is shown that the differentiating diffraction grating allows the conversion of the two-dimensional beam into the two-dimensional Hermite – Gaussian mode. The presented results of numerical modelling are in good agreement with the proposed theoretical description. The use of the considered resonant diffraction gratings is promising for solving the problems of all-optical data processing. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. Jefferson Laboratory IR Demo project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinn, Michelle D.

    1997-05-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (formerly known as CEBAF) has embarked on the construction of a 1 kW free-electron laser operating initially at 5 microns that is designed for laser-material interaction experiments and to explore the feasibility of scaling the system in power for Navy defense and industrial applications. The accelerator system for this IR demo includes a 10 MeV photocathode-based injector, a 32 MeV CEBAF-style superconducting radio-frequency linac, and single-pass transport that accelerates the beam from injector to wiggler, followed by energy-recovery deceleration to a dump. The initial optical configuration is a conventional near-concentric resonator with transmissive outcoupling. Following commissioning, the laser output will be extended to an operating range of 3-to-6.6 microns, and distributed to six labs in a user facility built with funds from the Commonwealth of Virginia. A description of the machine and facility and the project status are presented.

  3. Single molecule diffraction.

    PubMed

    Spence, J C H; Doak, R B

    2004-05-14

    For solving the atomic structure of organic molecules such as small proteins which are difficult to crystallize, the use of a jet of doped liquid helium droplets traversing a continuous high energy electron beam is proposed as a means of obtaining electron diffraction patterns (serial crystallography). Organic molecules (such as small proteins) within the droplet (and within a vitreous ice jacket) may be aligned by use of a polarized laser beam. Iterative methods for solving the phase problem are indicated. Comparisons with a related plan for pulsed x-ray diffraction from single proteins in a molecular beam are provided.

  4. Biopolymer holographic diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savić Šević, Svetlana; Pantelić, Dejan

    2008-03-01

    Surface-relief diffraction gratings are holographically recorded in dextran sensitized with ammonium dichromate (DCD). DCD was exposed with single-frequency 200 mW diode pumped ND-YAG laser, at 532 nm. The diffraction grating profiles were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was found that different surface profiles could be obtained. Gratings with 330 lines/mm spatial frequencies were made. Existence of higher harmonics in Fourier Transform of non-sinusoidal profiles shows that DCD is capable of recording spatial frequencies up to 1320 lines/mm (four times fundamental frequency). The measured maximum relief depth of the DCD grating is 402 nm.

  5. Illumination analysis of LAPAN's IR micro bolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustanul, A.; Irwan, P.; Andi M., T.

    2016-10-01

    We have since 2 years ago been doing a research in term of an IR Micrometer Bolometer which aims to fulfill our office, LAPAN, desire to put it as one of payloads into LAPAN's next micro satellite project, either at LAPAN A4 or at LAPAN A5. Due to the lack of experience on the subject, everything had been initiated by spectral radiance analysis adjusted by catastrophes sources in Indonesia, mainly wild fire (forest fire) and active volcano. Based on the result of the appropriate spectral radiance wavelength, 3.8 - 4 μm, and field of view (FOV), we, then, went through the further analysis, optical analysis. Focusing in illumination matter, the process was done by using Zemax software. Optical pass Interference and Stray light were two things that become our concern throughout the work. They could also be an evaluation of the performance optimization of illumination analysis of our optical design. The results, graphs, show that our design performance is close diffraction limited and the image blur of the geometrical produced by Lapan's IR Micro Bolometer lenses is in the pixel area range. Therefore, our optical design performance is relatively good and will produce image with high quality. In this paper, the Illumination analysis and process of LAPAN's Infra Red (IR) Micro Bolometer is presented.

  6. IR Earth Flats Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullough, Peter

    2009-07-01

    This program is an experimental path finder for Cycle 18 calibration. {The WFC3 UVIS version of this is program 11914 and contains additional detail in its description}. Infrared-wavelength flat fields will be obtained by observing the dark side of the Earth during periods of full moon illumination. The observations will consist of full-frame streaked WFC3 IR imagery: per single "dark-sky" orbit, we anticipate achieving Poisson S/N > 100 per pixel in each of three to five exposures, depending on sample sequence {SPARS25 or SPARS50}.Why not use the Sunlit Earth? It is too bright for WFC3 IR full-frame minimum exposure time of 3 sec. Similarly, for NICMOS the sunlit-Earth is too bright which saturates the detector too quickly and/or induces abnormal behaviors such as super-shading {Gilmore 1998, NIC 098-011}. In the narrowband IR filters the sunlit earth sometimes is faint enough to not saturate immediately, but based upon predictions {Cox et al. 1987 "Standard Astronomical Sources for HST: 6. Spatially Flat Fields."} and observations {Gilmore 1998}, we consider sunlit Earth unlikely to be successful unless it is twilight.Other possibilities? Cox et al.'s Section II.D addresses many other possible sources for flat fields, rejecting them for a variety of reasons. A remaining possibility would be the totally eclipsed moon. Such eclipses provide approximately 2 hours {1 HST orbit} of opportunity per year, so they are too rare to be generically useful. An advantage of the moon over the Earth is that the moon subtends less than 0.25 square degree, whereas the Earth subtends a steradian or more, so scattered light and light prior to the unshuttered exposure presents additional problems for the Earth. Also, we're unsure if HST can point 180 deg from the Sun.

  7. DIFFRACTION FROM MODEL CRYSTALS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although calculating X-ray diffraction patterns from atomic coordinates of a crystal structure is a widely available capability, calculation from non-periodic arrays of atoms has not been widely applied to cellulose. Non-periodic arrays result from modeling studies that, even though started with at...

  8. Diffract, then destroy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Philip

    2016-09-01

    A new implementation of X-ray diffraction using free-electron lasers can take snapshots of biological molecules that are inaccessible via X-ray crystallography. As Philip Ball reports, the technique can even be used to create stop-motion films of dynamic molecular processes

  9. Inclusive diffraction at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Favart, Laurent

    2011-07-15

    Results are reported on recent measurements, performed by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations, of the cross section of the diffractive deep-inelastic process ep{yields}eXp using different experimental methods. In particular, first results using the Very Forward Proton Spectrometer of H1 are discussed.

  10. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, data analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.

  11. The IRS-1 signaling system.

    PubMed

    White, M F

    1994-02-01

    IRS-1 is a principal substrate of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. It undergoes multi-site tyrosine phosphorylation and mediates the insulin signal by associating with various signaling molecules containing Src homology 2 domains. Interleukin-4 also stimulates IRS-1 phosphorylation, and it is suspected that a few more growth factors or cytokines will be added to form a select group of receptors that utilize the IRS-1 signaling pathway. More IRS-1-like adapter molecules, such as 4PS (IRS-2), may remain to be found.

  12. Correcting for diffraction in the far-infrared reflectance measurement of rough surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sheldon M.

    1993-01-01

    The manner in which diffraction can increase the reflectance measured from very rough surfaces is shown by observations of diffracted light within the instrument profile of a far-IR reflectometer system. A correction to the calibration signal based on numerical integration of the diffracted part of the instrument profile is described. Diffraction correction factors as large as 2.94 have been found with small optics at long wavelength (630 microns). The effect of diffraction on diffuse reflectance measurements of a very rough perfect reflector is shown at wavelengths from 56 to 200 microns.

  13. Correcting for diffraction in the far-infrared reflectance measurement of rough surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Sheldon M.

    1993-01-01

    The manner in which diffraction can increase the reflectance measured from very rough surfaces is shown by observations of diffracted light within the instrument profile of a far-IR reflectometer system. A correction to the calibration signal based on numerical integration of the diffracted part of the instrument profile is described. Diffraction correction factors as large as 2.94 have been found with small optics at long wavelength (630 microns). The effect of diffraction on diffuse reflectance measurements of a very rough perfect reflector is shown at wavelengths from 56 to 200 microns.

  14. Study on antibacterial alginate-stabilized copper nanoparticles by FT-IR and 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Visurraga, Judith; Daza, Carla; Pozo, Claudio; Becerra, Abraham; von Plessing, Carlos; García, Apolinaria

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify the intermolecular interaction between antibacterial copper nanoparticles (Cu NPs) and sodium alginate (NaAlg) by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and to process the spectra applying two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) correlation analysis. To our knowledge, the addition of NaAlg as a stabilizer of copper nanoparticles has not been previously reported. It is expected that the obtained results will provide valuable additional information on: (1) the influence of reducing agent ratio on the formation of copper nanoparticles in order to design functional nanomaterials with increased antibacterial activity, and (2) structural changes related to the incorporation of Cu NPs into the polymer matrix. Cu NPs were prepared by microwave heating using ascorbic acid as reducing agent and NaAlg as stabilizing agent. The characterization of synthesized Cu NPs by ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and semiquantitative analysis of the weight percentage composition indicated that the average particle sizes of Cu NPs are about 3-10 nm, they are spherical in shape, and consist of zerovalent Cu and Cu₂O. Also, crystallite size and relative particle size of stabilized Cu NPs were calculated by XRD using Scherrer's formula and FT from the X-ray diffraction data. Thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), FT-IR, second-derivative spectra, and 2D-IR correlation analysis were applied to studying the stabilization mechanism of Cu NPs by NaAlg molecules. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of stabilized Cu NPs against five bacterial strains (Staphylococccus aureus ATCC 6538P, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and O157: H7, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ATCC 13311 and 14028) were evaluated with macrodilution, agar dilution plate

  15. Study on antibacterial alginate-stabilized copper nanoparticles by FT-IR and 2D-IR correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Visurraga, Judith; Daza, Carla; Pozo, Claudio; Becerra, Abraham; von Plessing, Carlos; García, Apolinaria

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to clarify the intermolecular interaction between antibacterial copper nanoparticles (Cu NPs) and sodium alginate (NaAlg) by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and to process the spectra applying two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) correlation analysis. To our knowledge, the addition of NaAlg as a stabilizer of copper nanoparticles has not been previously reported. It is expected that the obtained results will provide valuable additional information on: (1) the influence of reducing agent ratio on the formation of copper nanoparticles in order to design functional nanomaterials with increased antibacterial activity, and (2) structural changes related to the incorporation of Cu NPs into the polymer matrix. Methods Cu NPs were prepared by microwave heating using ascorbic acid as reducing agent and NaAlg as stabilizing agent. The characterization of synthesized Cu NPs by ultraviolet visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and semiquantitative analysis of the weight percentage composition indicated that the average particle sizes of Cu NPs are about 3–10 nm, they are spherical in shape, and consist of zerovalent Cu and Cu2O. Also, crystallite size and relative particle size of stabilized Cu NPs were calculated by XRD using Scherrer’s formula and FT from the X-ray diffraction data. Thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), FT-IR, second-derivative spectra, and 2D-IR correlation analysis were applied to studying the stabilization mechanism of Cu NPs by NaAlg molecules. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of stabilized Cu NPs against five bacterial strains (Staphylococccus aureus ATCC 6538P, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and O157: H7, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ATCC 13311 and 14028) were evaluated with macrodilution

  16. Ecological and agricultural applications of synchrotron IR microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, T. K.; Vogel, J. P.

    2004-10-01

    The diffraction-limited spot size of synchrotron-based IR microscopes provides cell-specific, spectrochemical imaging of cleared leaf, stem and root tissues of the model genetic organism Arabidopsis thaliana, and mutant plants created either by T-DNA insertional inactivation or chemical mutagenesis. Spectra in the wavelength region from 6 to 12 μm provide chemical and physical information on the cell wall polysaccharides of mutants lacking particular biosynthetic enzymes ("Cellulose synthase-like" genes). In parallel experiments, synchrotron IR microscopy delineates the role of Arabidopsis cell wall enzymes as susceptibility factors to the fungus Erysiphe cichoracearum, a causative agent of powdery mildew disease. Three genes, pmr4, pmr5, and pmr6 have been characterized by these methods, and biochemical relations between two of the genes suggested by IR spectroscopy and multivariate statistical techniques could not have been inferred through classical molecular biology. In ecological experiments, live plants can also be imaged in small microcosms with mid-IR transmitting ZnSe windows. Small exudate molecules may be spatially mapped in relation to root architecture at diffraction-limited resolution, and the effect of microbial symbioses on the quantity and quality of exudates inferred. Synchrotron IR microscopy provides a useful adjunct to molecular biological methods and underground observatories in the ongoing assessment of the role of root-soil-microbe communication.

  17. Intercalation of IR absorber into layered double hydroxides: Preparation, thermal stability and selective IR absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Haifeng; Tang, Pinggui; Feng, Yongjun; Wang, Lijing; Li, Dianqing

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PMIDA anions were intercalated into Mg{sub 2}Al-NO{sub 3} LDH by anion-exchange method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The prepared material has highly selective IR absorption property in 9-11 {mu}m. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained material has practical applications as heat-retaining additive. -- Abstract: N-phosphonomethyl aminodiacetic acid (PMIDA) was intercalated into the interlayer spacing of layered double hydroxides (LDH) by an anion-exchange method. The intercalated LDHs were characterized by various techniques such as powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and simultaneous thermogravimetric and mass spectrometry (TG-MS) in details. The results show the formation of Mg{sub 2}Al-PMIDA LDH based on the expansion of d-spacing from 0.89 nm to 1.22 nm and the disappearance of the characteristic IR absorption band at 1384 cm{sup -1} for NO{sub 3}{sup -} anions. The incorporation of Mg{sub 2}Al-PMIDA LDH into the low density polyethylene (LDPE) as an additive enhances the selectivity of IR absorption in the main wavelength region 9-11 {mu}m for radiant heat loss at night. Mg{sub 2}Al-PMIDA LDH as a heat-retaining additive has practical application in agricultural plastic films.

  18. Evidence for anionic redox activity in a tridimensional-ordered Li-rich positive electrode β-Li2IrO3.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Paul E; Perez, Arnaud J; Rousse, Gwenaelle; Saubanère, Mathieu; Batuk, Dmitry; Foix, Dominique; McCalla, Eric; Abakumov, Artem M; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Doublet, Marie-Liesse; Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    2017-02-27

    Lithium-ion battery cathode materials have relied on cationic redox reactions until the recent discovery of anionic redox activity in Li-rich layered compounds which enables capacities as high as 300 mAh g(-1). In the quest for new high-capacity electrodes with anionic redox, a still unanswered question was remaining regarding the importance of the structural dimensionality. The present manuscript provides an answer. We herein report on a β-Li2IrO3 phase which, in spite of having the Ir arranged in a tridimensional (3D) framework instead of the typical two-dimensional (2D) layers seen in other Li-rich oxides, can reversibly exchange 2.5 e(-) per Ir, the highest value ever reported for any insertion reaction involving d-metals. We show that such a large activity results from joint reversible cationic (M(n+)) and anionic (O2)(n-) redox processes, the latter being visualized via complementary transmission electron microscopy and neutron diffraction experiments, and confirmed by density functional theory calculations. Moreover, β-Li2IrO3 presents a good cycling behaviour while showing neither cationic migration nor shearing of atomic layers as seen in 2D-layered Li-rich materials. Remarkably, the anionic redox process occurs jointly with the oxidation of Ir(4+) at potentials as low as 3.4 V versus Li(+)/Li(0), as equivalently observed in the layered α-Li2IrO3 polymorph. Theoretical calculations elucidate the electrochemical similarities and differences of the 3D versus 2D polymorphs in terms of structural, electronic and mechanical descriptors. Our findings free the structural dimensionality constraint and broaden the possibilities in designing high-energy-density electrodes for the next generation of Li-ion batteries.

  19. Evidence for anionic redox activity in a tridimensional-ordered Li-rich positive electrode β-Li2IrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Paul E.; Perez, Arnaud J.; Rousse, Gwenaelle; Saubanère, Mathieu; Batuk, Dmitry; Foix, Dominique; McCalla, Eric; Abakumov, Artem M.; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Doublet, Marie-Liesse; Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    2017-05-01

    Lithium-ion battery cathode materials have relied on cationic redox reactions until the recent discovery of anionic redox activity in Li-rich layered compounds which enables capacities as high as 300 mAh g-1. In the quest for new high-capacity electrodes with anionic redox, a still unanswered question was remaining regarding the importance of the structural dimensionality. The present manuscript provides an answer. We herein report on a β-Li2IrO3 phase which, in spite of having the Ir arranged in a tridimensional (3D) framework instead of the typical two-dimensional (2D) layers seen in other Li-rich oxides, can reversibly exchange 2.5 e- per Ir, the highest value ever reported for any insertion reaction involving d-metals. We show that such a large activity results from joint reversible cationic (Mn+) and anionic (O2)n- redox processes, the latter being visualized via complementary transmission electron microscopy and neutron diffraction experiments, and confirmed by density functional theory calculations. Moreover, β-Li2IrO3 presents a good cycling behaviour while showing neither cationic migration nor shearing of atomic layers as seen in 2D-layered Li-rich materials. Remarkably, the anionic redox process occurs jointly with the oxidation of Ir4+ at potentials as low as 3.4 V versus Li+/Li0, as equivalently observed in the layered α-Li2IrO3 polymorph. Theoretical calculations elucidate the electrochemical similarities and differences of the 3D versus 2D polymorphs in terms of structural, electronic and mechanical descriptors. Our findings free the structural dimensionality constraint and broaden the possibilities in designing high-energy-density electrodes for the next generation of Li-ion batteries.

  20. AFM-IR: Technology and Applications in Nanoscale Infrared Spectroscopy and Chemical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dazzi, Alexandre; Prater, Craig B

    2016-12-13

    Atomic force microscopy-based infrared spectroscopy (AFM-IR) is a rapidly emerging technique that provides chemical analysis and compositional mapping with spatial resolution far below conventional optical diffraction limits. AFM-IR works by using the tip of an AFM probe to locally detect thermal expansion in a sample resulting from absorption of infrared radiation. AFM-IR thus can provide the spatial resolution of AFM in combination with the chemical analysis and compositional imaging capabilities of infrared spectroscopy. This article briefly reviews the development and underlying technology of AFM-IR, including recent advances, and then surveys a wide range of applications and investigations using AFM-IR. AFM-IR applications that will be discussed include those in polymers, life sciences, photonics, solar cells, semiconductors, pharmaceuticals, and cultural heritage. In the Supporting Information , the authors provide a theoretical section that reviews the physics underlying the AFM-IR measurement and detection mechanisms.

  1. Nanosized IrO2 electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction in an SPE electrolyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, J. C.; Baglio, V.; Siracusano, S.; Ornelas, R.; Ortiz-Frade, L.; Arriaga, L. G.; Antonucci, V.; Aricò, A. S.

    2011-04-01

    Nanosized IrO2 electrocatalysts ( d 7-9 nm) with specific surface area up to 100 m2 g-1 were synthesized and characterized for the oxygen evolution reaction in a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) electrolyzer. The catalysts were prepared by a colloidal method in aqueous solution and a subsequent thermal treatment. An iridium hydroxide hydrate precursor was obtained at 100 °C, which was, successively, calcined at different temperatures from 200 to 500 °C. The physico-chemical characterization was carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). IrO2 catalysts were sprayed onto a Nafion 115 membrane up to a loading of 3 mg cm-2. A Pt catalyst was used at the cathode compartment with a loading of 0.6 mg cm-2. The electrochemical activity for water electrolysis of the membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs) was investigated in a single cell SPE electrolyzer by steady-state polarization curves, impedance spectroscopy and chrono-amperometric measurements. A maximum current density of 1.3 A cm-2 was obtained at 1.8 V and 80 °C for the IrO2 catalyst calcined at 400 °C for 1 h. A stable performance was recorded in single cell for this anode catalyst at 80 °C. The suitable catalytic activity and stability of the most performing catalyst were interpreted in terms of proper combination between nanostructure and suitable morphology.

  2. Diffractive interference optical analyzer (DiOPTER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Harish; Prasad, Vishnu; Pal, Parama; Varma, Manoj M.

    2016-03-01

    This report demonstrates a method for high-resolution refractometric measurements using, what we have termed as, a Diffractive Interference Optical Analyzer (DiOpter). The setup consists of a laser, polarizer, a transparent diffraction grating and Si-photodetectors. The sensor is based on the differential response of diffracted orders to bulk refractive index changes. In these setups, the differential read-out of the diffracted orders suppresses signal drifts and enables time-resolved determination of refractive index changes in the sample cell. A remarkable feature of this device is that under appropriate conditions, the measurement sensitivity of the sensor can be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude due to interference between multiply reflected diffracted orders. A noise-equivalent limit of detection (LoD) of 6x10-7 RIU was achieved in glass. This work focuses on devices with integrated sample well, made on low-cost PDMS. As the detection methodology is experimentally straightforward, it can be used across a wide array of applications, ranging from detecting changes in surface adsorbates via binding reactions to estimating refractive index (and hence concentration) variations in bulk samples. An exciting prospect of this technique is the potential integration of this device to smartphones using a simple interface based on transmission mode configuration. In a transmission configuration, we were able to achieve an LoD of 4x10-4 RIU which is sufficient to explore several applications in food quality testing and related fields. We are envisioning the future of this platform as a personal handheld optical analyzer for applications ranging from environmental sensing to healthcare and quality testing of food products.

  3. Streaking images that appear only in the plane of diffraction in undoped GaAs single crystals: Diffraction imaging (topography) by monochromatic synchrotron radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuriyama, Masao; Steiner, Bruce; Dobbyn, Ronald C.; Laor, Uri; Larson, David; Brown, Margaret

    1988-01-01

    Streaking images restricted to the direction of the diffraction (scattering) vector have been observed on transmission through undoped GaAs. These disruption images (caused by the reduction of diffraction in the direction of observation) appear both in the forward and in Bragg diffracted directions in monochromatic synchrontron radiation diffraction imaging. This previously unobserved phenomenon can be explained in terms of planar defects (interfaces) or platelets which affects the absorption coefficient in anomalous transmission. Such regions of the crystal look perfect despite the presence of imperfections when the scattering vector is not perpendicular to the normal of the platelets. The observed crystallographic orientation of these interfaces strongly indicates that they are antiphase boundaries.

  4. A novel CO 2 gas analyzer based on IR absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Wu, Xiaoli

    2004-08-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2) gas analyzer can be widely used in many fields. A novel CO 2 gas analyzer based on infrared ray (IR) absorption is presented sufficiently in this paper. Applying Lambert-Beer Law, a novel space-double-beam optical structure is established successfully. The optical structure includes an IR source, a gas cell, a bandpass filter with a transmission wavelength at 4.26 μm, another bandpass filter with a transmission wavelength at 3.9 μm, and two IR detectors. Based on Redial Basic Function (RBF) artificial neural network, the measuring model of IR CO 2 analyzer is established with a high accuracy. A dynamic compensation filter is effectively designed to improve the dynamic characteristic of the IR CO 2 analyzer without gas pump. The IR CO 2 analyzer possesses the advantages of high accuracy and mechanical reliability with small volume, lightweight, and low-power consumption. Therefore, it can be used in such relevant fields as environmental protection, processing control, chemical analysis, medical diagnosis, and space environmental and control systems.

  5. Measurements of the negative refractive index of sub-diffraction waves propagating in an indefinite permittivity medium.

    PubMed

    Korobkin, Dmitriy; Neuner, Burton; Fietz, Chris; Jegenyes, Nikoletta; Ferro, Gabriel; Shvets, Gennady

    2010-10-25

    An indefinite permittivity medium (IPM) has been fabricated and optically characterized in mid-infrared spectral range (10.7 µm-11.3 µm). Phase and amplitude transmission measurements reveal two remarkable properties of IPMs: (i) transmission of sub-diffraction waves (as short as λ/4) can exceed those of diffraction-limited ones, and (ii) sub-diffraction waves can propagate with negative refractive index. We describe a novel double-detector optical technique relying on the interference between sub-diffraction and diffraction-limited waves for accurate measurement of the transmission amplitude and phase of the former.

  6. Rectangular Relief Diffraction Gratings for Coherent Lidar Beam Scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, H. J.; Chambers, D. M.; Dixit, S. N.; Britten, J. A.; Shore, B. W.; Kavaya, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    The application of specialized rectangular relief transmission gratings to coherent lidar beam scanning is presented. Two types of surface relief transmission grating approaches are studied with an eye toward potential insertion of a constant thickness, diffractive scanner where refractive wedges now exist. The first diffractive approach uses vertically oriented relief structure in the surface of an optical flat; illumination of the diffractive scanner is off-normal in nature. The second grating design case describes rectangular relief structure slanted at a prescribed angle with respect to the surface. In this case, illumination is normal to the diffractive scanner. In both cases, performance predictions for 2.0 micron, circularly polarized light at beam deflection angles of 30 or 45 degrees are presented.

  7. Data on atmospheric transmission in the IR spectral region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paramonova, N. N.; Kazakova, K. V.; Brounshteyn, A. M.

    1979-01-01

    The weakening of radiation by the atmosphere in the infrared region of the spectrum was studied. The instrument used for the measurements was the IKAU-1 infrared atmospheric unit, and measurements were carried out both on an inclined path and a near-earth horizontal path.

  8. Central diffraction at ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lämsä, J. W.; Orava, R.

    2011-02-01

    The ALICE experiment is shown to be well suited for studies of exclusive final states from central diffractive reactions. The gluon-rich environment of the central system allows detailed QCD studies and searches for exotic meson states, such as glueballs, hybrids and new charmonium-like states. It would also provide a good testing ground for detailed studies of heavy quarkonia. Due to its central barrel performance, ALICE can accurately measure the low-mass central systems with good purity. The efficiency of the Forward Multiplicity Detector (FMD) and the Forward Shower Counter (FSC) system for detecting rapidity gaps is shown to be adequate for the proposed studies. With this detector arrangement, valuable new data can be obtained by tagging central diffractive processes.

  9. Investigation of structural and electrical transport properties in Ti doped Sr2IrO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, Imtiaz Noor; Pramanik, A. K.

    2016-05-01

    Effects of Ti substitution at Ir-site on structural and electrical properties are studies in Sr2IrO4. Structural investigation has been done using x-ray powder diffraction and allied Rietveld analysis for all the samples. While there is no structural phase transition but the lattice parameters evolve with Ti doping. Resistivity measurements show an insulating behavior for all the samples. Data show resistivity increases drastically with Ti doping. The increase in resistivity is understood to arise due to dilution of Ir-O-Ir network as well as tuning of electronic correlation effect.

  10. SINGLE CRYSTAL NEUTRON DIFFRACTION.

    SciTech Connect

    KOETZLE,T.F.

    2001-03-13

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction measures the elastic Bragg reflection intensities from crystals of a material, the structure of which is the subject of investigation. A single crystal is placed in a beam of neutrons produced at a nuclear reactor or at a proton accelerator-based spallation source. Single-crystal diffraction measurements are commonly made at thermal neutron beam energies, which correspond to neutron wavelengths in the neighborhood of 1 Angstrom. For high-resolution studies requiring shorter wavelengths (ca. 0.3-0.8 Angstroms), a pulsed spallation source or a high-temperature moderator (a ''hot source'') at a reactor may be used. When complex structures with large unit-cell repeats are under investigation, as is the case in structural biology, a cryogenic-temperature moderator (a ''cold source'') may be employed to obtain longer neutron wavelengths (ca. 4-10 Angstroms). A single-crystal neutron diffraction analysis will determine the crystal structure of the material, typically including its unit cell and space group, the positions of the atomic nuclei and their mean-square displacements, and relevant site occupancies. Because the neutron possesses a magnetic moment, the magnetic structure of the material can be determined as well, from the magnetic contribution to the Bragg intensities. This latter aspect falls beyond the scope of the present unit; for information on magnetic scattering of neutrons see Unit 14.3. Instruments for single-crystal diffraction (single-crystal diffractometers or SCDs) are generally available at the major neutron scattering center facilities. Beam time on many of these instruments is available through a proposal mechanism. A listing of neutron SCD instruments and their corresponding facility contacts is included in an appendix accompanying this unit.

  11. SINGLE CRYSTAL NEUTRON DIFFRACTION.

    SciTech Connect

    KOETZLE,T.F.

    2001-03-13

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction measures the elastic Bragg reflection intensities from crystals of a material, the structure of which is the subject of investigation. A single crystal is placed in a beam of neutrons produced at a nuclear reactor or at a proton accelerator-based spallation source. Single-crystal diffraction measurements are commonly made at thermal neutron beam energies, which correspond to neutron wavelengths in the neighborhood of 1 Angstrom. For high-resolution studies requiring shorter wavelengths (ca. 0.3-0.8 Angstroms), a pulsed spallation source or a high-temperature moderator (a ''hot source'') at a reactor may be used. When complex structures with large unit-cell repeats are under investigation, as is the case in structural biology, a cryogenic-temperature moderator (a ''cold source'') may be employed to obtain longer neutron wavelengths (ca. 4-10 Angstroms). A single-crystal neutron diffraction analysis will determine the crystal structure of the material, typically including its unit cell and space group, the positions of the atomic nuclei and their mean-square displacements, and relevant site occupancies. Because the neutron possesses a magnetic moment, the magnetic structure of the material can be determined as well, from the magnetic contribution to the Bragg intensities. This latter aspect falls beyond the scope of the present unit; for information on magnetic scattering of neutrons see Unit 14.3. Instruments for single-crystal diffraction (single-crystal diffractometers or SCDs) are generally available at the major neutron scattering center facilities. Beam time on many of these instruments is available through a proposal mechanism. A listing of neutron SCD instruments and their corresponding facility contacts is included in an appendix accompanying this unit.

  12. Central Diffraction in ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    Schicker, R.

    2011-07-15

    The ALICE experiment consists of a central barrel in the pseudorapidity range -0.9<{eta}<0.9 and of additional detectors covering about 3 units of pseudorapidity on either side of the central barrel. Such a geometry allows the tagging of single and double gap events. The status of the analysis of such diffractive events in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 7 TeV is presented.

  13. Microstructure analysis of IrO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiuyi; Takahashi, Ryota; Yamamoto, Takahisa; Lippmaa, Mikk

    2017-03-01

    We have grown IrO2 thin films on TiO2(110) substrates to determine the pulsed laser deposition growth window for iridates. Relaxed IrO2 films were obtained at a growth temperature of 500 °C and background oxygen pressure of 100 m Torr; otherwise, either pure Ir metal films or evaporative Ir loss were observed. Although x-ray Φ-scan measurement indicated that the films were epitaxial, a distinct grain structure was seen by atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The grain boundaries were found to limit the conductivity of films at low temperature. It appeared that strain relaxation leads to stacking faults at grain boundaries.

  14. Diffraction before destruction

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Henry N.; Caleman, Carl; Timneanu, Nicusor

    2014-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers have opened up the possibility of structure determination of protein crystals at room temperature, free of radiation damage. The femtosecond-duration pulses of these sources enable diffraction signals to be collected from samples at doses of 1000 MGy or higher. The sample is vaporized by the intense pulse, but not before the scattering that gives rise to the diffraction pattern takes place. Consequently, only a single flash diffraction pattern can be recorded from a crystal, giving rise to the method of serial crystallography where tens of thousands of patterns are collected from individual crystals that flow across the beam and the patterns are indexed and aggregated into a set of structure factors. The high-dose tolerance and the many-crystal averaging approach allow data to be collected from much smaller crystals than have been examined at synchrotron radiation facilities, even from radiation-sensitive samples. Here, we review the interaction of intense femtosecond X-ray pulses with materials and discuss the implications for structure determination. We identify various dose regimes and conclude that the strongest achievable signals for a given sample are attained at the highest possible dose rates, from highest possible pulse intensities. PMID:24914146

  15. Polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.; Reischig, P.; Adrien, J.; Peetermans, S.; Ludwig, W.

    2014-11-15

    This tutorial review introduces the use of polychromatic radiation for 3D grain mapping using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography. The objective is to produce a 3D map of the grain shapes and orientations within a bulk, millimeter-sized polycrystalline sample. The use of polychromatic radiation enables the standard synchrotron X-ray technique to be applied in a wider range of contexts: 1) Using laboratory X-ray sources allows a much wider application of the diffraction contrast tomography technique. 2) Neutron sources allow large samples, or samples containing high Z elements to be studied. 3) Applied to synchrotron sources, smaller samples may be treated, or faster measurements may be possible. Challenges and particularities in the data acquisition and processing, and the limitations of the different variants, are discussed. - Highlights: • We present a tutorial review of polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography techniques. • The use of polychromatic radiation allows the standard synchrotron DCT technique to be extended to a range of other sources. • The characteristics and limitations of all variants of the techniques are derived, discussed and compared. • Examples using laboratory X-ray and cold neutron radiation are presented. • Suggestions for the future development of these techniques are presented.

  16. Coherent IR radar technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gschwendtner, A. B.; Harney, R. C.; Hull, R. J.

    Recent progress in the development of coherent IR radar equipment is reviewed, focusing on the Firepond laser radar installation and the more compact systems derived for it. The design and capabilities of Firepond as a long-range satellite-tracking device are outlined. The technological improvements necessary to make laser radar mobile are discussed: a lightweight, stable 5-10-W transmitter laser for both CW and pulsed operation, a 12-element HgCdTe detector array, an eccentric-pupil Ritchey-Chretien telescope, and a combination of near-field phase modification and anamorphic expansion to produce a fan beam of relatively uniform intensity. Sample images obtained with a prototype system are shown, and the applicability of the mobile system to range-resolved coherent DIAL measurement is found to be similar to that of a baseline DIAL system.

  17. Integrated IR sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tom, Michael; Trujillo, Edward

    1994-06-01

    Integrated infrared (IR) sensors which exploit modular avionics concepts can provide features such as operational flexibility, enhanced stealthiness, and ease of maintenance to meet the demands of tactical, airborne sensor systems. On-board, tactical airborne sensor systems perform target acquisition, tracking, identification, threat warning, missile launch detection, and ground mapping in support of situation awareness, self-defense, navigation, target attack, weapon support, and reconnaissance activities. The use of sensor suites for future tactical aircraft such as US Air Force's multirole fighter require a blend of sensor inputs and outputs that may vary over time. It is expected that special-role units of these tactical aircraft will be formed to conduct tasks and missions such as anti-shipping, reconnaissance, or suppression of enemy air defenses.

  18. Structure and Properties of Ir-Containing Oxides with Large Spin-Orbit Coupling: Ba2In(2-x)Ir(x)O(5+δ).

    PubMed

    Flynn, Joshua; Li, Jun; Sleight, Arthur W; Ramirez, Arthur P; Subramanian, M A

    2016-03-21

    In this work, the solid solution series Ba2In(2-x)Ir(x)O5+δ (x = 0-1.4, 2) was synthesized, and its structural, magnetic, and charge-transport properties were measured. With increasing Ir content, three transitions in the room-temperature structure were observed: orthorhombic to tetragonal to cubic to a monoclinic distortion of a hexagonal BaTiO3 structure. Neutron diffraction shows Ba2In(1.6)Ir(0.4)O5.4 to be cubic and Ba2InIrO6 to be monoclinic, the latter contrary to previously published X-ray diffraction refinements. Magnetization measurements show Curie-Weiss behavior for x = 0.2-0.6, which arises from nearly 50:50 ratio of Ir(V) and Ir(VI). To our knowledge, this is the first time Ir(VI) has been stabilized with standard solid-state methods under ambient conditions. The electrical resistivity measurements show all the compounds studied are semiconducting and that resistivity decreases with increasing Ir content, suggesting the proximity to a metal-insulator transition. A sign reversal in the high-temperature Seebeck coefficient is observed indicating both electron and hole charge transport.

  19. Optically nonlinear Bragg diffracting nanosecond optical switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Guisheng

    We prepared low refractive index crystalline colloidal arrays (CCA) from highly charged fluorinated monodisperse spherical particles synthesized by emulsion polymerization of 1H,1H-heptafluorobutyl methacrylate. We have also covalently attached dyes to the fluorinated particles to prepare absorbing CCA. We photopolymerized these dyed CCA within a polyacrylamide matrix to form a polymerized crystalline colloidal array (PCCA). These semi-solid PCCA can withstand vibrations, ionic impurity addition and thermal shocks while maintaining the CCA ordering. The medium within the PCCA can easily be exchanged to exactly refractive index match the CCA. Thus, we were able to prepare a material where the real part of the refractive index was matched, while preserving a periodic modulation of the imaginary part of the refractive index. Under low light intensities the CCA is refractive index matched to the medium and does not diffract. However, high incident intensity illumination within the dye absorption band heats the particles within nsec to decrease their refractive index. This results in a mesoscopically periodic refractive index modulation with the periodicity of the CCA lattice. The array 'pops up' to diffract light within 2.5 nsec. These intelligent CCA hydrogels may have applications in optical limiting, optical computing and nsec fast optical switching devices, etc. We have also measured the polarization dependence of the Bragg diffraction efficiency of a CCA and compared the experimental results to that predicted by theory. The diffraction efficiency is maximized for σ polarization light at Bragg angle (θB) of 90o and minimized to zero for π polarized light at θB=45o. Our experimental diffraction and transmission results quantitatively agree with the predictions of Dynamical Diffraction Theory.

  20. Time-dependent Bragg diffraction by multilayer gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Jean-Michel; Jonnard, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Time-dependent Bragg diffraction by multilayer gratings working by reflection or by transmission is investigated. The study is performed by generalizing the time-dependent coupled-wave theory previously developed for one-dimensional photonic crystals (André J-M and Jonnard P 2015 J. Opt. 17 085609) and also by extending the Takagi-Taupin approach of the dynamical theory of diffraction. The indicial response is calculated. It presents a time delay with a transient time that is a function of the extinction length for reflection geometry and of the extinction length combined with the thickness of the grating for transmission geometry.

  1. The IRS-1 signaling system.

    PubMed

    Myers, M G; Sun, X J; White, M F

    1994-07-01

    Insulin-receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) is a principal substrate of the receptor tyrosine kinase for insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1, and a substrate for a tyrosine kinase activated by interleukin 4. IRS-1 undergoes multisite tyrosine phosphorylation and mediates downstream signals by 'docking' various proteins that contain Src homology 2 domains. IRS-1 appears to be a unique molecule; however, 4PS, a protein found mainly in hemopoietic cells, may represent another member of this family.

  2. Magnetic properties and crystal structure of Sr3CoIrO6 and Sr3NiIrO6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailova, D.; Schwarz, B.; Senyshyn, A.; Bell, A. M. T.; Skourski, Y.; Ehrenberg, H.; Tsirlin, A. A.; Agrestini, S.; Rotter, M.; Reichel, P.; Chen, J. M.; Hu, Z.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Z. F.; Tjeng, L. H.

    2012-10-01

    We have studied the magnetic properties and crystal structure of Sr3CoIrO6 and Sr3NiIrO6 as a function of temperature. Two characteristic temperatures, T1=90 K and T2=25 K for Sr3CoIrO6, and T1=85 K and T2=15 K for Sr3NiIrO6, were observed. Below T1 a significant increase of magnetization and below T2 a weak temperature dependence of magnetization in the field-cooled and practically zero magnetization values in the zero-field-cooled mode were detected for both compounds. The existence of Ir4+ in Sr3CoIrO6 was confirmed by an Ir-LIII x-ray absorption measurement. Magnetoelastic effects have been observed in the temperature dependence of the lattice parameters of Sr3CoIrO6 and Sr3NiIrO6. The magnetic structure of Sr3CoIrO6 in zero fields can be described as a commensurate modulated antiferromagnet with a propagation vector k=(0,0,1). Neutron powder diffraction with polarized neutrons gave evidence of short-range magnetic order, above and below the magnetic ordering temperature.

  3. Eyeglass: A Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R; Dixit, S; Weisberg, A; Rushford, M

    2002-07-29

    Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25-100 meter) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope's large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently fieldable (lightweight and flat, hence packagable and deployable) and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight, surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope's eyepiece. The Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band, multiband, or continuous spectral coverage. Broadband diffractive telescopes have been built at LLNL and have demonstrated diffraction-limited performance over a 40% spectral bandwidth (0.48-0.72 {micro}m). As one approach to package a large aperture for launch, a foldable lens has been built and demonstrated. A 75 cm aperture diffractive lens was constructed from 6 panels of 1 m thick silica; it achieved diffraction-limited performance both before and after folding. This multiple panel, folding lens, approach is currently being scaled-up at LLNL. We are building a 5 meter aperture foldable lens, involving 72 panels of 700 {micro}m thick glass sheets, diffractively patterned to operate as coherent f/50 lens.

  4. Transmission eigenvalues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakoni, Fioralba; Haddar, Houssem

    2013-10-01

    In inverse scattering theory, transmission eigenvalues can be seen as the extension of the notion of resonant frequencies for impenetrable objects to the case of penetrable dielectrics. The transmission eigenvalue problem is a relatively late arrival to the spectral theory of partial differential equations. Its first appearance was in 1986 in a paper by Kirsch who was investigating the denseness of far-field patterns for scattering solutions of the Helmholtz equation or, in more modern terminology, the injectivity of the far-field operator [1]. The paper of Kirsch was soon followed by a more systematic study by Colton and Monk in the context of developing the dual space method for solving the inverse scattering problem for acoustic waves in an inhomogeneous medium [2]. In this paper they showed that for a spherically stratified media transmission eigenvalues existed and formed a discrete set. Numerical examples were also given showing that in principle transmission eigenvalues could be determined from the far-field data. This first period of interest in transmission eigenvalues was concluded with papers by Colton et al in 1989 [3] and Rynne and Sleeman in 1991 [4] showing that for an inhomogeneous medium (not necessarily spherically stratified) transmission eigenvalues, if they existed, formed a discrete set. For the next seventeen years transmission eigenvalues were ignored. This was mainly due to the fact that, with the introduction of various sampling methods to determine the shape of an inhomogeneous medium from far-field data, transmission eigenvalues were something to be avoided and hence the fact that transmission eigenvalues formed at most a discrete set was deemed to be sufficient. In addition, questions related to the existence of transmission eigenvalues or the structure of associated eigenvectors were recognized as being particularly difficult due to the nonlinearity of the eigenvalue problem and the special structure of the associated transmission

  5. AQUIFER TRANSMISSIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of groundwater resources requires the knowledge of the capacity of aquifers to store and transmit ground water. This requires estimates of key hydraulic parameters, such as the transmissivity, among others. The transmissivity T (m2/sec) is a hydrauli...

  6. Automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, M.; Aoki, H.

    1988-02-02

    An automatic transmission is described comprising: an automatic transmission mechanism portion comprising a single planetary gear unit and a dual planetary gear unit; carriers of both of the planetary gear units that are integral with one another; an input means for inputting torque to the automatic transmission mechanism, clutches for operatively connecting predetermined ones of planetary gear elements of both of the planetary gear units to the input means and braking means for restricting the rotation of predetermined ones of planetary gear elements of both of the planetary gear units. The clutches are disposed adjacent one another at an end portion of the transmission for defining a clutch portion of the transmission; a first clutch portion which is attachable to the automatic transmission mechanism portion for comprising the clutch portion when attached thereto; a second clutch portion that is attachable to the automatic transmission mechanism portion in place of the first clutch portion for comprising the clutch portion when so attached. The first clutch portion comprising first clutch for operatively connecting the input means to a ring gear of the single planetary gear unit and a second clutch for operatively connecting the input means to a single gear of the automatic transmission mechanism portion. The second clutch portion comprising a the first clutch, the second clutch, and a third clutch for operatively connecting the input member to a ring gear of the dual planetary gear unit.

  7. AQUIFER TRANSMISSIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of groundwater resources requires the knowledge of the capacity of aquifers to store and transmit ground water. This requires estimates of key hydraulic parameters, such as the transmissivity, among others. The transmissivity T (m2/sec) is a hydrauli...

  8. Investigation of Acrylic Acid at High Pressure Using Neutron Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article details the exploration of perdeuterated acrylic acid at high pressure using neutron diffraction. The structural changes that occur in acrylic acid-d4 are followed via diffraction and rationalized using the Pixel method. Acrylic acid undergoes a reconstructive phase transition to a new phase at ∼0.8 GPa and remains molecular to 7.2 GPa before polymerizing on decompression to ambient pressure. The resulting product is analyzed via Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry and found to possess a different molecular structure compared with polymers produced via traditional routes. PMID:24650085

  9. Diffraction of a Laser Beam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jodoin, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the effect of the nonuniform irradiance across a laser beam on diffraction of the beam, specifically the Fraunhofer diffraction of a laser beam with a Gaussian irradiance profile as it passes through a circular aperture. (GA)

  10. Diffractive Alvarez lens

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Ian M.; Dixit, Sham N.; Summers, Leslie J.; Thompson, Charles A.; Avicola, Kenneth; Wilhelmsen, Julia

    2000-01-01

    A diffractive Alvarez lens is demonstrated that consists of two separate phase plates, each having complementary 16-level surface-relief profiles that contain cubic phase delays. Translation of these two components in the plane of the phase plates is shown to produce a variable astigmatic focus. Both spherical and cylindrical phase profiles are demonstrated with good accuracy, and the discrete surface-relief features are shown to cause less than {lambda}/10 wave-front aberration in the transmitted wave front over a 40 mmx80 mm region. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  11. Diffraction from materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, L.H.; Cohen, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    This is a completely revised second edition and is intended as a text in diffraction. The book presents elementary topics on scattering and crystallography and expands on concepts in later chapters which focus on defects in solids, scattering from perfect solids, and crystal structure determination. The first half of the book may be used as an introductory text for juniors or seniors in college, while the second half is suitable for a graduate-level course or for use as a monograph. The new edition simplifies the introduction to crystallography, introduces concepts required by the advent of synchrotron radiation and pulsed reaction sources, and updates the subject matter dealing with defects in solids.

  12. Transurethral Ultrasound Diffraction Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    transmitter. These are then 7 Fourier transformed into the frequency domain data. The clock rate is 33 MHz, and the FFT is performed after 1536 time...B. Yazgan and O.K. Ersoy, Multistage parallel algorithm for diffraction tomography, Applied Optica , vol. 34, pp, 1426-1431, 1995. [9] J. Wiskin, D.T...J1k0a2. Note that Eq. 34 reflects the well-known fact that in the Born approxi- mation the Fourier frequencies of the object are confined within a

  13. Dynamic diffraction effects and coherent breathing oscillations in ultrafast electron diffraction in layered 1T-TaSeTe

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Linlin; Sun, Shuaishuai; Guo, Cong; Li, Zhongwen; Sun, Kai; Liu, Yu; Lu, Wenjian; Sun, Yuping; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi

    2017-01-01

    Anisotropic lattice movements due to the difference between intralayer and interlayer bonding are observed in the layered transition-metal dichalcogenide 1T-TaSeTe following femtosecond laser pulse excitation. Our ultrafast electron diffraction investigations using 4D-transmission electron microscopy (4D-TEM) clearly reveal that the intensity of Bragg reflection spots often changes remarkably due to the dynamic diffraction effects and anisotropic lattice movement. Importantly, the temporal diffracted intensity from a specific crystallographic plane depends on the deviation parameter s, which is commonly used in the theoretical study of diffraction intensity. Herein, we report on lattice thermalization and structural oscillations in layered 1T-TaSeTe, analyzed by dynamic diffraction theory. Ultrafast alterations of satellite spots arising from the charge density wave in the present system are also briefly discussed. PMID:28470025

  14. Reflection and Transmission Coefficient of Yttrium Iron Garnet Filled Polyvinylidene Fluoride Composite Using Rectangular Waveguide at Microwave Frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Hassan; Abbas, Zulkifly; Yahya, Noorhana; Shameli, Kamyar; Soleimani, Hojjatollah; Shabanzadeh, Parvaneh

    2012-01-01

    The sol-gel method was carried out to synthesize nanosized Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG). The nanomaterials with ferrite structure were heat-treated at different temperatures from 500 to 1000 °C. The phase identification, morphology and functional groups of the prepared samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), respectively. The YIG ferrite nanopowder was composited with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) by a solution casting method. The magnitudes of reflection and transmission coefficients of PVDF/YIG containing 6, 10 and 13% YIG, respectively, were measured using rectangular waveguide in conjunction with a microwave vector network analyzer (VNA) in X-band frequencies. The results indicate that the presence of YIG in polymer composites causes an increase in reflection coefficient and decrease in transmission coefficient of the polymer. PMID:22942718

  15. Reflection and transmission coefficient of yttrium iron garnet filled polyvinylidene fluoride composite using rectangular waveguide at microwave frequencies.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Hassan; Abbas, Zulkifly; Yahya, Noorhana; Shameli, Kamyar; Soleimani, Hojjatollah; Shabanzadeh, Parvaneh

    2012-01-01

    The sol-gel method was carried out to synthesize nanosized Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG). The nanomaterials with ferrite structure were heat-treated at different temperatures from 500 to 1000 °C. The phase identification, morphology and functional groups of the prepared samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), respectively. The YIG ferrite nanopowder was composited with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) by a solution casting method. The magnitudes of reflection and transmission coefficients of PVDF/YIG containing 6, 10 and 13% YIG, respectively, were measured using rectangular waveguide in conjunction with a microwave vector network analyzer (VNA) in X-band frequencies. The results indicate that the presence of YIG in polymer composites causes an increase in reflection coefficient and decrease in transmission coefficient of the polymer.

  16. Electron diffraction from cylindrical nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, L.C. )

    1994-09-01

    Electron diffraction intensities from cylindrical objects can be conveniently analyzed using Bessel functions. Analytic formulas and geometry of the diffraction patterns from cylindrical carbon nanotubes are presented in general forms in terms of structural parameters, such as the pitch angle and the radius of a tubule. As an example the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern from a graphitic tubule of structure [18,2] has been simulated to illustrate the characteristics of such diffraction patterns. The validity of the projection approximation is also discussed.

  17. Diffraction-Based Optical Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sperno, Stevan M. (Inventor); Fuhr, Peter L. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Method and system for controllably redirecting a light beam, having a central wavelength lambda, from a first light-receiving site to a second light-receiving site. A diffraction grating is attached to or part of a piezoelectric substrate, which is connected to one or two controllable voltage difference sources. When a substrate voltage difference is changed and the diffraction grating length in each of one or two directions is thereby changed, at least one of the diffraction angle, the diffraction order and the central wavelength is controllably changed. A diffracted light beam component, having a given wavelength, diffraction angle and diffraction order, that is initially received at a first light receiving site (e.g., a detector or optical fiber) is thereby controllably shifted or altered and can be received at a second light receiving site. A polynomially stepped, chirped grating is used in one embodiment. In another embodiment, an incident light beam, having at least one of first and second wavelengths, lambda1 and lambda2, is received and diffracted at a first diffraction grating to provide a first diffracted beam. The first diffracted beam is received and diffracted at a second diffraction grating to produce a second diffracted beam. The second diffracted beam is received at a light-sensitive transducer, having at least first and second spaced apart light detector elements that are positioned so that, when the incident light beam has wavelength lambda1 or lambda2 (lambda1 not equal to lambda2), the second diffracted beam is received at the first element or at the second element, respectively; change in a selected physical parameter at the second grating can also be sensed or measured. A sequence of spaced apart light detector elements can be positioned along a linear or curvilinear segment with equal or unequal spacing.

  18. Design the diffractive optical element with large diffraction angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Hui; Yin, Shaoyun; Zheng, Guoxing; Deng, Qiling; Shi, Lifang; Du, Chunlei

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a quite effective method is proposed for designing the diffractive optical element (DOE) to generate a pattern with large diffraction angle. Through analyze the difference between the non-paraxial Rayleigh Sommerfeld integral and the paraxial Fraunhofer diffraction integral, we modify the desired output intensity distribution with coordinate transformation and intensity adjustment. Then the paraxial Fraunhofer diffraction integral can be used to design the DOE, which adopts the fast-Fourier-transform (FFT) algorithm to accelerate the computation. To verify our method, the simulation and the experiments are taken. And the result shows that our method can effectively rectify the pillow distortion and can achieve the exact diffraction angle.

  19. Aberrations of diffracted wave fields. II. Diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, V N

    2000-12-01

    The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld theory is applied to diffraction of a spherical wave by a grating. The grating equation is obtained from the aberration-free diffraction pattern, and its aberrations are shown to be the same as the conventional aberrations obtained by using Fermat's principle. These aberrations are shown to be not associated with the diffraction process. Moreover, it is shown that the irradiance distribution of a certain diffraction order is the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of the grating aperture as a whole aberrated by the aberration of that order.

  20. Diffractive physics results at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Michele Gallinaro

    2003-12-18

    Forward detectors are described together with the first physics results from Run II. Using new data and dedicated diffractive triggers, a measurement of single diffractive dijet production rate, with particular focus on the diffractive structure function of the antiproton, is discussed. Upper limits on the exclusive dijet and {chi}{sub c}{sup 0} production cross sections are also presented.

  1. Spectral diffraction efficiency characterization of broadband diffractive optical elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Junoh; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Tanbakuchi, Anthony

    2013-03-01

    Diffractive optical elements, with their thin profile and unique dispersion properties, have been studied and utilized in a number of optical systems, often yielding smaller and lighter systems. Despite the interest in and study of diffractive elements, the application has been limited to narrow spectral bands. This is due to the etch depths, which are optimized for optical path differences of only a single wavelength, consequently leading to rapid decline in efficiency as the working wavelength shifts away from the design wavelength. Various broadband diffractive design methodologies have recently been developed that improve spectral diffraction efficiency and expand the working bandwidth of diffractive elements. We have developed diffraction efficiency models and utilized the models to design, fabricate, and test two such extended bandwidth diffractive designs.

  2. Novel diffraction gratings for next generation spectrographs with high spectral dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebizuka, N.; Okamoto, T.; Hosobata, T.; Yamagata, Y.; Sasaki, M.; Uomoto, M.; Shimatsu, T.; Sato, S.; Hashimoto, N.; Tanaka, I.; Hattori, T.; Ozaki, S.; Aoki, W.

    2016-07-01

    As a transmission grating, a surface-relief (SR) grating with sawtooth shaped ridges and volume phase holographic (VPH) grating are widely used for instruments of astronomical observations. However the SR grating is difficult to achieve high diffraction efficiency at high angular dispersion, and the VPH grating has low diffraction efficiency in high diffraction orders. We propose novel gratings that solve these problems. We introduce the hybrid grism which combines a high refractive index prism with a replicated transmission grating, which has sawtooth shaped ridges of an acute apex angle. The birefringence VPH (B-VPH) grating which contains an anisotropic medium, such as a liquid crystal, achieves diffraction efficiency up to 100% at the first diffraction order for natural polarization and for circular polarization. The quasi-Bragg (QB) grating which consists of long rectangular mirrors aligned in parallel precisely, like a window blind, achieves diffraction efficiency of 60% or more in higher than the 4th diffraction order. The volume binary (VB) grating with narrow grooves also achieves diffraction efficiency of 60% or more in higher than the 6th diffraction order. The reflector facet transmission (RFT) grating which is a SR grating with sawtooth shaped ridges of an acute apex angle achieves diffraction efficiency up to 80% in higher than the 4th diffraction order.

  3. Radial reflection diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, Sean K.; Norton, Stephen J.

    2004-10-01

    A wave-based tomographic imaging algorithm based upon a single rotating radially outward oriented transducer is developed. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, the transducer launches a primary field and collects the backscattered field in a ``pitch/catch'' operation. The hardware configuration, operating mode, and data collection method are identical to that of most medical intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) systems. IVUS systems form images of the medium surrounding the probe based upon ultrasonic B scans, using a straight-ray model of sound propagation. The goal of this research is to develop a wave-based imaging algorithm using diffraction tomography techniques. Given the hardware configuration and the imaging method, this system is referred to as ``radial reflection diffraction tomography.'' Two hardware configurations are considered: a multimonostatic mode using a single transducer as described above, and a multistatic mode consisting of a single transmitter and an aperture formed by multiple receivers. In this latter case, the entire source/receiver aperture rotates about the fixed radius. Practically, such a probe is mounted at the end of a catheter or snaking tube that can be inserted into a part or medium with the goal of forming images of the plane perpendicular to the axis of rotation. An analytic expression for the multimonostatic inverse is derived, but ultimately the new Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm is used to construct images using both operating modes. Applications include improved IVUS imaging, bore hole tomography, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of parts with existing access holes. .

  4. Radial Reflection Diffraction Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Norton, S J

    2003-10-10

    We develop a wave-based tomographic imaging algorithm based upon a single rotating radially outward oriented transducer. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, the transducer launches a primary field and collects the backscattered field in a ''pitch/catch'' operation. The hardware configuration, operating mode, and data collection method is identical to that of most medical intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) systems. IVUS systems form images of the medium surrounding the probe based upon ultrasonic B-scans, using a straight-ray model of sound propagation. Our goal is to develop a wave-based imaging algorithm using diffraction tomography techniques. Given the hardware configuration and the imaging method, we refer to this system as ''radial reflection diffraction tomography.'' We consider two hardware configurations: a multimonostatic mode using a single transducer as described above, and a multistatic mode consisting of a single transmitter and an aperture formed by multiple receivers. In this latter case, the entire source/receiver aperture rotates about the fixed radius. Practically, such a probe is mounted at the end of a catheter or snaking tube that can be inserted into a part or medium with the goal of forming images of the plane perpendicular to the axis of rotation. We derive an analytic expression for the multimonostatic inverse but ultimately use the new Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm to construct images using both operating modes. Applications include improved IVUS imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts with existing access holes.

  5. Quantifying Transmission.

    PubMed

    Woolhouse, Mark

    2017-07-01

    Transmissibility is the defining characteristic of infectious diseases. Quantifying transmission matters for understanding infectious disease epidemiology and designing evidence-based disease control programs. Tracing individual transmission events can be achieved by epidemiological investigation coupled with pathogen typing or genome sequencing. Individual infectiousness can be estimated by measuring pathogen loads, but few studies have directly estimated the ability of infected hosts to transmit to uninfected hosts. Individuals' opportunities to transmit infection are dependent on behavioral and other risk factors relevant given the transmission route of the pathogen concerned. Transmission at the population level can be quantified through knowledge of risk factors in the population or phylogeographic analysis of pathogen sequence data. Mathematical model-based approaches require estimation of the per capita transmission rate and basic reproduction number, obtained by fitting models to case data and/or analysis of pathogen sequence data. Heterogeneities in infectiousness, contact behavior, and susceptibility can have substantial effects on the epidemiology of an infectious disease, so estimates of only mean values may be insufficient. For some pathogens, super-shedders (infected individuals who are highly infectious) and super-spreaders (individuals with more opportunities to transmit infection) may be important. Future work on quantifying transmission should involve integrated analyses of multiple data sources.

  6. Magnetic symmetries in neutron and resonant x-ray Bragg diffraction patterns of four iridium oxides.

    PubMed

    Lovesey, S W; Khalyavin, D D; Manuel, P; Chapon, L C; Cao, G; Qi, T F

    2012-12-12

    The magnetic properties of Sr(2)IrO(4), Na(2)IrO(3), Sr(3)Ir(2)O(7) and CaIrO(3) are discussed, principally in the light of experimental data in recent literature for Bragg intensities measured in x-ray diffraction with enhancement at iridium L-absorption edges. The electronic structure factors we report, which incorporate parity-even and acentric entities, serve the immediate purpose of making full use of crystal and magnetic symmetry to refine our knowledge of the magnetic properties of the four iridates from resonant x-ray diffraction data. They also offer a platform on which to interpret future investigations, using dichroic signals, resonant x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction, for example, as well as ab initio calculations of electronic structure. Unit-cell structure factors, suitable for x-ray Bragg diffraction enhanced by an electric dipole-electric dipole (E1-E1) event, reveal exactly which iridium multipoles are visible, e.g., a magnetic dipole parallel to the crystal c-axis (z-axis) and an electric quadrupole with yz-like symmetry in the specific case of CaIrO(3). Magnetic space-groups are assigned to Sr(2)IrO(4), Sr(3)Ir(2)O(7) and CaIrO(3), namely, P(I)cca, P(A)ban and Cm'cm', respectively, in the Belov-Neronova-Smirnova notation. The assignment for Sr(2)IrO(4) is possible because of our new high-resolution neutron diffraction data, gathered on a powder sample. In addition, the new data are used to show that the ordered magnetic moment of an Ir(4+) ion in Sr(2)IrO(4) does not exceed 0.29(4) μ(B). Na(2)IrO(3) has two candidate magnetic space-groups that are not resolved with currently available resonant x-ray data.

  7. Structural study by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy of the misfit compound (SbS{sub 1-x}Se{sub x}){sub 1.16}(Nb{sub 1.036}S{sub 2}){sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kars, Mohammed; Fredrickson, Daniel C.; Gomez-Herrero, A.; Lidin, Sven; Rebbah, Allaoua; Otero-Diaz, L.C.

    2010-08-15

    In the Sb-Nb-S-Se system, a new misfit layer compound (MSL) has been synthesized and its structure was determined by combining single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. It presents a composite crystal structure formed by (SbS{sub 1-x}Se{sub x}) slabs stacking alternately with double NbS{sub 2} layers and both can be treated as separate monoclinic subsystems. The (SbS{sub 1-x}Se{sub x}) slabs comprise a distorted, two-atom-thick layer with NaCl-type structure formed by an array of {l_brace}SbX{sub 5}{r_brace} square pyramids joined by edges (X: S, Se); the NbS{sub 2} layers consist of {l_brace}NbS{sub 6}{r_brace} trigonal prisms linked through edge-sharing to form sheets, just as in the 2H-NbS{sub 2} structure type. Both sublattices have the same lattice parameters a = 5.7672(19) A, c = 17.618(6) A and {beta} = 96.18(3){sup o}, with incommensurability occurring along the b direction: b{sub 1} = 3.3442(13) A for the NbS{sub 2} subsystem and b{sub 2} = 2.8755(13) A for the (SbS{sub 1-x}Se{sub x}) subsystem. The occurrence of diffuse scattering intensity streaked along c{sup *} indicates that the (SbS{sub 1-x}Se{sub x}) subsystem is subjected to extended defects along the stacking direction.

  8. TiC supported Pt-Ir electrocatalyst prepared by a plasma process for the oxygen electrode in unitized regenerative fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Sheng; Ma, Lirong; Zhai, Yuchun

    Unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs) have become more attractive for some time due to its potentially wide energy storage application such as in fields of space and renewable energy. In this study, TiC supported Pt-Ir electrocatalysts (Pt-Ir/TiC) for oxygen electrode in URFCs were synthesized, respectively, by chemical reduction process and plasma reduction process. Their physical and electrochemical properties are characterized and compared using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cyclic voltammogram (CV), potentiostatic technique, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results from XRD, XPS and TEM demonstrate that the plasma process gives a finer metal crystals and higher metal dispersion on the TiC support. The CV, polarization, potentiostatic and EIS results show that the Pt-Ir/TiC electrocatalyst prepared by the plasma reduction process is obviously more active than that by the chemical reduction process, in agreement with the above metal-dispersion observations. The plasma process is a promising way for the preparation of supported electrocatalysts.

  9. Multilayer diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1990-04-10

    This invention is for a reflection diffraction grating that functions at X-ray to VUV wavelengths and at normal angles of incidence. The novel grating is comprised of a laminar grating of period D with flat-topped grating bars. A multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures, of period d and comprised of alternating flat layers of two different materials, are disposed on the tops of the grating bars of the laminar grating. In another embodiment of the grating, a second multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures are also disposed on the flat faces, of the base of the grating, between the bars. D is in the approximate range from 3,000 to 50,000 Angstroms, but d is in the approximate range from 10 to 400 Angstroms. The laminar grating and the layered microstructures cooperatively interact to provide many novel and beneficial instrumentational advantages. 2 figs.

  10. Multilayer diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1990-01-01

    This invention is for a reflection diffraction grating that functions at X-ray to VUV wavelengths and at normal angles of incidence. The novel grating is comprised of a laminar grating of period D with flat-topped grating bars. A multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures, of period d and comprised of alternating flat layers of two different materials, are disposed on the tops of the grating bars of the laminar grating. In another embodiment of the grating, a second multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures are also disposed on the flat faces, of the base of the grating, between the bars. D is in the approximate range from 3,000 to 50,000 Angstroms, but d is in the approximate range from 10 to 400 Angstroms. The laminar grating and the layered microstructures cooperatively interact to provide many novel and beneficial instrumentational advantages.

  11. Birefringent coherent diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, Dmitry; dos Santos Rolo, Tomy; Rich, Hannah; Kryuchkov, Yuriy; Kiefer, Boris; Fohtung, E.

    2016-10-01

    Directional dependence of the index of refraction contains a wealth of information about anisotropic optical properties in semiconducting and insulating materials. Here we present a novel high-resolution lens-less technique that uses birefringence as a contrast mechanism to map the index of refraction and dielectric permittivity in optically anisotropic materials. We applied this approach successfully to a liquid crystal polymer film using polarized light from helium neon laser. This approach is scalable to imaging with diffraction-limited resolution, a prospect rapidly becoming a reality in view of emergent brilliant X-ray sources. Applications of this novel imaging technique are in disruptive technologies, including novel electronic devices, in which both charge and spin carry information as in multiferroic materials and photonic materials such as light modulators and optical storage.

  12. Multilayer diffraction grating

    SciTech Connect

    Barbee, T.W., Jr.

    1988-10-18

    This invention is for a reflection diffraction grating that functions at x-ray to VUV wavelengths and at normal angles of incidence. The novel grating is comprised of a laminar grating of period D with flat-topped grating bars. A multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures, of period d and comprised of alternating flat layers of two different materials, are disposed on the tops of the grating bars of the laminar grating. In another embodiment of the grating, a second multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures are also disposed on the flat faces, of the base of the grating, between the bars. D is in the approximate range from 3000 to 50,000 Angstroms, but d is in the approximate range from 10 to 400 Angstroms. The laminar grating and the layered microstructures cooperatively interact to provide many novel and beneficial instrumentational advantages. 2 figs.

  13. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1996-08-29

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 8 figs.

  14. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1996-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  15. Diffraction and Unitarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremin, I. M.

    I begin with a tribute to V.N. Gribov and then come to a particular problem which would be of interest for him. His first paper on reggeology was devoted to elastic scatterings of hadrons. Here, using the unitarity relation in combination with experimental data about the elastic scattering in the diffraction cone, I show how the shape and the darkness of the interaction region of colliding protons change with the increase of their energies. In particular, the collisions become fully absorptive at small impact parameters at LHC energies that results in some special features of inelastic processes as well. The possible evolution with increasing energy of the shape from the dark core at the LHC to the fully transparent one at higher energies is discussed. It implies that the terminology of the black disk would be replaced by the black torus.

  16. Diffraction and unitarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremin, I. M.

    2016-10-01

    I begin with a tribute to V.N. Gribov and then come to a particular problem which would be of interest for him. His first paper on reggeology was devoted to elastic scatterings of hadrons. Here, using the unitarity relation in combination with experimental data about the elastic scattering in the diffraction cone, I show how the shape and the darkness of the interaction region of colliding protons change with the increase of their energies. In particular, the collisions become fully absorptive at small impact parameters at LHC energies that results in some special features of inelastic processes as well. The possible evolution with increasing energy of the shape from the dark core at the LHC to the fully transparent one at higher energies is discussed. It implies that the terminology of the black disk would be replaced by the black torus.

  17. Dichroic coherent diffractive imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Ashish; Mohanty, Jyoti; Dietze, Sebastian H.; Shpyrko, Oleg G.; Shipton, Erik; Fullerton, Eric E.; Kim, Sang Soo; McNulty, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Understanding electronic structure at the nanoscale is crucial to untangling fundamental physics puzzles such as phase separation and emergent behavior in complex magnetic oxides. Probes with the ability to see beyond surfaces on nanometer length and subpicosecond time scales can greatly enhance our understanding of these systems and will undoubtedly impact development of future information technologies. Polarized X-rays are an appealing choice of probe due to their penetrating power, elemental and magnetic specificity, and high spatial resolution. The resolution of traditional X-ray microscopes is limited by the nanometer precision required to fabricate X-ray optics. Here we present a novel approach to lensless imaging of an extended magnetic nanostructure, in which a scanned series of dichroic coherent diffraction patterns is recorded and numerically inverted to map its magnetic domain configuration. Unlike holographic methods, it does not require a reference wave or precision optics. In addition, it enables the imaging of samples with arbitrarily large spatial dimensions, at a spatial resolution limited solely by the coherent X-ray flux, wavelength, and stability of the sample with respect to the beam. It can readily be extended to nonmagnetic systems that exhibit circular or linear dichroism. We demonstrate this approach by imaging ferrimagnetic labyrinthine domains in a Gd/Fe multilayer with perpendicular anisotropy and follow the evolution of the domain structure through part of its magnetization hysteresis loop. This approach is scalable to imaging with diffraction-limited resolution, a prospect rapidly becoming a reality in view of the new generation of phenomenally brilliant X-ray sources. PMID:21825152

  18. Dichroic Coherent Diffractive Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Ashish

    Understanding electronic structure at nanometer resolution is crucial to understanding physics such as phase separation and emergent behavior in correlated electron materials. Nondestructive probes which have the ability to see beyond surfaces on nanometer length and sub-picosecond time scales can greatly enhance our understanding of these systems and will impact development of future technologies, such as magnetic storage. Polarized x-rays are an appealing choice of probe due to their penetrating power, elemental and magnetic specificity, and high spatial resolution. The resolution of traditional x-ray microscopy is limited by the nanometer precision required to fabricate x-ray optics. In this thesis, a novel approach to lensless imaging of an extended magnetic nanostructure is presented. We demonstrate this approach by imaging ferrimagnetic "maze" domains in a Gd/Fe multilayer with perpendicular anisotropy. A series of dichroic coherent diffraction patterns, ptychographically recorded, are numerically inverted using non-convex and non-linear optimization theory, and we follow the magnetic domain configuration evolution through part of its magnetization hysteresis loop by applying an external magnetic field. Unlike holographic methods, it does not require a reference wave or precision optics, and so is a far simpler experiment. In addition, it enables the imaging of samples with arbitrarily large spatial dimensions, at a spatial resolution limited solely by the coherent x-ray flux and wavelength. It can readily be extended to other non-magnetic systems that exhibit circular or linear dichroism. This approach is scalable to imaging with diffraction-limited resolution, a prospect rapidly becoming a reality in view of the new generation of phenomenally brilliant x-ray sources.

  19. Dichroic coherent diffractive imaging.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Ashish; Mohanty, Jyoti; Dietze, Sebastian H; Shpyrko, Oleg G; Shipton, Erik; Fullerton, Eric E; Kim, Sang Soo; McNulty, Ian

    2011-08-16

    Understanding electronic structure at the nanoscale is crucial to untangling fundamental physics puzzles such as phase separation and emergent behavior in complex magnetic oxides. Probes with the ability to see beyond surfaces on nanometer length and subpicosecond time scales can greatly enhance our understanding of these systems and will undoubtedly impact development of future information technologies. Polarized X-rays are an appealing choice of probe due to their penetrating power, elemental and magnetic specificity, and high spatial resolution. The resolution of traditional X-ray microscopes is limited by the nanometer precision required to fabricate X-ray optics. Here we present a novel approach to lensless imaging of an extended magnetic nanostructure, in which a scanned series of dichroic coherent diffraction patterns is recorded and numerically inverted to map its magnetic domain configuration. Unlike holographic methods, it does not require a reference wave or precision optics. In addition, it enables the imaging of samples with arbitrarily large spatial dimensions, at a spatial resolution limited solely by the coherent X-ray flux, wavelength, and stability of the sample with respect to the beam. It can readily be extended to nonmagnetic systems that exhibit circular or linear dichroism. We demonstrate this approach by imaging ferrimagnetic labyrinthine domains in a Gd/Fe multilayer with perpendicular anisotropy and follow the evolution of the domain structure through part of its magnetization hysteresis loop. This approach is scalable to imaging with diffraction-limited resolution, a prospect rapidly becoming a reality in view of the new generation of phenomenally brilliant X-ray sources.

  20. Visible/near-IR-light-driven TNFePc/BiOCl organic-inorganic heterostructures with enhanced photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Zhang, Mingyi; Zhao, Zhenyu; Sun, Baodong; Zhang, Xitian

    2016-06-21

    Although semiconductor photocatalysis has been reported for more than 40 years, the spectral response is still focused on the region of UV-Visible and it is seldom extended to more than 600 nm. In this work, visible/near-IR-light-driven 2,9,16,23-tetranitrophthalocyanine iron (FeTNPc)/bismuth oxychloride (BiOCl) organic-inorganic heterostructures have been synthesized by a two-step solvothermal method. The obtained products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectra, scanning electron and transmission microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, and electrochemical measurements. The photocatalytic activity for the decomposition of methyl orange and bisphenol A solution can be significantly improved under visible/near-IR-light irradiation. Through detecting the main oxidative species by trapping experiments, the results show holes and ˙O2(-) radicals are majorly and minorly responsible for photodegradation respectively. What's more, the FeTNPc/BiOCl composite photocatalyst still retained the photocatalytic activity after three cycle measurements.

  1. Temperature Profile of IR Blocking Windows Used in Cryogenic X-Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S.; Funk, T.; Drury, O.; Labov, S.E.

    2000-08-08

    Cryogenic high-resolution X-ray spectrometers are typically operated with thin IR blocking windows to reduce radiative heating of the detector while allowing good x-ray transmission. We have estimated the temperature profile of these IR blocking windows under typical operating conditions. We show that the temperature in the center of the window is raised due to radiation from the higher temperature stages. This can increase the infrared photon flux onto the detector, thereby increasing the IR noise and decreasing the cryostat hold time. The increased window temperature constrains the maximum window size and the number of windows required. We discuss the consequences for IR blocking window design.

  2. Diffraction-based optical correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spremo, Stevan M. (Inventor); Fuhr, Peter L. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Method and system for wavelength-based processing of a light beam. A light beam, produced at a chemical or physical reaction site and having at least first and second wavelengths, ?1 and ?2, is received and diffracted at a first diffraction grating to provide first and second diffracted beams, which are received and analyzed in terms of wavelength and/or time at two spaced apart light detectors. In a second embodiment, light from first and second sources is diffracted and compared in terms of wavelength and/or time to determine if the two beams arise from the same source. In a third embodiment, a light beam is split and diffracted and passed through first and second environments to study differential effects. In a fourth embodiment, diffracted light beam components, having first and second wavelengths, are received sequentially at a reaction site to determine whether a specified reaction is promoted, based on order of receipt of the beams. In a fifth embodiment, a cylindrically shaped diffraction grating (uniform or chirped) is rotated and translated to provide a sequence of diffracted beams with different wavelengths. In a sixth embodiment, incident light, representing one or more symbols, is successively diffracted from first and second diffraction gratings and is received at different light detectors, depending upon the wavelengths present in the incident light.

  3. Structure and magnetism of Eu/sub 2/IrD/sub 5/

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, J.; Kunnmann, W.; Corliss, L.M.; Hastings, J.M.; Moyer, R.O. Jr.

    1983-06-01

    A powder neutron diffraction study of Eu/sub 2//sup 153/IrD/sub 5/ has shown it to be isostructural with Sr/sub 2/IrD/sub 5/ at room temperature. Unlike the latter compound, it does not undergo a deuterium-ordering transition at low temperatures. Magnetic scattering at helium temperatures confirms the suggestion that it becomes ferromagnetic below 20 K with a moment corresponding to that of divalent europium.

  4. Optical/IR from ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strom, Stephen; Sargent, Wallace L. W.; Wolff, Sidney; Ahearn, Michael F.; Angel, J. Roger; Beckwith, Steven V. W.; Carney, Bruce W.; Conti, Peter S.; Edwards, Suzan; Grasdalen, Gary

    1991-01-01

    Optical/infrared (O/IR) astronomy in the 1990's is reviewed. The following subject areas are included: research environment; science opportunities; technical development of the 1980's and opportunities for the 1990's; and ground-based O/IR astronomy outside the U.S. Recommendations are presented for: (1) large scale programs (Priority 1: a coordinated program for large O/IR telescopes); (2) medium scale programs (Priority 1: a coordinated program for high angular resolution; Priority 2: a new generation of 4-m class telescopes); (3) small scale programs (Priority 1: near-IR and optical all-sky surveys; Priority 2: a National Astrometric Facility); and (4) infrastructure issues (develop, purchase, and distribute optical CCDs and infrared arrays; a program to support large optics technology; a new generation of large filled aperture telescopes; a program to archive and disseminate astronomical databases; and a program for training new instrumentalists)

  5. Electronic excitations and structure of Li{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} thin films grown on ZrO{sub 2}:Y (001) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Jenderka, Marcus Schmidt-Grund, Rüdiger; Grundmann, Marius; Lorenz, Michael

    2015-01-14

    Thin films are a prerequisite for application of the emergent exotic ground states in iridates that result from the interplay of strong spin-orbit coupling and electronic correlations. We report on pulsed laser deposition of Li{sub 2}IrO{sub 3} films on ZrO{sub 2}:Y (001) single crystalline substrates. X-ray diffraction confirms preferential (001) and (10-1) out-of-plane crystalline orientations with well defined in-plane orientation. Resistivity between 35 and 300 K is dominated by a three-dimensional variable range hopping mechanism. The dielectric function is determined by means of spectroscopic ellipsometry and, complemented by Fourier transform infrared transmission spectroscopy, reveals a small optical gap of ≈300 meV, a splitting of the 5d-t{sub 2g} manifold, and several in-gap excitations attributed to phonons and possibly magnons.

  6. Solving conical diffraction grating problems with integral equations.

    PubMed

    Goray, Leonid I; Schmidt, Gunther

    2010-03-01

    Off-plane scattering of time-harmonic plane waves by a plane diffraction grating with arbitrary conductivity and general surface profile is considered in a rigorous electromagnetic formulation. Integral equations for conical diffraction are obtained involving, besides the boundary integrals of the single and double layer potentials, singular integrals, the tangential derivative of single-layer potentials. We derive an explicit formula for the calculation of the absorption in conical diffraction. Some rules that are expedient for the numerical implementation of the theory are presented. The efficiencies and polarization angles compared with those obtained by Lifeng Li for transmission and reflection gratings are in a good agreement. The code developed and tested is found to be accurate and efficient for solving off-plane diffraction problems including high-conductive gratings, surfaces with edges, real profiles, and gratings working at short wavelengths.

  7. Feasibility of neutron diffraction on solid 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemensmeyer, K.; Schuberth, E. A.; Adams, E. D.; Takano, Y.; Guckelsberger, K.

    2000-07-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of neutron diffraction from solid 3He. The experiment will be performed at the HMI, first aiming for the properties of the antiferromagnetic ordering in the BCC phase and the ferromagnetic order in the HCP phase. Signal and beam heating considerations are essential to account for the enormous neutron absorption cross section of 3He. The study shows that neutron diffraction and transmission experiments are possible, relying on the experience gained from the neutron diffraction experiments on Cu and Ag at nanokelvin temperatures. A pressure cell has been developed which complies with the conflicting demands arising from the neutron and ultralow temperature aspects of the experiment. This work is a first step in an extensive effort to characterize 3He by neutron diffraction.

  8. Diffraction at HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A; Garlea, Vasile O; Hubbard, Camden R; Wang, Xun-Li

    2008-01-01

    Of the planned suite of powder and single-crystal diffractometers for the HFIR, only two are currently operating, the Neutron Residual Stress Mapping Facility (NRSF2) diffractometer, and the Wide Angle Neutron Diffractometer (WAND). The NSRF2 was recently upgraded and is available to external users via the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program for studies of stress, texture and phase mapping. The WAND is a flat-cone geometry diffractometer equipped with a curve 1-D PSD, suitable for high intensity powder diffraction (e.g., kinetics, high pressure) and diffuse scattering studies of single-crystals. A rebuild of the old HFIR powder diffractometer, originally located at HB-4 station is now underway, and is expected to begin commissioning by summer 2008. This instrument has a Debye-Scherrer geometry, with a detector bank consisting of 44 3He tubes each with 6' Soller collimators. A four-circle single-crystal diffractometer is located at the HB-3A station, and is slowly being brought back to life after the long hiatus connected to the reactor upgrade. A Letter of Intent to build a quasi-Laue diffractometer, called IMAGINE, in the HFIR Cold Guide Hall has been presented to and endorsed by the Neutron Scattering Science Advisory Committee.

  9. Diffractive parameric colors.

    PubMed

    Orava, Joni; Heikkila, Noora; Jaaskelainen, Timo; Parkkinen, Jussi

    2008-12-01

    A method of producing inkless parameric color pairs is studied. In this method, colors are formed additively using diffraction gratings with differing grating periods as primary colors. Gratings with different grating periods reflect different spectral radiance peaks of a fluorescent lamp to the desired viewing angle, according to the grating equation. Four spectral peaks of a 4000 K fluorescent lamp--red, green, cyan, and blue-are used as the primary colors. The colors are mixed additively by fixing the relative areas of different grating periods inside a pixel. With four primary colors it is possible to mix certain colors with different triplets of primary colors. Thus, it is theoretically possible to produce metameric colors. In this study, three parameric color pairs are fabricated using electron beam lithography, electroplating, and hot embossing. The radiance spectra of the color pairs are measured by spectroradiometer from hot-embossed plastic samples. The CIELAB DeltaE(ab) and CIEDE2000 color differences between radiance spectra of the color pairs are calculated. The CIEDE2000 color differences of color pairs are between 2.6 and 7.2 units in reference viewing conditions. The effects of viewing angle and different light sources are also evaluated. It is found that both the viewing angle and the light source have very strong influences on the color differences of the color pairs.

  10. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar; Allam, Srinivasa Rao; Satyanarayana, S. V. M.; Sharan, Alok

    2014-10-01

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  11. Electrically-programmable diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Butler, Michael A.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Senturia, Stephen D.

    1998-01-01

    An electrically-programmable diffraction grating. The programmable grating includes a substrate having a plurality of electrodes formed thereon and a moveable grating element above each of the electrodes. The grating elements are electrostatically programmable to form a diffraction grating for diffracting an incident beam of light as it is reflected from the upper surfaces of the grating elements. The programmable diffraction grating, formed by a micromachining process, has applications for optical information processing (e.g. optical correlators and computers), for multiplexing and demultiplexing a plurality of light beams of different wavelengths (e.g. for optical fiber communications), and for forming spectrometers (e.g. correlation and scanning spectrometers).

  12. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M. E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok E-mail: aloksharan@email.com

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  13. Power transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Yale, O.S.

    1989-12-12

    This patent describes a power transmission. It comprises: in combination, a master gear having at least one annular tooth set, means for drivingly engaging the master gear with a power source, driven shaft, a yoke member attached to the shaft and including a screw pump housing extending radially with respect to the shaft with a pair of ports in spaced relation, a pump screw rotatable in the housing and a pump gear attached to the screw and engaging the annular tooth set, and a casing for transmission fluid. The pump housing being located for immersion in the fluid.

  14. Diffractive Measurements at the LHC: Elastic and Inelastic Soft Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Orava, Risto

    2011-07-15

    A short review of four topics was presented: (1) Photon bremsstrahlung in elastic proton-proton scattering, (2) Low mass Single Diffraction (SD), (3) Low mass Central Exclusive Diffraction (CED), and (4) Event classification of the pp interactions at the LHC. This article summarizes topic (1).

  15. A supramolecular Tröger's base derived coordination zinc polymer for fluorescent sensing of phenolic-nitroaromatic explosives in water† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Spectroscopic (multinuclear NMR, IR HRMS) characterizations, optimized structure, TGA, powder diffraction and fluorescence titration profiles. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc04367d Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Dabadie, Charlyne; Byrne, Kevin; Savyasachi, Aramballi J.; Umadevi, Deivasigamani; Schmitt, Wolfgang; Kitchen, Jonathan A.

    2017-01-01

    A V-Shaped 4-amino-1,8-napthalimide derived tetracarboxylic acid linker (L; bis-[N-(1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid)]-9,18-methano-1,8-naphthalimide-[b,f][1,5]diazocine) comprising the Tröger's base (TB) structural motif was rationally designed and synthesised to access a nitrogen-rich fluorescent supramolecular coordination polymer. By adopting the straight forward precipitation method, a new luminescent nanoscale Zn(ii) coordination polymer (TB-Zn-CP) was synthesized in quantitative yield using Zn(OAc)2·2H2O and tetraacid linker L (1 : 0.5) in DMF at room temperature. The phase-purity of as-synthesised TB-Zn-CP was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction analysis, infra-red spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. Thermogravimetric analysis suggests that TB-Zn-CP is thermally stable up to 330 °C and the morphological features of TB-Zn-CP was analysed by SEM and AFM techniques. The N2 adsorption isotherm of thermally activated TB-Zn-CP at 77 K revealed a type-II reversible adsorption isotherm and the calculated Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area was found to be 72 m2 g–1. Furthermore, TB-Zn-CP displayed an excellent CO2 uptake capacity of 76 mg g–1 at 273 K and good adsorption selectivity for CO2 over N2 and H2. The aqueous suspension of as-synthesized TB-Zn-CP showed strong green fluorescence (λ max = 520 nm) characteristics due to the internal-charge transfer (ICT) transition and was used as a fluorescent sensor for the discriminative sensing of nitroaromatic explosives. The aqueous suspension of TB-Zn-CP showed the largest quenching responses with high selectivity for phenolic-nitroaromatics (4-NP, 2,4-DNP and PA) even in the concurrent presence of other potentially competing nitroaromatic analytes. The fluorescence titration studies also provide evidence that TB-Zn-CP detects picric acid as low as the parts per billion (26.3 ppb) range. Furthermore, the observed fluorescence quenching responses of TB-Zn-CP towards picric acid were highly

  16. Characterization of an InGaAs/InP-based Echelle mirror multiplexer for widely-tunable mid-IR sources based on quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbe, L. J.; Carpintero, G.; Gilles, C.; Boulila, F.; Maisons, G.; Carras, M.

    2015-03-01

    We present the experimental characterization results of a 15-to-1 wavelength multiplexer for a Distributed Feedback Quantum Cascade Laser (DFB QCL) array operating in the 7-8.5 μm (mid-long) infrared (IR) range. This design is customized for its use to combine the output from a DFB QCL array with a 0.1 μm wavelength channel spacing for spectroscopy applications, and it is proposed in order to achieve a continuous tuning range overcoming the limited tunability of a single QCLs, required for multi-gas or complex molecule detection. This multiplexer is based on an Echelle diffraction mirror grating scheme, in which multiple output waveguides are deliberately implemented in the design to de-risk for wavelength deviations in the fabrication process. We optimized the location of the input and output guides in order to allow for monolithic integration of the DFB QCL arrays, which would provide for a number of advantages such as a higher stability, less complexity and lower cost over other technologies such as external cavities. We discuss the effects over the device performance of the design, such as the diffraction effects, input channel width overlapping/crosstalk and input channel profile, which are very important to address in order to avoid unaccounted transmission losses. Other parameters such as the profile of the input and output waveguides and fabrication limitations are also discussed as their effect on the device is observed. A series of characterization tests are presented in order to compare the simulation results to the experimental data, which suggests that these multiplexers are a suitable option compared to other IR multiplexer schemes in terms of size and power transmission.

  17. Controlled tuning of thin film deposition of IrO{sub 2} on Si using pulsed laser ablation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Koshy, Abraham M. Bhat, Shwetha G. Kumar, P. S. Anil

    2016-05-06

    We have successfully grown a stable phase of polycrystalline IrO{sub 2} on Si (100) substrate. We have found that the phase of IrO{sub 2} can be controllably tuned to obtain either Ir or IrO{sub 2} using pulsed laser ablation technique. O{sub 2} conditions during the deposition influences the phase directly and drastically whereas annealing conditions do not show any variation in the phase of thin film. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoemission experiments confirm both Ir and IrO{sub 2} can be successively grown on Si using IrO{sub 2} target. Also, the morphology is found to be influenced by the O{sub 2} conditions.

  18. Phase-diffractive coating for daylight control on smart window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perennes, Frederic; Twardowski, Patrice J.; Gesbert, D.; Meyrueis, Patrick

    1992-11-01

    Daylight can be processed by a smart window in a transmission, reflective, refractive, and diffractive mode. In the future an optimization will be realized by a mixing of these approaches depending on the applied cases. Non-imaging diffractive optics has its roots in the work done in holographic diffractive coating for head up displays (HUD) and helmet mounted displays. For having globally good results on smart window with diffractive coating, a very high diffraction efficiency must be reached close to 100% without having a too important lowering of the control of other parameters of the light processed by a smart window (direction and frequency control essentially). We propose a method for designing, realizing, and using diffractive coating for a smart window that is based on a new organic material and diffractive model that were already validated in HUD. Potential low cost is possible for mass production on a large surface with an adapted investment. We describe the present technology and its limits and the ones that can be reached in the future. In this work, we present a holographic way to modify the slant of sun rays through a window, and to filter infrared radiations by using dichromated gelatin material. In this way it would be able to ensure a more uniform lighting and a more pleasant temperature inside buildings or vehicles, without using dye or photochromics glasses.

  19. HIV Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS HIV Transmission Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  20. Tolerance analysis on diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency for harmonic diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Mao

    2016-10-01

    In this dissertation, the mathematical model of effect of manufacturing errors including microstructure relative height error and relative width error on diffraction efficiency for the harmonic diffractive optical elements (HDEs) is set up. According to the expression of the phase delay and diffraction efficiency of the HDEs, the expression of diffraction efficiency of refraction and diffractive optical element with the microstructure height and periodic width errors in fabrication process is presented in this paper. Furthermore, the effect of manufacturing errors on diffraction efficiency for the harmonic diffractive optical elements is studied, and diffraction efficiency change is analyzed as the relative microstructure height-error in the same and in the opposite sign as well as relative width-error in the same and in the opposite sign. Example including infrared wavelength with materials GE has been discussed in this paper. Two kinds of manufacturing errors applied in 3.7 4.3um middle infrared and 8.7-11.5um far infrared optical system which results in diffraction efficiency and PIDE of HDEs are studied. The analysis results can be used for manufacturing error control in micro-structure height and periodic width. Results can be used for HDEs processing.

  1. Inelastic diffraction at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshin, S. M.; Tyurin, N. E.

    2017-03-01

    The relativistic scattering was one of the scientific fields where Academician V.G. Kadyshevsky has made an important and highly cited contribution [1]. In this paper we discuss the high-energy dependencies of diffractive and non-diffractive inelastic cross-sections in view of the recent LHC data which reveal a presence of the reflective scattering mode.

  2. Computer Simulation of Diffraction Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an Apple computer program (listing available from author) which simulates Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction using vector addition techniques (vector chaining) and allows user to experiment with different shaped multiple apertures. Graphics output include vector resultants, phase difference, diffraction patterns, and the Cornu spiral…

  3. Ptychographic Fresnel coherent diffractive imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, D. J.; Williams, G. J.; Nugent, K. A.; Abbey, B.; Pfeifer, M. A.; Clark, J. N.; Peele, A. G.; Jonge, M. D. de; McNulty, I.

    2009-12-15

    This paper reports improved reconstruction of complex wave fields from extended objects. The combination of ptychography with Fresnel diffractive imaging results in better reconstructions with fewer iterations required to convergence than either method considered separately. The method is applied to retrieve the projected thickness of a gold microstructure and comparative results using ptychography and Fresnel diffractive imaging are presented.

  4. Epitaxial growth and electrochemical transfer of graphene on Ir(111)/α-Al2O3(0001) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Shinji; Saito, Yuta; Kodama, Hideyuki; Sawabe, Atsuhito

    2016-07-01

    Low-pressure chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene on Iridium (Ir) layers epitaxially deposited on α-Al2O3 (0001) substrates was investigated. The X-ray diffraction, Raman and reflection high energy electron diffraction characterizations revealed that graphene films were epitaxially grown on Ir(111) layers, and the in-plane epitaxial relationship between graphene, Ir(111), and α-Al2O3(0001) was graphene ⟨ 1 1 ¯ 00 ⟩//Ir⟨ 11 2 ¯ ⟩//α-Al2O3⟨ 11 2 ¯ 0 ⟩. The graphene on Ir(111) was electrochemically transferred onto SiO2/Si substrates. We also demonstrated the reuse of the Ir(111)/α-Al2O3(0001) substrates in multiple growth and transfer cycles.

  5. Transmission electron microscope studies of extraterrestrial materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.

    1995-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray spectrometry and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy are used to analyse carbon in interplanetary dust particles. Optical micrographs are shown depicting cross sections of the dust particles embedded in sulphur. Selected-area electron diffraction patterns are shown. Transmission Electron Microscope specimens of lunar soil were prepared using two methods: ion-milling and ultramicrotomy. A combination of high resolution TEM imaging and electron diffraction is used to characterize the opaque assemblages. The opaque assemblages analyzed in this study are dominated by ilmenite with lesser rutile and spinel exsolutions, and traces of Fe metal.

  6. Molecular Tectonics: Design of Enantiopure Luminescent Heterometallic Ir(III)-Cd(II) Coordination Network.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chaojie; Guenet, Aurélie; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Planeix, Jean-Marc; Hosseini, Mir Wais

    2015-11-02

    With the aim of combining luminescence and chirality in heterometallic Ir(III)-Cd(II) coordination networks, synthetic strategies for the formation of new Ir(III)-based chiral metallatectons ([Ir(dFppy)2(1)][PF6]), both as a racemic mixture of Δ and Λ enantiomers (rac-[Ir(dFppy)2(1)][PF6]) and as enantiopure complexes (Δ-[Ir(dFppy)2(1)][PF6] and Λ-[Ir(dFppy)2(1)][PF6]), were developed. The final compounds were characterized both in solution and in the crystalline phase. Notably, their crystal structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction, and their photophysical properties in solution and in the solid state were investigated. Combination of the cationic linear metallatecton with Cd(2+) iodide salt ([CdI3](-)), behaving as an anionic two-connecting node, leads to the formation of 1D chiral and neutral heterometallic Ir(III)-Cd(II) luminescent coordination networks both as a racemic mixture and as enantiomerically pure infinite architectures. The latter have been structurally studied in the solid state by X-ray diffraction both on single crystals and on microcrystalline powders. The infinite coordination networks display phosphorescence in the solid state at ca. 600 nm upon excitation at 400 nm.

  7. Image contrast of diffraction-limited telescopes for circular incoherent sources of uniform radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackleford, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    A simple approximate formula is derived for the background intensity beyond the edge of the image of uniform incoherent circular light source relative to the irradiance near the center of the image. The analysis applies to diffraction-limited telescopes with or without central beam obscuration due to a secondary mirror. Scattering off optical surfaces is neglected. The analysis is expected to be most applicable to spaceborne IR telescopes, for which diffraction can be the major source of off-axis response.

  8. Bond strength and electronic structures of coherent Ir /Ir3Zr interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, H. R.; Liu, Yong; Tang, Hui Ping; Xiang, Chang Shu

    2008-05-01

    First principles calculation reveals that the coherent Ir /Ir3Zr interfaces possess high values of bond strength and that interface orientation and atomic configuration have important effects on interface bonding and interface energy. Calculation also shows that the interface dipole is formed in the Ir /Ir3Zr interface due to an unequal loss of the electrons from Ir and Ir3Zr atoms, and density of states suggests that a stronger covalent bonding is formed in the interface than corresponding Ir or Ir3Zr bulks, which results in the strengthening effect of the Ir3Zr precipitation in the Ir-base superalloys from experimental observations in the literature.

  9. Observing conditions and mid-IR data quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Rachel; Wong, Andre; Geballe, Tom; Volk, Kevin; Hayward, Tom; Dillman, Matt; Fisher, Robert Scott; Radomski, James

    2008-07-01

    Ground-based mid-infrared (mid-IR) observations appear to be widely perceived as esoteric and demanding, and very sensitive to observing conditions. Although the principles of observing in the background-limited regime are well-known, it is difficult for the non-specialist to find specific information on exactly how mid-IR data can be affected by environmental conditions. Understanding these effects is important for the efficiency of mid-IR queue observing, the ability of classical observers to adapt their programs to the prevailing conditions, and the standard of data being delivered. Through operating mid-IR instruments in the queue at Gemini we have amassed a considerable database of standard star observations taken under a wide range of atmospheric conditions and in a variety of instrumental configurations. These data can be used to illustrate the effect of factors such as water vapour column, airmass, cloud cover, etc. on observed quantities like raw sky background, residual background, atmospheric transmission and image FWHM. Here we present some preliminary results from this study, which we hope to be of use to observatory users and staff as a guide to which environmental conditions are truly important to mid- IR imaging observations, and which can safely be neglected.

  10. Reflection Spectroscopy With The FT-IR Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wihlborg, William T.; Reffner, John A.; Strand, Scott W.; Wasacz, Frank M.

    1989-12-01

    The FT-IR microscope is a versatile sampling accessory used to record IR spectra in either transmittance or reflectance modes and capable of obtaining data from microscopic sampling areas. Because the FT-IR microscope simplifies the collection of reflectance data it has renewed interest in reflectance spectroscopy. Moreover, the ability to see the specific sample and to obtain spectra from small areas makes it possible to differentiate the mode of the reflection data. Reflections can be specular, diffuse or reflection-absorption modes. These modes are not independent, but the sample and its surface geometry can cause one mode to dominate all others. With polished grains or single crystal faces, specular reflection is the dominate mode. Thin films on metallic reflecting substrates make reflection-absorption the major reflection mode. Diffuse reflection dominates when the surface is very rough or fine irregular particles are analyzed. Since the sample can be seen with the microscope, the reflection mode can be predicted by direct observation of the sample's surface. In this work, examples of reflection spectral measurements are presented to illustrate the versatility of the FT-IR microscope. Of particular interest is the first report of quantitative analysis of a copolymer using specular reflectance measurements obtained with the FT-IR microscope. In this analysis, the Kramers-Kroenig transformation was used to obtain extinction (k) values. The k values derived from specular reflection are quantitative agreement with absorbance values measured by transmission.

  11. Characterization and identification of microorganisms by FT-IR microspectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo-Thi, N. A.; Kirschner, C.; Naumann, D.

    2003-12-01

    We report on a novel FT-IR approach for microbial characterization/identification based on a light microscope coupled to an infrared spectrometer which offers the possibility to acquire IR-spectra of microcolonies containing only few hundred cells. Microcolony samples suitable for FT-IR microspectroscopic measurements were obtained by a replica technique with a stamping device that transfers spatially accurate cells of microcolonies growing on solid culture plates to a special, IR-transparent or reflecting stamping plate. High quality spectra could be recorded either by applying the transmission/absorbance or the reflectance/absorbance mode of the infrared microscope. Signal to noise ratios higher than 1000 were obtained for microcolonies as small as 40 μm in diameter. Reproducibility levels were established that allowed species and strain identification. The differentiation and classification capacity of the FT-IR microscopic technique was tested for different selected microorganisms. Cluster and factor analysis methods were used to evaluate the complex spectral data. Excellent discrimination between bacteria and yeasts, and at the same time Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains was obtained. Twenty-two selected strains of different species within the genus Staphylococcus were repetitively measured and could be grouped into correct species cluster. Moreover, the results indicated that the method allows also identifications at the subspecies level. Additionally, the new approach allowed spectral mapping analysis of single colonies which provided spatially resolved characterization of growth heterogeneity within complex microbial populations such as colonies.

  12. Lamb wave diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyarenko, Eugene Valentinovich

    , fails. Diffraction tomography is a way to incorporate scattering effects into tomographic algorithms in order to improve image quality and resolution. This work describes the iterative reconstruction procedure developed for the Lamb Wave tomography and allowing for ray bending correction for imaging of moderately scattering objects.

  13. Investigation of structural and electrical transport properties in Ti doped Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatti, Imtiaz Noor Pramanik, A. K.

    2016-05-23

    Effects of Ti substitution at Ir-site on structural and electrical properties are studies in Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4}. Structural investigation has been done using x-ray powder diffraction and allied Rietveld analysis for all the samples. While there is no structural phase transition but the lattice parameters evolve with Ti doping. Resistivity measurements show an insulating behavior for all the samples. Data show resistivity increases drastically with Ti doping. The increase in resistivity is understood to arise due to dilution of Ir-O-Ir network as well as tuning of electronic correlation effect.

  14. Photoinduced phase transitions in vanadium dioxide revealed by ultrafast electron diffraction and mid-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Kunal; Morrison, Vance; Chatelain, Robert; Hendaoui, Ali; Bruhacs, Andrew; Chaker, Mohamed; Siwick, Bradley

    2015-03-01

    The complex interplay between strong electron-electron correlations and structural distortions is thought to determine the electronic properties of many oxides, but the respective role of these two contributions is often difficult to determine. We report combined radio-frequency compressed ultrafast electron diffraction (RF-UED) and infrared transmissivity experiments in which we directly monitor and separate the lattice and charge density reorganizations associated with the optically induced semiconductor-to-metal phase transition in vanadium dioxide. These studies have uncovered a previously unreported photoinduced transition to a metastable phase retaining the periodic lattice distortion characteristic of the insulating phase, but differing by a reorganization of charge density along the vanadium dimer chains and a transition to metal-like mid IR optical properties. These results demonstrate that UED is able to follow details of both lattice and electronic structural dynamics on the ultrafast timescale. Supported by Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Canada Research Chairs program, NSERC PGS-D and CGS-D fellowships, and Fonds de Récherche du Québec-Nature et Technologies.

  15. Heterooctamolybdate-Based Clusters H3[(Cp*Rh)4PMo8O32] and H5[Na2(Cp*Ir)4PMo8O34] and Derived Hybrid Nanomaterials with Efficient Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Reaction Activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vikram; Ma, Pengtao; Drew, Michael G B; Niu, Jingyang; Wang, Jingping; Jin, Guo-Xin

    2017-09-22

    Polyoxometalates (POMs), emerging as a new class of porous molecular materials, play a promising role in homo- and heterogeneous catalysis. Among them, noble-metal-decorated POMs have a profound impact as catalytic materials. Thus, it is imperative to design and structurally explore new catalysts including noble metals. Herein, two new clusters, H3[(Cp*Rh)4PMo8O32]·14H2O (1) and H5[Na2(Cp*Ir)4PMo8O34]·13H2O (2) (Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl), based on a heterooctamolybdate anionic core were successfully obtained via a one-pot reaction using [Cp*MCl2]2 [M = Rh (1) and Ir (2)] and Na2MoO4 in acidic conditions. Compounds 1 and 2 were well characterized in the solid state by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, IR, and thermogravimetric analysis and in solution by UV-vis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and electrochemistry. Compounds 1 and 2 represent an important class of structurally isolated organometallic POM-based clusters that were successfully nanostructured onto Ni foam and electrochemically reduced after 48 h of electrolysis to M/MoO2, where M = Rh (3) and Ir (4), nanocomposite hybrid materials on a Ni foam surface in a 0.1 M KOH solution. The modified electrocatalysts (3 and 4) show efficient hydrogen evolution reaction activities almost comparable to those of high-grade Pt/C at 0.1 M KOH. The nanostructured POMs [1- and 2@NF (Ni foam)] and their corresponding reduced products (3 and 4) were observed by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and further proven by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM.

  16. Rotorcraft transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coy, John J.

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center and the U.S. Army Aviation Systems Command share an interest in advancing the technology for helicopter propulsion systems. In particular, this presentation outlines that portion of the program that applies to the drive train and its various mechanical components. The major goals of the program are to increase the life, reliability, and maintainability; reduce the weight, noise, and vibration; and maintain the relatively high mechanical efficiency of the gear train. The current activity emphasizes noise reduction technology and analytical code development followed by experimental verification. Selected significant advances in technology for transmissions are reviewed, including advanced configurations and new analytical tools. Finally, the plan for transmission research in the future is presented.

  17. High-speed autofocusing of a cell using diffraction pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oku, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Masatoshi; Theodorus; Hashimoto, Koichi

    2006-05-01

    This paper proposes a new autofocusing method for observing cells under a transmission illumination. The focusing method uses a quick and simple focus estimation technique termed “depth from diffraction,” which is based on a diffraction pattern in a defocused image of a biological specimen. Since this method can estimate the focal position of the specimen from only a single defocused image, it can easily realize high-speed autofocusing. To demonstrate the method, it was applied to continuous focus tracking of a swimming paramecium, in combination with two-dimensional position tracking. Three-dimensional tracking of the paramecium for 70 s was successfully demonstrated.

  18. Optical diffraction properties of multimicrogratings

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenbach, Christian A.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Gupta, Mool C.

    2015-02-27

    This paper shows the results of optical diffraction properties of multimicrograting structures fabricated by e-beam lithography. Multimicrograting consist of arrays of hexagonally shaped cells containing periodic one-dimensional (1D) grating lines in different orientations and arrayed to form large area patterns. We analyzed the optical diffraction properties of multimicrogratings by studying the individual effects of the several periodic elements of multimicrogratings. The observed optical diffraction pattern is shown to be the combined effect of the periodic and non-periodic elements that define the multimicrogratings and the interaction between different elements. We measured the total transverse electric (TE) diffraction efficiency of multimicrogratings and found it to be 32.1%, which is closely related to the diffraction efficiency of 1D periodic grating lines of the same characteristics, measured to be 33.7%. Beam profiles of the optical diffraction patterns from multimicrogratings are captured with a CCD sensor technique. Interference fringes were observed under certain conditions formed by multimicrograting beams interfering with each other. Finally, these diffraction structures may find applications in sensing, nanometrology, and optical interconnects.

  19. Optical diffraction properties of multimicrogratings

    DOE PAGES

    Rothenbach, Christian A.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Gupta, Mool C.

    2015-02-27

    This paper shows the results of optical diffraction properties of multimicrograting structures fabricated by e-beam lithography. Multimicrograting consist of arrays of hexagonally shaped cells containing periodic one-dimensional (1D) grating lines in different orientations and arrayed to form large area patterns. We analyzed the optical diffraction properties of multimicrogratings by studying the individual effects of the several periodic elements of multimicrogratings. The observed optical diffraction pattern is shown to be the combined effect of the periodic and non-periodic elements that define the multimicrogratings and the interaction between different elements. We measured the total transverse electric (TE) diffraction efficiency of multimicrogratings andmore » found it to be 32.1%, which is closely related to the diffraction efficiency of 1D periodic grating lines of the same characteristics, measured to be 33.7%. Beam profiles of the optical diffraction patterns from multimicrogratings are captured with a CCD sensor technique. Interference fringes were observed under certain conditions formed by multimicrograting beams interfering with each other. Finally, these diffraction structures may find applications in sensing, nanometrology, and optical interconnects.« less

  20. ON THE ANALYSIS OF SPECTRA IN TRANSMISSION THROUGH THIN FILMS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Reprint: On the analysis of spectra in transmission through thin films . A technique to investigate the adequacy of the damped harmonicoscillator...model for IR absorption in thin films . Procedure for extracting material parameters and film thickness from the transmission curve.

  1. Arbitrary shape surface Fresnel diffraction.

    PubMed

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2012-04-09

    Fresnel diffraction calculation on an arbitrary shape surface is proposed. This method is capable of calculating Fresnel diffraction from a source surface with an arbitrary shape to a planar destination surface. Although such calculation can be readily calculated by the direct integral of a diffraction calculation, the calculation cost is proportional to O(N²) in one dimensional or O(N⁴) in two dimensional cases, where N is the number of sampling points. However, the calculation cost of the proposed method is O(N log N) in one dimensional or O(N² log N) in two dimensional cases using non-uniform fast Fourier transform.

  2. Diffractive optics in adverse environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrmann, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation at the Army Research Laboratory is in progress to characterize DOE performance in mil-spec environments. One of the most significant environmental influences is temperature. An analysis of a diffractive lens is presented in which optical performance is described as a function of temperature. In particular, we review the thermal dependence of focal length and diffraction efficiency. It is shown that the change in these parameters is independent of lens shape and relates only to material properties. Thermalized hybrid refractive/diffractive designs are discussed.

  3. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkovszky, Laszlo; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2013-04-15

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  4. Insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 but not Shc can activate the insulin receptor independent of insulin and induce proliferation in CHO-IR cells

    SciTech Connect

    Niessen, Markus . E-mail: markus.niessen@usz.ch; Jaschinski, Frank; Item, Flurin; McNamara, Morgan P.; Spinas, Giatgen A.; Trueb, Thomas

    2007-02-15

    Ligand-activated insulin receptor (IR) attracts and phosphorylates various substrates such as insulin receptor substrates 1-4 (IRS) and Shc. To investigate how binding affinity for substrate affects signalling we generated chimeric receptors with the {beta}-chain of the insulin receptor containing NPXY motives with different affinities for receptor substrates. We found that the extent of receptor tyrosine phosphorylation positively correlates with binding affinity towards IRS1/2 but not towards Shc. Moreover, overexpression of IRS1 or IRS2 but not of Shc increased IR tyrosine phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, also independent of insulin. Molecular truncations of IRS1 revealed that neither the isolated PH and PTB domains nor the C-terminus with the tyrosine phosphorylation sites alone are sufficient for substrate-dependent receptor activation. Overexpression of IRS1 and IRS2 impaired insulin-induced internalization of the IR in a dose-dependent manner suggesting that IRS proteins prevent endosome-associated receptor dephosphorylation/inactivation. IRS1 and IRS2 could therefore target the activated IR to different cellular compartments. Overexpression of IRS1 and IRS2 inhibited insulin-stimulated activation of the MAP kinases Erk1/2 while it increased/induced activation of Akt/PKB. Finally, overexpression of IRS1 and IRS2 but not of Shc induced DNA synthesis in starved CHO-IR cells independent of exogenous growth factors. Our results demonstrate that variations in cellular IRS1 and IRS2 concentration affect insulin signalling both upstream and downstream and that IRS proteins could play instructive rather than just permissive roles in signal transmission.

  5. Devices useful for vacuum ultraviolet beam characterization including a movable stage with a transmission grating and image detector

    DOEpatents

    Gessner, Oliver; Kornilov, Oleg A; Wilcox, Russell B

    2013-10-29

    The invention provides for a device comprising an apparatus comprising (a) a transmission grating capable of diffracting a photon beam into a diffracted photon output, and (b) an image detector capable of detecting the diffracted photon output. The device is useful for measuring the spatial profile and diffraction pattern of a photon beam, such as a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) beam.

  6. Thermal image measurement and analysis under obscured IR smoke screen conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Zeying; Chen, Zhigang; Chen, Wenjian; Li, Li; You, Mingjun

    1998-08-01

    Under the condition of laying artificial smoke screen, studying transmission property of IR, laser and visible light, especially studying the effect of smoke screen on transmission of thermal image of target is of theoretical and practical significance. The paper is based on a field- testing during which artificial IR smoke screen was produced. In the course of testing, typical motor vehicle in operating condition was chosen as target. By combing the change of typical thermal image which was taken by AGEMA-880 thermovision before and after IR smoke screen producing with a large amount of data concerned, the nature and law are studied and analyzed that different types of IR smoke screen have an effect on thermal image of target and image quality of thermovision. Therefore, we further have put forward that the change of thermal image quality is reflected under the influence of smoke screen by fractal fitting error.

  7. Theoretical studies of Ir5Th and Ir5Ce nanoscale precipitates in Ir

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, James R; Averill, Frank; Cooper, Valentino R

    2014-01-01

    Experimentally, it is known that very small amounts of thorium and/or cerium added to iridium metal form a precipitate, Ir5Th / Ir5Ce, which improves the high temperature mechanical properties of the resulting alloys. We demonstrate that there are low-energy configurations for nano-scale precipitates of these phases in Ir, and that these coherent arrangements may assist in producing improved mechanical properties. One precipitate/matrix orientation gives a particularly low interfacial energy, and a low lattice misfit. Nanolayer precipitates with this orientation are found to be likely to form, with little driving force to coarsen. The predicted morphology of the precipitates and their orientation with the matrix phase provide a potential experiment that could be used to test these predictions.

  8. Interlaced X-ray diffraction computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakeros, Antonios; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Di Michiel, Marco; Senecal, Pierre; Middelkoop, Vesna; Cernik, Robert J.; Beale, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction computed tomography data-collection strategy that allows, post experiment, a choice between temporal and spatial resolution is reported. This strategy enables time-resolved studies on comparatively short timescales, or alternatively allows for improved spatial resolution if the system under study, or components within it, appear to be unchanging. The application of the method for studying an Mn–Na–W/SiO2 fixed-bed reactor in situ is demonstrated. Additionally, the opportunities to improve the data-collection strategy further, enabling post-collection tuning between statistical, temporal and spatial resolutions, are discussed. In principle, the interlaced scanning approach can also be applied to other pencil-beam tomographic techniques, like X-ray fluorescence computed tomography, X-ray absorption fine structure computed tomography, pair distribution function computed tomography and tomographic scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. PMID:27047305

  9. Interlaced X-ray diffraction computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Vamvakeros, Antonios; Jacques, Simon D M; Di Michiel, Marco; Senecal, Pierre; Middelkoop, Vesna; Cernik, Robert J; Beale, Andrew M

    2016-04-01

    An X-ray diffraction computed tomography data-collection strategy that allows, post experiment, a choice between temporal and spatial resolution is reported. This strategy enables time-resolved studies on comparatively short timescales, or alternatively allows for improved spatial resolution if the system under study, or components within it, appear to be unchanging. The application of the method for studying an Mn-Na-W/SiO2 fixed-bed reactor in situ is demonstrated. Additionally, the opportunities to improve the data-collection strategy further, enabling post-collection tuning between statistical, temporal and spatial resolutions, are discussed. In principle, the interlaced scanning approach can also be applied to other pencil-beam tomographic techniques, like X-ray fluorescence computed tomography, X-ray absorption fine structure computed tomography, pair distribution function computed tomography and tomographic scanning transmission X-ray microscopy.

  10. Dust content in compact HII regions (NGC 7538-IRS1, IRS2, and IRS3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akabane, K.; Kuno, N.

    2005-02-01

    The luminosity of the central star of the compact HII regions of NGC 7538 was estimated from the solid angle of the IR sources subtended relative to the central star, and was found to be 5˜ 10 times as intense as that of IR sources. Under the single central star approximation, the luminosity gives a stellar UV photon rate NU(*) (s-1) of ˜3.0 × 1048, ˜1.5 × 1049, ˜5.1 × 1049, and ˜1.7 × 1047 for the compact HII regions of NGC 7538-IRS1(A/2), B, IRS2, and IRS3, respectively. NU (*) and the observed electron density, ne, provide the dust opacity of the ionizing photon, τSd, for the optical path out to the Strömgren sphere radius rS, assuming a gas with standard dust content. Ionizing photon opacity over the same optical path but with the actual dust content τSda is also derived from ri / rS, where ri is the radius of the ionized sphere, which is estimated from NU(*) and the observed volume emission measure ne2 (4 π ri3/3) (Spitzer \\cite{Spitzer1978}). An observational trend of γ NU(*) / 4π ri2 1/2 ˜ constant, where γ = τSda / τSd}, was obtained for the 4 compact HII regions of the NGC 7538(N). Fourteen selected compact HII regions from data catalogued by VLA observations were examined for this trend, and a similar result was obtained. A limit of γ as 15 ≥ γ ≥ 0.1 was given for the 14 selected sources. The size of the dust-depleted cavity of the NGC 7538(N) suggested by Chini et al. (\\cite{Chini1986}) coincides with that of the ionized sphere of the IRS2 of the region.

  11. The atomic structural dynamics of γ-Al2O3 supported Ir-Pt nanocluster catalysts prepared from a bimetallic molecular precursor: a study using aberration-corrected electron microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Small, Matthew W; Sanchez, Sergio I; Menard, Laurent D; Kang, Joo H; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Nuzzo, Ralph G

    2011-03-16

    This study describes a prototypical, bimetallic heterogeneous catalyst: compositionally well-defined Ir-Pt nanoclusters with sizes in the range of 1-2 nm supported on γ-Al(2)O(3). Deposition of the molecular bimetallic cluster [Ir(3)Pt(3)(μ-CO)(3)(CO)(3)(η-C(5)Me(5))(3)] on γ-Al(2)O(3), and its subsequent reduction with hydrogen, provides highly dispersed supported bimetallic Ir-Pt nanoparticles. Using spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (C(s)-STEM) and theoretical modeling of synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements, our studies provide unambiguous structural assignments for this model catalytic system. The atomic resolution C(s)-STEM images reveal strong and specific lattice-directed strains in the clusters that follow local bonding configurations of the γ-Al(2)O(3) support. Combined nanobeam diffraction (NBD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) data suggest the polycrystalline γ-Al(2)O(3) support material predominantly exposes (001) and (011) surface planes (ones commensurate with the zone axis orientations frequently exhibited by the bimetallic clusters). The data reveal that the supported bimetallic clusters exhibit complex patterns of structural dynamics, ones evidencing perturbations of an underlying oblate/hemispherical cuboctahedral cluster-core geometry with cores that are enriched in Ir (a result consistent with models based on surface energetics, which favor an ambient cluster termination by Pt) due to the dynamical responses of the M-M bonding to the specifics of the adsorbate and metal-support interactions. Taken together, the data demonstrate that strong temperature-dependent charge-transfer effects occur that are likely mediated variably by the cluster-support, cluster-adsorbate, and intermetallic bonding interactions.

  12. Metal-carbon nanocomposites based on activated IR pyrolized polyacrylonitrile

    SciTech Connect

    Efimov, Mikhail N.; Zhilyaeva, Natalya A.; Vasilyev, Andrey A.; Muratov, Dmitriy G.; Zemtsov, Lev M.; Karpacheva, Galina P.

    2016-05-18

    In this paper we report about new approach to preparation of metal-carbon nanocomposites based on activated carbon. Polyacrylonitrile is suggested as a precursor for Co, Pd and Ru nanoparticles carbon support which is prepared under IR pyrolysis conditions of a precursor. The first part of the paper is devoted to study activated carbon structural characteristics dependence on activation conditions. In the second part the effect of type of metal introduced in precursor on metal-carbon nanocomposite structural characteristics is shown. Prepared AC and nanocomposite samples are characterized by BET, TEM, SEM and X-ray diffraction.

  13. Compact IR synchrotron beamline design.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Thierry

    2017-03-01

    Third-generation storage rings are massively evolving due to the very compact nature of the multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice which allows amazing decreases of the horizontal electron beam emittance, but leaves very little place for infrared (IR) extraction mirrors to be placed, thus prohibiting traditional IR beamlines. In order to circumvent this apparent restriction, an optimized optical layout directly integrated inside a SOLEIL synchrotron dipole chamber that delivers intense and almost aberration-free beams in the near- to mid-IR domain (1-30 µm) is proposed and analyzed, and which can be integrated into space-restricted MBA rings. Since the optics and chamber are interdependent, the feasibility of this approach depends on a large part on the technical ability to assemble mechanically the optics inside the dipole chamber and control their resulting stability and thermo-mechanical deformation. Acquiring this expertise should allow dipole chambers to provide almost aberration-free IR synchrotron sources on current and `ultimate' MBA storage rings.

  14. IR Variability of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2008-02-01

    Every 5.5 years, η Carinae experiences a dramatic ``spectroscopic event'' when high-excitation lines in its UV, optical, and IR spectrum disappear, and its hard X-ray and radio continuum flux crash. This periodicity has been attributed to an eccentric binary system with a shell ejection occurring at periastron, and the next periastron event will occur at the very end of 2008. In addition, η Car shows long term changes as it is still recovering from its giant 19th century outburst. Both types of variability are directly linked to the current mass-loss rate and dust formation in its wind. Mid-IR images and spectra with T-ReCS provide a direct measure of changes in the current bolometric luminosity and a direct measure of the massw in dust formation episodes that may occur at periastron in the colliding wind shock. Near-IR emission lines trace related changes in the post-event wind and ionization changes in the circumstellar environment needed to test specific models for the cause of η Car's variability as it recovers from its recent ``event''. High resolution near-IR spectra with Phoenix will continue the important work of HST/STIS, investigating changes in the direct and reflected spectrum of the stellar wind, and ionization changes in the nebula.

  15. IR Variability of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Nathan

    2007-02-01

    Every 5.5 years, η Carinae experiences a dramatic ``spectroscopic event'' when high-excitation lines in its UV, optical, and IR spectrum disappear, and its hard X-ray and radio continuum flux crash. This periodicity has been attributed to an eccentric binary system with a shell ejection occurring at periastron. In addition, η Car shows long term changes as it is still recovering from its giant 19th century outburst. Both types of variability are directly linked to the current mass-loss rate and dust formation in its wind. Mid-IR images and spectra with T-ReCS provide a direct measure of changes in the current bolometric luminosity and trace dust formation episodes. This will provide a direct measurement of the mass ejected. Near-IR emission lines trace related changes in the post-event wind and ionization changes in the circumstellar environment needed to test specific models for the cause of η Car's variability as it recovers from its recent ``event''. High resolution near-IR spectra with GNIRS will continue the important work of HST/STIS, investigating changes in the direct and reflected spectrum of the stellar wind, and ionization changes in the nebula.

  16. Electrically-programmable diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, A.J.; Butler, M.A.; Sinclair, M.B.; Senturia, S.D.

    1998-05-26

    An electrically-programmable diffraction grating is disclosed. The programmable grating includes a substrate having a plurality of electrodes formed thereon and a moveable grating element above each of the electrodes. The grating elements are electrostatically programmable to form a diffraction grating for diffracting an incident beam of light as it is reflected from the upper surfaces of the grating elements. The programmable diffraction grating, formed by a micromachining process, has applications for optical information processing (e.g. optical correlators and computers), for multiplexing and demultiplexing a plurality of light beams of different wavelengths (e.g. for optical fiber communications), and for forming spectrometers (e.g. correlation and scanning spectrometers). 14 figs.

  17. Femtosecond single-electron diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Lahme, S.; Kealhofer, C.; Krausz, F.; Baum, P.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction allows the tracking of atomic motion in real time, but space charge effects within dense electron packets are a problem for temporal resolution. Here, we report on time-resolved pump-probe diffraction using femtosecond single-electron pulses that are free from intra-pulse Coulomb interactions over the entire trajectory from the source to the detector. Sufficient average electron current is achieved at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz. Thermal load on the sample is avoided by minimizing the pump-probe area and by maximizing heat diffusion. Time-resolved diffraction from fibrous graphite polycrystals reveals coherent acoustic phonons in a nanometer-thick grain ensemble with a signal-to-noise level comparable to conventional multi-electron experiments. These results demonstrate the feasibility of pump-probe diffraction in the single-electron regime, where simulations indicate compressibility of the pulses down to few-femtosecond and attosecond duration. PMID:26798778

  18. X-Ray Diffraction Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F. (Inventor); Bryson, Charles (Inventor); Freund, Friedmann (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction apparatus for use in analyzing the x-ray diffraction pattern of a sample is introduced. The apparatus includes a beam source for generating a collimated x-ray beam having one or more discrete x-ray energies, a holder for holding the sample to be analyzed in the path of the beam, and a charge-coupled device having an array of pixels for detecting, in one or more selected photon energy ranges, x-ray diffraction photons produced by irradiating such a sample with said beam. The CCD is coupled to an output unit which receives input information relating to the energies of photons striking each pixel in the CCD, and constructs the diffraction pattern of photons within a selected energy range striking the CCD.

  19. Multiple annular linear diffractive axicons.

    PubMed

    Bialic, Emilie; de la Tocnaye, Jean-Louis de Bougrenet

    2011-04-01

    We propose a chromatic analysis of multiple annular linear diffractive axicons. Large aperture axicons are optical devices providing achromatic nondiffracting beams, with an extended depth of focus, when illuminated by a white light source, due to chromatic foci superimposition. Annular apertures introduce chromatic foci separation, and because chromatic aberrations result in focal segment axial shifts, polychromatic imaging properties are partially lost. We investigate here various design parameters that can be used to achieve color splitting, filtering, and combining using these properties. In order to improve the low-power efficiency of a single annular axicon, we suggest a spatial multiplexing of concentric annular axicons with different sizes and periods we call multiple annular aperture diffractive axicons (MALDAs). These are chosen to maintain focal depths while enabling color imaging with sufficient diffraction efficiency. Illustrations are given for binary phase diffractive axicons, considering technical aspects such as grating design wavelength and phase dependence due to the grating thickness.

  20. Fresnel diffraction by spherical obstacles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovenac, Edward A.

    1989-01-01

    Lommel functions were used to solve the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction integral for the case of a spherical obstacle. Comparisons were made between Fresnel diffraction theory and Mie scattering theory. Fresnel theory is then compared to experimental data. Experiment and theory typically deviated from one another by less than 10 percent. A unique experimental setup using mercury spheres suspended in a viscous fluid significantly reduced optical noise. The major source of error was due to the Gaussian-shaped laser beam.

  1. Automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Miki, N.

    1988-10-11

    This patent describes an automatic transmission including a fluid torque converter, a first gear unit having three forward-speed gears and a single reverse gear, a second gear unit having a low-speed gear and a high-speed gear, and a hydraulic control system, the hydraulic control system comprising: a source of pressurized fluid; a first shift valve for controlling the shifting between the first-speed gear and the second-speed gear of the first gear unit; a second shift valve for controlling the shifting between the second-speed gear and the third-speed gear of the first gear unit; a third shift valve equipped with a spool having two positions for controlling the shifting between the low-speed gear and the high-speed gear of the second gear unit; a manual selector valve having a plurality of shift positions for distributing the pressurized fluid supply from the source of pressurized fluid to the first, second and third shift valves respectively; first, second and third solenoid valves corresponding to the first, second and third shift valves, respectively for independently controlling the operation of the respective shift valves, thereby establishing a six forward-speed automatic transmission by combining the low-speed gear and the high-speed gear of the second gear unit with each of the first-speed gear, the second speed gear and the third-speed gear of the first gear unit; and means to fixedly position the spool of the third shift valve at one of the two positions by supplying the pressurized fluid to the third shift valve when the manual selector valve is shifted to a particular shift position, thereby locking the second gear unit in one of low-speed gear and the high-speed gear, whereby the six forward-speed automatic transmission is converted to a three forward-speed automatic transmission when the manual selector valve is shifted to the particular shift position.

  2. Automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, M.

    1988-02-16

    An automatic transmission is described combining a stator reversing type torque converter and speed changer having first and second sun gears comprising: (a) a planetary gear train composed of first and second planetary gears sharing one planetary carrier in common; (b) a clutch and requisite brakes to control the planetary gear train; and (c) a speed-increasing or speed-decreasing mechanism is installed both in between a turbine shaft coupled to a turbine of the stator reversing type torque converter and the first sun gear of the speed changer, and in between a stator shaft coupled to a reversing stator and the second sun gear of the speed changer.

  3. Design of LCPG-type polarization-independent shutter with diffractive efficiency and high contrast at wavelength 532 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavosh Tehrani, Masoud; Sajad Mousavi Fard, Sayed

    2017-02-01

    We have designed liquid crystal (LC) shutter of LCPG type with high diffractive efficiency and transmission rate of more than 99.747% for modulation of non-polar light with wavelength 532 nm and high contrast in this article. Compared to other similar cases, the advantages of this design include maximization of transmission percent of diffractive element (particularly first-order diffraction) and minimization of light leakage rate caused by zero-order, and other unwanted diffractive orders. The conditions have been prepared for using diffractive elements (gratings) with shorter periods and acquisition of diffraction orders with greater diffraction angles by benefitting from suitable compounds of LC in the given design. Similarly, required measures have been taken for the deletion of adverse effects caused by reflection from optic surfaces so that very appropriate status is prepared for the function of LCPG shutter.

  4. Small pixel oversampled IR focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulfield, John; Curzan, Jon; Lewis, Jay; Dhar, Nibir

    2015-06-01

    We report on a new high definition high charge capacity 2.1 Mpixel MWIR Infrared Focal Plane Array. This high definition (HD) FPA utilizes a small 5 um pitch pixel size which is below the Nyquist limit imposed by the optical systems Point Spread Function (PSF). These smaller sub diffraction limited pixels allow spatial oversampling of the image. We show that oversampling IRFPAs enables improved fidelity in imaging including resolution improvements, advanced pixel correlation processing to reduce false alarm rates, improved detection ranges, and an improved ability to track closely spaced objects. Small pixel HD arrays are viewed as the key component enabling lower size, power and weight of the IR Sensor System. Small pixels enables a reduction in the size of the systems components from the smaller detector and ROIC array, the reduced optics focal length and overall lens size, resulting in an overall compactness in the sensor package, cooling and associated electronics. The highly sensitive MWIR small pixel HD FPA has the capability to detect dimmer signals at longer ranges than previously demonstrated.

  5. Computational high frequency waves through curved interfaces via the Liouville equation and geometric theory of diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Shi Yin Dongsheng

    2008-06-01

    We construct a class of numerical schemes for the Liouville equation of geometric optics coupled with the Geometric Theory of Diffractions to simulate the high frequency linear waves with a discontinuous index of refraction. In this work [S. Jin, X. Wen, A Hamiltonian-preserving scheme for the Liouville equation of geometric optics with partial transmissions and reflections, SIAM J. Numer. Anal. 44 (2006) 1801-1828], a Hamiltonian-preserving scheme for the Liouville equation was constructed to capture partial transmissions and reflections at the interfaces. This scheme is extended by incorporating diffraction terms derived from Geometric Theory of Diffraction into the numerical flux in order to capture diffraction at the interface. We give such a scheme for curved interfaces. This scheme is proved to be positive under a suitable time step constraint. Numerical experiments show that it can capture diffraction phenomena without fully resolving the wave length of the original wave equation.

  6. Numerical investigation of diffraction of acoustic waves by phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Declercq, Nico F.; Laude, Vincent

    2012-05-01

    Diffraction as well as transmission of acoustic waves by two-dimensional phononic crystals (PCs) composed of steel rods in water are investigated in this paper. The finite element simulations were performed in order to compute pressure fields generated by a line source that are incident on a finite size PC. Such field maps are analyzed based on the complex band structure for the infinite periodic PC. Finite size computations indicate that the exponential decrease of the transmission at deaf frequencies is much stronger than that in Bragg band gaps.

  7. Transmission Investment: A Primer

    SciTech Connect

    McGarvey, Joe

    2006-10-15

    This primer highlights recent trends in transmission investment, summarizes the division of jurisdictional authority over transmission, and presents four alternative models for transmission ownership. (author)

  8. Dynamical x-ray diffraction from an icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn quasicrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Kycia, S.

    1996-04-23

    Primary extinction effects in diffraction from single grains of Al-Pd- Mn, and presumably many other FCI alloys, may be significant and should be corrected for prior to use of diffraction data in structural determinations. Probes based on dynamical diffraction effects, such as x-ray standing wave fluorescence, multiple beam interference, and x-ray transmission topographs, may now be used to study the bulk and surface structure of some quasicrystals. The observation of dynamical diffraction from icosahedral Al-Pd-Mn is a striking confirmation of the fact that quasicrystals can present a degree of structural perfection comparable to that found in the best periodic intermetallic crystals.

  9. Automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, H.

    1989-03-21

    An automatic transmission is described, comprising: a torque converter including an impeller having a connected member, a turbine having an input member and a reactor; and an automatic transmission mechanism having first to third clutches and plural gear units including a single planetary gear unit with a ring gear and a dual planetary gear unit with a ring gear. The single and dual planetary gear units have respective carriers integrally coupled with each other and respective sun gears integrally coupled with each other, the input member of the turbine being coupled with the ring gear of the single planetary gear unit through the first clutch, and being coupled with the sun gear through the second clutch. The connected member of the impeller is coupled with the ring gear of the dual planetary gear of the dual planetary gear unit is made to be and ring gear of the dual planetary gear unit is made to be restrained as required, and the carrier is coupled with an output member.

  10. Vented transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T.H.

    1990-01-29

    This patent describes a vented transmission. It comprises: a housing; a rotary input to the housing; a rotary output from the housing; transmission means within the housing interconnecting the input and the output and including a hollow, rotary shaft journaled within the housing; a vent tube having a first end extending into one end of the hollow shaft and a second end in fluid communication with the exterior of the housing; a shoulder within the hollow shaft and intermediate the ends of the vent tube and defining of relatively smaller diameter section near the first end of the vent tube that is within the hollow shaft and a relatively large diameter section nearer the second end of the vent tube; at least one aperture extending through the hollow shaft from the large diameter section immediately adjacent the shoulder; and a labyrinth seal at the interface of the vent tube and the large diameter section at a location between the aperture (s) and the second end of the vent tube.

  11. Gear transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Takami, A.

    1987-08-11

    A gear transmission is provided with a first rotary shaft, a first non-circular gear fixed thereto, a second rotary shaft, and a second non-circular gear fixed thereto, the first non-circular gear and the second non-circular gear being continuously engageably rotated, thereby transmitting a rotational driving force between the first rotary shaft and the second rotary shaft. The gear transmission is characterized in that when the absolute value vertical bar..omega..2/..omega..1vertical bar of a ratio of an angular velocity of ..omega..2 of the second rotary shaft with respect to an angular velocity of ..omega..1 of the first rotary shaft is represented by F(theta) as the function of the angular displacement theta of the first rotary shaft, an engageably rotary portion where a differential value K given in a differential equation as to the angular displacement thetaK=d log F(theta)/dtheta presents a positive or negative constant value in continuation is provided in the shape of intermeshing pitch curves of the first non-circular gear and the second non-circular gear.

  12. Diffraction efficiency analysis for multi-level diffractive optical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Erteza, I.A.

    1995-11-01

    Passive optical components can be broken down into two main groups: Refractive elements and diffractive elements. With recent advances in manufacturing technologies, diffractive optical elements are becoming increasingly more prevalent in optical systems. It is therefore important to be able to understand and model the behavior of these elements. In this report, we present a thorough analysis of a completely general diffractive optical element (DOE). The main goal of the analysis is to understand the diffraction efficiency and power distribution of the various modes affected by the DOE. This is critical to understanding cross talk and power issues when these elements are used in actual systems. As mentioned, the model is based on a completely general scenario for a DOE. This allows the user to specify the details to model a wide variety of diffractive elements. The analysis is implemented straightforwardly in Mathematica. This report includes the development of the analysis, the Mathematica implementation of the model and several examples using the Mathematical analysis tool. It is intended that this tool be a building block for more specialized analyses.

  13. Structure symmetry determination and magnetic evolution in Sr2Ir1–xRhxO4

    DOE PAGES

    Ye, Feng; Wang, Xiaoping; Hoffmann, Christina; ...

    2015-11-23

    We use single-crystal neutron diffraction to determine the crystal structure symmetry and to study the magnetic evolution in the rhodium doped iridates Sr2Ir1–xRhxO4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.16). Throughout this doping range, the crystal structure retains a tetragonal symmetry (space group I41/a) with two distinct magnetic Ir sites in the unit cell forming staggered IrO6 rotation. Upon Rh doping, the magnetic order is suppressed and the magnetic moment of Ir4+ is reduced from 0.21 μB/Ir for x = 0 to 0.18 μB/Ir for x = 0.12. As a result, the magnetic structure at x = 0.12 is different from thatmore » of the parent compound while the moments remain in the basal plane.« less

  14. A dual-waveband dynamic IR scene projector based on DMD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yu; Zheng, Ya-wei; Gao, Jiao-bo; Sun, Ke-feng; Li, Jun-na; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Fang

    2016-10-01

    Infrared scene simulation system can simulate multifold objects and backgrounds to perform dynamic test and evaluate EO detecting system in the hardware in-the-loop test. The basic structure of a dual-waveband dynamic IR scene projector was introduced in the paper. The system's core device is an IR Digital Micro-mirror Device (DMD) and the radiant source is a mini-type high temperature IR plane black-body. An IR collimation optical system which transmission range includes 3~5μm and 8~12μm is designed as the projection optical system. Scene simulation software was developed with Visual C++ and Vega soft tools and a software flow chart was presented. The parameters and testing results of the system were given, and this system was applied with satisfying performance in an IR imaging simulation testing.

  15. High resolution neutron Larmor diffraction using superconducting magnetic Wollaston prisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Fankang; Feng, Hao; Thaler, Alexander N; Parnell, Steven R; Hamilton, William A; Crow, Lowell; Yang, Wencao; Jones, Amy B; Bai, Hongyu; Matsuda, Masaaki; Baxter, David V; Keller, Thomas; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A; Pynn, Roger

    2017-04-13

    The neutron Larmor diffraction technique has been implemented using superconducting magnetic Wollaston prisms in both single-arm and double-arm configurations. Successful measurements of the coefficient of thermal expansion of a single-crystal copper sample demonstrates that the method works as expected. The experiment involves a new method of tuning by varying the magnetic field configurations in the device and the tuning results agree well with previous measurements. The difference between single-arm and double-arm configurations has been investigated experimentally. We conclude that this measurement benchmarks the applications of magnetic Wollaston prisms in Larmor diffraction and shows in principle that the setup can be used for inelastic phonon line-width measurements. The achievable resolution for Larmor diffraction is comparable to that using Neutron Resonance Spin Echo (NRSE) coils. The use of superconducting materials in the prisms allows high neutron polarization and transmission efficiency to be achieved.

  16. Cryo diffraction microscopy: Ice conditions and finite supports

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, H.; Downing, K.; Huang, X.; Kirz, J.; Marchesini, S.; Nelson, J.; Shapiro, D.; Steinbrener, J.; Stewart, A.; Jacobsen, C.

    2009-09-25

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution images using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.

  17. High resolution neutron Larmor diffraction using superconducting magnetic Wollaston prisms

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Fankang; Feng, Hao; Thaler, Alexander N.; ...

    2017-04-13

    The neutron Larmor diffraction technique has been implemented using superconducting magnetic Wollaston prisms in both single-arm and double-arm configurations. Successful measurements of the coefficient of thermal expansion of a single-crystal copper sample demonstrates that the method works as expected. Our experiment involves a new method of tuning by varying the magnetic field configurations in the device and the tuning results agree well with previous measurements. The difference between single-arm and double-arm configurations has been investigated experimentally. Here, we conclude that this measurement benchmarks the applications of magnetic Wollaston prisms in Larmor diffraction and shows in principle that the setup canmore » be used for inelastic phonon line-width measurements. The achievable resolution for Larmor diffraction is comparable to that using Neutron Resonance Spin Echo (NRSE) coils. Furthermore, the use of superconducting materials in the prisms allows high neutron polarization and transmission efficiency to be achieved.« less

  18. Optical properties and diffraction effects in opal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Balestreri, Alessandra; Andreani, Lucio Claudio; Agio, Mario

    2006-09-01

    Optical properties of fcc opals oriented along the [111] direction are calculated by means of a scattering-matrix approach based on approximating each sphere with cylindrical slices. The use of a plane-wave basis in each layer allows distinguishing zero-order reflection and transmission from higher-order (diffraction) spectra. Optical spectra at large values of the angle of incidence indicate the presence of diffraction effects and of polarization mixing along the LW orientation. Reflectance and transmittance in the high-energy region show a rich spectral dependence and compare reasonably well with recent experimental observations on polystyrene opals. Diffraction spectra as a function of the number of layers display an oscillatory behavior, pointing to the existence of a Pendellösung phenomenon, related to the exchange of energy between two propagating modes in the investigated three-dimensional photonic crystal. This phenomenon could be observed in transmittance experiments on high-quality opals with controlled thickness.

  19. Cryo diffraction microscopy: Ice conditions and finite supports

    DOE PAGES

    Miao, H.; Downing, K.; Huang, X.; ...

    2009-09-25

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution imagesmore » using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.« less

  20. Metal-mesh optical filter technology for mid-IR, far-IR, and submillimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, William R.; Swinehart, Philip R.; Hogue, Eric L.; Daughton, David R.; DeLombard, Jay V.

    2012-06-01

    The innovative, high transmission band-pass filter technology presented here for the mid infrared (IR), terahertz (THz) and submillimeter ranges can tolerate cryogenic temperatures (down to 4K and below), are radiation-hard, vacuum-compatible and vibration-tolerant making them launch-capable and durable for potential space applications. In addition, Lake Shore band-pass filters (BPF) are light weight, as they employ no heavy substrates, nor have any vibronic bands due to polymer support layers. The filters are less than 2 mm thick (mostly the mounting frame) which allows insertion into tight spaces and standard filter wheels. The thin, light weight, vacuum compatible design can be incorporated into almost any detector setup. Filters are available for quick delivery in 29 standard center wavelengths (CWL) with 4 standard diameter sizes, up to 40mm inner diameter (ID).

  1. Shaped Ir-Ni bimetallic nanoparticles for minimizing Ir utilization in oxygen evolution reaction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jinkyu; Yang, Sungeun; Kim, Chanyeon; Roh, Chi-Woo; Kwon, Yongwoo; Kim, Yong-Tae; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-04-25

    Shaped Ir-Ni bimetallic nanoparticles were synthesized and used for electrocatalytic oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The obtained bimetallic nanoparticles showed significantly enhanced Ir mass activity and durability compared with Ir nanoparticles.

  2. Acoustic Wood anomaly in transmitted diffraction field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingfei; Declercq, Nico F.

    2017-03-01

    In acoustics, the term Wood anomaly, in analogy to the Wood anomaly in optics, has so far referred to the anomalies observed in the specular reflection spectra of acoustic waves perpendicularly incident on periodic surfaces. Inspired by the pioneering work of Jungman et al. on the study of the transmission field of a solid-fluid periodic interface, this work attempts to provide a complete experimental investigation of the transmission fields of a broadband sound pulse transmitted through a periodic liquid-solid interface as well as a periodic solid-liquid interface. At different frequencies, two types of anomalies are observed: a spectral tip and a spectral dip, which correspond, respectively, to the brighter band and the darker band in optical Wood anomalies. The search for their physical origin suggests that the type and location of the observed spectral anomalies are strongly related to the generation and the diffraction of pseudosurface waves on the interface having superimposed periodic corrugations and time-domain windowing in spectral analysis. To compare with the surface waves on a plane surface, the properties of the pseudosurface waves are also investigated through examining their phase and by comparing their amplitudes.

  3. Automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Meyman, U.

    1987-03-10

    An automatic transmission is described comprising wheel members each having discs defining an inner space therebetween; turnable blades and vane members located in the inner space between the discs of at least one of the wheel members, the turnable blades being mechanically connected with the vane members. Each of the turnable blades has an inner surface and an outer surface formed by circular cylindrical surfaces having a common axis, each of the turnable blades being turnable about the common axis of the circular cylindrical surfaces forming the inner and outer surfaces of the respective blade; levers turnable about the axes and supporting the blades; the discs having openings extending coaxially with the surfaces which describe the blades. The blades are partially received in the openings of the discs; and a housing accommodating the wheel members and the turnable blades and the vane members.

  4. Automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Hamane, M.; Ohri, H.

    1989-03-21

    This patent describes an automatic transmission connected between a drive shaft and a driven shaft and comprising: a planetary gear mechanism including a first gear driven by the drive shaft, a second gear operatively engaged with the first gear to transmit speed change output to the driven shaft, and a third gear operatively engaged with the second gear to control the operation thereof; centrifugally operated clutch means for driving the first gear and the second gear. It also includes a ratchet type one-way clutch for permitting rotation of the third gear in the same direction as that of the drive shaft but preventing rotation in the reverse direction; the clutch means comprising a ratchet pawl supporting plate coaxially disposed relative to the drive shaft and integrally connected to the third gear, the ratchet pawl supporting plate including outwardly projection radial projections united with one another at base portions thereof.

  5. Planetary transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Nerstad, K.A.; Windish, W.E.

    1987-04-21

    A planetary transmission is described comprising: an input shaft; a first planetary gear set having a first sun gear driven by the input shaft, a first planet carrier serving as the output, a first ring gear, and first brake means for selectively holding the fist ring gear stationary; a second planetary gear set having a second sun gear driven by the input shaft, a second planet carrier connected for joint rotation to the first ring gear, a second ring gear, and second brake means for selectively holding the second ring gear stationary; a third planetary gear set having a third sun gear connected for joint rotation to the second planet carrier, a third planet carrier connected for joint rotation to the second ring gear, a third ring gear, and third brake means for selectively holding the third ring gear stationary; and clutch means for connecting the third sun gear to the input shaft and providing a direct drive mode of operation.

  6. Overdrive transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.F.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes an overdrive transmission device for use with a motor vehicle. It consists of: a housing; a driving shaft rotatably mounted within the housing; a planetary gear-train; a driven shaft rotatably mounted in the housing and driven by the planetary gear train; and, a device for selectively connecting the planetary gear carrier to the housing or to the driven shaft for rotation; a hydraulically actuated piston adapted to forcibly contact the clutch friction members of the second clutch; a source of working fluid; a pump in fluid flow communication with the source of working fluid; a first valve downstream of the pump and in fluid flow communication with the pump and the hydraulically activated piston.

  7. Phasing transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Himmelein, M.K.; Haaser, J.D.

    1992-06-23

    This patent describes a mechanical power transmission. It comprises a pair of axially aligned rotatable shaft members, a motor member, having a motor housing of thin axial width located within the central housing, fixed to one of the shaft members and axially aligned to rotate wherewith, and a harmonic drive member of thin axial width positioned within the central housing in axial alignment between the motor member and the remaining shaft member, a circular spline fixed to the motor housing for rotation therewith, a flex spline engaged with the dynamic spline and the circular spline, and a wave generator in communication with the flex spline and a wave generator in communication with the flex spline and engaged with the center shaft of the motor member.

  8. Electromagnetic diffraction efficiencies for plane reflection diffraction gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marathay, A. S.; Shrode, T. E.

    1974-01-01

    The theory and computer programs, based on electromagnetic theory, for the analysis and design of echelle gratings were developed. The gratings are designed for instruments that operate in the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum. The theory was developed so that the resulting computer programs will be able to analyze deep (up to 30 wavelengths) gratings by including as many as 100 real or homogeneous diffraction orders. The program calculates the complex amplitude coefficient for each of the diffracted orders. A check on the numerical method used to solve the integral equations is provided by a conservation of energy calculation.

  9. Optimized IR synchrotron beamline design.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    Synchrotron infrared beamlines are powerful tools on which to perform spectroscopy on microscopic length scales but require working with large bending-magnet source apertures in order to provide intense photon beams to the experiments. Many infrared beamlines use a single toroidal-shaped mirror to focus the source emission which generates, for large apertures, beams with significant geometrical aberrations resulting from the shape of the source and the beamline optics. In this paper, an optical layout optimized for synchrotron infrared beamlines, that removes almost totally the geometrical aberrations of the source, is presented and analyzed. This layout is already operational on the IR beamline of the Brazilian synchrotron. An infrared beamline design based on a SOLEIL bending-magnet source is given as an example, which could be useful for future IR beamline improvements at this facility.

  10. Ir/IrSi3/Si Schottky-Barrier Infrared Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, True-Lon

    1991-01-01

    Quantum efficiency increased. Proposed Schottky-barrier infrared detector has double metallic layer of Ir and IrSi3 instead of single metallic layer of Ir, IrSi, or IrSi3. Offers advantages of both relatively high infrared absorption in thin film of Ir and stability and reproducibility of layer of IrSi3 in contact with Si. Also serves as barrier to chemical reactions between Ir overlayer and Si substrate. Detectors used to form focal-plane array integrated with charge-coupled-device-addressing and image-processing circuitry.

  11. New approach to imaging spectroscopy using diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnrichs, Michele; Massie, Mark A.

    1997-10-01

    Over the past several years, Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) has developed several hyperspectral imagers using diffractive optics as the dispersive media. This new approach has been patented and demonstrated in numerous field tests. PAT has developed hyperspectral cameras in the visible, mid-wave IR and is currently under contrast to the Air Force to develop a dual band hyperspectral lens for simultaneous spectral imaging in both the mid-wave and long- wave IR. The development of these cameras over the years have been sponsored by internal research and development, contracts from the Air Force Phillips Lab., Air Force Wright Labs Armament Division, BMDO and by the Office of Naval Research. Numerous papers have been presented in the past describing the performance of these various hyperspectral cameras. The purpose of this paper is to describe the theory behind the image multi-spectral sensing (IMSS) used in these hyperspectral cameras. IMSS utilizes a very simple optical design that enables a robust and low cost hyper-spectral imaging instrument. The IMSS is a dispersive spectrometer using a single diffractive optical element for both imaging and dispersion. The lens is tuned for a single wavelength giving maximum diffraction efficiency at that wavelength and high efficiency throughout the spectral band-pass of the camera. The diffractive optics disperse the light along the optical axis as opposed to perpendicular to the axis in conventional dispersive spectrometers. A detector array is used as the sensing medium and the spectral images are rad out electronically. POst processing is used to reduce spectral cross talk and to spatially sharpen the spectral images.

  12. Design of diffractive microlens array integration with focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sihai; Yi, Xinjian; Li, Yi; He, Miao; Chen, Sixiang; Kong, Lingbin

    2000-10-01

    The IR spectrum from 3 to 5micrometers has numerous applications in both military and civil industries. High performance at high operating temperature is often important in these applications. Conventional Focal Plane Arrays (FPAs) without integration with concentrator such as microlens have poor sensitivity and low signal-to-noise ratio because of their lower fill factor. The binary optics microlens arrays reported in this paper are designed for integration with FPAs. Thus, the FPAs' fill factor, sensitivity, and signal- to-noise ratio can be improved while retaining a given image resolution and optical collection area. In the paper, we discussed the 256(Horizontal)x290(Vertical) microlens arrays designed for a center wavelength of 4micrometers , with 50micrometers (Horizontalx33micrometers (Vertical) quadrate pixel dimension and a speed (F number) of F/1.96. PtSi FPAs were fabricated on the front side of a 400-micrometers -thick Si substrate. The designed diffractive microlens arrays will be etched on the back side of the same wafer in a register fashion and it will be reported in other paper. Considering the diffraction efficiency, 8-phase-level approximation is enough. For the diffraction efficiency of 8-phase-level diffractive microlens reaches 95%. The process only need three mask-level, so we designed and fabricated three masks with the same dimension 4'x4'. Also, a set of fine verniers was designed and fabricated on each mask to allow accurate alignment during the fabrication process. Through a computer simulation, the microlens arrays are nearly diffraction limited, with the diffraction efficiency of 93%, a bit lower than the theoretical value of 95%. Introduction of microlens arrays has the ability to increase the FPAs' fill factor to 100%, while it is only about 21.6% without microlens. To our knowledge, this is the first trial of integration large area microlens arrays with FPAs at home.

  13. Quantum-dot-array diffraction grating with single order diffraction property for soft x-ray region

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang Longyu; Wang Chuanke; Wang Zhebin; Cao Leifeng; Liu Shenye; Ding Yongkun; Zhu Xiaoli; Xie Changqing

    2010-07-15

    A gold transmission grating is used routinely to disperse the x-ray spectrum at the Z soft x-ray facility to measure the spectrum and temporal history of the absolute soft x-ray power emitted from z-pinch and hohlraum radiation sources. A quantum-dot-array diffraction grating (QDADG) of 250 lines/mm for soft x-ray is designed and fabricated for the first time according to the principle of binary sinusoidal transmission grating. The diffraction efficiencies of the grating are measured in the 150-300 eV photon energy range on the Beamline 3W1B of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. This article describes the basic concept and calibration techniques and presents calibration results. It is shown that the 250 lines/mm QDADG can be used to disperse light without higher-order diffractions in soft x-ray range, and the diffraction efficiencies of this grating are nearly constant (about 25%), which is beneficial in the spectrum analysis.

  14. IR and X-ray study of polymorphism in 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imides.

    PubMed

    Paulechka, Y U; Kabo, G J; Blokhin, A V; Shaplov, A S; Lozinskaya, E I; Golovanov, D G; Lyssenko, K A; Korlyukov, A A; Vygodskii, Ya S

    2009-07-16

    The crystal structure of [C(n)mim]NTf(2) (n = 2, 4, 6) was studied for the first time simultaneously by X-ray diffraction method and IR spectroscopy. The temperature-dependent IR spectrum for crystalline [C(4)mim]NTf(2) was demonstrated to correlate with both the X-ray data and the calorimetric results obtained earlier. Therefore, it was found that IR spectroscopy is able to establish the correspondence between the X-ray and the calorimetric data in this case. The joint use of X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy, and quantum-chemical calculations allowed us to determine the structure of all [C(2)mim]NTf(2) crystalline modifications obtained earlier by adiabatic calorimetry measurements. Thus, a new approach for the future identification of ionic liquid crystal structure by use of temperature-dependent infrared spectroscopy is suggested and justified.

  15. Single Photon diffraction and interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, John

    2015-04-01

    A previous paper based on the Scalar Theory of Everything studied photon diffraction and interference (IntellectualArchive, Vol.1, No. 3, P. 20, Toronto, Canada July 2012. http://intellectualarchive.com/?link=item&id=597). Several photons were required in the experiment at the same time. Interference experiments with one photon in the experiment at a time also showed interference patterns. The previous paper with the Bohm Interpretation, models of the screen and mask, and the Transaction Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics were combined. The reverse wave required by the Transaction Interpretation was provided by a reflected plenum wave rather than a reverse time wave. The speed of the plenum wave was assumed to be much faster than the speed of photons/light. Using the assumptions of Fraunhofer diffraction resulted in the same equation for the photon distribution on a screen as the intensity pattern of the Fraunhofer diffraction. (http://myplace.frontier.com/ ~ jchodge/)

  16. AD, the ALICE diffractive detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tello, Abraham Villatoro

    2017-03-01

    ALICE is one of the four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As a complement to its Heavy-Ion physics program, ALICE started during Run 1 of LHC an extensive program dedicated to the study of proton-proton diffractive processes. In order to optimize its trigger efficiencies and purities in selecting diffractive events, the ALICE Collaboration installed a very forward AD detector during the Long Shut Down 1 of LHC. This new forward detector system consists of two stations made of two layers of scintillator pads, one station on each side of the interaction point. With this upgrade, ALICE has substantially increased its forward physics coverage, including the double rapidity gap based selection of central production, as well as the measurements of inclusive diffractive cross sections.

  17. Electron diffraction by plasmon waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García de Abajo, F. J.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, F.

    2016-07-01

    An electron beam traversing a structured plasmonic field is shown to undergo diffraction with characteristic angular patterns of both elastic and inelastic outgoing electron components. In particular, a plasmonic grating (e.g., a standing wave formed by two counterpropagating plasmons in a thin film) produces diffraction orders of the same parity as the net number of exchanged plasmons. Large diffracted beam fractions are predicted to occur for realistic plasmon intensities in attainable geometries due to a combination of phase and amplitude changes locally imprinted on the passing electron wave. Our study opens vistas in the study of multiphoton exchanges between electron beams and evanescent optical fields with unexplored effects related to the transversal component of the electron wave function.

  18. Superconductivity in SmFe1-xMxASO (M = Co, Rh, Ir)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yan-Peng; Wang, Lei; Gao, Zhao-Shun; Wang, Don-Liang; Zhang, Xian-Ping; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Ma, Yan-Wei

    2010-03-01

    In this paper we report the comparative study of superconductivity by 3d (Co), 4d (Rh), 5d (Ir) element doping in SmFeAsO. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate that the material has formed the ZrCuSiAs-type structure with a space group P4/nmm. It is found that the antiferromagnetic spin-density-wave (SDW) order in the parent compounds is rapidly suppressed by Co, Rh, and Ir doping, and superconductivity emerges. The diamagnetism, consistent with the R-T data, conforms to the bulk superconductivity in our SmFe1-xMxAsO (M=Co, Rh, Ir) samples. Co, Rh and Ir locate in the same column in the periodic table of the elements but have different electronic band structure, so a comparative study would add more ingredients to the underlying physics of iron-based superconductors.

  19. Boundary diffraction wave integrals for diffraction modeling of external occulters.

    PubMed

    Cady, Eric

    2012-07-02

    An occulter is a large diffracting screen which may be flown in conjunction with a telescope to image extrasolar planets. The edge is shaped to minimize the diffracted light in a region beyond the occulter, and a telescope may be placed in this dark shadow to view an extrasolar system with the starlight removed. Errors in position, orientation, and shape of the occulter will diffract additional light into this region, and a challenge of modeling an occulter system is to accurately and quickly model these effects. We present a fast method for the calculation of electric fields following an occulter, based on the concept of the boundary diffraction wave: the 2D structure of the occulter is reduced to a 1D edge integral which directly incorporates the occulter shape, and which can be easily adjusted to include changes in occulter position and shape, as well as the effects of sources-such as exoplanets-which arrive off-axis to the occulter. The structure of a typical implementation of the algorithm is included.

  20. IR-laser assisted additive freeform optics manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhihan; Liang, Rongguang

    2017-08-02

    Computer-controlled additive manufacturing (AM) processes, also known as three-dimensional (3D) printing, create 3D objects by the successive adding of a material or materials. While there have been tremendous developments in AM, the 3D printing of optics is lagging due to the limits in materials and tight requirements for optical applicaitons. We propose a new precision additive freeform optics manufacturing (AFOM) method using an pulsed infrared (IR) laser. Compared to ultraviolet (UV) curable materials, thermally curable optical silicones have a number of advantages, such as strong UV stability, non-yellowing, and high transmission, making it particularly suitable for optical applications. Pulsed IR laser radiation offers a distinct advantage in processing optical silicones, as the high peak intensity achieved in the focal region allows for curing the material quickly, while the brief duration of the laser-material interaction creates a negligible heat-affected zone.

  1. VLT near- to mid-IR imaging and spectroscopy of the M 17 UC1 - IRS5 region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nürnberger, Dieter E. A.; Chini, Rolf; Jiang, Zhibo; Fang, Min

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We investigate the surroundings of the hypercompact H ii region M 17 UC1 to probe the physical properties of the associated young stellar objects and the environment of massive star formation. Methods: We use diffraction-limited near-IR (VLT/NACO) and mid-IR (VLT/VISIR) images to reveal the different morphologies at various wavelengths. Likewise, we investigate the stellar and nebular content of the region with VLT/SINFONI integral field spectroscopy with a resolution R ˜ 1500 at H + K bands. Results: Five of the seven point sources in this region show L-band excess emission. A geometric match is found between the H2 emission and near-IR polarized light in the vicinity of IRS5A, and between the diffuse mid-IR emission and near-IR polarization north of UC1. The H2 emission is typical for dense photodissociation regions (PDRs), which are initially far-ultraviolet pumped and repopulated by collisional de-excitation. The spectral types of IRS5A and B273A are B3-B7 V/III and G4-G5 III, respectively. The observed infrared luminosity LIR in the range 1-20 μm is derived for three objects; we obtain 2.0 × 103 L⊙ for IRS5A, 13 L⊙ for IRS5C, and 10 L⊙ for B273A. Conclusions: IRS5 might be a young quadruple system. Its primary star IRS5A is confirmed to be a high-mass protostellar object (˜9 M⊙, ˜1 × 105 yrs); it might have terminated accretion due to the feedback from stellar activities (radiation pressure, outflow) and the expanding H ii region of M 17. The object UC1 might also have terminated accretion because of the expanding hypercompact H ii region, which it ionizes. The disk clearing process of the low-mass young stellar objects in this region might be accelerated by the expanding H ii region. The outflows driven by UC1 are running south-north with its northeastern side suppressed by the expanding ionization front of M 17; the blue-shifted outflow lobe of IRS5A is seen in two types of tracers along the same line of sight in the form of H2 emission

  2. Algorithmic methods in diffraction microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Pierre

    Recent diffraction imaging techniques use properties of coherent sources (most notably x-rays and electrons) to transfer a portion of the imaging task to computer algorithms. "Diffraction microscopy" is a method which consists in reconstructing the image of a specimen from its diffraction pattern. Because only the amplitude of a wavefield incident on a detector is measured, reconstruction of the image entails to recovering the lost phases. This extension of the 'phase problem" commonly met in crystallography is solved only if additional information is available. The main topic of this thesis is the development of algorithmic techniques in diffraction microscopy. In addition to introducing new methods, it is meant to be a review of the algorithmic aspects of the field of diffractive imaging. An overview of the scattering approximations used in the interpretation of diffraction datasets is first given, as well as a numerical propagation tool useful in conditions where known approximations fail. Concepts central to diffraction microscopy---such as oversampling---are then introduced and other similar imaging techniques described. A complete description of iterative reconstruction algorithms follows, with a special emphasis on the difference map, the algorithm used in this thesis. The formalism, based on constraint sets and projection onto these sets, is then defined and explained. Simple projections commonly used in diffraction imaging are then described. The various ways experimental realities can affect reconstruction methods will then be enumerated. Among the diverse sources of algorithmic difficulties, one finds that noise, missing data and partial coherence are typically the most important. Other related difficulties discussed are the detrimental effects of crystalline domains in a specimen, and the convergence problems occurring when the support of a complex-valued specimen is not well known. The last part of this thesis presents reconstruction results; an

  3. Diffraction-induced coherence levels.

    PubMed

    Tavrov, Alexander; Schmit, Joanna; Kerwien, Norbert; Osten, Wolfgang; Tiziani, Hans

    2005-04-10

    We examined the influence of complex diffraction effects on low-coherence fringes created for high-aspect depth-to-width ratio structures called trenches. The coherence function was analyzed for these micrometer-wide trenches and was registered with a white-light interference microscope. For some types of surface structure we observed that additional low-coherence fringes that do not correspond directly to the surface topology are formed near the sharp edges of the structures. These additional coherence fringes were studied by rigorous numerical evaluations of vector diffractions, and these simulated interference fields were then compared with experimental results that were obtained with a white-light interference microscope.

  4. High-pressure neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongwu

    2011-01-10

    This lecture will cover progress and prospect of applications of high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques to Earth and materials sciences. I will first introduce general high-pressure research topics and available in-situ high-pressure techniques. Then I'll talk about high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques using two types of pressure cells: fluid-driven and anvil-type cells. Lastly, I will give several case studies using these techniques, particularly, those on hydrogen-bearing materials and magnetic transitions.

  5. Diffraction inspired unidirectional and bidirectional beam splitting in defect-containing photonic structures without interface corrugations

    SciTech Connect

    Colak, Evrim; Serebryannikov, Andriy E.; Usik, P. V.; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2016-05-21

    It is shown that strong diffractions and related dual-beam splitting can be obtained at transmission through the nonsymmetric structures that represent two slabs of photonic crystal (PhC) separated by a single coupled-cavity type defect layer, while there are no grating-like corrugations at the interfaces. The basic operation regimes include unidirectional and bidirectional splitting that occur due to the dominant contribution of the first positive and first negative diffraction orders to the transmission, which is typically connected with different manifestations of the asymmetric transmission phenomenon. Being the main component of the resulting transmission mechanism, diffractions appear owing to the effect exerted by the defect layer that works like an embedded diffractive element. Two mechanisms can co-exist in one structure, which differ, among others, in that whether dispersion allows coupling of zero order to a wave propagating in the regular, i.e., defect-free PhC segments or not. The possibility of strong diffractions and efficient splitting related to it strongly depend on the dispersion properties of the Floquet-Bloch modes of the PhC. Existence of one of the studied transmission scenarios is not affected by location of the defect layer.

  6. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Dueck, Benjamin; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We explore and exploit diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modelling optical measurement techniques for the bending of micro-mechanical transducers such as cantilevers for atomic force microscopy. The illumination of a cantilever edge causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photo-detector affecting the calibration of the measured signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). The conditions that avoid such detection artefacts conflict with the use of smaller cantilevers. Embracing diffraction patterns as data yields a potent detection technique that decouples tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the illumination alignment and detector position through a measurable which is invariant to translation and rotation. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically relevant experimental data demonstrating the utility of the diffraction patterns. We offer experimental design guidelines and quantify possible sources of systematic error in OBDT. We demonstrate a new nanometre resolution detection method that can replace OBDT, where diffraction effects from finite sized or patterned cantilevers are exploited. Such effects are readily generalized to cantilever arrays, and allow transmission detection of mechanical curvature, enabling instrumentation with simpler geometry. We highlight the comparative advantages over OBDT by detecting molecular activity of antibiotic Vancomycin. PMID:27255427

  7. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Rodolfo I; Dueck, Benjamin; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-06-03

    We explore and exploit diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modelling optical measurement techniques for the bending of micro-mechanical transducers such as cantilevers for atomic force microscopy. The illumination of a cantilever edge causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photo-detector affecting the calibration of the measured signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). The conditions that avoid such detection artefacts conflict with the use of smaller cantilevers. Embracing diffraction patterns as data yields a potent detection technique that decouples tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the illumination alignment and detector position through a measurable which is invariant to translation and rotation. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically relevant experimental data demonstrating the utility of the diffraction patterns. We offer experimental design guidelines and quantify possible sources of systematic error in OBDT. We demonstrate a new nanometre resolution detection method that can replace OBDT, where diffraction effects from finite sized or patterned cantilevers are exploited. Such effects are readily generalized to cantilever arrays, and allow transmission detection of mechanical curvature, enabling instrumentation with simpler geometry. We highlight the comparative advantages over OBDT by detecting molecular activity of antibiotic Vancomycin.

  8. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Dueck, Benjamin; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    We explore and exploit diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modelling optical measurement techniques for the bending of micro-mechanical transducers such as cantilevers for atomic force microscopy. The illumination of a cantilever edge causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photo-detector affecting the calibration of the measured signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). The conditions that avoid such detection artefacts conflict with the use of smaller cantilevers. Embracing diffraction patterns as data yields a potent detection technique that decouples tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the illumination alignment and detector position through a measurable which is invariant to translation and rotation. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically relevant experimental data demonstrating the utility of the diffraction patterns. We offer experimental design guidelines and quantify possible sources of systematic error in OBDT. We demonstrate a new nanometre resolution detection method that can replace OBDT, where diffraction effects from finite sized or patterned cantilevers are exploited. Such effects are readily generalized to cantilever arrays, and allow transmission detection of mechanical curvature, enabling instrumentation with simpler geometry. We highlight the comparative advantages over OBDT by detecting molecular activity of antibiotic Vancomycin.

  9. Using Graded Relevance Assessments in IR Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kekalalainen, Jaana; Jarvelin, Kalervo

    2002-01-01

    Proposes evaluation methods based on the use of nondichotomous relevance judgements in information retrieval (IR) experiments. Argues that evaluation methods should credit IR methods for their ability to retrieve highly relevant documents. This is desirable from the user point of view in modern large IR environments. (Author/AEF)

  10. Hydromechanical transmission

    DOEpatents

    Orshansky, Jr. deceased, Elias; Weseloh, William E.

    1978-01-01

    A power transmission having three planetary assemblies, each having its own carrier and its own planet, sun, and ring gears. A speed-varying module is connected in driving relation to the input shaft and in driving relationship to the three sun gears, all of which are connected together. The speed-varying means may comprise a pair of hydraulic units hydraulically interconnected so that one serves as a pump while the other serves as a motor and vice versa, one of the units having a variable stroke and being connected in driving relation to the input shaft, the other unit, which may have a fixed stroke, being connected in driving relation to the sun gears. The input shaft also drives the carrier of the third planetary assembly. A brake grounds the first carrier in the first range and in reverse and causes drive to be delivered to the output through the first ring gear in a hydrostatic mode. The carrier of the third planetary assembly drives the ring gear of the second planetary assembly, and a first clutching means connects the second carrier with the output in a second range, the brake for grounding the first carrier then being released. A second clutching means enables the third ring gear to drive the output shaft in a third range.

  11. Adsorbed or intercalated: Na on graphene/Ir(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervan, Petar; Lazić, Predrag

    2017-09-01

    Interaction of sodium with graphene (Gr) on Ir(111) was studied with the aim to resolve the issue of Na adsorption/intercalation kinetics. The system Na/Gr/Ir(111) was studied by means of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculation. It has been found that at room temperature (RT) and low concentrations Na is dominantly adsorbed on graphene. At higher concentrations, an intercalation process sets in so that it is possible to observe the coexistence of these two states. Eventually, all Na atoms are found in the intercalated state as determined by exposure to oxygen. While adsorption of Na on graphene already intercalated by Na [Na/Gr/Na/Ir(111) system] at RT was not possible, we could observe Li adsorption through the increase of Dirac point binding energy. Li coadsorption strongly affects the binding energy of the iridium surface state as well. This finding was supported by DFT calculations of adsorption energy of Na and Li on bare and fully Na intercalated graphene.

  12. Novel electronic transition in layered IrTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Yoon; Yang, J. J.; Horibe, Y.; Cheong, S.-W.

    2013-03-01

    Layered chalcogenides such as 1T-TaS2, 1T-TiSe2, Bi2Se3, and MoS2 exhibit rich low-dimensional physical properties such as superconductivity, topological insulator, charge density waves (CDW), and field-effect-transistor with high mobility. IrTe2 forms in the layered CdI2 structure, and exhibits diamagnetism and superlattice modulations below ~260 K. In addition, superconductivity appears when the ~260 K transition is fully suppressed by, for example, chemical doping. The origin of the ~260 K transition in IrTe2 has been controversial. It was claimed to be a structural transition, which suppresses electronic conduction. It was also reported that Fermi surface instability drives the transition - i . e . it is charge density wave-type. In this talk, we present our comprehensive studies on electron diffraction and transport experiments under chemical/hydrostatic pressure to unveil the origin of the novel electronic transition in IrTe2.

  13. New facility for large-scale DCG transmission holographic gratings: status and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habraken, Serge L.; Lemaire, Philippe C.; Blanche, Pierre-Alexandre; Jamar, Claude A. J.

    2002-01-01

    The recent interest of the astronomer community for volume phase holographic gratings is directly related to the enhancement of spectrograph throughput since the grating can rise higher diffraction efficiency. Indeed, dichromated gelatin technology has demonstrated capability for 70-90% efficiency. From the heritage of several diffractive and holographic projects and applications, the Centre Spatial de Liege has recently decided to invest in the large-scale DCG grating technology. This paper will present the new facility presently under construction. The goal is to be ready to respond to the market demand in 2002 with a capacity for producing 30 cm dia. holographic gratings. The challenge is not the size itself but the quality control in each process step. Thanks to the heritage of space instrumentation, CSL is trained to fulfill requirements on product and quality control. Large clean rooms are equipped with DCG coating machine, optical bench, development lab, and conditioning processes. The grating period may range from 325 to 3000 lp/mm. Low frequencies are especially hard to holographically record because it induces a cumbersome set-up. The working wavelength of DCG gratings is limited by the gelatin transmissivity (from 350 nm to 2 micrometers ). But the actual limitation factor in the IR is the refractive index modulation, equivalent to etching depth on ruled gratings: working wavelength of 1.5 micrometers means a need for 3 times the modulation of a visible grating. Large efforts are needed to insure that IR volume-phase gratings can reach efficiency higher than alternative grating technologies. In that field, this paper presents experimental results on small grating samples. A realistic performance goal is discussed to advise the astronomer community of our near-future products.

  14. IR susceptibility of naval ships using ShipIR/NTCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitekunas, David A.

    2010-04-01

    Methods of analysing the signature and susceptibility of naval platforms to infrared detection are described. An unclassified ShipIR destroyer model is used to illustrate the primary sources of infrared signature and detection: the exhaust system, solar-heating, and operating climate. The basic detection algorithm used by the Naval Threat Countermeasure Simulator (NTCS) component of ShipIR is described and used to analyse the effectiveness of various stealth technologies: stack suppression, low solar absorptive (LSA) paints, and Active Hull Cooling (AHC). Standard marine climate statistics are used to determine a minimum (5%), average (50%) and maximum (95%) signature condition for each operating region. The change in detection range of two wave-band sensors (3-5μm, 8-12 μm) operating at different altitudes (10m, 270m) in each of four climatic conditions is used to assess the effectiveness of each stealth solution, providing a more integral approach to infrared stealth design. These tools and methods form the basis on which future platform designs are being evaluated.

  15. Neutron diffraction studies of bacteriorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.; Popot, J.L.; Engelman, D.M.; Zaccai, G.

    1985-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of bacteriorhodopsin have utilized the entire range of deuterium labeling techniques that are commonly used in biological neutron scattering experiments. We will review the work published in this area and report on current projects. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Diffraction Plates for Classroom Demonstrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Richard B.

    1969-01-01

    Describes the computer generation of random and regular arrays of apertures on photographic film and their applications for classroom demonstrations of the Fraunhofer patterns produced by simple and complex apertures, Babinet's principle, resolution according to the Rayleigh criterion, and many other aspects of diffraction. (LC)

  17. Fresnel Diffraction for CTR Microbunching

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, R.; Knyazik, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Andonian, G.

    2009-01-22

    Laser beams of high intensities are routinely used for IFEL experiments. Such beams can potentially destroy microbunching diagnostic tools such as coherent transition radiation foils due to their low damage thresholds. Near-field Fresnel diffraction scheme for termination of CO{sub 2} laser beam has been experimentally studied and is presented in this paper. Novel THz camera was utilized for such study.

  18. Diffractive corneal inlay for presbyopia.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Walter D; García-Delpech, Salvador; Udaondo, Patricia; Remón, Laura; Ferrando, Vicente; Monsoriu, Juan A

    2017-09-01

    A conceptually new type of corneal inlays for a customized treatment of presbyopia is presented. The diffractive inlay consists on a small aperture disc having an array of micro-holes distributed inside the open zones of a Fresnel zone plate. In this way, the central hole of the disc lets pass the zero order diffraction and produces an extension of the depth of far focus of the eye, while the diffracted light through the holes in the periphery produce the near focus. Additionally, the micro-holes in the inlay surface fulfill the essential requirement of allowing the flow of nutrients through it to the cells of the corneal stroma. Theoretical and optical-bench experimental results for the polychromatic axial Point Spread Function (PSF) were obtained, showing an improved performance compared to the small aperture corneal inlay currently in the market (Kamra). Images of a test object, obtained at several vergences in the surroundings of the far and near foci, are also shown. Picture: Simulation of the appearance of the Diffractive corneal inlay on a real eye. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Albrow, M.G.

    1994-08-01

    I describe the evolution of experiments at hadron colliders on (a) high mass diffraction (b) double pomeron exchange, from the ISR through the Sp{bar p}S to the Tevatron. I emphasize an experimental approach to the question: ``What is the pomeron?``

  20. Fresnel Diffraction for CTR Microbunching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhoplav, R.; Knyazik, A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Andonian, G.

    2009-01-01

    Laser beams of high intensities are routinely used for IFEL experiments. Such beams can potentially destroy microbunching diagnostic tools such as coherent transition radiation foils due to their low damage thresholds. Near-field Fresnel diffraction scheme for termination of CO2 laser beam has been experimentally studied and is presented in this paper. Novel THz camera was utilized for such study.

  1. Mathmatical modeling for diffractive optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, David; Cox, J. Allen

    1993-01-01

    We consider a 'diffractive optic' to be a biperiodic surface separating two half-spaces, each having constant constitutive parameters; within a unit cell of the periodic surface and across the transition zone between the two half-spaces, the constitutive parameters can be a continuous, complex-valued function. Mathematical models for diffractive optics have been developed, and implemented as numerical codes, both for the 'direct' problem and for the 'inverse' problem. In problems of the 'direct' class, the diffractive optic is specified, and the full set of Maxwell's equations is cast in a variational form and solved numerically by a finite element approach. This approach is well-posed in the sense that existence and uniqueness of the solution can be proved and specific convergence conditions can be derived. An example of a metallic grating at a Wood anomaly is presented as a case where other approaches are known to have convergence problems. In problems of the 'inverse' class, some information about the diffracted field (e.g., the far-field intensity) is given, and the problem is to find the periodic structure in some optimal sense. Two approaches are described: phase reconstruction in the far-field approximation; and relaxed optimal design based on the Helmholtz equation. Practical examples are discussed for each approach to the inverse problem, including array generators in the far-field case and antireflective structures for the relaxed optimal design.

  2. Fresnel diffraction plates are simple and inexpensive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, R. B.

    1967-01-01

    Fresnel plate demonstrates diffraction phenomena simply and inexpensively. A large number of identical diffracting apertures are made in random orientation on photographic film. When a small source of light is viewed through the plate, the diffraction pattern typical of the diffracting aperture is readily seen.

  3. Electro-Optic Diffraction Grating Tuned Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The patent concerns an electro - optic diffraction grating tuned laser comprising a laser medium, output mirror, retro-reflective grating and an electro - optic diffraction grating beam deflector positioned between the laser medium and the reflective diffraction grating. An optional angle multiplier may be used between the electro - optic diffraction grating and the reflective grating.

  4. Stratified volume diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Diana Marie

    2000-11-01

    Gratings with high diffraction efficiency into a single order find use in applications ranging from optical interconnects to beam steering. Such gratings have been realized with volume holographic, blazed, and diffractive optical techniques. However, each of these methods has limitations that restrict the range of applications in which they can be used. In this work an alternate, novel approach and method for creating high efficiency gratings has been developed. These new gratings are named stratified volume diffractive optical elements (SVDOE's). In this approach diffractive optic techniques are used to create an optical structure that emulates volume grating behavior. An SVDOE consists of binary gratings interleaved with homogeneous layers in a multi-layer, stratified grating structure. The ridges of the binary gratings form fringe planes analogous to those of a volume hologram. The modulation and diffraction of an incident beam, which occur concurrently in a volume grating, are achieved sequentially by the grating layers and the homogeneous layers, respectively. The layers in this type of structure must be fabricated individually, which introduces the capability to laterally shift the binary grating layers relative to one another to create a grating with slanted fringe planes. This allows an element to be designed with high diffraction efficiency into the first order for any arbitrary angle of incidence. A systematic design process has been developed for SVDOE's. Optimum modulation depth of the SVDOE is determined analytically and the number of grating layers along with the thickness of homogeneous layers is determined by numerical simulation. A rigorous electromagnetic simulation of the diffraction properties of multi-layer grating structures, based on the Rigorous Coupled-Wave Analysis (RCWA) algorithm, was developed and applied to SVDOE performance prediction. Fabrication of an SVDOE structure presents unique challenges. Microfabrication combined with

  5. Infrared Metamaterials for Diffractive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Ju

    Intense developments in optical metamaterials have led to a renaissance in several optics fields. Metamaterials, artificially structured media, provide several additional degrees of freedom that cannot be accessed with conventional materials. For example, metamaterials offer a convenient and precise way to explore a wide range of refractive indices, including negative values. In this dissertation, I introduce the idea of metamaterial based diffractive optics. Merging diffractive optics with metamaterials has several benefits, including access to almost continuous phase profiles and a wide range of available controlled anisotropy. I demonstrate this concept with several examples. I begin with an example of metamaterial based blazed diffraction grating using gradient index metamaterials for lambda = 10.6 microm. A series of non-resonant metamaterial elements were designed and fabricated to mimic a saw-tooth refractive index profile with a linear index variation of Deltan = 3.0. The linear gradient profile is repeated periodically to form the equivalent of a blazed grating, with the gradient occurring across a spatial distance of 61 microm. The index gradient is confirmed by comparing the measured magnitudes of the -1, 0 and +1 diffracted orders to those obtained from full wave simulations. In addition to a metamaterial grating, a metamaterial based computer-generated phase hologram was designed by implementing the Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) iterative algorithm to form a 2D phase panel. A three layer metamaterial hologram was fabricated, with the size of 750 microm x 750 microm. Each pixel is comprised of 5 x 5 metamaterial elements. This simple demonstration shows the potential for practical applications of metamaterial based diffractive optics. The demand for compact and integrated optoelectronic systems increases the urgency for optical components that can simultaneously perform various functions. This dissertation also presents an optical element capable of

  6. Power transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Ordo, J.P.; Raszkowski, J.A.; Klemen, D.

    1991-04-23

    This patent describes a transmission. It comprises a housing having first and second end covers; an input shaft rotatably mounted in the first end cover; an output shaft rotatably supported on the input shaft and in the second end cover; first and second countershafts rotatably supported in the end covers for rotation on respective axis parallel with the input shaft and the output shaft; a first head gear continuously rotatable with the input shaft; second and third head gears meshing with the first head gear and continuously rotatable with the first and second countershafts respectively; ratio gears rotatably supported on each of the countershafts including a first ratio gear on the first countershaft and a second ratio gear on the second countershaft; reverse gear means including a first ratio gear on the first countershaft and a second ratio gear on the second countershaft; reverse gear means including a first member rotatable with the first ratio gear means including a first member rotatable with the first ratio gear and a second member rotatably supported on the second countershaft; synchronizer clutch means selectively and alternatively connectible with the second ratio gear and the second member of the reverse gear means; output gear means drivingly connected with the output shaft and including a first ratio output gear meshing with the second ratio gear; first selectively engageable friction clutch means for connecting the first ratio gear with the first countershaft for completing a low forward drive ratio between the input and output shafts; and second selectively engageable friction clutch means for selectively connecting the synchronizer clutch means to the second countershaft and cooperating therewith to selectively alternatively complete a reverse drive ratio between the input shaft and the output shaft and another forward drive ratio between the input and output shafts.

  7. Automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, M.; Inuzuka, T.

    1986-08-26

    1. An automatic transmission with four forward speeds and one reverse position, is described which consists of: an input shaft; an output member; first and second planetary gear sets each having a sun gear, a ring gear and a carrier supporting a pinion in mesh with the sun gear and ring gear; the carrier of the first gear set, the ring gear of the second gear set and the output member all being connected; the ring gear of the first gear set connected to the carrier of the second gear set; a first clutch means for selectively connecting the input shaft to the sun gear of the first gear set, including friction elements, a piston selectively engaging the friction elements and a fluid servo in which hydraulic fluid is selectively supplied to the piston; a second clutch means for selectively connecting the input shaft to the sun gear of the second gear set a third clutch means for selectively connecting the input shaft to the carrier of the second gear set including friction elements, a piston selectively engaging the friction elements and a fluid servo in which hydraulic fluid is selectively supplied to the piston; a first drive-establishing means for selectively preventing rotation of the ring gear of the first gear set and the carrier of the second gear set in only one direction and, alternatively, in any direction; a second drive-establishing means for selectively preventing rotation of the sun gear of the second gear set; and a drum being open to the first planetary gear set, with a cylindrical intermediate wall, an inner peripheral wall and outer peripheral wall and forming the hydraulic servos of the first and third clutch means between the intermediate wall and the inner peripheral wall and between the intermediate wall and the outer peripheral wall respectively.

  8. Advanced combined application of micro-X-ray diffraction/micro-X-ray fluorescence with conventional techniques for the identification of pictorial materials from Baroque Andalusia paintings.

    PubMed

    Herrera, L K; Montalbani, S; Chiavari, G; Cotte, M; Solé, V A; Bueno, J; Duran, A; Justo, A; Perez-Rodriguez, J L

    2009-11-15

    The process of investigating paintings includes the identification of materials to solve technical and historical art questions, to aid in the deduction of the original appearance, and in the establishment of the chemical and physical conditions for adequate restoration and conservation. In particular, we have focused on the identification of several samples taken from six famous canvases painted by Pedro Atanasio Bocanegra, who created a very special collection depicting the life of San Ignacio, which is located in the church of San Justo y Pastor of Granada, Spain. The characterization of the inorganic and organic compounds of the textiles, preparation layers, and pictorial layers have been carried out using an XRD diffractometer, SEM observations, EDX spectrometry, FT-IR spectrometry (both in reflection and transmission mode), pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and synchrotron-based micro-X-ray techniques. In this work, the advantages over conventional X-ray diffraction of using combined synchrotron-based micro-X-ray diffraction and micro-X-ray fluorescence in the identification of multi-layer paintings is demonstrated.

  9. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  10. Moisture map by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinzato, E.; Cadelano, G.; Bison, P.

    2010-10-01

    A new approach to moisture detection in buildings by an optical method is presented. Limits of classical and new methods are discussed. The state of the art about the use of IR thermography is illustrated as well. The new technique exploits characteristics of the materials and takes into account explicitly the heat and mass exchange between surface and environment. A set of experiments in controlled laboratory conditions on different materials is used to better understand the physical problem. The testing procedure and the data reduction are illustrated. A case study on a heritage building points up the features of this technique.

  11. Analysis of working range in IR camera measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wei; Chen, Jing; An, Ying

    2009-05-01

    Parameters of infrared cameras play an important role in the application of IR cameras. Most of these parameters' testing principles are based on the measurement of radiation. In order to make measurement accurately, factors such as distant from the test camera to the apparatus, optics index of reflection of measurement unit and atmospheric transmission must be evaluated carefully. By means of the analysis of radiation energy, the concept of "working range" of a double-blackbody parameters measurement unit and its mathematics model are proposed. The distribution of radiation is simulated.

  12. First: Florida Ir Silicon Immersion Grating Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jian; Zhao, B.; Wang, J.; Wan, X.; Powell, S.

    2012-01-01

    The FIRST silicon immersion grating spectrometer is being developed at UF to search for habitable Earth-like planets around M dwarfs and giant planets around young active stars. This compact cryogenic IR instrument is designed to have a spectral resolution of R=72,000 at 1.4-1.8 µm with a silicon immersion grating and R=60K at 0.8-1.35 µm with an R4 echelle. The goal is to reach a long term Doppler precision of 1-3 m/s for bright M dwarfs. The FIRST silicon immersion grating, with 54.74 degree blaze angle and 16 l/mm groove density, has been fully characterized in the lab. The 50x50 mm square grating entrance pupil is coated with a single layer of anti-reflection coating resulting in a 2.1% measured reflection loss. The grating surface was coated with a gold layer to increase grating surface reflectivity. It has produced R=110,000 diffraction limited spectral resolution at 1.523 micron in a lab test spectrograph with 20 mm pupil diameter. The integrated scattered light is less than 0.2\\% and grating has no visible ghosts down to the measuring instrument noise level. The grating efficiency is 69\\% at the peak of the blaze. This silicon immersion grating is ready for scientific observations with FIRST. FIRST is scheduled to be integrated in the lab during the spring of 2012 and see the first light at an astronomical telescope (TBD) the summer of 2012.

  13. Li adsorption versus graphene intercalation on Ir(111): From quenching to restoration of the Ir surface state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervan, P.; Lazić, P.; Petrović, M.; Šrut Rakić, I.; Pletikosić, I.; Kralj, M.; Milun, M.; Valla, T.

    2015-12-01

    It is common knowledge that even a trace amount of a chemisorbed species can strongly perturb the surface electronic structure, in particular the surface states, to the point of their complete eradication. We have confirmed this behavior by adsorbing Li on the Ir(111), but surprisingly, we have discovered that in the presence of graphene Li does not suppress the Ir surface state. By combining the results of the low-energy electron diffraction and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy with the density functional theory for modeling of the studied systems we can provide a detailed explanation for the observed phenomena. The quenching of the surface state by the electronic states of disordered Li layer on a bare Ir surface is efficiently deactivated by the presence of graphene which shifts the Li states to lower energies thereby leading to the unexpected reappearance of the surface state. Such protection of the surface state coherence from disorder upon intercalation could be used as a benchmark in the toolbox of surface science.

  14. IRS-2 Deficiency Impairs NMDA Receptor-Dependent Long-term Potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Eduardo D.; Sánchez-Perez, Ana; Trejo, José Luis; Martin-Aldana, Juan Antonio; Cano Jaimez, Marife; Pons, Sebastián; Acosta Umanzor, Carlos; Menes, Lorena; White, Morris F.

    2012-01-01

    The beneficial effects of insulin and insulin-like growth factor I on cognition have been documented in humans and animal models. Conversely, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and diabetes increase the risk for neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanisms by which insulin regulates synaptic plasticity are not well understood. Here, we report that complete disruption of insulin receptor substrate 2 (Irs2) in mice impairs long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. Basal synaptic transmission and paired-pulse facilitation were similar between the 2 groups of mice. Induction of LTP by high-frequency conditioning tetanus did not activate postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in hippocampus slices from Irs2−/− mice, although the expression of NR2A, NR2B, and PSD95 was equivalent to wild-type controls. Activation of Fyn, AKT, and MAPK in response to tetanus stimulation was defective in Irs2−/− mice. Interestingly, IRS2 was phosphorylated during induction of LTP in control mice, revealing a potential new component of the signaling machinery which modulates synaptic plasticity. Given that IRS2 expression is diminished in Type 2 diabetics as well as in AD patients, these data may reveal an explanation for the prevalence of cognitive decline in humans with metabolic disorders by providing a mechanistic link between insulin resistance and impaired synaptic transmission. PMID:21955917

  15. Digital diffractive optics: Have diffractive optics entered mainstream industry yet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Bernard; Hejmadi, Vic

    2010-05-01

    When a new technology is integrated into industry commodity products and consumer electronic devices, and sold worldwide in retail stores, it is usually understood that this technology has then entered the realm of mainstream technology and therefore mainstream industry. Such a leap however does not come cheap, as it has a double edge sword effect: first it becomes democratized and thus massively developed by numerous companies for various applications, but also it becomes a commodity, and thus gets under tremendous pressure to cut down its production and integration costs while not sacrificing to performance. We will show, based on numerous examples extracted from recent industry history, that the field of Diffractive Optics is about to undergo such a major transformation. Such a move has many impacts on all facets of digital diffractive optics technology, from the optical design houses to the micro-optics foundries (for both mastering and volume replication), to the final product integrators or contract manufacturers. The main causes of such a transformation are, as they have been for many other technologies in industry, successive technological bubbles which have carried and lifted up diffractive optics technology within the last decades. These various technological bubbles have been triggered either by real industry needs or by virtual investment hype. Both of these causes will be discussed in the paper. The adjective ""digital"" in "digital diffractive optics" does not refer only, as it is done in digital electronics, to the digital functionality of the element (digital signal processing), but rather to the digital way they are designed (by a digital computer) and fabricated (as wafer level optics using digital masking techniques). However, we can still trace a very strong similarity between the emergence of micro-electronics from analog electronics half a century ago, and the emergence of digital optics from conventional optics today.

  16. Coprates Chasma Landslides in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Today's daytime IR image is of a portion of Coprates Chasma, part of Valles Marineris. As with yesterday's image, this image shows multiple large landslides.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.2, Longitude 300.2 East (59.8 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. Xanthe Terra Landslide in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This is a daytime IR image of a chaos region within Xanthe Terra. As with earlier images, the landslide in this image is caused by the failure of steep slopes releasing material to form the landslide deposit.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 3.1, Longitude 309.7 East (50.3 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. Xanthe Terra Landslide in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This is a daytime IR image of a chaos region within Xanthe Terra. As with earlier images, the landslide in this image is caused by the failure of steep slopes releasing material to form the landslide deposit.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 3.1, Longitude 309.7 East (50.3 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Coprates Chasma Landslides in IR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Today's daytime IR image is of a portion of Coprates Chasma, part of Valles Marineris. As with yesterday's image, this image shows multiple large landslides.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude -8.2, Longitude 300.2 East (59.8 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Gamma radiation transmission along the multibend mazes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangrok

    2016-08-01

    Installing a maze on the corridor reduces much shielding materials in shielding door at the end of the pathway. In this study, gamma transmission was measured along single-, double-, and triple-bend mazes, which were applied to nondestructive test workplace by Monte Carlo method. In the facility using (192)Ir 1.85TBq, the lengths of corridors to reduce the effective dose under the limitation without shielding door were 10 and 6m in double- and triple-bend mazes, respectively.

  1. Comparative IR-spectral studies of different modifications of the antibiotic cefazolin Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinkova, G. N.; Ovcharova, G.; Gagauzov, I.; Krestev, V.; Petrov, L.

    1990-03-01

    The crystalline structure of Cefazolin Na was investigated by IR-spectroscopy, in different modifications prepared thereof. The following differences were observed: in Amide I, II, III, IV, V, VI and also in the region 3000 - 3400 cm -1. X-ray diffraction measurements, scanning electron microscopy and analytical investigations confirmed the spectral differences between the crystalline, lyophilized, solvated, desolvated and ground samples. Spectral differences on storage at 60 % and 90 % relative humidity are explained by the increased H 2O content. The significance of IR-spectroscopy in discovering the supermolecular structure of Cefazolin Na is evident.

  2. A new high efficiency InP acousto-optic device for IR wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soos, Jolanta I.; Rosemeier, Ronald G.; Rosenbaum, Joel

    1990-09-01

    InP acoustooptic Bragg cells which are IR-transparent in the 1-10 micron bandpass have a center frequency in the 200-600 MHz range, and a diffraction efficiency of 40-60 percent, on the basis of 1-W RF driving power. These devices are anticipated to be ideal in such applications as fiber-optic modulators, IR scanners, deflectors, and HF mode-lockers. In the course of fabrication, the photoelastic constant p44 has been defined; using other crystallographic configurations, such photoelastic constants as p11 and p12 are expected to emerge.

  3. Origin of the phase transition in IrTe2: structural modulation and local bonding instability

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Huibo; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Yan, Jiaqiang; Zhou, Haidong; Custelcean, Radu; Mandrus, D.; McGuire, Michael A; Singh, David J; Chen, Xin; Yang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    We used X-ray/neutron diffraction to determine the low temperature (LT) structure of IrTe2. A structural modulation was observed with a wavevector of k =(1/5, 0, 1/5) below Ts285 K, accompanied by a structural transition from a trigonal to a triclinic lattice. We also performed the first principles calculations for high temperature (HT) and LT structures, which elucidate the nature of the phase transition and the LT structure. A local bonding instability associated with the Te 5p states is likely the origin of the structural phase transition in IrTe2.

  4. Diffraction Ellipsometry Studies of Skeletal Muscle Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, William Lloyd

    Many of the techniques used to study the structure and contraction mechanism of muscle rely on the interaction of light or other electromagnetic radiation with the muscle. Some of the most important of these techniques are light and electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, spectroscopy of muscle fibers "labelled" with spin or fluorescent probes, visible spectrum diffraction, and transmission birefringence. Chapter I of this dissertation reviews these techniques, focussing on what they have to tell us about muscle structure. In Chapter II, we discuss experiments in which the microstructural features of relaxed, skinned fibers compressed with polyvinylpyrollidone were examined by optical diffraction ellipsometry. The change in polarization state of light after interacting with the muscle is described by the differential field ratio (DFR) and birefringence (Deltan). Compression of single fibers with 0%-21% PVP caused an increase in up to 23% and 31% for DFR and Deltan, respectively. Theoretical modelling suggests that the average S-1 tilt angle may be reduced upon compression of the filament lattice. This is supported by experiments in which S-1 was cleaved with alpha-chymotrypsin. Experiments comparing fibers with intact membranes and skinned fibers compressed to an equivalent lattice spacing showed little difference in DFR or Deltan. Chapter III deals with experiments on contracting, intact fibers. The differential field ratio (DFR) was monitored for tetanically contracting muscle fibers subject to rapid (<0.4 msec) release or stretch. Upon stimulation, DFR decreases 14% from its resting value; the half-time for the decrease leads that of tension rise by 10 msecs. This suggests that the movement of cross -bridges precedes tension development and that the average cross-bridge angle is more perpendicular in the contracting state. Upon rapid release of 0.5% of the fiber length, DFR decreases 9.5% further simultaneous with the length step. Rapid and slow recovery phases

  5. Demonstration of KHILS two-color IR projection capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lawrence E.; Coker, Jason S.; Garbo, Dennis L.; Olson, Eric M.; Murrer, Robert Lee, Jr.; Bergin, Thomas P.; Goldsmith, George C., II; Crow, Dennis R.; Guertin, Andrew W.; Dougherty, Michael; Marler, Thomas M.; Timms, Virgil G.

    1998-07-01

    transmission path of the beam combiner provided the LWIR (6.75 to 12 microns), while the reflective path produced the MWIR (3 to 6.5 microns). Each resistor array was individually projected into the Agema through the beam combiner at incremental output levels. Once again the Agema's output counts were recorded at each resistor array output level. These projections established the resistor array output to Agema count curves for the MWIR and LWIR resistor arrays. Using the radiance to Agema counts curves, the MWIR and LWIR resistor array output to radiance curves were established. With the calibration curves established, a two-color movie was projected and compared to the generated movie radiance values. By taking care to correctly account for the spectral qualities of the Agema camera, the calibration filters, and the diachroic beam combiner, the projections matched the theoretical calculations. In the near future, a Lockheed- Martin Multiple Quantum Well camera with true two-color IR capability will be tested.

  6. Diffraction operators in paraxial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasso, William; Navas, Marianela; Añez, Liz; Urdaneta, Romer; Díaz, Leonardo; Torres, César O.

    2014-07-01

    Nowadays, research in the field of science education points to the creation of alternative ways of teaching contents encouraging the development of more elaborate reasoning, where a high degree of abstraction and generalization of scientific knowledge prevails. On that subject, this research shows a didactic alternative proposal for the construction of Fresnel and Fraunhoffer diffraction concepts applying the Fourier transform technique in the study of electromagnetic waves propagation in free space. Curvature transparency and Fourier sphere operators in paraxial approximation are used in order to make the usual laborious mathematical approach easier. The main result shows that the composition of optic metaxial operators results in the discovery of a simpler way out of the standard electromagnetic wave propagation in free space between a transmitter and a receptor separated from a given distance. This allows to state that the didactic proposal shown encourages the construction of Fresnel and Fraunhoffer diffraction concepts in a more effective and easier way than the traditional teaching.

  7. dxtbx: the diffraction experiment toolbox.

    PubMed

    Parkhurst, James M; Brewster, Aaron S; Fuentes-Montero, Luis; Waterman, David G; Hattne, Johan; Ashton, Alun W; Echols, Nathaniel; Evans, Gwyndaf; Sauter, Nicholas K; Winter, Graeme

    2014-08-01

    Data formats for recording X-ray diffraction data continue to evolve rapidly to accommodate new detector technologies developed in response to more intense light sources. Processing the data from single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments therefore requires the ability to read, and correctly interpret, image data and metadata from a variety of instruments employing different experimental representations. Tools that have previously been developed to address this problem have been limited either by a lack of extensibility or by inconsistent treatment of image metadata. The dxtbx software package provides a consistent interface to both image data and experimental models, while supporting a completely generic user-extensible approach to reading the data files. The library is written in a mixture of C++ and Python and is distributed as part of the cctbx under an open-source licence at http://cctbx.sourceforge.net.

  8. Phase Aberrations in Diffraction Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Marchesini, S; Chapman, H N; Barty, A; Howells, M R; Spence, J H; Cui, C; Weierstall, U; Minor, A M

    2005-09-29

    In coherent X-ray diffraction microscopy the diffraction pattern generated by a sample illuminated with coherent x-rays is recorded, and a computer algorithm recovers the unmeasured phases to synthesize an image. By avoiding the use of a lens the resolution is limited, in principle, only by the largest scattering angles recorded. However, the imaging task is shifted from the experiment to the computer, and the algorithm's ability to recover meaningful images in the presence of noise and limited prior knowledge may produce aberrations in the reconstructed image. We analyze the low order aberrations produced by our phase retrieval algorithms. We present two methods to improve the accuracy and stability of reconstructions.

  9. Deterministic Bragg Coherent Diffraction Imaging.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Konstantin M; Punegov, Vasily I; Morgan, Kaye S; Schmalz, Gerd; Paganin, David M

    2017-04-25

    A deterministic variant of Bragg Coherent Diffraction Imaging is introduced in its kinematical approximation, for X-ray scattering from an imperfect crystal whose imperfections span no more than half of the volume of the crystal. This approach provides a unique analytical reconstruction of the object's structure factor and displacement fields from the 3D diffracted intensity distribution centred around any particular reciprocal lattice vector. The simple closed-form reconstruction algorithm, which requires only one multiplication and one Fourier transformation, is not restricted by assumptions of smallness of the displacement field. The algorithm performs well in simulations incorporating a variety of conditions, including both realistic levels of noise and departures from ideality in the reference (i.e. imperfection-free) part of the crystal.

  10. Anomalous diffraction in hyperbolic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberucci, Alessandro; Jisha, Chandroth P.; Boardman, Allan D.; Assanto, Gaetano

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that light is subject to anomalous (i.e., negative) diffraction when propagating in the presence of hyperbolic dispersion. We show that light propagation in hyperbolic media resembles the dynamics of a quantum particle of negative mass moving in a two-dimensional potential. The negative effective mass implies time reversal if the medium is homogeneous. Such property paves the way to diffraction compensation, i.e., spatial analog of dispersion compensating fibers in the temporal domain. At variance with materials exhibiting standard elliptic dispersion, in inhomogeneous hyperbolic materials light waves are pulled towards regions with a lower refractive index. In the presence of a Kerr-like optical response, bright (dark) solitons are supported by a negative (positive) nonlinearity.

  11. Perturbation theory in electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakken, L. N.; Marthinsen, K.; Hoeier, R.

    1992-12-01

    The Bloch-wave approach is used for discussing multiple inelastic electron scattering and higher-order perturbation theory in inelastic high-energy electron diffraction. In contrast to previous work, the present work describes three-dimensional diffraction so that higher-order Laue zone (HOLZ) effects are incorporated. Absorption is included and eigenvalues and eigenvectors are calculated from a structure matrix with the inclusion of an absorptive potential. Centrosymmetric as well as non-centrosymmetric crystal structures are allowed. An iteration method with a defined generalized propagation function for solving the inelastic coupling equations is described. It is shown that a similar iteration method with the same propagation function can be used for obtaining higher-order perturbation terms for the wave-function when a perturbation is added to the crystal potential. Finally, perturbation theory by matrix calculations when a general perturbation is added to the structure matrix is considered.

  12. Diffraction moire: The dynamic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, V.A.; Epstein, J.S.; Reuter, W.G.

    1987-01-01

    The technique of diffraction moire interferometry has been applied to numerous static and slowly changing stress configurations. The method has now been extended to the study of dynamic loading events, especially to the interaction of dynamic stress waves with such flaws as cracks or with the variations in composition found in composite materials. A pulsed ruby laser was used to provide the rapid (20 ns wide), brilliant and coherent illumination required for these studies. The technique and several specific applications are described.

  13. Industrial applications of neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Felcher, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron diffraction (or, to be more general, neutron scattering) is a most versatile and universal tool, which has been widely employed to probe the structure, the dynamics and the magnetism of condensed matter. Traditionally used for fundamental research in solid state physics, this technique more recently has been applied to problems of immediate industrial interest, as illustrated in examples covering the main fields of endeavour. 14 refs., 14 figs.

  14. Confinement, Turbulence and Diffraction Catastrophes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaizot, J.-P.; Nowak, M. A.

    2009-08-01

    Many features of the large N transition that occurs in the spectral density of Wilson loops as a function of loop area (observed recently in numerical simulations of Yang-Mills theory by Narayanan and Neuberger) can be captured by a simple Burgers equation used to model turbulence. Spectral shock waves that precede this asymptotic limit exhibit universal scaling with N, with indices that can be related to Berry indices for diffraction catastrophes.

  15. Neutron diffraction and Vitamin E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harroun, T. A.

    2010-11-01

    It is generally accepted that neutron diffraction from model membrane systems is an effective biophysical technique for determining membrane structure. Here we describe an example of how deuterium labelling can elucidate the location of specific membrane soluble molecules, including a brief discussion of the technique itself. We show that deuterium labelled α-tocopherol sits upright in the bilayer, as might be expected, but at very different locations within the bilayer, depending on the degree of lipid chain unsaturation.

  16. Aberrations of diffracted wave fields: distortion.

    PubMed

    Harvey, James E; Bogunovic, Dijana; Krywonos, Andrey

    2003-03-01

    Near-field diffraction patterns are merely aberrated Fraunhofer diffraction patterns. These aberrations, inherent to the diffraction process, provide insight and understanding into wide-angle diffraction phenomena. Nonparaxial patterns of diffracted orders produced by a laser beam passing through a grating and projected upon a plane screen exhibit severe distortion (W311). This distortion is an artifact of the configuration chosen to observe diffraction patterns. Grating behavior expressed in terms of the direction cosines of the propagation vectors of the incident and diffracted orders exhibits no distortion. Use of a simple direction cosine diagram provides an elegant way to deal with nonparaxial diffraction patterns, particularly when large obliquely incident beams produce conical diffraction.

  17. Diffraction Techniques in Structural Biology

    PubMed Central

    Egli, Martin

    2010-01-01

    A detailed understanding of chemical and biological function and the mechanisms underlying the activities ultimately requires atomic-resolution structural data. Diffraction-based techniques such as single-crystal X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy and neutron diffraction are well established and have paved the road to the stunning successes of modern-day structural biology. The major advances achieved in the last 20 years in all aspects of structural research, including sample preparation, crystallization, the construction of synchrotron and spallation sources, phasing approaches and high-speed computing and visualization, now provide specialists and non-specialists alike with a steady flow of molecular images of unprecedented detail. The present chapter combines a general overview of diffraction methods with a step-by-step description of the process of a single-crystal X-ray structure determination experiment, from chemical synthesis or expression to phasing and refinement, analysis and quality control. For novices it may serve as a stepping-stone to more in-depth treatises of the individual topics. Readers relying on structural information for interpreting functional data may find it a useful consumer guide. PMID:20517991

  18. Submicron X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, Alastair; Celestre, Richard; Tamura, Nobumichi; Spolenak, Ralph; Valek, Bryan; Brown, Walter; Bravman, John; Padmore, Howard; Batterman, Boris; Patel, Jamshed

    2000-08-17

    At the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley the authors have instrumented a beam line that is devoted exclusively to x-ray micro diffraction problems. By micro diffraction they mean those classes of problems in Physics and Materials Science that require x-ray beam sizes in the sub-micron range. The instrument is for instance, capable of probing a sub-micron size volume inside micron sized aluminum metal grains buried under a silicon dioxide insulating layer. The resulting Laue pattern is collected on a large area CCD detector and automatically indexed to yield the grain orientation and deviatoric (distortional) strain tensor of this sub-micron volume. A four-crystal monochromator is then inserted into the beam, which allows monochromatic light to illuminate the same part of the sample. Measurement of diffracted photon energy allows for the determination of d spacings. The combination of white and monochromatic beam measurements allow for the determination of the total strain/stress tensor (6 components) inside each sub-micron sized illuminated volume of the sample.

  19. Diffraction Techniques in Structural Biology

    PubMed Central

    Egli, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A detailed understanding of chemical and biological function and the mechanisms underlying the molecular activities ultimately requires atomic-resolution structural data. Diffraction-based techniques such as single-crystal X-ray crystallography, electron microscopy, and neutron diffraction are well established and they have paved the road to the stunning successes of modern-day structural biology. The major advances achieved in the last 20 years in all aspects of structural research, including sample preparation, crystallization, the construction of synchrotron and spallation sources, phasing approaches, and high-speed computing and visualization, now provide specialists and nonspecialists alike with a steady flow of molecular images of unprecedented detail. The present unit combines a general overview of diffraction methods with a detailed description of the process of a single-crystal X-ray structure determination experiment, from chemical synthesis or expression to phasing and refinement, analysis, and quality control. For novices it may serve as a stepping-stone to more in-depth treatises of the individual topics. Readers relying on structural information for interpreting functional data may find it a useful consumer guide. PMID:27248784

  20. Stratified Diffractive Optic Approach for Creating High Efficiency Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Diana M.; Nordin, Gregory P.

    1998-01-01

    Gratings with high efficiency in a single diffracted order can be realized with both volume holographic and diffractive optical elements. However, each method has limitations that restrict the applications in which they can be used. For example, high efficiency volume holographic gratings require an appropriate combination of thickness and permittivity modulation throughout the bulk of the material. Possible combinations of those two characteristics are limited by properties of currently available materials, thus restricting the range of applications for volume holographic gratings. Efficiency of a diffractive optic grating is dependent on its approximation of an ideal analog profile using discrete features. The size of constituent features and, consequently, the number that can be used within a required grating period restricts the applications in which diffractive optic gratings can be used. These limitations imply that there are applications which cannot be addressed by either technology. In this paper we propose to address a number of applications in this category with a new method of creating high efficiency gratings which we call stratified diffractive optic gratings. In this approach diffractive optic techniques are used to create an optical structure that emulates volume grating behavior. To illustrate the stratified diffractive optic grating concept we consider a specific application, a scanner for a space-based coherent wind lidar, with requirements that would be difficult to meet by either volume holographic or diffractive optic methods. The lidar instrument design specifies a transmissive scanner element with the input beam normally incident and the exiting beam deflected at a fixed angle from the optical axis. The element will be rotated about the optical axis to produce a conical scan pattern. The wavelength of the incident beam is 2.06 microns and the required deflection angle is 30 degrees, implying a grating period of approximately 4 microns

  1. Triple Bragg diffraction in paratellurite crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, V. M.; Averin, S. V.; Voronko, A. I.; Kotov, E. V.; Tikhomirov, S. A.

    2017-07-01

    Triple Bragg diffraction in a paratellurite crystal has been considered for the case when the plane of diffraction is oblique to the optical axis of the crystal. It has been shown that effective photoelastic constants for isotropic and anisotropic diffraction depend on the inclination of the plane of diffraction insignificantly. Triple Bragg diffraction of 0.63-μm coherent radiation in paratellurite at a 47.3-MHz slow acoustic wave has been experimentally demonstrated. For an optical power of 0.69 W delivered to a piezoconverter, the relative intensities of diffraction orders equal 0.4, 0.4, 0.1, and 0.1, respectively.

  2. Preparation of Soybean Seed Samples for FT-IR Microspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller,S.; Pietrzak, L.

    2005-01-01

    Typical preparation of seed samples for infrared (IR) microspectroscopy involves imbibition of the seed for varying time periods followed by cryosectioning. Imbibition, however, may initiate germination even at 4 C with associated changes in the chemistry of the sample. We have found that it is possible to section seeds that are sufficiently hard, such as soybeans, on a standard laboratory microtome without imbibition. The use of dry sectioning of unimbibed seeds is reported here, as well as a comparison of different mounting media and modes of analysis. Glycerol, Tissue-Tek, and ethanol were used as mounting media, and the quality of the resulting spectra was assessed. Ethanol was the preferred mountant, because it dried quickly with no residue and thus did not interfere with the spectrum of interest. Analysis in transmission mode using barium fluoride windows to hold the samples was compared with transmission-reflection analysis with sections mounted on special infrared-reflecting slides. The two modes of analysis performed well in different regions of the spectrum. The mode of analysis (transmission vs. transmission-reflection) should be based on the components of greatest interest in the sample.

  3. Optimization and characterization of a highly-efficient diffraction nanograting for MHz XUV pulses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying-Ying; Süssmann, Frederik; Zherebtsov, Sergey; Pupeza, Ioachim; Kaster, Jan; Lehr, Dennis; Fuchs, Hans-Jörg; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Fill, Ernst; Duan, Xuan-Ming; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Krausz, Ferenc; Stebbings, Sarah L; Kling, Matthias F

    2011-01-31

    We designed, fabricated and characterized a nano-periodical highly-efficient blazed grating for extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation. The grating was optimized by the rigorous coupled-wave analysis method (RCWA) and milled into the top layer of a highly-reflective mirror for IR light. The XUV diffraction efficiency was determined to be around 20% in the range from 35.5 to 79.2 nm. The effects of the nanograting on the reflectivity of the IR light and non-linear effects introduced by the nanograting have been measured and are discussed.

  4. Eshelby twist and correlation effects in diffraction from nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Leonardi, A.; Scardi, P.; Ryu, S.; Pugno, N. M.

    2015-04-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to model the Eshelby dislocation inside Pd and Ir nanowires and to predict the powder diffraction pattern using the Debye scattering equation. We find that the ideal dislocation solution by Eshelby is in good agreement with the observed twist angle and deviatoric strain, even though it ignores both the splitting of the Eshelby dislocation into two partials and surface stress. Surface stress plays a significant role only for nanorods with small aspect ratio (∼1:1). We also find that Wilson's prediction on the diffraction peak broadening for the Eshelby dislocation is overestimated because it ignores the fact that the Eshelby twist relaxes the deviatoric strain. Moreover, the twist loosens the correlation along the nanorod, causing additional line profile broadening, which is read by diffraction as a decrease of coherent domain size when the total twist angle is bigger than 1.5°. Overall, our findings suggest a novel way to predict and analyze the dislocations as well as the resulting strain fields in the twisted nanocrystalline rods.

  5. Dedicated spectrometers based on diffractive optics: design, modelling and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Løvhaugen, O.; Johansen, I.-R.; Bakke, K. A. H.; Fismen, B. G.; Nicolas, S.

    The described design of diffractive optical elements for low cost IR-spectrometers gives a built-in wavelength reference and allows 'spectral arithmetic' to be implemented in the optical performance of the DOE. The diffractive element combines the function of the lenses and the grating and eliminates the need for alignment of those components in the standard scanned grating spectrometer design. The element gives out a set of foci, each with one spectral component, which are scanned across a detector, thus relaxing the demands for scan angle control. It can thus be regarded as an alternative solution to a beam splitter and band pass filter instrument. Software tools have been designed to ease the adaptation of the design to different applications. To model the performance of the spectrometers we have implemented a scalar Rayleigh-Sommerfeldt diffraction model. The gold-coated elements are produced by injection moulding using a compact disc (CD) moulding technique and mould inlays mastered by e-beam lithography. The optimized selection of wavelength bands and the classification of the measured signal use a combination of principal component analysis and robust statistical methods. Typical applications will be material characterization of recycled plastics and gas monitoring. Spectrometers for two different applications have been built and tested. Comparisons between the design goals and the measured performance have been made and show good agreements.

  6. Survey of Transmission Cost Allocation Methodologies for Regional Transmission Organizations

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, S.; Porter, K.; Mudd, C.; Rogers, J.

    2011-02-01

    The report presents transmission cost allocation methodologies for reliability transmission projects, generation interconnection, and economic transmission projects for all Regional Transmission Organizations.

  7. GaSb substrates with extended IR wavelength for advanced space based applications

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Lisa P.; Flint, Patrick; Dallas, Gordon; Bakken, Daniel; Blanchat, Kevin; Brown, Gail J.; Vangala, Shivashankar R.; Goodhue, William D.; Krishnaswami, Kannan

    2009-05-01

    GaSb substrates have advantages that make them attractive for implementation of a wide range of infrared (IR) detectors with higher operating temperatures for stealth and space based applications. A significant aspect that would enable widespread commercial application of GaSb wafers for very long wavelength IR (VLWIR) applications is the capability for transmissivity beyond 15 m. Due largely to the GaSb (antisite) defect and other point defects in undoped GaSb substrates, intrinsic GaSb is still slightly p-type and strongly absorbs in the VLWIR. This requires backside thinning of the GaSb substrate for IR transmissivity. An extremely low n-type GaSb substrate is preferred to eliminate thinning and provide a substrate solution for backside illuminated VLWIR devices. By providing a more homogeneous radial distribution of the melt solute to suppress GaSb formation and controlling the cooling rate, ultra low doped n:GaSb has been achieved. This study examines the surface properties and IR transmission spectra of ultra low doped GaSb substrates at both room and low temperatures. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), homoepitaxy by MBE, and infrared Fourier transform (FTIR) analysis was implemented to examine material quality. As compared with standard low doped GaSb, the ultra low doped substrates show over 50% transmission and consistent wavelength transparency past 23 m with improved %T at low temperature. Homoepitaxy and AFM results indicate the ultra low doped GaSb has a low thermal desorbtion character and qualified morphology. In summary, improvements in room temperature IR transmission and extended wavelength characteristics have been shown consistently for ultra low doped n:GaSb substrates.

  8. IR Thermography NDE of ISS Radiator Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay; Winfree, William; Morton, Richard; Wilson, Walter; Reynolds, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The presentation covers an active and a passive infrared (IR) thermography for detection of delaminations in the radiator panels used for the International Space Station (ISS) program. The passive radiator IR data was taken by a NASA astronaut in an extravehicular activity (EVA) using a modified FLIR EVA hand-held camera. The IR data could be successfully analyzed to detect gross facesheet disbonds. The technique used the internal hot fluid tube as the heat source in analyzing the IR data. Some non-flight ISS radiators were inspected using an active technique of IR flash thermography to detect disbond of face sheet with honeycomb core, and debonds in facesheet overlap areas. The surface temperature and radiated heat emission from flight radiators is stable during acquisition of the IR video data. This data was analyzed to detect locations of unexpected surface temperature gradients. The flash thermography data was analyzed using derivative analysis and contrast evolutions. Results of the inspection are provided.

  9. Spatiotemporal response of crystals in x-ray Bragg diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri; Lindberg, Ryan

    2012-10-01

    The spatiotemporal response of crystals in x-ray Bragg diffraction resulting from excitation by an ultrashort, laterally confined x-ray pulse is studied theoretically. The theory presents an extension of the analysis in symmetric reflection geometry [R. R. Lindberg and Y. V. Shvyd’ko, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 15, 050706 (2012)PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.15.050706] to the generic case, which includes Bragg diffraction both in reflection (Bragg) and transmission (Laue) asymmetric scattering geometries. The spatiotemporal response is presented as a product of a crystal-intrinsic plane-wave spatiotemporal response function and an envelope function defined by the crystal-independent transverse profile of the incident beam and the scattering geometry. The diffracted wave fields exhibit amplitude modulation perpendicular to the propagation direction due to both angular dispersion and the dispersion due to Bragg’s law. The characteristic measure of the spatiotemporal response is expressed in terms of a few parameters: the extinction length, crystal thickness, Bragg angle, asymmetry angle, and the speed of light. Applications to self-seeding of hard x-ray free-electron lasers are discussed, with particular emphasis on the relative advantages of using either the Bragg or Laue scattering geometries. Intensity front inclination in asymmetric diffraction can be used to make snapshots of ultrafast processes with femtosecond resolution.

  10. Novel type of the elements of integrated diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minin, I. V.; Minin, O. V.; Shi, S.; Chen, C.; Mititu, J.; Prather, D.

    2006-05-01

    Novels diffractive element in the THz waveband offers the potential to realize novel types of devices for communications, sensing, integrated optics, networks, transmission lines, and so on. To this end, diffractive planar elements fabricated on non-flat surfaces make it possible to enrich the "pool of devices" for applications including integrated optics at different waveband, including THz, and to design elements with novel properties and potentials. This can be illustrated most clearly using as an example optical element such as that for optical polychromatic computers. For instance, the diffractive element discussed above can be used as a nonlinear device for polychromatic radiation or multiplexer or a focusing element with selectivity in the multimode regime. Frequency characteristics for such elements are determined by the extent of concavity (convexity) of the surface of the element and by the direction of incidence wave onto it. Therefore, when working on a wavelength λ is not equal to λ 0, the position of the focusing area in space (the amount of its displacement) and focusing properties should depend on the direction of incidence of the radiation. Hence, it is possible to distinguish between a signal incident on the "tip" of the element from that falling on its "base," simply by placing radiation receivers at the corresponding points in space. Thus, in this paper we will present detailed simulation results obtained using a parallel FDTD method and the application of the proposed device to focusing and frequency-selective properties of flat conical diffractive elements in THz waveband.

  11. The principles of laser beam control with polarization gratings introduced as diffractive waveplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nersisyan, S. R.; Tabiryan, N. V.; Steeves, D. M.; Kimball, B. R.

    2010-08-01

    The development history of polarization gratings (PGs), with origins in holography and Bragg gratings, accentuated and reinforced their perception as gratings. We highlight their nature as waveplates - diffractive waveplates (DWs) - and stress their family connection to vector vortex waveplates. This approach provides a straightforward understanding of the unusual properties of PGs, such as nearly 100% diffraction in thin material layers, the presence of only one diffraction order for a circularly polarized beam, wide diffraction bandwidth and the possibility of achromatic behavior. With technology being ripe for applications such as beam steering, and optical switching, we characterize the resistance of DWs to optical radiation, the effects of temperature and deformations. We also show that the boundary effects in the manufacturing process make it necessary to use substrates larger than the desired aperture of the DW. The multicomponent systems are discussed for developing normally transmissive switchable imaging systems, beam scanning, and achromatic diffraction.

  12. Femtosecond X-ray diffraction from two-dimensional protein crystals.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthias; Carlson, David B; Hunter, Mark S; Williams, Garth J; Messerschmidt, Marc; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Barty, Anton; Benner, W Henry; Chu, Kaiqin; Graf, Alexander T; Hau-Riege, Stefan P; Kirian, Richard A; Padeste, Celestino; Pardini, Tommaso; Pedrini, Bill; Segelke, Brent; Seibert, M Marvin; Spence, John C H; Tsai, Ching-Ju; Lane, Stephen M; Li, Xiao-Dan; Schertler, Gebhard; Boutet, Sebastien; Coleman, Matthew; Evans, James E

    2014-03-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns from two-dimensional (2-D) protein crystals obtained using femtosecond X-ray pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) are presented. To date, it has not been possible to acquire transmission X-ray diffraction patterns from individual 2-D protein crystals due to radiation damage. However, the intense and ultrafast pulses generated by an XFEL permit a new method of collecting diffraction data before the sample is destroyed. Utilizing a diffract-before-destroy approach at the Linac Coherent Light Source, Bragg diffraction was acquired to better than 8.5 Å resolution for two different 2-D protein crystal samples each less than 10 nm thick and maintained at room temperature. These proof-of-principle results show promise for structural analysis of both soluble and membrane proteins arranged as 2-D crystals without requiring cryogenic conditions or the formation of three-dimensional crystals.

  13. Crystal imperfections and Mott parameters of sprayed nanostructure IrO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanien, A. S.; A. Akl, Alaa

    2015-09-01

    Nano-crystalline iridium oxide thin films were obtained by a spray pyrolysis technique onto preheated glass substrates. X-ray diffraction reveals that IrO2 thin films were polycrystalline in the rutile structure with primitive tetragonal lattice and its preferential orientation were along the <110> and <101> directions. X-ray diffraction line profile analysis (XRDLPA) was used to assign microstructure and crystal imperfections of IrO2 thin films. Some important parameters such as crystallite size, microstrain, average residual stress, number of crystallite/cm2 and dislocation density were studied. The effects of deposition temperatures and solution concentrations on the microstructural and crystal defects were discussed. All estimated values were found to be dependent upon the growth parameters. Mott parameters, trapping state energy and potential barrier were investigated and studied for a defined thin film sample. This sample was selected because it has the suitable conditions for electrochromic applications.

  14. Ion irradiation of graphene on Ir(111): From trapping to blistering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbig, Charlotte; Åhlgren, E. Harriet; Valerius, Philipp; Schröder, Ulrike A.; Martínez-Galera, Antonio J.; Arman, Mohammad A.; Kotakoski, Jani; Knudsen, Jan; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Michely, Thomas

    Graphene grown epitaxially on Ir(111) is irradiated with low energy noble gas ions and the processes induced by atomic collision and subsequent annealing are analyzed using scanning tunneling microscopy, low energy electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron diffraction and thermal desorption spectroscopy. Upon room temperature ion irradiation graphene amorphizes and recovers its crystalline structure during annealing. The energetic noble gas projectiles are trapped with surprisingly high efficiency under the graphene cover up to extremely high temperatures beyond 1300K. The energy, angle, and ion species dependence of trapping are quantified. At elevated temperatures the trapped gas forms well developed and highly pressurized blisters under the graphene cover. We use molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio calculations to elucidate the trapping mechanism and its thermal robustness. Similar trapping and blistering are observed after ion irradiation of a single layer of hexagonal boron nitride on Ir(111) and we speculate on the generality of the observed phenomena.

  15. Asymmetric acoustic transmission in multiple frequency bands

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hong-xiang; Yuan, Shou-qi; Zhang, Shu-yi

    2015-11-23

    We report both experimentally and numerically that the multi-band device of the asymmetric acoustic transmission is realized by placing two periodic gratings with different periods on both sides of two brass plates immersed in water. The asymmetric acoustic transmission can exist in four frequency bands below 1500 kHz, which arises from the interaction between various diffractions from the two gratings and Lamb modes in the brass plates immersed in water. The results indicate that the device has the advantages of multiple band, broader bandwidth, and simpler structure. Our finding should have great potential applications in ultrasonic devices.

  16. Transmission of polarized light in skeletal muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuaib, Ali; Li, Xin; Yao, Gang

    2011-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to study polarized light transmission in fresh bovine skeletal muscle of varying thicknesses. Two-dimensional polarization-sensitive transmission images were acquired and analyzed using a numerical parametric fitting algorithm. The total transmittance intensity and degree-of-polarization were calculated for both central ballistic and surrounding scattering regions. Full Mueller matrix images were derived from the raw polarization images and the polar decomposition algorithm was applied to extract polarization parameters. The results suggest that polarized light propagation through skeletal muscle is affected by strong birefringence, diattenuation, multiple scattering induced depolarization and the sarcomere diffraction effect.

  17. HST WFC3/IR Calibration Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, Meredith; Brammer, Gabriel; Long, Knox S.; Pirzkal, Norbert; Ryan, Russell E.; McCullough, Peter R.; Baggett, Sylvia M.; Gosmeyer, Catherine; Bourque, Matthew; HST WFC3 Team

    2016-01-01

    We report on several improvements to the characterization, monitoring, and calibration of the HST WFC3/IR detector. The detector performance has remained overall stable since its installation during HST Servicing Mission 4 in 2009. We present an updated persistence model that takes into account effects of exposure time and spatial variations in persistence across the detector, new grism wavelength solutions and master sky images, and a new SPARS sample sequence. We also discuss the stability of the IR gain, the time evolution and photometric properties of IR "snowballs," and the effect of IR "blobs" on point-source photometry.

  18. Machined immersion grating with theoretically predicted diffraction efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yuji; Kobayashi, Naoto; Sarugaku, Yuki; Sukegawa, Takashi; Sugiyama, Shigeru; Kaji, Sayumi; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Kondo, Sohei; Yasui, Chikako; Kataza, Hirokazu; Nakagawa, Takao; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2015-06-01

    An immersion grating composed of a transmissive material with a high refractive index (n>2) is a powerful device for high-resolution spectroscopy in the infrared region. Although the original idea is attributed to Fraunhofer about 200 years ago, an immersion grating with high diffraction efficiency has never been realized due to the difficulty in processing infrared crystals that are mostly brittle. While anisotropic etching is one successful method for fabricating a fine groove pattern on Si crystal, machining is necessary for realizing the ideal groove shape on any kind of infrared crystal. In this paper, we report the realization of the first, to the best of our knowledge, machined immersion grating made of single-crystal CdZnTe with a high diffraction efficiency that is almost identical to that theoretically predicted by rigorous coupled-wave analysis.

  19. Rectangular Relief Diffraction Gratings for Coherent Lidar Beam Deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, H. J.; Dixit, S. N.; Shore, B. W.; Chambers, D. M.; Britten, J. A.; Kavaya, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    LIDAR systems require a light transmitting system for sending a laser light pulse into space and a receiving system for collecting the retro-scattered light, separating it from the outgoing beam and analyzing the received signal for calculating wind velocities. Currently, a shuttle manifested coherent LIDAR experiment called SPARCLE (SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment) includes a silicon wedge (or prism) in its design in order to deflect the outgoing beam 30 degrees relative to the incident direction. The intent of this paper is to present two optical design approaches that may enable the replacement of the optical wedge component (in future, larger aperture, post-SPARCLE missions) with a surface relief transmission diffraction grating. Such a grating could be etched into a lightweight, flat, fused quartz substrate. The potential advantages of a diffractive beam deflector include reduced weight, reduced power requirements for the driving scanning motor, reduced optical sensitivity to thermal gradients, and increased dynamic stability.

  20. Estimating the Size of Onion Epidermal Cells from Diffraction Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groff, Jeffrey R.

    2012-10-01

    Bioscience and premedical profession students are a major demographic served by introductory physics courses at many colleges and universities. Exposing these students to biological applications of physical principles will help them to appreciate physics as a useful tool for their future professions. Here I describe an experiment suitable for introductory physics where principles of wave optics are applied to probe the size of onion epidermal cells. The epidermis tissue is composed of cells of relatively uniform size and shape (Fig. 1) so the tissue acts like a one-dimensional transmission diffraction grating. The diffraction patterns generated when a laser beam passes through the tissue (Fig. 2) are analyzed and an estimate of the average width of individual onion epidermal cells is calculated. The results are compared to direct measurements taken using a light microscope. The use of microscopes and plant-cell tissue slides creates opportunities for cross-discipline collaboration between physics and biology instructors.