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Sample records for irbesartan suppressing atherosclerosis

  1. Macrophage EP4 deficiency increases apoptosis and suppresses early atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Babaev, Vladimir R.; Chew, Joshua D.; Ding, Lei; Davis, Sarah; Breyer, Matthew D.; Breyer, Richard M.; Oates, John A.; Fazio, Sergio; Linton, MacRae F.

    2009-01-01

    Prostagladin (PG) E2, a major product of activated macrophages, has been implicated in atherosclerosis and plaque rupture. The PGE2 receptors, EP2 and EP4, are expressed in atherosclerotic lesions and are known to inhibit apoptosis in cancer cells. To examine the roles of macrophage EP4 and EP2 in apoptosis and early atherosclerosis, fetal liver cell transplantation was used to generate LDLR−/− mice chimeric for EP2−/− or EP4−/− hematopoietic cells. After 8-weeks on a Western diet, EP4−/− → LDLR−/− mice, but not EP2−/− → LDLR−/− mice, had significantly reduced aortic atherosclerosis with increased apoptotic cells in the lesions. EP4−/− peritoneal macrophages had increased sensitivity to pro-apoptotic stimuli, including palmitic acid and free cholesterol loading, which was accompanied by suppression of activity of p-Akt, p-Bad and NF-kB-regulated genes. Thus, EP4 deficiency inhibits the PI3K/Akt and NF-kB pathways compromising macrophage survival and suppressing early atherosclerosis, identifying macrophage EP4 signaling pathways as molecular targets for modulating the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:19041765

  2. Suppression of atherosclerosis by synthetic REV-ERB agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaula, Sadichha; Billon, Cyrielle; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Solt, Laura A.; Burris, Thomas P.

    2015-05-08

    The nuclear receptors for heme, REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ, play important roles in the regulation of metabolism and inflammation. Recently it was demonstrated that reduced REV-ERBα expression in hematopoetic cells in LDL receptor null mice led to increased atherosclerosis. We sought to determine if synthetic REV-ERB agonists that we have developed might have the ability to suppress atherosclerosis in this model. A previously characterized synthetic REV-ERB agonist, SR9009, was used to determine if activation of REV-ERB activity would affect atherosclerosis in LDL receptor deficient mice. Atherosclerotic plaque size was significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in mice administered SR9009 (100 mg/kg) for seven weeks compared to control mice (n = 10 per group). SR9009 treatment of bone marrow-derived mouse macrophages (BMDM) reduced the polarization of BMDMs to proinflammatory M1 macrophage while increasing the polarization of BMDMs to anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Our results suggest that pharmacological targeting of REV-ERBs may be a viable therapeutic option for treatment of atherosclerosis. - Highlights: • Synthetic REV-ERB agonist treatment reduced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB decreased M1 macrophage polarization. • Pharmacological activation of REV-ERB increased M2 macrophage polarization.

  3. Atherosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Atherosclerosis? Español Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque ... problems, including heart attack , stroke , or even death. Atherosclerosis Figure A shows a normal artery with normal ...

  4. Atherosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up inside your arteries. Plaque is a sticky substance ... flow of oxygen-rich blood to your body. Atherosclerosis can lead to serious problems, including Coronary artery ...

  5. Atherosclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Atherosclerosis Updated:Jul 6,2015 View an animation of ... the arteries as you get older. How does atherosclerosis start and progress? It's a complex process. Exactly ...

  6. Apocynin suppresses the progression of atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice by inactivation of macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Takeshi; Ishii, Norio; Fukuda, Kazuki; Senokuchi, Takafumi; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Tatsuya; Taketa, Kayo; Kawasaki, Shuji; Hanatani, Satoko; Takeya, Motohiro; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► We examined the anti-athrogenic effect of apocynin in atherosclerotic model mice. ► Apocynin prevented atherosclerotic lesion formation. ► Apocynin suppressed ROS production in aorta and in macrophages. ► Apocynin suppressed cytokine expression and cell proliferation in macrophages. ► Apocynin may be beneficial compound for the prevention of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other proinflammatory substances by macrophages plays an important role in atherogenesis. Apocynin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-acetophenone), which is well known as a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, has anti-inflammatory effects including suppression of the generation of ROS. However, the suppressive effects of apocynin on the progression of atherosclerosis are not clearly understood. Thus, we investigated anti-atherosclerotic effects of apocynin using apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE{sup –/–}) mice in vivo and in mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. In atherosclerosis-prone apoE{sup –/–} mice, apocynin suppressed the progression of atherosclerosis, decreased 4-hydroxynonenal-positive area in atherosclerotic lesions, and mRNA expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in aorta. In mouse peritoneal macrophages, apocynin suppressed the Ox-LDL-induced ROS generation, mRNA expression of MCP-1, IL-6 and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and cell proliferation. Moreover, immunohistochemical studies revealed that apocynin decreased the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions of apoE{sup –/–} mice. These results suggested that apocynin suppressed the formation of atherosclerotic lesions, at least in part, by inactivation of macrophages. Therefore, apocynin may be a potential therapeutic material to prevent the progression of atherosclerosis.

  7. Niacin Suppresses Progression of Atherosclerosis by Inhibiting Vascular Inflammation and Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Gang; Sun, Guangli; Liu, Hai; Shu, Liliang; Zhang, Jingchao; Guo, Longhui; Huang, Chen; Xu, Jing

    2015-12-29

    BACKGROUND Niacin is a broad-spectrum lipid-regulating drug used for the clinical therapy of atherosclerosis; however, the mechanisms by which niacin ameliorates atherosclerosis are not clear. MATERIAL AND METHODS The effect of niacin on atherosclerosis was assessed by detection of atherosclerotic lesion area. Adhesion molecules in arterial endothelial cells were determined by using qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The levels of serum inflammatory cytokines in ApoE-/- mice were detected by using ELISA. We detected the expression levels of phosphorylated nuclear factors-kB (NF-κB) p65 in aortic endothelial cells of mice using Western blot analysis. Furthermore, we investigated the anti-inflammation effect and endothelium-protecting function of niacin and their regulatory mechanisms in vitro. RESULTS Niacin inhibited the progress of atherosclerosis and decreased the levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules in ApoE-/- mice. Niacin suppressed the activity of NF-κB and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Furthermore, niacin induced phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and FAK inhibitor PF-573228 reduced the level of Bcl-2 and elevated the level of cleaved caspase-3 in VSMCs. CONCLUSIONS Niacin inhibits vascular inflammation and apoptosis of VSMCs via inhibiting the NF-κB signaling and the FAK signaling pathway, respectively, thus protecting ApoE-/- mice against atherosclerosis.

  8. Irbesartan

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease, a heart attack, heart failure, stroke, kidney failure, loss of vision, and other problems. In addition ... if you have or have ever had heart failure, or kidney disease.tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding. ...

  9. Endothelial Dicer promotes atherosclerosis and vascular inflammation by miRNA-103-mediated suppression of KLF4

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Petra; Zhou, Zhe; Natarelli, Lucia; Wei, Yuanyuan; Nazari-Jahantigh, Maliheh; Zhu, Mengyu; Grommes, Jochen; Steffens, Sabine; Weber, Christian; Schober, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs regulate the maladaptation of endothelial cells (ECs) to naturally occurring disturbed blood flow at arterial bifurcations resulting in arterial inflammation and atherosclerosis in response to hyperlipidemic stress. Here, we show that reduced endothelial expression of the RNAse Dicer, which generates almost all mature miRNAs, decreases monocyte adhesion, endothelial C–X–C motif chemokine 1 (CXCL1) expression, atherosclerosis and the lesional macrophage content in apolipoprotein E knockout mice (Apoe−/−) after exposure to a high-fat diet. Endothelial Dicer deficiency reduces the expression of unstable miRNAs, such as miR-103, and promotes Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4)-dependent gene expression in murine atherosclerotic arteries. MiR-103 mediated suppression of KLF4 increases monocyte adhesion to ECs by enhancing nuclear factor-κB-dependent CXCL1 expression. Inhibiting the interaction between miR-103 and KLF4 reduces atherosclerosis, lesional macrophage accumulation and endothelial CXCL1 expression. Overall, our study suggests that Dicer promotes endothelial maladaptation and atherosclerosis in part by miR-103-mediated suppression of KLF4. PMID:26837267

  10. Endothelial Dicer promotes atherosclerosis and vascular inflammation by miRNA-103-mediated suppression of KLF4.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Petra; Zhou, Zhe; Natarelli, Lucia; Wei, Yuanyuan; Nazari-Jahantigh, Maliheh; Zhu, Mengyu; Grommes, Jochen; Steffens, Sabine; Weber, Christian; Schober, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs regulate the maladaptation of endothelial cells (ECs) to naturally occurring disturbed blood flow at arterial bifurcations resulting in arterial inflammation and atherosclerosis in response to hyperlipidemic stress. Here, we show that reduced endothelial expression of the RNAse Dicer, which generates almost all mature miRNAs, decreases monocyte adhesion, endothelial C-X-C motif chemokine 1 (CXCL1) expression, atherosclerosis and the lesional macrophage content in apolipoprotein E knockout mice (Apoe(-/-)) after exposure to a high-fat diet. Endothelial Dicer deficiency reduces the expression of unstable miRNAs, such as miR-103, and promotes Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4)-dependent gene expression in murine atherosclerotic arteries. MiR-103 mediated suppression of KLF4 increases monocyte adhesion to ECs by enhancing nuclear factor-κB-dependent CXCL1 expression. Inhibiting the interaction between miR-103 and KLF4 reduces atherosclerosis, lesional macrophage accumulation and endothelial CXCL1 expression. Overall, our study suggests that Dicer promotes endothelial maladaptation and atherosclerosis in part by miR-103-mediated suppression of KLF4. PMID:26837267

  11. Myeloid Acyl-CoA:Cholesterol Acyltransferase 1 Deficiency Reduces Lesion Macrophage Content and Suppresses Atherosclerosis Progression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Hao; Melton, Elaina M; Li, Haibo; Sohn, Paul; Rogers, Maximillian A; Mulligan-Kehoe, Mary Jo; Fiering, Steven N; Hickey, William F; Chang, Catherine C Y; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2016-03-18

    Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 1 (Acat1) converts cellular cholesterol to cholesteryl esters and is considered a drug target for treating atherosclerosis. However, in mouse models for atherosclerosis, global Acat1 knockout (Acat1(-/-)) did not prevent lesion development. Acat1(-/-) increased apoptosis within lesions and led to several additional undesirable phenotypes, including hair loss, dry eye, leukocytosis, xanthomatosis, and a reduced life span. To determine the roles of Acat1 in monocytes/macrophages in atherosclerosis, we produced a myeloid-specific Acat1 knockout (Acat1(-M/-M)) mouse and showed that, in the Apoe knockout (Apoe(-/-)) mouse model for atherosclerosis, Acat1(-M/-M) decreased the plaque area and reduced lesion size without causing leukocytosis, dry eye, hair loss, or a reduced life span. Acat1(-M/-M) enhanced xanthomatosis in apoe(-/-) mice, a skin disease that is not associated with diet-induced atherosclerosis in humans. Analyses of atherosclerotic lesions showed that Acat1(-M/-M) reduced macrophage numbers and diminished the cholesterol and cholesteryl ester load without causing detectable apoptotic cell death. Leukocyte migration analysis in vivo showed that Acat1(-M/-M) caused much fewer leukocytes to appear at the activated endothelium. Studies in inflammatory (Ly6C(hi)-positive) monocytes and in cultured macrophages showed that inhibiting ACAT1 by gene knockout or by pharmacological inhibition caused a significant decrease in integrin β 1 (CD29) expression in activated monocytes/macrophages. The sparse presence of lesion macrophages without Acat1 can therefore, in part, be attributed to decreased interaction between inflammatory monocytes/macrophages lacking Acat1 and the activated endothelium. We conclude that targeting ACAT1 in a myeloid cell lineage suppresses atherosclerosis progression while avoiding many of the undesirable side effects caused by global Acat1 inhibition.

  12. Myeloid Acyl-CoA:Cholesterol Acyltransferase 1 Deficiency Reduces Lesion Macrophage Content and Suppresses Atherosclerosis Progression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Hao; Melton, Elaina M; Li, Haibo; Sohn, Paul; Rogers, Maximillian A; Mulligan-Kehoe, Mary Jo; Fiering, Steven N; Hickey, William F; Chang, Catherine C Y; Chang, Ta-Yuan

    2016-03-18

    Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 1 (Acat1) converts cellular cholesterol to cholesteryl esters and is considered a drug target for treating atherosclerosis. However, in mouse models for atherosclerosis, global Acat1 knockout (Acat1(-/-)) did not prevent lesion development. Acat1(-/-) increased apoptosis within lesions and led to several additional undesirable phenotypes, including hair loss, dry eye, leukocytosis, xanthomatosis, and a reduced life span. To determine the roles of Acat1 in monocytes/macrophages in atherosclerosis, we produced a myeloid-specific Acat1 knockout (Acat1(-M/-M)) mouse and showed that, in the Apoe knockout (Apoe(-/-)) mouse model for atherosclerosis, Acat1(-M/-M) decreased the plaque area and reduced lesion size without causing leukocytosis, dry eye, hair loss, or a reduced life span. Acat1(-M/-M) enhanced xanthomatosis in apoe(-/-) mice, a skin disease that is not associated with diet-induced atherosclerosis in humans. Analyses of atherosclerotic lesions showed that Acat1(-M/-M) reduced macrophage numbers and diminished the cholesterol and cholesteryl ester load without causing detectable apoptotic cell death. Leukocyte migration analysis in vivo showed that Acat1(-M/-M) caused much fewer leukocytes to appear at the activated endothelium. Studies in inflammatory (Ly6C(hi)-positive) monocytes and in cultured macrophages showed that inhibiting ACAT1 by gene knockout or by pharmacological inhibition caused a significant decrease in integrin β 1 (CD29) expression in activated monocytes/macrophages. The sparse presence of lesion macrophages without Acat1 can therefore, in part, be attributed to decreased interaction between inflammatory monocytes/macrophages lacking Acat1 and the activated endothelium. We conclude that targeting ACAT1 in a myeloid cell lineage suppresses atherosclerosis progression while avoiding many of the undesirable side effects caused by global Acat1 inhibition. PMID:26801614

  13. Ginkgo suppresses atherosclerosis through downregulating the expression of connexin 43 in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Gong, Hui; Shi, Yi Jun; Zou, Yunzeng

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) EGb761 is widely used for cardiovascular prevention. Here, we investigated the effects of GBE on atherosclerotic lesion development in rabbits with a high-fat diet. Material and methods Forty New Zealand white male rabbits were randomly divided into four groups. The first two were the normal diet group (C) and the high-fat group (HF). The remaining two groups were those who received a high cholesterol diet supplemented with either the standard drug (simvastatin 2 mg/kg/day) or GBE (3 mg/kg/day). At 12 weeks, histopathological and chemical analyses were performed. Results Plasma lipid measurement showed that GBE inhibited high-fat diet-induced increase of serum triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) by 59.1% (0.9 ±0.2 4 mmol/l vs. 2.2 ±0.4 mmol/l), 18.2% (31.1 ±1.4 mmol/l vs. 38.0 ±0.4 mmol/l) and 15% (28.9 ±1.3 mmol/l vs. 34.0±1.0 mmol/l), respectively, at 12 weeks (p < 0.01). The en face Sudan IV-positive lesion area of the aorta in the GBE group (51.7 ±3.1%) was significantly lower compared with that in the HF group (88.2 ±2.2%; p < 0.01). The mean atherosclerotic lesion area of the GBE group was reduced by 53.2% compared with the HF group (p < 0.01). Immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis showed that GBE markedly suppressed high-fat diet-induced upregulation of connexin 43 (Cx43) in rabbits (p < 0.01). Conclusions Thus, our study revealed that GBE prevented atherosclerosis progress through modulating plasma lipid, suppressing atherosclerotic lesion development, and attenuating the expression of Cx43 protein. PMID:23671447

  14. MiR-129-5p-mediated Beclin-1 suppression inhibits endothelial cell autophagy in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Zhaohua; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Yiguan

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell injury and subsequent death play an essential role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Autophagy of endothelial cells antagonizes the development of atherosclerosis, whereas the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. MicroRNA-129-5p (miR-129-5p) is a well-defined tumor suppressorin some types of cancer, while it is unknown whether miR-129-5p may also play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. Here, we addressed this question in the current study. We examined the levels of endothelial cell autophagy in ApoE (-/-) mice suppled with high-fat diet (HFD), a mouse model for atherosclerosis (simplified as HFD mice). We analyzed the levels of Beclin-1 and the levels of miR-129-5p in the purified CD31+ endothelial cells from mouse aorta. Prediction of the binding between miR-129-5p and 3’-UTR of Beclin-1 mRNA was performed by bioinformatics analyses and confirmed by a dual luciferase reporter assay. The effects of miR-129-5p were further analyzed in an in vitro model using oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-treated human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). We found that HFD mice developed atherosclerosisin 12 weeks, while the control ApoE (-/-) mice that had received normal diet (simplified as CTL mice) did not. Compared to CTL mice, HFD mice had significantly lower levels of endothelial cell autophagy, resulting from decreases in Beclin-1 protein, but not mRNA. The decreases in Beclin-1 in endothelial cells were due to HFD-induced increases inmiR-129-5p, which suppressed the translation of Beclin-1 mRNA via 3’-UTR binding. These in vivo findings were reproduced in vitro on ox-LDL-treated HAECs. Together, these data suggest that upregulation of miR-129-5p by HFD may impair the protective effects of endothelial cell autophagy against development of atherosclerosis through suppressing protein translation of Beclin-1. PMID:27186312

  15. Protective Effect of Irisin on Atherosclerosis via Suppressing Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Induced Vascular Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuzhu; Mu, Qian; Zhou, Zheng; Song, Haibo; Zhang, Yuan; Wu, Fei; Jiang, Miao; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Wen; Li, Liang; Shao, Lei; Wang, Xingli; Li, Shiwu; Yang, Lijun; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Mingxiang; Tang, Dongqi

    2016-01-01

    Irisin, a newly discovered myokine, is considered as a promising candidate for the treatment of metabolic disturbances and cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, we used two animal models, apolipoprotein E-deficient mice fed on a high-cholesterol diet and a mouse carotid partial ligation model to test the anti-atherosclerotic effect of irisin. Irisin treatment (0.5 μg/g body weight/day) significantly reduced the severity of aortic atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice fed on a high-cholesterol diet and suppressed carotid neointima formation in a carotid partial ligation model. It was associated with decreased inflammation and cell apoptosis in aortic tissues. In addition, in a cell culture model, irisin restored ox-LDL-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell dysfunction by reducing the levels of inflammatory genes via inhibiting the reactive oxygen species (ROS)/ p38 MAPK/ NF-κB signaling pathway activation and inhibiting cell apoptosis via up-regulating Bcl-2 and down-regulating Bax and caspase-3 expression. Our study demonstrated that irisin significantly reduced atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice via suppressing ox-LDL-induced cell inflammation and apoptosis, which might have a direct therapeutic effect on atherosclerotic diseases. PMID:27355581

  16. Prevention of atherosclerosis by bioactive palmitoleate through suppression of organelle stress and inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Çimen, Ismail; Kocatürk, Begüm; Koyuncu, Seda; Tufanlı, Özlem; Onat, Umut I; Yıldırım, Asli D; Apaydın, Onur; Demirsoy, Şeyma; Aykut, Zaliha G; Nguyen, Uyen T; Watkins, Steven M; Hotamışlıgil, Gökhan S; Erbay, Ebru

    2016-09-28

    De novo lipogenesis (DNL), the conversion of glucose and other substrates to lipids, is often associated with ectopic lipid accumulation, metabolic stress, and insulin resistance, especially in the liver. However, organ-specific DNL can also generate distinct lipids with beneficial metabolic bioactivity, prompting a great interest in their use for the treatment of metabolic diseases. Palmitoleate (PAO), one such bioactive lipid, regulates lipid metabolism in liver and improves glucose utilization in skeletal muscle when it is generated de novo from the obese adipose tissue. We show that PAO treatment evokes an overall lipidomic remodeling of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes in macrophages and mouse tissues, which is associated with resistance of the ER to hyperlipidemic stress. By preventing ER stress, PAO blocks lipid-induced inflammasome activation in mouse and human macrophages. Chronic PAO supplementation also lowers systemic interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 concentrations in vivo in hyperlipidemic mice. Moreover, PAO prevents macrophage ER stress and IL-1β production in atherosclerotic plaques in vivo, resulting in a marked reduction in plaque macrophages and protection against atherosclerosis in mice. These findings demonstrate that oral supplementation with a product of DNL such as PAO can promote membrane remodeling associated with metabolic resilience of intracellular organelles to lipid stress and limit the progression of atherosclerosis. These findings support therapeutic PAO supplementation as a potential preventive approach against complex metabolic and inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, which warrants further studies in humans. PMID:27683551

  17. Suppressive effects of cacao polyphenols on the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Midori; Baba, Seigo

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies in humans have shown that the cacao polyphenols, (-)-epicatechin and its oligomers, prevent in vitro and ex vivo low-density lipoprotein oxidation mediated by free radical generators and metal ions and also reduce plasma LDL-cholesterol levels. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of cacao polyphenols on the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (-/-) mice. Mice aged 8 weeks (n = 90) were randomized into three groups, and fed either normal mouse chow (controls) or chow supplemented with 0.25 or 0.40 % cacao polyphenols for 16 weeks. The mean plaque area in cross-sections of the brachiocephalic trunk was measured and found to be lower in the 0.25 % cacao polyphenol group than in the control group (p < 0.05). Pathological observations showed that accumulation of cholesterol crystals in the plaque area was greater in the control group compared with the 0.40 % cacao polyphenol group (p < 0.05). Immunochemical staining in the 0.25 and 0.40 % groups showed that expression of the cell adhesion molecules (VCAM-1 and ICAM-1) and production of oxidative stress markers (4-hydroxynonenal, hexanoyl-lysine, and dityrosine) were reduced in cross-sections of the brachiocephalic trunk. These results suggest that cacao polyphenols inhibit the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (-/-) mice by reducing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. PMID:24374929

  18. Suppressive effects of cacao polyphenols on the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Midori; Baba, Seigo

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies in humans have shown that the cacao polyphenols, (-)-epicatechin and its oligomers, prevent in vitro and ex vivo low-density lipoprotein oxidation mediated by free radical generators and metal ions and also reduce plasma LDL-cholesterol levels. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of cacao polyphenols on the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (-/-) mice. Mice aged 8 weeks (n = 90) were randomized into three groups, and fed either normal mouse chow (controls) or chow supplemented with 0.25 or 0.40 % cacao polyphenols for 16 weeks. The mean plaque area in cross-sections of the brachiocephalic trunk was measured and found to be lower in the 0.25 % cacao polyphenol group than in the control group (p < 0.05). Pathological observations showed that accumulation of cholesterol crystals in the plaque area was greater in the control group compared with the 0.40 % cacao polyphenol group (p < 0.05). Immunochemical staining in the 0.25 and 0.40 % groups showed that expression of the cell adhesion molecules (VCAM-1 and ICAM-1) and production of oxidative stress markers (4-hydroxynonenal, hexanoyl-lysine, and dityrosine) were reduced in cross-sections of the brachiocephalic trunk. These results suggest that cacao polyphenols inhibit the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient (-/-) mice by reducing oxidative stress and inflammatory responses.

  19. Suppressive Impact of Anethum Graveolens Consumption on Biochemical Risk Factors of Atherosclerosis in Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Setorki, Mahbubeh; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Merikhi, Alireza; Heidarian, Esfandiar; Shahinfard, Najmeh; Ansari, Roya; Nasri, Hamid; Esmael, Nafiseh; Baradaran, Azar

    2013-01-01

    Background: We aimed to determine the effects of Anethum graveolens (Dill) powder on postprandial lipid profile, markers of oxidation and endothelial activation when added to a fatty meal. Methods: In an experimental study, 32 rabbits were randomly designated into four diet groups: normal diet, high cholesterol diet (1%), high cholesterol diet plus 5% (w/w) dill powder and high cholesterol diet plus lovastatin (10 mg/kg, bw). The concentrations of glucose, total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoproteins-cholesterol (LDL-C), alanine aminotransferase (alt), aspartate aminotransferase (ast), fibrinogen, factor VII, apolipoprotein B (ApoB), nitrite and nitrate were measured in blood samples following 15 h of fasting and 3 h after feeding. Results: Concurrent use of A. graveolens powder or lovastatin significantly decreased ALT, TC, glucose, fibrinogen and LDL-C values in comparison with hypercholesterolemic diet group (P < 0.05). Consumption of A. graveolens or lovastatin did not change factor VII, ApoB, nitrite and nitrate levels significantly in comparison with hypercholesterolemic diet group. Intake of A. graveolens significantly decreased serum AST compared to hypercholesterolemic diet. Conclusions: A. graveolens might have some protective values against atherosclerosis and that it significantly affects some biochemical risk factors of this disease. Our findings also confirm the potential harmful effects of oxidized fats and the importance of dietary polyphenols in the meal. PMID:24049614

  20. Cardiac protective effects of irbesartan via the PPAR-gamma signaling pathway in angiotensin-converting enzyme 2-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    and phosphorylated ERK1/2 were lower, and expression of PPARγ was higher in ACE2KO mice in response to irbesartan treatment, without affecting cardiac expression of PPARα, PPARδ, β-myosin heavy chain, TGFβ2 and fibronectin. Conclusions We conclude that irbesartan prevents ACE2 deficiency-mediated pathological hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis in ACE2 mutant mice via activation of the PPARγ signaling and suppression of the TGFβ−CTGF−ERK signaling, resulting in attenuation of myocardial injury. Drugs targeting ACE2 and PPARγ represent potential candidates to prevent and treat myocardial injury and related cardiac disorders. PMID:24067190

  1. Melatonin ameliorates vascular endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and atherosclerosis by suppressing the TLR4/NF-κB system in high-fat-fed rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ze-Ping; Fang, Xiao-Ling; Fang, Nan; Wang, Xiao-Bian; Qian, Hai-Yan; Cao, Zhong; Cheng, Yuan; Wang, Bang-Ning; Wang, Yuan

    2013-11-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) and inflammation contribute to the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Melatonin (MLT) normalizes lipid profile, improves endothelial function, and possesses anti-inflammatory properties. However, the precise mechanisms are still unclear. This study investigated whether MLT could ameliorate VED, inflammation, and atherosclerosis by suppressing the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) system in high-fat-fed rabbits. Rabbits were randomly divided into three groups that received a standard diet (control group), high-cholesterol diet (atherosclerosis group), or high-cholesterol diet plus 10 mg/kg/day MLT (MLT group) for 12 wk. After treatment, high-fat diet significantly increased serum lipid and inflammatory markers in rabbits in atherosclerosis group compared with that in control group. In addition, high-fat diet also induced VED and typical atherosclerotic plaque formation and increased intima/media thickness ratio, which were significantly improved by MLT therapy as demonstrated in MLT group. Histological and immunoblot analysis further showed that high-fat diet enhanced the expressions of TLR4, myeloid differentiation primary response protein (MyD88), and NF-κB p65, but decreased inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB) expression. By contrast, MLT therapy decreased the expressions of TLR4, MyD88, and NF-κB p65 and increased IκB expression. This study has demonstrated that MLT ameliorates lipid metabolism, VED, and inflammation and inhibits the progression of atherosclerosis in high-fat-fed rabbits. Moreover, our study indicates for the first time that suppression of the TLR4/NF-κB system in local vasculature with atherosclerotic damage is important for the protective effects of MLT. PMID:24006943

  2. Taurine and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Taurine is abundantly present in most mammalian tissues and plays a role in many important physiological functions. Atherosclerosis is the underlying mechanism of cardiovascular disease including myocardial infarctions, strokes and peripheral artery disease and remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Studies conducted in laboratory animal models using both genetic and dietary models of hyperlipidemia have demonstrated that taurine supplementation retards the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Epidemiological studies have also suggested that taurine exerts preventive effects on cardiovascular diseases. The present review focuses on the effects of taurine on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In addition, the potential mechanisms by which taurine suppress the development of atherosclerosis will be discussed.

  3. Sialic Acid-Binding Immunoglobulin-like Lectin G Promotes Atherosclerosis and Liver Inflammation by Suppressing the Protective Functions of B-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Sabrina; Hendrikx, Tim; Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Ozsvar-Kozma, Maria; Göderle, Laura; Mallat, Ziad; Witztum, Joseph L.; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; Nitschke, Lars; Binder, Christoph J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Atherosclerosis is initiated and sustained by hypercholesterolemia, which results in the generation of oxidized LDL (OxLDL) and other metabolic byproducts that trigger inflammation. Specific immune responses have been shown to modulate the inflammatory response during atherogenesis. The sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin G (Siglec-G) is a negative regulator of the functions of several immune cells, including myeloid cells and B-1 cells. Here, we show that deficiency of Siglec-G in atherosclerosis-prone mice inhibits plaque formation and diet-induced hepatic inflammation. We further demonstrate that selective deficiency of Siglec-G in B cells alone is sufficient to mediate these effects. Levels of B-1 cell-derived natural IgM with specificity for OxLDL were significantly increased in the plasma and peritoneal cavity of Siglec-G-deficient mice. Consistent with the neutralizing functions of OxLDL-specific IgM, Siglec-G-deficient mice were protected from OxLDL-induced sterile inflammation. Thus, Siglec-G promotes atherosclerosis and hepatic inflammation by suppressing protective anti-inflammatory effector functions of B cells. PMID:26947073

  4. Histone deacetylases and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xia-xia; Zhou, Tian; Wang, Xin-An; Tong, Xiao-hong; Ding, Jia-wang

    2015-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common pathological process that leads to cardiovascular diseases, a disease of large- and medium-sized arteries that is characterized by a formation of atherosclerotic plaques consisting of necrotic cores, calcified regions, accumulated modified lipids, smooth muscle cells (SMCs), endothelial cells, leukocytes, and foam cells. Recently, the question about how to suppress the occurrence of atherosclerosis and alleviate the progress of cardiovascular disease becomes the hot topic. Accumulating evidence suggests that histone deacetylases(HDACs) play crucial roles in arteriosclerosis. This review summarizes the effect of HDACs and HDAC inhibitors(HDACi) on the progress of atherosclerosis.

  5. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits the Development of Atherosclerosis with Suppressing CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Duojiao; Zhang, Alian; Gu, Ting; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Changqian

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide, as a novel gaseous mediator, has been suggested to play a key role in atherogenesis. However, the precise mechanisms by which H2S affects atherosclerosis remain unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the potential role of H2S in atherosclerosis and the underlying mechanism with respect to chemokines (CCL2, CCL5 and CX3CL1) and chemokine receptors (CCR2, CCR5, and CX3CR1) in macrophages. Mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 or mouse peritoneal macrophages were pre-incubated with saline or NaHS (50 µM, 100 µM, 200 µM), an H2S donor, and then stimulated with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It was found that NaHS dose-dependently inhibited IFN-γ or LPS-induced CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression, as well as CX3CR1-mediated chemotaxis in macrophages. Overexpression of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), an enzyme that catalyzes H2S biosynthesis resulted in a significant reduction in CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression as well as CX3CR1-mediated chemotaxis in stimulated macrophages. The inhibitory effect of H2S on CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression was mediated by modulation of proliferators-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) and NF-κB pathway. Furthermore, male apoE−/− mice were fed a high-fat diet and then randomly given NaHS (1 mg/kg, i.p., daily) or DL-propargylglycine (PAG, 10 mg/kg, i.p., daily). NaHS significantly inhibited aortic CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression and impeded aortic plaque development. NaHS had a better anti-atherogenic benefit when it was applied at the early stage of atherosclerosis. However, inhibition of H2S formation by PAG increased aortic CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression and exacerbated the extent of atherosclerosis. In addition, H2S had minimal effect on the expression of CCL2, CCL5, CCR2 and CCR5 in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, these data indicate that H2S hampers the progression of atherosclerosis in fat-fed apoE−/− mice and downregulates CX3CR1 and CX3CL1 expression on macrophages and in lesion

  6. Tanshinol suppresses endothelial cells apoptosis in mice with atherosclerosis via lncRNA TUG1 up-regulating the expression of miR-26a

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao; Cheng, Guangqing; Yang, Xiaoni; Li, Changsheng; Shi, Ran; Zhao, Ningning

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis is a crucial process for the development of atherosclerosis. Tanshinol is reported to protect vascular endothelia and attenuate the formation of atherosclerosis. However, the potential molecule mechanism of the protective role of tanshinol in atherosclerosis need to be further investigated. ApoE-/-mice were fed with a high-fat diet and treated with tanshinol to detect the effect of tanshinol on endothelial cells apoptosis with TUNEL staining assay. qRT-PCR and Western blot were performed to examine the expression of TUG1 and miR-26a in endothelial cells. RNA-binding protein immunoprecipitation assay was performed to verify the relationship between TUG1 and miR-26a. It has been shown that tanshinol reduced the aortic atherosclerotic lesion area in the entire aorta and aortic sinus in a concentration dependent manner, and suppressed the endothelial cells apoptosis in ApoE-/- mice. We further found that the mRNA level of TUG1 was reduced and the expression of miR-26a was up-regulated by tanshinol in endothelial cells. In addition, TUG1 down-regulated the expression of miR-26a in ECV304 cells. Finally, it was shown that overexpression of TUG1 removed the reversed effect of tanshinol on oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced endothelial cells apoptosis. Taken together, our study reveals that tanshinol could attenuate the endothelial cells apoptosis in atherosclerotic ApoE-/- mice. Moreover, low TUG1 expression and high level of miR-26a are associated with the endothelial protecting effect of tanshinol. PMID:27508018

  7. Atherosclerosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Atherosclerosis is a disease of the arteries in which fatty material is deposited in the vessel wall, ... muscle leads to symptoms such as chest pain. Atherosclerosis shows no symptoms until a complication occurs.

  8. Irbesartan increased PPAR{gamma} activity in vivo in white adipose tissue of atherosclerotic mice and improved adipose tissue dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Iwai, Masaru; Kanno, Harumi; Senba, Izumi; Nakaoka, Hirotomo; Moritani, Tomozo; Horiuchi, Masatsugu

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Atherosclerotic apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoEKO) mice were treated with irbesartan. {yields} Irbesartan decreased white adipose tissue weight without affecting body weight. {yields} DNA-binding for PPAR{gamma} was increased in white adipose tissue in vivo by irbesartan. {yields} Irbesartan increased adipocyte number in white adipose tissue. {yields} Irbesatan increased the expression of adiponectin and leptin in white adipose tissue. -- Abstract: The effect of the PPAR{gamma} agonistic action of an AT{sub 1} receptor blocker, irbesartan, on adipose tissue dysfunction was explored using atherosclerotic model mice. Adult male apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoEKO) mice at 9 weeks of age were treated with a high-cholesterol diet (HCD) with or without irbesartan at a dose of 50 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks. The weight of epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue was decreased by irbesartan without changing food intake or body weight. Treatment with irbesartan increased the expression of PPAR{gamma} in white adipose tissue and the DNA-binding activity of PPAR{gamma} in nuclear extract prepared from adipose tissue. The expression of adiponectin, leptin and insulin receptor was also increased by irbesartan. These results suggest that irbesartan induced activation of PPAR{gamma} and improved adipose tissue dysfunction including insulin resistance.

  9. MicroRNA-27 Prevents Atherosclerosis by Suppressing Lipoprotein Lipase-Induced Lipid Accumulation and Inflammatory Response in Apolipoprotein E Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hai-Peng; Gong, Duo; Lv, Yun-Cheng; Yao, Feng; He, Ping-Ping; Ouyang, Xin-Ping; Lan, Gang; Liu, Dan; Zhao, Zhen-Wang; Tan, Yu-Lin; Zheng, Xi-Long; Yin, Wei-Dong; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions are lipometabolic disorder characterized by chronic progressive inflammation in arterial walls. Previous studies have shown that macrophage-derived lipoprotein lipase (LPL) might be a key factor that promotes atherosclerosis by accelerating lipid accumulation and proinflammatory cytokine secretion. Increasing evidence indicates that microRNA-27 (miR-27) has beneficial effects on lipid metabolism and inflammatory response. However, it has not been fully understood whether miR-27 affects the expression of LPL and subsequent development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE KO) mice. To address these questions and its potential mechanisms, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-treated THP-1 macrophages were transfected with the miR-27 mimics/inhibitors and apoE KO mice fed high-fat diet were given a tail vein injection with miR-27 agomir/antagomir, followed by exploring the potential roles of miR-27. MiR-27 agomir significantly down-regulated LPL expression in aorta and peritoneal macrophages by western blot and real-time PCR analyses. We performed LPL activity assay in the culture media and found that miR-27 reduced LPL activity. ELISA showed that miR-27 reduced inflammatory response as analyzed in vitro and in vivo experiments. Our results showed that miR-27 had an inhibitory effect on the levels of lipid both in plasma and in peritoneal macrophages of apoE KO mice as examined by HPLC. Consistently, miR-27 suppressed the expression of scavenger receptors associated with lipid uptake in ox-LDL-treated THP-1 macrophages. In addition, transfection with LPL siRNA inhibited the miR-27 inhibitor-induced lipid accumulation and proinflammatory cytokines secretion in ox-LDL-treated THP-1 macrophages. Finally, systemic treatment revealed that miR-27 decreased aortic plaque size and lipid content in apoE KO mice. The present results provide evidence that a novel antiatherogenic role of miR-27 was closely related to reducing lipid

  10. 77 FR 1695 - Determination That AVALIDE (Hydrochlorothiazide and Irbesartan), Oral Tablets, 25 Milligrams/300...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... indicated for treatment of hypertension in patients whose blood pressure is not adequately controlled on monotherapy. AVALIDE is also indicated for initial therapy for hypertension in patients who are likely to need multiple drugs to achieve their blood pressure goals. AVALIDE (hydrochlorothiazide and irbesartan),...

  11. Imaging Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tarkin, Jason M.; Dweck, Marc R.; Evans, Nicholas R.; Takx, Richard A.P.; Brown, Adam J.; Tawakol, Ahmed; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in atherosclerosis imaging technology and research have provided a range of diagnostic tools to characterize high-risk plaque in vivo; however, these important vascular imaging methods additionally promise great scientific and translational applications beyond this quest. When combined with conventional anatomic- and hemodynamic-based assessments of disease severity, cross-sectional multimodal imaging incorporating molecular probes and other novel noninvasive techniques can add detailed interrogation of plaque composition, activity, and overall disease burden. In the catheterization laboratory, intravascular imaging provides unparalleled access to the world beneath the plaque surface, allowing tissue characterization and measurement of cap thickness with micrometer spatial resolution. Atherosclerosis imaging captures key data that reveal snapshots into underlying biology, which can test our understanding of fundamental research questions and shape our approach toward patient management. Imaging can also be used to quantify response to therapeutic interventions and ultimately help predict cardiovascular risk. Although there are undeniable barriers to clinical translation, many of these hold-ups might soon be surpassed by rapidly evolving innovations to improve image acquisition, coregistration, motion correction, and reduce radiation exposure. This article provides a comprehensive review of current and experimental atherosclerosis imaging methods and their uses in research and potential for translation to the clinic. PMID:26892971

  12. What Causes Atherosclerosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Atherosclerosis? The exact cause of atherosclerosis isn't known. ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  13. How Is Atherosclerosis Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Atherosclerosis Treated? Treatments for atherosclerosis may include heart-healthy ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  14. Nanoparticle-Mediated Delivery of Irbesartan Induces Cardioprotection from Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Antagonizing Monocyte-Mediated Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Yasuhiro; Matoba, Tetsuya; Tokutome, Masaki; Funamoto, Daiki; Katsuki, Shunsuke; Ikeda, Gentaro; Nagaoka, Kazuhiro; Ishikita, Ayako; Nakano, Kaku; Koga, Jun-ichiro; Sunagawa, Kenji; Egashira, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury limits the therapeutic effect of early reperfusion therapy for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), in which the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes plays a causative role. Here we develop bioabsorbable poly-lactic/glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticles incorporating irbesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ agonistic effect (irbesartan-NP). In a mouse model of IR injury, intravenous PLGA nanoparticles distribute to the IR myocardium and monocytes in the blood and in the IR heart. Single intravenous treatment at the time of reperfusion with irbesartan-NP (3.0 mg kg−1 irbesartan), but not with control nanoparticles or irbesartan solution (3.0 mg kg−1), inhibits the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to the IR heart, and reduces the infarct size via PPARγ-dependent anti-inflammatory mechanisms, and ameliorates left ventricular remodeling 21 days after IR. Irbesartan-NP is a novel approach to treat myocardial IR injury in patients with AMI. PMID:27403534

  15. Nanoparticle-Mediated Delivery of Irbesartan Induces Cardioprotection from Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Antagonizing Monocyte-Mediated Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Yasuhiro; Matoba, Tetsuya; Tokutome, Masaki; Funamoto, Daiki; Katsuki, Shunsuke; Ikeda, Gentaro; Nagaoka, Kazuhiro; Ishikita, Ayako; Nakano, Kaku; Koga, Jun-Ichiro; Sunagawa, Kenji; Egashira, Kensuke

    2016-07-01

    Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury limits the therapeutic effect of early reperfusion therapy for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), in which the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes plays a causative role. Here we develop bioabsorbable poly-lactic/glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticles incorporating irbesartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker with a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ agonistic effect (irbesartan-NP). In a mouse model of IR injury, intravenous PLGA nanoparticles distribute to the IR myocardium and monocytes in the blood and in the IR heart. Single intravenous treatment at the time of reperfusion with irbesartan-NP (3.0 mg kg‑1 irbesartan), but not with control nanoparticles or irbesartan solution (3.0 mg kg‑1), inhibits the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to the IR heart, and reduces the infarct size via PPARγ-dependent anti-inflammatory mechanisms, and ameliorates left ventricular remodeling 21 days after IR. Irbesartan-NP is a novel approach to treat myocardial IR injury in patients with AMI.

  16. Efficacy and safety of irbesartan/HCTZ combination therapy as initial treatment for rapid control of severe hypertension.

    PubMed

    Neutel, Joel M; Franklin, Stanley S; Oparil, Suzanne; Bhaumik, Amitabha; Ptaszynska, Agata; Lapuerta, Pablo

    2006-12-01

    Severe hypertension is difficult to control. This prospective, randomized, double-blind, active-controlled, multicenter trial compared efficacy and safety of once-daily irbesartan/hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) combination therapy with irbesartan monotherapy in severe hypertension. Patients who were untreated or uncontrolled on monotherapy (seated diastolic blood pressure [BP] > or =110 mm Hg) received fixed-dose irbesartan 150 mg/HCTZ 12.5 mg combination therapy for 7 weeks, force-titrated to irbesartan 300 mg/HCTZ 25 mg at week 1 (n=468); or irbesartan 150 mg monotherapy, force-titrated to 300 mg at week 1 (n=269). Significantly more patients on combination therapy achieved seated diastolic BP <90 mm Hg at week 5 (primary end point) compared with monotherapy recipients (47.2% vs 33.2%; P=.0005). Likewise, significantly more patients attained goals per the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7) (<140/90 mm Hg) at week 5 (34.6% vs 19.2%, respectively; P<.0001), while the mean difference between combination and monotherapy in seated diastolic BP and seated systolic BP was 4.7 mm Hg and 9.7 mm Hg (P<.0001). Greater and more rapid BP reduction with irbesartan/HCTZ was achieved without additional side effects. PMID:17170610

  17. Naringenin and atherosclerosis: a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Ilkay E; Nabavi, Seyed F; Daglia, Maria; Tenore, Gian C; Mansouri, Kowsar; Nabavi, Seyed M

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease mainly caused by deposition of low-density lipoprotein (LD) cholesterol in macrophages of arterial walls. Atherosclerosis leads to heart attacks as well as stroke. Epidemiological studies showed that there is an inverse correlation between fruit and vegetable consumption and the risk of atherosclerosis. The promising effect of high vegetable and fruit containing diet on atherosclerosis is approved by several experimental studies on isolated phytochemicals such as flavonoids. Flavonoids are known to up-regulate endogenous antioxidant system, suppress oxidative and nitrosative stress, decrease macrophage oxidative stress through cellular oxygenase inhibition as well as interaction with several signal transduction pathways and from these ways, have therapeutic effects against atherosclerosis. Naringenin is a well known flavonoid belonging to the chemical class of flavanones. It is especially abundant in citrus fruits, especially grapefruits. A plethora of evidences ascribes to naringenin antiatherosclerotic effects. Naringenin abilities to decrease LDL and triglycerides as well as inhibit glucose uptake; increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL); co-oxidation of NADH; suppress protein oxidation; protect against intercellular adhesion molecule-1(ICAM-1); suppress macrophage inflammation; inhibit leukotriene B4, monocyte adhesion and foam cell formation; induce of HO-1 and G 0/G 1 cell cycle arrest in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and down regulate atherosclerosis related genes are believed to have crucial role in the promising role against atherosclerosis. In the present review, we have summarized the available literature data on the anti-atherosclerotic effects of naringenin and its possible mechanisms of action.

  18. [Irbesartan reduces inflammatory response of central nervous system in a rat model of fluid percussion brain injury].

    PubMed

    Xing, Guoxiang; Wei, Min; Xiu, Binhua; Ma, Yinghui; Liu, Tao

    2016-07-01

    Objective To investigate the neuroprotective effect of the angiotensin II receptor 1 (AT1) antagonist irbesartan on rat models with lateral fluid percussion brain injury (FPBI). Methods FPBI models were prepared using a modified fluid percussion injury method. Before and after modeling, irbesartan was given to the rats. The regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was monitored by laser Doppler flowmetry. Neurologic status was evaluated before and 1, 3, 5, 7 days after FPBI surgery. Brains were removed for immunohistochemical evaluation of active microglias and macrophages. Results Compared to sham group, the rCBF and neurologic score of FPBI rats decreased significantly, while microglia and macrophage activation were confirmed. Treatment with irbesartan before FPBI surgery increased rCBF and improved neurological functions. In the peri-infarct cortex, irbesartan treatment attenuated the invasion of activated microglias and macrophages on day 7 after FPBI surgery. Conclusion Irbesartan can play a neuroprotective role through inhibiting microglia and macrophage activation in FPBI rats. PMID:27363272

  19. Atherosclerosis and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stroke When the Beat is Off - Atrial Fibrillation Atherosclerosis and Stroke How Cardiovascular & Stroke Risks Relate Problems ... of LDL cholesterol contribute to the development of atherosclerosis as the cholesterol is deposited in artery walls, ...

  20. Postmortem Study of Validation of Low Signal on Fat-Suppressed T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging as Marker of Lipid Core in Middle Cerebral Artery Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Jie; Zhao, Hai-Lu; Niu, Chun-Bo; Zhang, Bing; Xu, Yun; Wong, Ka-Sing; Ng, Ho-Keung

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— High signal on T1-weighted fat-suppressed images in middle cerebral artery plaques on ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging was verified to be intraplaque hemorrhage histologically. However, the underlying plaque component of low signal on T1-weighted fat-suppressed images (LST1) has never been explored. Based on our experience, we hypothesized that LST1 might indicate the presence of lipid core within intracranial plaques. Methods— 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging was performed in the postmortem brains to scan the cross sections of bilateral middle cerebral arteries. Then middle cerebral artery specimens were removed for histology processing. LST1 presence was identified on magnetic resonance images, and lipid core areas were measured on the corresponding histology sections. Results— Total 76 middle cerebral artery locations were included for analysis. LST1 showed a high specificity (96.9%; 95% confidence interval, 82.0%–99.8%) but a low sensitivity (38.6%; 95% confidence interval, 24.7%–54.5%) for detecting lipid core of all areas. However, the sensitivity increased markedly (81.2%; 95% confidence interval, 53.7%–95.0%) when only lipid cores of area ≥0.80 mm2 were included. Mean lipid core area was 5× larger in those with presence of LST1 than in those without (1.63±1.18 mm2 versus 0.32±0.31 mm2; P=0.003). Conclusions— LST1 is a promising imaging biomarker of identifying intraplaque lipid core, which may be useful to distinguish intracranial atherosclerotic disease from other intracranial vasculopathies and to assess plaque vulnerability for risk stratification of patients with intracranial atherosclerotic disease. In vivo clinical studies are required to explore the correlation between LST1 and clinical outcomes of patients with intracranial atherosclerotic disease. PMID:27462119

  1. [AII antagonists (candesartan and irbesartan) in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Spinar, J; Vítovec, J

    2012-10-01

    Treatment of hypertension with angiotensin II receptor antagonists (AIIA) was first limited to diabetics and patients with microalbuminuria. So far, results of several large clinical trials with AIIAs were published, confirming significant renoprotective effect of these agents compared to placebo (RENAAL and IRMA), amlodipin (MARVAL and IDNT) and a combination of ACEI and AIIA (CALM). In 2002, results of 2 large comparator studies in hypertension were published: LIFE - Losartan Intervention For Endpoints and SCOPE - the Study on COgnition and Prognosis in Elderly hypertensives. In 2003, a series of the CHARM studies involving patients with heart failure were published and, from than, AIIA have been used as an alternative to ACEI or in a combination with ACEI. MOSES study - Morbidity and mortality after stroke, eprosartan compared with nitrendipine for secondary prevention - results were published in 2005 and ONTARGET study, focusing on secondary prevention of ischemic heart disease, was published in 2008. The CORD study - Comparison of recommended doses - and the ACTIVE I study (AF Clopidogrel Trial with Irbesartan for prevention of Vascular Events) were published in 2009. Candesartan was used in the CALM, SCOPE, RESOLVED and CHARM studies, irbesartan in the IRMA, IDNT and ACTIVE I. PMID:23121062

  2. Vinpocetine attenuates lipid accumulation and atherosclerosis formation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yujun; Li, Jian-Dong; Yan, Chen

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Vinpocetine attenuates hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. •Vinpocetine antagonizes ox-LDL uptake and accumulation in macrophages. •Vinpocetine blocks the induction of ox-LDL receptor LOX-1 in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis, the major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, is a chronic arterial disease characterized by lipid deposition and inflammation in the vessel wall. Cholesterol, in low-density lipoprotein (LDL), plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. Recent study indicated that vinpocetine is a potent anti-inflammatory agent. However, its role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis remains unexplored. In the present study, we show that vinpocetine significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion formation in ApoE knockout mice fed with a high-fat diet. In cultured murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, vinpocetine markedly attenuated oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) uptake and foam cell formation. Moreover, vinpocetine greatly blocked the induction of ox-LDL receptor 1 (LOX-1) in cultured macrophages as well as in the LOX-1 level in atherosclerotic lesions. Taken together, our data reveal a novel role of vinpocetine in reduction of pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, at least partially through suppressing LOX-1 signaling pathway. Given the excellent safety profile of vinpocetine, this study suggests vinpocetine may be a therapeutic candidate for treating atherosclerosis.

  3. Arsenic and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Simeonova, Petia P; Luster, Michael I

    2004-08-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a correlation between environmental or occupational arsenic exposure and a risk of vascular diseases related to atherosclerosis. Studies summarized in this review suggest that arsenic induces endothelial dysfunction, including inflammatory and coagulating activity as well as impairs nitric oxide (NO) balance. This may provide the pathophysiological basis for atherogenic potential of arsenic. Consistent with these data, arsenic accelerates atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E (ApoE) deficient mice, a model of human atherosclerosis.

  4. Genetic Variation and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Biros, Erik; Karan, Mirko; Golledge, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    A family history of atherosclerosis is independently associated with an increased incidence of cardiovascular events. The genetic factors underlying the importance of inheritance in atherosclerosis are starting to be understood. Genetic variation, such as mutations or common polymorphisms has been shown to be involved in modulation of a range of risk factors, such as plasma lipoprotein levels, inflammation and vascular calcification. This review presents examples of present studies of the role of genetic polymorphism in atherosclerosis. PMID:19424482

  5. Response to angiotensin blockade with irbesartan in a patient with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jones, M. R.; Schrader, K. A.; Shen, Y.; Pleasance, E.; Ch'ng, C.; Dar, N.; Yip, S.; Renouf, D. J.; Schein, J. E.; Mungall, A. J.; Zhao, Y.; Moore, R.; Ma, Y.; Sheffield, B. S.; Ng, T.; Jones, S. J. M.; Marra, M. A.; Laskin, J.; Lim, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background A patient suffering from metastatic colorectal cancer, treatment-related toxicity and resistance to standard chemotherapy and radiation was assessed as part of a personalized oncogenomics initiative to derive potential alternative therapeutic strategies. Patients and methods Whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing was used to interrogate a metastatic tumor refractory to standard treatments of a patient with mismatch repair-deficient metastatic colorectal cancer. Results Integrative genomic analysis indicated overexpression of the AP-1 transcriptional complex suggesting experimental therapeutic rationales, including blockade of the renin–angiotensin system. This led to the repurposing of the angiotensin II receptor antagonist, irbesartan, as an anticancer therapy, resulting in the patient experiencing a dramatic and durable response. Conclusions This case highlights the utility of comprehensive integrative genomic profiling and bioinformatics analysis to provide hypothetical rationales for personalized treatment options. PMID:27022066

  6. Obesity, inflammation, and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Viviane Z; Libby, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Understanding of the pathophysiology of atherogenesis has evolved substantially during the last few decades. Atherosclerosis was once identified as a lipid-storage disease, but is now recognized as a subacute inflammatory condition of the vessel wall, characterized by infiltration of macrophages and T cells, which interact with one another and with cells of the arterial wall. The pathological mechanisms of obesity recapitulate many features of the inflammatory processes at work in atherosclerosis. Our current appreciation of the similarities between obesity and atherosclerosis has already fostered innovations for the diagnosis, prognosis, and prevention of these two conditions.

  7. [Epigenetics in atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Guardiola, Montse; Vallvé, Joan C; Zaina, Silvio; Ribalta, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The association studies based on candidate genes carried on for decades have helped in visualizing the influence of the genetic component in complex diseases such as atherosclerosis, also showing the interaction between different genes and environmental factors. Even with all the knowledge accumulated, there is still some way to go to decipher the individual predisposition to disease, and if we consider the great influence that environmental factors play in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, epigenetics is presented as a key element in trying to expand our knowledge on individual predisposition to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Epigenetics can be described as the discipline that studies the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, independent of changes in the sequence of DNA, and mostly induced by environmental factors. This review aims to describe what epigenetics is and how epigenetic mechanisms are involved in atherosclerosis.

  8. Infection and Atherosclerosis Development

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Lee Ann; Rosenfeld, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease hallmarked by chronic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and lipid accumulation in the vasculature. Although lipid modification and deposition are thought to be a major source of the continuous inflammatory stimulus, a large body of evidence suggests that infectious agents may contribute to atherosclerotic processes. This could occur by either direct effects through infection of vascular cells and/or through indirect effects by induction of cytokine and acute phase reactant proteins by infection at other sites. Multiple bacterial and viral pathogens have been associated with atherosclerosis by seroepidemiological studies, identification of the infectious agent in human atherosclerotic tissue, and experimental studies demonstrating an acceleration of atherosclerosis following infection in animal models of atherosclerosis. This review will focus on those infectious agents for which biological plausibility has been demonstrated in animal models and on the challenges of proving a role of infection in human atherosclerotic disease. PMID:26004263

  9. How Is Atherosclerosis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... sign that you're at risk for atherosclerosis. EKG (Electrocardiogram) An EKG is a simple, painless test that detects and ... beating and its rhythm (steady or irregular). An EKG also records the strength and timing of electrical ...

  10. Prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis with flaxseed-derived compound secoisolariciresinol diglucoside.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kailash; Jadhav, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of coronary artery disease, heart attack, strokes, and peripheral vascular disease. Alternative/complimentary medicines, although are unacceptable by medical community, may be of great help in suppression, slowing of progression and regression of atherosclerosis. Numerous natural products are in use for therapy in spite of lack of evidence. This paper discusses the basic mechanism of atherosclerosis, risk factors for atherosclerosis, and prevention, slowing of progression and regression of atherosclerosis with flaxseed-derived secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG). SDG content of flaxseed varies from 6mg/g to 18 mg/g. Flaxseed is the richest source of SDG. SDG possesses antioxidant, antihypertensive, antidiabetic, hypolipidemic, anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic activities. SDG content of some commonly used food has been described. SDG in very low dose (15 mg/ kg) suppressed the development of hypercholesterolemic atherosclerosis by 73 % and this effect was associated with reduction in serum total cholesterol, LDL-C, and oxidative stress, and an increase in the levels HDL-C. A summary of the effects of flaxseed and its components on hypercholesterolemic atherosclerosis has been provided. Reduction in hypercholesterolemic atherosclerosis by flaxseed, CDC-flaxseed, flaxseed oil, flax lignan complex and SDG are 46 %, 69 %, 0 %, 34 % and 73 % respectively in dietary cholesterol -induced rabbit model of atherosclerosis. SDG slows the progression of atherosclerosis in animal model. Long-term use of SDG regresses hypercholesterolemic atherosclerosis. It is interesting that regular diet following high cholesterol diet accelerates in this animal model of atherosclerosis. In conclusion SDG suppresses, slow the progression and regresses the atherosclerosis. It could serve as an alternative medicine for the prevention, slowing of progression and regression of atherosclerosis and hence for the treatment of coronary artery disease

  11. Prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis with flaxseed-derived compound secoisolariciresinol diglucoside.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kailash; Jadhav, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of coronary artery disease, heart attack, strokes, and peripheral vascular disease. Alternative/complimentary medicines, although are unacceptable by medical community, may be of great help in suppression, slowing of progression and regression of atherosclerosis. Numerous natural products are in use for therapy in spite of lack of evidence. This paper discusses the basic mechanism of atherosclerosis, risk factors for atherosclerosis, and prevention, slowing of progression and regression of atherosclerosis with flaxseed-derived secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG). SDG content of flaxseed varies from 6mg/g to 18 mg/g. Flaxseed is the richest source of SDG. SDG possesses antioxidant, antihypertensive, antidiabetic, hypolipidemic, anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic activities. SDG content of some commonly used food has been described. SDG in very low dose (15 mg/ kg) suppressed the development of hypercholesterolemic atherosclerosis by 73 % and this effect was associated with reduction in serum total cholesterol, LDL-C, and oxidative stress, and an increase in the levels HDL-C. A summary of the effects of flaxseed and its components on hypercholesterolemic atherosclerosis has been provided. Reduction in hypercholesterolemic atherosclerosis by flaxseed, CDC-flaxseed, flaxseed oil, flax lignan complex and SDG are 46 %, 69 %, 0 %, 34 % and 73 % respectively in dietary cholesterol -induced rabbit model of atherosclerosis. SDG slows the progression of atherosclerosis in animal model. Long-term use of SDG regresses hypercholesterolemic atherosclerosis. It is interesting that regular diet following high cholesterol diet accelerates in this animal model of atherosclerosis. In conclusion SDG suppresses, slow the progression and regresses the atherosclerosis. It could serve as an alternative medicine for the prevention, slowing of progression and regression of atherosclerosis and hence for the treatment of coronary artery disease

  12. Who Is at Risk for Atherosclerosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for Atherosclerosis? The exact cause of atherosclerosis isn't known. ... role in atherosclerosis risk. Other Factors That Affect Atherosclerosis Other factors also may raise your risk for ...

  13. Formulation and development of a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system of irbesartan

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jaydeep; Patel, Anjali; Raval, Mihir; Sheth, Navin

    2011-01-01

    Irbesartan (IRB) is an angiotensin II receptor blocker antihypertensive agent. The aim of the present investigation was to develop a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) to enhance the oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble IRB. The solubility of IRB in various oils was determined to identify the oil phase of SNEDDS. Various surfactants and co-surfactants were screened for their ability to emulsify the selected oil. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were constructed to identify the efficient self-emulsifying region. The optimized SNEDDS formulation contained IRB (75 mg), Cremophor® EL (43.33%), Carbitol® (21.67%) and Capryol® 90 (32%). SNEDDS was further evaluated for its percentage transmittance, emulsification time, drug content, phase separation, dilution, droplet size and zeta potential. The optimized formulation of IRB-loaded SNEDDS exhibited complete in vitro drug release in 15 min as compared with the plain drug, which had a limited dissolution rate. It was also compared with the pure drug solution by oral administration in male Wister rats. The in vivo study exhibited a 7.5-fold increase in the oral bioavailability of IRB from SNEDDS compared with the pure drug solution. These results suggest the potential use of SNEDDS to improve dissolution and oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble IRB. PMID:22171286

  14. Animal Models of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Getz, Godfrey S.; Reardon, Catherine A.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that is the underlying cause of most cardiovascular disease. Both cells of the vessel wall and cells of the immune system participate in atherogenesis. This process is heavily influenced by plasma lipoproteins, genetics and the hemodynamics of the blood flow in the artery. A variety of small and large animal models have been used to study the atherogenic process. No model is ideal as each has its own advantages and limitations with respect to manipulation of the atherogenic process and modeling human atherosclerosis or lipoprotein profile. Useful large animal models include pigs, rabbits and non-human primates. Due in large part to the relative ease of genetic manipulation and the relatively short time frame for the development of atherosclerosis, murine models are currently the most extensively used. While not all aspects of murine atherosclerosis are identical to humans, studies using murine models have suggested potential biological processes and interactions that underlie this process. As it becomes clear that different factors may influence different stages of lesion development, the use of mouse models with the ability to turn on or delete proteins or cells in tissue specific and temporal manner will be very valuable. PMID:22383700

  15. Noncoding RNAs and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Binod; Rotllan, Noemi; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) represent a class of RNA molecules that typically do not code for proteins. Emerging data suggest that ncRNAs play an important role in several physiological and pathological conditions such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. The best-characterized ncRNAs are the microRNAs which are small, approximately 22-nucleotide sequences of RNA that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level through transcript degradation or translational repression. MicroRNAs control several aspects of atherosclerosis, including endothelial cell, vascular smooth cell, and macrophage functions as well as lipoprotein metabolism. Apart from microRNAs, recently ncRNAs, especially long ncRNAs, have emerged as important potential regulators of the progression of atherosclerosis. However, the molecular mechanism of their regulation and function as well as the significance of other ncRNAs such as small nucleolar RNAs during atherogenesis is largely unknown. In this review, we summarize the recent findings in the field, highlighting the importance of ncRNAs in atherosclerosis and discuss their potential use as therapeutic targets in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24623179

  16. Atherosclerosis, diabetes and lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Tomkin, Gerald H

    2010-07-01

    The enormous burden of vascular disease is likely to expand rapidly as sedentary obesity and diabetes increase. Although cholesterol plays a major role in atherosclerosis and LDL is the major carrier of cholesterol in the blood, the importance of the postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins in the development of atherosclerosis is gaining recognition. The role of HDL-cholesterol is also receiving more attention. These changes have been forced upon us by the realization that statins, which primarily lower LDL-cholesterol, only reduce the risk of atherosclerosis by 30%, suggesting that 70% of the risk still has to be explained and treated. In diabetes, abnormality in the metabolism of the triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and the inter-relationship with HDL-cholesterol appears to be of primary importance in atherosclerotic risk. Postprandial studies are difficult to carry out, which is one reason why large studies have not so far been performed. The important new findings in chylomicron metabolism suggest new treatments for the future.

  17. Atherosclerosis induced by arsenic in drinking water in rats through altering lipid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Tain-Junn; Chuu, Jiunn-Jye; Chang, Chia-Yu; Tsai, Wan-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Jung; Guo, How-Ran

    2011-10-15

    Arsenic in drinking water is a global environmental health problem, and the exposure may increase cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases mortalities, most likely through causing atherosclerosis. However, the mechanism of atherosclerosis formation after arsenic exposure is still unclear. To study the mechanism of atherosclerosis formation after arsenic exposure and explore the role of high cholesterol diet (HCD) in this process, we fed spontaneous hypertensive rats and Wistar Kyoto rats with basal diet or HCD and provided with them drinking water containing arsenic at different ages and orders for 20 consecutive weeks. We measured high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol, triglycerides, heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70), and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) at predetermined intervals and determined expressions of cholesteryl ester transfer protein-1 (CETP-1) and liver X receptor {beta} (LXR{beta}) in the liver. Atherosclerosis was determined by examining the aorta with hematoxylin and eosin stain. After 20 weeks, we found arsenic, alone or combined with HCD, may promote atherosclerosis formation with transient increases in HSP 70 and hs-CRP. Early combination exposure decreased the HDL-C/LDL-C ratio without changing the levels of total cholesterol and triglyceride until 30 weeks old. Both CETP-1 and LXR{beta} activities were suppressed, most significantly in early combination exposure. In conclusion, arsenic exposure may induce atherosclerosis through modifying reverse cholesterol transport in cholesterol metabolism and suppressing LXR{beta} and CEPT-1 expressions. For decreasing atherosclerosis related mortality associated with arsenic, preventing exposure from environmental sources in early life is an important element. - Highlights: > Arsenic causes cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases through atherosclerosis. > Arsenic may promote atherosclerosis with transient increase in HSP

  18. Lesion progression in apoE-deficient mice: implication of chemokines and effect of the AT1 angiotensin II receptor antagonist irbesartan.

    PubMed

    Martin, Geneviève; Dol, Frédérique; Marés, Anne-Marie; Berezowski, Vincent; Staels, Bart; Hum, Dean W; Schaeffer, Paul; Herbert, Jean-Marc

    2004-02-01

    We recently described that a treatment with the angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist irbesartan inhibits atherosclerotic lesion development, macrophage accumulation, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) as well as the chemokine KC expression in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE-deficient) mice. The present study addresses whether these and other chemokines are expressed not only during the initiation but also during the development of atherosclerotic lesions and whether irbesartan can inhibit the expression of these chemokines during lesion progression. The time course of lesion development was assessed in apoE-deficient mice aged 1 to 9 months and the relative expression of chemokines was quantified by RT-PCR. Significant lesion formation already appeared in 3-month-old apoE-deficient mice, and progressed further to the age of 9 months. The expression of MCP-1 and KC (the mouse homologue of Groalpha), was induced at 1 month in apoE-deficient as compared with wild type (C57/Bl6) mice, and was observed before any detectable histologic changes. MCP-1 and KC expression remained high during lesion progression. The expression of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2, the mouse Grobeta/gamma homologue) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) was increased in lesions from 4-month-old mice onward, whereas Regulated upon Activation of Normal T-cells Expressed and Secreted (RANTES) was significantly induced in 6- to 9-month-old mice only. Irbesartan (50 mg/kg/d) administered from the age of 3 months onward significantly reduced the progression of the lesions as well as the expression of the chemokines. A short-term treatment with irbesartan significantly inhibited the expression of MCP-1 and KC, suggesting that activation of the renin-angiotensin system is involved in up-regulation of these chemokines and that this effect represents a potential mechanism by which irbesartan inhibits plaque development and progression.

  19. Long-Term Effects of Irbesartan Treatment and Smoking on Nucleic Acid Oxidation in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Microalbuminuria

    PubMed Central

    Broedbaek, Kasper; Henriksen, Trine; Weimann, Allan; Petersen, Morten; Andersen, Jon T.; Afzal, Shoaib; Jimenez-Solem, Espen; Persson, Frederik; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Rossing, Peter; Poulsen, Henrik E.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We tested whether long-term treatment with the angiotensin II receptor antagonist irbesartan reduces nucleic acid oxidation in patients with type 2 diabetes and microalbuminuria. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Irbesartan in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Microalbuminuria (IRMA 2) study was a 2-year multicenter randomized double-blind trial comparing irbesartan (150 and 300 mg once daily) with placebo. We studied a subgroup of 50 patients where urine samples were available for analysis of albumin and the oxidatively modified guanine nucleosides 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo). RESULTS During the 2-year trial, no significant differences in 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGuo excretions between placebo and irbesartan treatment were seen. 8-oxodG and albumin excretion decreased with time (P = 0.0004 and P < 0.0001, respectively), whereas treatment-related differences were shown for albumin excretion (P = 0.0008) only, as previously reported. Important secondary findings were significant associations between changes in 8-oxodG excretion and changes in albumin excretion and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). During the study period, 8-oxodG excretion decreased by 3 and 26% in smokers and nonsmokers, respectively (P = 0.015), and urinary albumin excretion decreased 22% in smokers and 58% in nonsmokers (P = 0.011). CONCLUSIONS Irbesartan treatment was not significantly more effective than placebo in reducing nucleic acid oxidation. The results indicate that DNA oxidation in diabetes patients is reduced by various components in the treatment of diabetes where glycemic control seems to be important and addition of angiotensin II receptor antagonists does not lead to any substantial additional reduction. Furthermore, the reductions in DNA oxidation and albumin excretion seem to be counteracted by smoking. PMID:21454798

  20. Role of Micronutrients on Subclinical Atherosclerosis Micronutrients in Subclinical Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kocyigit, Duygu; Gurses, Kadri Murat; Yalcin, Muhammed Ulvi; Tokgozoglu, Lale

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) leading to coronary heart disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world. Nutrition is one of the key factors in the etiology of atherosclerosis. Micronutrient supplements are widely used to prevent many chronic diseases including atherosclerosis. However, scientific evidence regarding this issue is still insufficient and current data on the association of dietary micronutrients and CVD risk is contradictory. Most of the randomized studies have failed to demonstrate beneficial effects of micronutrient supplementation on markers of subclinical atherosclerosis. In this review, role of each micronutrient on subclinical atherosclerosis will be evaluated thoroughly.

  1. Effects of garlic on atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Orekhov, A N; Grünwald, J

    1997-01-01

    This review discusses the use of garlic and garlic preparations as agents for prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis and atherosclerosis-related diseases. Garlic indirectly effects atherosclerosis by reduction of hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and probably diabetes mellitus and prevents thrombus formation. In addition, in animal models, garlic causes direct antiatherogenic (preventive) and antiatherosclerotic (causing regression) effects at the level of artery wall. Garlic's direct effect on atherosclerosis may be explained by its capacity to reduce lipid content in arterial cells and to prevent intracellular lipid accumulation. This effect, in turn, is accompanied by other atherosclerotic manifestations, i.e., stimulation of cell proliferation and extracellular matrix synthesis. Clinical trials are currently being carried out to reveal the possible effect of garlic therapy on human atherosclerosis. Positive results of these trials may open a new era in the use of garlic for prevention and treatment of many atherosclerosis-related diseases. PMID:9263259

  2. Xanthine oxidase inhibition by febuxostat attenuates experimental atherosclerosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Johji; Busso, Nathalie; Ives, Annette; Matsui, Chieko; Tsujimoto, Syunsuke; Shirakura, Takashi; Tamura, Mizuho; Kobayashi, Tsunefumi; So, Alexander; Yamanaka, Yoshihiro

    2014-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease due to lipid deposition in the arterial wall. Multiple mechanisms participate in the inflammatory process, including oxidative stress. Xanthine oxidase (XO) is a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and has been linked to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we show enhanced XO expression in macrophages in the atherosclerotic plaque and in aortic endothelial cells in ApoE(-/-) mice, and that febuxostat, a highly potent XO inhibitor, suppressed plaque formation, reduced arterial ROS levels and improved endothelial dysfunction in ApoE(-/-) mice without affecting plasma cholesterol levels. In vitro, febuxostat inhibited cholesterol crystal-induced ROS formation and inflammatory cytokine release in murine macrophages. These results demonstrate that in the atherosclerotic plaque, XO-mediated ROS formation is pro-inflammatory and XO-inhibition by febuxostat is a potential therapy for atherosclerosis.

  3. [Atherosclerosis and oncogenes].

    PubMed

    Onraed-Dupriez, B

    1992-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a leading cause of mortality in the developed world, has mainly been studied with respect to the pathogenic role of lipids. However, over the last few years, a new avenue of research has stemmed from Benditt's monoclonal theory which linkens the atheroma plaque to a benign tumor developed from a single smooth muscle cell. Investigations into mechanisms capable of initiating this monoclonal cell growth have included studies of protooncogene activation. Barrett and Benditt have reported increased expression of the sis oncogene in the atheroma plaque; the product of this oncogene is very similar to the beta chain of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) which may play a role in the development of the atheroma plaque. These recent studies focusing on the earliest step of formation of the atheroma plaque, ie, cell growth, complement the pathophysiologic theories studied until now.

  4. A Mechanism by Which Dietary Trans Fats Cause Atherosclerosis*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Lin; Tetri, Laura H.; Neuschwander-Tetri, Brent A.; Huang, Shuan Shian; Huang, Jung San

    2010-01-01

    Dietary trans fats have been causally linked to atherosclerosis but the mechanism by which they cause the disease remain elusive. Suppressed TGF-β responsiveness in aortic endothelium has been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in animals with hypercholesterolemia. We investigated the effects of a high trans-fat (TF) diet on TGF-β responsiveness in aortic endothelium and integration of cholesterol in tissues. Here we show that normal mice fed a high TF diet for 24 weeks exhibit atherosclerotic lesions and suppressed TGF-β responsiveness in aortic endothelium. The suppressed TGF-β responsiveness is evidenced by markedly reduced expression of TGF-β type I and II receptors and profoundly decreased levels of P-Smad2, an important TGF-β–response indicator, in aortic endothelium. These mice exhibit greatly increased integration of cholesterol into tissue plasma membranes. These results suggest that dietary trans fats cause atherosclerosis, at least in part, by suppressing TGF-β responsiveness. This effect is presumably mediated by the increased deposition of cholesterol into cellular plasma membranes in vascular tissue, as in hypercholesterolemia. PMID:21036587

  5. Experimental and DFT characterization, antioxidant and anticancer activities of a Cu(II)-irbesartan complex: structure-antihypertensive activity relationships in Cu(II)-sartan complexes.

    PubMed

    Islas, María S; Luengo, Alicia; Franca, Carlos A; Merino, Mercedes Griera; Calleros, Laura; Rodriguez-Puyol, Manuel; Lezama, Luis; Ferrer, Evelina G; Williams, Patricia A M

    2016-10-01

    The coordination compound of the antihypertensive ligand irbesartan (irb) with copper(II) (CuIrb) was synthesized and characterized by FTIR, FT-Raman, UV-visible, reflectance and EPR spectroscopies. Experimental evidence allowed the implementation of structural and vibrational studies by theoretical calculations made in the light of the density functional theory (DFT). This compound was designed to induce structural modifications on the ligand. No antioxidant effects were displayed by both compounds, though CuIrb behaved as a weak 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH(·)) scavenger (IC50 = 425 μM). The measurements of the contractile capacity on human mesangial cell lines showed that CuIrb improved the antihypertensive effects of the parent medication. In vitro cell growth inhibition against prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP and DU 145) was measured for CuIrb, irbesartan and copper(II). These cell lines have been selected since the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor (that was blocked by the angiotensin receptor blockers, ARB) has been identified in them. The complex exerted anticancer behavior (at 100 μM) improving the activity of the ligand. Flow cytometry determinations were used to determine late apoptotic mechanisms of cell death. Experimental and DFT characterization of an irbesartan copper(II) complex has been performed. The complex exhibits low scavenging activity against DPPH(·) and significant growth inhibition of LNCaP and DU 145 prostate cancer cell lines. Flow cytometry determinations were used to determine late apoptotic mechanisms of cell death. This compound improved the antihypertensive effect of irbesartan. This effect was observed earlier for the mononuclear Cu-candesartan complex, but not in structurally modified sartans forming dinuclear or octanuclear Cu-sartan compounds.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA damage and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Emma P K; Bennett, Martin R

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondria are often regarded as the cellular powerhouses through their ability to generate ATP, the universal fuel for metabolic processes. However, in recent years mitochondria have been recognised as critical regulators of cell death, inflammation, metabolism, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus, mitochondrial dysfunction directly promotes cell death, inflammation, and oxidative stress and alters metabolism. These are key processes in atherosclerosis and there is now evidence that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and promotes atherosclerosis directly. In this review we discuss the recent evidence for and mechanisms linking mtDNA defects and atherosclerosis and suggest areas of mitochondrial biology that are potential therapeutic targets.

  7. [PREDICTORS OF ATHEROSCLEROSIS: NEW DEVELOPMENTS].

    PubMed

    Gozhenko, A I; Kotyuzhinskaya, S G; Kovalevskaya, L A

    2014-12-01

    The article describes known atherosclerosis predictors of endothelial origin, which are diagnostic criteria for identifying's early stages of atherosclerosis, and can prevent the development of this disease and are used to monitor the effectiveness of the therapy The authors analyzed the possibility of using heparin as an early marker of atherosclerosis, based on the fact that the inhibition of lipoprotein lipase activity due hyperheparinemia resulting from depletion of mast cells due to endothelial dysfunction, leads to the disorders of lipid transporting system in the form of the resistant hyperlipidemia with the phenomena of dyslipidemia. PMID:26638463

  8. MicroRNAs and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Rotllan, Noemi; Aranda, Juan F.; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small (~22nucleotide) sequences of RNA that regulate gene expression at posttranscriptional level. MiRNA/mRNA base pairing complementarity provokes mRNA decay and consequent gene silencing. These endogenous gene expression inhibitors were primarily described in cancer but recent exciting findings have also demonstrated a key role in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) including atherosclerosis. MiRNAs controls endothelial cell (EC), vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) and macrophage functions, and thereby regulate the progression of atherosclerosis. MiRNAs expression is modulated by different stimuli involved in every stage of atherosclerosis and conversely miRNAs modulates several pathways implicated in plaque development such as cholesterol metabolism. In the present review, we focus on the importance of miRNAs in atherosclerosis and we further discuss their potential use as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in CVDs. PMID:23512606

  9. Protective roles of SIRT1 in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Stein, Sokrates; Matter, Christian M

    2011-02-15

    SIRT1 is a NAD (+) -dependent class III histone deacetylase (HDAC) that mediates the effects of caloric restriction on lifespan and metabolic pathways in various organisms. It deacetylates both histone and non-histone proteins, and targets proteins with diverse cellular and tissue functions. In the vasculature of rodent models SIRT1 mediates vasodilatation via eNOS-derived nitric oxide (NO) and scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recent studies demonstrated further protective roles of SIRT1 in vascular biology and atherosclerosis. In endothelial cells and macrophages SIRT1 has anti-inflammatory functions by downregulating the expression of various pro-inflammatory cytokines by interfering with the NF-kB signaling pathway. Deacetylation of RelA/p65-NF-kB by SIRT1 in macrophages also suppresses the expression of Lox-1, a scavenger receptor for oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL), thereby preventing macrophage foam cell formation. Moreover, SIRT1 has been shown to regulate the activity of Liver X-receptor (LXR), thereby promoting ABCA1-driven reverse cholesterol transport in plaque macrophages. Finally, SIRT1 suppresses the expression of endothelial tissue factor (coagulation factor III) and hence exerts anti-thrombotic properties. These findings indicate atheroprotective effects of SIRT1 in atherogenesis and highlight the need for translational research from bench-to-bedside. Indeed, SIRT1 activators are available for experimental research and undergo clinical testing. Taken together, these studies suggest SIRT1 activation as a promising therapeutic approach in atherosclerosis. Further studies are necessary to better understand the exact role of SIRT1 in the protagonist cells orchestrating atherogenesis and to identify the specificity, target effects and putative off-target effects of these promising SIRT1 activators. PMID:21293192

  10. Microdomains, Inflammation, and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sorci-Thomas, Mary G; Thomas, Michael J

    2016-02-19

    Elevated levels of cholesteryl ester (CE)-enriched apoB containing plasma lipoproteins lead to increased foam cell formation, the first step in the development of atherosclerosis. Unregulated uptake of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by circulating monocytes and other peripheral blood cells takes place through scavenger receptors and over time causes disruption in cellular cholesterol homeostasis. As lipoproteins are taken up, their CE core is hydrolyzed by liposomal lipases to generate free cholesterol (FC). FC can be either re-esterified and stored as CE droplets or shuttled to the plasma membrane for ATP-binding cassette transporter A1-mediated efflux. Because cholesterol is an essential component of all cellular membranes, some FC may be incorporated into microdomains or lipid rafts. These platforms are essential for receptor signaling and transduction, requiring rapid assembly and disassembly. ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 plays a major role in regulating microdomain cholesterol and is most efficient when lipid-poor apolipoprotein AI (apoAI) packages raft cholesterol into soluble particles that are eventually catabolized by the liver. If FC is not effluxed from the cell, it becomes esterified, CE droplets accumulate and microdomain cholesterol content becomes poorly regulated. This dysregulation leads to prolonged activation of immune cell signaling pathways, resulting in receptor oversensitization. The availability of apoAI or other amphipathic α-helix-rich apoproteins relieves the burden of excess microdomain cholesterol in immune cells allowing a reduction in immune cell proliferation and infiltration, thereby stimulating regression of foam cells in the artery. Therefore, cellular balance between FC and CE is essential for proper immune cell function and prevents chronic immune cell overstimulation and proliferation. PMID:26892966

  11. How Can Atherosclerosis Be Prevented or Delayed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Can Atherosclerosis Be Prevented or Delayed? Taking action to control ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  12. [Adipose tissue inflammation and atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Shwarts, V

    2009-01-01

    Adipose tissue is an endocrine organ secreting more than 30 various adipokines which regulate wide spectrum of metabolic and immune processes. Obesity is associated with development of adipose tissue inflammation. This inflammation is characterized by infiltration with macrophages, alterations of adipokine secretion, development of insulin resistance. All these factors promote atherosclerosis. Inflammation of perivascular adipose tissue is especially important. Adipokines damage vascular endothelium via paracrine pathway. Cytokines released by macrophages as well as changes of adipokine secretion lead to endothelial dysfunction - the first stage of atherogenesis. Besides specific action curative factors used in obesity, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes mellitus also produce anti-inflammatory effect and thus diminish risk factors of cardiovascular diseases, rate of their development, and alleviate manifestations of atherosclerosis. Inflammation of adipose tissue is a connecting link between obesity and atherosclerosis. This review contains an outline of roles of various major adipokines in development of atherosclerosis as well as synopsis of anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic effects of glytazones , metformin, rimonabant, statins, and of lowering of body weight.

  13. Vitamin K Intake and Atherosclerosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been hypothesized that insufficient intake of vitamin K may increase soft tissue calcification due to impaired gamma-carboxylation of the vitamin K-dependent protein, matrix gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (MGP). The evidence to support this putative role of vitamin K intake in atherosclerosis is ...

  14. CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells reduce atherosclerosis in apoE(−/−) mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jianchang; Dimayuga, Paul C.; Zhao, Xiaoning; Yano, Juliana; Lio, Wai Man; Trinidad, Portia; Honjo, Tomoyuki; Cercek, Bojan; Shah, Prediman K.; Chyu, Kuang-Yuh

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •The role of a sub-population of CD8{sup +} T cells with suppressor functions was investigated in atherosclerosis. •CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells from adult apoE(−/−) mice had phenotype characteristics of T suppressor cells. •These CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells reduced CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation and CD8{sup +} cytotoxic activity in vitro. •Adoptive transfer of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells significantly reduced atherosclerosis. •CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells have a suppressive function in atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Background: It is increasingly evident that CD8{sup +} T cells are involved in atherosclerosis but the specific subtypes have yet to be defined. CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells exert suppressive effects on immune signaling and modulate experimental autoimmune disorders but their role in atherosclerosis remains to be determined. The phenotype and functional role of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells in experimental atherosclerosis were investigated in this study. Methods and results: CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells were observed in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE(−/−) mice fed hypercholesterolemic diet. Characterization by flow cytometric analysis and functional evaluation using a CFSE-based proliferation assays revealed a suppressive phenotype and function of splenic CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells from apoE(−/−) mice. Depletion of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} from total CD8{sup +} T cells rendered higher cytolytic activity of the remaining CD8{sup +}CD25{sup −} T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells into apoE(−/−) mice suppressed the proliferation of splenic CD4{sup +} T cells and significantly reduced atherosclerosis in recipient mice. Conclusions: Our study has identified an athero-protective role for CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells in experimental atherosclerosis.

  15. Atherosclerosis, inflammation and Chlamydia pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Giovanni; Giovino, Maria; Gullotti, Alessandro; Bacarella, Daniela; Novo, Giuseppina; Novo, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the single most common cause of illness and death in the developed world. Coronary atherosclerosis is by far the most frequent cause of ischemic heart disease, and plaque disruption with superimposed thrombosis is the main cause of the acute coronary syndromes of unstable angina, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. Atherosclerosis is the result of a complex interaction between blood elements, disturbed flow, and vessel wall abnormality, involving several pathological processes: inflammation, with increased endothelial permeability, endothelial activation, and monocyte recruitment; growth, with smooth muscle cell proliferation, migration, and matrix synthesis; degeneration, with lipid accumulation; necrosis, possibly related to the cytotoxic effect of oxidized lipid; calcification/ossification, which may represent an active rather than a dystrophic process; and thrombosis, with platelet recruitment and fibrin formation. In this review we discuss these processes and the possible pathological effects of Chlamydia infection and the ensuing phlogosis. PMID:21160574

  16. [Is regression of atherosclerosis possible?].

    PubMed

    Thomas, D; Richard, J L; Emmerich, J; Bruckert, E; Delahaye, F

    1992-10-01

    Experimental studies have shown the regression of atherosclerosis in animals given a cholesterol-rich diet and then given a normal diet or hypolipidemic therapy. Despite favourable results of clinical trials of primary prevention modifying the lipid profile, the concept of atherosclerosis regression in man remains very controversial. The methodological approach is difficult: this is based on angiographic data and requires strict standardisation of angiographic views and reliable quantitative techniques of analysis which are available with image processing. Several methodologically acceptable clinical coronary studies have shown not only stabilisation but also regression of atherosclerotic lesions with reductions of about 25% in total cholesterol levels and of about 40% in LDL cholesterol levels. These reductions were obtained either by drugs as in CLAS (Cholesterol Lowering Atherosclerosis Study), FATS (Familial Atherosclerosis Treatment Study) and SCOR (Specialized Center of Research Intervention Trial), by profound modifications in dietary habits as in the Lifestyle Heart Trial, or by surgery (ileo-caecal bypass) as in POSCH (Program On the Surgical Control of the Hyperlipidemias). On the other hand, trials with non-lipid lowering drugs such as the calcium antagonists (INTACT, MHIS) have not shown significant regression of existing atherosclerotic lesions but only a decrease on the number of new lesions. The clinical benefits of these regression studies are difficult to demonstrate given the limited period of observation, relatively small population numbers and the fact that in some cases the subjects were asymptomatic. The decrease in the number of cardiovascular events therefore seems relatively modest and concerns essentially subjects who were symptomatic initially. The clinical repercussion of studies of prevention involving a single lipid factor is probably partially due to the reduction in progression and anatomical regression of the atherosclerotic plaque

  17. Intestinal Microbiota Metabolism and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tian-Xing; Niu, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Shu-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This review aimed to summarize the relationship between intestinal microbiota metabolism and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and to propose a novel CVD therapeutic target. Data Sources: This study was based on data obtained from PubMed and EMBASE up to June 30, 2015. Articles were selected using the following search terms: “Intestinal microbiota”, “trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)”, “trimethylamine (TMA)”, “cardiovascular”, and “atherosclerosis”. Study Selection: Studies were eligible if they present information on intestinal microbiota metabolism and atherosclerosis. Studies on TMA-containing nutrients were also included. Results: A new CVD risk factor, TMAO, was recently identified. It has been observed that several TMA-containing compounds may be catabolized by specific intestinal microbiota, resulting in TMA release. TMA is subsequently converted to TMAO in the liver. Several preliminary studies have linked TMAO to CVD, particularly atherosclerosis; however, the details of this relationship remain unclear. Conclusions: Intestinal microbiota metabolism is associated with atherosclerosis and may represent a promising therapeutic target with respect to CVD management. PMID:26481750

  18. Interventional strategies in early atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gattone, Marinella; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo

    2006-03-01

    Atherosclerosis remains clinically mute for a long time and frequently manifests itself with an acute cardiovascular event; therefore, the possibility to detect the disease in a subclinical phase and to reduce or reverse its progression is an issue of relevance. Non-invasive diagnostic procedures such as B-mode ultrasonography of carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) allow to identify atherosclerotic disease in its early phases, to evaluate the disease progression and monitor the effects of interventions. In recent years, several therapeutic strategies have been adopted over time to slow early atherosclerosis in asymptomatic individuals at intermediate/high cardiovascular risk. Prospective trials employing multifactorial non-pharmacological interventions (diet, exercise, smoking cessation) have demonstrated a favorable effect on progression of atherosclerosis. Hence lifestyle modification may be an effective therapeutic strategy to be adopted as a first step and a highly cost-effective intervention in a preclinical setting involving a large number of individuals. Drugs should be considered as a second step or should be associated to further reduce the risk in individuals at high probability of future events, who require more intensive interventions. Reducing low-density lipoprotein levels, blood pressure and platelet aggregation seems to be the most effective intervention in these subjects, whereas the treatment of emerging coronary risk factors, e.g. oxidative stress, inflammatory activation and infections has not produced the expected protective effect. PMID:17125046

  19. Immunity, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the major cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD), is a chronic inflammatory condition with immune competent cells in lesions producing mainly pro-inflammatory cytokines. Dead cells and oxidized forms of low density lipoproteins (oxLDL) are abundant. The major direct cause of CVD appears to be rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. oxLDL has proinflammatory and immune-stimulatory properties, causes cell death at higher concentrations and contains inflammatory phospholipids with phosphorylcholine (PC) as an interesting epitope. Antibodies against PC (anti-PC) may be atheroprotective, one mechanism being anti-inflammatory. Bacteria and virus have been discussed, but it has been difficult to find direct evidence, and antibiotic trials have not been successful. Heat shock proteins could be one major target for atherogenic immune reactions. More direct causes of plaque rupture include pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and lipid mediators. To prove that inflammation is a cause of atherosclerosis and CVD, clinical studies with anti-inflammatory and/or immune-modulatory treatment are needed. The potential causes of immune reactions and inflammation in atherosclerosis and how inflammation can be targeted therapeutically to provide novel treatments for CVD are reviewed. PMID:23635324

  20. Regulatory T cells in atherosclerosis: critical immune regulatory function and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Spitz, Charlotte; Winkels, Holger; Bürger, Christina; Weber, Christian; Lutgens, Esther; Hansson, Göran K; Gerdes, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that is mediated by innate and adaptive immune responses. The disease is characterized by sub-endothelial accumulation and modification of lipids in the artery wall triggering an inflammatory reaction which promotes lesion progression and eventual plaque rupture, thrombus formation, and the respective clinical sequelae such as myocardial infarction or stroke. During the past decade, T-cell-mediated immune responses, especially control of pro-inflammatory signals by regulatory T cells (Tregs), have increasingly attracted the interest of experimental and clinical researchers. By suppression of T cell proliferation and secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β, Tregs exert their atheroprotective properties. Atherosclerosis-prone, hyperlipidemic mice harbor systemically less Tregs compared to wild-type mice, suggesting an imbalance of immune cells which affects local and systemic inflammatory and potentially metabolic processes leading to atherogenesis. Restoring or increasing Treg frequency and enhancing their suppressive capacity by various modulations may pose a promising approach for treating inflammatory conditions such as cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we briefly summarize the immunological basics of atherosclerosis and introduce the role and contribution of different subsets of T cells. We then discuss experimental data and current knowledge pertaining to Tregs in atherosclerosis and perspectives on manipulating the adaptive immune system to alleviate atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease.

  1. Atherosclerosis induced by arsenic in drinking water in rats through altering lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tain-Junn; Chuu, Jiunn-Jye; Chang, Chia-Yu; Tsai, Wan-Chen; Chen, Kuan-Jung; Guo, How-Ran

    2011-10-15

    Arsenic in drinking water is a global environmental health problem, and the exposure may increase cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases mortalities, most likely through causing atherosclerosis. However, the mechanism of atherosclerosis formation after arsenic exposure is still unclear. To study the mechanism of atherosclerosis formation after arsenic exposure and explore the role of high cholesterol diet (HCD) in this process, we fed spontaneous hypertensive rats and Wistar Kyoto rats with basal diet or HCD and provided with them drinking water containing arsenic at different ages and orders for 20 consecutive weeks. We measured high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol, triglycerides, heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70), and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) at predetermined intervals and determined expressions of cholesteryl ester transfer protein-1 (CETP-1) and liver X receptor β (LXRβ) in the liver. Atherosclerosis was determined by examining the aorta with hematoxylin and eosin stain. After 20 weeks, we found arsenic, alone or combined with HCD, may promote atherosclerosis formation with transient increases in HSP 70 and hs-CRP. Early combination exposure decreased the HDL-C/LDL-C ratio without changing the levels of total cholesterol and triglyceride until 30 weeks old. Both CETP-1 and LXRβ activities were suppressed, most significantly in early combination exposure. In conclusion, arsenic exposure may induce atherosclerosis through modifying reverse cholesterol transport in cholesterol metabolism and suppressing LXRβ and CEPT-1 expressions. For decreasing atherosclerosis related mortality associated with arsenic, preventing exposure from environmental sources in early life is an important element.

  2. Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-28

    Atherosclerosis; Cardiovascular Diseases; Heart Diseases; Coronary Artery Disease; Coronary Disease; Stroke; Myocardial Infarction; Heart Failure; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2; Hypertension; Diabetes Mellitus

  3. Cholesterol-Lowering Atherosclerosis Study (CLAS)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-12

    Arterial Occlusive Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Carotid Artery Diseases; Cerebral Arteriosclerosis; Cerebrovascular Disorders; Coronary Arteriosclerosis; Coronary Disease; Heart Diseases; Myocardial Ischemia; Atherosclerosis

  4. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atherosclerosis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Atherosclerosis? Atherosclerosis usually doesn't cause signs and symptoms ... Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is atherosclerosis? 05/22/2014 Describes how the build-up ...

  5. Oxyradical Stress, Endocannabinoids, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Anberitha T.; Ross, Matthew K.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is responsible for most cardiovascular disease (CVD) and is caused by several factors including hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and chronic inflammation. Oxidants and electrophiles have roles in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and the concentrations of these reactive molecules are an important factor in disease initiation and progression. Overactive NADPH oxidase (Nox) produces excess superoxide resulting in oxidized macromolecules, which is an important factor in atherogenesis. Although superoxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS) have obvious toxic properties, they also have fundamental roles in signaling pathways that enable cells to adapt to stress. In addition to inflammation and ROS, the endocannabinoid system (eCB) is also important in atherogenesis. Linkages have been postulated between the eCB system, Nox, oxidative stress, and atherosclerosis. For instance, CB2 receptor-evoked signaling has been shown to upregulate anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative pathways, whereas CB1 signaling appears to induce opposite effects. The second messenger lipid molecule diacylglycerol is implicated in the regulation of Nox activity and diacylglycerol lipase β (DAGLβ) is a key biosynthetic enzyme in the biosynthesis eCB ligand 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG). Furthermore, Nrf2 is a vital transcription factor that protects against the cytotoxic effects of both oxidant and electrophile stress. This review will highlight the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in intracellular signaling and the impact of deregulated ROS-mediated signaling in atherogenesis. In addition, there is also emerging knowledge that the eCB system has an important role in atherogenesis. We will attempt to integrate oxidative stress and the eCB system into a conceptual framework that provides insights into this pathology. PMID:26702404

  6. ABC transporters, atherosclerosis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Michael L; Mujawar, Zahedi; Tamehiro, Norimasa

    2010-08-01

    Atherosclerosis, driven by inflamed lipid-laden lesions, can occlude the coronary arteries and lead to myocardial infarction. This chronic disease is a major and expensive health burden. However, the body is able to mobilize and excrete cholesterol and other lipids, thus preventing atherosclerosis by a process termed reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Insight into the mechanism of RCT has been gained by the study of two rare syndromes caused by the mutation of ABC transporter loci. In Tangier disease, loss of ABCA1 prevents cells from exporting cholesterol and phospholipid, thus resulting in the build-up of cholesterol in the peripheral tissues and a loss of circulating HDL. Consistent with HDL being an athero-protective particle, Tangier patients are more prone to develop atherosclerosis. Likewise, sitosterolemia is another inherited syndrome associated with premature atherosclerosis. Here mutations in either the ABCG5 or G8 loci, prevents hepatocytes and enterocytes from excreting cholesterol and plant sterols, including sitosterol, into the bile and intestinal lumen. Thus, ABCG5 and G8, which from a heterodimer, constitute a transporter that excretes cholesterol and dietary sterols back into the gut, while ABCA1 functions to export excess cell cholesterol and phospholipid during the biogenesis of HDL. Interestingly, a third protein, ABCG1, that has been shown to have anti-atherosclerotic activity in mice, may also act to transfer cholesterol to mature HDL particles. Here we review the relationship between the lipid transport activities of these proteins and their anti-atherosclerotic effect, particularly how they may reduce inflammatory signaling pathways. Of particular interest are recent reports that indicate both ABCA1 and ABCG1 modulate cell surface cholesterol levels and inhibit its partitioning into lipid rafts. Given lipid rafts may provide platforms for innate immune receptors to respond to inflammatory signals, it follows that loss of ABCA1 and ABCG1

  7. Therapeutic approaches to drug targets in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jamkhande, Prasad G.; Chandak, Prakash G.; Dhawale, Shashikant C.; Barde, Sonal R.; Tidke, Priti S.; Sakhare, Ram S.

    2013-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases such as cancer, atherosclerosis and diabetes are responsible for major social and health burden as millions of people are dying every year. Out of which, atherosclerosis is the leading cause of deaths worldwide. The lipid abnormality is one of the major modifiable risk factors for atherosclerosis. Both genetic and environmental components are associated with the development of atherosclerotic plaques. Immune and inflammatory mediators have a complex role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Understanding of all these processes will help to invent a range of new biomarkers and novel treatment modalities targeting various cellular events in acute and chronic inflammation that are accountable for atherosclerosis. Several biochemical pathways, receptors and enzymes are involved in the development of atherosclerosis that would be possible targets for improving strategies for disease diagnosis and management. Earlier anti-inflammatory or lipid-lowering treatments could be useful for alleviating morbidity and mortality of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. However, novel drug targets like endoglin receptor, PPARα, squalene synthase, thyroid hormone analogues, scavenger receptor and thyroid hormone analogues are more powerful to control the process of atherosclerosis. Therefore, the review briefly focuses on different novel targets that act at the starting stage of the plaque form to the thrombus formation in the atherosclerosis. PMID:25061401

  8. Endothelium Preserving Microwave Treatment for Atherosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick; Arndt, G. D.; Ngo, Phong

    2003-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of microwave technology for treating Atherosclerosis while preserving the endothelium. The system uses catheter antennas as part of the system that is intended to treat atherosclerosis. The concept is to use a microwave catheter for heating the atherosclerotic lesions, and reduce constriction in the artery.

  9. Rapid Progression of Coronary Atherosclerosis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Priyank; Bajaj, Sharad; Virk, Hartaj; Bikkina, Mahesh; Shamoon, Fayez

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is chronic disease, the prevalence of which has increased steadily as the population ages. Vascular injury is believed to be critical initiating event in pathogenesis of spontaneous atherosclerosis. Syndrome of accelerated atherosclerosis has been classically described in patients undergoing heart transplantation, coronary artery bypass graft, and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. In contrast to spontaneous atherosclerosis, denuding endothelial injury followed by thrombus formation and initial predominant smooth muscle cell proliferation is believed to be playing a significant role in accelerated atherosclerosis. There is no universal definition of rapid progression of atherosclerosis. However most studies describing the phenomenon have used the following definition: (i) > or = 10% diameter reduction of at least one preexisting stenosis > or = 50%, (ii) > or = 30% diameter reduction of a preexisting stenosis <50%, and (iii) progression of a lesion to total occlusion within few months. Recent studies have described the role of coronary vasospasm, human immunodeficiency virus, various inflammatory markers, and some genetic mutations as predictors of rapid progression of atherosclerosis. As research in the field of vascular biology continues, more factors are likely to be implicated in the pathogenesis of rapid progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:26823982

  10. Quantification of carotid vessel atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Bernard; Egger, Micaela; Spence, J. D.; Parraga, Grace; Fenster, Aaron

    2006-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the development of plaques in the arterial wall, which ultimately leads to heart attacks and stroke. 3D ultrasound (US) has been used to screen patients' carotid arteries. Plaque measurements obtained from these images may aid in the management and monitoring of patients, and in evaluating the effect of new treatment options. Different types of measures for ultrasound phenotypes of atherosclerosis have been proposed. Here, we report on the development and application of a method used to analyze changes in carotid plaque morphology from 3D US images obtained at two different time points. We evaluated our technique using manual segmentations of the wall and lumen of the carotid artery from images acquired in two US scanning sessions. To incorporate the effect of intraobserver variability in our evaluation, manual segmentation was performed five times each for the arterial wall and lumen. From this set of five segmentations, the mean wall and lumen surfaces were reconstructed, with the standard deviation at each point mapped onto the surfaces. A correspondence map between the mean wall and lumen surfaces was then established, and the thickness of the atherosclerotic plaque at each point in the vessel was estimated to be the distance between each correspondence pairs. The two-sample Student's t-test was used to judge whether the difference between the thickness values at each pair corresponding points of the arteries in the two 3D US images was statistically significant.

  11. Role of LCAT in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ossoli, Alice; Simonelli, Sara; Vitali, Cecilia; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is the only enzyme capable of esterifying cholesterol in plasma, thus determining the maturation of high-density lipoproteins. Because it maintains an unesterified cholesterol gradient between peripheral cells and extracellular acceptors, for a long time, LCAT has been considered as a key enzyme in reverse cholesterol transport. However, despite the fact that it has been more than 50 years since the identification of LCAT, the role of this enzyme in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is still debated. A number of studies have been conducted in different animal models, with contradictory results. Studies in humans, in particular in the general population, in subjects at high cardiovascular risk, and in carriers of genetic LCAT deficiency in an excellent model to evaluate the correlation between the reduction of LCAT activity and atherosclerosis also gave conflicting results. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the controversial findings obtained in animals and humans, strengthening the necessity of further investigation to establish how LCAT could be regulated in a promising therapeutic strategy to reduce cardiovascular risk. PMID:26607351

  12. The roles of macrophage autophagy in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Bo-zong; Han, Bin-ze; Zeng, Yan-xia; Su, Ding-feng; Liu, Chong

    2016-01-01

    Although various types of drugs and therapies are available to treat atherosclerosis, it remains a major cause of mortality throughout the world. Macrophages are the major source of foam cells, which are hallmarks of atherosclerotic lesions. Consequently, the roles of macrophages in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis are increasingly investigated. Autophagy is a self-protecting cellular catabolic pathway. Since its discovery, autophagy has been found to be associated with a variety of diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, malignant tumors, neurodegenerative diseases, and immune system disorders. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that autophagy plays an important role in inhibiting inflammation and apoptosis, and in promoting efferocytosis and cholesterol efflux. These facts suggest the induction of autophagy may be exploited as a potential strategy for the treatment of atherosclerosis. In this review we mainly discuss the relationship between macrophage autophagy and atherosclerosis and the molecular mechanisms, as well as the recent advances in targeting the process of autophagy to treat atherosclerosis. PMID:26750103

  13. Vasa vasorum in atherosclerosis and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junyan; Lu, Xiaotong; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that leads to several acute cardiovascular complications with poor prognosis. For decades, the role of the adventitial vasa vasorum (VV) in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis has received broad attention. The presence of VV neovascularization precedes the apparent symptoms of clinical atherosclerosis. VV also mediates inflammatory cell infiltration, intimal thickening, intraplaque hemorrhage, and subsequent atherothrombosis that results in stroke or myocardial infarction. Intraplaque neovessels originating from VV can be immature and hence susceptible to leakage, and are thus regarded as the leading cause of intraplaque hemorrhage. Evidence supports VV as a new surrogate target of atherosclerosis evaluation and treatment. This review provides an overview into the relationship between VV and atherosclerosis, including the anatomy and function of VV, the stimuli of VV neovascularization, and the available underlying mechanisms that lead to poor prognosis. We also summarize translational researches on VV imaging modalities and potential therapies that target VV neovascularization or its stimuli.

  14. Vasa Vasorum in Atherosclerosis and Clinical Significance

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Lu, Xiaotong; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that leads to several acute cardiovascular complications with poor prognosis. For decades, the role of the adventitial vasa vasorum (VV) in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis has received broad attention. The presence of VV neovascularization precedes the apparent symptoms of clinical atherosclerosis. VV also mediates inflammatory cell infiltration, intimal thickening, intraplaque hemorrhage, and subsequent atherothrombosis that results in stroke or myocardial infarction. Intraplaque neovessels originating from VV can be immature and hence susceptible to leakage, and are thus regarded as the leading cause of intraplaque hemorrhage. Evidence supports VV as a new surrogate target of atherosclerosis evaluation and treatment. This review provides an overview into the relationship between VV and atherosclerosis, including the anatomy and function of VV, the stimuli of VV neovascularization, and the available underlying mechanisms that lead to poor prognosis. We also summarize translational researches on VV imaging modalities and potential therapies that target VV neovascularization or its stimuli. PMID:26006236

  15. Targeting T cells to treat atherosclerosis: odyssey from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Bullenkamp, Jessica; Dinkla, Sip; Kaski, Juan Carlos; Dumitriu, Ingrid E.

    2016-01-01

    More than 150 years from the initial description of inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques, randomized clinical trials to test anti-inflammatory therapies in atherosclerosis have recently been initiated. Lymphocytes and macrophages are main participants in the inflammatory response in atherosclerosis. T lymphocytes operate mainly by exerting strong influences on the function of many cells in the immune system and beyond, and co-ordinating their interactions. Importantly, T lymphocytes are not a homogenous population, but include several subsets with specialized functions that can either promote or suppress inflammation. The interactions between these T-lymphocyte subsets have critical consequences on the course and outcome of inflammation. The complexity of the inflammatory response in atherosclerosis poses significant challenges on translating experimental findings into clinical therapies and makes the journey from bench to bedside an arduous one. Here, we summarize recent advances on the role of CD4+ T cells in the inflammatory process in atherosclerosis and discuss potential therapies to modulate these lymphocytes that may provide future breakthroughs in the treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:27418972

  16. Prostacyclin, nitric oxide, and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gryglewski, R J; Chłopicki, S; Swies, J; Niezabitowski, P

    1995-01-17

    Disorders in arterial production of PGI2 and NO occur in atherosclerosis. Exogenous PGI2 and NO are capable of interacting pharmacologically. We claim that no such direct interactions occur between endogenous endothelial PGI2 and NO. Studying mechanisms of cardiac reactive hyperemia in guinea pigs and of thrombolysis in cats, we surmise that in vivo vascular intima releases PGI2 intraluminally while NO is secreted abluminally and thus these two ephemeral mediators do not see each other. Hence, in any disease, the disturbances in endothelial generation of PGI2 or NO have to be scrutinized separately. It may well be that endogenous PGI2 maintains endothelial thromboresistance while NO controls arterial myocytes and tissues in which microcirculation is embedded. These responsibilities remain unshared. Interactions between PGI2 and NO are confined to pharmacological domains. PMID:7695165

  17. Noninvasive Assessment of Preclinical Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Helen A; Smith, Jamie C; Davies, J Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Initially considered as a semipermeable barrier separating lumen from vessel wall, the endothelium is now recognised as a complex endocrine organ responsible for a variety of physiological processes vital for vascular homeostasis. These include the regulation of vascular tone, luminal diameter, and blood flow; hemostasis and thrombolysis; platelet and leucocyte vessel-wall interactions; the regulation of vascular permeability; and tissue growth and remodelling. The endothelium modulates arterial stiffness, which precedes overt atherosclerosis and is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events. Unsurprisingly, dysfunction of the endothelium may be considered as an early and potentially reversible step in the process of atherogenesis and numerous methods have been developed to assess endothelial status and large artery stiffness. Methodology includes flow-mediated dilatation of the brachial artery, assessment of coronary flow reserve, carotid intimamedia thickness, pulse wave analysis, pulse wave velocity, and plethysmography. This review outlines the various modalities, indications, and limitations of available methods to assess arterial dysfunction and vascular risk. PMID:17319466

  18. LXR signaling pathways and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Calkin, Anna; Tontonoz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    First discovered as orphan receptors, liver X receptors (LXRs) were subsequently identified as the nuclear receptor target of the cholesterol metabolites, oxysterols.1 There are 2 LXR receptors encoded by distinct genes: LXRα is most highly expressed in the liver, adipose, kidney, adrenal tissues and macrophages, and LXRβ is ubiquitously expressed. Despite differential tissue distribution, these isoforms have 78% homology in their ligand-binding domain and appear to respond to the same endogenous ligands. Work over the past 10 years has shown that the LXR pathway regulates lipid metabolism and inflammation via both the induction and repression of target genes. Given the importance of cholesterol regulation and inflammation in the development of cardiovascular disease, it is not surprising that activation of the LXR pathway attenuates various mechanisms underlying atherosclerotic plaque development.2 In this minireview we will discuss the impact of the LXR pathway on both cholesterol metabolism and atherosclerosis. PMID:20631351

  19. CLI-095 decreases atherosclerosis by modulating foam cell formation in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    WANG, XIAO-QING; WAN, HUI-QING; WEI, XIAN-JING; ZHANG, YING; QU, PENG

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is considered to have a critical role in the occurrence and development of atherosclerosis in atherosclerosis-prone mice; however, it remains uncertain whether treatment with a TLR4 inhibitor may attenuate atherosclerosis. The present study aimed to determine the vascular protective effects of the TLR4 inhibitor CLI-095 on apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE−/−) mice. ApoE−/− mice were fed either chow or a high-fat diet, and were treated with or without CLI-095 for 10 weeks. The mean atherosclerotic plaque area in the aortic sections of CLI-095-treated mice was 54.3% smaller than in the vehicle-treated mice (P=0.0051). In vitro, murine peritoneal macrophages were treated with or without CLI-095, and were subsequently stimulated with oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Treatment with CLI-095 markedly reduced the expression levels of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 and acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1, and significantly upregulated the expression levels of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1, predominantly via suppressing activation of the TLR4/nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway. The results of the present study indicated that the TLR4 inhibitor CLI-095 has the ability to suppress the progression of atherosclerosis in an in vivo model by reducing macrophage foam cell formation. PMID:27176130

  20. Aorta Atherosclerosis Lesion Analysis in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mohanta, Sarajo; Yin, Changjun; Weber, Christian; Hu, Desheng; Habenicht, Andreas JR

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of large and medium-sized arteries. Apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice are used as experimental models to study human atherosclerosis. ApoE-/- mice are constitutively hyperlipidemic and develop intima plaques that resemble human plaques. Various issues including experimental design for lesion analysis, dietary conditions, isolation of the aorta, staining methods, morphometry, group size, age, the location within the arterial tree, and statistical analyses are important parameters that need to be addressed to obtain robust data. Here, we provide detailed methods to quantify aorta atherosclerosis. PMID:27366759

  1. Methylarginines in Mice with Experimental Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gilinsky, M A; Sukhovershin, R A; Cherkanova, M S

    2015-11-01

    We studied the dynamics of indexes for the system of endogenous regulation of NO bioavailability. The content of NO synthase inhibitors (monomethylarginine and asymmetric dimethylarginine) in the blood of mice was measured after intraperitoneal injections of a nonionic surfactant poloxamer 407 for 2 and 14 weeks. The concentrations of both methylarginines in animals with atherosclerosis due to 14-week administration of poloxamer were much higher than in control specimens. The amount of arginine and symmetric dimethylarginine practically did not differ from the control. Poloxamer-induced model of atherosclerosis is characterized by increased content of NO synthase inhibitors. These changes contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. PMID:26601840

  2. Methylarginines in Mice with Experimental Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gilinsky, M A; Sukhovershin, R A; Cherkanova, M S

    2015-11-01

    We studied the dynamics of indexes for the system of endogenous regulation of NO bioavailability. The content of NO synthase inhibitors (monomethylarginine and asymmetric dimethylarginine) in the blood of mice was measured after intraperitoneal injections of a nonionic surfactant poloxamer 407 for 2 and 14 weeks. The concentrations of both methylarginines in animals with atherosclerosis due to 14-week administration of poloxamer were much higher than in control specimens. The amount of arginine and symmetric dimethylarginine practically did not differ from the control. Poloxamer-induced model of atherosclerosis is characterized by increased content of NO synthase inhibitors. These changes contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis.

  3. MRI of Atherosclerosis: Diagnosis and Monitoring Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Justin D.; Kramer, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Atherosclerosis is a prevalent disease affecting millions of Americans. Despite our advances in diagnosis and treatment, atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death in America. High resolution MRI has overcome the limitations of current angiographic techniques and has emerged as a leading noninvasive imaging modality of atherosclerotic disease. Atherosclerosis of the arterial wall of human carotid, aortic, peripheral, and coronary arteries have all been successfully evaluated. In addition, the power of MRI to differentiate the major components of atherosclerotic plaque has been validated. The ability to image the vessel wall and risk stratify atherosclerotic plaque will create management decisions not previously faced and has the potential to change the way atherosclerosis is treated. PMID:17187458

  4. Macrophages, dendritic cells, and regression of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Feig, Jonathan E; Feig, Jessica L

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the number one cause of death in the Western world. It results from the interaction between modified lipoproteins and cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs), T cells, and other cellular elements present in the arterial wall. This inflammatory process can ultimately lead to the development of complex lesions, or plaques, that protrude into the arterial lumen. Ultimately, plaque rupture and thrombosis can occur leading to the clinical complications of myocardial infarction or stroke. Although each of the cell types plays roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the focus of this review will be primarily on the macrophages and DCs. The role of these two cell types in atherosclerosis is discussed, with a particular emphasis on their involvement in atherosclerosis regression.

  5. Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disorder after all.

    PubMed

    Meng, Charles Q

    2006-01-01

    Inflammation has been increasingly recognized as an important player in the pathophysiology of numerous human disorders. Accumulating evidence has led to the conclusion that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease, although it was believed to be a disorder of high cholesterol levels in the bloodstream for over a century. Cholesterol does contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, but through inflammatory mechanisms. Statins lower cholesterol levels and hence reduce inflammation in the vasculature and prevent heart disease. Statins may also exert anti-inflammatory effects through mechanisms independent of cholesterol lowering. Adhesion molecules, cytokines, oxidative stress, etc. appear to contribute to the inflammatory state of atherosclerosis and therapeutic approaches directed toward these markers or targets have the potential to be effective in reducing inflammation and treating atherosclerosis. PMID:16454761

  6. Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Martin R; Sinha, Sanjay; Owens, Gary K

    2016-02-19

    The historical view of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in atherosclerosis is that aberrant proliferation of VSMCs promotes plaque formation, but that VSMCs in advanced plaques are entirely beneficial, for example preventing rupture of the fibrous cap. However, this view has been based on ideas that there is a homogenous population of VSMCs within the plaque, that can be identified separate from other plaque cells (particularly macrophages) using standard VSMC and macrophage immunohistochemical markers. More recent genetic lineage tracing studies have shown that VSMC phenotypic switching results in less-differentiated forms that lack VSMC markers including macrophage-like cells, and this switching directly promotes atherosclerosis. In addition, VSMC proliferation may be beneficial throughout atherogenesis, and not just in advanced lesions, whereas VSMC apoptosis, cell senescence, and VSMC-derived macrophage-like cells may promote inflammation. We review the effect of embryological origin on VSMC behavior in atherosclerosis, the role, regulation and consequences of phenotypic switching, the evidence for different origins of VSMCs, and the role of individual processes that VSMCs undergo in atherosclerosis in regard to plaque formation and the structure of advanced lesions. We think there is now compelling evidence that a full understanding of VSMC behavior in atherosclerosis is critical to identify therapeutic targets to both prevent and treat atherosclerosis.

  7. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Orbay, Hakan; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular events are the leading causes of death in the industrialized world. Atherosclerosis develops insidiously and the initial manifestation is usually sudden cardiac death, stroke, or myocardial infarction. Molecular imaging is a valuable tool to identify the disease at an early stage before fatal manifestations occur. Among the various molecular imaging techniques, this review mainly focuses on positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of atherosclerosis. The targets and pathways that have been investigated to date for PET imaging of atherosclerosis include: glycolysis, cell membrane metabolism (phosphatidylcholine synthesis), integrin αvβ3, low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors (LDLr), natriuretic peptide clearance receptors (NPCRs), fatty acid synthesis, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), macrophages, platelets, etc. Many PET tracers have been investigated clinically for imaging of atherosclerosis. Early diagnosis of atherosclerotic lesions by PET imaging can help to prevent the premature death caused by atherosclerosis, and smooth translation of promising PET tracers into the clinic is critical to the benefit of patients. PMID:24312158

  8. Nanoparticles: a promising therapeutic approach in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Antoniades, Charalambos; Psarros, Costantinos; Tousoulis, Dimitris; Bakogiannis, Constantinos; Shirodaria, Cheerag; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2010-10-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis is the largest cause of mortality and morbidity in industrialised countries. Despite recent advances in medical therapies, the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis remain suboptimal. Atherosclerosis is considered to be a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall, involving the accumulation of macrophages and excess low density lipoproteins (LDL), the formation of foam cells which create the atheromatous plaque, resulting in stenosis, aneurysm and plaque rupture leading to acute coronary events. Every step in the atherogenesis process is a potential therapeutic target for both the prevention and regression of atherosclerosis. A novel approach is the use of nanoparticles containing drugs, providing new perspectives in targeted modification of these pathways. Nanoparticles are ultrafine particles sized between 1-100 nm. By using specific methods, nanoparticles can be filled with drugs and achieve targeted drug delivery near the diseased area. In this review article we describe the basic actions of nanoparticles, and we discuss their potential applications in atherosclerosis. We also discuss their advantages and we expose the existing toxicity issues, making it clear however, that the use of nanoparticles is one of the most promising therapeutic strategies against atherosclerosis.

  9. Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yutang; Tikellis, Chris; Thomas, Merlin C; Golledge, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a homolog of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) which generates angiotensin II from angiotensin I. ACE, its product angiotensin II and the downstream angiotensin type I receptor are important components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Angiotensin II, the most important component of the RAS, promotes the development of atherosclerosis. The identification of ACE2 in 2000 opened a new chapter of research on the regulation of the RAS. ACE2 degrades pro-atherosclerotic angiotensin II and generates anti-atherosclerotic angiotensin 1-7. In this review, we explored the importance of ACE2 in protecting experimental animals from developing atherosclerosis and its involvement in human atherosclerosis. We also examined the published evidence assessing the importance of ACE2 in different cell types relevant to atherosclerosis and putative underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms linking ACE2 with protection from atherosclerosis. ACE2 shifts the balance from angiotensin II to angiotensin 1-7 inhibiting the progression of atherosclerosis in animal models.

  10. Citrus Flavonoids as Regulators of Lipoprotein Metabolism and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, Erin E; Burke, Amy C; Huff, Murray W

    2016-07-17

    Citrus flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds with significant biological properties. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding the ability of citrus flavonoids to modulate lipid metabolism, other metabolic parameters related to the metabolic syndrome, and atherosclerosis. Citrus flavonoids, including naringenin, hesperitin, nobiletin, and tangeretin, have emerged as potential therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic dysregulation. Epidemiological studies reveal an association between the intake of citrus flavonoid-containing foods and a decreased incidence of cardiovascular disease. Studies in cell culture and animal models, as well as a limited number of clinical studies, reveal the lipid-lowering, insulin-sensitizing, antihypertensive, and anti-inflammatory properties of citrus flavonoids. In animal models, supplementation of rodent diets with citrus flavonoids prevents hepatic steatosis, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance primarily through inhibition of hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increased fatty acid oxidation. Citrus flavonoids blunt the inflammatory response in metabolically important tissues including liver, adipose, kidney, and the aorta. The mechanisms underlying flavonoid-induced metabolic regulation have not been completely established, although several potential targets have been identified. In mouse models, citrus flavonoids show marked suppression of atherogenesis through improved metabolic parameters as well as through direct impact on the vessel wall. Recent studies support a role for citrus flavonoids in the treatment of dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, obesity, and atherosclerosis. Larger human studies examining dose, bioavailability, efficacy, and safety are required to promote the development of these promising therapeutic agents. PMID:27146015

  11. Superoxide and Peroxynitrite in Atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. Roger; Brock, Tommy A.; Chang, Ling-Yi; Crapo, James; Briscoe, Page; Ku, David; Bradley, William A.; Gianturco, Sandra H.; Gore, Jeri; Freeman, Bruce A.; Tarpey, Margaret M.

    1994-02-01

    The role of reactive oxygen species in the vascular pathology associated with atherosclerosis was examined by testing the hypothesis that impaired vascular reactivity results from the reaction of nitric oxide (^.NO) with superoxide (O^-_2), yielding the oxidant peroxynitrite (ONOO^-). Contractility studies were performed on femoral arteries from rabbits fed a cholesterol-supplemented diet. Cholesterol feeding shifted the EC50 for acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxation and impaired the maximal response to ACh. We used pH-sensitive liposomes to deliver CuZn superoxide dismutase (SOD; superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) to critical sites of ^.NO reaction with O^-_2. Intravenously injected liposomes (3000 units of SOD per ml) augmented ACh-induced relaxation in the cholesterol-fed group to a greater extent than in controls. Quantitative immunocytochemistry demonstrated enhanced distribution of SOD in both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells as well as in the extracellular matrix. SOD activity in vessel homogenates of liposome-treated rabbits was also increased. Incubation of β very low density lipoprotein with ONOO^- resulted in the rapid formation of conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. Our results suggest that the reaction of O^-_2 with ^.NO is involved in the development of atherosclerotic disease by yielding a potent mediator of lipoprotein oxidation, as well as by limiting ^.NO stimulation of vascular smooth muscle guanylate cyclase activity.

  12. The autoimmune concept of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Grundtman, Cecilia; Wick, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review This review summarizes the recent data on the ‘Autoimmune Concept of Atherosclerosis’, according to which the first stage of this disease is due to an autoimmune reaction against arterial endothelial cells expressing heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) and adhesion molecules when stressed by classical atherosclerosis risk factors. Special emphasis is put on oxidized low-density lipoproteins as early endothelial stressors. Recent findings Plasma cholesterol and LDL levels considered ‘normal’ by the medical community are possibly too high from an evolutionary viewpoint. The proinflammatory milieu at sites of early atherosclerotic lesions could be conducive to oxidation of LDL in situ. LDL oxidation can also take place at nonvascular sites or in the circulation under general proinflammatory conditions explaining its proatherosclerotic role in ‘normocholesterolemic’ individuals. Summary We hypothesize that the plasma cholesterol and LDL levels currently considered normal are evolutionarily too high. Cholesterol and/or oxidized low-density lipoprotein, even as a mild HSP60-inducing endothelial stressor, function as a ubiquitous risk factor. If this hypothesis is true, most members of developed societies might be at risk to develop atherosclerotic plaques at anti-HSP60-immunity-triggered intimal inflammatory foci, irrespective of the primary risk-factor(s). PMID:21881502

  13. The chylomicron: relationship to atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tomkin, Gerald H; Owens, Daphne

    2012-01-01

    The B-containing lipoproteins are the transporters of cholesterol, and the evidence suggests that the apo B48-containing postprandial chylomicron particles and the triglyceride-rich very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles play an important part in the development of the plaque both directly and indirectly by their impact on LDL composition. The ratio of dietary to synthesised cholesterol is variable but tightly regulated: hence intervention with diet at best reduces serum cholesterol by <20% andusually <10%. Statins are the mainstay of cholesterol reduction therapy, but they increase cholesterol absorption, an example of the relationship between synthesis and absorption. Inhibition of cholesterol absorption with Ezetimibe, an inhibitor of Niemann Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1-L1), the major regulator of cholesterol absorption, increases cholesterol synthesis and hence the value of adding an inhibitor of cholesterol absorption to an inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis. Apo B48, the structural protein of the chylomicron particle, is synthesised in abundance so that the release of these particles is dependent on the amount of cholesterol and triglyceride available in the intestine. This paper will discuss cholesterol absorption and synthesis, chylomicron formation, and the effect of postprandial lipoproteins on factors involved in atherosclerosis.

  14. AIP1-mediated stress signaling in atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiqin; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang

    2016-01-01

    AIP1 (encoded by the DAB2IP gene), a signaling scaffolding protein, is abundantly expressed in vascular endothelial cells (EC). While it was initially discovered as an ASK1-interacting protein, AIP1 broadly suppresses inflammatory responses triggered by cytokines and stresses such as TNF, LPS, VEGF and ER stress in EC (therefore AIP1 is an Anti-Inflammatory Protein). Human genome-wide association study (GWAS) has identified DAB2IP gene variants conferring susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases. Consistently, a global or vascular EC-specific deletion of DAB2IP in mice strongly enhances inflammatory responses and exacerbates atherosclerosis and graft arteriosclerosis progression in mouse models. Mechanisms for AIP1 function and regulation associated with human cardiovascular diseases need further investigations. PMID:25732743

  15. AIP1-mediated stress signaling in atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiqin; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Ji, Weidong; Min, Wang

    2015-05-01

    AIP1 (ASK1-interacting protein-1; encoded by the DAB2IP gene), a signaling scaffolding protein, is abundantly expressed in vascular endothelial cells (EC). While it was initially discovered as an apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)-interacting protein, AIP1 broadly suppresses inflammatory responses triggered by cytokines and stresses such as TNF, LPS, VEGF, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in EC (therefore, AIP1 is an anti-inflammatory protein). Human genome-wide association study (GWAS) has identified DAB2IP gene variants conferring susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases. Consistently, a global or vascular EC-specific deletion of DAB2IP in mice strongly enhances inflammatory responses and exacerbates atherosclerosis and graft arteriosclerosis progression in mouse models. Mechanisms for AIP1 function and regulation associated with human cardiovascular diseases need further investigations.

  16. Oxidative theory of atherosclerosis and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Salvayre, R; Negre-Salvayre, A; Camaré, C

    2016-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial process that begins early in infancy and affects all the humans. Early steps of atherogenesis and the evolution towards complex atherosclerotic plaques are briefly described. After a brief history of the 'Lipid theory of atherosclerosis', we report the most prominent discoveries on lipoproteins, their receptors and metabolism, and their role in atherogenesis. The main focus is the 'oxidative theory of atherosclerosis', with emphasis on free radicals and reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation and LDL oxidation, biological properties of oxidized LDL and their potential role in atherogenesis. Then, we report the properties of antioxidants and antioxidant systems and their effects in vitro, on cultured cells, in animal models and in humans. The surprising discrepancy between the efficacy of antioxidants in vitro and in animal models of atherosclerosis and the lack of protective effect against cardiovascular events and death in epidemiological study and clinical trials are discussed. In contrast, epidemiological studies seem to indicate that the Mediterranean diet may protect (in part) against atherosclerosis complications (myocardial infarction and cardiovascular death). PMID:26717905

  17. Cyclodextrin promotes atherosclerosis regression via macrophage reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, Sebastian; Grebe, Alena; Bakke, Siril S.; Bode, Niklas; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulas, Thomas; Skjelland, Mona; De Nardo, Dominic; Labzin, Larisa I.; Kerksiek, Anja; Hempel, Chris; Heneka, Michael T.; Hawxhurst, Victoria; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Trebicka, Jonel; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Westerterp, Marit; Tall, Alan R.; Wright, Samuel D.; Espevik, Terje; Schultze, Joachim L.; Nickenig, Georg; Lütjohann, Dieter; Latz, Eicke

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease linked to elevated blood cholesterol levels. Despite ongoing advances in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Continuous retention of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in the subendothelial space causes a local overabundance of free cholesterol. Since cholesterol accumulation and deposition of cholesterol crystals (CCs) triggers a complex inflammatory response, we tested the efficacy of the cyclic oligosaccharide 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (CD), a compound that increases cholesterol solubility, in preventing and reversing atherosclerosis. Here we show that CD treatment of murine atherosclerosis reduced atherosclerotic plaque size and CC load, and promoted plaque regression even with a continued cholesterol-rich diet. Mechanistically, CD increased oxysterol production in both macrophages and human atherosclerotic plaques, and promoted liver X receptor (LXR)-mediated transcriptional reprogramming to improve cholesterol efflux and exert anti-inflammatory effects. In vivo, this CD-mediated LXR agonism was required for the anti-atherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects of CD as well as for augmented reverse cholesterol transport. Since CD treatment in humans is safe and CD beneficially affects key mechanisms of atherogenesis, it may therefore be used clinically to prevent or treat human atherosclerosis. PMID:27053774

  18. Cyclodextrin promotes atherosclerosis regression via macrophage reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Sebastian; Grebe, Alena; Bakke, Siril S; Bode, Niklas; Halvorsen, Bente; Ulas, Thomas; Skjelland, Mona; De Nardo, Dominic; Labzin, Larisa I; Kerksiek, Anja; Hempel, Chris; Heneka, Michael T; Hawxhurst, Victoria; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Trebicka, Jonel; Björkhem, Ingemar; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke; Westerterp, Marit; Tall, Alan R; Wright, Samuel D; Espevik, Terje; Schultze, Joachim L; Nickenig, Georg; Lütjohann, Dieter; Latz, Eicke

    2016-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease linked to elevated blood cholesterol concentrations. Despite ongoing advances in the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Continuous retention of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in the subendothelial space causes a local overabundance of free cholesterol. Because cholesterol accumulation and deposition of cholesterol crystals (CCs) trigger a complex inflammatory response, we tested the efficacy of the cyclic oligosaccharide 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (CD), a compound that increases cholesterol solubility in preventing and reversing atherosclerosis. We showed that CD treatment of murine atherosclerosis reduced atherosclerotic plaque size and CC load and promoted plaque regression even with a continued cholesterol-rich diet. Mechanistically, CD increased oxysterol production in both macrophages and human atherosclerotic plaques and promoted liver X receptor (LXR)-mediated transcriptional reprogramming to improve cholesterol efflux and exert anti-inflammatory effects. In vivo, this CD-mediated LXR agonism was required for the antiatherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects of CD as well as for augmented reverse cholesterol transport. Because CD treatment in humans is safe and CD beneficially affects key mechanisms of atherogenesis, it may therefore be used clinically to prevent or treat human atherosclerosis. PMID:27053774

  19. Atherosclerosis: Process, Indicators, Risk Factors and New Hopes

    PubMed Central

    Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Setorki, Mahbubeh; Doudi, Monir; Baradaran, Azar; Nasri, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerosis is the major cause of morbidities and mortalities worldwide. In this study we aimed to review the mechanism of atherosclerosis and its risk factors, focusing on new findings in atherosclerosis markers and its risk factors. Furthermore, the role of antioxidants and medicinal herbs in atherosclerosis and endothelial damage has been discussed and a list of important medicinal plants effective in the treatment and prevention of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis is presented. Methods: The recently published papers about atherosclerosis pathogenesis and herbal medicines effective in the treatment and prevention of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis were searched. Results: Inflammation has a crucial role in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The disease is accompanied by excessive fibrosis of the intima, fatty plaques formation, proliferation of smooth muscle cells, and migration of a group of cells such as monocytes, T cells, and platelets which are formed in response to inflammation. The oxidation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) to Ox-LDL indicates the first step of atherosclerosis in cardiovascular diseases. Malondialdehyde factor shows the level of lipoperoxidation and is a sign of increased oxidative pressure and cardiovascular diseases. In special pathological conditions such as severe hypercholesterolemia, peroxynitrite concentration increases and atherosclerosis and vascular damage are intensified. Medicinal plants have shown to be capable of interacting these or other pathogenesis factors to prevent atherosclerosis. Conclusions: The pathogenesis factors involved in atherosclerosis have recently been cleared and the discovery of these factors has brought about new hopes for better prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:25489440

  20. Endogenous biosynthesis of thromboxane and prostacyclin in 2 distinct murine models of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Praticò, D; Cyrus, T; Li, H; FitzGerald, G A

    2000-12-01

    Thromboxane A(2) is a potent vasoconstrictor and platelet agonist; prostacyclin is a potent platelet inhibitor and vasodilator. Altered biosynthesis of these eicosanoids is a feature of human hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. This study examined whether in 2 murine models of atherosclerosis their levels are increased and correlated with the evolution of the disease. Urinary 2,3-dinor thromboxane B(2) and 2,3-dinor-6-keto prostaglandin F(1 alpha), metabolites of thromboxane and prostacyclin, respectively, were assayed in apoliprotein E (apoE)-deficient mice on chow and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-deficient mice on chow and a Western-type diet. Atherosclerosis lesion area was measured by en face method. Both eicosanoids increased in apoE-deficient mice on chow and in LDLR-deficient mice on a high-fat diet, but not in LDLR-deficient mice on chow by the end of the study. Aspirin suppressed ex vivo platelet aggregation, serum thromboxane B(2), and 2,3-dinor thromboxane B(2), and significantly reduced the excretion of 2,3-dinor-6-keto prostaglandin F(1 alpha) in these animals. This study demonstrates that thromboxane as well as prostacyclin biosynthesis is increased in 2 murine models of atherogenesis and is secondary to increased in vivo platelet activation. Assessment of their generation in these models may afford the basis for future studies on the functional role of these eicosanoids in the evolution and progression of atherosclerosis. (Blood. 2000;96:3823-3826)

  1. Hemodynamic shear stress characteristic of atherosclerosis-resistant regions promotes glycocalyx formation in cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Koo, Andrew; Dewey, C Forbes; García-Cardeña, Guillermo

    2013-01-15

    The endothelial glycocalyx, a glycosaminoglycan layer located on the apical surface of vascular endothelial cells, has been shown to be important for several endothelial functions. Previous studies have documented that the glycocalyx is highly abundant in the mouse common carotid region, where the endothelium is exposed to laminar shear stress, and it is resistant to atherosclerosis. In contrast, the glycocalyx is scarce or absent in the mouse internal carotid sinus region, an area exposed to nonlaminar shear stress and highly susceptible to atherosclerosis. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesized that the expression of components of the endothelial glycocalyx is differentially regulated by distinct hemodynamic environments. To test this hypothesis, human endothelial cells were exposed to shear stress waveforms characteristic of atherosclerosis-resistant or atherosclerosis-susceptible regions of the human carotid, and the expression of several components of the glycocalyx was assessed. These experiments revealed that expression of several components of the endothelial glycocalyx is differentially regulated by distinct shear stress waveforms. Interestingly, we found that heparan sulfate expression is increased and evenly distributed on the apical surface of endothelial cells exposed to the atheroprotective waveform and is irregularly present in cells exposed to the atheroprone waveform. Furthermore, expression of a heparan sulfate proteoglycan, syndecan-1, is also differentially regulated by the two waveforms, and its suppression mutes the atheroprotective flow-induced cell surface expression of heparan sulfate. Collectively, these data link distinct hemodynamic environments to the differential expression of critical components of the endothelial glycocalyx.

  2. Metabonomics-based omics study and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Duo-Jiao; Zhu, Bi-Jun; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis results from dyslipidemia and systemic inflammation, associated with the strong metabolism and interaction between diet and disease. Strategies based on the global profiling of metabolism would be important to define the mechanisms involved in pathological alterations. Metabonomics is the quantitative measurement of the dynamic multiparametric metabolic response of living systems to pathophysiological stimuli or genetic modification. Metabonomics has been used in combination with proteomics and transcriptomics as the part of a systems biology description to understand the genome interaction with the development of atherosclerosis. The present review describes the application of metabonomics to explore the potential role of metabolic disturbances and inflammation in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis. Metabonomics-based omics study offers a new potential for biomarker discovery by disentangling the impacts of diet, environment and lifestyle.

  3. Inflammatory cytokines in atherosclerosis: current therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Tousoulis, Dimitris; Oikonomou, Evangelos; Economou, Evangelos K; Crea, Filippo; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2016-06-01

    The notion of atherosclerosis as a chronic inflammatory disease has intensified research on the role of cytokines and the way these molecules act and interact to initiate and sustain inflammation in the microenvironment of an atherosclerotic plaque. Cytokines are expressed by all types of cells involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, act on a variety of targets exerting multiple effects, and are largely responsible for the crosstalk among endothelial, smooth muscle cells, leucocytes, and other vascular residing cells. It is now understood that widely used drugs such as statins, aspirin, methotrexate, and colchicine act in an immunomodulatory way that may beneficially affect atherogenesis and/or cardiovascular disease progression. Moreover, advancement in pharmaceutical design has enabled the production of highly specific antibodies against key molecules involved in the perpetuation of the inflammatory cascade, raising hope for advances in the treatment of atherosclerosis. This review describes the actions and effects of these agents, their potential clinical significance, and future prospects. PMID:26843277

  4. [The treatment of atherosclerosis--drug therapy].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Takahashi, Y

    1993-08-01

    Drug treatment against atherosclerosis has been evaluated recently in many epidemiological studies. Lipid Research Clinics Group convincingly reported in a large scale design that anion exchange resin effectively reduced blood cholesterol level and concomitantly decreased the events of coronary heart disease. Subsequently, anion exchange resin with or without combined administration of niacin or statin was found to inhibit the progression of coronary atherosclerotic lesions in FATS, SCOR, CLAS and STARS. Fenofibrate also successfully reduced the coronary artery narrowings. Based on these intervention studies, several hypocholesterolemic agents are definitely effective in the treatment of coronary atherosclerosis.

  5. Atherosclerosis and the role of immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Ilhan, Fulya; Kalkanli, Sevgi Tas

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease arising from lipids, specifically low-density lipoproteins, and leukocytes. Following the activation of endothelium with the expression of adhesion molecules and monocytes, inflammatory cytokines from macrophages, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, high levels of interferon (IFN)-α and β are generated upon the activation of toll-like receptor-9, and T-cells, especially the ones with Th1 profile, produce pro-inflammatory mediators such as IFN-γ and upregulate macrophages to adhere to the endothelium and migrate into the intima. This review presents an exhaustive account for the role of immune cells in the atherosclerosis. PMID:25879006

  6. Long Noncoding RNA: Recent Updates in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Zhu, Hongming; Ge, Junbo

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs belong to a class of noncoding RNAs longer than 200 nucleotides with the epigenetic regulation potential. As a novel molecular regulator, lncRNAs are often dysregulated in various pathological conditions and display multiple functions in a wide range of biological processes. Given that recent studies have indicated that lncRNAs are involved in atherosclerosis-related smooth muscle cell, endothelial cell, macrophage and lipid metabolism regulation, it is pertinent to understand the potential function of lncRNAs in atherosclerosis development. This review will highlight the recent updates of lncRNAs in atherogenesis and also discuss their potential roles as novel therapeutic targets. PMID:27314829

  7. Imaging Atherosclerosis in Diabetes: Current State.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Sina; Nakanishi, Rine; Budoff, Matthew J

    2016-11-01

    Cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction and stroke, are the primary causes of mortality in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Affected patients frequently have asymptomatic coronary artery disease. Studies have shown heterogeneity in cardiovascular risk among patients with diabetes. Imaging can help categorize risk of future cardiovascular events by identifying those patients with atherosclerosis, rather than relying on risk prediction based on population-based studies. In this article, we will review the evidence regarding use of atherosclerosis imaging in patients with diabetes to predict risk of coronary heart disease and mortality. PMID:27658933

  8. Inflammation in atherosclerosis: new opportunities for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Meng, Charles Q

    2005-01-01

    Many lines of evidence indicate that inflammation is the ultimate cause of atherosclerosis; high cholesterol levels cause atherosclerosis through mechanism of inflammation. Drugs designed to address inflammatory aspects of atherosclerosis will likely be more effective than current therapies in treating and preventing coronary artery disease. PMID:15638790

  9. Nanomedicine for Atherosclerosis: Molecular Imaging and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Karagkiozaki, Varvara; Logothetidis, Stergios; Pappa, Anna-Maria

    2015-02-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and the underlying process of atherosclerosis are considered to be the most frequent causes of mortality and morbidity in developed societies. Atherosclerosis constitutes a systemic, chronic and progressive inflammatory disease that is initiated by early endothelial dysfunction and is subsequently amplified by oxidative stress, lipid deposition and monocyte recruitment. An interplay occurs among diverse cells, chemoattractants, adhesion molecules and low-density lipoproteins in the subendothelium. Due to the complexity of its pathogenesis, effective therapeutic strategies have not yet been applied in routine clinical practice. With the advent of nanotechnology, nanoparticulate systems with diagnostic and therapeutic moieties for the site-specific targeting of atherosclerotic lesions as well as nanomaterials that are suitable for cardiovascular implants may offer possible solutions to certain shortfalls of current treatment regimens. This article describes the recent advances that involve different types of nanoparticles for the early detection and concurrent therapy of atherosclerotic lesions. Moreover, it provides a state-of-the-art overview of stent technology in the restoration of normal blood flow to ischemic myocardial sites and underscores its drawbacks in light of substantial nanotechnology-based improvements. Emphasis is placed on the contribution of nanomedicine to the development of novel and effective therapies for atherosclerosis, ranging from 'nanotheranostic' strategies for vulnerable plaques to the nanoporous and nanoparticulate drug-delivery platforms that have been applied to stent technology. By striking a balance between the efficacy and the potential toxicity of nanotechnology-enabled systems, new frontiers in atherosclerosis treatment will emerge.

  10. Non-coding RNAs and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) represent a class of RNA molecules that typically do not code for proteins. Emerging data suggest that ncRNAs play an important role in several physiological and pathological conditions such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) including atherosclerosis. The best-characterized ncRNAs are the microRNAs (miRNAs), which are small, ~22 nucleotide (nt) sequences of RNA that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level through transcript degradation or translational repression. MiRNAs control several aspects of atherosclerosis including endothelial cell, vascular smooth cell, and macrophage functions as well as lipoprotein metabolism. Apart from miRNAs, recently ncRNAs, especially long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), have emerged as important potential regulators of the progression of atherosclerosis. However, the molecular mechanism of their regulation and function as well as significance of other ncRNAs such as small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) during atherogenesis is largely unknown. In this review, we summarize the recent findings in the field, highlighting the importance of ncRNAs in atherosclerosis and discuss their potential use as therapeutic targets in CVDs. PMID:24623179

  11. Subclinical atherosclerosis and subsequent cognitive function

    PubMed Central

    Rossetti, Heidi C.; Weiner, Myron; Hynan, Linda S.; Cullum, C. Munro; Khera, Amit; Lacritz, Laura H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between measures of subclinical atherosclerosis and subsequent cognitive function. Method Participants from the Dallas Heart Study (DHS), a population-based multiethnic study of cardiovascular disease pathogenesis, were re-examined 8 years later (DHS-2) with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA); N = 1904, mean age = 42.9, range 8–65. Associations of baseline measures of subclinical atherosclerosis (coronary artery calcium, abdominal aortic plaque, and abdominal aortic wall thickness) with MoCA scores measured at follow-up were examined in the group as a whole and in relation to age and ApoE4 status. Results A significant linear trend of successively lower MoCA scores with increasing numbers of atherosclerotic indicators was observed (F(3, 1150) = 5.918, p = .001). CAC was weakly correlated with MoCA scores (p = .047) and MoCA scores were significantly different between participants with and without CAC (M = 22.35 vs 23.69, p = 0.038). With the exception of a small association between abdominal AWT and MoCA in subjects over age 50, abdominal AWT and abdominal aortic plaque did not correlate with MoCA total score (p ≥.052). Cognitive scores and atherosclerosis measures were not impacted by ApoE4 status (p ≥.455). Conclusion In this ethnically diverse population-based sample, subclinical atherosclerosis was minimally associated with later cognitive function in middle-aged adults. PMID:25957568

  12. Photoacoustic tomography: applications for atherosclerosis imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangha, Gurneet S.; Goergen, Craig J.

    2016-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is a debilitating condition that increases a patient’s risk for intermittent claudication, limb amputation, myocardial infarction, and stroke, thereby causing approximately 50% of deaths in the western world. Current diagnostic imaging techniques, such as ultrasound, digital subtraction angiography, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and optical imaging remain suboptimal for detecting development of early stage plaques. This is largely due to the lack of compositional information, penetration depth, and/or clinical efficiency of these traditional imaging techniques. Photoacoustic imaging has emerged as a promising modality that could address some of these limitations to improve the diagnosis and characterization of atherosclerosis-related diseases. Photoacoustic imaging uses near-infrared light to induce acoustic waves, which can be used to recreate compositional images of tissue. Recent developments in photoacoustic techniques show its potential in noninvasively characterizing atherosclerotic plaques deeper than traditional optical imaging approaches. In this review, we discuss the significance and development of atherosclerosis, current and novel clinical diagnostic methods, and recent works that highlight the potential of photoacoustic imaging for both experimental and clinical studies of atherosclerosis.

  13. Phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein 1 in vacular endothelial cell autophagy and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Li, HaiYing; Zhang, JinFeng; Lu, Wei; Zhao, Jing; Su, Le; Zhao, BaoXiang; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, ShangLi; Miao, JunYing

    2013-01-01

    We previously found that phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) was a key inducing element of atherosclerosis, and might negatively regulate human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) autophagy. To further investigate the mechanism of PC-PLC action, we initially identified phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein 1 (PEBP1) as a binding partner of PC-PLC by using mass spectrometry (MS, MALDI-TOF/TOF). We found that PEBP1 positively regulated PC-PLC activity in HUVECs, and inhibition of PC-PLC by its inhibitor D609 suppressed PEBP1 expression dramatically. Moreover, both PC-PLC and PEBP1 negatively regulated HUVEC autophagy independently of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Furthermore, the PEBP1 level was elevated during the development of atherosclerosis, while D609 significantly decreased the upregulated PEBP1 level in apoE−/− mice. PMID:23959677

  14. [Immune cells in atherosclerosis--good or bad?].

    PubMed

    Klingenberg, Roland; Matter, Christian M; Lüscher, Thomas F

    2016-04-13

    Inflammation is a major mediator of atherosclerosis and plays a pivotal role for both innate and adaptive immunity in the onset and the progression of atherosclerosis. Novel insights into how the adaptive immune system is activated and propagates atherosclerosis elucidate the intricate interplay of different subsets of lymphocytes and their mediators as a central feature of vascular inflammation. The recognition of an inherent anti-inflammatory component of the adaptive immune system mediated by regulatory T (Treg) cells outline a novel concept: the expansion of regulatory T cells to reduce atherosclerosis. Based on a variety of research results, this concept represents a new therapeutic option in patients with atherosclerosis.

  15. [Immune cells in atherosclerosis--good or bad?].

    PubMed

    Klingenberg, Roland; Matter, Christian M; Lüscher, Thomas F

    2016-04-13

    Inflammation is a major mediator of atherosclerosis and plays a pivotal role for both innate and adaptive immunity in the onset and the progression of atherosclerosis. Novel insights into how the adaptive immune system is activated and propagates atherosclerosis elucidate the intricate interplay of different subsets of lymphocytes and their mediators as a central feature of vascular inflammation. The recognition of an inherent anti-inflammatory component of the adaptive immune system mediated by regulatory T (Treg) cells outline a novel concept: the expansion of regulatory T cells to reduce atherosclerosis. Based on a variety of research results, this concept represents a new therapeutic option in patients with atherosclerosis. PMID:27078727

  16. Clinical Characteristics of Young Type 2 Diabetes Patients with Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenjia; Cai, Xiaoling; Han, Xueyao; Ji, Linong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing rapidly in the young population. The clinical characteristics and risk factors for young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis are not fully explicated. The aim of the present study was to investigate various clinical and biochemical characteristics of young type 2 diabetic patients with atherosclerosis. Design and Methods This was a cross-sectional study. The study involved 2199 hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes. The young patients were classified into the atherosclerotic group or the non-atherosclerotic group, and we also enrolled an older group with peripheral atherosclerosis disease and an age of at least 45 years. Comparisons were made between the different groups to investigate the cardiovascular and metabolic risk profiles of young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis. We also used logistic regression models to assess the atherosclerosis risk factors for young patients. Results Compared to older type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis, young patients with atherosclerosis had more deleterious profiles of weight and hyperlipidemia. Only age and diabetes duration were found to be significant independent risk factors for atherosclerosis in young patients. The ratio of the presence of atherosclerosis in the lower extremity arteries alone was significantly higher in young patients than older patients (26.4% vs. 14.0%, P = 0.000). Conclusion Young type 2 diabetes patients with atherosclerosis have more adverse cardiovascular risk profiles and inadequate control of these risk factors. Lower extremity examination is of high importance in young patients. PMID:27391819

  17. Current status of carotid ultrasound in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) primarily caused by atherosclerosis is a major cause of death and disability in developed countries. Sonographic carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is widely studied as a surrogate marker for detecting subclinical atherosclerosis for risk prediction and disease progress to guide medical intervention. However, there is no standardized CIMT measurement methodology in clinical studies resulting in inconsistent findings, thereby undermining the clinical value of CIMT. Increasing evidences show that CIMT alone has weak predictive value for CVD while CIMT including plaque presence consistently improves the predictive power. Quantification of plaque burden further enhances the predictive power beyond plaque presence. Sonographic carotid plaque characteristics have been found to be predictive of cerebral ischaemic events. With advances in ultrasound technology, enhanced assessment of carotid plaques is feasible to detect high-risk/vulnerable plaques, and provide risk assessment for ischemic stroke beyond measurement of luminal stenosis. PMID:27429912

  18. Mechanisms of MicroRNAs in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Schober, Andreas; Weber, Christian

    2016-05-23

    The maladaptation of endothelial cells to disturbed flow at arterial bifurcations increases permeability for lipoproteins. Additional injury by chemically modified lipoproteins disrupts the continuous repair of maladapted endothelial cells and triggers intimal macrophage accumulation. Macrophages remove modified lipoproteins from the extracellular space until the cholesterol overload leads to macrophage death and insufficient efferocytosis. This macrophage failure promotes the progression to advanced lesions by formation of a lipid-rich necrotic core, which may rupture and cause myocardial infarction and stroke. In this article, we summarize the fundamental roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the regulation of endothelial maladaptation and macrophage failure during atherosclerosis. We describe how miRNAs coordinate the mutual interaction between chronic endothelial repair and endothelial senescence and mechanistically link the regulation of macrophage cholesterol homeostasis with defective efferocytosis. Lastly, we discuss how miRNAs may challenge and extend current theories about atherosclerosis. PMID:27193456

  19. Computer assessment of atherosclerosis from angiographic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selzer, R. H.; Blankenhorn, D. H.; Brooks, S. H.; Crawford, D. W.; Cashin, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    A computer method for detection and quantification of atherosclerosis from angiograms has been developed and used to measure lesion change in human clinical trials. The technique involves tracking the vessel edges and measuring individual lesions as well as the overall irregularity of the arterial image. Application of the technique to conventional arterial-injection femoral and coronary angiograms is outlined and an experimental study to extend the technique to analysis of intravenous angiograms of the carotid and cornary arteries is described.

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduce Murine Atherosclerosis Development

    PubMed Central

    Frodermann, Vanessa; van Duijn, Janine; van Pel, Melissa; van Santbrink, Peter J.; Bot, Ilze; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C. A.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have regenerative properties, but recently they were also found to have immunomodulatory capacities. We therefore investigated whether MSCs could reduce atherosclerosis, which is determined by dyslipidaemia and chronic inflammation. We adoptively transferred MSCs into low-density lipoprotein-receptor knockout mice and put these on a Western-type diet to induce atherosclerosis. Initially after treatment, we found higher levels of circulating regulatory T cells. In the long-term, overall numbers of effector T cells were reduced by MSC treatment. Moreover, MSC-treated mice displayed a significant 33% reduction in circulating monocytes and a 77% reduction of serum CCL2 levels. Most strikingly, we found a previously unappreciated effect on lipid metabolism. Serum cholesterol was reduced by 33%, due to reduced very low-density lipoprotein levels, likely a result of reduced de novo hepatic lipogenesis as determined by a reduced expression of Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 and lipoprotein lipase. MSCs significantly affected lesion development, which was reduced by 33% in the aortic root. These lesions contained 56% less macrophages and showed a 61% reduction in T cell numbers. We show here for the first time that MSC treatment affects not only inflammatory responses but also significantly reduces dyslipidaemia in mice. This makes MSCs a potent candidate for atherosclerosis therapies. PMID:26490642

  1. Lifestyle effects on hematopoiesis and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nahrendorf, Matthias; Swirski, Filip K

    2015-02-27

    Diet, exercise, stress, and sleep are receiving attention as environmental modifiers of chronic inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis, the culprit condition of myocardial infarction and stroke. Accumulating data indicate that psychosocial stress and a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet aggravate cardiovascular disease, whereas regular physical activity and healthy sleeping habits help prevent it. Here, we raise the possibility that inflammation-associated leukocyte production plays a causal role in lifestyle effects on atherosclerosis progression. Specifically, we explore whether and how potent real-life disease modifiers influence hematopoiesis' molecular and cellular machinery. Lifestyle, we hypothesize, may rearrange hematopoietic topography, diverting production from the bone marrow to the periphery, thus propagating a quantitative and qualitative drift of the macrophage supply chain. These changes may involve progenitor-extrinsic and intrinsic communication nodes that connect organ systems along neuroimmune and immunometabolic axes, ultimately leading to an altered number and phenotype of lesional macrophages. We propose that, in conjunction with improved public health policy, future therapeutics could aim to modulate the quantitative and qualitative output, as well as the location, of the hematopoietic tree to decrease the risk of atherosclerosis complications. PMID:25722442

  2. Comparative studies of atherosclerosis in swine

    PubMed Central

    Bijlenga, G.; Dahme, E.; Detweiler, D. K.; Gresham, G. A.; Grünberg, W.; Howard, A. N.; Kagan, A. R.; Kaplan, M. M.; van Nie, C. J.; Rubarth, S.; Sternby, N. H.; Stünzi, H.; Uemura, K.; Whitney, J. C.

    1967-01-01

    A survey of spontaneously occurring fatty streaks and fibrous plaques, considered as atherosclerosis, in 1637 swine in different European countries and the USA, using a standardized procedure, was undertaken to determine whether significant differences exist in the occurrence and extent of the disease in various groups of animals. At the same time a preliminary study on the possible relation of any differences observed in atherosclerosis to certain environmental and constitutional factors was carried out with the ultimate goal of contributing to the understanding of analogous problems in man. Statistically significant increases of fatty streaks and fibrous plaques were noted in relation to: (a) increasing age, starting at 6 to 7 months, the earliest age period studied; (b) geographical locality; and (c) considerable as compared with moderate or slight physical activity at 1 year of age. Although not statistically significant, there was also a suggestive trend towards more atherosclerosis in pigs consuming soft water as compared with those consuming hard water. While these correlations may represent contributory factors to the increases of the changes noted in the abdominal aortas, it is not possible to pinpoint the importance of individual components because of the limited data and the large number of variables involved in this preliminary study. Studies in swine and other animals are being encouraged in which all variables but one are being kept constant to determine their possible role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:5299676

  3. MicroRNA Regulation of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Mark W; Moore, Kathryn J

    2016-02-19

    Atherosclerosis and its attendant clinical complications, such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral artery disease, are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western societies. In response to biochemical and biomechanical stimuli, atherosclerotic lesion formation occurs from the participation of a range of cell types, inflammatory mediators, and shear stress. Over the past decade, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as evolutionarily conserved, noncoding small RNAs that serve as important regulators and fine-tuners of a range of pathophysiological cellular effects and molecular signaling pathways involved in atherosclerosis. Accumulating studies reveal the importance of miRNAs in regulating key signaling and lipid homeostasis pathways that alter the balance of atherosclerotic plaque progression and regression. In this review, we highlight current paradigms of miRNA-mediated effects in atherosclerosis progression and regression. We provide an update on the potential use of miRNAs diagnostically for detecting increasing severity of coronary disease and clinical events. Finally, we provide a perspective on therapeutic opportunities and challenges for miRNA delivery in the field.

  4. Vaccination, atherosclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, J F; Pereira, R M R; Shoenfeld, Y

    2009-11-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease, leading to the formation of pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidative lipids that generate an immune response. Several antigens have been shown to activate the immune response and affect the development of atherogenesis. Systemic lupus erythematosus is an autoimmune and inflammatory disease strongly associated with premature development of atherosclerotic plaques. Modulation of the immune system could represent a useful approach to prevent and/or treat atherosclerosis. A vaccination-based approach might be a useful, effective tool in the modern arsenal of cardiovascular therapies and could be used on a large scale at a low cost. In non-systemic lupus erythematosus populations, vaccines against oxidized low-density lipoprotein, beta-2-glycoprotein I, heat shock proteins, lipoproteins, cholesterol, molecules involved in cholesterol metabolism, and other molecules (CD99, vascular endothelial growth factor-receptor, and interleukin-2) have been tested, with promising results. However, there are no studies of vaccination against atherosclerosis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

  5. Lifestyle effects on hematopoiesis and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Nahrendorf, Matthias; Swirski, Filip K

    2015-02-27

    Diet, exercise, stress, and sleep are receiving attention as environmental modifiers of chronic inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis, the culprit condition of myocardial infarction and stroke. Accumulating data indicate that psychosocial stress and a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet aggravate cardiovascular disease, whereas regular physical activity and healthy sleeping habits help prevent it. Here, we raise the possibility that inflammation-associated leukocyte production plays a causal role in lifestyle effects on atherosclerosis progression. Specifically, we explore whether and how potent real-life disease modifiers influence hematopoiesis' molecular and cellular machinery. Lifestyle, we hypothesize, may rearrange hematopoietic topography, diverting production from the bone marrow to the periphery, thus propagating a quantitative and qualitative drift of the macrophage supply chain. These changes may involve progenitor-extrinsic and intrinsic communication nodes that connect organ systems along neuroimmune and immunometabolic axes, ultimately leading to an altered number and phenotype of lesional macrophages. We propose that, in conjunction with improved public health policy, future therapeutics could aim to modulate the quantitative and qualitative output, as well as the location, of the hematopoietic tree to decrease the risk of atherosclerosis complications.

  6. Atherosclerosis: the path from genomics to therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Miller, David T; Ridker, Paul M; Libby, Peter; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2007-04-17

    Recent rapid advances in genomic tools and techniques hold great promise for transforming the practice of cardiovascular medicine. Resources including the Human Genome Project and the International HapMap project, major technological advances in high-throughput genotyping and methods of statistical analysis, and methods for high-throughput gene expression and small molecule profiling allow researchers to confront issues that will fundamentally change the practice of cardiovascular medicine during the 21st century. Genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic studies of complex cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis will bridge epidemiology and basic biology, and promise increased understanding of cardiovascular disease processes. Genetic approaches applied to atherosclerosis will continue to identify genes and pathways involved in the predisposition to and pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Gene expression profiling refines our understanding of the dynamic nature of the atherosclerotic vascular wall and promises discovery and validation of targets for therapeutic intervention. Opportunities to translate genetic, genomic, proteomic, and metabolomic information into cardiovascular clinical practice have never been greater, but their fruition requires validation in large independent cohorts, achieved only through collaborative effort. Their continued success will depend on ongoing cooperation within the cardiovascular research community.

  7. Accelerated atherosclerosis in patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatologic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jison; Maron, David J; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Weyand, Cornelia M

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex inflammatory disease involving aberrant immune and tissue healing responses, which begins with endothelial dysfunction and ends with plaque development, instability and rupture. The increased risk for coronary artery disease in patients with rheumatologic diseases highlights how aberrancy in the innate and adaptive immune system may be central to development of both disease states and that atherosclerosis may be on a spectrum of immune-mediated conditions. Recognition of the tight association between chronic inflammatory disease and complications of atherosclerosis will impact the understanding of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and change diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in patients with rheumatologic syndromes as well as patients with coronary artery disease. In this review, we provide a summary of the role of the immune system in atherosclerosis, discuss the proposed mechanisms of accelerated atherosclerosis seen in association with rheumatologic diseases, evaluate the effect of immunosuppression on atherosclerosis and provide updates on available risk assessment tools, biomarkers and imaging modalities. PMID:27042216

  8. LDL biochemical modifications: a link between atherosclerosis and aging

    PubMed Central

    Alique, Matilde; Luna, Carlos; Carracedo, Julia; Ramírez, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an aging disease in which increasing age is a risk factor. Modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is a well-known risk marker for cardiovascular disease. High-plasma LDL concentrations and modifications, such as oxidation, glycosylation, carbamylation and glycoxidation, have been shown to be proatherogenic experimentally in vitro and in vivo. Atherosclerosis results from alterations to LDL in the arterial wall by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Evidence suggests that common risk factors for atherosclerosis raise the likelihood that free ROS are produced from endothelial cells and other cells. Furthermore, oxidative stress is an important factor in the induction of endothelial senescence. Thus, endothelial damage and cellular senescence are well-established markers for atherosclerosis. This review examines LDL modifications and discusses the mechanisms of the pathology of atherosclerosis due to aging, including endothelial damage and oxidative stress, and the link between aging and atherosclerosis. PMID:26637360

  9. Tissue specific up regulation of ACE2 in rabbit model of atherosclerosis by atorvastatin: role of epigenetic histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Tikoo, Kulbhushan; Patel, Gaurang; Kumar, Sandeep; Karpe, Pinakin Arun; Sanghavi, Maitri; Malek, Vajir; Srinivasan, K

    2015-02-01

    Growing body of evidence points out the crucial role of ACE2 in preventing atherosclerosis. However, data on how atherosclerosis affects ACE2 expression in heart and kidney remains unknown. Atherosclerosis was induced by feeding New Zealand White rabbits with high cholesterol diet (HCD - 2%) for 12 weeks and atorvastatin was administered (5mg/kg/day p.o) in last 3 weeks. ACE2 mRNA and protein expression was assessed by Western blotting and real time PCR. HCD fed rabbits developed atherosclerosis as confirmed by increase in plasma total cholesterol, LDL and triglycerides as well as formation atherosclerotic plaques in arch of aorta. The ACE2 protein but not mRNA expression was reduced in heart and kidney of HCD rabbits. Interestingly, atorvastatin increased the ACE2 protein expression in heart and kidney of HCD rabbits. However, atorvastatin increased ACE2 mRNA in heart but not in kidney of HCD rabbits. Atorvastatin increased the occupancy of histone H3 acetylation (H3-Ac) mark on ACE2 promoter region in heart of HCD rabbits indicating direct or indirect epigenetic up-regulation of ACE2 by atorvastatin. Further, atorvastatin suppressed Ang II-induced contractile responses and enhanced AT2 receptor mediated relaxant responses in atherosclerotic aorta. We propose that atherosclerosis is associated with reduced ACE2 expression in heart and kidney. We also show an unexplored potential of atorvastatin to up-regulate ACE2 via epigenetic histone modifications. Our data suggest a novel way of replenishing ACE2 expression for preventing not only atherosclerosis but also other cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25482567

  10. Loss of Reelin protects against atherosclerosis by reducing leukocyte-endothelial adhesion and lesion macrophage accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yinyuan; Huang, Linzhang; Xian, Xunde; Yuhanna, Ivan S.; Wasser, Catherine R.; Frotscher, Michael; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W.; Herz, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The multimodular glycoprotein Reelin controls neuronal migration and synaptic transmission by binding to Apolipoprotein E receptor-2 (Apoer2) and very low-density lipoprotein receptor (Vldlr) on neurons. In the periphery, Reelin is produced by the liver, circulates in blood and promotes thrombosis and hemostasis. To investigate if Reelin influences atherogenesis we studied atherosclerosis-prone low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr−/−) mice in which we inducibly deleted Reelin either ubiquitously or only in the liver, thus preventing the production of circulating Reelin. In both types of Reelin-deficient mice, atherosclerosis progression was markedly attenuated, and macrophage content and endothelial cell staining for vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1) were reduced at the sites of atherosclerotic lesions. Intravital microscopy revealed decreased leukocyte-endothelial adhesion in the Reelin-deficient mice. In cultured human endothelial cells, Reelin enhanced monocyte adhesion and increased ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression by suppressing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and increasing the activity of NF-kB in an Apoer2-dependent manner. These findings suggest that circulating Reelin promotes atherosclerosis by increasing vascular inflammation, and that reducing or inhibiting circulating Reelin may present a novel approach for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26980442

  11. Hypercholesterolemia Tunes Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells for Inflammation and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaojuan; Feng, Yingmei

    2016-01-01

    As the pathological basis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), atherosclerosis is featured as a chronic inflammation. Hypercholesterolemia is an independent risk factor for CVD. Accumulated studies have shown that hypercholesterolemia is associated with myeloid cell expansion, which stimulates innate and adaptive immune responses, strengthens inflammation, and accelerates atherosclerosis progression. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) in bone marrow (BM) expresses a panel of lipoprotein receptors to control cholesterol homeostasis. Deficiency of these receptors abrogates cellular cholesterol efflux, resulting in HSPC proliferation and differentiation in hypercholesterolemic mice. Reduction of the cholesterol level in the lipid rafts by infusion of reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or its major apolipoprotein, apoA-I, reverses hypercholesterolemia-induced HSPC expansion. Apart from impaired cholesterol metabolism, inhibition of reactive oxygen species production suppresses HSPC activation and leukocytosis. These data indicate that the mechanisms underlying the effects of hypercholesterolemia on HSPC proliferation and differentiation could be multifaceted. Furthermore, dyslipidemia also regulates HSPC-neighboring cells, resulting in HSPC mobilization. In the article, we review how hypercholesterolemia evokes HSPC activation and mobilization directly or via its modification of BM microenvironment. We hope this review will bring light to finding key molecules to control HSPC expansion, inflammation, and atherosclerosis for the treatment of CVD. PMID:27447612

  12. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Protects against Atherosclerosis via Fine-Tuning the Multiorgan Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Leigang; Lin, Zhuofeng

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a metabolic hormone with pleiotropic effects on energy metabolism and insulin sensitivity. Besides its antiobese and antidiabetic activity, FGF21 also possesses the protective effects against atherosclerosis. Circulating levels of FGF21 are elevated in patients with atherosclerosis, macrovascular and microvascular complications of diabetes, possibly due to a compensatory upregulation. In apolipoprotein E-deficient mice, formation of atherosclerotic plaques is exacerbated by genetic depletion of FGF21, but is attenuated upon replenishment with recombinant FGF21. However, the blood vessel is not the direct target of FGF21, and the antiatherosclerotic activity of FGF21 is attributed to its actions in adipose tissues and liver. In adipocytes, FGF21 promotes secretion of adiponectin, which in turn acts directly on blood vessels to reduce endothelial dysfunction, inhibit proliferation of smooth muscle cells and block conversion of macrophages to foam cells. Furthermore, FGF21 suppresses cholesterol biosynthesis and attenuates hypercholesterolemia by inhibiting the transcription factor sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 in hepatocytes. The effects of FGF21 on elevation of adiponectin and reduction of hypercholesterolemia are also observed in a phase-1b clinical trial in patients with obesity and diabetes. Therefore, FGF21 exerts its protection against atherosclerosis by fine-tuning the interorgan crosstalk between liver, brain, adipose tissue, and blood vessels. PMID:26912152

  13. Is atherosclerosis fundamental to human aging? Lessons from ancient mummies.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Emily M; Thompson, Randall C; Allam, Adel H; Wann, L Samuel; Lombardi, Guido P; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Cox, Samantha L; Soliman, Muhammad Al-Tohamy; Abd el-Maksoud, Gomaa; Badr, Ibrahem; Miyamoto, Michael I; Frohlich, Bruno; Nur el-din, Abdel-Halim; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Narula, Jagat; Zink, Albert R; Finch, Caleb E; Michalik, David E; Thomas, Gregory S

    2014-05-01

    Case reports from Johan Czermak, Marc Ruffer, and others a century or more ago demonstrated ancient Egyptians had atherosclerosis three millennia ago. The Horus study team extended their findings, demonstrating that atherosclerosis was prevalent among 76 ancient Egyptian mummies and among 61 mummies from each of the ancient cultures of Peru, the American Southwest, and the Aleutian Islands. These findings challenge the assumption that atherosclerosis is a modern disease caused by present day risk factors. An extensive autopsy of an ancient Egyptian teenage male weaver named Nakht found that he was infected with four parasites: Schistosoma haematobium, Taenia species, Trichinella spiralis, and Plasmodium falciparum. Modern day patients with chronic inflammatory disease such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and human immunodeficiency virus experience premature atherosclerosis. Could the burden of chronic inflammatory disease have been a risk factor for atherosclerosis in these ancient cultures? The prevalence of atherosclerosis in four diverse ancient cultures is consistent with atherosclerosis being fundamental to aging. The impact of risk factors in modern times, and potentially in ancient times, suggests a strong gene-environmental interplay: human genes provide a vulnerability to atherosclerosis, the environment determines when and if atherosclerosis becomes manifest clinically.

  14. Is the Use of Fullerene in Photodynamic Therapy Effective for Atherosclerosis?

    SciTech Connect

    Nitta, Norihisa Seko, Ayumi; Sonoda, Akinaga; Ohta, Shinichi; Tanaka, Toyohiko; Takahashi, Masashi; Murata, Kiyoshi; Takemura, Shizuki; Sakamoto, Tsutomu; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate Fullerene as a therapeutic photosensitizer in the treatment of atherosclerosis. An atherosclerotic experimental rabbit model was prepared by causing intimal injury to bilateral external iliac arteries using balloon expansion. In four atherosclerotic rabbits and one normal rabbit, polyethylene glycol-modified Fullerene (Fullerene-PEG) was infused into the left external iliac artery and illuminated by light emitting diode (LED), while the right external iliac artery was only illuminated by LED. Two weeks later, the histological findings for each iliac artery were evaluated quantitatively and comparisons were made among atherosclerotic Fullerene+LED artery (n = 4), atherosclerotic light artery (n = 4), normal Fullerene+LED artery (n = 1), and normal light artery (n = 1). An additional two atherosclerotic rabbits were studied by fluorescence microscopy, after Fullerene-PEG-Cy5 complex infusion into the left external iliac artery, for evaluation of Fullerene-PEG incorporated within the atherosclerotic lesions. The degree of atherosclerosis in the atherosclerotic Fullerene+LED artery was significantly (p < 0.05) more severe than that in the atherosclerotic LED artery. No pathological change was observed in normal Fullerene+LED and LED arteries. In addition, strong accumulation of Fullerene-PEG-Cy5 complex within the plaque of the left iliac artery of the two rabbits was demonstrated, in contrast to no accumulation in the right iliac artery. We conclude that infusion of a high concentration of Fullerene-PEG followed by photo-illumination resulted not in a suppression of atherosclerosis but in a progression of atherosclerosis in experimental rabbit models. However, this intervention showed no adverse effects on the normal iliac artery.

  15. Deleting myeloid IL-10 receptor signalling attenuates atherosclerosis in LDLR-/- mice by altering intestinal cholesterol fluxes.

    PubMed

    Stöger, J Lauran; Boshuizen, Marieke C S; Brufau, Gemma; Gijbels, Marion J J; Wolfs, Ine M J; van der Velden, Saskia; Pöttgens, Chantal C H; Vergouwe, Monique N; Wijnands, Erwin; Beckers, Linda; Goossens, Pieter; Kerksiek, Anja; Havinga, Rick; Müller, Werner; Lütjohann, Dieter; Groen, Albert K; de Winther, Menno P J

    2016-08-30

    Inflammatory responses and cholesterol homeostasis are interconnected in atherogenesis. Interleukin (IL)-10 is an important anti-inflammatory cytokine, known to suppress atherosclerosis development. However, the specific cell types responsible for the atheroprotective effects of IL-10 remain to be defined and knowledge on the actions of IL-10 in cholesterol homeostasis is scarce. Here we investigated the functional involvement of myeloid IL-10-mediated atheroprotection. To do so, bone marrow from IL-10 receptor 1 (IL-10R1) wild-type and myeloid IL-10R1-deficient mice was transplanted to lethally irradiated female LDLR-/- mice. Hereafter, mice were given a high cholesterol diet for 10 weeks after which atherosclerosis development and cholesterol metabolism were investigated. In vitro, myeloid IL-10R1 deficiency resulted in a pro-inflammatory macrophage phenotype. However, in vivo significantly reduced lesion size and severity was observed. This phenotype was associated with lower myeloid cell accumulation and more apoptosis in the lesions. Additionally, a profound reduction in plasma and liver cholesterol was observed upon myeloid IL-10R1 deficiency, which was reflected in plaque lipid content. This decreased hypercholesterolaemia was associated with lowered very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels, likely as a response to decreased intestinal cholesterol absorption. In addition, IL-10R1 deficient mice demonstrated substantially higher faecal sterol loss caused by increased non-biliary cholesterol efflux. The induction of this process was linked to impaired ACAT2-mediated esterification of liver and plasma cholesterol. Overall, myeloid cells do not contribute to IL-10-mediated atheroprotection. In addition, this study demonstrates a novel connection between IL-10-mediated inflammation and cholesterol homeostasis in atherosclerosis. These findings make us reconsider IL-10 as a beneficial influence on atherosclerosis. PMID:27358035

  16. Short and Long-Term Effects of the Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker Irbesartan on Intradialytic Central Hemodynamics: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled One-Year Intervention Trial (the SAFIR Study)

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Christian Daugaard; Kjaergaard, Krista Dybtved; Jensen, Jens Dam; Christensen, Kent Lodberg; Strandhave, Charlotte; Tietze, Ida Noerager; Novosel, Marija Kristina; Bibby, Bo Martin; Jespersen, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim Little is known about the tolerability of antihypertensive drugs during hemodialysis treatment. The present study evaluated the use of the angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) irbesartan. Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, one-year intervention trial. Setting and Participants Eighty-two hemodialysis patients with urine output >300 mL/day and dialysis vintage <1 year. Intervention Irbesartan/placebo 300 mg/day for 12 months administered as add-on to antihypertensive treatment using a predialytic systolic blood pressure target of 140 mmHg in all patients. Outcomes and Measurements Cardiac output, stroke volume, central blood volume, total peripheral resistance, mean arterial blood pressure, and frequency of intradialytic hypotension. Results At baseline, the groups were similar regarding age, comorbidity, blood pressure, antihypertensive medication, ultrafiltration volume, and dialysis parameters. Over the one-year period, predialytic systolic blood pressure decreased significantly, but similarly in both groups. Mean start and mean end cardiac output, stroke volume, total peripheral resistance, heart rate, and mean arterial pressure were stable and similar in the two groups, whereas central blood volume increased slightly but similarly over time. The mean hemodynamic response observed during a dialysis session was a drop in cardiac output, in stroke volume, in mean arterial pressure, and in central blood volume, whereas heart rate increased. Total peripheral resistance did not change significantly. Overall, this pattern remained stable over time in both groups and was uninfluenced by ARB treatment. The total number of intradialytic hypotensive episodes was (placebo/ARB) 50/63 (P = 0.4). Ultrafiltration volume, left ventricular mass index, plasma albumin, and change in intradialytic total peripheral resistance were significantly associated with intradialytic hypotension in a multivariate logistic regression analysis based on

  17. Future imaging of atherosclerosis: molecular imaging of coronary atherosclerosis with 18F positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Psaltis, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the formation of complex atheroma lesions (plaques) in arteries that pose risk by their flow-limiting nature and propensity for rupture and thrombotic occlusion. It develops in the context of disturbances to lipid metabolism and immune response, with inflammation underpinning all stages of plaque formation, progression and rupture. As the primary disease process responsible for myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease, atherosclerosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality on a global scale. A precise understanding of its pathogenic mechanisms is therefore critically important. Integral to this is the role of vascular wall imaging. Over recent years, the rapidly evolving field of molecular imaging has begun to revolutionize our ability to image beyond just the anatomical substrate of vascular disease, and more dynamically assess its pathobiology. Nuclear imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) can target specific molecular and biological pathways involved in atherosclerosis, with the application of 18Fluoride PET imaging being widely studied for its potential to identify plaques that are vulnerable or high risk. In this review, we discuss the emergence of 18Fluoride PET as a promising modality for the assessment of coronary atherosclerosis, focusing on the strengths and limitations of the two main radionuclide tracers that have been investigated to date: 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose (18F-FDG) and sodium 18F-fluoride (18F-NaF). PMID:27500093

  18. Future imaging of atherosclerosis: molecular imaging of coronary atherosclerosis with (18)F positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Daniel J; Psaltis, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by the formation of complex atheroma lesions (plaques) in arteries that pose risk by their flow-limiting nature and propensity for rupture and thrombotic occlusion. It develops in the context of disturbances to lipid metabolism and immune response, with inflammation underpinning all stages of plaque formation, progression and rupture. As the primary disease process responsible for myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease, atherosclerosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality on a global scale. A precise understanding of its pathogenic mechanisms is therefore critically important. Integral to this is the role of vascular wall imaging. Over recent years, the rapidly evolving field of molecular imaging has begun to revolutionize our ability to image beyond just the anatomical substrate of vascular disease, and more dynamically assess its pathobiology. Nuclear imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) can target specific molecular and biological pathways involved in atherosclerosis, with the application of (18)Fluoride PET imaging being widely studied for its potential to identify plaques that are vulnerable or high risk. In this review, we discuss the emergence of (18)Fluoride PET as a promising modality for the assessment of coronary atherosclerosis, focusing on the strengths and limitations of the two main radionuclide tracers that have been investigated to date: 2-deoxy-2-((18)F)fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) and sodium (18)F-fluoride ((18)F-NaF). PMID:27500093

  19. Accelerated atherosclerosis in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis

    PubMed Central

    de Leeuw, K; Sanders, J; Stegeman, C; Smit, A; Kallenberg, C; Bijl, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Several autoimmune disorders are complicated by excess cardiovascular disease. In addition to traditional risk factors, non-traditional risk factors such as endothelial activation and excessive vascular remodelling might be determinants of the progression of atherosclerosis in patients with an autoimmune disease. Objective: To evaluate whether patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) have an increased prevalence of atherosclerosis and to determine predisposing factors. Methods: 29 WG patients (19 men; mean (SD) age, 53 (14) years) with inactive disease and 26 controls (16 men; age 53 (15) years) were studied. Common carotid intima–media thickness (IMT) was measured by ultrasound. In all individuals traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease were determined. High sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP) was measured. Endothelial activation was assessed by measuring thrombomodulin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, and von Willebrand factor. As a marker of vascular remodelling matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-3 and MMP-9) and TIMP-1 were measured. Results: IMT was increased in WG patients compared with controls (p<0.05). No differences in traditional risk factors and endothelial activation markers between patients and controls were found. Levels of hsCRP, MMPs, and TIMP-1 were increased in WG patients (p<0.05). Conclusions: Increased IMT found in WG patients cannot be explained by an increased prevalence of traditional risk factors. Although endothelial activation markers in WG patients with inactive disease were not increased, the raised levels of hsCRP, MMPs, and TIMP-1 suggest that enhanced inflammation and excessive vascular remodelling are contributing factors in the development of accelerated atherosclerosis in WG. PMID:15374854

  20. Chronic intermittent hypoxia exposure-induced atherosclerosis: a brief review.

    PubMed

    Song, Dongmei; Fang, Guoqiang; Greenberg, Harly; Liu, Shu Fang

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent in the USA and is recognized as an independent risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Identification of atherosclerosis risk factor attributable to OSA may provide opportunity to develop preventive measures for cardiovascular risk reduction. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a prominent feature of OSA pathophysiology and may be a major mechanism linking OSA to arteriosclerosis. Animal studies demonstrated that CIH exposure facilitated high-cholesterol diet (HCD)-induced atherosclerosis, accelerated the progression of existing atherosclerosis, and induced atherosclerotic lesions in the absence of other atherosclerosis risk factors, demonstrating that CIH is an independent causal factor of atherosclerosis. Comparative studies revealed major differences between CIH-induced and the classic HCD-induced atherosclerosis. Systemically, CIH was a much weaker inducer of atherosclerosis. CIH and HCD differentially activated inflammatory pathways. Histologically, CIH-induced atherosclerotic plaques had no clear necrotic core, contained a large number of CD31+ endothelial cells, and had mainly elastin deposition, whereas HCD-induced plaques had typical necrotic cores and fibrous caps, contained few endothelial cells, and had mainly collagen deposition. Metabolically, CIH caused mild, but HCD caused more severe dyslipidemia. Mechanistically, CIH did not, but HCD did, cause macrophage foam cell formation. NF-κB p50 gene deletion augmented CIH-induced, but not HCD-induced atherosclerosis. These differences reflect the intrinsic differences between the two types of atherosclerosis in terms of pathological nature and underlying mechanisms and support the notion that CIH-induced atherosclerosis is a new paradigm that differs from the classic HCD-induced atherosclerosis.

  1. Statins and atherosclerosis: the role of epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Storino Farina, Marcelo; Rojano Rada, Jairo; Molina Garrido, Antony; Martínez, Xiomara; Pulgar, Alfredo; Paniagua, Roxanna; Garrido, Jorge

    2015-11-26

    Atherosclerosis is an immune-inflammatory disease, in which pathophysiological mechanisms include inflammation patterns and epigenetic changes that alter gene expression of several inflammatory and non-inflammatory mediators. Epigenetics is offering explanations on how diet, environmental factors and lifestyle can influence the onset and progression of the disease, and how these alterations can be transmitted to the following generations without any changes in DNA sequences. Statins, through their pleiotropic effects, provide a useful tool in controlling the progression of plaques and their subsequent impact.

  2. Imaging and Nanomedicine in Inflammatory Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Willem J. M.; Jaffer, Farouc A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Bioengineering provides unique opportunities to better understand and manage atherosclerotic disease. The field is entering a new era that merges the latest biological insights into inflammatory disease processes with targeted imaging and nanomedicine. Preclinical cardiovascular molecular imaging allows the in vivo study of targeted nanotherapeutics specifically directed toward immune system components that drive atherosclerotic plaque development and complication. The first multicenter trials highlight the potential contribution of multimodality imaging to more efficient drug development. This review describes how the integration of engineering, nanotechnology, and cardiovascular immunology may yield precision diagnostics and efficient therapeutics for atherosclerosis and its ischemic complications. PMID:24898749

  3. MicroRNA-26a prevents endothelial cell apoptosis by directly targeting TRPC6 in the setting of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Qin, Wei; Zhang, Longyin; Wu, Xianxian; Du, Ning; Hu, Yingying; Li, Xiaoguang; Shen, Nannan; Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Haiying; Li, Zhange; Zhang, Yue; Yang, Huan; Gao, Feng; Du, Zhimin; Xu, Chaoqian; Yang, Baofeng

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease, is the major cause of life-threatening complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Endothelial apoptosis plays a vital role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. Although a subset of microRNAs (miRs) have been identified as critical regulators of atherosclerosis, studies on their participation in endothelial apoptosis in atherosclerosis have been limited. In our study, we found that miR-26a expression was substantially reduced in the aortic intima of ApoE−/− mice fed with a high-fat diet (HFD). Treatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) with oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) suppressed miR-26a expression. Forced expression of miR-26a inhibited endothelial apoptosis as evidenced by MTT assay and TUNEL staining results. Further analysis identified TRPC6 as a target of miR-26a, and TRPC6 overexpression abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of miR-26a. Moreover, the cytosolic calcium and the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway were found to mediate the beneficial effects of miR-26a on endothelial apoptosis. Taken together, our study reveals a novel role of miR-26a in endothelial apoptosis and indicates a therapeutic potential of miR-26a for atherosclerosis associated with apoptotic cell death. PMID:25801675

  4. MicroRNA-26a prevents endothelial cell apoptosis by directly targeting TRPC6 in the setting of atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Qin, Wei; Zhang, Longyin; Wu, Xianxian; Du, Ning; Hu, Yingying; Li, Xiaoguang; Shen, Nannan; Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Haiying; Li, Zhange; Zhang, Yue; Yang, Huan; Gao, Feng; Du, Zhimin; Xu, Chaoqian; Yang, Baofeng

    2015-03-01

    Atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease, is the major cause of life-threatening complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Endothelial apoptosis plays a vital role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic lesions. Although a subset of microRNAs (miRs) have been identified as critical regulators of atherosclerosis, studies on their participation in endothelial apoptosis in atherosclerosis have been limited. In our study, we found that miR-26a expression was substantially reduced in the aortic intima of ApoE-/- mice fed with a high-fat diet (HFD). Treatment of human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) with oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) suppressed miR-26a expression. Forced expression of miR-26a inhibited endothelial apoptosis as evidenced by MTT assay and TUNEL staining results. Further analysis identified TRPC6 as a target of miR-26a, and TRPC6 overexpression abolished the anti-apoptotic effect of miR-26a. Moreover, the cytosolic calcium and the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway were found to mediate the beneficial effects of miR-26a on endothelial apoptosis. Taken together, our study reveals a novel role of miR-26a in endothelial apoptosis and indicates a therapeutic potential of miR-26a for atherosclerosis associated with apoptotic cell death.

  5. Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 prevents atherosclerosis via inhibition of intestinal cholesterol absorption in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Wang, Jinfeng; Quan, Guihua; Wang, Xiaojun; Yang, Longfei; Zhong, Lili

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 4356 on the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE(-/-)) mice. Eight-week-old ApoE(-/-) mice were fed a Western diet with or without L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 daily for 16 weeks. L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 protected ApoE(-/-) mice from atherosclerosis by reducing their plasma cholesterol levels from 923 ± 44 to 581 ± 18 mg/dl, likely via a marked decrease in cholesterol absorption caused by modulation of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1). In addition, suppression of cholesterol absorption induced reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) in macrophages through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor/liver X receptor (PPAR/LXR) pathway. Fecal lactobacillus and bifidobacterium counts were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 treatment groups than in the control groups. Furthermore, L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 was detected in the rat small intestine, colon, and feces during the feeding trial. The bacterial levels remained high even after the administration of lactic acid bacteria had been stopped for 2 weeks. These results suggest that administration of L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 can protect against atherosclerosis through the inhibition of intestinal cholesterol absorption. Therefore, L. acidophilus ATCC 4356 may be a potential therapeutic material for preventing the progression of atherosclerosis.

  6. Role of DNA damage in atherosclerosis--bystander or participant?

    PubMed

    Gray, Kelly; Bennett, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Atherosclerosis leading to cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among western populations. Atherosclerosis in characterised by the development of a fibrofatty lesion that consists of a diverse cell population, including inflammatory cells that create an intensely oxidising environment within the vessel. Coupled with normal replication, the local intracellular and extracellular environment causes damage to cellular DNA that is recognised and repaired by the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway. The role of DNA damage and the resulting deregulation of 'normal' cellular behaviour and subsequent loss of cell cycle control checkpoints have been widely studied in cancer. However, despite the extensive evidence for DNA damage in atherosclerosis, it is only over the past two decades that a causative link between DNA damage and atherosclerosis has been hypothesised. Whilst atherosclerosis is a feature of human disease characterised by defects in DNA damage, currently the role of DNA damage in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis remains highly debated, as a 'chicken and egg' situation. This review will analyse the evidence for, the causes of, and consequences of DNA damage in atherosclerosis, detail the DNA damage response pathway that results in these consequences, and highlight therapeutic opportunities in this area. We also outline the evidence that DNA damage is a cause of both initiation and progression of atherosclerosis, and not just a consequence of disease.

  7. Nutritional Approaches to Primary Prevention of Atherosclerosis in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Fennoy, Ilene

    1981-01-01

    Many risk factors have been identified with the progression of atherosclerotic lesions. Of these hyperglycemia, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and obesity are amenable to nutritional therapy. Minimal data exist to prove that alteration in these risk factors prevent atherosclerosis in adults and children. This paper discusses nutritional approaches to prevention of atherosclerosis in children. PMID:7218362

  8. Quantum dot mediated imaging of atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayagopal, Ashwath; Su, Yan Ru; Blakemore, John L.; Linton, MacRae F.; Fazio, Sergio; Haselton, Frederick R.

    2009-04-01

    The progression of atherosclerosis is associated with leukocyte infiltration within lesions. We describe a technique for the ex vivo imaging of cellular recruitment in atherogenesis which utilizes quantum dots (QD) to color-code different cell types within lesion areas. Spectrally distinct QD were coated with the cell-penetrating peptide maurocalcine to fluorescently-label immunomagnetically isolated monocyte/macrophages and T lymphocytes. QD-maurocalcine bioconjugates labeled both cell types with a high efficiency, preserved cell viability, and did not perturb native leukocyte function in cytokine release and endothelial adhesion assays. QD-labeled monocyte/macrophages and T lymphocytes were reinfused in an ApoE-/- mouse model of atherosclerosis and age-matched controls and tracked for up to four weeks to investigate the incorporation of cells within aortic lesion areas, as determined by oil red O (ORO) and immunofluorescence ex vivo staining. QD-labeled cells were visible in atherosclerotic plaques within two days of injection, and the two cell types colocalized within areas of subsequent ORO staining. Our method for tracking leukocytes in lesions enables high signal-to-noise ratio imaging of multiple cell types and biomarkers simultaneously within the same specimen. It also has great utility in studies aimed at investigating the role of distinct circulating leukocyte subsets in plaque development and progression.

  9. Cardiac CT: atherosclerosis to acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Munnur, Ravi Kiran; Cameron, James D.; Ko, Brian S.; Meredith, Ian T.

    2014-01-01

    Coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) is a robust non-invasive method to assess coronary artery disease (CAD). Qualitative and quantitative assessment of atherosclerotic coronary stenosis with CCTA has been favourably compared with invasive coronary angiography (ICA) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). Importantly, it allows the study of preclinical stages of atherosclerotic disease, may help improve risk stratification and monitor the progressive course of the disease. The diagnostic accuracy of CCTA in the assessment of coronary artery bypass grafts (CABG) is excellent and the constantly improving technology is making the evaluation of stents feasible. Novel techniques are being developed to assess the functional significance of coronary stenosis. The excellent negative predictive value of CCTA in ruling out disease enables early and safe discharge of patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in the Emergency Department (ED). In addition, CCTA is useful in predicting clinical outcomes based on the extent of coronary atherosclerosis and also based on individual plaque characteristics such as low attenuation plaque (LAP), positive remodelling and spotty calcification. In this article, we review the role of CCTA in the detection of coronary atherosclerosis in native vessels, stented vessels, calcified arteries and grafts; the assessment of plaque progression, evaluation of chest pain in the ED, assessment of functional significance of stenosis and the prognostic significance of CCTA. PMID:25610801

  10. [Key laboratory diagnostic biomarkers of coronary atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Ragino, Iu I; Cherniavskiĭ, A M; Eremenko, N V; Shakhtshneĭder, E V; Polonskaia, Ia V; Tsymbal, S Iu; Ivanova, M V; Voevoda, M I

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory lipid and lipoprotein biomarkers (total cholesterol - CH, triglycerides - TG, low-density and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol- LDL-CH, HDL-CH, apolipoproteins B and A1 - apoB, apoA1), carbohydrate biomarkers (plasma glucose, basal insulin), high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and oxidative biomarkers (basal level of lipid peroxidation [LPO] products in LDL, LDL resistance to oxidation in vitro, oxidative modification of apoLDL and level of LDL lipophilic antioxidants) were studied in 388 men aged 42-70 years: 96 citizens of Western Siberia with angiographically documented coronary atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease (CHD); 292 men of population sample of citizens of Novosibirsk, including 44 men with CHD confirmed by standardized criteria and methods. Significant associations were found of coronary atherosclerosis and CHD with laboratory diagnostic biomarkers like blood levels of HDL-CH, TG, apoB, apoA1, basal insulin, hsCRP and basal level of LPO products in LDL and LDL resistance to oxidation. PMID:21627612

  11. Sulphur: the vulnerable factor X in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hollertz, O

    2002-07-01

    In the light of Erwin Schrödinger's remark, that all science is in constant interaction with culture and human thoughts, I want to propose a hypothesis regarding the etiology of atherosclerosis, that challenges the lipid theory. In our Western culture fat is associated with bad habits, bad character and illness, thus it was not surprising that hyperlipidemia was proposed to be the etiological cause of atherosclerosis and early death in coronary heart disease. This made us look in the wrong direction and enormous amounts of money and personal prestige has been invested in the lipid theory. I believe instead that the answer to the question of what is behind the atherosclerotic process, is hidden in the structure of the extracellular matrix. Our defenses, developed by evolution, against harmful protein modulation are today overcome by new substances in food and environment. The result of this is an injury to the basal membrane in the wall of the blood vessel and the atherosclerotic process starts. PMID:12160678

  12. Macrophage-mediated cholesterol handling in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2016-01-01

    Formation of foam cells is a hallmark at the initial stages of atherosclerosis. Monocytes attracted by pro-inflammatory stimuli attach to the inflamed vascular endothelium and penetrate to the arterial intima where they differentiate to macrophages. Intimal macrophages phagocytize oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL). Several scavenger receptors (SR), including CD36, SR-A1 and lectin-like oxLDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), mediate oxLDL uptake. In late endosomes/lysosomes of macrophages, oxLDL are catabolysed. Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) hydrolyses cholesterol esters that are enriched in LDL to free cholesterol and free fatty acids. In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), acyl coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase-1 (ACAT1) in turn catalyses esterification of cholesterol to store cholesterol esters as lipid droplets in the ER of macrophages. Neutral cholesteryl ester hydrolases nCEH and NCEH1 are involved in a secondary hydrolysis of cholesterol esters to liberate free cholesterol that could be then out-flowed from macrophages by cholesterol ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 and SR-BI. In atherosclerosis, disruption of lipid homoeostasis in macrophages leads to cholesterol accumulation and formation of foam cells. PMID:26493158

  13. Photoangioplasty: new applications of photodynamic therapy in atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockson, Stanley G.

    2000-05-01

    Atherosclerosis has traditionally held appeal as a pathologic entity in which photodynamic therapy might arrest or reverse the manifestations of disease. Earlier attempts to bring photodynamic therapy to the human clinical arena were hampered by the limitations of the photosensitizers under investigation, including the propensity to phototoxic manifestations and light-induced trauma to surrounding, normal vascular tissues. Many of these inherent limitations may be circumvented by newer photosensitizers that are activated at longer, more optimal wavelengths of light energy. Advances in fiberoptic catheter design for the endovascular delivery of light have also contributed to the greater applicability of photodynamic therapy to human atherosclerosis. Initial experiences with one family of photosensitizers, the texaphyrins, indicate that photodynamic therapy of human peripheral arterial atherosclerosis is feasible, safe, and well-tolerated. Photodynamic therapy of atherosclerosis holds promise for the treatment of de novo atherosclerosis and may have future applicability in the treatment, and perhaps prevention, of restenosis.

  14. Intranasal immunization with heat shock protein 60 induces CD4(+) CD25(+) GARP(+) and type 1 regulatory T cells and inhibits early atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Y; Tang, H; Wang, X; Zeng, Q; Liu, Y; Zhao, X I; Yu, K; Shi, H; Zhu, R; Mao, X

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is an autoimmune inflammatory disease involving both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Immune tolerance induction may have therapeutic potential for the suppression of atherosclerosis. Current interest is directed towards mucosal tolerance induction, especially nasal tolerance. Previous studies have shown that heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) is recognized as an important autoantigen in atherosclerosis, and nasal or oral HSP60 can induce tolerance and ameliorate atherosclerosis by inducing several subsets of regulatory T cells (Tregs ) such as latency-associated peptide (LAP)(+) and forkhead box transcription factor 3 (FoxP3)(+) Tregs. However, little is known regarding the detailed mechanisms of nasal tolerance. Here, we again investigated the impact of nasal HSP60 on atherosclerosis and the mechanisms underlying the anti-atherosclerosis responses. We found that nasal HSP60 caused a significant 33·6% reduction in plaque size at the aortic root in the early stages of atherosclerosis (P < 0·001). Notably, a significant increase in activated CD4(+) CD25(+) glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP)(+) Tregs, type 1 Tregs (Tr1 cells), and CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) Tregs, as well as a marked decrease in the numbers of type 1 and 17 T helper cells was detected in the spleens and cervical lymph nodes of HSP60-treated mice. Moreover, nasal HSP60 increases the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and interleukin (IL)-10 and decreases the secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17. Interestingly, the atheroprotective role of nasal HSP60 treatment was abrogated partly by the neutralization of IL-10. Our findings show that nasal administration of HSP60 can attenuate atherosclerotic formation by inducing GARP(+) Tregs, Tr1 cells and FoxP3(+) Tregs, and that these Tregs maintain immune homeostasis by secreting IL-10 and TGF-β.

  15. Ginseng extracts restore high-glucose induced vascular dysfunctions by altering triglyceride metabolism and downregulation of atherosclerosis-related genes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Gabriel Hoi-Huen; Law, Betty Yuen-Kwan; Chu, John Man-Tak; Yue, Kevin Kin-Man; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Lau, Chi-Wai; Huang, Yu; Chan, Shun-Wan; Ying-Kit Yue, Patrick; Wong, Ricky Ngok-Shun

    2013-01-01

    The king of herbs, Panax ginseng, has been used widely as a therapeutic agent vis-à-vis its active pharmacological and physiological effects. Based on Chinese pharmacopeia Ben Cao Gang Mu and various pieces of literature, Panax ginseng was believed to exert active vascular protective effects through its antiobesity and anti-inflammation properties. We investigated the vascular protective effects of ginseng by administrating ginseng extracts to rats after the induction of diabetes. We found that Panax ginseng can restore diabetes-induced impaired vasorelaxation and can reduce serum triglyceride but not cholesterol level in the diabetic rats. The ginseng extracts also suppressed the expression of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered the expression of lipid-related genes. The results provide evidence that Panax ginseng improves vascular dysfunction induced by diabetes and the protective effects may possibly be due to the downregulation of atherosclerosis-related genes and altered lipid metabolism, which help to restore normal endothelium functions.

  16. Association of plasma lipid levels with atherosclerosis prevalence in psittaciformes.

    PubMed

    Beaufrère, Hugues; Vet, Dr Med; Cray, Carolyn; Ammersbach, Mélanie; Tully, Thomas N

    2014-09-01

    The prevalence of atherosclerosis is high in the captive psittacine population and increases with age and female sex. The genera Psittacus, Amazona, and Nymphicus are predisposed to atherosclerosis, whereas the genera Cacatua and Ara are less susceptible. Plasma cholesterol and lipoprotein abnormalities have been suggested as risk factors in the development of atherosclerosis as observed in mammals. To investigate whether the psittacine genera susceptibility to atherosclerosis and the known risk factors of age and sex could be associated with differences in the lipid profile, a retrospective analysis was conducted on blood lipid values from 5625 birds. Prevalence values were obtained from a previously published, large, case-control study and were compared with identified trends in plasma lipid profiles. Genus-specific differences were identified in plasma total cholesterol values that corresponded to observed trends in the prevalence of clinically important atherosclerotic lesions, which were also highly correlated. The effect of age was significant but was mild and may not account for the dramatic increase in atherosclerosis prevalence observed with age. In addition, Quaker parrots ( Myiopsitta monachus ), which were used as experimental models for psittacine atherosclerosis and dyslipidemia, were found to have the highest values in all lipid profile parameters. The results of this study suggest that the differences observed in prevalence among species of the psittacine genera may partly be explained by differences in plasma total cholesterol levels. Results also support the use of Quaker parrots as models for studying atherosclerosis and dyslipidemia.

  17. Correlation between Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen and Severity of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dorighello, Gabriel G.; Paim, Bruno A.; Kiihl, Samara F.; Ferreira, Mônica S.; Catharino, Rodrigo R.; Vercesi, Anibal E.; Oliveira, Helena C. F.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis has been associated with mitochondria dysfunction and damage. Our group demonstrated previously that hypercholesterolemic mice present increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen (mtROS) generation in several tissues and low NADPH/NADP+ ratio. Here, we investigated whether spontaneous atherosclerosis in these mice could be modulated by treatments that replenish or spare mitochondrial NADPH, named citrate supplementation, cholesterol synthesis inhibition, or both treatments simultaneously. Robust statistical analyses in pooled group data were performed in order to explain the variation of atherosclerosis lesion areas as related to the classic atherosclerosis risk factors such as plasma lipids, obesity, and oxidative stress, including liver mtROS. Using three distinct statistical tools (univariate correlation, adjusted correlation, and multiple regression) with increasing levels of stringency, we identified a novel significant association and a model that reliably predicts the extent of atherosclerosis due to variations in mtROS. Thus, results show that atherosclerosis lesion area is positively and independently correlated with liver mtROS production rates. Based on these findings, we propose that modulation of mitochondrial redox state influences the atherosclerosis extent. PMID:26635912

  18. [Cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Historical considerations and treatment].

    PubMed

    Zárate, Arturo; Manuel-Apolinar, Leticia; Basurto, Lourdes; De la Chesnaye, Elsa; Saldívar, Iván

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is a precursor of steroid hormones and an essential component of the cell membrane, however, altered regulation of the synthesis, absorption and excretion of cholesterol predispose to cardiovascular diseases of atherosclerotic origin. Despite, the recognition of historical events for 200 years, starting with Michel Chevreul naming «cholesterol»; later on, Lobstein coining the term atherosclerosis and Marchand introducing it, Anichkov identifying cholesterol in atheromatous plaque, and Brown and Goldstein discovering LDL receptor; as well as the emerging of different drugs, such as fibrates, statins and cetrapibs this decade, promising to increase HDL and the most recent ezetimibe and anti-PCSK9 to inhibit the degradation of LDL receptor, however morbidity has not been reduced in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26774359

  19. Chemokines: established and novel targets in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Koenen, Rory R; Weber, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In their role as small chemotactic cytokines, chemokines are crucial mediators and regulators of leukocyte trafficking during immune surveillance and inflammation. Their involvement in the development and progression of inflammatory diseases has been subject of intense investigation. Concordantly, the chemokine system has been explored in search for therapeutic targets to prevent or treat inflammatory disorders, such as atherosclerosis. Targeting the chemokine system offers various entry points for a causative treatment of this widespread and chronic illness. Although this approach has encountered some setbacks, several innovative compounds are currently in an advanced stage of development. In this review, the current standing of this dynamic field is highlighted and the potential advantages and drawbacks of particular strategies are discussed. PMID:22038924

  20. The Role of Triglycerides in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Talayero, Beatriz G.; Sacks, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is a prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and increasingly important in the setting of current obesity and insulin resistance epidemics. High triglyceride (TG) levels are markers for several types of atherogenic lipoproteins. Patients who have hypertriglyceridemia may be at significant risk for CVD even if low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels are at goal, and therefore warrant treatment that optimizes diet, reduces overweight, and promotes regular exercise. High-risk patients with hypertriglyceridemia, such as those with diabetes, CVD, or metabolic syndrome, may benefit from additional drug treatment aside from a statin to address other lipid abnormalities. In this discussion, we review the role of hypertriglyceridemia and its associated atherogenic lipoproteins in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the relevance of a high TG level as a predictor of CVD, the cardiovascular outcomes from TG-lowering intervention trials, and the current guidelines for treating hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:21968696

  1. Vascular oxidative stress, nitric oxide and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Huige; Horke, Sven; Förstermann, Ulrich

    2014-11-01

    In the vascular wall, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by several enzyme systems including NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase, uncoupled endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. On the other hand, the vasculature is protected by antioxidant enzyme systems, including superoxide dismutases, catalase, glutathione peroxidases and paraoxonases, which detoxify ROS. Cardiovascular risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus enhance ROS generation, resulting in oxidative stress. This leads to oxidative modification of lipoproteins and phospholipids, mechanisms that contribute to atherogenesis. In addition, oxidation of tetrahydrobiopterin may cause eNOS uncoupling and thus potentiation of oxidative stress and reduction of eNOS-derived NO, which is a protective principle in the vasculature. This review summarizes the latest advances in the role of ROS-producing enzymes, antioxidative enzymes as well as NO synthases in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis.

  2. [Cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Historical considerations and treatment].

    PubMed

    Zárate, Arturo; Manuel-Apolinar, Leticia; Basurto, Lourdes; De la Chesnaye, Elsa; Saldívar, Iván

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is a precursor of steroid hormones and an essential component of the cell membrane, however, altered regulation of the synthesis, absorption and excretion of cholesterol predispose to cardiovascular diseases of atherosclerotic origin. Despite, the recognition of historical events for 200 years, starting with Michel Chevreul naming «cholesterol»; later on, Lobstein coining the term atherosclerosis and Marchand introducing it, Anichkov identifying cholesterol in atheromatous plaque, and Brown and Goldstein discovering LDL receptor; as well as the emerging of different drugs, such as fibrates, statins and cetrapibs this decade, promising to increase HDL and the most recent ezetimibe and anti-PCSK9 to inhibit the degradation of LDL receptor, however morbidity has not been reduced in cardiovascular disease.

  3. Atherosclerosis: a nutritional disease of childhood.

    PubMed

    Berenson, G S; Srinivasan, S R; Nicklas, T A

    1998-11-26

    The development of coronary atherosclerosis begins in childhood. A clear relation between diet and cardiovascular disease risk has been demonstrated. Findings from the Bogalusa Heart Study indicate that most children still exceed national recommendations for intake of total and saturated fat. In addition, children's mean total energy intake is greater than energy expenditure, contributing to the high prevalence of obesity beginning in childhood. Even in childhood, obesity often occurs with other risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as increased blood pressure, adverse changes in serum lipoproteins, and hyperinsulinemia. This clustering of risk factors has been linked to acceleration of atherosclerotic lesions in the coronary arteries of young individuals. Decreasing the incidence of coronary artery disease in mid and late life necessitates healthy habits in nutrition and lifestyle in early life. Public health measures to favorably alter lifestyle can have a major impact on heart disease prevention and should be pursued vigorously.

  4. Atherosclerosis risk factors in pigeon squabs

    SciTech Connect

    Klumpp, S.A.; Clarkson, T.B.

    1986-03-01

    The basis for atherosclerosis susceptibility of White Carneau (WC) and resistance of Show Racer (SR) pigeons is not known. Body weight (BW), total serum cholesterol (TSC), growth of the aorta and replication of endothelial cells of the distal thoracic aorta (lesion prone site) of 1, 2 and 4 week old squabs were studied. Aortic measurements were determined morphometrically, and endothelial cell replication was quantitated by 24-hour /sup 3/H-thymidine labeling and whole-mount SEM autoradiography. From hatching to 4 weeks, BW increased more in WC than SR (22 to 473 gm in WC vs 19 to 416 gm in SR, p < 0.05) in WC than SR (197, 243 and 338 mg/dl in WC and 125, 194 and 282 mg/dl in SR). Surface area of the aorta between 1 and 4 weeks increased by 63% (109, 154 and 178 mm/sup 2/) in WC and 44% (101, 140 and 146 mm/sup 2/) in SR. Aortic surface area was significantly larger (0 = 0.002) in the 4 week WC than 4 week SR. /sup 3/H-thymidine labeled endothelial cells at 1, 2 and 4 weeks were 783, 387 and 53 in WC and 674, 283 and 27 cells/mm/sup 2/ in SR. Endothelial replication in the 4 week WC was twice that of the SR and significantly different between breeds at 2 and 4 weeks (p = 0.04; p = 0.02, respectively). Higher TSC, endothelial cell replication and larger aortic surface area in the WC may be contributing factors to increased atherosclerosis susceptibility.

  5. Association Between Psoriasis and Subclinical Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Na; Jiang, Menglin; Fan, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The association between psoriasis and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) or impaired flow-mediated dilation (FMD) remains controversial. We aimed to evaluate the extent of subclinical atherosclerosis as measured by CIMT and FMD in patients with psoriasis by conducting a meta-analysis. A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, Embase, Cochrane databases, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and VIP databases up to February 2015. Observational studies investigating CIMT or FMD in patients with psoriasis and controls were eligible. Psoriatic patients and controls were at least age- and sex-matched. Random-effects analysis was used to estimate the weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) between psoriatic patients and controls. A total of 20 studies were identified and analyzed. Meta-analysis showed that psoriatic patients had a significantly thicker CIMT (WMD 0.11 mm; 95% CI 0.08–0.15) and lower FMD (WMD −2.79%; −4.14% to −1.43%) than those in controls. Subgroup analysis indicated that psoriatic arthritis appeared to have less impaired FMD (WMD −2.45%) and thinner CIMT (WMD 0.10 mm). Psoriatic patients with mean age >45 years had much thicker CIMT (WMD 0.13 mm). The impaired FMD (WMD −3.99%) seemed more pronounced in psoriatic patients with mean age <45 years. This meta-analysis suggests that patients with psoriasis are associated with excessive risk of subclinical atherosclerosis. Screening and monitoring CIMT and brachial artery FMD may be recommended to identify a subgroup of psoriatic patients at higher risk for cardiovascular events. PMID:27196459

  6. Antihypercholesterolemic and antioxidant efficacies of zerumbone on the formation, development, and establishment of atherosclerosis in cholesterol-fed rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hemn, Hassan Othman; Noordin, Muhammad Mustapha; Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman; Hazilawati, Hamza; Zuki, Abubakr; Chartrand, Max Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the high incidence of cholesterol-induced cardiovascular disease, particularly atherosclerosis, the current study was designed to investigate the preventive and therapeutic efficacies of dietary zerumbone (ZER) supplementation on the formation and development of atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with a high cholesterol diet. A total of 72 New Zealand white rabbits were divided randomly on two experimental studies carried out 8 weeks apart. The first experiment was designed to investigate the prophylactic efficacy of ZER in preventing early developed atheromatous lesion. The second experimental trial was aimed at investigating the therapeutic effect of ZER in reducing the atherosclerotic lesion progression and establishment. Sudanophilia, histopathological, and ultrastructural changes showed pronounced reduction in the plaque size in ZER-medicated aortas. On the other hand, dietary supplementation of ZER for almost 10 weeks as a prophylactic measure indicated substantially decreasing lipid profile values, and similarly, plaque size in comparison with high-cholesterol non-supplemented rabbits. Furthermore, the results of oxidative stress and antioxidant biomarker evaluation indicated that ZER is a potent antioxidant in suppressing the generation of free radicals in terms of atherosclerosis prevention and treatment. ZER significantly reduced the value of malondialdehyde and augmented the value of superoxide dismutase. In conclusion, our data indicated that dietary supplementation of ZER at doses of 8, 16, and 20 mg/kg alone as a prophylactic measure, and as a supplementary treatment with simvastatin, significantly reduced early plague formation, development, and establishment via significant reduction in serum lipid profile, together with suppression of oxidative damage, and therefore alleviated atherosclerosis lesions. PMID:26347047

  7. Heavy Snoring as a Cause of Carotid Artery Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sharon A.; Amis, Terence C.; Byth, Karen; Larcos, George; Kairaitis, Kristina; Robinson, Tracey D.; Wheatley, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Previous studies have suggested that snoring and obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome may be important risk factors for the development of carotid atherosclerosis and stroke. However, it is not clear if snoring per se is independently related to the risk of developing carotid atherosclerotic plaque. Design: Observational cohort study. Setting: Volunteer sample examined in a sleep laboratory. Participants: One hundred ten volunteers (snorers and nonsnorers with only mild, nonhypoxic obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome) underwent polysomnography with quantification of snoring, bilateral carotid and femoral artery ultrasound with quantification of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular risk factor assessment. Subjects were categorized into 3 snoring groups: mild (0%–25% night snoring), moderate (> 25%–50% night snoring), and heavy (> 50% night snoring). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: The prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis was 20% with mild snoring, 32% with moderate snoring, and 64% with heavy snoring (P < 0.04, Χ2). Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the independent effect of snoring on the prevalence of carotid and femoral atherosclerosis. After adjustment for age, sex, smoking history, and hypertension, heavy snoring was significantly associated with carotid atherosclerosis (odds ratio 10.5; 95% confidence interval 2.1–51.8; P = 0.004) but not with femoral atherosclerosis. Conclusions: Heavy snoring significantly increases the risk of carotid atherosclerosis, and the increase is independent of other risk factors, including measures of nocturnal hypoxia and obstructive sleep apnea severity. Considering the high prevalence of snoring in the community, these findings have substantial public health implications for the management of carotid atherosclerosis and the prevention of stroke. Citation: Lee SA; Amis TC; Byth K; Larcos G; Kairaitis K; RobinsonTD; Wheatley JR. Heavy snoring as a cause of carotid

  8. Imaging Macrophage Development and Fate in Atherosclerosis and Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Swirski, Filip K.; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are central regulators of disease progression in both atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction. In atherosclerosis, macrophages are the dominant leukocyte population that influences lesional development. In myocardial infarction, which is caused by atherosclerosis, macrophages accumulate readily and play important roles in inflammation and healing. Molecular imaging has grown considerably as a field and can reveal biological process at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels. Here we explore how various imaging modalities, from intravital microscopy in mice to organ-level imaging in patients, are contributing to our understanding of macrophages and their progenitors in cardiovascular disease. PMID:23207281

  9. Dataset of mitochondrial genome variants associated with asymptomatic atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sazonova, Margarita A.; Zhelankin, Andrey V.; Barinova, Valeria A.; Sinyov, Vasily V.; Khasanova, Zukhra B.; Postnov, Anton Y.; Sobenin, Igor A.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    This dataset report is dedicated to mitochondrial genome variants associated with asymptomatic atherosclerosis. These data were obtained using the method of next generation pyrosequencing (NGPS). The whole mitochondrial genome of the sample of patients from the Moscow region was analyzed. In this article the dataset including anthropometric, biochemical and clinical parameters along with detected mtDNA variants in patients with carotid atherosclerosis and healthy individuals was presented. Among 58 of the most common homoplasmic mtDNA variants found in the observed sample, 7 variants occurred more often in patients with atherosclerosis and 16 variants occurred more often in healthy individuals. PMID:27222855

  10. RIP3-dependent necrosis induced inflammation exacerbates atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingjun; Jin, Wei; Wang, Yuhui; Huang, Huanwei; Li, Jia; Zhang, Cai

    2016-04-29

    Atherothrombotic vascular disease is already the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Atherosclerosis shares features with diseases caused by chronic inflammation. More attention should concentrates on the innate immunity effect atherosclerosis progress. RIP3 (receptor-interacting protein kinase 3) act through the transcription factor named Nr4a3 (Nuclear orphan receptors) to regulate cytokine production. Deletion RIP3 decreases IL-1α production. Injection of anti-IL-1α antibody protects against the progress of atherosclerosis in ApoE -/- mice. RIP3 as a molecular switch in necrosis, controls macrophage necrotic death caused inflammation. Inhibiting necrosis will certainly reduce atherosclerosis through limit inflammation. Necrotic cell death caused systemic inflammation exacerbated cardiovascular disease. Inhibition of necrosis may yield novel therapeutic targets for treatment in years to come.

  11. MicroRNA-33 in atherosclerosis etiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wu-Jun; Zhang, Min; Zhao, Guo-Jun; Fu, Yuchang; Zhang, Da-Wei; Zhu, Hai-Bo; Tang, Chao-Ke

    2013-04-01

    MicroRNAs are a group of endogenous, small non-coding RNA molecules that can induce translation repression of target genes within metazoan cells by specific base pairing with the mRNA of target genes. Recently, microRNA-33 has been discovered as a key regulator in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. This review highlights the impact of microRNA-33-mediated regulation in the major cardiometabolic risk factors of atherosclerosis including lipid metabolism (HDL biogenesis and cholesterol homeostasis, fatty acid, phospholipid and triglyceride, bile acids metabolism), inflammatory response, insulin signaling and glucose/energy homeostasis, cell cycle progression and proliferation, and myeloid cell differentiation. Understanding the etiology and pathophysiology of microRNA-33 in atherosclerosis may provide basic knowledge for the development of novel therapeutic targets for ameliorating atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease.

  12. Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) - Ancillary Eye Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-05

    Atherosclerosis; Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Arteriosclerosis; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Disorders; Heart Failure, Congestive; Myocardial Infarction; Heart Diseases; Diabetes Mellitus, Non-insulin Dependent; Hypertension; Diabetic Retinopathy; Macular Degeneration; Diabetes Mellitus

  13. Helper T cells and atherosclerosis: the cytokine web

    PubMed Central

    Baidya, S; Zeng, Q

    2005-01-01

    There is growing evidence regarding the importance of inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and its ultimate progression to the clinical syndromes. Recently there has been an increasing interest in the role of helper T (Th) cells in atherosclerosis. The Th cells act with the macrophages and the dendritic cells via the various cytokines in bringing about a variety of changes thus leading to the progression of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerotic lesions have been seen to have increased expression of type 1 helper T (TH1) cells together with increased levels of the Th1 related cytokines. It is mainly the cytokines involved with Th1 functioning that seem to show a prominent effect, with the whole process centred around interferon gamma, making it seem like every pathway and the cytokines involved lead to a final common pathway of interferon gamma secretion; the increase or decrease of which dictates the progression of atherosclerosis and its final manifestation as the clinical syndromes. PMID:16344296

  14. Inflammatory and autoimmune reactions in atherosclerosis and vaccine design informatics.

    PubMed

    Jan, Michael; Meng, Shu; Chen, Natalie C; Mai, Jietang; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading pathological contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide. As its complex pathogenesis has been gradually unwoven, the regime of treatments and therapies has increased with still much ground to cover. Active research in the past decade has attempted to develop antiatherosclerosis vaccines with some positive results. Nevertheless, it remains to develop a vaccine against atherosclerosis with high affinity, specificity, efficiency, and minimal undesirable pathology. In this review, we explore vaccine development against atherosclerosis by interpolating a number of novel findings in the fields of vascular biology, immunology, and bioinformatics. With recent technological breakthroughs, vaccine development affords precision in specifying the nature of the desired immune response--useful when addressing a disease as complex as atherosclerosis with a manifold of inflammatory and autoimmune components. Moreover, our exploration of available bioinformatic tools for epitope-based vaccine design provides a method to avoid expenditure of excess time or resources.

  15. Aortic Atherosclerosis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Roldan, Paola C; Ratliff, Michelle; Snider, Richard; Macias, Leonardo; Rodriguez, Rodrigo; Sibbitt, Wilmer; Roldan, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Aortic atherosclerosis (AoA) defined as intima-media thickening or plaques and aortic stiffness (AoS) also considered an atherosclerotic process and defined as decreased vessel distensibility (higher pulse pressure to achieve similar degree of vessel distension) are common in patients with SLE. Immune-mediated inflammation, thrombogenesis, traditional atherogenic factors, and therapy-related metabolic abnormalities are the main pathogenic factors of AoA and AoS. Pathology of AoA and AoS suggests an initial subclinical endothelialitis or vasculitis, which is exacerbated by thrombogenesis and atherogenic factors and ultimately resulting in AoA and AoS. Computed tomography (CT) for detection of arterial wall calcifications and arterial tonometry for detection of increased arterial pulse wave velocity are the most common diagnostic methods for detecting AoA and AoS, respectively. MRI may become a more applicable and accurate technique than CT. Although transesophageal echocardiography accurately detects earlier and advanced stages of AoA and AoS, it is semi-invasive and cannot be used as a screening method. Although imaging techniques demonstrate highly variable prevalence rates, on average about one third of adult SLE patients may have AoA or AoS. Age at SLE diagnosis; SLE duration; activity and damage; corticosteroid therapy; metabolic syndrome; chronic kidney disease; and mitral annular calcification are common independent predictors of AoA and AoS. Also, AoA and AoS are highly associated with carotid and coronary atherosclerosis. Earlier stages of AoA and AoS are usually subclinical. However, earlier stages of disease may be causally related or contribute to peripheral or cerebral embolism, pre-hypertension and hypertension, and increased left ventricular afterload resulting in left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. Later stages of disease predisposes to visceral ischemia, aortic aneurysms and aortic dissection. Even earlier stages of AoA and Ao

  16. A major role for RCAN1 in atherosclerosis progression.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Barbero, Nerea; Esteban, Vanesa; Villahoz, Silvia; Escolano, Amelia; Urso, Katia; Alfranca, Arantzazu; Rodríguez, Cristina; Sánchez, Susana A; Osawa, Tsuyoshi; Andrés, Vicente; Martínez-González, José; Minami, Takashi; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Campanero, Miguel R

    2013-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex inflammatory disease involving extensive vascular vessel remodelling and migration of vascular cells. As RCAN1 is implicated in cell migration, we investigated its contribution to atherosclerosis. We show RCAN1 induction in atherosclerotic human and mouse tissues. Rcan1 was expressed in lesional macrophages, endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells and was induced by treatment of these cells with oxidized LDLs (oxLDLs). Rcan1 regulates CD36 expression and its genetic inactivation reduced atherosclerosis extension and severity in Apoe(-/-) mice. This effect was mechanistically linked to diminished oxLDL uptake, resistance to oxLDL-mediated inhibition of macrophage migration and increased lesional IL-10 and mannose receptor expression. Moreover, Apoe(-/-) Rcan1(-/-) macrophages expressed higher-than-Apoe(-/-) levels of anti-inflammatory markers. We previously showed that Rcan1 mediates aneurysm development and that its expression is not required in haematopoietic cells for this process. However, transplantation of Apoe(-/-) Rcan1(-/-) bone-marrow (BM) cells into Apoe(-/-) recipients confers atherosclerosis resistance. Our data define a major role for haematopoietic Rcan1 in atherosclerosis and suggest that therapies aimed at inhibiting RCAN1 expression or function might significantly reduce atherosclerosis burden.

  17. Macrophage Phenotype and Function in Different Stages of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tabas, Ira; Bornfeldt, Karin E

    2016-02-19

    The remarkable plasticity and plethora of biological functions performed by macrophages have enticed scientists to study these cells in relation to atherosclerosis for >50 years, and major discoveries continue to be made today. It is now understood that macrophages play important roles in all stages of atherosclerosis, from initiation of lesions and lesion expansion, to necrosis leading to rupture and the clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis, to resolution and regression of atherosclerotic lesions. Lesional macrophages are derived primarily from blood monocytes, although recent research has shown that lesional macrophage-like cells can also be derived from smooth muscle cells. Lesional macrophages take on different phenotypes depending on their environment and which intracellular signaling pathways are activated. Rather than a few distinct populations of macrophages, the phenotype of the lesional macrophage is more complex and likely changes during the different phases of atherosclerosis and with the extent of lipid and cholesterol loading, activation by a plethora of receptors, and metabolic state of the cells. These different phenotypes allow the macrophage to engulf lipids, dead cells, and other substances perceived as danger signals; efflux cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein; proliferate and migrate; undergo apoptosis and death; and secrete a large number of inflammatory and proresolving molecules. This review article, part of the Compendium on Atherosclerosis, discusses recent advances in our understanding of lesional macrophage phenotype and function in different stages of atherosclerosis. With the increasing understanding of the roles of lesional macrophages, new research areas and treatment strategies are beginning to emerge.

  18. Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Jane E.; Roman, Mary J.

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are associated with increased mortality, largely as a consequence of cardiovascular disease. Increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with RA and SLE cannot be entirely explained by traditional risk factors, suggesting that the systemic inflammation that characterizes these diseases may accelerate atherosclerosis. We used carotid ultrasonography to investigate the prevalence and correlates to preclinical atherosclerosis in patients with RA and SLE. Because atherosclerosis is a systemic disease, assessment of carotid plaque by ultrasonography provides a robust, direct measure of systemic atherosclerosis. We observed a substantially increased prevalence of carotid plaque in RA and SLE patients compared with age- and sex-matched controls, which remained after adjustment for traditional risk factors. The presence of carotid atherosclerosis was associated with disease duration in both RA and SLE and damage in SLE. These data support the hypothesis that inflammation associated with RA and SLE contributes to accelerated atherosclerosis and argue that RA and SLE disease activity should be more aggressively managed. PMID:18926167

  19. KLF4: a novel target for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fang-fang; Liu, Yun-Fang; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Yu-Xia

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease characterized by a large amount of hyperproliferation and poorly differentiated or undifferentiated smooth muscle cells in atherosclerotic plaque. Cancer cells differ from normal cells in many aspects, including hyperproliferation and loss of differentiation. So the research on tumor may shed light on the treatment of atherosclerosis. Given that Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) has an important function in tumor development and progression, it may be associated with the formation and development of atherosclerosis. Recently, KLF4 expression has been documented in vascular endothelial cells. KLF4, which is normally not expressed in differentiated SMC in vivo, was rapidly up-regulated in response to vascular injury. In addition, KLF4 is a critical regulator in macrophage activation. Endothelial dysfunction, macrophage activation and VSMC phenotype switching are critical component elements in development of atherosclerosis. Herein we hypothesize that KLF4 is an important regulator in different phase of atherosclerosis and may be a novel target of prevention and cure of atherosclerosis. Further investigation is needed to approach the concrete signaling pathways about KLF4. PMID:17869009

  20. Insulin decreases atherosclerosis by inducing endothelin receptor B expression

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoungmin; Mima, Akira; Li, Qian; Rask-Madsen, Christian; He, Pingnian; Mizutani, Koji; Katagiri, Sayaka; Maeda, Yasutaka; Wu, I-Hsien; Khamaisi, Mogher; Preil, Simone Rordam; Sørensen, Ditte; Huang, Paul L.; King, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) insulin resistance and dysfunction, caused by diabetes, accelerates atherosclerosis. It is unknown whether specifically enhancing EC-targeted insulin action can decrease atherosclerosis in diabetes. Accordingly, overexpressing insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) in the endothelia of Apoe–/– mice (Irs1/Apoe–/–) increased insulin signaling and function in the aorta. Atherosclerosis was significantly reduced in Irs1/ApoE–/– mice on diet-induced hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. The mechanism of insulin’s enhanced antiatherogenic actions in EC was related to remarkable induction of NO action, which increases endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) expression and intracellular [Ca2+]. Using the mice with knockin mutation of eNOS, which had Ser1176 mutated to alanine (AKI), deleting the only known mechanism for insulin to activate eNOS/NO pathway, we observed that IRS1 overexpression in the endothelia of Aki/ApoE–/– mice significantly decreased atherosclerosis. Interestingly, endothelial EDNRB expression was selectively reduced in intima of arteries from diabetic patients and rodents. However, endothelial EDNRB expression was upregulated by insulin via P13K/Akt pathway. Finally EDNRB deletion in EC of Ldlr–/– and Irs1/Ldlr–/– mice decreased NO production and accelerated atherosclerosis, compared with Ldlr–/– mice. Accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetes may be reduced by improving insulin signaling selectively via IRS1/Akt in the EC by inducing EDNRB expression and NO production. PMID:27200419

  1. The association of serum trans-nonachlor levels with atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mangum, Lee C; Mangum, Lauren H; Chambers, Janice E; Ross, Matthew K; Meek, Edward C; Wills, Robert W; Crow, J Allen

    2016-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies suggest a strong association between exposure to environmental contaminants, including organochlorine (OC) insecticides or their metabolites, and development of pathologies, such as atherosclerosis, in which oxidative stress plays a significant etiological role. Biomarkers of systemic oxidative stress have the potential to link production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are formed as a result of exposure to xenobiotic toxicants, and underlying pathophysiological states. Measurement of F2-isoprostane concentrations in body fluids is the most accurate and sensitive method currently available for assessing in vivo steady-state oxidative stress levels. In the current study, urinary concentrations of F2-isoprostanes and serum levels of persistent OC compounds p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (DDE), trans-nonachlor (a component of the technical chlordane mixture), and oxychlordane (a chlordane metabolite) were quantified in a cross-sectional study sample and the association of these factors with a clinical diagnosis of atherosclerosis determined. Urinary isoprostane levels were not associated with atherosclerosis or serum concentrations of OC compounds in this study sample. However, occurrence of atherosclerosis was found to be associated with serum trans-nonachlor levels. DDE and oxychlordane were not associated with atherosclerosis. This finding supports current evidence that exposure to environmental factors is a risk factor for atherosclerosis, in addition to other known risk factors. PMID:26953872

  2. Insulin decreases atherosclerosis by inducing endothelin receptor B expression

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoungmin; Mima, Akira; Li, Qian; Rask-Madsen, Christian; He, Pingnian; Mizutani, Koji; Katagiri, Sayaka; Maeda, Yasutaka; Wu, I-Hsien; Khamaisi, Mogher; Preil, Simone Rordam; Maddaloni, Ernesto; Sørensen, Ditte; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt; Huang, Paul L.; King, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) insulin resistance and dysfunction, caused by diabetes, accelerates atherosclerosis. It is unknown whether specifically enhancing EC-targeted insulin action can decrease atherosclerosis in diabetes. Accordingly, overexpressing insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) in the endothelia of Apoe−/− mice (Irs1/Apoe−/−) increased insulin signaling and function in the aorta. Atherosclerosis was significantly reduced in Irs1/ApoE−/− mice on diet-induced hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. The mechanism of insulin’s enhanced antiatherogenic actions in EC was related to remarkable induction of NO action, which increases endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) expression and intracellular [Ca2+]. Using the mice with knockin mutation of eNOS, which had Ser1176 mutated to alanine (AKI), deleting the only known mechanism for insulin to activate eNOS/NO pathway, we observed that IRS1 overexpression in the endothelia of Aki/ApoE−/− mice significantly decreased atherosclerosis. Interestingly, endothelial EDNRB expression was selectively reduced in intima of arteries from diabetic patients and rodents. However, endothelial EDNRB expression was upregulated by insulin via P13K/Akt pathway. Finally EDNRB deletion in EC of Ldlr−/− and Irs1/Ldlr−/− mice decreased NO production and accelerated atherosclerosis, compared with Ldlr−/− mice. Accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetes may be reduced by improving insulin signaling selectively via IRS1/Akt in the EC by inducing EDNRB expression and NO production. PMID:27200419

  3. Purification, structure features and anti-atherosclerosis activity of a Laminaria japonica polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Peng, Fu-Hua; Zha, Xue-Qiang; Cui, Shao-Hua; Asghar, Muhammad-Naeem; Pan, Li-Hua; Wang, Jun-Hui; Luo, Jian-Ping

    2015-11-01

    A homogeneous polysaccharide (LJP12) was isolated from Laminaria japonica by diethylaminoethyl-cellulose and Sephacryl S-500 chromatography, with a molecular weight of 2.31×10(6)Da. Monosaccharide analysis showed that LJP12 was mainly composed of arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucose and galactose in a molar ratio of 1:0.17:1.54:2.64:0.18. For these monosaccharides, mannose was suggested to be 1,4-linked and 1,3,6-linked while glucose was linked by 1,6-glycosidic bond. The xylose, arabinose and galactose were suggested to be the terminal residues. To study the effects of LJP12 on protecting against atherosclerosis, LJP12 was administered to LDL receptor-deficient (LDLr(-/-)) mice (50, 100 and 200mg/kg/day, n=30 for each experimental group). Results showed that LJP12 exhibited the ability to inhibit high-fat-cholesterol diet (HFD)-induced formation of atherosclerotic plaques and plasma lipid levels in a dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, both the HFD-induced systemic inflammation and local inflammation at the site of atherosclerotic lesion were significantly attenuated by LJP12, which were accompanied by the suppression of the activation of nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling pathways. Taken together, we concluded that long-term oral administration of LJP12 protects against atherosclerosis in LDLr(-/-) mice via inhibiting NF-κB/MAPKs-mediated inflammatory responses.

  4. Intestinal microbiota metabolism of L-carnitine, a nutrient in red meat, promotes atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Koeth, Robert A.; Wang, Zeneng; Levison, Bruce S.; Buffa, Jennifer A.; Org, Elin; Sheehy, Brendan T.; Britt, Earl B.; Fu, Xiaoming; Wu, Yuping; Li, Lin; Smith, Jonathan D.; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Chen, Jun; Li, Hongzhe; Wu, Gary D.; Lewis, James D.; Warrier, Manya; Brown, J. Mark; Krauss, Ronald M.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Bushman, Frederic D.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota metabolism of choline/phosphatidylcholine produces trimethylamine (TMA), which is further metabolized to a proatherogenic species, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO). Herein we demonstrate that intestinal microbiota metabolism of dietary L-carnitine, a trimethylamine abundant in red meat, also produces TMAO and accelerates atherosclerosis. Omnivorous subjects are shown to produce significantly more TMAO than vegans/vegetarians following ingestion of L-carnitine through a microbiota-dependent mechanism. Specific bacterial taxa in human feces are shown to associate with both plasma TMAO and dietary status. Plasma L-carnitine levels in subjects undergoing cardiac evaluation (n = 2,595) predict increased risks for both prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) and incident major adverse cardiac events (MI, stroke or death), but only among subjects with concurrently high TMAO levels. Chronic dietary L-carnitine supplementation in mice significantly altered cecal microbial composition, markedly enhanced synthesis of TMA/TMAO, and increased atherosclerosis, but not following suppression of intestinal microbiota. Dietary supplementation of TMAO, or either carnitine or choline in mice with intact intestinal microbiota, significantly reduced reverse cholesterol transport in vivo. Intestinal microbiota may thus participate in the well-established link between increased red meat consumption and CVD risk. PMID:23563705

  5. Endothelium Preserving Microwave Treatment for Atherosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carl, James R. (Inventor); Arndt, Dickey (Inventor); Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Beer, Reginald (Inventor); Henry, Phillip D. (Inventor); Pacifico, Antonio (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided to treat atherosclerosis wherein the artery is partially closed by dilating the artery while preserving the vital and sensitive endothelial layer thereof. Microwave energy having a frequency from 3 GHz to 300 GHz is propagated into the arterial wall to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally necrosing connective tissue and softening fatty and waxy plaque while limiting heating of surrounding tissues including the endothelial layer and/or other healthy tissue, organs, and blood. The heating period for raising the temperature a potentially desired amount, about 20 C. within the atherosclerotic lesion may be less than about one second. In one embodiment of the invention, a radically beveled waveguide antenna is used to deliver microwave energy at frequencies from 25 GHz or 30 GHz to about 300 GHz and is focused towards a particular radial sector of the artery. Because the atherosclerotic lesions are often asymmetrically disposed, directable or focussed heating preserves healthy sectors or the artery and applies energy to the asymmetrically positioned lesion faster than a non-directed bean. A computer simulation predicts isothermic temperature profiles for the given conditions and may be used in selecting power, pulse duration, beam width, and frequency of operation to maximize energy deposition and control heat rise within the atherosclerotic lesion without harming healthy tissues or the sensitive endothelium cells.

  6. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibition in atherosclerosis and stroke.

    PubMed

    Roycik, M D; Myers, J S; Newcomer, R G; Sang, Q-X A

    2013-09-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of tightly regulated, zinc-dependent proteases that degrade extracellular matrix (ECM), cell surface, and intracellular proteins. Vascular remodeling, whether as a function of normal physiology or as a consequence of a myriad of pathological processes, requires degradation of the ECM. Thus, the expression and activity of many MMPs are up-regulated in numerous conditions affecting the vasculature and often exacerbate vascular dysfunction. A growing body of evidence supports the rationale of using MMP inhibitors for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, stroke, and chronic vascular dementia. This manuscript will examine promising targets for MMP inhibition in atherosclerosis and stroke, reviewing findings in preclinical animal models and human patient studies. Strategies for MMP inhibition have progressed beyond chelating the catalytic zinc to functional blocking antibodies and peptides that target either the active site or exosites of the enzyme. While the inhibition of MMP activity presents a rational therapeutic avenue, the multiplicity of roles for MMPs and the non-selective nature of MMP inhibitors that cause unintended side-effects hinder full realization of MMP inhibition as therapy for vascular disease. For optimal therapeutic effects to be realized, specific targets for MMP inhibition in these pathologies must first be identified and then attacked by potent and selective agents during the most appropriate timepoint.

  7. Thrombosis and blood cells in atherosclerosis development.

    PubMed

    Santolaya, C; Hernández, M R; Villaverde, C A

    1988-06-01

    Hemorheological changes produced in blood cells seem to be essential in atheroma plaque development and thrombotic episodes. In this study, we investigated the relationship between blood cells count, thrombogenic situations and morphological mesenteric alterations in atherosclerotic rats. Atherosclerosis was induced by an atherogenic diet made up of two phases, the first a hypervitaminic diet, and the second a hyperlipidic one. Cell counts were performed with Thoma's camera. Morphological changes were observed directly in rat mesentery. Thrombogenic situations were investigated by a mesenteric microthrombosis induction method. In atherosclerotic animals we can observe a higher mesenteric opacity, increase in blood viscosity and a thickness in vessel wall. Thrombosis time is shortened at 3 days, which indicates a thrombogenic situation although at 10 days there is a lenthening in this parameter. Blood cell counts were not modified significantly, but modifications in differential leukocyte counts were significant. We found a direct relationship between lymphocyte number and thrombosis time whereas with granulocytes this relationship was inverse: shortening in thrombosis time appearing simultaneously with an increase in cell number. PMID:3419397

  8. Genomic correlates of atherosclerosis in ancient humans.

    PubMed

    Zink, Albert; Wann, L Samuel; Thompson, Randall C; Keller, Andreas; Maixner, Frank; Allam, Adel H; Finch, Caleb E; Frohlich, Bruno; Kaplan, Hillard; Lombardi, Guido P; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Watson, Lucia; Cox, Samantha L; Miyamoto, Michael I; Narula, Jagat; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Thomas, Gregory S; Krause, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Paleogenetics offers a unique opportunity to study human evolution, population dynamics, and disease evolution in situ. Although histologic and computed x-ray tomographic investigations of ancient mummies have clearly shown that atherosclerosis has been present in humans for more than 5,000 years, limited data are available on the presence of genetic predisposition for cardiovascular disease in ancient human populations. In a previous whole-genome study of the Tyrolean Iceman, a 5,300-year-old glacier mummy from the Alps, an increased risk for coronary heart disease was detected. The Iceman's genome revealed several single nucleotide polymorphisms that are linked with cardiovascular disease in genome-wide association studies. Future genetic studies of ancient humans from various geographic origins and time periods have the potential to provide more insights into the presence and possible changes of genetic risk factors in our ancestors. The study of ancient humans and a better understanding of the interaction between environmental and genetic influences on the development of heart diseases may lead to a more effective prevention and treatment of the most common cause of death in the modern world. PMID:25667090

  9. Is Sudden Hearing Loss Associated with Atherosclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Rajati, Mohsen; Azarpajooh, Mahmoud Reza; Mouhebati, Mohsen; Nasrollahi, Mostafa; Salehi, Maryam; Khadivi, Ehsan; Nourizadeh, Navid; Hashemi, Firoozeh; Bakhshaee, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Sudden sensorineural hearing-loss (SSNHL) patients constitute approximately 2–3% of referrals to ear, nose and throat (ENT) clinics. Several predisposing factors have been proposed for this condition; one of which is vascular disorders and perfusion compromise. In this research the atherosclerotic changes and their known risk factors are studied in SSNHL patients. Materials and Methods: Thirty SSNHL patients and 30 controls were evaluated with regard to cardiovascular risks including history, heart examination, blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, electrocardiogram, blood sugar, triglycerides, cholesterol, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HSCRP); also, carotid artery color Doppler study was undertaken to measure intima media thickness(IMT). Results: IMT and HSCRP showed an increased risk in the case group compared with the controls (P= 0.005 & P=0.001). However, waist circumference, history of smoking, fasting blood sugar, lipid profile, and electrocardiogram revealed no significant difference between the two groups. Interestingly, blood pressure and body mass index were higher in the controls in this study. Conclusion: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss may be associated with subclinical atherosclerosis. PMID:27429947

  10. Genomic correlates of atherosclerosis in ancient humans.

    PubMed

    Zink, Albert; Wann, L Samuel; Thompson, Randall C; Keller, Andreas; Maixner, Frank; Allam, Adel H; Finch, Caleb E; Frohlich, Bruno; Kaplan, Hillard; Lombardi, Guido P; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Watson, Lucia; Cox, Samantha L; Miyamoto, Michael I; Narula, Jagat; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Thomas, Gregory S; Krause, Johannes

    2014-06-01

    Paleogenetics offers a unique opportunity to study human evolution, population dynamics, and disease evolution in situ. Although histologic and computed x-ray tomographic investigations of ancient mummies have clearly shown that atherosclerosis has been present in humans for more than 5,000 years, limited data are available on the presence of genetic predisposition for cardiovascular disease in ancient human populations. In a previous whole-genome study of the Tyrolean Iceman, a 5,300-year-old glacier mummy from the Alps, an increased risk for coronary heart disease was detected. The Iceman's genome revealed several single nucleotide polymorphisms that are linked with cardiovascular disease in genome-wide association studies. Future genetic studies of ancient humans from various geographic origins and time periods have the potential to provide more insights into the presence and possible changes of genetic risk factors in our ancestors. The study of ancient humans and a better understanding of the interaction between environmental and genetic influences on the development of heart diseases may lead to a more effective prevention and treatment of the most common cause of death in the modern world.

  11. Endothelium Preserving Microwave Treatment for Atherosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carl, James R. (Inventor); Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Beer, N. Reginald (Inventor); Henry, Phillip D. (Inventor); Pacifico, Antonio (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided to treat atherosclerosis wherein the artery is partially closed by dilating the artery while preserving the vital and sensitive endothelial layer thereof. Microwave energy having a frequency from 3 GHz to 300 GHz is propagated into the arterial wall to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally necrosing connective tissue and softening fatty and waxy plaque while limiting heating of surrounding tissues including the endothelial layer and/or other healthy tissue, organs, and blood. The heating period for raising the temperature a potentially desired amount, about 20 C. within the atherosclerotic lesion may be less than about one second. In one embodiment of the invention, a radically beveled waveguide antenna is used to deliver microwave energy at frequencies from 25 GHz or 30 GHz to about 300 GHz and is focused towards a particular radial sector of the artery. Because the atherosclerotic lesions are often asymmetrically disposed directable or focussed heating preserves healthy sectors of the artery and applies energy to the asymmetrically positioned lesion faster than a non-directed beam. A computer simulation predicts isothermic temperature profiles for the given conditions and may be used in selecting power, pulse duration, beam width, and frequency of operation to maximize energy deposition and control heat rise within the atherosclerotic lesion without harming healthy tissues or the sensitive endothelium cells.

  12. Endothelium Preserving Microwave Treatment for Atherosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carl, James R. (Inventor); Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Beer, N. Reginald (Inventor); Henry, Phillip D. (Inventor); Pacifico, Antonio (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided to treat atherosclerosis wherein the artery is partially closed by dilating the artery while preserving the vital and sensitive endothelial layer thereof Microwave energy having a frequency from 3 GHz to 300 GHz is propagated into the arterial wall to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally necrosing connective tissue and softening fatty and waxy plaque while limiting heating of surrounding tissues including the endothelial laser and/or other healthy tissue, organs, and blood. The heating period for raising the temperature a potentially desired amount, about 20 C., within the atherosclerotic lesion may be less than about one second. In one embodiment of the invention, a radically beveled waveguide antenna is used to deliver microwave energy at frequencies from 25 GHz or 30 GHz to about 300 GHz and is focused towards a particular radial sector of the artery. Because the atherosclerotic lesions are often asymmetrically disposed, directable of focussed heating preserves healthy sectors of the artery and applies energy to the asymmetrically positioned lesion faster than a non-directed beam. A computer simulation predicts isothermic temperature profiles for the given conditions and man be used in selecting power, pulse duration, beam width, and frequency of operation to maximize energy deposition and control heat rise within the atherosclerotic lesion without harming healthy tissues or the sensitive endothelium cells.

  13. Molecular Imaging of Inflammation in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Swirski, Filip K.; Zernecke, Alma

    2013-01-01

    Acute rupture of vulnerable plaques frequently leads to myocardial infarction and stroke. Within the last decades, several cellular and molecular players have been identified that promote atherosclerotic lesion formation, maturation and plaque rupture. It is now widely recognized that inflammation of the vessel wall and distinct leukocyte subsets are involved throughout all phases of atherosclerotic lesion development. The mechanisms that render a stable plaque unstable and prone to rupture, however, remain unknown and the identification of the vulnerable plaque remains a major challenge in cardiovascular medicine. Imaging technologies used in the clinic offer minimal information about the underlying biology and potential risk for rupture. New imaging technologies are therefore being developed, and in the preclinical setting have enabled new and dynamic insights into the vessel wall for a better understanding of this complex disease. Molecular imaging has the potential to track biological processes, such as the activity of cellular and molecular biomarkers in vivo and over time. Similarly, novel imaging technologies specifically detect effects of therapies that aim to stabilize vulnerable plaques and silence vascular inflammation. Here we will review the potential of established and new molecular imaging technologies in the setting of atherosclerosis, and discuss the cumbersome steps required for translating molecular imaging approaches into the clinic. PMID:24312156

  14. Loss of Reelin protects against atherosclerosis by reducing leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion and lesion macrophage accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yinyuan; Huang, Linzhang; Xian, Xunde; Yuhanna, Ivan S; Wasser, Catherine R; Frotscher, Michael; Mineo, Chieko; Shaul, Philip W; Herz, Joachim

    2016-03-15

    The multimodular glycoprotein Reelin controls neuronal migration and synaptic transmission by binding to apolipoprotein E receptor 2 (Apoer2) and very low density lipoprotein receptor (Vldlr) on neurons. In the periphery, Reelin is produced by the liver, circulates in blood, and promotes thrombosis and hemostasis. To investigate if Reelin influences atherogenesis, we studied atherosclerosis-prone low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice in which we inducibly deleted Reelin either ubiquitously or only in the liver, thus preventing the production of circulating Reelin. In both types of Reelin-deficient mice, atherosclerosis progression was markedly attenuated, and macrophage content and endothelial cell staining for vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were reduced at the sites of atherosclerotic lesions. Intravital microscopy revealed decreased leukocyte-endothelial adhesion in the Reelin-deficient mice. In cultured human endothelial cells, Reelin enhanced monocyte adhesion and increased ICAM1, VCAM1, and E-selectin expression by suppressing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity and increasing nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activity in an Apoer2-dependent manner. These findings suggest that circulating Reelin promotes atherosclerosis by increasing vascular inflammation, and that reducing or inhibiting circulating Reelin may present a novel approach for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  15. Lipid lowering and imaging protease activation in atherosclerosis Lipid therapy and MMP imaging in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Challa, Azariyas; Zhang, Jiasheng; Golestani, Reza; Jung, Jae-Joon; Robinson, Simon; Sadeghi, Mehran M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Lipid lowering is a mainstay of modern therapeutic approach to atherosclerosis. We sought to evaluate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-targeted microSPECT imaging for tracking of the effect of lipid-lowering interventions on plaque biology in atherosclerotic mice in vivo. Methods and Results ApoE−/− mice fed on a high fat diet (HFD) for 2 months were randomly assigned to continuation of HFD, HFD plus simvastatin, HFD plus fenofibrate and high fat withdrawal (HFW). The animals underwent serial microSPECT/CT imaging using RP805, a 99mTc-labeled MMP-targeted tracer at 1 and 4 weeks after randomization. All three interventions reduced total blood cholesterol by 4 weeks. In animals on HFD, aortic arch RP805 uptake significantly increased from 1 week to 4 weeks. Tracer uptake in fenofibrate and HFW groups was significantly lower than uptake in the HFD group at 4 weeks. Similarly, CD 68 gene expression, reflecting plaque inflammation, was significantly lower in fenofibrate and HFW groups compared to HFD group. MMP tracer uptake significantly correlated with aortic CD68, but not VE-cadherin or smooth muscle α-actin expression. Conclusions MMP tracer uptake paralleled the effect of lipid-lowering interventions on plaque inflammation in atherosclerotic mice. MMP-targeted imaging may be used to track the effect of therapeutic interventions in atherosclerosis. PMID:24368425

  16. Immune mechanisms in atherosclerosis, especially in diabetes type 2.

    PubMed

    Frostegård, Johan

    2013-10-29

    Atherosclerosis and ensuing cardiovascular disease (CVD) are major complications of diabetes type 2. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory condition involving immunocompetent cells of different types present in the lesions. Even though inflammation and immune activation may be more pronounced in atherosclerosis in diabetes type 2, there does not appear to be any major differences between diabetics and non-diabetics. Similar factors are thus implicated in atherosclerosis-associated immune activation in both groups. The cause of immune activation is not known and different mutually non-exclusive possibilities exist. Oxidized and/or enzymatically modified forms of low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) and dead cells are present in atherosclerotic plaques. OxLDL could play a role, being pro-inflammatory and immunostimulatory as it activates T-cells and is cytotoxic at higher concentrations. Inflammatory phospholipids in OxLDL are implicated, with phosphorylcholine (PC) as one of the exposed antigens. Antibodies against PC (anti-PC) are anti-atherogenic in mouse studies, and anti-PC is negatively associated with development of atherosclerosis and CVD in humans. Bacteria and virus have been discussed as potential causes of immune activation, but it has been difficult to find direct evidence supporting this hypothesis, and antibiotic trials in humans have been negative or inconclusive. Heat shock proteins (HSP) could be one major target for atherogenic immune reactions. More direct causes of plaque rupture include cytokines such as interleukin 1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and also lipid mediators as leukotrienes. In addition, in diabetes, hyperglycemia and oxidative stress appear to accelerate the development of atherosclerosis, one mechanism could be via promotion of immune reactions. To prove that immune reactions are causative of atherosclerosis and CVD, further studies with immune-modulatory treatments are needed.

  17. Immune mechanisms in atherosclerosis, especially in diabetes type 2.

    PubMed

    Frostegård, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and ensuing cardiovascular disease (CVD) are major complications of diabetes type 2. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory condition involving immunocompetent cells of different types present in the lesions. Even though inflammation and immune activation may be more pronounced in atherosclerosis in diabetes type 2, there does not appear to be any major differences between diabetics and non-diabetics. Similar factors are thus implicated in atherosclerosis-associated immune activation in both groups. The cause of immune activation is not known and different mutually non-exclusive possibilities exist. Oxidized and/or enzymatically modified forms of low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) and dead cells are present in atherosclerotic plaques. OxLDL could play a role, being pro-inflammatory and immunostimulatory as it activates T-cells and is cytotoxic at higher concentrations. Inflammatory phospholipids in OxLDL are implicated, with phosphorylcholine (PC) as one of the exposed antigens. Antibodies against PC (anti-PC) are anti-atherogenic in mouse studies, and anti-PC is negatively associated with development of atherosclerosis and CVD in humans. Bacteria and virus have been discussed as potential causes of immune activation, but it has been difficult to find direct evidence supporting this hypothesis, and antibiotic trials in humans have been negative or inconclusive. Heat shock proteins (HSP) could be one major target for atherogenic immune reactions. More direct causes of plaque rupture include cytokines such as interleukin 1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and also lipid mediators as leukotrienes. In addition, in diabetes, hyperglycemia and oxidative stress appear to accelerate the development of atherosclerosis, one mechanism could be via promotion of immune reactions. To prove that immune reactions are causative of atherosclerosis and CVD, further studies with immune-modulatory treatments are needed. PMID:24194733

  18. Accelerated atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic C57BL/6 mice treated with cyclosporin A.

    PubMed Central

    Emeson, E. E.; Shen, M. L.

    1993-01-01

    We and others have demonstrated that T lymphocytes are prominent components of atherosclerotic lesions. We hypothesized that if T cells were necessary for the development of atherosclerosis it would be possible to demonstrate its prevention or retardation in T-cell-suppressed mice. To test this hypothesis, CyA, a potent suppressor of T-cell activation, was used to treat C57BL/6 mice undergoing lipid hyperalimentation. Mice receiving normal mouse chow were completely free of atherosclerotic lesions. In mice receiving the atherogenic diet plus control oil injections, lesions of the aorta and coronary arteries were observed at 135 days and increased progressively in area until 310 days. Somewhat surprisingly, mice given the atherogenic diet plus CyA injections displayed even larger lesions at all three observed time intervals. Although CyA did suppress T-cell reactivity sufficiently to obtain the expected prolongation of skin allografts, it did not suppress the development or progression of atherosclerotic lesions. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8506958

  19. SIRT1 - an anti-inflammatory pathway at the crossroads between metabolic disease and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Winnik, Stephan; Stein, Sokrates; Matter, Christian M

    2012-11-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that is based on the interaction between inflammatory cell subsets and specific cells in the arterial wall. SIRT1 deacetylates histone and non-histone proteins and has been implicated in protective effects of caloric restriction on lifespan and metabolic pathways in yeast, nematodes, and mice. In the vasculature of rodents, SIRT1 mediates vasodilatation through the release of endothelial nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide and scavenges reactive oxygen species. Using a genetic loss-of-function approach, SIRT1 has been shown to interfere with crucial steps of endothelial activation and atherogenesis by suppressing NFκB signaling: Partial SIRT1 deletion in ApoE-/- mice prevented expression of endothelial adhesion molecules thereby hampering the extravasation of circulating monocytes. In monocyte-derived macrophages SIRT1 deletion reduced the expression of the scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (Lox-1) resulting in reduced foam cell formation and atherosclerosis. Moreover, it was reported that SIRT1 regulates the activity of liver X-receptor, thereby promoting ABCA1-driven reverse cholesterol transport in plaque-resident macrophages slowing foam cell formation. Finally, SIRT1 suppressed the expression of endothelial tissue factor, and thus exerted anti-thrombotic properties during induced carotid thrombosis in mice. These findings indicate protective effects of SIRT1 in atherogenesis and thrombosis at an experimental level and highlight the opportunity to translate this concept from bench to bedside. Indeed, SIRT1 activators are available and have been shown to exert beneficial effects at the preclinical level in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). SIRT1 activators are currently being evaluated in phase II clinical trials in patients with T2DM. The concept of SIRT1 activation appears a promising strategy for novel therapeutic approaches in patients with

  20. Yindanxinnaotong, a Chinese compound medicine, synergistically attenuates atherosclerosis progress.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Long; Pan, Guo-feng; Zhang, Xiao-dong; Wang, Jian-lu; Wang, Wan-dan; Zhang, Jian-yong; Wang, Hui; Liang, Ri-xin; Sun, Xiao-bo

    2015-01-01

    Yindanxinnaotong (YD), a traditional Chinese medicine, has been introduced to clinical medicine for more than a decade, while its pharmacological properties are still not to be well addressed. This report aimed to explore the anti-atherosclerosis properties and underlying mechanisms of YD. We initially performed a computational prediction based on a network pharmacology simulation, which clued YD exerted synergistically anti-atherosclerosis properties by vascular endothelium protection, lipid-lowering, anti-inflammation, and anti-oxidation. These outcomes were then validated in atherosclerosis rats. The experiments provided evidences indicating YD's contribution in this study included, (1) significantly reduced the severity of atherosclerosis, inhibited reconstruction of the artery wall and regulated the lipid profile; (2) enhanced antioxidant power, strengthened the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and decreased malondialdhyde levels; (3) significantly increased the viability of umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to oxidative stress due to pretreatment with YD; (4) significantly reduced the level of pro-inflammatory cytokines; (5) significantly down-regulated NF-kB/p65 and up-regulated IkB in the YD-treated groups. Overall, these results demonstrated that YD intervention relieves atherosclerosis through regulating lipids, reducing lipid particle deposition in the endothelial layer of artery, enhancing antioxidant power, and repressing inflammation activity by inhibiting the nuclear factor-kappa B signal pathway. PMID:26196108

  1. Antigen-Induced Immunomodulation in the Pathogenesis of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Milioti, Natalia; Bermudez-Fajardo, Alexandra; Penichet, Manuel L.; Oviedo-Orta, Ernesto

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterised by the accumulation of monocytes/macrophages, smooth muscle cells, and lymphocytes within the arterial wall in response to the release of proinflammatory molecules. Such accumulation results in the formation of the atherosclerotic plaque, which would eventually evolve to complications such as total artery occlusion, rupture, calcification, or aneurysm. Although the molecular mechanism responsible for the development of atherosclerosis is not completely understood, it is clear that the immune system plays a key role in the development of the atherosclerotic plaque and in its complications. There are multiple antigenic stimuli that have been associated with the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Most of these stimuli come from modified self-molecules such as oxidised low-density lipoproteins (oxLDLs), beta2glycoprotein1 (β2GP1), lipoprotein a (LP(a)), heat shock proteins (HSPs), and protein components of the extracellular matrix such as collagen and fibrinogen in the form of advanced glycation-end (AGE) products. In addition, several foreign antigens including bacteria such as Porphyromonas gingivalis and Chlamydia pneumoniae and viruses such as enterovirus and cytomegalovirus have been associated with atherosclerosis as potentially causative or bystander participants, adding another level of complexity to the analysis of the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. The present review summarises the most important scientific findings published within the last two decades on the importance of antigens, antigen stimulation, and adaptive immune responses in the development of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:18551190

  2. Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition drives atherosclerosis progression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei-Yu; Qin, Lingfeng; Baeyens, Nicolas; Li, Guangxin; Afolabi, Titilayo; Budatha, Madhusudhan; Tellides, George; Schwartz, Martin A.; Simons, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for the development and progression of atherosclerotic lesions have not been fully established. Here, we investigated the role played by endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) and its key regulator FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1) in atherosclerosis. In cultured human endothelial cells, both inflammatory cytokines and oscillatory shear stress reduced endothelial FGFR1 expression and activated TGF-β signaling. We further explored the link between disrupted FGF endothelial signaling and progression of atherosclerosis by introducing endothelial-specific deletion of FGF receptor substrate 2 α (Frs2a) in atherosclerotic (Apoe–/–) mice. When placed on a high-fat diet, these double-knockout mice developed atherosclerosis at a much earlier time point compared with that their Apoe–/– counterparts, eventually demonstrating an 84% increase in total plaque burden. Moreover, these animals exhibited extensive development of EndMT, deposition of fibronectin, and increased neointima formation. Additionally, we conducted a molecular and morphometric examination of left main coronary arteries from 43 patients with various levels of coronary disease to assess the clinical relevance of these findings. The extent of coronary atherosclerosis in this patient set strongly correlated with loss of endothelial FGFR1 expression, activation of endothelial TGF-β signaling, and the extent of EndMT. These data demonstrate a link between loss of protective endothelial FGFR signaling, development of EndMT, and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:26517696

  3. [Cyclooxygenase-2: a new therapeutic target in atherosclerosis?].

    PubMed

    Páramo, José A; Beloqui, Oscar; Orbe, Josune

    2006-05-27

    It is now widely accepted that atherosclerosis is a complex chronic inflammatory disorder of the arterial tree associated with several risk factors. From the initial phases to eventual rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques, a low-grade inflammation, also termed microinflammation, appears to play a key pathogenetic role. Systemic inflammatory markers (C reactive protein, cytokines adhesion molecules) also play a role in this process. Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an enzyme which catalyzes the generation of prostaglandins from arachidonic acid, also contributes to lesion formation. Recent reports by our group have demonstrated increased monocyte COX-2 activity and the production of prostaglandin E2 in relation to cardiovascular risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis in asymptomatic subjects. Our findings support the notion that the COX-2/prostaglandin E2 axis may have a role, raising the question as to whether its selective inhibition might be an attractive therapeutic target in atherosclerosis. COX-2 inhibitors, collectively called "coxibs" (celecoxib, rofecoxib, valdecoxib, lumiracoxib, etc), held a promise as anti-inflammatory drugs without the some of the side effects of aspirin or non steroidal antiinflammatory agents. However, clinical studies raise several clinically relevant questions as to their beneficial role in atherosclerosis prevention, because of increased thrombogenicity and cardiovascular risk, and therefore coxibs should be restricted in atherosclerosis-prone patients.

  4. Redox balance and blood elemental levels in atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napoleão, P.; Lopes, P. A.; Santos, M.; Steghens, J.-P.; Viegas-Crespo, A. M.; Pinheiro, T.

    2006-08-01

    Oxidation of lipids and proteins represents a causative event for atherogenesis, which can be opposed by antioxidant activity. Elements, such as, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se can be involved in both mechanisms. Thus, evaluation of blood elemental levels, easily detected by PIXE, and of redox parameters may be useful in assessing the risk of atherosclerosis. A group of stable patients suffering from atherosclerosis, was matched with a cohort of normo-tensive and -lipidemic volunteers. Although no major discrepancies were observed for trace elemental levels in blood, increased concentrations of K and Ca were found in atherosclerotic group. Patients presented enhance levels of antioxidant (α-tocopherol) and decreased of protein oxidation (protein carbonyls), while for the lipid oxidation marker (malondialdehyde) no variation was observed. This study contributes to a better understanding of atherosclerosis development and its relationship with blood elemental levels, and set basis for further clinical trials with pathological groups in acute phase.

  5. Nestin+ cells direct inflammatory cell migration in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    del Toro, Raquel; Chèvre, Raphael; Rodríguez, Cristina; Ordóñez, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Andrés, Vicente; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading death cause. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells participate in atherogenesis, but it is unclear whether other mesenchymal cells contribute to this process. Bone marrow (BM) nestin+ cells cooperate with endothelial cells in directing monocyte egress to bloodstream in response to infections. However, it remains unknown whether nestin+ cells regulate inflammatory cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we show that nestin+ cells direct inflammatory cell migration during chronic inflammation. In Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high-fat diet, BM nestin+ cells regulate the egress of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils. In the aorta, nestin+ stromal cells increase ∼30 times and contribute to the atheroma plaque. Mcp1 deletion in nestin+ cells—but not in endothelial cells only— increases circulating inflammatory cells, but decreases their aortic infiltration, delaying atheroma plaque formation and aortic valve calcification. Therefore, nestin expression marks cells that regulate inflammatory cell migration during atherosclerosis. PMID:27586429

  6. IL-35: a potential target for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Lin, Ying-Zhong; Shi, Ying; Ji, Qing-Wei

    2013-10-01

    The imbalance of anti- inflammatory/pro-inflammatory cytokines plays an important role in the process of atherosclerosis. IL-35 is an anti-inflammatory cytokine comprising the p35 subunit of IL-12 and the subunit Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) -induced gene 3(EBI3). Accumulating evidence showed that IL-35 up-regulates the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines, induces the generation of CD4 + regulatory T cells, inhibits CD4 + effector T cells response and other target cells activity, and reduces the progression of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In addition, it has been found that Ebi3 and p35 strongly coexpressed in human advanced lesions. Therefore, we hypothesize that IL-35 may become a novel target for the treatment of atherosclerosis. Further studies are required to investigate the precise effect and the signaling pathway of IL-35 in atherosclerosis process.

  7. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Wang; Chaoshu, Tang; Hongfang, Jin; Junbao, Du

    2010-05-28

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, complex, and progressive pathological process in large and medium sized arteries. The exact mechanism of this process remains unclear. Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a novel gasotransmitter, was confirmed as playing a major role in the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases. It plays a role in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and apoptosis, participates in the progress of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHCY), inhibits atherogenic modification of LDL, interferes with vascular calcification, intervenes with platelet function, and there are interactions between H{sub 2}S and inflammatory processes. The role of H{sub 2}S in atherosclerotic pathogenesis highlights the mysteries of atherosclerosis and inspires the search for innovative therapeutic strategies. Here, we review the studies to date that have considered the role of H{sub 2}S in atherosclerosis.

  8. Macrophages and Their Role in Atherosclerosis: Pathophysiology and Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A.; Nikiforov, Nikita G.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis can be regarded as a chronic inflammatory state, in which macrophages play different and important roles. Phagocytic proinflammatory cells populate growing atherosclerotic lesions, where they actively participate in cholesterol accumulation. Moreover, macrophages promote formation of complicated and unstable plaques by maintaining proinflammatory microenvironment. At the same time, anti-inflammatory macrophages contribute to tissue repair and remodelling and plaque stabilization. Macrophages therefore represent attractive targets for development of antiatherosclerotic therapy, which can aim to reduce monocyte recruitment to the lesion site, inhibit proinflammatory macrophages, or stimulate anti-inflammatory responses and cholesterol efflux. More studies are needed, however, to create a comprehensive classification of different macrophage phenotypes and to define their roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge on macrophage diversity, activation, and plasticity in atherosclerosis and describe macrophage-based cellular tests for evaluation of potential antiatherosclerotic substances. PMID:27493969

  9. Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis: Insights from Large Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Vilahur, Gemma; Padro, Teresa; Badimon, Lina

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and its thrombotic complications are responsible for remarkably high numbers of deaths. The combination of in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo experimental approaches has largely contributed to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the atherothrombotic process. Indeed, different animal models have been implemented in atherosclerosis and thrombosis research in order to provide new insights into the mechanisms that have already been outlined in isolated cells and protein studies. Yet, although no model completely mimics the human pathology, large animal models have demonstrated better suitability for translation to humans. Indeed, direct translation from mice to humans should be taken with caution because of the well-reported species-related differences. This paper provides an overview of the available atherothrombotic-like animal models, with a particular focus on large animal models of thrombosis and atherosclerosis, and examines their applicability for translational research purposes as well as highlights species-related differences with humans. PMID:21274431

  10. Nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Del Toro, Raquel; Chèvre, Raphael; Rodríguez, Cristina; Ordóñez, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Andrés, Vicente; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading death cause. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells participate in atherogenesis, but it is unclear whether other mesenchymal cells contribute to this process. Bone marrow (BM) nestin(+) cells cooperate with endothelial cells in directing monocyte egress to bloodstream in response to infections. However, it remains unknown whether nestin(+) cells regulate inflammatory cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we show that nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration during chronic inflammation. In Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high-fat diet, BM nestin(+) cells regulate the egress of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils. In the aorta, nestin(+) stromal cells increase ∼30 times and contribute to the atheroma plaque. Mcp1 deletion in nestin(+) cells-but not in endothelial cells only- increases circulating inflammatory cells, but decreases their aortic infiltration, delaying atheroma plaque formation and aortic valve calcification. Therefore, nestin expression marks cells that regulate inflammatory cell migration during atherosclerosis. PMID:27586429

  11. Symptomatic atherosclerosis is associated with an altered gut metagenome

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Fredrik H.; Fåk, Frida; Nookaew, Intawat; Tremaroli, Valentina; Fagerberg, Björn; Petranovic, Dina; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Recent findings have implicated the gut microbiota as a contributor of metabolic diseases through the modulation of host metabolism and inflammation. Atherosclerosis is associated with lipid accumulation and inflammation in the arterial wall, and bacteria have been suggested as a causative agent of this disease. Here we use shotgun sequencing of the gut metagenome to demonstrate that the genus Collinsella was enriched in patients with symptomatic atherosclerosis, defined as stenotic atherosclerotic plaques in the carotid artery leading to cerebrovascular events, whereas Roseburia and Eubacterium were enriched in healthy controls. Further characterization of the functional capacity of the metagenomes revealed that patient gut metagenomes were enriched in genes encoding peptidoglycan synthesis and depleted in phytoene dehydrogenase; patients also had reduced serum levels of β-carotene. Our findings suggest that the gut metagenome is associated with the inflammatory status of the host and patients with symptomatic atherosclerosis harbor characteristic changes in the gut metagenome. PMID:23212374

  12. Metabonomic Changes Associated with Atherosclerosis Progression for LDLR(-/-) Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Zhang, Lulu; Dong, Fangcong; Liu, Yan; Li, Ning; Li, Huihui; Lei, Hehua; Hao, Fuhua; Wang, Yulan; Zhu, Yi; Tang, Huiru

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerosis resulting from hyperlipidemia causes many serious cardiovascular diseases. To understand the systems changes associated with pathogenesis and progression of atherosclerosis, we comprehensively analyzed the dynamic metabonomic changes in multiple biological matrices of LDLR(-/-) mice using NMR and GC-FID/MS with gene expression, clinical chemistry, and histopathological data as well. We found that 12 week "Western-type" diet (WD) treatment caused obvious aortic lesions, macrophage infiltration, and collagen level elevation in LDLR(-/-) mice accompanied by up-regulation of inflammatory factors including aortic ICAM-1, MCP-1, iNOS, MMP2, and hepatic TNFα and IL-1β. The WD-induced atherosclerosis progression was accompanied by metabonomic changes in multiple matrices including biofluids (plasma, urine) and (liver, kidney, myocardial) tissues involving multiple metabolic pathways. These included disruption of cholesterol homeostasis, disturbance of biosynthesis of amino acids and proteins, altered gut microbiota functions together with metabolisms of vitamin-B3, choline, purines, and pyrimidines. WD treatment caused down-regulation of SCD1 and promoted oxidative stress reflected by urinary allantoin elevation and decreases in hepatic PUFA-to-MUFA ratio. When switching to normal diet, atherosclerotic LDLR(-/-) mice reprogrammed their metabolisms and reversed the atherosclerosis-associated metabonomic changes to a large extent, although aortic lesions, inflammation parameters, macrophage infiltration, and collagen content were only partially alleviated. We concluded that metabolisms of fatty acids and vitamin-B3 together with gut microbiota played crucially important roles in atherosclerosis development. These findings offered essential biochemistry details of the diet-induced atherosclerosis and demonstrated effectiveness of the integrated metabonomic analysis of multiple biological matrices for understanding the molecular aspects of cardiovascular

  13. Targeting macrophage necroptosis for therapeutic and diagnostic interventions in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Denuja; Geoffrion, Michele; Wei, Lihui; Gan, Wei; Richards, Laura; Shangari, Prakriti; DeKemp, Ella M.; Beanlands, Rachelle A.; Perisic, Ljubica; Maegdefessel, Lars; Hedin, Ulf; Sad, Subash; Guo, Liang; Kolodgie, Frank D.; Virmani, Renu; Ruddy, Terrence; Rayner, Katey J.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis results from maladaptive inflammation driven primarily by macrophages, whose recruitment and proliferation drive plaque progression. In advanced plaques, macrophage death contributes centrally to the formation of plaque necrosis, which underlies the instability that promotes plaque rupture and myocardial infarction. Hence, targeting macrophage cell death pathways may offer promise for the stabilization of vulnerable plaques. Necroptosis is a recently discovered pathway of programmed cell necrosis regulated by RIP3 and MLKL kinases that, in contrast to apoptosis, induces a proinflammatory state. We show herein that necroptotic cell death is activated in human advanced atherosclerotic plaques and can be targeted in experimental atherosclerosis for both therapeutic and diagnostic interventions. In humans with unstable carotid atherosclerosis, expression of RIP3 and MLKL is increased, and MLKL phosphorylation, a key step in the commitment to necroptosis, is detected in advanced atheromas. Investigation of the molecular mechanisms underlying necroptosis showed that atherogenic forms of low-density lipoprotein increase RIP3 and MLKL transcription and phosphorylation—two critical steps in the execution of necroptosis. Using a radiotracer developed with the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 (Nec-1), we show that 123I-Nec-1 localizes specifically to atherosclerotic plaques in Apoe−/− mice, and its uptake is tightly correlated to lesion areas by ex vivo nuclear imaging. Furthermore, treatment of Apoe−/− mice with established atherosclerosis with Nec-1 reduced lesion size and markers of plaque instability, including necrotic core formation. Collectively, our findings offer molecular insight into the mechanisms of macrophage cell death that drive necrotic core formation in atherosclerosis and suggest that this pathway can be used as both a diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the treatment of unstable atherosclerosis. PMID:27532042

  14. Hematopoietic Akt2 deficiency attenuates the progression of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rotllan, Noemi; Chamorro-Jorganes, Aránzazu; Araldi, Elisa; Wanschel, Amarylis C.; Aryal, Binod; Aranda, Juan F.; Goedeke, Leigh; Salerno, Alessandro G.; Ramírez, Cristina M.; Sessa, William C.; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major cause of death and disability in diabetic and obese subjects with insulin resistance. Akt2, a phosphoinositide-dependent serine-threonine protein kinase, is highly express in insulin-responsive tissues; however, its role during the progression of atherosclerosis remains unknown. Thus, we aimed to investigate the contribution of Akt2 during the progression of atherosclerosis. We found that germ-line Akt2-deficient mice develop similar atherosclerotic plaques as wild-type mice despite higher plasma lipids and glucose levels. It is noteworthy that transplantation of bone marrow cells isolated from Akt2−/− mice to Ldlr−/− mice results in marked reduction of the progression of atherosclerosis compared with Ldlr−/− mice transplanted with wild-type bone marrow cells. In vitro studies indicate that Akt2 is required for macrophage migration in response to proatherogenic cytokines (monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and macrophage colony-stimulating factor). Moreover, Akt2−/− macrophages accumulate less cholesterol and have an alternative activated or M2-type phenotype when stimulated with proinflammatory cytokines. Together, these results provide evidence that macrophage Akt2 regulates migration, the inflammatory response and cholesterol metabolism and suggest that targeting Akt2 in macrophages might be beneficial for treating atherosclerosis.—Rotllan, N., Chamorro-Jorganes, A., Araldi, E., Wanschel, A. C., Aryal, B., Aranda, J. F., Goedeke, L., Salerno, A. G., Ramírez, C. M., Sessa,W. C., Suárez, Y., Fernández-Hernando, C. Hematopoietic Akt2 deficiency attenuates the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25392271

  15. Basic Mechanisms in Atherosclerosis: The Role of Calcium.

    PubMed

    Kalampogias, Aimilios; Siasos, Gerasimos; Oikonomou, Evangelos; Tsalamandris, Sotirios; Mourouzis, Konstantinos; Tsigkou, Vasiliki; Vavuranakis, Manolis; Zografos, Thodoris; Deftereos, Spyridon; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    In the beginning, atherosclerosis was considered to be the result of passive lipid accumulation in the vascular walls. After tremendous technological advancements in research, we are now able to almost admire the complexity of the atherosclerotic process. Atherosclerosis is a chronicinflammatory condition that begins with the formation of calcified plaque, influenced by a number of different factors inside the vascular wall in large and mid-sized arteries. Calcium mineralization of the lumen in the atherosclerotic artery promotes and solidifies plaque formation causing narrowing of the vessel. Soft tissue calcification associated with tissue denegation or necrosis is a passive precipitation event. The process of atherogenesis is mainly driven by CD4+ T cells, CD40L, macrophages, foam cells with elevated transcription of many matrix metalloproteinases, osteoblasts, cytokines, selectins, myeloperoxidases, vascular adhesion molecules (VCAM), and smooth muscle cells. Our knowledge in the genesis of atherosclerosis has changed dramatically in the last few years. New imaging techniques such as intravascular ultrasound or IVUS have made possible to investigate atherosclerosis in early stages. Arterial calcification emerges from two different types, the medial-elastin dependent and the intimal, both of which are directly related to atherosclerosis due to osteoblast differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells. The deposition of minerals in the form of calcium (Ca(2+)) initially emerges from the inorganing mineral octacalcium phosphate [Ca8H2(PO4)6.5H2O] to the form of Hydroxylapatite [Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2]. This review is devoted to broaden the understanding regarding atherosclerosis and the central role of calcium in the development of the condition. PMID:26411606

  16. Therapies targeting innate immunity for fighting inflammation in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Itzhak; Yacov, Niva; Harats, Dror; Breitbart, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a smoldering disease of the vasculature that can lead to the occlusion of the arteries, resulting in ischemia of the heart and brain. For many years, the asserted underlying mechanism of atherosclerosis, supported by its epidemiology, was based on the "cholesterol hypothesis" that people with high blood cholesterol are at higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. This hypothesis instigated a vigorous search for treatment that yielded the generation of statins, which specifically reduce LDL cholesterol. Since then, statins have revolutionized the way people are treated for the prevention of atherosclerosis. Nonetheless, despite this potent class of drugs, cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading cause of death in many parts of the world, suggesting that additional mechanisms are involved in disease pathogenesis. Intensive research has revealed that the atherosclerotic plaque is enriched with leukocytes, and that macrophages constitute the majority of immune cells in the lesion. Monocytes/macrophages are now recognized as the prime immune cells involved in the development of atherosclerosis and are implicated to affect the size, composition and vulnerability of the atherosclerotic plaque. While many of the macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory mechanisms associated with atherogenesis have been characterized, such as cell adhesion, cytokine production and protease secretion, there is a dearth of drugs that specifically target innate immunity for treating patients with atherosclerosis. This review presents pre-clinical studies, and in most cases following clinical trials with antagonists and agonists that have been designed to counteract inflammation in atherosclerosis and associated diseases, highlighting targets expressed predominantly in monocytes.

  17. 75 FR 62544 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request; the Atherosclerosis... and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Proposed Collection: Title: The Atherosclerosis Risk...

  18. 76 FR 3146 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC) Summary: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D) of the...: Title: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC). Type of Information Collection...

  19. 75 FR 7482 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC) Summary: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D) of the... Title: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC). Type of Information Collection...

  20. [Correlation of some biochemical and coagulological parameters in carotid atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Akhvlediani, M V; Vorob'eva, E O; Emukhvari, M G; Sharashidze, N A; Kupreishvili, S B

    2009-11-01

    It has been established positive correlation of the degree of stenosis and intima-media thickness of carotid arteries with the following biochemical parameters: total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, Apo-B, Lp(a), triglycerides, hs-C-reactive protein(CRP), interleukines (IL-1beta and IL-6), fibrinogen, D-dimers. Negative correlation was stated with respect to HDL cholesterol, Apo-A-1, protein C. Relation between the parameters of the blood lipid spectre, proteins and mediators of inflammation as well as those of hemostasis enables us to approach pathophysiological mechanisms of carotid atherosclerosis, define the processes of inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  1. Targeting and therapeutic peptides in nanomedicine for atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Peptides in atherosclerosis nanomedicine provide structural, targeting, and therapeutic functionality and can assist in overcoming delivery barriers of traditional pharmaceuticals. Moreover, their inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability make them especially attractive as materials intended for use in vivo. In this review, an overview of nanoparticle-associated targeting and therapeutic peptides for atherosclerosis is provided, including peptides designed for cellular targets such as endothelial cells, monocytes, and macrophages as well as for plaque components such as collagen and fibrin. An emphasis is placed on recent advances in multimodal strategies and a discussion on current challenges and barriers for clinical applicability is presented. PMID:27022138

  2. Targeting and therapeutic peptides in nanomedicine for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eun Ji

    2016-05-01

    Peptides in atherosclerosis nanomedicine provide structural, targeting, and therapeutic functionality and can assist in overcoming delivery barriers of traditional pharmaceuticals. Moreover, their inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability make them especially attractive as materials intended for use in vivo In this review, an overview of nanoparticle-associated targeting and therapeutic peptides for atherosclerosis is provided, including peptides designed for cellular targets such as endothelial cells, monocytes, and macrophages as well as for plaque components such as collagen and fibrin. An emphasis is placed on recent advances in multimodal strategies and a discussion on current challenges and barriers for clinical applicability is presented.

  3. Perspectives and opportunities for nanomedicine in the management of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lobatto, Mark E.; Fuster, Valentin; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2013-01-01

    The use of nanotechnology for medical purposes — nanomedicine — has grown exponentially over the past few decades. This is exemplified by the US Food and Drug Administration’s approval of several nanotherapies for various conditions, as well as the funding of nanomedical programmes worldwide. Although originally the domain of anticancer therapy, recent advances have illustrated the considerable potential of nanomedicine in the diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerosis. This Review elaborates on nanoparticle-targeting concepts in atherosclerotic disease, provides an overview of the use of nanomedicine in atherosclerosis, and discusses potential future applications and clinical benefits. PMID:22015921

  4. Recent insights into the cellular biology of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    García-Cardeña, Guillermo; Owens, Gary K.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis occurs in the subendothelial space (intima) of medium-sized arteries at regions of disturbed blood flow and is triggered by an interplay between endothelial dysfunction and subendothelial lipoprotein retention. Over time, this process stimulates a nonresolving inflammatory response that can cause intimal destruction, arterial thrombosis, and end-organ ischemia. Recent advances highlight important cell biological atherogenic processes, including mechanotransduction and inflammatory processes in endothelial cells, origins and contributions of lesional macrophages, and origins and phenotypic switching of lesional smooth muscle cells. These advances illustrate how in-depth mechanistic knowledge of the cellular pathobiology of atherosclerosis can lead to new ideas for therapy. PMID:25869663

  5. Lessons for atherosclerosis research from tuberculosis and peptic ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, M C

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the causes of a disease is essential to the effective alteration of factors affecting the disease's incidence. The history of the medical understanding of tuberculosis and peptic ulcer shows that we may neglect to consider the contribution of microorganisms to long-term or recurring diseases. The author presents evidence that we may similarly be overlooking the role of microorganisms in atherosclerosis. A collaborative, comprehensive investigation of the role of microorganisms in atherosclerosis is needed to understand the cause of this disease. PMID:7882229

  6. 75 FR 46945 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-04

    ... Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event Surveillance SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of... Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Proposed Collection: Title: Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis... and progression of subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD)-- that is, atherosclerosis and other...

  7. JTT-130, a novel intestine-specific inhibitor of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, ameliorates lipid metabolism and attenuates atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic animal models.

    PubMed

    Mera, Yasuko; Kawai, Takashi; Ogawa, Naoto; Odani, Naoya; Sasase, Tomohiko; Miyajima, Katsuhiro; Ohta, Takeshi; Kakutani, Makoto

    2015-11-01

    JTT-130 was developed as an intestine-specific MTP inhibitor designed to rapidly catabolize after absorption to avoid causing hepatotoxicity due to hepatic MTP inhibition. In previous reports, we have demonstrated that JTT-130 suppresses dietary lipid absorption in the small intestine without inducing hepatic steatosis. Thus, in this report, JTT-130 was administered to hyperlipidemic animals fed a Western diet to investigate the effect of intestinal MTP inhibition on lipid metabolism and progression of atherosclerosis. JTT-130 potently lowered plasma non-high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and elevated plasma high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), indicating improvement in atherogenic index in hamsters. HDL fractions obtained after two weeks treatment with JTT-130 significantly increased the efflux of cholesterol from macrophages, as an index parameter of HDL function. Furthermore, long-term treatment with JTT-130 also improved the plasma lipid profile without inducing hepatic steatosis in rabbits, resulting in the suppression of atherosclerosis formation in aortas. From these results, JTT-130 ameliorates lipid metabolism accompanied with the enhancement of the anti-atherosclerotic function of HDL, and attenuates the progression of atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic animals. These findings indicate that intestinal MTP inhibition may be atherogenic in vivo and that JTT-130 may be a useful compound for the treatment of dyslipidemia and a potential anti-atherogenic drug.

  8. Immunoglobulin treatment reduces atherosclerosis in apo E knockout mice.

    PubMed Central

    Nicoletti, A; Kaveri, S; Caligiuri, G; Bariéty, J; Hansson, G K

    1998-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is associated with immune activation. T cells and macrophages infiltrate atherosclerotic plaques and disease progression is associated with formation of autoantibodies to oxidized lipoproteins. In the apo E knockout mouse, a genetic model of cholesterol-induced atherosclerosis, congenital deficiency of macrophages, lymphocytes, or interferon-gamma receptors result in reduced lesion formation. We have now evaluated whether immune modulation in the adult animal affects disease development. Injections of 7-wk-old male apo E knockout mice with polyclonal immunoglobulin preparations (ivIg) during a 5-d period reduced fatty streak formation over a 2-mo period on cholesterol diet by 35%. Fibrofatty lesions induced by diet treatment for 4 mo were reduced by 50% in mice receiving ivIg after 2 mo on the diet. ivIg treatment also reduced IgM antibodies to oxidized LDL and led to inactivation of spleen and lymph node T cells. These data indicate that ivIg inhibits atherosclerosis, that it is effective both during the fatty streak and plaque phases, and that it may act by modulating T cell activity and/or antibody production. Therefore, immunomodulation may be an effective way to prevent and/or treat atherosclerosis. PMID:9727059

  9. Animal Models in Cardiovascular Research: Hypertension and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chun-Yi; Jaarin, Kamsiah

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and atherosclerosis are among the most common causes of mortality in both developed and developing countries. Experimental animal models of hypertension and atherosclerosis have become a valuable tool for providing information on etiology, pathophysiology, and complications of the disease and on the efficacy and mechanism of action of various drugs and compounds used in treatment. An animal model has been developed to study hypertension and atherosclerosis for several reasons. Compared to human models, an animal model is easily manageable, as compounding effects of dietary and environmental factors can be controlled. Blood vessels and cardiac tissue samples can be taken for detailed experimental and biomolecular examination. Choice of animal model is often determined by the research aim, as well as financial and technical factors. A thorough understanding of the animal models used and complete analysis must be validated so that the data can be extrapolated to humans. In conclusion, animal models for hypertension and atherosclerosis are invaluable in improving our understanding of cardiovascular disease and developing new pharmacological therapies. PMID:26064920

  10. Analysis of gene expression profile identifies potential biomarkers for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Luran; Liu, Yan; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Zhuobo; Du, Yaojun; Zhao, Hao

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to identify potential biomarkers for atherosclerosis via analysis of gene expression profiles. The microarray dataset no. GSE20129 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. A total of 118 samples from the peripheral blood of female patients was used, including 47 atherosclerotic and 71 non‑atherosclerotic patients. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the atherosclerosis samples were identified using the Limma package. Gene ontology term and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses for DEGs were performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery tool. The recursive feature elimination (RFE) algorithm was applied for feature selection via iterative classification, and support vector machine classifier was used for the validation of prediction accuracy. A total of 430 DEGs in the atherosclerosis samples were identified, including 149 up‑ and 281 downregulated genes. Subsequently, the RFE algorithm was used to identify 11 biomarkers, whose receiver operating characteristic curves had an area under curve of 0.92, indicating that the identified 11 biomarkers were representative. The present study indicated that APH1B, JAM3, FBLN2, CSAD and PSTPIP2 may have important roles in the progression of atherosclerosis in females and may be potential biomarkers for early diagnosis and prognosis as well as treatment targets for this disease. PMID:27573188

  11. Cell signaling by reactive nitrogen and oxygen species in atherosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, R. P.; Moellering, D.; Murphy-Ullrich, J.; Jo, H.; Beckman, J. S.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species has been implicated in atherosclerosis principally as means of damaging low-density lipoprotein that in turn initiates the accumulation of cholesterol in macrophages. The diversity of novel oxidative modifications to lipids and proteins recently identified in atherosclerotic lesions has revealed surprising complexity in the mechanisms of oxidative damage and their potential role in atherosclerosis. Oxidative or nitrosative stress does not completely consume intracellular antioxidants leading to cell death as previously thought. Rather, oxidative and nitrosative stress have a more subtle impact on the atherogenic process by modulating intracellular signaling pathways in vascular tissues to affect inflammatory cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Furthermore, cellular responses can affect the production of nitric oxide, which in turn can strongly influence the nature of oxidative modifications occurring in atherosclerosis. The dynamic interactions between endogenous low concentrations of oxidants or reactive nitrogen species with intracellular signaling pathways may have a general role in processes affecting wound healing to apoptosis, which can provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  12. Essential Roles of Toll-Like Receptors in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Juntang; Kakkar, Vijay; Lu, Xinjie

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is driven by inflammation with an involvement of innate and adaptive immune responses. Toll-like receptors, the well-defined pattern recognition receptors of the immune system, play a central role in macrophage activation. Toll-like receptors recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns expressed by a wide range of infectious agents and provide a strong link between local innate and adaptive immunity. Activation of these receptors triggers an intracellular signaling cascade mediated through myeloid differentiation factor 88 or toll/interleukin-1 receptor-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β, leading to the secretion of proand anti-inflammatory cytokines. Engagement of Toll-like receptors with their ligands induces leukocyte recruitment and enhances matrix metalloproteinase expression within atherosclerotic lesions. Recently certain Toll-like receptors have shown a protective role in atherosclerosis. TLRs, therefore, represent an important link between inflammation and atheroma, making them attractive targets for the treatment of atherosclerosis. This review will briefly describe the general biological structure and potential roles of Toll-like receptors as therapeutic targets for the treatment of atherosclerosis and highlight the potential challenges on Toll-like receptor- based therapy in cardiovascular disease. PMID:26639096

  13. Analysis of gene expression profile identifies potential biomarkers for atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Luran; Liu, Yan; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Zhuobo; Du, Yaojun; Zhao, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify potential biomarkers for atherosclerosis via analysis of gene expression profiles. The microarray dataset no. GSE20129 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. A total of 118 samples from the peripheral blood of female patients was used, including 47 atherosclerotic and 71 non-atherosclerotic patients. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in the atherosclerosis samples were identified using the Limma package. Gene ontology term and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses for DEGs were performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery tool. The recursive feature elimination (RFE) algorithm was applied for feature selection via iterative classification, and support vector machine classifier was used for the validation of prediction accuracy. A total of 430 DEGs in the atherosclerosis samples were identified, including 149 up- and 281 downregulated genes. Subsequently, the RFE algorithm was used to identify 11 biomarkers, whose receiver operating characteristic curves had an area under curve of 0.92, indicating that the identified 11 biomarkers were representative. The present study indicated that APH1B, JAM3, FBLN2, CSAD and PSTPIP2 may have important roles in the progression of atherosclerosis in females and may be potential biomarkers for early diagnosis and prognosis as well as treatment targets for this disease. PMID:27573188

  14. Lipoicmethylenedioxyphenol Reduces Experimental Atherosclerosis through Activation of Nrf2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Zhekang; Chen, Minjie; Xie, Xiaoyun; Wang, Xiaoke; Kherada, Nisharahmed; Desikan, Rajagopal; Mihai, Georgeta; Burns, Patrick; Sun, Qinghua; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Objective Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and Nrf2 is the transcriptional factor central in cellular antioxidant responses. In the present study, we investigate the effect of a dihydrolipoic acid derivative lipoicmethylenedioxyphenol (LMDP) on the progression of atherosclerosis and test whether its effect on atherosclerosis is mediated by Nrf2. Methods and Results Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning and en face analysis reveal that 14 weeks of treatment with LMDP markedly reduced atherosclerotic burden in a rabbit balloon vascular injury model. Myograph analyses show decreased aortic contractile response to phenylephrine and increased aortic response to acetylcholine and insulin in LMDP-treated animals, suggesting that LMDP inhibits atherosclerosis through improving vascular function. A role of Nrf2 signaling in mediating the amelioration of vascular function by LMDP was supported by increased Nrf2 translocation into nuclear and increased expression of Nrf2 target genes. Furthermore, chemotaxis analysis with Boydem chamber shows that leukocytes isolated from LMDP-treated rabbits had reduced chemotaxis, and knock-down of Nrf2 significantly reduced the effect of LMDP on the chemotaxis of mouse macrophages. Conclusion Our results support that LMDP has an anti-atherosclerotic effect likely through activation of Nrf2 signaling and subsequent inhibition of macrophage chemotaxis. PMID:26859892

  15. Evaluation of the biomechanics of atherosclerosis by acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saijo, Yoshifumi; Nitta, Shin-ichi; Schiott Jorgensen, Claus; Falk, Erling

    2001-07-01

    Acoustic microscopy provides not only the morphology, but also the biomechanical properties of the biological soft tissues. The biomechanics of atherosclerosis is important because the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis is closely related with mechanical properties and mechanical stress. Rupture of the fibrous cap of atheromatous plaque is the initial event in acute coronary syndrome such as acute myocardial infarction or unstable angina. In addition to extrinsic physical stresses to the plaque, the intrinsic biomechanical property of the plaque is important for assessing the mechanism of the rupture. Two sets of SAMs operating in 100 to 200 MHz and in 800 MHz to 1.3 GHz were equipped to measure the acoustic properties of atherosclerosis of human or mouse arteries. The values of attenuation and sound speed in the tissue components of atherosclerosis were measured by analyzing the frequency dependent characteristics of the amplitude and phase signals. Both values were highest in calcification and lowest in lipid pool. Although attenuation and sound speed were relatively high in intimal fibrosis, the inhomogeneity of acoustic parameters was found within the fibrous cap. Polarized microscopy for the collagen stained with Picrosirius red showed that the attenuation of ultrasound was significantly higher in type I collagen with orange polarized color compared to type III collagen with green color. SAM has shown the possibility to detect the plaque vulnerability and it might improve our understanding of the sudden rupture from micro-mechanical point of view.

  16. Ezetimibe reduces plaque inflammation in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis and inhibits monocyte migration in addition to its lipid-lowering effect

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Garre, D; Muñoz-Pacheco, P; González-Rubio, ML; Aragoncillo, P; Granados, R; Fernández-Cruz, A

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Ezetimibe, a selective inhibitor of intestinal cholesterol absorption, might also suppress inflammatory components of atherogenesis. We have studied the effects of ezetimibe on two characteristics of atherosclerotic plaques (infiltrate and fibrosis) and on expression of inflammatory genes in a rabbit model of accelerated atherosclerosis. Experimental approach: Femoral atherosclerosis was induced by a combination of endothelial desiccation and atherogenic diet. Animals were randomized to ezetimibe (0.6 mg·kg−1·day−1), simvastatin (5 mg·kg−1·day−1), ezetimibe plus simvastatin or no treatment, still on atherogenic diet. A control group of rabbits received normolipidemic diet. Key results: Rabbits fed the normolipidemic diet showed normal plasma lipid levels. Either the normolipidemic diet or drug treatment reduced the intima/media ratio (normolipidemic diet: 22%, ezetimibe: 13%, simvastatin: 27%, ezetimibe + simvastatin: 28%), compared with rabbits with atherosclerosis. Ezetimibe also decreased macrophage content and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression in atherosclerotic lesions. Furthermore, ezetimibe reduced the increased activity of nuclear factor κB in peripheral blood leucocytes and plasma C-reactive protein levels in rabbits with atherosclerosis. In THP-1 cells, ezetimibe decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1-induced monocyte migration. Importantly, the combination of ezetimibe with simvastatin was associated with a more significant reduction in plaque monocyte/macrophage content and some proinflammatory markers than observed with each drug alone. Conclusions and implications: Ezetimibe had beneficial effects both on atherosclerosis progression and plaque stabilization and showed additional anti-atherogenic benefits when combined with simvastatin. Its effect on monocyte migration provides a potentially beneficial action, in addition to its effects on lipids. PMID:19222481

  17. Macrophage autophagy regulated by miR-384-5p-mediated control of Beclin-1 plays a role in the development of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Beiyun; Zhong, Yuan; Huang, Dong; Li, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play an essential and complicated role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. However, the regulation of macrophage autophagy as well as it role in the development of atherosclerosis is unclear. MicroRNA-384-5p (miR-384-5p) is a new miRNA that attracted attention very recently, while its effects on Beclin-1 and cell autophagy has not been reported. Here, we studied macrophage autophagy in ApoE (-/-) mice suppled with high-fat diet (HFD), a mouse model for atherosclerosis (simplified as HFD mice). We analyzed the levels of Beclin-1 and the levels of miR-384-5p in the purified F4/80+ macrophages from mouse aorta. Prediction of the binding between miR-384-5p and 3’-UTR of Beclin-1 mRNA was performed by bioinformatics analyses and confirmed by a dual luciferase reporter assay. We found that HFD mice developed atherosclerosis in 12 weeks, while the control ApoE (-/-) mice that had received normal diet (simplified as NOR mice) did not. Compared to NOR mice, HFD mice had significantly lower levels of macrophage autophagy, and significantly higher levels of macrophage death, resulting from decreases in Beclin-1. The decreases in Beclin-1 in macrophages were due to HFD-induced increases in miR-384-5p, which suppressed the translation of Bectlin-1 mRNA via 3’-UTR binding. Together, our study suggests that upregulation of miR-384-5p by HFD may impair the Beclin-1-mediated protection of macrophages through autophagy to accelerate the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:27158352

  18. Targeting the adaptive immune system: new strategies in the treatment of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zarzycka, Barbara; Nicolaes, Gerry A F; Lutgens, Esther

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is a lipid-driven chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. Current treatment of atherosclerosis is focused on limiting its risk factors, such as hyperlipidemia or hypertension. However, treatments that target the inflammatory nature of atherosclerosis are still under development. Discovery of novel targets involved in the inflammation of the arterial wall creates opportunities to design new therapeutics that successfully modulate atherosclerosis. Here, we review drug targets that have proven to play pivotal roles in the adaptive immune system in atherosclerosis, and we discuss their potential as novel therapeutics.

  19. Improved animal models for testing gene therapy for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Du, Liang; Zhang, Jingwan; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Flynn, Rowan; Dichek, David A

    2014-04-01

    Gene therapy delivered to the blood vessel wall could augment current therapies for atherosclerosis, including systemic drug therapy and stenting. However, identification of clinically useful vectors and effective therapeutic transgenes remains at the preclinical stage. Identification of effective vectors and transgenes would be accelerated by availability of animal models that allow practical and expeditious testing of vessel-wall-directed gene therapy. Such models would include humanlike lesions that develop rapidly in vessels that are amenable to efficient gene delivery. Moreover, because human atherosclerosis develops in normal vessels, gene therapy that prevents atherosclerosis is most logically tested in relatively normal arteries. Similarly, gene therapy that causes atherosclerosis regression requires gene delivery to an existing lesion. Here we report development of three new rabbit models for testing vessel-wall-directed gene therapy that either prevents or reverses atherosclerosis. Carotid artery intimal lesions in these new models develop within 2-7 months after initiation of a high-fat diet and are 20-80 times larger than lesions in a model we described previously. Individual models allow generation of lesions that are relatively rich in either macrophages or smooth muscle cells, permitting testing of gene therapy strategies targeted at either cell type. Two of the models include gene delivery to essentially normal arteries and will be useful for identifying strategies that prevent lesion development. The third model generates lesions rapidly in vector-naïve animals and can be used for testing gene therapy that promotes lesion regression. These models are optimized for testing helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd)-mediated gene therapy; however, they could be easily adapted for testing of other vectors or of different types of molecular therapies, delivered directly to the blood vessel wall. Our data also supports the promise of HDAd to deliver long

  20. Gradient Echo MRI Characterization of Development of Atherosclerosis in the Abdominal Aorta in Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic Rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J. Kuribayashi, Hideto; Wagberg, Maria; Holmes, Andrew P.; Tessier, Jean J.; Waterton, John C.

    2006-08-15

    Purpose. The Watanabe Heritable Hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbit provides an important model of spontaneous atherosclerosis. With a strain of WHHL rabbits which do not develop abdominal aorta lumen stenosis even with advanced atherosclerosis, we studied the MRI-histology correlation, and the natural progression of atherosclerosis in the abdominal aorta. In addition, intra-reader segmentation repeatability and scan-rescan reproducibility were assessed. Methods. Two batches of female WHHL rabbits were used. The first batch of 6 rabbits was scanned at 20 weeks old. A second batch of 17 rabbits was scanned at 50 weeks old and then randomly divided into two subgroups: 8 were killed for histologic investigation; 9 were kept alive for follow-up, with repeat scanning a week later to assess scan-rescan reproducibility, and again at 73 weeks old to assess disease progression. MR images were acquired at 4.7 T using a chemical shift selective fat suppression gradient echo with a saturation band suppressing blood signal within the aortic lumen. Five slices per animal were acquired, centered around the renal artery region of the abdominal aorta, with in-plane resolution of 0.195 mm and slice thickness of 3 mm. Results. The coefficient of variation for intra-reader reproducibility for aortic wall thickness measurements was 2.5% for repeat segmentations of the same scans on the same day, but segmentations of these same scans made 8 months later showed a systematic change, suggesting that intra-reader bias as well as increased variability could compromise assessments made over time. Comparative analyses were therefore performed in one postprocessing session. The coefficient of variation for scan-rescan reproducibility for aortic wall thickness was 5.5% for nine pairs of scans acquired a week apart and segmented on the same day. Good MRI-histology correlation was obtained. The MRI-measured mean aortic wall thickness of animals at 20 weeks of age was 76% that of animals at 50 weeks of

  1. E-selectin-targeting delivery of microRNAs by microparticles ameliorates endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shuangtao; Tian, Xiao Yu; Zhang, Yunrong; Mu, Chaofeng; Shen, Haifa; Bismuth, Jean; Pownall, Henry J.; Huang, Yu; Wong, Wing Tak

    2016-01-01

    E-selectin is a surface marker of endothelial cell (EC) inflammation, one of the hallmarks of atherogenesis. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that delivery of microRNA (miR)-146a and miR-181b with an E-selectin-targeting multistage vector (ESTA-MSV) to inflamed endothelium covering atherosclerotic plaques inhibits atherosclerosis. Cy5-conjugated miR-146a and miR-181b were packaged in polyethylene glycol-polyethyleneimine (PEG/PEI) nanoparticles and loaded into ESTA-MSV microparticles. Both miRs were downregulated in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-treated ECs. Transfection of TNF-α-treated mouse aortas and cultured ECs with miRs was more efficient with ESTA-MSV than with the PEG/PEI. Likewise, miR-146a/-181b packaged in ESTA-MSV efficiently suppressed the chemokines, CCL2, CCL5, CCL8, and CXCL9, and monocyte adhesion to ECs. Complementary in vivo tests were conducted in male apolipoprotein E-deficient mice fed a Western diet and injected intravenously with the particles prepared as above biweekly for 12 weeks. Treatment with miRs packaged in ESTA-MSV but not in PEG/PEI reduced atherosclerotic plaque size. Concurrently, vascular inflammation markers, including macrophages in aortic root lesions and chemokine expression in aortic tissues were reduced while the vascular smooth muscle cells and collagen increased in plaques from ESTA-MSV/miRs-treated vs. vehicle-treated mice. Our data supported our hypothesis that ESTA-MSV microparticle-mediated delivery of miR-146a/-181b ameliorates endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis. PMID:26956647

  2. Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Transplantation Delays Progression of Carotid Atherosclerosis in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Cui, Kefei; Ma, Xiao; Yu, Lie; Jiang, Chao; Fu, Chao; Fu, Xiaojie; Yu, Xiaofang; Huang, Yuanjing; Hou, Suyun; Si, Caifeng; Chen, Zhengguang; Yu, Jing; Wan, Jieru; Wang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) can counteract oxidative stress and inhibit the inflammatory response in focal ischemic stroke models. However, the effect of BMMNC transplantation on carotid atherosclerosis needs to be determined. The carotid atherosclerotic plaque model was established in New Zealand White rabbits by balloon injury and 8 weeks of high-fat diet. Rabbits were randomized to receive an intravenous injection of autologous bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled BMMNCs or an equal volume of phosphate-buffered saline. Plaques were evaluated for expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, anti-oxidant proteins, and markers of cell death. BMMNCs migrated into atherosclerotic plaque on the first day after cell transplantation. BMMNC-treated rabbits had smaller plaques and more collagen deposition than did the vehicle-treated controls on day 28 (p < 0.05). BMMNC treatment significantly increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase and the anti-oxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase in plaques compared to vehicle treatment on day 7. BMMNC-treated rabbits also had lower levels of cleaved caspase-3 expression; lower levels of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and matrix metalloproteinase 9; and higher levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 and its receptor (p < 0.05). Autologous BMMNC transplantation can suppress the process of atherosclerotic plaque formation and is associated with enhanced anti-oxidative effect, reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines and cleaved caspase-3, and increased expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 and its receptor. BMMNC transplantation represents a novel approach for the treatment of carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:26232064

  3. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    GH suppression test; Glucose loading test; Acromegaly - blood test; Gigantism - blood test ... is not changed and stays high during the suppression test, the provider will suspect gigantism or acromegaly. ...

  4. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medication. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  5. Strong correlation between early stage atherosclerosis and electromechanical coupling of aorta.

    PubMed

    Liu, X Y; Yan, F; Niu, L L; Chen, Q N; Zheng, H R; Li, J Y

    2016-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is the underlying cause of cardiovascular diseases that are responsible for many deaths in the world, and the early diagnosis of atherosclerosis is highly desirable. The existing imaging methods, however, are not capable of detecting the early stage of atherosclerosis development due to their limited spatial resolution. Using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), we show that the piezoelectric response of an aortic wall increases as atherosclerosis advances, while the stiffness of the aorta shows a less evident correlation with atherosclerosis. Furthermore, we show that there is strong correlation between the coercive electric field necessary to switch the polarity of the artery and the development of atherosclerosis. Thus by measuring the electromechanical coupling of the aortic wall, it is possible to probe atherosclerosis at the early stage of its development, not only improving the spatial resolution by orders of magnitude, but also providing comprehensive quantitative information on the biomechanical properties of the artery. PMID:26972797

  6. Strong correlation between early stage atherosclerosis and electromechanical coupling of aorta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. Y.; Yan, F.; Niu, L. L.; Chen, Q. N.; Zheng, H. R.; Li, J. Y.

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is the underlying cause of cardiovascular diseases that are responsible for many deaths in the world, and the early diagnosis of atherosclerosis is highly desirable. The existing imaging methods, however, are not capable of detecting the early stage of atherosclerosis development due to their limited spatial resolution. Using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), we show that the piezoelectric response of an aortic wall increases as atherosclerosis advances, while the stiffness of the aorta shows a less evident correlation with atherosclerosis. Furthermore, we show that there is strong correlation between the coercive electric field necessary to switch the polarity of the artery and the development of atherosclerosis. Thus by measuring the electromechanical coupling of the aortic wall, it is possible to probe atherosclerosis at the early stage of its development, not only improving the spatial resolution by orders of magnitude, but also providing comprehensive quantitative information on the biomechanical properties of the artery.

  7. Large animal models of atherosclerosis--new tools for persistent problems in cardiovascular medicine.

    PubMed

    Shim, J; Al-Mashhadi, R H; Sørensen, C B; Bentzon, J F

    2016-01-01

    Coronary heart disease and ischaemic stroke caused by atherosclerosis are leading causes of illness and death worldwide. Small animal models have provided insight into the fundamental mechanisms driving early atherosclerosis, but it is increasingly clear that new strategies and research tools are needed to translate these discoveries into improved prevention and treatment of symptomatic atherosclerosis in humans. Key challenges include better understanding of processes in late atherosclerosis, factors affecting atherosclerosis in the coronary bed, and the development of reliable imaging biomarker tools for risk stratification and monitoring of drug effects in humans. Efficient large animal models of atherosclerosis may help tackle these problems. Recent years have seen tremendous advances in gene-editing tools for large animals. This has made it possible to create gene-modified minipigs that develop atherosclerosis with many similarities to humans in terms of predilection for lesion sites and histopathology. Together with existing porcine models of atherosclerosis that are based on spontaneous mutations or severe diabetes, such models open new avenues for translational research in atherosclerosis. In this review, we discuss the merits of different animal models of atherosclerosis and give examples of important research problems where porcine models could prove pivotal for progress.

  8. CD47-blocking antibodies restore phagocytosis and prevent atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Yoko; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; McKenna, Kelly; Civelek, Mete; Lusis, Aldons Jake; Miller, Clint L; Direnzo, Daniel; Nanda, Vivek; Ye, Jianqin; Connolly, Andrew J; Schadt, Eric E; Quertermous, Thomas; Betancur, Paola; Maegdefessel, Lars; Matic, Ljubica Perisic; Hedin, Ulf; Weissman, Irving L; Leeper, Nicholas J

    2016-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is the disease process that underlies heart attack and stroke. Advanced lesions at risk of rupture are characterized by the pathological accumulation of diseased vascular cells and apoptotic cellular debris. Why these cells are not cleared remains unknown. Here we show that atherogenesis is associated with upregulation of CD47, a key anti-phagocytic molecule that is known to render malignant cells resistant to programmed cell removal, or 'efferocytosis'. We find that administration of CD47-blocking antibodies reverses this defect in efferocytosis, normalizes the clearance of diseased vascular tissue, and ameliorates atherosclerosis in multiple mouse models. Mechanistic studies implicate the pro-atherosclerotic factor TNF-α as a fundamental driver of impaired programmed cell removal, explaining why this process is compromised in vascular disease. Similar to recent observations in cancer, impaired efferocytosis appears to play a pathogenic role in cardiovascular disease, but is not a fixed defect and may represent a novel therapeutic target. PMID:27437576

  9. CD47-blocking antibodies restore phagocytosis and prevent atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Yoko; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; McKenna, Kelly; Civelek, Mete; Lusis, Aldons Jake; Miller, Clint L; Direnzo, Daniel; Nanda, Vivek; Ye, Jianqin; Connolly, Andrew J; Schadt, Eric E; Quertermous, Thomas; Betancur, Paola; Maegdefessel, Lars; Matic, Ljubica Perisic; Hedin, Ulf; Weissman, Irving L; Leeper, Nicholas J

    2016-08-01

    Atherosclerosis is the disease process that underlies heart attack and stroke. Advanced lesions at risk of rupture are characterized by the pathological accumulation of diseased vascular cells and apoptotic cellular debris. Why these cells are not cleared remains unknown. Here we show that atherogenesis is associated with upregulation of CD47, a key anti-phagocytic molecule that is known to render malignant cells resistant to programmed cell removal, or 'efferocytosis'. We find that administration of CD47-blocking antibodies reverses this defect in efferocytosis, normalizes the clearance of diseased vascular tissue, and ameliorates atherosclerosis in multiple mouse models. Mechanistic studies implicate the pro-atherosclerotic factor TNF-α as a fundamental driver of impaired programmed cell removal, explaining why this process is compromised in vascular disease. Similar to recent observations in cancer, impaired efferocytosis appears to play a pathogenic role in cardiovascular disease, but is not a fixed defect and may represent a novel therapeutic target.

  10. Probing nanoparticle translocation across the permeable endothelium in experimental atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongtae; Lobatto, Mark E; Kawahara, Tomohiro; Lee Chung, Bomy; Mieszawska, Aneta J; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L; Fay, Francois; Senders, Max L; Calcagno, Claudia; Becraft, Jacob; Tun Saung, May; Gordon, Ronald E; Stroes, Erik S G; Ma, Mingming; Farokhzad, Omid C; Fayad, Zahi A; Mulder, Willem J M; Langer, Robert

    2014-01-21

    Therapeutic and diagnostic nanomaterials are being intensely studied for several diseases, including cancer and atherosclerosis. However, the exact mechanism by which nanomedicines accumulate at targeted sites remains a topic of investigation, especially in the context of atherosclerotic disease. Models to accurately predict transvascular permeation of nanomedicines are needed to aid in design optimization. Here we show that an endothelialized microchip with controllable permeability can be used to probe nanoparticle translocation across an endothelial cell layer. To validate our in vitro model, we studied nanoparticle translocation in an in vivo rabbit model of atherosclerosis using a variety of preclinical and clinical imaging methods. Our results reveal that the translocation of lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles across the atherosclerotic endothelium is dependent on microvascular permeability. These results were mimicked with our microfluidic chip, demonstrating the potential utility of the model system.

  11. Novel anti-inflammatory therapies for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Razi; Spagnoli, Vincent; Tardif, Jean-Claude; L'Allier, Philippe L

    2015-06-01

    The underlying role of inflammation in atherosclerosis has been characterized. However, current treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD) predominantly consists of targeted reductions in serum lipoprotein levels rather than combating the deleterious effects of acute and chronic inflammation. Vascular inflammation acts by a number of different molecular and cellular pathways to contribute to atherogenesis. Over the last decades, both basic studies and clinical trials have provided evidence for the potential benefits of treatment of inflammation in CAD. During this period, development of pharmacotherapies directed towards inflammation in atherosclerosis has accelerated quickly. This review will highlight specific therapies targeting interleukin-1β (IL-1β), P-selectin and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO). It will also aim to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of serpin administration, colchicine and intravenous HDL-directed treatment of CAD. We summarize the mechanistic rationale and evidence for these novel anti-inflammatory treatments at both the experimental and clinical levels.

  12. Role of diabetes, hypertension, and cigarette smoking on atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Ram K.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperosmolar food causes atherosclerosis. Hyperosmolal food hypothesis encompasses all the factors involved under one heading and, that is, the generation of heat in the body. The involvement of cigarette smoking is obvious. High glycemic index food and diabetes result in high levels of blood glucose, which raises the core body temperature. The ingestion of hyperosmolal salt, glucose, and amino acids singularly or synergistically raise the core body temperature, forcing abdominal aorta to form an insulation wall of fatty material causing atherosclerotic plaques. The osmolarity of food, that is glucose, salt, and amino acids is reduced when water is ingested with food. The incidence of atherosclerosis goes down with increasing intake of water. PMID:20877688

  13. Modulation of atherosclerosis, blood pressure and arterial elasticity by statins.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Anjan K; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that dyslipidemia and hypertension frequently coexist. There is increasing recognition of a mutually facilitative interaction between dyslipidemia and renin- angiotensin system (RAS) activation in the development of atherosclerosis. Both of these systems share many of the same properties in terms of activation of pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant and pro-atherosclerosis pathways. Statins in particular have been shown to influence the biology of endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells and constituents of the interstitial matrix, particularly fibroblasts. It is no wonder that concurrent therapy of dyslipidemia with statins enhances the effects of RAS inhibitors. Although the effects of statins on the regulation of determinants of vascular stiffness are not well defined, it is quite likely that these regulatory pathways will be influenced by dyslipidemia therapy, especially statins.

  14. Circadian Influence on Metabolism and Inflammation in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    McAlpine, Cameron S; Swirski, Filip K

    2016-06-24

    Many aspects of human health and disease display daily rhythmicity. The brain's suprachiasmic nucleus, which interprets recurring external stimuli, and autonomous molecular networks in peripheral cells together, set our biological circadian clock. Disrupted or misaligned circadian rhythms promote multiple pathologies including chronic inflammatory and metabolic diseases such as atherosclerosis. Here, we discuss studies suggesting that circadian fluctuations in the vessel wall and in the circulation contribute to atherogenesis. Data from humans and mice indicate that an impaired molecular clock, disturbed sleep, and shifting light-dark patterns influence leukocyte and lipid supply in the circulation and alter cellular behavior in atherosclerotic lesions. We propose that a better understanding of both local and systemic circadian rhythms in atherosclerosis will enhance clinical management, treatment, and public health policy. PMID:27340272

  15. The Impact of Organokines on Insulin Resistance, Inflammation, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Immoderate energy intake, a sedentary lifestyle, and aging have contributed to the increased prevalence of obesity, sarcopenia, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. There is an urgent need for the development of novel pharmacological interventions that can target excessive fat accumulation and decreased muscle mass and/or strength. Adipokines, bioactive molecules derived from adipose tissue, are involved in the regulation of appetite and satiety, inflammation, energy expenditure, insulin resistance and secretion, glucose and lipid metabolism, and atherosclerosis. Recently, there is emerging evidence that skeletal muscle and the liver also function as endocrine organs that secrete myokines and hepatokines, respectively. Novel discoveries and research into these organokines (adipokines, myokines, and hepatokines) may lead to the development of promising biomarkers and therapeutics for cardiometabolic disease. In this review, I summarize recent data on these organokines and focus on the role of adipokines, myokines, and hepatokines in the regulation of insulin resistance, inflammation, and atherosclerosis. PMID:26996418

  16. Hypercorticism--a risk factor in arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Berceanu-Gabrielescu, A; Mănciulescu, D; Marinescu, I; Popovici, D; Dinulescu, E; Juvină, E; Ioaniţiu, D; Tache, A; Cristoveanu, A; Ciocirdia, C; Bunea, M; Sooliuc, E; Panaitiu, G; Augustin, M

    1981-01-01

    The present work has attempted an analysis of the role hypercorticism as a risk factor in arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis. Our series consisted of 149 male and female patients of various ages. The incidence of cardiovascular disorders in relation to age and the glucidic lipidic metabolic disorders were also investigated. The results showed that hypercorticism may trigger in very young patients as well arterial hypertension (AH) and glucidic-lipid metabolic disorders both incriminated as risk factors in including atherosclerosis. Hypercorticism was proved to be an aggravating factor of pre-existing cardiopathy. Efficient management of adrenocortical hormones excess brings complete resolution of arterial hypertension and glucidic lipid metabolic disorders in young patients and most adult patients who had no cardiovascular complaints prior to the endocrine syndrome.

  17. Lysophospholipids and their G protein-coupled receptors in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Feng; Li, Rong-Shan; Samuel, Sonia B; Cueto, Ramon; Li, Xin-Yuan; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPLs) are bioactive lipid-derived signaling molecules generated by the enzymatic and chemical processes of regiospecific phospholipases on substrates such as membrane phospholipids (PLs) and sphingolipids (SLs). They play a major role as extracellular mediators by activating G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and stimulating diverse cellular responses from their signaling pathways. LPLs are involved in various pathologies of the vasculature system including coronary heart disease and hypertension. Many studies suggest the importance of LPLs in their association with the development of atherosclerosis, a chronic and severe vascular disease. This paper focuses on the pathophysiological effects of different lysophospholipids on atherosclerosis, which may promote the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction and strokes. Their atherogenic biological activities take place in vascular endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, monocytes and macrophages, dendritic cells, T-lymphocytes, platelets, etc. PMID:26709762

  18. Extracellular vesicles as new pharmacological targets to treat atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Min; Loyer, Xavier; Boulanger, Chantal M

    2015-09-15

    Extracellular vesicles released by most cell types, include apoptotic bodies (ABs), microvesicles (MVs) and exosomes. They play a crucial role in physiology and pathology, contributing to "cell-to-cell" communication by modifying the phenotype and the function of target cells. Thus, extracellular vesicles participate in the key processes of atherosclerosis from endothelial dysfunction, vascular wall inflammation to vascular remodeling. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent findings on extracellular vesicle formation, structure, release and clearance. We focus on the deleterious and beneficial effects of extracellular vesicles in the development of atherosclerosis. The potential role of extracellular vesicles as biomarkers and pharmacological targets, their innate therapeutic capacity, or their use for novel drug delivery devices in atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases will also be discussed. PMID:26142082

  19. Imaging of coronary atherosclerosis and identification of the vulnerable plaque

    PubMed Central

    de Feyter, P.J.; Serruys, P. W.; Nieman, K.; Mollet, N.; Cademartiri, F.; van Geuns, R. J.; Slager, C.; van der Steen, A.F.W.; Krams, R.; Schaar, J.A.; Wielopolski, P.; Pattynama, P.M.T.; Arampatzis, A.; van der Lugt, A.; Regar, E.; Ligthart, J.; Smits, P.

    2003-01-01

    Identification of the vulnerable plaque responsible for the occurrence of acute coronary syndromes and acute coronary death is a prerequisite for the stabilisation of this vulnerable plaque. Comprehensive coronary atherosclerosis imaging in clinical practice should involve visualisation of the entire coronary artery tree and characterisation of the plaque, including the three-dimensional morphology of the plaque, encroachment of the plaque on the vessel lumen, the major tissue components of the plaque, remodelling of the vessel and presence of inflammation. Obviously, no single diagnostic modality is available that provides such comprehensive imaging and unfortunately no diagnostic tool is available that unequivocally identifies the vulnerable plaque. The objective of this article is to discuss experience with currently available diagnostic modalities for coronary atherosclerosis imaging. In addition, a number of evolving techniques will be briefly discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:25696244

  20. [CHRONIC FLUORIDE INTOXICATION AS A RISK FACTOR FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF ATHEROSCLEROSIS].

    PubMed

    Korotenko, O Yu; Panev, N I; Zakharenkov, V V; Filimonov, S N; Semenova, E A; Panev, R N

    2015-01-01

    In workers employed in the aluminum industry, the main harmful production factor is exposure to fluoride salts, which can cause chronic fluoride intoxication. For the assessment of the impact of chronic fluoride intoxication on the development of atherosclerosis, we conducted a comprehensive survey of 87 aluminum-metal makers with chronic fluoride intoxication and 43 aluminum-metal makers without occupational diseases, mean age--52.1 ± 0.4 years. There were considered the presence and severity of atherosclerosis of brachiocephalic arteries, and the arteries of the lower extremities in the studied group, there was evaluated the effect of other risk factors for atherosclerosis (smoking, presence of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia). With the use of Doppler ultrasound of the arteries it was revealed that in metallurgists with chronic fluoride intoxication atherosclerosis was detected in 73.6% versus 55.8% in persons of the comparison group. The performed analysis of the prevalence of main risk factors for atherosclerosis showed that in metal makers with chronic fluoride intoxication in combination with atherosclerosis hypertension is more common (in 54.7%) than in metallurgists with chronic fluoride intoxication without atherosclerosis--only 26.1%. According to the frequency of occurrence of smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertriglyceridemia, there were no significant differences between the metallurgists with chronic fluoride intoxication, with and without atherosclerosis, and the control group, the increase in LDL cholesterol occurs significantly more often in metal-makers with chronic fluoride intoxication in combination with atherosclerosis if compared to workers without occupational diseases. Thus, chronic fluoride intoxication acts as a risk factor in the development of atherosclerosis: atherosclerosis in metal-makers with chronic fluoride intoxication occurs more frequently than in workers who do not have professional pathology

  1. Heterogeneity of plasma low-density lipoproteins and atherosclerosis risk.

    PubMed

    Krauss, R M

    1994-10-01

    Increased levels of IDL and small, dense LDL are associated with the risk of coronary artery disease. Possible mechanisms include increased susceptibility of small, dense LDL to oxidation, and to other pathologic effects, such as increased retention in the arterial wall. Beneficial effects of a low-fat diet and certain lipid-lowering therapies on the levels and properties of small, dense LDL or their precursors may contribute substantially to the reductions in coronary atherosclerosis observed in several lipid-lowering trials.

  2. Subclinical Atherosclerosis and Increased Risk of Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Mary E; Schubert, Carla R; Nondahl, David M; Dalton, Dayna S; Huang, Guan-Hua; Keating, Brendan J; Klein, Barbara EK; Klein, Ronald; Tweed, Ted S; Cruickshanks, Karen J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The study’s purpose was to test if subclinical atherosclerosis was associated with the risk of developing HI in a large cohort of middle-aged participants. Methods Study subjects were members of the Beaver Dam Offspring Study (BOSS), a longitudinal study of adult children of participants in the population-based Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (1993-present). BOSS examinations took place in 2005–2008 (baseline) and 2010–2013 (5-year follow-up). The 5-year incidence of hearing impairment was defined as a pure-tone average (PTA) of thresholds at 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 kHz > 25 decibels Hearing Level (dB HL) in either ear at follow-up among participants at risk (baseline PTA in both ears < = 25 dB HL; n=2,436, mean age = 47.7 years). Atherosclerosis was measured as the mean carotid intima-media thickness and the presence of carotid artery plaque. Results Among the 1,984 participants at-risk with a follow-up audiometric examination, the 5-year incidence of hearing impairment was 8.3% (95% Confidence Interval (C.I.) 7.1, 9.5). With multivariable adjustment, carotid intima-media thickness was positively associated with hearing impairment incidence (Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.18 per 0.1 mm, 95% C.I. 1.05, 1.32). The number of sites (0–6) with plaque was also positively associated with the incidence of impairment (OR = 1.19 per site, 95% C.I. 1.01, 1.41). Conclusion Atherosclerosis was associated with the 5-year incidence of hearing impairment in this predominantly middle-aged cohort. Interventions targeting atherosclerosis prevention may help to prevent or delay the onset of hearing impairment. PMID:25555266

  3. Adropin is associated with hyperhomocysteine and coronary atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, LIANG-PING; YOU, TAO; CHAN, SIEW-PANG; CHEN, JIAN-CHANG; XU, WEI-TING

    2016-01-01

    Homocysteine has been recognized as a risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. Adropin is a newly-identified energy homeostasis protein with a potential protective effect against coronary artery disease (CAD). This study attempted to measure the correlation between serum homocysteine and adropin levels in patients with CAD, and to ascertain how the two hormones could affect the severity of coronary atherosclerosis. A cohort of CAD patients who had undergone coronary angiography was prospectively recruited. The serum homocysteine and adropin levels of the patients were measured and the severity of coronary atherosclerosis was quantified with the SYNTAX score. The data were analyzed with a generalized structural equation model. In total, 170 consecutive patients were recruited with a mean serum homocysteine level of 15.9±8.3 µmol/l, and 76 (44.7%) patients were identified as hyperhomocysteinemic with a serum homocysteine level >15 µmol/l. Serum homocysteine level was found to be significantly negatively correlated with serum adropin level (r=−0.169, P=0.028). Patients with hyperhomocysteinemia had lower serum adropin levels and higher SYNTAX scores than patients without hyperhomocysteinemia. Further analysis with a generalized structural equation model showed that adropin was significantly associated with hyperhomocysteinemia (adjusted odds ratio: 0.95, 95% confidence interval: 0.93 to 0.98; P=0.002), which in turn was significantly associated with the SYNTAX score (coefficient: 4.71, 95% confidence interval: 1.39 to 8.03; P=0.005). In conclusion, the serum homocysteine level was inversely correlated with the serum adropin level in patients with CAD. A low serum adropin level was associated with hyperhomocysteinemia and more severe coronary atherosclerosis, as reflected by a higher SYNTAX score. PMID:26998038

  4. Relationship of the apolipoprotein E polymorphism with carotid artery atherosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    de Andrade, M; Thandi, I; Brown, S; Gotto, A; Patsch, W; Boerwinkle, E

    1995-01-01

    From the cohort taking part in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, a multicenter investigation of atherosclerosis and its sequelae in women and men ages 45-64 years, a sample of 145 subjects with significant carotid artery atherosclerosis but without clinically recognized coronary heart disease was identified along with 224 group-matched control subjects. The aim of this paper is to measure the association of the apolipoprotein (apo) E polymorphism with the prevalence of significant carotid artery atherosclerotic disease (CAAD) after considering the contribution of established risk factor variables. The first model used a stepwise selection procedure to define a group of significant physical and lifestyle characteristics and a group of significant plasma lipid, lipoprotein, and apolipoprotein variables that were predictive of CAAD status in this sample. Those variables selected included age (years), body mass index (BMI; kg/m2), consumption of cigarettes (CigYears; number of cigarettes/d x the number of smoking years), hypertension status, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (mg/dl), total cholesterol (mg/dl), and Lp[a] (micrograms/ml). The second model was built by forcing into the equation an a priori set of demographic, anthropometric, and lipoprotein variables, which were age, BMI, CigYears, hypertensive status, LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol. In both models, the apo E genotype epsilon 2/3 was related to CAAD status. For both models, the estimated odds ratio of being a CAAD case associated with the apo E genotype epsilon 2/3 was > 2:1. The mechanism of the observed association between the epsilon 2/3 genotype and carotid atherosclerosis is unknown, but it is likely due to the known effects of the E2 isoform in causing delayed clearance of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. PMID:7762561

  5. Inflammation, oxidative stress and renin angiotensin system in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Husain, Kazim; Hernandez, Wilfredo; Ansari, Rais A; Ferder, Leon

    2015-08-26

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with cardiovascular dysfunction including myocardial infarction, unstable angina, sudden cardiac death, stroke and peripheral thromboses. It has been predicted that atherosclerosis will be the primary cause of death in the world by 2020. Atherogenesis is initiated by endothelial injury due to oxidative stress associated with cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cigarette smoking, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. The impairment of the endothelium associated with cardiovascular risk factors creates an imbalance between vasodilating and vasoconstricting factors, in particular, an increase in angiotensin II (Ang II) and a decrease in nitric oxide. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS), and its primary mediator Ang II, also have a direct influence on the progression of the atherosclerotic process via effects on endothelial function, inflammation, fibrinolytic balance, and plaque stability. Anti-inflammatory agents [statins, secretory phospholipase A2 inhibitor, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 inhibitor, 5-lipoxygenase activating protein, chemokine motif ligand-2, C-C chemokine motif receptor 2 pathway inhibitors, methotrexate, IL-1 pathway inhibitor and RAS inhibitors (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors)], Ang II receptor blockers and ranin inhibitors may slow inflammatory processes and disease progression. Several studies in human using anti-inflammatory agents and RAS inhibitors revealed vascular benefits and reduced progression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with stable angina pectoris; decreased vascular inflammatory markers, improved common carotid intima-media thickness and plaque volume in patients with diagnosed atherosclerosis. Recent preclinical studies have demonstrated therapeutic efficacy of vitamin D analogs paricalcitol in ApoE-deficient atherosclerotic mice.

  6. Artery Tertiary Lymphoid Organs: Powerhouses of Atherosclerosis Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Changjun; Mohanta, Sarajo Kumar; Srikakulapu, Prasad; Weber, Christian; Habenicht, Andreas J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Artery tertiary lymphoid organs (ATLOs) are atherosclerosis-associated lymphoid aggregates with varying degrees of complexity ranging from small T/B-cell clusters to well-structured lymph node-like though unencapsulated lymphoid tissues. ATLOs arise in the connective tissue that surrounds diseased arteries, i.e., the adventitia. ATLOs have been identified in aged atherosclerosis-prone hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE−/−) mice: they are organized into distinct immune cell compartments, including separate T-cell areas, activated B-cell follicles, and plasma cell niches. Analyses of ATLO immune cell subsets indicate antigen-specific T- and B-cell immune reactions within the atherosclerotic arterial wall adventitia. Moreover, ATLOs harbor innate immune cells, including a large component of inflammatory macrophages, B-1 cells, and an aberrant set of antigen-presenting cells. There is marked neoangiogenesis, irregular lymphangiogenesis, neoformation of high endothelial venules, and de novo synthesis of lymph node-like conduits. Molecular mechanisms of ATLO formation remain to be identified though media vascular smooth muscle cells may adopt features of lymphoid tissue organizer-like cells by expressing lymphorganogenic chemokines, i.e., CXCL13 and CCL21. Although these data are consistent with the view that ATLOs participate in primary T- and B-cell responses against elusive atherosclerosis-specific autoantigens, their specific protective or disease-promoting roles remain to be identified. In this review, we discuss what is currently known about ATLOs and their potential impact on atherosclerosis and make attempts to define challenges ahead. PMID:27777573

  7. Macrophages: an elusive yet emerging therapeutic target of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, R L; Singh, V; Barthwal, M K

    2008-07-01

    Macrophages are central to the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and thus can be very appropriate targets for therapy. Cell adhesion molecules mediating monocytes recruitment to the endothelium are attractive therapy targets and their inhibitors are in clinical trials. Macrophage scavenger receptors like SR-A and CD-36 mediate foam cell formation by facilitating the uptake of modified lipids. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), liver X receptor (LXR)-mediated signaling, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) induced phosphorylation events seem to play an important role in this phenomenon. Proteins affecting macrophage cholesterol metabolism and transport, including ATP-binding cassette (ABC) A1, ABCG1, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), apolipoprotein A-1 (ApoA-1), neutral cholesteryl ester hydrolase (NCEH) also regulate foam cell formation and are being developed as therapeutic targets by many pharmaceutical companies. Macrophage proliferation and apoptosis are important events controlling inflammatory response, plaque vulnerability, and destabilization. Free cholesterol (FC) activates the macrophage endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway and apoptosis. Free radicals and nitric oxide also modulate macrophage foam cell formation and apoptosis. Various antioxidants like AGI-1067 and BO-653 are in clinical trials for atherosclerosis treatment. Macrophage matrix metalloproteinase's (MMP's) play a significant role in weakening and rupture of plaques. Efforts are on to develop isoform specific MMP inhibitor. CD-14, MMP-3, ABCA1, Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4), lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), arachidonate lipoxygenase-15 (ALOX-15), and Connexin37 polymorphisms and macrophage dysfunction signify their importance in atherosclerosis. Deciphering the role of macrophages in regulating dyslipidemia and inflammation during atherosclerosis is important for developing them as therapeutic targets. PMID

  8. Inflammation, oxidative stress and renin angiotensin system in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Husain, Kazim; Hernandez, Wilfredo; Ansari, Rais A; Ferder, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with cardiovascular dysfunction including myocardial infarction, unstable angina, sudden cardiac death, stroke and peripheral thromboses. It has been predicted that atherosclerosis will be the primary cause of death in the world by 2020. Atherogenesis is initiated by endothelial injury due to oxidative stress associated with cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cigarette smoking, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. The impairment of the endothelium associated with cardiovascular risk factors creates an imbalance between vasodilating and vasoconstricting factors, in particular, an increase in angiotensin II (Ang II) and a decrease in nitric oxide. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS), and its primary mediator Ang II, also have a direct influence on the progression of the atherosclerotic process via effects on endothelial function, inflammation, fibrinolytic balance, and plaque stability. Anti-inflammatory agents [statins, secretory phospholipase A2 inhibitor, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 inhibitor, 5-lipoxygenase activating protein, chemokine motif ligand-2, C-C chemokine motif receptor 2 pathway inhibitors, methotrexate, IL-1 pathway inhibitor and RAS inhibitors (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors)], Ang II receptor blockers and ranin inhibitors may slow inflammatory processes and disease progression. Several studies in human using anti-inflammatory agents and RAS inhibitors revealed vascular benefits and reduced progression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with stable angina pectoris; decreased vascular inflammatory markers, improved common carotid intima-media thickness and plaque volume in patients with diagnosed atherosclerosis. Recent preclinical studies have demonstrated therapeutic efficacy of vitamin D analogs paricalcitol in ApoE-deficient atherosclerotic mice. PMID:26322175

  9. Atherosclerosis in young Brazilians suffering violent deaths: a pathological study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke, which can cause sudden death in adulthood. In general, the clinical manifestations of cardiovascular diseases are caused by atherosclerosis, which is a process that starts during middle age. More recent studies indicate that the atherosclerotic process begins during childhood. Methods To evaluate the extent of atherosclerotic disease in young Brazilians, we conducted a study of the pathological alterations in the major arteries of victims of violent death. Samples of the right carotid artery, left coronary artery, and thoracic aorta of young victims of violent death were analyzed and graded in accordance with the histological atherosclerotic lesion types proposed by the American Heart Association. Samples were collected from 100 individuals who had died from external causes, aged from 12 to 33 years. Results The majority of cases (83%) were male, and 66% of deaths were homicides caused by firearms. The median age was 20.0 years and mean body mass index was 20.9 kg/m2. Of the right carotid artery specimens, 3% were normal, 55% had type I, 40% had type II, 1% had type III, and 1% had type IV atherosclerotic lesions. Of the left coronary artery specimens, 5% were normal, 48% had type I, 41% had type II, 3% had type III, and 3% had type IV lesions. Of the thoracic aorta specimens, none were normal, 13% had type I, 64% had type II, 22% had type III, and 1% had type IV lesions. Overall, 97.34% of arteries examined had some degree of atherosclerosis. The most common histological type was type II (foam cells). No thoracic aorta specimens were normal, and the coronary artery specimens had the most atherosclerosis. Conclusions Our results show a high prevalence of atherosclerotic lesions among young people in Brazil. Intervention should be undertaken to decrease the rate of sudden cardiac death in the adult population. PMID:22152277

  10. Role of Brown Fat in Lipoprotein Metabolism and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hoeke, Geerte; Kooijman, Sander; Boon, Mariëtte R; Rensen, Patrick C N; Berbée, Jimmy F P

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, for which hyperlipidemia is a major risk factor, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western society, and new therapeutic strategies are highly warranted. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is metabolically active in human adults. Although positron emission tomography-computed tomography using a glucose tracer is the golden standard to visualize and quantify the volume and activity of BAT, it has become clear that activated BAT combusts fatty acids rather than glucose. Here, we review the role of brown and beige adipocytes in lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis, with evidence derived from both animal and human studies. On the basis of mainly data from animal models, we propose a model in which activated brown adipocytes use their intracellular triglyceride stores to generate fatty acids for combustion. BAT rapidly replenishes these stores by internalizing primarily lipoprotein triglyceride-derived fatty acids, generated by lipoprotein lipase-mediated hydrolysis of triglycerides, rather than by holoparticle uptake. As a consequence, BAT activation leads to the generation of lipoprotein remnants that are subsequently cleared via the liver provided that an intact apoE-low-density lipoprotein receptor pathway is present. Through these mechanisms, BAT activation reduces plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels and attenuates diet-induced atherosclerosis development. Initial studies suggest that BAT activation in humans may also reduce triglyceride and cholesterol levels, but potential antiatherogenic effects should be assessed in future studies.

  11. Adaptive Response of T and B Cells in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ketelhuth, Daniel F J; Hansson, Göran K

    2016-02-19

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that is initiated by the retention and accumulation of cholesterol-containing lipoproteins, particularly low-density lipoprotein, in the artery wall. In the arterial intima, lipoprotein components that are generated through oxidative, lipolytic, and proteolytic activities lead to the formation of several danger-associated molecular patterns, which can activate innate immune cells as well as vascular cells. Moreover, self- and non-self-antigens, such as apolipoprotein B-100 and heat shock proteins, can contribute to vascular inflammation by triggering the response of T and B cells locally. This process can influence the initiation, progression, and stability of plaques. Substantial clinical and experimental data support that the modulation of adaptive immune system may be used for treating and preventing atherosclerosis. This may lead to the development of more selective and less harmful interventions, while keeping host defense mechanisms against infections and tumors intact. Approaches such as vaccination might become a realistic option for cardiovascular disease, especially if they can elicit regulatory T and B cells and the secretion of atheroprotective antibodies. Nevertheless, difficulties in translating certain experimental data into new clinical therapies remain a challenge. In this review, we discuss important studies on the function of T- and B-cell immunity in atherosclerosis and their manipulation to develop novel therapeutic strategies against cardiovascular disease.

  12. SIRT6 protects against endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Suowen; Yin, Meimei; Koroleva, Marina; Mastrangelo, Michael A.; Zhang, Wenbo; Bai, Peter; Little, Peter J.; Jin, Zheng Gen

    2016-01-01

    SIRT6 is an important member of sirtuin family that represses inflammation, aging and DNA damage, three of which are causing factors for endothelial dysfunction. SIRT6 expression is decreased in atherosclerotic lesions from ApoE−/− mice and human patients. However, the role of SIRT6 in regulating vascular endothelial function and atherosclerosis is not well understood. Here we show that SIRT6 protects against endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Global and endothelium-specific SIRT6 knockout mice exhibited impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Moreover, SIRT6+/− haploinsufficient mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) also displayed impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Importantly, SIRT6+/−;ApoE−/− mice after HFD feeding exhibited exacerbated atherosclerotic lesion development, concurrent with increased expression of the proinflammatory cytokine VCAM-1. Loss- and gain-of-SIRT6 function studies in cultured human endothelial cells (ECs) showed that SIRT6 attenuated monocyte adhesion to ECs. RNA-sequencing profiling revealed that SIRT6 overexpression decreased the expression of multiple atherosclerosis-related genes, including proatherogenic gene TNFSF4 (tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 4). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that SIRT6 decreased TNFSF4 gene expression by binding to and deacetylating H3K9 at TNFSF4 gene promoter. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that SIRT6 play a pivotal role in maintaining endothelial function and increased SIRT6 activity could be a new therapeutic strategy to combat atherosclerotic disease. PMID:27249230

  13. Invasive versus noninvasive studies of risk factors and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sharrett, A R

    1993-03-01

    Associations of risk factors with atherosclerosis may be assessed by either invasive methods for measuring the arterial disease, such as angiography, or noninvasive methods; these methods differ in their potential for bias. Biases associated with coronary angiography may be difficult to control in statistical analysis, either because they are unrecognized or because they are amenable to neither stratification nor multivariate analysis. Problems in control selection include the likelihood that angiography controls overrepresent related ischemic or noncoronary cardiac conditions with their own risk factor associations. Differential misclassification is more likely in the clinical setting when invasive studies are used than in a research setting involving ultrasound imaging of carotid arteries. Nondifferential misclassification, however, affects both types of studies and clouds interpretation of the comparative strength of risk factor associations with atherosclerosis assessed by the two methods. Recent angiographic studies have generally provided insufficient information to evaluate these biases. However, with proper attention to such biases, one may be able to learn much about early and late stages of atherosclerosis by comparing risk factor associations with disease measured by both coronary angiography and carotid ultrasound.

  14. DNA modifications in atherosclerosis: from the past to the future.

    PubMed

    Borghini, Andrea; Cervelli, Tiziana; Galli, Alvaro; Andreassi, Maria Grazia

    2013-10-01

    The role of DNA damage in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis has been extensively investigated in recent decades. There is now clear that oxidative stress is an important inducer of both DNA damage and telomere attrition which, in turn, can gives rise to genome instability and vascular senescence. This review discusses the role of the DNA damage response, including the key DNA repair pathways (base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining), deregulated cell cycle and apoptosis in atherosclerosis. We also highlight emerging evidence suggesting that epigenetic changes (DNA methylation and microRNA-mediated mechanisms), not associated with alterations in DNA sequences, may play a critical role in the regulation of the DNA damage response. Nevertheless, further investigation is still required to better understand the complexity of DNA repair and DNA damage response in atherosclerosis, making this topic an exciting and promising field for future investigation. Unraveling these molecular mechanisms provide the rationale for the development of novel efficient therapies to combat the vascular aging process.

  15. Role of Brown Fat in Lipoprotein Metabolism and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hoeke, Geerte; Kooijman, Sander; Boon, Mariëtte R; Rensen, Patrick C N; Berbée, Jimmy F P

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, for which hyperlipidemia is a major risk factor, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Western society, and new therapeutic strategies are highly warranted. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is metabolically active in human adults. Although positron emission tomography-computed tomography using a glucose tracer is the golden standard to visualize and quantify the volume and activity of BAT, it has become clear that activated BAT combusts fatty acids rather than glucose. Here, we review the role of brown and beige adipocytes in lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis, with evidence derived from both animal and human studies. On the basis of mainly data from animal models, we propose a model in which activated brown adipocytes use their intracellular triglyceride stores to generate fatty acids for combustion. BAT rapidly replenishes these stores by internalizing primarily lipoprotein triglyceride-derived fatty acids, generated by lipoprotein lipase-mediated hydrolysis of triglycerides, rather than by holoparticle uptake. As a consequence, BAT activation leads to the generation of lipoprotein remnants that are subsequently cleared via the liver provided that an intact apoE-low-density lipoprotein receptor pathway is present. Through these mechanisms, BAT activation reduces plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels and attenuates diet-induced atherosclerosis development. Initial studies suggest that BAT activation in humans may also reduce triglyceride and cholesterol levels, but potential antiatherogenic effects should be assessed in future studies. PMID:26837747

  16. Lasting monitoring of immune state in patients with coronary atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinova, Lidia I.; Denisova, Tatyana P.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2007-02-01

    Immune state monitoring is an expensive, invasive and sometimes difficult necessity in patients with different disorders. Immune reaction dynamics study in patients with coronary atherosclerosis provides one of the leading components to complication development, clinical course prognosis and treatment and rehabilitation tactics. We've chosen intravenous glucose injection as metabolic irritant in the following four groups of patients: men with proved coronary atherosclerosis (CA), non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), men hereditary burden by CA and NIDDM and practically healthy persons with longlivers in generation. Immune state parameters such as quantity of leukocytes and lymphocytes, circulating immune complexes levels, serum immunoglobulin levels, HLA antigen markers were studied at 0, 30 and 60 minutes during glucose loading. To obtain continues time function of studied parameters received data were approximated by polynomials of high degree with after going first derivatives. Time functions analyze elucidate principally different dynamics studied parameters in all chosen groups of patients, which couldn't be obtained from discontinuous data compare. Leukocyte and lymphocyte levels dynamics correlated HLA antigen markers in all studied groups. Analytical estimation of immune state in patients with coronary atherosclerosis shows the functional "margin of safety" of immune system state under glucose disturbance. Proposed method of analytical estimation also can be used in immune system monitoring in other groups of patients.

  17. Atherosclerosis in chronic kidney disease: the role of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Valentina; Linton, MacRae F.; Fazio, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and loss of renal parenchyma accelerates atherosclerosis in animal models. Macrophages are central to atherogenesis because they regulate cholesterol traffic and inflammation in the arterial wall. CKD influences macrophage behavior at multiple levels, rendering them proatherogenic. Even at normal creatinine levels, macrophages from uninephrectomized Apoe−/− mice are enriched in cholesterol owing to downregulation of cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette subfamily A member 1 levels and activation of nuclear factor κB, which leads to impaired cholesterol efflux. Interestingly, treatment with an angiotensin-II-receptor blocker (ARB) improves these effects. Moreover, atherosclerotic aortas from Apoe−/− mice transplanted into renal-ablated normocholesterolemic recipients show plaque progression and increased macrophage content instead of the substantial regression seen in recipient mice with intact kidneys. ARBs reduce atherosclerosis development in mice with partial renal ablation. These results, combined with the clinical benefits of angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and ARBs in patients with CKD, suggest an important role for the angiotensin system in the enhanced susceptibility to atherosclerosis seen across the spectrum of CKD. The role of macrophages could explain why these therapies may be effective in end-stage renal disease, one of the few conditions in which statins show no clinical benefit. PMID:21102540

  18. Atomic Force Microscopy Study of Atherosclerosis Progression in Arterial Walls.

    PubMed

    Timashev, Peter S; Kotova, Svetlana L; Belkova, Galina V; Gubar'kova, Ekaterina V; Timofeeva, Lidia B; Gladkova, Natalia D; Solovieva, Anna B

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Here we suggest a novel approach for tracking atherosclerosis progression based on the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Using AFM, we studied cross-sections of coronary arteries with the following types of lesions: Type II-thickened intima; Type III-thickened intima with a lipid streak; Type IV-fibrotic layer over a lipid core; Type Va-unstable fibrotic layer over a lipid core; Type Vc-very thick fibrotic layer. AFM imaging revealed that the fibrotic layer of an atherosclerotic plaque is represented by a basket-weave network of collagen fibers and a subscale network of fibrils that become looser with atherosclerosis progression. In an unstable plaque (Type Va), packing of the collagen fibers and fibrils becomes even less uniform than that at the previous stages, while a stable fibrotic plaque (Vc) has significantly tighter packing. Such alterations of the collagen network morphology apparently, led to deterioration of the Type Va plaque mechanical properties, that, in turn, resulted in its instability and propensity to rupture. Thus, AFM may serve as a useful tool for tracking atherosclerosis progression in the arterial wall tissue. PMID:26843417

  19. [Subclinical atherosclerosis. An objective index of susceptibility and vascular risk].

    PubMed

    Werba, P; Cuniberti, L A; Martínez, V; Rey, R H

    1999-01-01

    Clinical data suggest that the individual susceptibility to atherosclerosis is not accounted for only by exposure to classical or "emerging" vascular risk factors. Although recent investigations with transgenic animals have revealed new genetic determinants of susceptibility, little is known concerning this situation in human beings. Even though the human genome project might uncover specific genetic markers in the future, the only early and objective method to identify the susceptible individual at present is to detect atherosclerosis non-invasively. High resolution B-mode ultrasonography of superficial arteries coupled with advanced computer-assisted image processing systems is a highly reproducible method to perform a quali-quantitative early evaluation of already developed wall lesions. Clinically more significant, the detection of silent atherosclerosis has an additional value for risk factor assessment in the prediction of global vascular risk, a relevant index for decision-making in cardiovascular prevention. It is conceivable that the introduction of non-invasive measures of the atherosclerotic burden in risk stratification of asymptomatic subjects will help to target interventions for more rational risk factor control and to reduce the cost/benefit ratio of primary prevention.

  20. Involvement of heparanase in atherosclerosis and other vessel wall pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Vlodavsky, Israel; Blich, Miry; Li, Jin-Ping; Sanderson, Ralph D.; Ilan, Neta

    2014-01-01

    Heparanase, the sole mammalian endoglycosidase degrading heparan sulfate, is causally involved in cancer metastasis, angiogenesis, inflammation and kidney dysfunction. Despite the wide occurrence and impact of heparan sulfate proteoglycans in vascular biology, the significance of heparanase in vessel wall disorders is underestimated. Blood vessels are highly active structures whose morphology rapidly adapts to maintain vascular function under altered systemic and local conditions. In some pathologies (restenosis, thrombosis, atherosclerosis) this normally beneficial adaptation may be detrimental to overall function. Enzymatic dependent and independent effects of heparanase on arterial structure mechanics and repair closely regulate arterial compliance and neointimal proliferation following endovascular stenting. Additionally, heparanase promotes thrombosis after vascular injury and contributes to a pro-coagulant state in human carotid atherosclerosis. Importantly, heparanase is closely associated with development and progression of atherosclerotic plaques, including stable to unstable plaque transition. Consequently, heparanase levels are markedly increased in the plasma of patients with acute myocardial infarction. Noteworthy, heparanase activates macrophages, resulting in marked induction of cytokine expression associated with plaque progression towards vulnerability. Together, heparanase emerges as a regulator of vulnerable lesion development and potential target for therapeutic intervention in atherosclerosis and related vessel wall complications. PMID:23499530

  1. Effective suppressibility of chaos.

    PubMed

    López, Álvaro G; Seoane, Jesús M; Sanjuán, Miguel A F

    2013-06-01

    Suppression of chaos is a relevant phenomenon that can take place in nonlinear dynamical systems when a parameter is varied. Here, we investigate the possibilities of effectively suppressing the chaotic motion of a dynamical system by a specific time independent variation of a parameter of our system. In realistic situations, we need to be very careful with the experimental conditions and the accuracy of the parameter measurements. We define the suppressibility, a new measure taking values in the parameter space, that allows us to detect which chaotic motions can be suppressed, what possible new choices of the parameter guarantee their suppression, and how small the parameter variations from the initial chaotic state to the final periodic one are. We apply this measure to a Duffing oscillator and a system consisting on ten globally coupled Hénon maps. We offer as our main result tool sets that can be used as guides to suppress chaotic dynamics. PMID:23822472

  2. Fire Suppression and Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This report is concerned with the following topics regarding fire suppression:What is the relative effectiveness of candidate suppressants to extinguish a representative fire in reduced gravity, including high-O2 mole fraction, low -pressure environments? What are the relative advantages and disadvantages of physically acting and chemically-acting agents in spacecraft fire suppression? What are the O2 mole fraction and absolute pressure below which a fire cannot exist? What effect does gas-phase radiation play in the overall fire and post-fire environments? Are the candidate suppressants effective to extinguish fires on practical solid fuels? What is required to suppress non-flaming fires (smoldering and deep seated fires) in reduced gravity? How can idealized space experiment results be applied to a practical fire scenario? What is the optimal agent deployment strategy for space fire suppression?

  3. Dietary Cocoa Powder Improves Hyperlipidemia and Reduces Atherosclerosis in apoE Deficient Mice through the Inhibition of Hepatic Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Hua; Lin, Yan; Bai, Liang; An, Yingfeng; Shang, Jianan; Wang, Zhao; Zhao, Sihai; Fan, Jianglin

    2016-01-01

    Cocoa powder is rich in flavonoids, which have many beneficial effects on human health, including antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the intake of cocoa powder has any influence on hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis and examine the underlying molecular mechanisms. We fed apoE knockout mice a Western diet supplemented with either 0.2% (low group) or 2% (high group) cocoa powder for 12 weeks. The groups fed dietary cocoa powder showed a significant reduction in both plasma cholesterol levels and aortic atherosclerosis compared to the control group. Analysis of mRNA profiling of aortic atherosclerotic lesions revealed that the expression of several genes related to apoptosis, lipid metabolism, and inflammation was significantly reduced, while the antiapoptotic gene Bcl2 was significantly increased in the cocoa powder group compared to the control. RT-PCR analysis along with Western blotting revealed that a diet containing cocoa powder inhibited the expression of hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress. These data suggest that cocoa powder intake improves hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis, and such beneficial effects are possibly mediated through the suppression of hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:26980943

  4. Dietary Cocoa Powder Improves Hyperlipidemia and Reduces Atherosclerosis in apoE Deficient Mice through the Inhibition of Hepatic Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    PubMed

    Guan, Hua; Lin, Yan; Bai, Liang; An, Yingfeng; Shang, Jianan; Wang, Zhao; Zhao, Sihai; Fan, Jianglin; Liu, Enqi

    2016-01-01

    Cocoa powder is rich in flavonoids, which have many beneficial effects on human health, including antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the intake of cocoa powder has any influence on hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis and examine the underlying molecular mechanisms. We fed apoE knockout mice a Western diet supplemented with either 0.2% (low group) or 2% (high group) cocoa powder for 12 weeks. The groups fed dietary cocoa powder showed a significant reduction in both plasma cholesterol levels and aortic atherosclerosis compared to the control group. Analysis of mRNA profiling of aortic atherosclerotic lesions revealed that the expression of several genes related to apoptosis, lipid metabolism, and inflammation was significantly reduced, while the antiapoptotic gene Bcl2 was significantly increased in the cocoa powder group compared to the control. RT-PCR analysis along with Western blotting revealed that a diet containing cocoa powder inhibited the expression of hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress. These data suggest that cocoa powder intake improves hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis, and such beneficial effects are possibly mediated through the suppression of hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:26980943

  5. Pterostilbene, a novel natural plant conduct, inhibits high fat-induced atherosclerosis inflammation via NF-κB signaling pathway in Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Yi

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a specific form of an artery wall thickens, a syndrome affecting arterial blood vessels due to a chronic inflammatory response in the walls of arteries, which is promoted by fat accumulation. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play prominent roles in inflammatory responses. And TLR5 is overexpressed in several diseases. Here in our study, we investigated the effect of TLR5 in high fat-induced atherosclerosis via NF-κB signaling pathway modulating pro-inflammatory cytokines releasing. Our results found that high fat induced atherosclerosis in wild type mice with fat accumulation and inflammatory response through NF-κB activation. Contrastly, TLR5 knockout mice displayed lower fat accumulation and ameliorated inflammation after high fat feeding with NF-κB inactivation. In addition, pterostilbene, as a natural dimethyl ether derivative of resveratrol mainly from blueberries, has diverse pharmacological activities, especially anti-inflammation. Our study also found that pterostilbene displayed inhibited role in suppressing inflammatory response through inactivating NF-κB signaling pathway regulated by TLR5 down-regulation in high fat-induced mice. Moreover, in vitro experiments of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) challenged with LPS or TNF-α, further indicated that NF-κB was involved in atherosclerosis progression, leading to high secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. However, VSMCs from TLR5 deficient mice inhibited phosphorylated levels of NF-κB signalilng pathway, finally resulting in down-regulation of inflammatory cytokines. Notably, pterostilbene also displayed suppressed role in inflammatory response via NF-κB inactivity in LPS or TNF-α-induced VSMCs by decreasing TLR5 expression. The results above indicated a novel therapeutic strategy of pterostilbene to protect against atherosclerosis via TLR5 regulation for clinic treatment in the future. PMID:27261612

  6. Why did ancient people have atherosclerosis?: from autopsies to computed tomography to potential causes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gregory S; Wann, L Samuel; Allam, Adel H; Thompson, Randall C; Michalik, David E; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Lombardi, Guido P; Watson, Lucia; Cox, Samantha L; Valladolid, Clide M; Abd El-Maksoud, Gomaa; Al-Tohamy Soliman, Muhammad; Badr, Ibrahem; el-Halim Nur el-Din, Abd; Clarke, Emily M; Thomas, Ian G; Miyamoto, Michael I; Kaplan, Hillard S; Frohlich, Bruno; Narula, Jagat; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Zink, Albert; Finch, Caleb E

    2014-06-01

    Computed tomographic findings of atherosclerosis in the ancient cultures of Egypt, Peru, the American Southwest and the Aleutian Islands challenge our understanding of the fundamental causes of atherosclerosis. Could these findings be true? Is so, what traditional risk factors might be present in these cultures that could explain this apparent paradox? The recent computed tomographic findings are consistent with multiple autopsy studies dating as far back as 1852 that demonstrate calcific atherosclerosis in ancient Egyptians and Peruvians. A nontraditional cause of atherosclerosis that could explain this burden of atherosclerosis is the microbial and parasitic inflammatory burden likely to be present in ancient cultures inherently lacking modern hygiene and antimicrobials. Patients with chronic systemic inflammatory diseases of today, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and human immunodeficiency virus infection, experience premature atherosclerosis and coronary events. Might the chronic inflammatory load of ancient times secondary to infection have resulted in atherosclerosis? Smoke inhalation from the use of open fires for daily cooking and illumination represents another potential cause. Undiscovered risk factors could also have been present, potential causes that technologically cannot currently be measured in our serum or other tissue. A synthesis of these findings suggests that a gene-environmental interplay is causal for atherosclerosis. That is, humans have an inherent genetic susceptibility to atherosclerosis, whereas the speed and severity of its development are secondary to known and potentially unknown environmental factors. PMID:25667093

  7. [25 year experience with using surgical correction of dislipidemia in treatment of patients with atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Sedov, V M; Mirchuk, K K; Sedletskiĭ, Iu I

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of results of using partial ileoshunting for the treatment of dislipidemia in 159 patients with atherosclerosis has shown that operation of partial ileoshunting has an obligatory, pronounced and lifelong lipidcorrecting effect. An antiatherogenic effect of the operation of partial ileoshunting is manifested as the improvement of the clinical course of the disease caused by atherosclerosis, by less number of thrombotic complications of atherosclerosis and less lethality from cardio-vascular diseases. At a longer follow-up period, the efficiency of partial ileoshunting as a means of secondary prophylactics of atherosclerosis is confirmed but in case of liquidation after operation of dislipoproteidemia.

  8. Why did ancient people have atherosclerosis?: from autopsies to computed tomography to potential causes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Gregory S; Wann, L Samuel; Allam, Adel H; Thompson, Randall C; Michalik, David E; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Lombardi, Guido P; Watson, Lucia; Cox, Samantha L; Valladolid, Clide M; Abd El-Maksoud, Gomaa; Al-Tohamy Soliman, Muhammad; Badr, Ibrahem; el-Halim Nur el-Din, Abd; Clarke, Emily M; Thomas, Ian G; Miyamoto, Michael I; Kaplan, Hillard S; Frohlich, Bruno; Narula, Jagat; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Zink, Albert; Finch, Caleb E

    2014-06-01

    Computed tomographic findings of atherosclerosis in the ancient cultures of Egypt, Peru, the American Southwest and the Aleutian Islands challenge our understanding of the fundamental causes of atherosclerosis. Could these findings be true? Is so, what traditional risk factors might be present in these cultures that could explain this apparent paradox? The recent computed tomographic findings are consistent with multiple autopsy studies dating as far back as 1852 that demonstrate calcific atherosclerosis in ancient Egyptians and Peruvians. A nontraditional cause of atherosclerosis that could explain this burden of atherosclerosis is the microbial and parasitic inflammatory burden likely to be present in ancient cultures inherently lacking modern hygiene and antimicrobials. Patients with chronic systemic inflammatory diseases of today, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and human immunodeficiency virus infection, experience premature atherosclerosis and coronary events. Might the chronic inflammatory load of ancient times secondary to infection have resulted in atherosclerosis? Smoke inhalation from the use of open fires for daily cooking and illumination represents another potential cause. Undiscovered risk factors could also have been present, potential causes that technologically cannot currently be measured in our serum or other tissue. A synthesis of these findings suggests that a gene-environmental interplay is causal for atherosclerosis. That is, humans have an inherent genetic susceptibility to atherosclerosis, whereas the speed and severity of its development are secondary to known and potentially unknown environmental factors.

  9. ARG2 impairs endothelial autophagy through regulation of MTOR and PRKAA/AMPK signaling in advanced atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yuyan; Yepuri, Gautham; Forbiteh, Michael; Yu, Yi; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Yang, Zhihong; Ming, Xiu-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Impaired autophagy function and enhanced ARG2 (arginase 2)-MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) crosstalk are implicated in vascular aging and atherosclerosis. We are interested in the role of ARG2 and the potential underlying mechanism(s) in modulation of endothelial autophagy. Using human nonsenescent “young” and replicative senescent endothelial cells as well as Apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoe−/−Arg2+/+) and Arg2-deficient apoe−/− (apoe−/−arg2−/−) mice fed a high-fat diet for 10 wk as the atherosclerotic animal model, we show here that overexpression of ARG2 in the young cells suppresses endothelial autophagy with concomitant enhanced expression of RICTOR, the essential component of the MTORC2 complex, leading to activation of the AKT-MTORC1-RPS6KB1/S6K1 (ribosomal protein S6 kinase, 70kDa, polypeptide 1) cascade and inhibition of PRKAA/AMPK (protein kinase, AMP-activated, α catalytic subunit). Expression of an inactive ARG2 mutant (H160F) had the same effect. Moreover, silencing RPS6KB1 or expression of a constitutively active PRKAA prevented autophagy suppression by ARG2 or H160F. In senescent cells, enhanced ARG2-RICTOR-AKT-MTORC1-RPS6KB1 and decreased PRKAA signaling and autophagy were observed, which was reversed by silencing ARG2 but not by arginase inhibitors. In line with the above observations, genetic ablation of Arg2 in apoe−/− mice reduced RPS6KB1, enhanced PRKAA signaling and endothelial autophagy in aortas, which was associated with reduced atherosclerosis lesion formation. Taken together, the results demonstrate that ARG2 impairs endothelial autophagy independently of the L-arginine ureahydrolase activity through activation of RPS6KB1 and inhibition of PRKAA, which is implicated in atherogenesis. PMID:25484082

  10. MafB promotes atherosclerosis by inhibiting foam-cell apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Michito; Nakamura, Megumi; Tran, Mai Thi Nhu; Moriguchi, Takashi; Hong, Cynthia; Ohsumi, Takayuki; Dinh, Tra Thi Huong; Kusakabe, Manabu; Hattori, Motochika; Katsumata, Tokio; Arai, Satoko; Nakashima, Katsuhiko; Kudo, Takashi; Kuroda, Etsushi; Wu, Chien-Hui; Kao, Pei-Han; Sakai, Masaharu; Shimano, Hitoshi; Miyazaki, Toru; Tontonoz, Peter; Takahashi, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    MafB is a transcription factor that induces myelomonocytic differentiation. However, the precise role of MafB in the pathogenic function of macrophages has never been clarified. Here we demonstrate that MafB promotes hyperlipidemic atherosclerosis by suppressing foam-cell apoptosis. Our data show that MafB is predominantly expressed in foam cells found within atherosclerotic lesions, where MafB mediates the oxidized LDL-activated LXR/RXR-induced expression of apoptosis inhibitor of macrophages (AIM). In the absence of MafB, activated LXR/RXR fails to induce the expression of AIM, a protein that is normally responsible for protecting macrophages from apoptosis; thus, Mafb-deficient macrophages are prone to apoptosis. Haematopoietic reconstitution with Mafb-deficient fetal liver cells in recipient LDL receptor-deficient hyperlipidemic mice revealed accelerated foam-cell apoptosis, which subsequently led to the attenuation of the early atherogenic lesion. These findings represent the first evidence that the macrophage-affiliated MafB transcription factor participates in the acceleration of atherogenesis.

  11. Kv1.3 potassium channel mediates macrophage migration in atherosclerosis by regulating ERK activity.

    PubMed

    Kan, Xiao-Hong; Gao, Hai-Qing; Ma, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Lin; Ling, Ming-Ying; Wang, Yuan-Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Ion channels expressed in macrophages have been tightly related to atherosclerosis by coupling cellular function. How the voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv) affect macrophage migration remain unknown. The aim of our study is to investigate whether Kv1.3-ERK signaling pathway plays an important role in the process. We explored the expression of Kv1.3 in coronary atherosclerotic heart disease and found Kv1.3 channel was increased in acute coronary syndrome patients. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells with Kv1.3 small interfering RNA, suppressed cell migration. The expression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 also decreased after knockdown of Kv1.3. On the other hand, overexpression of Kv1.3 channel promoted cell migration and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. U-0126, the mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors, could reverse macrophage migration induced by Kv1.3 channel overexpression. Downregulation of Kv1.3 channel by siRNA could not further inhibit cell migration when cells were treated with U-0126. It means that ERK is downstream signal of Kv1.3 channel. We concluded that Kv1.3 may stimulate macrophage migration through the activation of ERK.

  12. Akt3 Deficiency in Macrophages Promotes Foam Cell Formation and Atherosclerosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Liang; Biswas, Sudipta; Morton, Richard E.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Hay, Nissim; Byzova, Tatiana; Febbraio, Maria; Podrez, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Summary Akt, a serine-threonine protein kinase, exists as three isoforms. The Akt signaling pathway controls multiple cellular functions in the cardiovascular system, and the atheroprotective endothelial cell dependent role of Akt1 has been recently demonstrated. The role of Akt3 isoform in cardiovascular pathophysiology is not known. We explored the role of Akt3 in atherosclerosis using mice with a genetic ablation of the Akt3 gene. Using hyperlipidemic ApoE−/− mice, we demonstrated a macrophage dependent, atheroprotective role for Akt3. In vitro experiments demonstrated differential subcellular localization of Akt1 and Akt3 in macrophages, and showed that Akt3 specifically inhibits macrophage cholesteryl ester accumulation and foam cell formation, a critical early event in atherogenesis. Mechanistically, Akt3 suppresses foam cell formation by reducing lipoprotein uptake and promoting ACAT-1 degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. These studies demonstrate the non-redundant atheroprotective role for Akt3 exerted via the previously unknown link between the Akt signaling pathway and cholesterol metabolism. PMID:22632897

  13. Ultrasound Biomicroscopic Imaging for Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist-Inhibiting Atherosclerosis and Markers of Inflammation in Atherosclerotic Development in Apolipoprotein-E Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong-Juan; Sun, Yan; Wang, Qin; Yang, Jiao; Yang, Ya; Song, Li; Wang, Zheng; Luo, Xiang-Hong; Su, Rui-Juan

    2015-08-01

    We sought to validate the hypothesis that the development of atherosclerosis can be suppressed by the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in murine models of atherosclerosis in vivo, noninvasively seen by means of high-resolution ultrasound biomicroscopy, and we studied changes in inflammatory markers such as IL-1 and C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels in these models of atherosclerosis. We divided IL-1Ra(+/-)/apolipoprotein-E (apoE)(-/-) and IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice into 2 age groups, used as atherosclerotic models. The control groups were age-matched IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(+/+) mice. Plaque thickness was measured in the ascending aorta in short-axis images by means of ultrasound and histology. Plasma levels of IL-1 and CRP were quantified in the 3 murine groups. At 16 weeks, plaque thickness in the ascending aortas of the IL-1Ra(+/-)/apoE(-/-) mice was significantly greater than that in the IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice, on ultrasound and histology (P <0.01). In contrast, at 32 weeks, the differences between these 2 genotypes were not statistically significant. Serum IL-1 levels were lower in the IL-1Ra(+/-)/apoE(-/-) mice than in the IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice at 16 and 32 weeks (P <0.05). At 16 weeks, serum CRP levels in the IL-1Ra(+/-)/apoE(-/-) mice were higher than in the IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice (P <0.01). Our results suggest that ultrasound biomicroscopy enables evaluation of atherosclerotic lesions in vivo, noninvasively and in real-time, in apoE(-/-) mice. Partial IL-1Ra deficiencies might promote early plaque development in 16-week-old apoE(-/-) mice. The balance of IL-1 and IL-1Ra might influence atherosclerotic development. Finally, CRP might affect the initiation of atherosclerosis, rather than its progression.

  14. Ultrasound Biomicroscopic Imaging for Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist-Inhibiting Atherosclerosis and Markers of Inflammation in Atherosclerotic Development in Apolipoprotein-E Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Rong-Juan; Sun, Yan; Wang, Qin; Yang, Jiao; Yang, Ya; Song, Li; Wang, Zheng; Luo, Xiang-Hong; Su, Rui-Juan

    2015-08-01

    We sought to validate the hypothesis that the development of atherosclerosis can be suppressed by the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in murine models of atherosclerosis in vivo, noninvasively seen by means of high-resolution ultrasound biomicroscopy, and we studied changes in inflammatory markers such as IL-1 and C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels in these models of atherosclerosis. We divided IL-1Ra(+/-)/apolipoprotein-E (apoE)(-/-) and IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice into 2 age groups, used as atherosclerotic models. The control groups were age-matched IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(+/+) mice. Plaque thickness was measured in the ascending aorta in short-axis images by means of ultrasound and histology. Plasma levels of IL-1 and CRP were quantified in the 3 murine groups. At 16 weeks, plaque thickness in the ascending aortas of the IL-1Ra(+/-)/apoE(-/-) mice was significantly greater than that in the IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice, on ultrasound and histology (P <0.01). In contrast, at 32 weeks, the differences between these 2 genotypes were not statistically significant. Serum IL-1 levels were lower in the IL-1Ra(+/-)/apoE(-/-) mice than in the IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice at 16 and 32 weeks (P <0.05). At 16 weeks, serum CRP levels in the IL-1Ra(+/-)/apoE(-/-) mice were higher than in the IL-1Ra(+/+)/apoE(-/-) mice (P <0.01). Our results suggest that ultrasound biomicroscopy enables evaluation of atherosclerotic lesions in vivo, noninvasively and in real-time, in apoE(-/-) mice. Partial IL-1Ra deficiencies might promote early plaque development in 16-week-old apoE(-/-) mice. The balance of IL-1 and IL-1Ra might influence atherosclerotic development. Finally, CRP might affect the initiation of atherosclerosis, rather than its progression. PMID:26413013

  15. Splenocytes seed bone marrow of myeloablated mice: implication for atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lai; Yang, Mingjie; Arias, Ana; Song, Lei; Li, Fuqiang; Tian, Fang; Qin, Minghui; Yukht, Ada; Williamson, Ian K; Shah, Prediman K; Sharifi, Behrooz G

    2015-01-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis has been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases including cardiovascular diseases. In this process, the spleen is seeded with mobilized bone marrow cells that augment its hematopoietic ability. It is unclear whether these immigrant cells that are produced/reprogrammed in spleen are similar or different from those found in the bone marrow. To begin to understand this, we investigated the relative potency of adult splenocytes per se to repopulate bone marrow of lethally-irradiated mice and its functional consequences in atherosclerosis. The splenocytes were harvested from GFP donor mice and transplanted into myeloablated wild type recipient mice without the inclusion of any bone marrow helper cells. We found that adult splenocytes repopulated bone marrow of myeloablated mice and the transplanted cells differentiated into a full repertoire of myeloid cell lineages. The level of monocytes/macrophages in the bone marrow of recipient mice was dependent on the cell origin, i.e., the donor splenocytes gave rise to significantly more monocytes/macrophages than the donor bone marrow cells. This occurred despite a significantly lower number of hematopoietic stem cells being present in the donor splenocytes when compared with donor bone marrow cells. Atherosclerosis studies revealed that donor splenocytes displayed a similar level of atherogenic and atheroprotective activities to those of donor bone marrow cells. Cell culture studies showed that the phenotype of macrophages derived from spleen is different from those of bone marrow. Together, these results demonstrate that splenocytes can seed bone marrow of myeloablated mice and modulate atherosclerosis. In addition, our study shows the potential of splenocytes for therapeutic interventions in inflammatory disease.

  16. In vitro experimental photodynamic diagnosis of artery atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialy, Dariusz; Derkacz, Arkadiusz; Wawrzynska, M.; Kwasny, Miroslaw; Strek, Wieslaw; Protasiewicz, Marcin

    2004-07-01

    Background: Although there are several methods for atherosclerosis detection available, none of them seems to be accurate enough to identify the vulnerable atheroscleroitc plaque. Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) and therapy (PDT) -- a new method evaluated for neoplasms treatment is a modern approach to detecting and treating atherosclerosis. Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess in vitro the capability of PDD with use of chlorin e6 to recognize atherosclerotic plaque and its usefulness as a feedback system for photoangioplasty treatment. Methods: 30 specimens of human aorta. The samples were soaked with chlorin e6 and then washed out. The luminescence spectra were then collected. All samples were examined with light microscopy. Results: Tissue fluorescence is seen as green light. We noted a very strong red fluorescence of chlorin e6 originating from lipid reach plaque. We established a quantitative factor which would be the ratio R of chlorin e6 red intensity in its 660 nm maximum compared to the area of green luminescence centered at 515 nm. The highest value of the ratio was reached at atheromatous samples, then calcified and normal ones R2 = 3.51 +/- 0.62, R3 = 1.63 +/- 0.31, R1 = 1.51 +/- 0.15 respectively. Statistically significant difference was noted between group two and one and between group two and three R2 = 3.51 +/- 0.62 vs R3 = 1.63 +/- 0.31 (p < 0,05); R2 = 3.51 +/- 0.62 vs. R1 = 1.51 +/- 0.15 (p<0.05) respectively. Conclusions: the following in vitro study confirms that photosensitizer chlorin e6 accumulates within atheromatous plaque. It may be a specific tool for atheromatous and normal or calcified segments discrimination. The advantage of the above method is a possibility of a real time imaging followed by targeted therapy of various forms and stages of atherosclerosis.

  17. Beta-carotene inhibits atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Shaish, A; Daugherty, A; O'Sullivan, F; Schonfeld, G; Heinecke, J W

    1995-01-01

    Oxidatively damaged LDL may be of central importance in atherogenesis. Epidemiological evidence suggests that high dietary intakes of beta-carotene and vitamin E decreases the risk for atherosclerotic vascular disease, raising the possibility that lipid-soluble antioxidants slow vascular disease by protecting LDL from oxidation. To test this hypothesis, we fed male New Zealand White rabbits a high-cholesterol diet or the same diet supplemented with either 1% probucol, 0.01% vitamin E, 0.01% all-trans beta-carotene, or 0.01% 9-cis beta-carotene; then we assessed both the susceptibility of LDL to oxidation ex vivo and the extent of aortic atherosclerosis. As in earlier studies, probucol protected LDL from oxidation and inhibited lesion formation. In contrast, vitamin E modestly inhibited LDL oxidation but did not prevent atherosclerosis. While beta-carotene had no effect on LDL oxidation ex vivo, the all-trans isomer inhibited lesion formation to the same degree as probucol. Moreover, all-trans beta-carotene was undetectable in LDL isolated from rabbits fed the compound, although tissue levels of retinyl palmitate were increased. The effect of all-trans beta-carotene on atherogenesis can thus be separated from the resistance of LDL to oxidation, indicating that other mechanisms may account for the ability of this compound to prevent vascular disease. Our results suggest that metabolites derived from all-trans beta-carotene inhibit atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic rabbits, possibly via stereospecific interactions with retinoic acid receptors in the artery wall. PMID:7560102

  18. The Role of Phospholipid Oxidation Products in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangderk; Birukov, Konstantin G.; Romanoski, Casey E.; Springstead, James R.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Berliner, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing clinical evidence that phospholipid oxidation products (Ox-PL) play a role in atherosclerosis. This review focuses on the mechanisms by which Ox-PL interact with endothelial cells, monocyte/macrophages, platelets, smooth muscle cells and HDL to promote atherogenesis. In the last few years major progress has been made in identifying these mechanisms. It has been recognized that Ox-PL promote phenotypic changes in these cell types that have long term consequences for the vessel wall. Individual Ox-PL responsible for specific cellular effects has been identified. A model of the configuration of bioactive truncated Ox-PL within membranes has been developed that demonstrates that the oxidized fatty acid moiety protrudes into the aqueous phase, rendering it accessible for receptor recognition. Receptors and signaling pathways for individual Ox-PL species are now determined and receptor independent signaling pathways identified. The effects of Ox-PL are mediated both by gene regulation and transcription independent processes. It has now become apparent that Ox-PL affects multiple genes and pathways some of which are pro-atherogenic and some are protective. However, at concentrations that are likely present in the vessel wall in atherosclerotic lesions, the effects promote atherogenesis. There have also been new insights on enzymes that metabolize Ox-PL and the significance of these enzymes for atherosclerosis. With the knowledge we now have on the regulation and effects of Ox-PL in different vascular cell types, it should be possible to design experiments to test the role of specific Ox-PL on the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:22935534

  19. Atherosclerosis-related functions of C-reactive protein

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Alok; Hammond, David J.; Singh, Sanjay K.

    2011-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is secreted by hepatocytes as a pentameric molecule made up of identical monomers, circulates in the plasma as pentamers, and localizes in atherosclerotic lesions. In some cases, localized CRP was detected by using monoclonal antibodies that did not react with native pentameric CRP but were specific for isolated monomeric CRP. It has been reported that, once CRP is bound to certain ligands, the pentameric structure of CRP is altered so that it can dissociate into monomers. Accordingly, the monomeric CRP found in atherosclerotic lesions may be a stationary, ligand-bound, by-product of a ligand-binding function of CRP. CRP binds to modified forms of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The binding of CRP to oxidized LDL requires acidic pH conditions; the binding at physiological pH is controversial. The binding of CRP to enzymatically-modified LDL occurs at physiological pH; however, the binding is enhanced at acidic pH. Using enzymatically-modified LDL, CRP has been shown to prevent the formation of enzymatically-modified LDL-loaded macrophage foam cells. CRP is neither pro-atherogenic nor atheroprotective in ApoE−/− and ApoB100/100Ldlr −/− murine models of atherosclerosis, except in one study where CRP was found to be slightly atheroprotective in ApoB100/100Ldlr −/− mice. The reasons for the ineffectiveness of human CRP in murine models of atherosclerosis are not defined. It is possible that an inflammatory environment, such as those characterized by acidic pH, is needed for efficient interaction between CRP and atherogenic LDL during the development of atherosclerosis and to observe the possible atheroprotective function of CRP in animal models. PMID:20932269

  20. Experimental diet-induced atherosclerosis in Quaker parrots (Myiopsitta monachus).

    PubMed

    Beaufrère, H; Nevarez, J G; Wakamatsu, N; Clubb, S; Cray, C; Tully, T N

    2013-11-01

    Spontaneous atherosclerosis is common in psittaciformes, and clinical signs associated with flow-limiting stenosis are encountered in pet birds. Nevertheless, a psittacine model of atherosclerosis has not been developed for research investigations. Sixteen captive-bred Quaker parrots (Myiopsitta monachus) were used in this study. While 4 control birds were fed a maintenance diet, 12 other birds were fed an atherogenic diet composed of 1% cholesterol controlling for a calorie-to-protein ratio for periods ranging from 2 to 8 months. The birds were euthanized at the end of their respective food trial period. Histopathology, transmission electron microscopy, and cholesterol measurement were performed on the ascending aorta and brachiocephalic and pulmonary arteries. Plasma lipoproteins, cholesterol, and triglycerides were also measured on a monthly basis. Significant atherosclerotic lesions were induced within 2 months and advanced atherosclerotic lesions within 4 to 6 months. The advanced lesions were histologically similar to naturally occurring lesions identified in the same parrot species with a lipid core and a fibrous cap. Ultrastructurally, there were extracellular lipid, foam cell, and endothelial changes. Arterial cholesterol content increased linearly over time. Plasma cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) significantly increased over time by an average of 5- and 15-fold, respectively, with a shift from high-density lipoprotein to LDL as the main plasma lipoprotein. Quaker parrots also exhibited high plasma cholesteryl ester transfer protein activity that increased, although not significantly, over time. This experiment demonstrates that in Quaker parrots fed 1% cholesterol, advanced atherosclerosis can be induced relatively quickly, and lesions resemble those found in other avian models and humans.

  1. STAT4 deficiency reduces the development of atherosclerosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Taghavie-Moghadam, Parésa L; Gjurich, Breanne N; Jabeen, Rukhsana; Krishnamurthy, Purna; Kaplan, Mark H; Dobrian, Anca D; Nadler, Jerry L; Galkina, Elena V

    2015-11-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory process that leads to plaque formation in large and medium sized vessels. T helper 1 (Th1) cells constitute the majority of plaque infiltrating pro-atherogenic T cells and are induced via IFNγ-dependent activation of T-box (Tbet) and/or IL-12-dependent activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4). We thus aimed to define a role for STAT4 in atherosclerosis. STAT4-deficiency resulted in a ∼71% reduction (p < 0.001) in plaque burden in Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-) vs Apoe(-/-) mice fed chow diet and significantly attenuated atherosclerosis (∼31%, p < 0.01) in western diet fed Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, reduced atherogenesis in Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-) mice was not due to attenuated IFNγ production in vivo by Th1 cells, suggesting an at least partially IFNγ-independent pro-atherogenic role of STAT4. STAT4 is expressed in T cells, but also detected in macrophages (MΦs). Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-)in vitro differentiated M1 or M2 MΦs had reduced cytokine production compare to Apoe(-/-) M1 and M2 MΦs that was accompanied by reduced induction of CD69, I-A(b), and CD86 in response to LPS stimulation. Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-) MΦs expressed attenuated levels of CCR2 and demonstrated reduced migration toward CCL2 in a transwell assay. Importantly, the percentage of aortic CD11b(+)F4/80(+)Ly6C(hi) MΦs was reduced in Stat4(-/-)Apoe(-/-) vs Apoe(-/-) mice. Thus, this study identifies for the first time a pro-atherogenic role of STAT4 that is at least partially independent of Th1 cell-derived IFNγ, and primarily involving the modulation of MΦ responses.

  2. The pigeon (Columba livia) model of spontaneous atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J L; Smith, S C; Taylor, R L

    2014-11-01

    Multiple animal models have been employed to study human atherosclerosis, the principal cause of mortality in the United States. Each model has individual advantages related to specific pathologies. Initiation, the earliest disease phase, is best modeled by the White Carneau (WC-As) pigeon. Atherosclerosis develops spontaneously in the WC-As without either external manipulation or known risk factors. Furthermore, susceptibility is caused by a single gene defect inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The Show Racer (SR-Ar) pigeon is resistant to atherosclerosis. Breed differences in the biochemistry and metabolism of celiac foci cells have been described. For example, WC-As have lower oxidative metabolism but higher amounts of chondroitin-6-sulfate and nonesterified fatty acids compared with SR-Ar. Gene expression in aortic smooth muscle cells was compared between breeds using representational difference analysis and microarray analysis. Energy metabolism and cellular phenotype were the chief gene expression differences. Glycolysis and synthetic cell types were related to the WC-As but oxidative metabolism and contractile cell types were related to the SR-Ar. Rosiglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, blocked RNA binding motif (RBMS1) expression in WC-As cells. The drug may act through the c-myc oncogene as RBMS1 is a c-myc target. Proteomic tests of aortic smooth muscle cells supported greater glycosylation in the WC-As and a transforming growth factor β effect in SR-Ar. Unoxidized fatty acids build up in WC-As cells because of their metabolic deficiency, ultimately preventing the contractile phenotype in these cells. The single gene responsible for the disease is likely regulatory in nature.

  3. Risk Factors for Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Diabetic and Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Faienza, Maria Felicia; Acquafredda, Angelo; Tesse, Riccardina; Luce, Vincenza; Ventura, Annamaria; Maggialetti, Nicola; Monteduro, Mariantonietta; Giordano, Paola; Cavallo, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    Background. Increased carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) is considered a marker of early-onset atherosclerosis and it seems to predict cardiovascular events both in obese and diabetic subjects. We aimed to evaluate early signs of atherosclerosis and investigate for predisposing factors in children and adolescents affected by type 1 diabetes (T1DM) or obesity, comparing them with healthy controls. Methods. Out of 71 enrolled subjects (mean age 12.8 ± 2.3 years), 26 had T1DM and 24 were obese, while 21 age- and sex-matched subjects acted as controls. cIMT was measured using standardized methods. Serum glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides and C-reactive protein levels were evaluated. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed in obese subjects. Results. Diabetic and obese individuals showed higher cIMT mean values than healthy controls (p<0.005). cIMT of the three examined segments correlated positively with fasting glucose levels and negatively with units of insulin/kg/day administered in T1DM individuals. A positive correlation between insulin levels (basal and after oral glucose load) and cIMT of common, internal and external carotid artery was found in obese subjects (p<0.03). High density cholesterol levels represented a protective factor for cIMT in this latter group of the study population. Conclusions. Our findings show that cIMT correlates with high insulin levels (a sign of insulin resistance) in obese patients and with high fasting glucose levels (a sign of relative insulin deficiency) in T1DM subjects, confirming the need of reducing hyperinsulinism and monitoring blood glucose levels in these subjects to prevent atherosclerosis. PMID:23423872

  4. The association between periodontal disease parameters and severity of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ketabi, Mohammad; Meybodi, Fatemeh Rashidi; Asgari, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerosis is the most common cause for heart attack and stroke. In the last decade, several epidemiological studies have found an association between periodontal infection and atherosclerosis. The aim of this research was to determine the possible association between chronic periodontal disease and severity of atherosclerosis. Materials and Methods: Eighty-two subjects that were referred to Chamran Heart Hospital in Isfahan for angiography were involved in this study. Fifty-nine subjects had coronary artery obstruction (CAO) and 23 showed no obstruction after angiography. The severity of CAO was assessed. Periodontal parameters including pocket depth (PD), gingival recession (R), clinical attachment level (CAL), and bleeding on probing (BOP) of all subjects were recorded. The decayed-missing-filled (DMF) index of all subjects was also measured. For statistical analysis, Pearson correlation test, Chi-square, and independent t-test were used. Results: There were significant positive correlation between variables R, PD, CAL, decayed (D), missing (M), DMF, BOP, and degree of CAO. However, there were no significant differences between filling variable degree of CAO (left anterior descending, left circumflex, and right coronary artery). Independent t-test showed that the mean of variables R, PD, AL, D, M, and DMF in patients with obstructed arteries were significantly higher than subjects without CAO. But there were no significant differences between variable F in two groups. Conclusion: The results of this cross-section analytical study showed an association between periodontal disease and dental parameters with the severity of CAO measured by angiography. However, this association must not interpret as a cause and effect relationship. PMID:27274346

  5. The pigeon (Columba livia) model of spontaneous atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J. L.; Smith, S. C.; Taylor, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple animal models have been employed to study human atherosclerosis, the principal cause of mortality in the United States. Each model has individual advantages related to specific pathologies. Initiation, the earliest disease phase, is best modeled by the White Carneau (WC-As) pigeon. Atherosclerosis develops spontaneously in the WC-As without either external manipulation or known risk factors. Furthermore, susceptibility is caused by a single gene defect inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. The Show Racer (SR-Ar) pigeon is resistant to atherosclerosis. Breed differences in the biochemistry and metabolism of celiac foci cells have been described. For example, WC-As have lower oxidative metabolism but higher amounts of chondroitin-6-sulfate and nonesterified fatty acids compared with SR-Ar. Gene expression in aortic smooth muscle cells was compared between breeds using representational difference analysis and microarray analysis. Energy metabolism and cellular phenotype were the chief gene expression differences. Glycolysis and synthetic cell types were related to the WC-As but oxidative metabolism and contractile cell types were related to the SR-Ar. Rosiglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, blocked RNA binding motif (RBMS1) expression in WC-As cells. The drug may act through the c-myc oncogene as RBMS1 is a c-myc target. Proteomic tests of aortic smooth muscle cells supported greater glycosylation in the WC-As and a transforming growth factor β effect in SR-Ar. Unoxidized fatty acids build up in WC-As cells because of their metabolic deficiency, ultimately preventing the contractile phenotype in these cells. The single gene responsible for the disease is likely regulatory in nature. PMID:25214557

  6. Recent Advances of Radionuclide-based Molecular Imaging of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kazuma, Soraya M.; Sultan, Deborah; Zhao, Yongfeng; Detering, Lisa; You, Meng; Luehmann, Hannah P.; Abdalla, Dulcineia S.P.; Liu, Yongjian

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a systemic disease characterized by the development of multifocal plaque lesions within vessel walls and extending into the vascular lumen. The disease takes decades to develop symptomatic lesions, affording opportunities for accurate detection of plaque progression, analysis of risk factors responsible for clinical events, and planning personalized treatment. Of the available molecular imaging modalities, radionuclide-based imaging strategies have been favored due to their sensitivity, quantitative detection and pathways for translational research. This review summarizes recent advances of radiolabeled small molecules, peptides, antibodies and nanoparticles for atherosclerotic plaque imaging during disease progression. PMID:26369676

  7. Current siRNA Targets in Atherosclerosis and Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan-Nabzdyk, Leena; Huang, Chenyu; Logerfo, Frank W.; Nabzdyk, Christoph S.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (ATH) and aortic aneurysms (AA) remain challenging chronic diseases that confer high morbidity and mortality despite advances in medical, interventional, and surgical care. RNA interference represents a promising technology that may be utilized to silence genes contributing to ATH and AA. Despite positive results in preclinical and some clinical feasibility studies, challenges such as target/sequence validation, tissue specificity, transfection efficiency, and mitigation of unwanted off-target effects remain to be addressed. In this review the most current targets and some novel approaches in siRNA delivery are being discussed. Due to the plethora of investigated targets, only studies published between 2010 and 2014 were included. PMID:24882715

  8. Periodontal Disease-Induced Atherosclerosis and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Jia, Ru; Cai, Yu; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent disorder affecting up to 80% of the global population. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease, as oxidative stress plays an important role in chronic inflammatory diseases such as periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms by which periodontopathic bacteria cause chronic inflammation through the enhancement of oxidative stress and accelerate cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, we comment on the antioxidative activity of catechin in atherosclerosis accelerated by periodontitis. PMID:26783845

  9. Megakaryocyte ploidy and platelet changes in human diabetes and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Brown, A S; Hong, Y; de Belder, A; Beacon, H; Beeso, J; Sherwood, R; Edmonds, M; Martin, J F; Erusalimsky, J D

    1997-04-01

    Altered platelet morphology and function have been reported in patients with diabetes. They are likely to be associated with the pathological processes and increased risk of vascular disease seen in these patients. Mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet count, and megakaryocyte (MK) ploidy (DNA content) were measured in (1) nondiabetics with normal coronary arteries, (2) nondiabetics with coronary artery atherosclerosis, (3) diabetics without evidence of vascular complications, and (4) diabetics with vascular disease. The platelet count (+/- SD) was increased in all groups but only significantly in the diabetics with vascular disease (236 +/- 65 versus 250 +/- 54 versus 257 +/- 64 versus 295 +/- 90 [P < or = .05] x 10(9)/L, for groups, I, II, II, and IV, respectively). The MPV was significantly increased in patients with atherosclerosis (7.0 +/- 0.4 versus 8.0 +/- 1.2 [P < or = .05] versus 7.2 +/- 0.9 versus 8.1 +/- 0.9 [P < or = .05] IL). Geometric mean MK ploidy was significantly increased in all groups compared with controls (16 +/- 1.5 versus 18.7 +/- 1.8 [P < or = .05] versus 19.8 +/- 1.6 [P < or = .05] versus 20.1 +/- 2.7 [P < or = .05]). Furthermore, some patients with vascular disease and/or diabetes had a modal ploidy shift from 16 (the normal mammalian modal ploidy) to 32, with a concomitant reduction of MKs in the 8 and 16 ploidy classes. This shift was seen particularly in the diabetics with vascular disease (P = .007). Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were measured and were elevated in patients with atherosclerosis; the highest levels were found in the diabetic patients (0.7 +/- 0.9 versus 5.3 +/- 5.5 [P < or = .05] versus 2.5 +/- 2.8 versus 6.7 +/- 5.5 [P < or = .05] ng/L). In the diabetic patients with atherosclerosis, fibrinogen levels were also increased (2.85 +/- 0.76 versus 3.34 +/- 1.32 versus 2.43 +/- 1.50 versus 5.59 +/- 1.72 [P < or = .05] g/L). Furthermore, IL-6 levels correlated with MK ploidy (r = .45, P = .009) and fibrinogen levels (r = .5, P

  10. Piperlongumine inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by suppressing PDGF receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Son, Dong Ju; Kim, Soo Yeon; Han, Seong Su; Kim, Chan Woo; Kumar, Sandeep; Park, Byeoung Soo; Lee, Sung Eun; Yun, Yeo Pyo; Jo, Hanjoong; Park, Young Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL) is an alkaloid found in the long pepper (Piper longum L.) and has well-documented anti-platelet aggregation, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties; however, the role of PL in prevention of atherosclerosis is unknown. We evaluated the anti-atherosclerotic potential of PL in an in vivo murine model of accelerated atherosclerosis and defined its mechanism of action in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Local treatment with PL significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque formation as well as proliferation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in an in vivo setting. PL treatment in VSMCs in vitro showed inhibition of migration and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)-induced proliferation to the in vivo findings. We further identified that PL inhibited PDGF-BB-induced PDGF receptor beta activation and suppressed downstream signaling molecules such as phospholipase C1, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and Akt. Lastly, PL significantly attenuated activation of NF-κB—a downstream transcriptional regulator in PDGF receptor signaling, in response to PDGF-BB stimulation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a novel, therapeutic mechanism by which PL suppresses atherosclerosis plaque formation in vivo. PMID:22995306

  11. Caveolae and Caveolin-1 Integrate Reverse Cholesterol Transport and Inflammation in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Li; Zhu, Neng; Ao, Bao-Xue; Liu, Chan; Shi, Ya-Ning; Du, Ke; Chen, Jian-Xiong; Zheng, Xi-Long; Liao, Duan-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Lipid disorder and inflammation play critical roles in the development of atherosclerosis. Reverse cholesterol transport is a key event in lipid metabolism. Caveolae and caveolin-1 are in the center stage of cholesterol transportation and inflammation in macrophages. Here, we propose that reverse cholesterol transport and inflammation in atherosclerosis can be integrated by caveolae and caveolin-1. PMID:27011179

  12. Prevention of Coronary Atherosclerosis: The Role of a College Health Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manchester, Ralph A.; Greenland, Philip

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the concept of behavioral risk factors for atherosclerosis which become entrenched in adolescence or young adulthood. Evidence favoring intervention in the adolescent years and a screening program at the University of Rochester Health Service are described. A preliminary strategy for prevention of atherosclerosis on campus is…

  13. Atherosclerosis in LDLR-Knockout Mice Is Inhibited, but Not Reversed, by the PPARγ Ligand Pioglitazone

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Hideaki; Summers, Barbara D.; Nicholson, Andrew C.; Gotto, Antonio M.; Hajjar, David P.; Han, Jihong

    2009-01-01

    Thiazolidinediones, a class of drugs for the treatment of type-2 diabetes, are synthetic ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. They have been demonstrated to possess cardioprotective effects in humans and anti-atherogenic properties in animal models. However, the question remains whether a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ ligand can reverse the development of atherosclerosis. In this study, we tested the effects of pioglitazone on the development of established atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice. We observed that atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice progressed when mice were fed a high-fat diet. Pioglitazone treatment of atherogenic mice prevented this progression of atherosclerosis from its middle stages of disease, but was not able to reverse it. Withdrawal of the high-fat diet from mice with advanced atherosclerosis did not result in a reduction in lesion sizes. Pioglitazone treatment also had no effect on advanced atherosclerosis. Levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol correlated inversely with lesion development when pioglitazone was given during lesion progression. However, pioglitazone had no effect on circulating high density lipoprotein levels in mice in which treatment was initiated following 14 weeks on the high-fat diet. These findings have implications for the analysis of therapeutic agents in murine models of atherosclerosis and the use of pioglitazone in patients with established atherosclerosis. PMID:19435790

  14. Serum Resistin Level and Progression of Atherosclerosis during Glucocorticoid Therapy for Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Nahoko; Masuoka, Shotaro; Kusunoki, Natsuko; Nanki, Toshihiro; Kawai, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Adipokines are important regulators of several processes, including inflammation and atherosclerosis. In patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, atherosclerosis is accelerated with higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We prospectively investigated the association of adipokines and glucocorticoid therapy with progression of premature atherosclerosis in 38 patients starting glucocorticoid therapy for systemic autoimmune diseases. To detect premature atherosclerosis, carotid ultrasonography was performed at initiation of glucocorticoid therapy and after a mean three-year follow-up period. The ankle-brachial pressure index and cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) were measured. Serum adipokine levels were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Twenty-three patients (60.5%) had carotid artery plaque at baseline. The carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) increased significantly during follow-up. Glucocorticoids reduced the serum resistin level, while increasing serum leptin and high molecular weight-adiponectin. There was slower progression of atherosclerosis (carotid IMT and CAVI) at follow-up in patients with greater reduction of serum resistin and with higher cumulative prednisolone dose. In conclusion, progression of premature atherosclerosis occurred at an early stage of systemic autoimmune diseases before initiation of glucocorticoid therapy. Since resistin, an inflammation and atherosclerosis related adipokine, is reduced by glucocorticoids, glucocortidoid therapy may not accelerate atherosclerosis in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:27649254

  15. Serum Resistin Level and Progression of Atherosclerosis during Glucocorticoid Therapy for Systemic Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nahoko; Masuoka, Shotaro; Kusunoki, Natsuko; Nanki, Toshihiro; Kawai, Shinichi

    2016-09-16

    Adipokines are important regulators of several processes, including inflammation and atherosclerosis. In patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, atherosclerosis is accelerated with higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We prospectively investigated the association of adipokines and glucocorticoid therapy with progression of premature atherosclerosis in 38 patients starting glucocorticoid therapy for systemic autoimmune diseases. To detect premature atherosclerosis, carotid ultrasonography was performed at initiation of glucocorticoid therapy and after a mean three-year follow-up period. The ankle-brachial pressure index and cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) were measured. Serum adipokine levels were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Twenty-three patients (60.5%) had carotid artery plaque at baseline. The carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) increased significantly during follow-up. Glucocorticoids reduced the serum resistin level, while increasing serum leptin and high molecular weight-adiponectin. There was slower progression of atherosclerosis (carotid IMT and CAVI) at follow-up in patients with greater reduction of serum resistin and with higher cumulative prednisolone dose. In conclusion, progression of premature atherosclerosis occurred at an early stage of systemic autoimmune diseases before initiation of glucocorticoid therapy. Since resistin, an inflammation and atherosclerosis related adipokine, is reduced by glucocorticoids, glucocortidoid therapy may not accelerate atherosclerosis in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases.

  16. Serum Resistin Level and Progression of Atherosclerosis during Glucocorticoid Therapy for Systemic Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nahoko; Masuoka, Shotaro; Kusunoki, Natsuko; Nanki, Toshihiro; Kawai, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    Adipokines are important regulators of several processes, including inflammation and atherosclerosis. In patients with systemic autoimmune diseases, atherosclerosis is accelerated with higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We prospectively investigated the association of adipokines and glucocorticoid therapy with progression of premature atherosclerosis in 38 patients starting glucocorticoid therapy for systemic autoimmune diseases. To detect premature atherosclerosis, carotid ultrasonography was performed at initiation of glucocorticoid therapy and after a mean three-year follow-up period. The ankle-brachial pressure index and cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) were measured. Serum adipokine levels were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Twenty-three patients (60.5%) had carotid artery plaque at baseline. The carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) increased significantly during follow-up. Glucocorticoids reduced the serum resistin level, while increasing serum leptin and high molecular weight-adiponectin. There was slower progression of atherosclerosis (carotid IMT and CAVI) at follow-up in patients with greater reduction of serum resistin and with higher cumulative prednisolone dose. In conclusion, progression of premature atherosclerosis occurred at an early stage of systemic autoimmune diseases before initiation of glucocorticoid therapy. Since resistin, an inflammation and atherosclerosis related adipokine, is reduced by glucocorticoids, glucocortidoid therapy may not accelerate atherosclerosis in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:27649254

  17. Role of apoptosis in atherosclerosis and its therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Stoneman, Victoria E A; Bennett, Martin R

    2004-10-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques develop as a consequence of the accumulation of circulating lipid and the subsequent migration of inflammatory cells (macrophages and T-lymphocytes) and VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells). Advanced plaques consist of a lipid-rich core, separated from the lumen by a fibrous cap composed of VSMCs, collagen and extracellular matrix. Plaque enlargement ultimately narrows the lumen (stenosis) causing angina. However, recent studies have emphasized that acute coronary syndromes (unstable angina/myocardial infarction) are caused by lesion erosion/rupture with superimposed thrombus formation on often small non-stenotic plaques. Thus current therapies work predominantly on stabilization of plaques rather than plaque regression. Apoptosis (programmed cell death) is increasingly observed as plaques develop, although the exact mechanisms and consequences of apoptosis in the development and progression of atherosclerosis are still controversial. Increased endothelial cell apoptosis may initiate atherosclerosis, whereas apoptosis of VSMCs and macrophages localizes in 'vulnerable' lesions, i.e. those most likely to rupture, and at sites of rupture. This review will focus on the regulation of apoptosis of cells within the vasculature, concentrating on the relevance of apoptosis to plaque progression and clinical consequences of vascular cell apoptosis.

  18. Imaging of coronary atherosclerosis in various susceptible groups.

    PubMed

    Munnur, Ravi Kiran; Nerlekar, Nitesh; Wong, Dennis T L

    2016-08-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Atherosclerosis, which is the primary pathophysiologic mechanism for the development of plaque leading to CAD, is a multifactorial process resulting from a complex interplay between genetic susceptibility and various risk factors such as hypertension (HT), dyslipidaemia, diabetes mellitus (DM) and smoking. In addition, influences from other disease states such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), obesity and the metabolic syndrome as well as gender and ethnic diversity also contribute to the disease process. Insights from pathological observations and advances in cellular and molecular biology have helped us understand the process of plaque formation, progression and rupture leading to events. Several intravascular imaging techniques such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), Virtual histology IVUS (VH-IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) allow in vivo assessment of plaque burden, plaque morphology and response to therapy. In addition, non invasive assessment using coronary artery calcium (CAC) score allows risk stratification and plaque burden assessment whilst computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) allows evaluation of luminal stenosis, plaque characterisation and quantification. This review aims to summarise the results of invasive and non-invasive imaging studies of coronary atherosclerosis seen in various high-risk populations including DM, metabolic syndrome, obesity, CKD and, gender differences and ethnicity. Understanding the phenotype of plaques in various susceptible groups may allow potential development of personalised therapies. PMID:27500095

  19. Monitoring SERS-based contrast agents in atherosclerosis experimental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machtoub, Lina H.

    2011-03-01

    There have been enormous progresses in developing a class of multimodal contrast agents, which combine MRI with optical imaging. Contrast agent targeting can provide enhanced diagnostic information, allowing differentiation between variable and stable atherosclerotic plaques. Recently an intensive efforts have been working on the development of contrast agents that can improve the ability to detect and characterize atherosclerosis in clinical and preclinical applications. Earlier studies on hyperlipidemic rabbits using in vivo MRI have shown accumulation of USPIOs in plaques with a high macrophage content that induces magnetic resonance (MR) signal changes correlated to the absolute iron content in the aortic arch. A potent new class of nanoparticles contrast agents have recently drawn much attention for its wide diverse diagnostic and potential therapeutic applications particularly in monitoring the inflammatory responses. In our previous studies we have investigated SPIO contrast agents uptakes in hepatic and spleen tissues taken from NZW rabbits. The scope of this work encompasses application of an emerging hybrid imaging modality, SERSbased nonlinear optical microscopy, in investigating atherosclerosis experimental models. In this work experiments are performed on contrast treated tissue sections taken from aortic arch of atherosclerotic animal model. Marked contrast enhancement has been observed in the treated aortic sections compared with the untreated control. The obtained images are compared with immunohistochemistry .The work presented can be promising for future studies on in vivo detection of macrophages in human plaques and early detection of atherosclerotic diseases.

  20. Telomere Length and the Cancer-Atherosclerosis Trade-Off.

    PubMed

    Stone, Rivka C; Horvath, Kent; Kark, Jeremy D; Susser, Ezra; Tishkoff, Sarah A; Aviv, Abraham

    2016-07-01

    Modern humans, the longest-living terrestrial mammals, display short telomeres and repressed telomerase activity in somatic tissues compared with most short-living small mammals. The dual trait of short telomeres and repressed telomerase might render humans relatively resistant to cancer compared with short-living small mammals. However, the trade-off for cancer resistance is ostensibly increased age-related degenerative diseases, principally in the form of atherosclerosis. In this communication, we discuss (a) the genetics of human telomere length, a highly heritable complex trait that is influenced by genetic ancestry, sex, and paternal age at conception, (b) how cancer might have played a role in the evolution of telomere biology across mammals, (c) evidence that in modern humans telomere length is a determinant (rather than only a biomarker) of cancer and atherosclerosis, and (d) the potential influence of relatively recent evolutionary forces in fashioning the variation in telomere length across and within populations, and their likely lasting impact on major diseases in humans. Finally, we propose venues for future research on human telomere genetics in the context of its potential role in shaping the modern human lifespan. PMID:27386863

  1. BHUx: a patented polyherbal formulation to prevent hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Yamini B

    2009-01-01

    Since hyperlipidemia, inflammation and obesity are closely related to atherosclerosis, therefore management of these factors together would be beneficial for overall treatment approach for atherosclerosis. Although, Indian system of medicine, especially Ayurveda has several medicinal plants with proven beneficial claims towards these pathological conditions, but most of them lack enough experimental data. BHUx is a novel polyherbal formulation, consisting of 5 medicinal plants namely Termenalia arjuna, Strychnox nux vomica, Boswellia serrata, Commiphora mukul, and Semecarpus anacardium, which have history of clinical use as single or in other combinations, but these plant fractions were never tried collectively in this ratio as in BHUx, which has been found to be effective on all the etiological factors, together. In this paper, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, hypo-lipidemic, anti-proliferative properties of BHUx have been studied on several experimental models based on chemical tests, cell culture, in vitro models, and in vivo experiments with normal and transgenic animals. A separate pre-clinical toxicity study has also been carried out to prove its safety margin in therapeutic doses. Further, clinical trail of BHUx is under way, before it comes to market for public use as functional food to maintain healthy heart. This article also review some patent related to the field. PMID:19149746

  2. Imaging of coronary atherosclerosis in various susceptible groups

    PubMed Central

    Nerlekar, Nitesh; Wong, Dennis T. L.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Atherosclerosis, which is the primary pathophysiologic mechanism for the development of plaque leading to CAD, is a multifactorial process resulting from a complex interplay between genetic susceptibility and various risk factors such as hypertension (HT), dyslipidaemia, diabetes mellitus (DM) and smoking. In addition, influences from other disease states such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), obesity and the metabolic syndrome as well as gender and ethnic diversity also contribute to the disease process. Insights from pathological observations and advances in cellular and molecular biology have helped us understand the process of plaque formation, progression and rupture leading to events. Several intravascular imaging techniques such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), Virtual histology IVUS (VH-IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) allow in vivo assessment of plaque burden, plaque morphology and response to therapy. In addition, non invasive assessment using coronary artery calcium (CAC) score allows risk stratification and plaque burden assessment whilst computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) allows evaluation of luminal stenosis, plaque characterisation and quantification. This review aims to summarise the results of invasive and non-invasive imaging studies of coronary atherosclerosis seen in various high-risk populations including DM, metabolic syndrome, obesity, CKD and, gender differences and ethnicity. Understanding the phenotype of plaques in various susceptible groups may allow potential development of personalised therapies. PMID:27500095

  3. Macrophage Heterogeneity and Plasticity: Impact of Macrophage Biomarkers on Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Joselyn; Salazar, Juan; Martínez, María Sofía; Palmar, Jim; Bautista, Jordan; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Gómez, Alexis; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a global epidemic, currently representing the worldwide leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Atherosclerosis is the fundamental pathophysiologic component of CVD, where the immune system plays an essential role. Monocytes and macrophages are key mediators in this aspect: due to their heterogeneity and plasticity, these cells may act as either pro- or anti-inflammatory mediators. Indeed, monocytes may develop heterogeneous functional phenotypes depending on the predominating pro- or anti-inflammatory microenvironment within the lesion, resulting in classic, intermediate, and non-classic monocytes, each with strikingly differing features. Similarly, macrophages may also adopt heterogeneous profiles being mainly M1 and M2, the former showing a proinflammatory profile while the latter demonstrates anti-inflammatory traits; they are further subdivided in several subtypes with more specialized functions. Furthermore, macrophages may display plasticity by dynamically shifting between phenotypes in response to specific signals. Each of these distinct cell profiles is associated with diverse biomarkers which may be exploited for therapeutic intervention, including IL-10, IL-13, PPAR-γ, LXR, NLRP3 inflammasomes, and microRNAs. Direct modulation of the molecular pathways concerning these potential macrophage-related targets represents a promising field for new therapeutic alternatives in atherosclerosis and CVD. PMID:26491604

  4. Xanthine oxidoreductase in atherosclerosis pathogenesis: not only oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Battelli, Maria Giulia; Polito, Letizia; Bolognesi, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Endothelial xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) together with NAD(P)H oxidase and nitric oxide (NO) synthase plays a physiologic role in inflammatory signalling, the regulation of NO production and vascular function. The oxidative stress generated by these enzymes may induce endothelial dysfunction, leading to atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome. XOR activity creates both oxidant and anti-oxidant products that are implicated in the development of hypertension, smoking vascular injury, dyslipidemia and diabetes, which are the main risk factors of atherosclerosis. In particular, uric acid may have a protective as well as a detrimental role in vascular alterations, thus justifying the multi-directional effects of XOR inhibition. Moreover, XOR products are associated with cell differentiation, leading to adipogenesis and foam cell formation, as well as to the production of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 from arterial smooth muscle cells, after proliferation and migration. The role of XOR in adipogenesis is also connected with insulin resistance and obesity, two main features of type 2 diabetes.

  5. Lipid droplet-associated proteins in atherosclerosis (Review).

    PubMed

    Plakkal Ayyappan, Janeesh; Paul, Antoni; Goo, Young-Hwa

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation of atherosclerotic plaques in arterial walls leads to major cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Macrophages/foam cells are central components of atherosclerotic plaques, which populate the arterial wall in order to remove harmful modified low‑density lipoprotein (LDL) particles, resulting in the accumulation of lipids, mostly LDL‑derived cholesterol ester, in cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs). At present, LDs are recognized as dynamic organelles that govern cellular metabolic processes. LDs consist of an inner core of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids and free cholesterol, and contain LD‑associated proteins (LDAPs) that regulate LD functions. Foam cells are characterized by an aberrant accumulation of cytosolic LDs, and are considered a hallmark of atherosclerotic lesions through all stages of development. Previous studies have investigated the mechanisms underlying foam cell formation, aiming to discover therapeutic strategies that target foam cells and intervene against atherosclerosis. It is well established that LDAPs have a major role in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases caused by dysfunction of lipid metabolism, and several studies have linked LDAPs to the development of atherosclerosis. In this review, several foam cell‑targeting pathways have been described, with an emphasis on the role of LDAPs in cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. In addition, the potential of LDAPs as therapeutic targets to prevent the progression and/or facilitate the regression of the disease has been discussed. PMID:27082419

  6. Putative targeting of matrix metalloproteinase-8 in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shu

    2015-03-01

    There is compelling evidence indicating that some members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family play important roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and related vascular and cardiac conditions such as atherosclerotic plaque rupture leading to myocardial infarction, heart failure after myocardial infarction, neointima formation following angioplasty, and abdominal aortic aneurysm. Studies have shown that administration of MMP inhibitors can deter some of these conditions in experimental animal models, but few pertinent human clinical trials have been reported to date. Clinical studies of broad-spectrum MMP inhibitors in cancers and arthritis, however, have reported considerable side effects that are likely to be related to the lack of selectivity of these inhibitors. Since different members of the MMP family can have divergent and even opposing functions, it is believed that selective MMP inhibitors that specifically target particular MMPs that are key in the disease pathogenesis will likely have greater efficacy and less adverse effects. In recent years there has been accumulating evidence indicating an important role of MMP8 in atherosclerosis and the associated conditions mentioned above. This article will review findings from studies examining MMP8 in relation to these conditions and discuss rationale of targeting MMP8 as a potential therapeutic strategy.

  7. Fish consumption and early atherosclerosis in middle-aged men.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Ueno, Yoshiki; Tamaki, Shinji; Kadowaki, Takashi; Okamura, Tomonori; Kita, Yoshikuni; Miyamatsu, Naomi; Sekikawa, Akira; Takamiya, Tomoko; El-Saed, Aiman; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2007-08-01

    To investigate the association between fish consumption and early atherosclerosis, we analyzed the relationship between fish consumption and average intima-media thickness (AveIMT) by carotid ultrasound in middle-aged Japanese men. Participants were 250 randomly selected, community-based Japanese men aged 40 to 49 years without a prior history of cardiovascular disease. AveIMT was calculated from the mean of 1-cm lengths of both the right and the left carotid arteries at 8 locations. A lifestyle survey was carried out using a self-administered questionnaire including the frequency of fish intake. There were 147 men in the fewer than 4 times per week fish consumption group and 103 men in the 4 or more times per week group. The mean AveIMT was significantly higher in the low fish consumption group than in the high fish consumption group (0.623+/-0.068 vs 0.605+/-0.065 mm, P=.03). After adjustment for age, waist circumference, pack-years of smoking, alcohol consumption, diabetes, and lipid-lowering medications, the significant difference in the AveIMT between the 2 groups remained. However, after further adjustment for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and C-reactive protein in the model, the significant difference disappeared. Fish consumption may be protective against early atherosclerosis in middle-aged men, probably through its beneficial effects on inflammation.

  8. Characterization of systemic metabolic phenotypes associated with subclinical atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Würtz, Peter; Soininen, Pasi; Kangas, Antti J; Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; Groop, Per-Henrik; Savolainen, Markku J; Juonala, Markus; Viikari, Jorma S; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli T; Ala-Korpela, Mika

    2011-02-01

    Detailed molecular phenotyping gives insight into disease mechanisms and can individualize medical practice for improved risk assessment and treatment. We show in an epidemiological study (n = 4309) that the multi-metabolic profiles obtained by serum NMR metabonomics inherently associate with the extent of atherosclerosis already in preclinical stages. Data-driven analysis of the spectral profiles of healthy, young adults revealed three distinct metabolic phenotypes associated with high carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), a surrogate marker of cardiovascular disease. The phenotypes were characterized by varying combinations of well-known metabolic disturbances like elevated VLDL and LDL and low HDL levels. Low IMT was also associated with distinct metabolic phenotypes with lipoprotein as well as other biochemical characteristics partly opposing those found for the high IMT phenotypes. Profiles of low-molecular-weight metabolites quantified from the experimentation were also characteristic for the metabolic phenotypes and substantiate developments toward the use of multi-metabolic risk phenotypes. The methodology can be taken as a direct extension for the routine analytics used for the risk assessment of atherosclerosis; quantification of metabolites will complement and might even replace conventional lipid measurements. Serum NMR metabonomics is therefore anticipated as a rational option for comprehensive cardiovascular risk assessment.

  9. Update on medical management of dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ginter, E; Simko, V

    2013-01-01

    Scientific achievements revealing the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis resulted in the second half of the 20th century in major improvement in prevention and therapy of cardiovascular disorders (CVD). Essential became the understanding of a critical pathogenetic role of the low-density lipoproteins (LDL), mainly their oxidized form (oxLDL) and also the protective potential of the high-density lipoproteins (HDL). CVD is now regarded to be an inflammatory disease in which a systemic inflammatory reaction is combined with an accumulation of immune cells in atherosclerotic plaques. Higher intake of antioxidants in fruit and vegetable, life style modifications, cessation of smoking, physical exercise and introduction of medications that lower LDL and promote HDL (statins, niacin and fibrates) resulted in a substantial decline of the killer effect of unmanaged CVD. In the United Kingdom the male CVD mortality declined between 1970 and 2009 from 700 to 200 deaths per 100,000. In France, CVD mortality in the middle age population (25-64 years) is now responsible for death in only 15 % men and in 11 % women. Unfortunately, in many parts of the world CVD mortality remains a prominent population scourge. Recent discoveries, especially on the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) and antisense compounds used in addition to established anti-atherogenic medications, promise further gains in the fight against atherosclerosis (Fig. 4, Ref. 54).

  10. Circulating Endothelial Microparticles: A Key Hallmark of Atherosclerosis Progression

    PubMed Central

    Panth, Nisha; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    The levels of circulating microparticles (MPs) are raised in various cardiovascular diseases. Their increased level in plasma is regarded as a biomarker of alteration in vascular function. The prominent MPs present in blood are endothelial microparticles (EMPs) described as complex submicron (0.1 to 1.0 μm) vesicles like structure, released in response to endothelium cell activation or apoptosis. EMPs possess both physiological and pathological effects and may promote oxidative stress and vascular inflammation. EMPs release is triggered by inducer like angiotensin II, lipopolysaccharide, and hydrogen peroxide leading to the progression of atherosclerosis. However, there are multiple physiological pathways for EMPs generation like NADPH oxidase derived endothelial ROS formation, Rho kinase pathway, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Endothelial dysfunction is a key initiating event in atherosclerotic plaque formation. Atheroemboli, resulting from ruptured carotid plaques, is a major cause of stroke. Increasing evidence suggests that EMPs play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, acting as a marker of damage, either exacerbating disease progression or triggering a repair response. In this regard, it has been suggested that EMPs have the potential to act as biomarkers of disease status. This review aims to provide updated information of EMPs in relation to atherosclerosis pathogenesis. PMID:27066292

  11. Zebrafish models of dyslipidemia: Relevance to atherosclerosis and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Longhou; Liu, Chao; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Lipid and lipoprotein metabolism in zebrafish and in humans are remarkably similar. Zebrafish express all major nuclear receptors, lipid transporters, apolipoproteins and enzymes involved in lipoprotein metabolism. Unlike mice, zebrafish express cetp and the Cetp activity is detected in zebrafish plasma. Feeding zebrafish a high cholesterol diet, without any genetic intervention, results in significant hypercholesterolemia and robust lipoprotein oxidation, making zebrafish an attractive animal model to study mechanisms relevant to early development of human atherosclerosis. These studies are facilitated by the optical transparency of zebrafish larvae and the availability of transgenic zebrafish expressing fluorescent proteins in endothelial cells and macrophages. Thus, vascular processes can be monitored in live animals. In this review article we discuss recent advances in using dyslipidemic zebrafish in atherosclerosis-related studies. We also summarize recent work connecting lipid metabolism with regulation of angiogenesis, the work that considerably benefited from using the zebrafish model. These studies uncovered the role of aibp, abca1, abcg1, mtp, apoB and apoC2 in regulation of angiogenesis in zebrafish and paved the way for future studies in mammals, which may suggest new therapeutic approaches to modulation of excessive or diminished angiogenesis contributing to the pathogenesis of human disease. PMID:24095954

  12. Lipid droplet-associated proteins in atherosclerosis (Review)

    PubMed Central

    AYYAPPAN, JANEESH PLAKKAL; PAUL, ANTONI; GOO, YOUNG-HWA

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of atherosclerotic plaques in arterial walls leads to major cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Macrophages/foam cells are central components of atherosclerotic plaques, which populate the arterial wall in order to remove harmful modified low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles, resulting in the accumulation of lipids, mostly LDL-derived cholesterol ester, in cytosolic lipid droplets (LDs). At present, LDs are recognized as dynamic organelles that govern cellular metabolic processes. LDs consist of an inner core of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids and free cholesterol, and contain LD-associated proteins (LDAPs) that regulate LD functions. Foam cells are characterized by an aberrant accumulation of cytosolic LDs, and are considered a hallmark of atherosclerotic lesions through all stages of development. Previous studies have investigated the mechanisms underlying foam cell formation, aiming to discover therapeutic strategies that target foam cells and intervene against atherosclerosis. It is well established that LDAPs have a major role in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases caused by dysfunction of lipid metabolism, and several studies have linked LDAPs to the development of atherosclerosis. In this review, several foam cell-targeting pathways have been described, with an emphasis on the role of LDAPs in cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. In addition, the potential of LDAPs as therapeutic targets to prevent the progression and/or facilitate the regression of the disease has been discussed. PMID:27082419

  13. Aortic smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis in relation to atherosclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, I.J.

    1989-01-01

    Proteoglycans (PG) are implicated in atherogenesis by their effects on tissue permeability and cell proliferation and their interaction with plasma low density lipoproteins. Using the pigeon model in which an atherosclerosis-susceptible (WC) and -resistant (SR) breed can be compared, PG synthesis by cultured aortic smooth muscle cells was examined by the use of ({sup 35}S)-sodium sulfate and ({sup 3}H)-serine or ({sup 3}H)-glucosamine as labeling precursors. In both SR and WC cells, the majority of newly synthesized PG were secreted into the media. Chondroitin sulfate (CS) PG and dermatan sulfate (DS) PG were the major PG produced. Total PG production was consistently lower in WC compared to SR cultures due in part to reduce PG synthesis but also to degradation of newly synthesized PG. Since increased DS-PG accompanines atherosclerosis progression, experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that macrophages modulate smooth muscle cell metabolism to cause increase DS-PG production. Cultured WC aortic smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1 and the production of PG examined. Increasing concentration of conditioned media from both types of macrophages caused increased incorporation of {sup 35}S-sulfate into secreted PG, but no change in cell-associated PG. Lipopolysaccharide activation of P388D1 cells enhanced the effect.

  14. Telomere Length and the Cancer–Atherosclerosis Trade-Off

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Rivka C.; Horvath, Kent; Kark, Jeremy D.; Susser, Ezra; Tishkoff, Sarah A.; Aviv, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Modern humans, the longest-living terrestrial mammals, display short telomeres and repressed telomerase activity in somatic tissues compared with most short-living small mammals. The dual trait of short telomeres and repressed telomerase might render humans relatively resistant to cancer compared with short-living small mammals. However, the trade-off for cancer resistance is ostensibly increased age-related degenerative diseases, principally in the form of atherosclerosis. In this communication, we discuss (a) the genetics of human telomere length, a highly heritable complex trait that is influenced by genetic ancestry, sex, and paternal age at conception, (b) how cancer might have played a role in the evolution of telomere biology across mammals, (c) evidence that in modern humans telomere length is a determinant (rather than only a biomarker) of cancer and atherosclerosis, and (d) the potential influence of relatively recent evolutionary forces in fashioning the variation in telomere length across and within populations, and their likely lasting impact on major diseases in humans. Finally, we propose venues for future research on human telomere genetics in the context of its potential role in shaping the modern human lifespan. PMID:27386863

  15. Cough suppression disorders spectrum.

    PubMed

    Reich, Jerome M

    2014-02-01

    Volitional cough suppression, identified exclusively in females, is an unusual causal mechanism for instances of lobar atalectasis and bronchiectasis. It is a postulated mechanism for the genesis of Lady Windermere Syndrome.

  16. Anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic role of BMP receptor II in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Simic, Tatjana

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation of: Kim CW, Song H, Kumar S et al. Anti-inflammatory and anti-atherogenic role of BMP receptor II in endothelial cells. Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. 33, 1350-1359 (2013). Increased expression of BMPs in atherosclerosis suggested that the knockdown of the receptor mediating BMP action would prevent endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis. Based on this hypothesis, Kim et al. performed a series of experiments in which the effect of BMP receptor type II (BMPRII) knockout was tested in in vitro and in vivo models of atherogenesis. Unexpectedly, they found that the loss of BMPRII induces endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis. Knockdown of BMPRII in endothelial cells induced monocyte adhesion through the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. The loss of BMPRII induced endothelial inflammation and atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice. Besides, BMPRII expression was gradually lost over the course of atherosclerosis progression in human coronary arteries. PMID:24020661

  17. Role of inflammatory cells and toll-like receptors in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, Anusha N; Monaco, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The primary cause of cerebrovascular disease is atherosclerosis, to which many factors contribute. At first many saw atherosclerosis as a lipid-driven disease. Recently inflammation has appeared as a significant factor in the disease. Innate immune cells, for example monocytes and macrophages, are important in atherosclerosis. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the best-studied family of receptor in the immune system. TLR engagement with their ligands stimulates pro-inflammatory cytokine production and foam cell generation. Recently certain TLRs have shown a protective role in atherosclerosis. In this review, we analyse innate immunity, focusing on TLR signalling and macrophages, in atherosclerosis and acute cerebrovascular complications, and thereby discuss their potential as therapeutic targets.

  18. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  19. 75 FR 63488 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event Surveillance SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D... Collection: Title: Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Event Surveillance. Type of Information... disease (CVD)-- that is, atherosclerosis and other forms of CVD that have not produced signs and...

  20. Piperlongumine inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by suppressing PDGF receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Dong Ju; Kim, Soo Yeon; Han, Seong Su; Kim, Chan Woo; Kumar, Sandeep; Park, Byeoung Soo; Lee, Sung Eun; Yun, Yeo Pyo; Jo, Hanjoong; Park, Young Hyun

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-atherogenic effect of PL was examined using partial carotid ligation model in ApoE KO mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL prevented atherosclerotic plaque development, VSMCs proliferation, and NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Piperlongumine reduced vascular smooth muscle cell activation through PDGF-R{beta} and NF-{kappa}B-signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for atherosclerosis treatment. -- Abstract: Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL) is an alkaloid found in the long pepper (Piper longum L.) and has well-documented anti-platelet aggregation, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties; however, the role of PL in prevention of atherosclerosis is unknown. We evaluated the anti-atherosclerotic potential of PL in an in vivo murine model of accelerated atherosclerosis and defined its mechanism of action in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Local treatment with PL significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque formation as well as proliferation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation in an in vivo setting. PL treatment in VSMCs in vitro showed inhibition of migration and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)-induced proliferation to the in vivo findings. We further identified that PL inhibited PDGF-BB-induced PDGF receptor beta activation and suppressed downstream signaling molecules such as phospholipase C{gamma}1, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and Akt. Lastly, PL significantly attenuated activation of NF-{kappa}B-a downstream transcriptional regulator in PDGF receptor signaling, in response to PDGF-BB stimulation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a novel, therapeutic mechanism by which PL suppresses atherosclerosis plaque formation in vivo.

  1. Intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography imaging of coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Costopoulos, Charis; Brown, Adam J; Teng, Zhongzhao; Hoole, Stephen P; West, Nick E J; Samady, Habib; Bennett, Martin R

    2016-01-01

    Invasive imaging modalities, in particular intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT), have become established tools for the in vivo study of coronary atherosclerosis. Their use in clinical studies has confirmed histopathological observations that certain important plaque features, such as thin fibrous caps and large lipid cores, are associated with plaque rupture, the precipitating event for the majority of myocardial infarctions. Serial imaging studies have also successfully been used for the evaluation of potential disease modifying pharmacological agents. Recent prospective IVUS studies have confirmed specific baseline imaging features associated with subsequent adverse clinical outcomes, although absolute event rates were too low for clinical utility. Development of hybrid IVUS-OCT imaging or integration of novel techniques, including near-infrared spectroscopy, plaque structural and endothelial shear stress, have great potential to improve our current ability to identify and stratify atheromatous plaques at risk of rupture.

  2. LOX-1-Mediated Effects on Vascular Cells in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-01-01

    In healthy arteries, expression of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is almost undetectable. However, in proatherogenic conditions, LOX-1 is markedly up-regulated in vascular cells. In atherosclerosis, LOX-1 appears to be the key scavenger receptor for binding oxidized LDL (oxLDL). Notably, a positive feedback exists between LOX-1 and oxLDL. LOX-1 is involved in mediating of proatherosclerotic effects of oxLDL which result in endothelial dysfunction, proinflammatory recruitment of monocytes into the arterial intima, formation of foam cells, apoptosis of endothelial cells (ECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), as well as in plaque destabilization and rupture. In this review, we consider effects of the LOX-1/oxLDL axis on several types of vascular cells such as ECs, VSMCs, and macrophages. PMID:27160316

  3. Prediction of cardiovascular outcomes by imaging coronary atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pathan, Faraz

    2016-01-01

    Over the last two decades, several invasive and non-invasive coronary atherosclerosis imaging modalities have emerged as predictors of cardiovascular outcomes in at-risk population. These modalities have demonstrated independent or incremental prognostic information over existing/standard risk stratification schemes, such as the Framingham risk score (FRS), by identifying characteristics of coronary artery diseases (CADs). In this review, we begin with discussing the importance of pre-test probability and quality of outcome measure, followed by specific findings of each modality in relation to prognosis. We focused on both short and long term prognostic aspects of coronary computed tomography (CT) (including coronary calcium score and coronary angiography) and magnetic resonance imaging as non-invasive tools, as well as invasive modalities including intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), optical coherence tomography (OCT), near infrared spectroscopy and Angioscopy. PMID:27500091

  4. Noninvasive Molecular Imaging of Disease Activity in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dweck, Marc R; Aikawa, Elena; Newby, David E; Tarkin, Jason M; Rudd, James H F; Narula, Jagat; Fayad, Zahi A

    2016-07-01

    Major focus has been placed on the identification of vulnerable plaques as a means of improving the prediction of myocardial infarction. However, this strategy has recently been questioned on the basis that the majority of these individual coronary lesions do not in fact go on to cause clinical events. Attention is, therefore, shifting to alternative imaging modalities that might provide a more complete pan-coronary assessment of the atherosclerotic disease process. These include markers of disease activity with the potential to discriminate between patients with stable burnt-out disease that is no longer metabolically active and those with active atheroma, faster disease progression, and increased risk of infarction. This review will examine how novel molecular imaging approaches can provide such assessments, focusing on inflammation and microcalcification activity, the importance of these processes to coronary atherosclerosis, and the advantages and challenges posed by these techniques. PMID:27390335

  5. Emerging Roles of GPER in Diabetes and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Matthias; Prossnitz, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) is a 7-transmembrane receptor implicated in rapid estrogen signaling. Originally cloned from vascular endothelial cells, GPER plays a central role in the regulation of vascular tone and cell growth, as well as lipid and glucose homeostasis. This review highlights our knowledge of the physiological and pathophysiological functions of GPER in the pancreas, peripheral and immune tissues, and the arterial vasculature. Recent findings of its roles in obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis, including the GPER-dependent regulation of lipid metabolism and inflammation, are presented. The therapeutic potential of targeting GPER-dependent pathways in chronic diseases such as coronary artery disease and diabetes and in the context of menopause is also discussed. PMID:25767029

  6. [Optimization of organizational approaches to management of patients with atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Barbarash, L S; Barbarash, O L; Artamonova, G V; Sumin, A N

    2014-01-01

    Despite undoubted achievements of modern cardiology in prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis, cardiologists, neurologists, and vascular surgeons are still facing severe stenotic atherosclerotic lesions in different vascular regions, both symptomatic and asymptomatic. As a rule hemodynamically significant stenoses of different locations are found after development of acute vascular events. In this regard, active detection of arterial stenoses localized in different areas just at primary contact of patients presenting with symptoms of ischemia of various locations with care providers appears to be crucial. Further monitoring of these stenoses is also important. The article is dedicated to innovative organizational approaches to provision of healthcare to patients suffering from circulatory system diseases that have contributed to improvement of demographic situation in Kuzbass.

  7. Venous thromboembolism has the same risk factors as atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Yuhong; Yan, Shufeng; Lu, Yanhui; Liang, Ying; Li, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Previous studies have shown that idiopathic pulmonary embolism is positively associated with other cardiovascular events, such as myocardial infarction and stroke, suggesting a potentially important association between atherosclerosis risk factors and venous thromboembolism (VTE). We performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the correlation between risk factors for atherosclerosis and VTE. Methods: In December 2014, we searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for studies evaluating the associations between VTE and risk factors for atherosclerosis and pooled outcome data using random-effects meta-analysis. In addition, we analyzed publication bias. Results: Thirty-three case-control and cohort studies with a total of 185,124 patients met the inclusion criteria. We found that participants with body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m2 had a significantly higher prevalence of VTE than those with BMI <30 kg/m2 in both case-control studies (odds ratio [OR] = 2.45, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.78–3.35) and cohort studies (relative risk [RR] = 2.39, 95% CI: 1.79–3.17). VTE was more prevalent in patients with hypertension than without hypertension (OR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.06–1.84; RR = 1.36, 95% CI: 1.11–1.67). The findings were similar for VTE prevalence between patients with and without diabetes (OR = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.17–2.69; RR = 1.41, 95% CI: 1.20–1.66). Current smoking was significantly associated with VTE prevalence in case-control studies (OR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.01–1.77), but not in cohort studies (RR = 1.29, 95% CI: 0.96–1.72). In addition, we found that total cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were significantly higher in patients with VTE than without VTE (weighted mean differences [WMD] = 8.94 mg/dL, 95% CI: 3.52–14.35 mg/dL, and WMD = 14.00 mg/dL, 95% CI: 8.85–19.16 mg/dL, respectively). High-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations were significantly lower in patients with VTE

  8. Cathepsins and cystatin C in atherosclerosis and obesity.

    PubMed

    Lafarge, Jean-Charles; Naour, Nadia; Clément, Karine; Guerre-Millo, Michèle

    2010-11-01

    Given the increasing prevalence of human obesity worldwide, there is an urgent need for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms linking obesity to metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Our knowledge is nevertheless limited regarding molecules linking adipose tissue to downstream complications. The importance of cathepsins was brought to light in this context. Through a large scale transcriptomic analysis, our group recently identified the gene encoding cathepsin S as one of the most deregulated gene in the adipose tissue of obese subjects and positively correlated with body mass index. Other members of the cathepsin family are expressed in the adipose tissue, including cathepsin K and cathepsin L. Given their implication in atherogenesis, these proteases could participate into the well established deleterious relationship between enlarged adipose tissue and increased cardiovascular risk. Here, we review the clinical and experimental evidence relevant to the role of cathepsins K, L and S and their most abundant endogenous inhibitor, cystatin C, in atherosclerosis and in obesity.

  9. Dynamic Aspects of Macrophage Polarization during Atherosclerosis Progression and Regression

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Michael; Fisher, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that macrophages in many contexts in vitro and in vivo display a spectrum of inflammatory features and functional properties. A convenient system to group together different subsets of macrophages has been the M1 (inflammatory)/M2 (anti-inflammatory) classification. In addition to other sites of inflammation, it is now established that atherosclerotic plaques contain both M1 and M2 macrophages. We review results made possible by a number of recent mouse models of atherosclerotic regression that, taken with other literature, have shown the M1/M2 balance in plaques to be dynamic, with M1 predominating in disease progression and M2 in regression. The regulation of the macrophage phenotype in plaques and the functional consequences of the M1 and M2 states in atherosclerosis will also be discussed. PMID:25429291

  10. Atherosclerosis in psoriatic disease: latest evidence and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Lihi; Gladman, Dafna D.

    2015-01-01

    It is widely accepted that atherosclerosis is caused by chronic low-grade inflammation that results from an interaction between immune mechanisms and metabolic abnormalities within the vessel wall. Population-based studies have found an increased cardiovascular risk in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). This risk is higher in patients with severe disease phenotypes, such as those with severe psoriasis and with musculoskeletal inflammation. Higher levels of inflammatory biomarkers also predict the development of clinical cardiovascular events in these patients. The effect of medications used for PsA on cardiovascular risk is limited to observational studies. Antitumor necrosis factor agents and methotrexate have been associated with reduced cardiovascular risk. These data highlight the importance of screening for cardiovascular risk factors in these patients. PMID:26425147

  11. Are Genetic Tests for Atherosclerosis Ready for Routine Clinical Use?

    PubMed

    Paynter, Nina P; Ridker, Paul M; Chasman, Daniel I

    2016-02-19

    In this review, we lay out 3 areas currently being evaluated for incorporation of genetic information into clinical practice related to atherosclerosis. The first, familial hypercholesterolemia, is the clearest case for utility of genetic testing in diagnosis and potentially guiding treatment. Already in use for confirmatory testing of familial hypercholesterolemia and for cascade screening of relatives, genetic testing is likely to expand to help establish diagnoses and facilitate research related to most effective therapies, including new agents, such as PCSK9 inhibitors. The second area, adding genetic information to cardiovascular risk prediction for primary prevention, is not currently recommended. Although identification of additional variants may add substantially to prediction in the future, combining known variants has not yet demonstrated sufficient improvement in prediction for incorporation into commonly used risk scores. The third area, pharmacogenetics, has utility for some therapies today. Future utility for pharmacogenetics will wax or wane depending on the nature of available drugs and therapeutic strategies.

  12. Prenatal Arsenic Exposure Alters Gene Expression in the Adult Liver to a Proinflammatory State Contributing to Accelerated Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    States, J. Christopher; Singh, Amar V.; Knudsen, Thomas B.; Rouchka, Eric C.; Ngalame, Ntube O.; Arteel, Gavin E.; Piao, Yulan; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which environmental toxicants alter developmental processes predisposing individuals to adult onset chronic disease are not well-understood. Transplacental arsenic exposure promotes atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE−/−) mice. Because the liver plays a central role in atherosclerosis, diabetes and metabolic syndrome, we hypothesized that accelerated atherosclerosis may be linked to altered hepatic development. This hypothesis was tested in ApoE−/− mice exposed to 49 ppm arsenic in utero from gestational day (GD) 8 to term. GD18 hepatic arsenic was 1.2 µg/g in dams and 350 ng/g in fetuses. The hepatic transcriptome was evaluated by microarray analysis to assess mRNA and microRNA abundance in control and exposed pups at postnatal day (PND) 1 and PND70. Arsenic exposure altered postnatal developmental trajectory of mRNA and microRNA profiles. We identified an arsenic exposure related 51-gene signature at PND1 and PND70 with several hubs of interaction (Hspa8, IgM and Hnf4a). Gene ontology (GO) annotation analyses indicated that pathways for gluconeogenesis and glycolysis were suppressed in exposed pups at PND1, and pathways for protein export, ribosome, antigen processing and presentation, and complement and coagulation cascades were induced by PND70. Promoter analysis of differentially-expressed transcripts identified enriched transcription factor binding sites and clustering to common regulatory sites. SREBP1 binding sites were identified in about 16% of PND70 differentially-expressed genes. Western blot analysis confirmed changes in the liver at PND70 that included increases of heat shock protein 70 (Hspa8) and active SREBP1. Plasma AST and ALT levels were increased at PND70. These results suggest that transplacental arsenic exposure alters developmental programming in fetal liver, leading to an enduring stress and proinflammatory response postnatally that may contribute to early onset of atherosclerosis. Genes containing

  13. Soluble epoxide hydrolase is involved in the development of atherosclerosis and arterial neointima formation by regulating smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingjie; Huo, Leijun; He, Jinlong; Ding, Wenshuang; Su, Hang; Tian, Dongping; Welch, Carrie; Hammock, Bruce D; Ai, Ding; Zhu, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) have beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease. Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) metabolizes EETs to less active diols, thus diminishing their biological activity. sEH inhibitors can suppress the progression of atherosclerotic lesions in animal models. However, the regulation of sEH in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and role of sEH in patients with atherosclerosis have not been evaluated. We hypothesize that sEH in VSMCs plays a pivotal role in atherosclerosis and injury-induced neointima formation. In this study, sEH expression in human autopsy atherosclerotic plaque was determined by immunohistochemistry. In cultured rat and human VSMCs, the phenotypic switching marker and sEH expression induced by platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) were examined by Western blot analysis. Carotid-artery balloon injury was performed after adenovirus-mediated overexpression of sEH or oral administration of a potent sEH inhibitor in Sprague-Dawley rats. sEH was highly expressed in VSMCs of the intima and media within human atherosclerotic plaque. In vitro, PDGF-BB upregulated the expression in VSMCs after transcription and promoted cell proliferation and migration; the latter effect could be largely attenuated by an sEH inhibitor. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of sEH could mimic the effect of PDGF-BB and induce VSMC proliferation and migration. In vivo, the sEH inhibitor led to a significant decrease in injury-induced neointima formation in a rat carotid-artery injury model. These data establish the effect of sEH expression on atherosclerotic progression and vascular remodeling after injury, thus identifying a novel integrative role for sEH in VSMC phenotypic modulation and migration. Blocking sEH activity may be a potential therapeutic approach for ameliorating vascular occlusive disease.

  14. Explosion suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Sapko, Michael J.; Cortese, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  15. Metabolic Syndrome and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Patients Infected with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Mangili, Alexandra; Jacobson, Denise L.; Gerrior, Jul; Polak, Joseph F.; Gorbach, Sherwood L.; Wanke, Christine A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The present study examines the association between carotid and coronary atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected adults. Methods We measured the common and internal carotid intima-media thickness (c-IMT) using B-mode ultrasonography, and we measured coronary artery calcium (CAC) using high-resolution, electrocardiographic, synchronized, computed tomography, for 314 HIV-infected men and women. Metabolic syndrome was defined by National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. We compared the c-IMT measurements and CAC scores of patients with metabolic syndrome with the scores of those without metabolic syndrome using a Wilcoxon test for continuous variables and a χ2 test for categorical variables. To examine the association between surrogate markers and metabolic syndrome, we used logistic regression analysis. Results Participants with metabolic syndrome were more likely to have a common c-IMT measurement >0.8 mm than were those without metabolic syndrome (17% vs.7%; P=.009), but both groups were equally likely to have an internal c-IMT measurement >1.0 mm (20% vs. 13%; P=.15). Any positive CAC score was more likely to occur for participants with metabolic syndrome (80.3% vs. 46.7%; P < .0001). In a multivariate model adjusted for sex, age, ethnicity, and smoking status, participants with metabolic syndrome were more likely than those without metabolic syndrome to have an abnormal common c-IMT measurement (odds ratio [OR], 2.9; P= .020) and detectable CAC scores (OR, 4.9; P < .0001) but not a higher internal c-IMT measurement (OR, 1.6; P=.255). Conclusion Our study demonstrates that HIV-infected individuals with metabolic syndrome may be at increased risk for subclinical atherosclerosis and supports screening for metabolic syndrome among HIV-infected patients at risk for cardiovascular disease. PMID:17443477

  16. Losartan alleviates hyperuricemia-induced atherosclerosis in a rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hongchao; Li, Ning; Ding, Yueyou; Miao, Peizhi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of losartan on hyperuricemia-induced aortic atherosclerosis, in an experimental rabbit model. Methods: Male rabbits (n = 48) were divided into control, hyperuricemia (HU), hypercholesterolemia + hyperuricemia (HC + HU) and high-purine with 30-mg/kg/d losartan (HU + losartan) groups. Serum uric acid (UA) and plasma renin and angiotensin II activities were determined. Aortic tissue specimens were analyzed for histological changes and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Liver tissues were sampled for quantitative analyses of liver low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) mRNA and protein via reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Results: After 12 weeks, serum UA and plasma renin and plasma angiotensin II activities were enhanced in the HU and HU + HC groups (P < 0.001) compared to the control, whereas in the HU + losartan group plasma renin activity was not different and serum UA concentrations as well as plasma angiotensin II activity were moderately enhanced (P < 0.05). Smooth muscle cell (SMC) PCNA expression increased strongly in the HU and HU + HC groups (P < 0.001), but was less pronounced in the HU + losartan group. In contrast, transcription and expression of LDLR mRNA and protein were significantly higher in the control and HU + losartan groups compared to the HU and HU + HC groups. Both the HU and HU + HC groups had elevated intima thickness and intima areas compared to the control and HU + losartan groups. Conclusions: Losartan can alleviate experimental atherosclerosis induced by hyperuricemia. PMID:26617751

  17. Recent advances in pathogenesis, assessment, and treatment of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Spence, J David

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there have been a number of advances in the pathogenesis and treatment of atherosclerosis and in assessing prognosis in carotid atherosclerosis. Risk stratification to improve vascular prevention by identifying patients most likely to benefit from intensive therapy is much improved by measuring carotid plaque burden. In patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis, a number of modalities can be used to identify the 10-15% who could benefit from endarterectomy or stenting. Transcranial Doppler embolus detection, echolucency and ulceration on 3D ultrasound, intraplaque hemorrhage on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and reduced cerebrovascular reserve are useful already; new approaches including plaque texture on ultrasound and imaging of plaque inflammation and early calcification on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) are in development. The discovery that the intestinal microbiome produces vasculotoxic metabolites from dietary constituents such as carnitine in meat (particularly red meat) and phosphatidylcholine from egg yolk and other sources has revolutionized nutritional aspects of vascular prevention. Because many of these vasculotoxic metabolites are removed by the kidney, it is particularly important in patients with renal failure to limit their intake of red meat and egg yolk. A new approach to lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by blocking the action of an enzyme that destroys LDL receptors promises to revolutionize vascular prevention once less costly treatments are developed, and a new approach to vascular prevention-"treating arteries instead of risk factors"-shows promise but requires randomized trials. These advances all promise to help in the quest to prevent strokes in high-risk patients. PMID:27540477

  18. Recent advances in pathogenesis, assessment, and treatment of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Spence, J. David

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there have been a number of advances in the pathogenesis and treatment of atherosclerosis and in assessing prognosis in carotid atherosclerosis. Risk stratification to improve vascular prevention by identifying patients most likely to benefit from intensive therapy is much improved by measuring carotid plaque burden. In patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis, a number of modalities can be used to identify the 10-15% who could benefit from endarterectomy or stenting. Transcranial Doppler embolus detection, echolucency and ulceration on 3D ultrasound, intraplaque hemorrhage on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and reduced cerebrovascular reserve are useful already; new approaches including plaque texture on ultrasound and imaging of plaque inflammation and early calcification on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) are in development. The discovery that the intestinal microbiome produces vasculotoxic metabolites from dietary constituents such as carnitine in meat (particularly red meat) and phosphatidylcholine from egg yolk and other sources has revolutionized nutritional aspects of vascular prevention. Because many of these vasculotoxic metabolites are removed by the kidney, it is particularly important in patients with renal failure to limit their intake of red meat and egg yolk. A new approach to lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol by blocking the action of an enzyme that destroys LDL receptors promises to revolutionize vascular prevention once less costly treatments are developed, and a new approach to vascular prevention—“treating arteries instead of risk factors”—shows promise but requires randomized trials. These advances all promise to help in the quest to prevent strokes in high-risk patients. PMID:27540477

  19. Association of Anxiety with Resistance Vessel Dysfunction in Human Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Stillman, Ashley N.; Moser, David J.; Fiedorowicz, Jess; Robinson, Heather M.; Haynes, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Anxiety predicts cardiovascular events, though the mechanism remains unclear. We hypothesized that anxious symptoms will correlate with impaired resistance and conduit vessel function in participants aged 55–90 years. Method Anxious symptoms were measured with the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised in 89 participants with clinically diagnosed atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and 54 healthy control participants. Vascular function was measured in conduit arteries using brachial flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and in forearm resistance vessels (FRV) using intra-arterial drug administration and plethysmography. Results Anxious symptoms were not associated with FMD in either group. Participants with atherosclerosis exhibited significant inverse associations of anxious symptoms with FRV dilatation (β for acetylcholine =−0.302, p=0.004). Adjustment for medication, risk factors and depressive symptoms did not alter the association between anxiety and FRV dysfunction, except for BMI (anxiety β=−0.175, p=0.060; BMI β=−0.494, p<0.001). While BMI was more strongly associated with FRV function than anxiety, combined BMI and anxiety accounted for more variance in FRV function than either separately. Control participants showed no association of anxiety with FRV function. Conclusion Anxiety is uniquely and substantially related to poorer resistance vessel function (both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle function) in individuals with atherosclerosis. These relationships were independent of medication, depression and cardiovascular risk factors, with the exception of BMI. These findings support the concept that anxiety potentially increases vascular events through worsening of vascular function in atherosclerotic disease. PMID:23788697

  20. Aliskiren Inhibits Neointimal Matrix Metalloproteinases in Experimental Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao-Cheng; Lee, Chiu-Yang; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in atherosclerosis. Acting via the angiotensin II receptor, type 1, oxidative stress increases and contributes to endothelial dysfunction and vascular inflammation. Renin exerts effects through a renin receptor causing an increase in the efficiency of angiotensinogen cleavage and facilitates angiotensin II (Ang II) generation and action on cell surfaces. Ang II enhances proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells, indicating a direct involvement of the RAS in smooth muscle cell proliferation during neointimal formation. Aliskiren, a direct renin inhibitor, is a new oral antihypertensive drug. However, the role of the direct renin inhibitor in neointimal formation and vascular matrix metalloproteinases remains unclear. Methods To investigate the effects of aliskiren on the expression of vascular matrix metalloproteinases, we evaluated the aortic neointimal formation of high-cholesterol-fed animals after vascular injury in vivo and the cellular function of the tumor necrosis factor-α stimulated human aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro. Thereafter, we evaluated vascular expression (by western blot), activity (by gelatin zymography) and molecular pathway. Results In this study we demonstrated that aliskiren reduced neointimal hyperplasia in hypercholesterolemic rabbits after vascular injury and the expression of matrix metalloproteinases in the neointima. Aliskiren also inhibited the expression and activities of matrix metalloproteinases on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-stimulated human aortic smooth muscle cells via the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Conclusions The present study showed that aliskiren inhibited the expression of vascular matrix metalloproteinases. With these results, we have better clarified the potential role of renin inhibitors in human atherosclerosis. PMID:27713608

  1. Gr-1⁺CD11b⁺ immature myeloid cells (IMC) promote resistance of pro-inflammatory T cells to suppression by regulatory T cells in atherosclerotic Apo E- deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yulin; Jian, Ying; Liu, Minjie; Zhong, Liang; Zhang, Fang; Yang, Weifeng; Xu, Zhao; Chen, Guofan; Liu, Yuhua

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that both defects in Treg numbers and/or function as well as resistance of effector T cells to suppression may contribute to the development of human chronic inflammatory diseases. However, which mechanism involved in the progression of atherosclerosis remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the production and function of CD4⁺ inflammatory and regulatory T cells in atherosclerosis-prone mice. We found that the hyperactivity and unresponsiveness to Treg-mediated suppression of inflammatory CD4⁺ T cells occurred in the progression of atherosclerosis, though Treg cells were present in very large numbers and fully functional. We further found that Gr-1⁺CD11b⁺ immature myeloid cells were significantly accumulated in atherosclerotic Apo E⁻/⁻ mice, and they promoted resistance of inflammatory CD4⁺ T cells to Treg-mediated suppression in vitro and in vivo. we further confirmed that Gr-1⁺CD11b⁺ immature myeloid cells produced high level of interleukin 6 which was at least partially responsible for inducing unresponsiveness of inflammatory CD4⁺ T cells to suppression via activation of Jak/Stat signaling pathway. Taken together, these findings might provide new insights to explore potential targets for immune therapeutic intervention in atherosclerosis.

  2. Characterization of the europium tetracycline complex as a biomarker for atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrol, Lilia C.; da Silva, Mônica N.; Sicchieri, Leticia B.

    2016-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is a narrowing of the arteries caused by an increase of atheromatous plaque: material formed by macrophage cells containing cholesterol and fatty acids, calcium and a variable amount of fibrous connective tissue. The elation between vulnerable plaques and cardiovascular events can be determined using plaque biomarkers. In this work, atherosclerotic plaques stained with different molar ratios of europium, in a potential plaque biomarker, europium tetracycline complex, were studied by fluorescence microscopy. The tetracycline antibiotic used was chlortetracycline. The growth of atherosclerotic plaque was followed during 60 days in New Zealand rabbits divided in two groups: an experimental group (EG), with nine animals and a control group (CG) with three animals. The animals in the EG received a diet with 1% of cholesterol and the animals of GC received a normal diet. The aortic arch of the animals with 60 days were cut in the vertical plane in 6 μm thick slices, which were mounted on glass slides and stained with hematoxylin an eosin and europium chlortetracycline complex (EuCTc). The fluorescence images were obtained exciting the EuCTc absorption band with a filter cube D (BP 355 - 425) and the emission was collected with a LP 470 suppression filter. Light intensity, detector gain and acquisition time were fixed for comparisons. The 20× magnified images were collected with 12 bit (or 4096 gray tones) resolution. The mean value of gray scale for each molar ratio of EuCTc was different, indicating that the complex interacts with the components of atherosclerotic plaque and the best molar ratio was 1.5 EuCTc. These results indicate the potential use of the EuCTc biomarker for atherosclerotic plaque characterization.

  3. Social stress, visceral obesity, and coronary artery atherosclerosis in female primates.

    PubMed

    Shively, Carol A; Register, Thomas C; Clarkson, Thomas B

    2009-08-01

    Our previous work in cynomolgus monkeys demonstrated significant relationships between (i) social reorganization stress and visceral fat deposition, and (ii) central fat deposition and coronary artery atherosclerosis (CAA). Nevertheless, direct relationships between CAA and visceral fat have not been demonstrated in people or animals, nor have relationships among stress, visceral obesity, and CAA been observed within a single study. Here, we examine the hypothesis that visceral obesity provides a link between social stress and CAA. Subjects were 41 socially housed females that consumed an atherogenic diet for 32 months. Social behavior and ovarian function were continuously recorded; dexamethasone suppression tests, telemetered overnight heart rate, BMI, visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous abdominal (SAT) adipose tissue were measured before necropsy. Females with high VAT:SAT were relatively subordinate, socially isolated, received more aggression and less grooming, desensitized to circulating glucocorticoids, had impaired ovarian function, higher heart rates late in the day, and more CAA than low VAT:SAT females. High-BMI females had higher heart rates than low-BMI females. Poor ovarian function in high VAT:SAT females is a novel observation suggesting the need for studies of fat distribution and ovarian function in women. The results of this study are the first to demonstrate a relationship between CAA and visceral obesity, and suggest that social stress may exacerbate CAA in part by increasing the ratio of visceral:subcutaneous fat mass in selected individuals susceptible to diet-induced CAA. Further studies are needed to understand the complex and multifactorial temporal relationship among relative visceral obesity, physiological stress responses, and CAA.

  4. Sulforaphane attenuates the development of atherosclerosis and improves endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Suddek, Ghada M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to explore possible protective effects of sulforaphane (SFN) against atherosclerosis development and endothelial dysfunction in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Rabbits were assigned to three groups of five: group I fed normal chow diet for four weeks, group II fed 1% high cholesterol diet (HCD) and group III fed HCD + SFN (0.25 mg/kg/day). Blood samples were collected for measurement of serum triglycerides (TGs), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Aortic malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total nitrite/nitrate (NOx) were measured. Vascular reactivity and intima/media (I/M) ratio were analyzed. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in aortic endothelial cells was identified immunohistochemically. HCD induced significant increases in serum TGs, TC, LDL-C, LDH, and CRP, and aortic MDA and SOD. Moreover, HCD caused significant reductions in serum HDL-C, aortic GSH and NOx. SFN administration significantly decreased HCD-induced elevations in serum TC, LDL-C, CRP, and LDH. while significantly increased HDL-C and GSH levels and normalized aortic SOD and NOx. Additionally, SFN significantly improved rabbit aortic endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine. Moreover, SFN significantly reduced the elevation in I/M ratio. This effect was confirmed by aortic histopathologic examination. The expression of NF-κB in aortic tissue showed a marked reduction upon treatment with SFN. In conclusion, this study reveals that SFN has the ability to ameliorate HCD-induced atherosclerotic lesions progression and vascular dysfunction, possibly via its lipid-lowering and antioxidant effects and suppression of NF-κB-mediated inflammation. PMID:26490346

  5. Significantly increased risk of carotid atherosclerosis with arsenic exposure and polymorphisms in arsenic metabolism genes

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Lien, Li-Ming; Chung, Wen-Ting; Hsieh, Fang-I; Hsieh, Pei-Fan; Wu, Meei-Maan; Tseng, Hung-Pin; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2011-08-15

    Individual susceptibility to arsenic-induced carotid atherosclerosis might be associated with genetic variations in arsenic metabolism. The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction effect on risk of carotid atherosclerosis between arsenic exposure and risk genotypes of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), arsenic (+3) methyltransferase (As3MT), and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) and omega 2 (GSTO2). A community-based case-control study was conducted in northeastern Taiwan to investigate the arsenic metabolic-related genetic susceptibility to carotid atherosclerosis. In total, 863 subjects, who had been genotyped and for whom the severity of carotid atherosclerosis had been determined, were included in the present study. Individual well water was collected and arsenic concentration determined using hydride generation combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The result showed that a significant dose-response trend (P=0.04) of carotid atherosclerosis risk associated with increasing arsenic concentration. Non-significant association between genetic polymorphisms of PNP Gly51Ser, Pro57Pro, As3MT Met287Thr, GSTO1 Ala140Asp, and GSTO2 A-183G and the risk for development of carotid atherosclerosis were observed. However, the significant interaction effect on carotid atherosclerosis risk was found for arsenic exposure (>50 {mu}g/l) and the haplotypes of PNP (p=0.0115). A marked elevated risk of carotid atherosclerosis was observed in subjects with arsenic exposure of >50 {mu}g/l in drinking water and those who carried the PNP A-T haplotype and at least either of the As3MT risk polymorphism or GSTO risk haplotypes (OR, 6.43; 95% CI, 1.79-23.19). In conclusion, arsenic metabolic genes, PNP, As3MT, and GSTO, may exacerbate the formation of atherosclerosis in individuals with high levels of arsenic concentration in well water (>50 {mu}g/l). - Highlights: {yields}Arsenic metabolic genes might be associated with carotid atherosclerosis. {yields

  6. Therapeutic implications of chemokine-mediated pathways in atherosclerosis: realistic perspectives and utopias.

    PubMed

    Apostolakis, Stavros; Amanatidou, Virginia; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2010-09-01

    Current perspectives on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis strongly support the involvement of inflammatory mediators in the establishment and progression of atherosclerostic lesions. Chemokine-mediated mechanisms are potent regulators of such processes by orchestrating the interactions of inflammatory cellular components of the peripheral blood with cellular components of the arterial wall. The increasing evidence supporting the role of chemokine pathways in atherosclerosis renders chemokine ligands and their receptors potential therapeutic targets. In the following review, we aim to highlight the special structural and functional features of chemokines and their receptors in respect to their roles in atherosclerosis, and examine to what extent available data can be applied in disease management practices.

  7. Prevention of induced atherosclerosis by diversion of bile or blockade of intestinal lymphatics in dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, P J; Karipineni, R C; Pertsemlidis, D; Danese, C A

    1976-01-01

    The prevention of induced hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis was studied by means of intestinal lymphatic blockade and of bile diversion in the dog. Hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis were produced by high cholesterol feeding after induction of hypothyroidism with radio-iodine plus thiouracil. Complete diversion of bile, by shunting all bile into the urinary bladder, effectively prevented hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis; in contrast, blockade of the intestinal lymphatics failed to prevent the consequences of the atherogenic regimen, because of the development of collateral lymphatic channels. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:817679

  8. Association of SERPINA9 gene variants with carotid artery atherosclerosis: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Carotid MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Weihong; Morrison, Alanna; Wasserman, Bruce A; Folsom, Aaron R; Sun, Wei; Campbell, Stephen; Kao, W H Linda; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The SNP rs11628722 in the SERPINA9 gene was previously associated with incident ischemic stroke in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Centerin, the protein encoded by SERPINA9, is involved in maturation and maintenance of naïve B cells, which play a role in atherogenesis. We investigated whether 21 tag SNPs in the SERPINA9 gene are associated with features of carotid artery atherosclerotic plaque measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Carotid MRI data were obtained from 1,282 European Americans and 341 African Americans of the ARIC Carotid MRI study, which recruited participants from ARIC by a stratified sampling plan that over-sampled participants with carotid intima-media thickening. Five MRI measures, focused on carotid wall volume, wall thickness, and lipid core, were analyzed. Genetic associations between the MRI measurements and each of the 21 SNPs were analyzed in linear regression models with adjustment for sample weights and traditional risk factors. Rs11628722 was tested a priori. In African Americans, rs11628722 was significantly associated with carotid wall volume (p < 0.05). Among the other 20 SNPs, adjusted for multiple testing, rs4905204, which encodes an Ala to Val amino acid change, was significantly associated with maximum wall thickness (p < 0.000625) and suggestively associated with total wall volume (p < 0.0026) in European Americans. In conclusion, SNPs in the SERPINA9 gene showed race-specific associations with characteristics of carotid atherosclerotic plaques. Replications in other populations are needed to validate findings of this study and to establish the SERPINA9 gene as a candidate in the etiology of carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:24319541

  9. Associations between γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and Biomarkers of Atherosclerosis: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Ryan D.; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Jacobs, David R.; Lee, Duk-Hee; Jenny, Nancy Swords; Wake, David Herrington

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate associations between total serum γ-glutamyltransferase activity (GGT) and biomarkers of arteriosclerosis in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), including 6,783 participants from four ethnic subgroups, i.e., White, Chinese, Black and Hispanic. METHODS Associations between fasting total serum GGT activity and oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL), interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) were assessed. Following evaluation of linear trends between GGT and biomarkers of interest, multivariable linear regression models were serially adjusted for age, gender, site, ethnicity (M1); M1+lifestyle variables (M2); M2+traditional cardiovascular risk factors plus medications (M3); and M3+metabolic status (M4). Interactions were evaluated between GGT and age and ethnicity in all models. RESULTS Linear trends were positive and significant between GGT and oxLDL, IL-6, CRP and sICAM-1 in crude models, and trends remained significant in all ethnic subgroups for CRP (p<0.0001) and sICAM-1 (p<0.001), and for IL-6 except in the Chinese. Trends between GGT and oxLDL were significant in the entire cohort and the White subgroup (p<0.0001), but not in other ethnic subgroups. Multivariable models demonstrated continuous strong, positive associations between GGT and CRP, IL-6 and sICAM-1. Associations between GGT and oxLDL were attenuated upon adjustment for LDL-C and other traditional risk factors. All models were attenuated with adjustment for metabolic status. No age interactions were evident. CONCLUSIONS Our findings support the hypothesis that total serum GGT activity represents the impact of metabolic disease on vascular injury and atherosclerosis. PMID:24530768

  10. Photoimmune suppression and photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Stephen E

    2002-03-01

    The primary cause of non-melanoma skin cancer, the most prevalent form of human neoplasia, is the ultraviolet (UV) radiation found in sunlight. Exposing mice to UV radiation induces skin cancers that are highly antigenic. Upon transfer of an UV-induced skin cancer to a normal syngeneic mouse, the tumor cells are recognized and rapidly destroyed by the immune system of the recipient. This raises the question of how these cancers avoided immune destruction during their development in the UV-irradiated host. This question was answered when it was discovered that in addition to being carcinogenic, UV radiation was also immunosuppressive. Studies with immune suppressed transplantation recipients, and biopsy proven skin cancer patients have confirmed that UV-induced immune suppression is a risk factor for skin cancer development in humans. It is of great importance, therefore, to understand the mechanisms underlying UV-induced immune suppression. The focus of this manuscript will be to use some examples from the more recent scientific literature to review the mechanisms by which UV radiation suppresses the immune response and allows for the progressive outgrowth of antigenic skin tumors. PMID:11861222

  11. The involvement of NFAT transcriptional activity suppression in SIRT1-mediated inhibition of COX-2 expression induced by PMA/Ionomycin.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yu-Yan; Lu, Jie; Huang, Yue; Liu, Guang; Gao, Peng; Wan, Yan-Zhen; Zhang, Ran; Zhang, Zhu-Qin; Yang, Rui-Feng; Tang, Xiaoqiang; Xu, Jing; Wang, Xu; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, De-Pei

    2014-01-01

    SIRT1, a class III histone deacetylase, acts as a negative regulator for many transcription factors, and plays protective roles in inflammation and atherosclerosis. Transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) has been previously shown to play pro-inflammatory roles in endothelial cells. Inhibition of NFAT signaling may be an attractive target to regulate inflammation in atherosclerosis. However, whether NFAT transcriptional activity is suppressed by SIRT1 remains unknown. In this study, we found that SIRT1 suppressed NFAT-mediated transcriptional activity. SIRT1 interacted with NFAT, and the NHR and RHR domains of NFAT mediated the interaction with SIRT1. Moreover, we found that SIRT1 primarily deacetylated NFATc3. Adenoviral over-expression of SIRT1 suppressed PMA and calcium ionophore Ionomycin (PMA/Io)-induced COX-2 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), while SIRT1 RNAi reversed the effects in HUVECs. Moreover, inhibition of COX-2 expression by SIRT1 in PMA/Io-treated HUVECs was largely abrogated by inhibiting NFAT activation. Furthermore, SIRT1 inhibited NFAT-induced COX-2 promoter activity, and reduced NFAT binding to the COX-2 promoter in PMA/Io-treated HUVECs. These results suggest that suppression of NFAT transcriptional activity is involved in SIRT1-mediated inhibition of COX-2 expression induced by PMA/Io, and that the negative regulatory mechanisms of NFAT by SIRT1 may contribute to its anti-inflammatory effects in atherosclerosis.

  12. mTOR Enhances Foam Cell Formation by Suppressing the Autophagy Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lingxia; Niu, Xiaolin; Dang, Xiaoyan; Li, Ping; Qu, Li; Bi, Xiaoju; Gao, Yanxia; Hu, Yanfen; Li, Manxiang; Qiao, Wanhai; Peng, Zhuo; Pan, Longfei

    2014-01-01

    Recently, autophagy has drawn more attention in cardiovascular disease as it has important roles in lipid metabolism. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of autophagy; however, its effect on atherosclerosis and the underlying mechanism remains undefined. In this study, an obvious upregulation of mTOR and p-mTOR protein was observed in macrophage-derived foam cells. Blocking mTOR expression with specific small interference RNA (siRNA) dramatically suppressed foam cell formation, accompanied by a decrease of lipid deposition. Further mechanistic analysis indicated that suppressing mTOR expression significantly upregulated autophagic marker LC3 expression and downregulated autophagy substrate p62 levels, indicating that mTOR silencing triggered autophagosome formation. Moreover, blocking mTOR expression obviously accelerated neutral lipid delivery to lysosome and cholesterol efflux from foam cells, implying that mTOR could induce macrophage foam cell formation by suppressing autophagic pathway. Further, mTOR silencing significantly upregulated ULK1 expression, which was accounted for mTOR-induced foam cell formation via autophagic pathway as treatment with ULK1 siRNA dampened LC3-II levels and increased p62 expression, concomitant with lipid accumulation and decreased cholesterol efflux from foam cells. Together, our data provide an insight into how mTOR accelerates the pathological process of atherosclerosis. Accordingly, blocking mTOR levels may be a promising therapeutic agent against atherosclerotic complications. PMID:24512183

  13. Pravastatin and Sarpogrelate Synergistically Ameliorate Atherosclerosis in LDLr-Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Yeon; Oh, Euichaul; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Jun, Hyun Sik; Heo, Tae-Hwe

    2016-01-01

    Pravastatin is a lipid-lowering agent that attenuates atherosclerosis. However, the multifactorial pathogenesis of atherosclerosis requires other drugs with different anti-atherogenic mechanisms. We chose sarpogrelate as an anti-platelet agent and a novel component of a complex drug with pravastatin due to its high potential but little information on its beneficial effects on atherosclerosis. Low-density lipoprotein receptor-knockout mice were fed a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet and treated with pravastatin alone, sarpogrelate alone, or a combination of both drugs. Although sarpogrelate alone did not significantly reduce atherosclerotic plaque areas, co-treatment with pravastatin significantly decreased aortic lesions compared to those of the pravastatin alone treated group. The combined therapy was markedly more effective than that of the single therapies in terms of foam cell formation, smooth muscle cell proliferation, and inflammatory cytokine levels. These results suggest that pravastatin and sarpogrelate combined therapy may provide a new therapeutic strategy for treating atherosclerosis.

  14. Inflammatory therapeutic targets in coronary atherosclerosis-from molecular biology to clinical application.

    PubMed

    Linden, Fabian; Domschke, Gabriele; Erbel, Christian; Akhavanpoor, Mohammadreza; Katus, Hugo A; Gleissner, Christian A

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death worldwide. Over the past two decades, it has been clearly recognized that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. Accumulating data from animal experiments have supported this hypothesis, however, clinical applications making use of this knowledge remain scarce. In spite of optimal interventional and medical therapy, the risk for recurrent myocardial infarction remains by about 20% over 3 years after acute coronary syndromes, novel therapies to prevent atherogenesis or treat atherosclerosis are urgently needed. This review summarizes selected potential molecular inflammatory targets that may be of clinical relevance. We also review recent and ongoing clinical trails that target inflammatory processes aiming at preventing adverse cardiovascular events. Overall, it seems surprising that translation of basic science into clinical practice has not been a great success. In conclusion, we propose to focus on specific efforts that promote translational science in order to improve outcome and prognosis of patients suffering from atherosclerosis.

  15. 2015 Russell Ross Memorial Lecture in Vascular Biology: Protective Autoimmunity in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ley, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the arterial wall. It is accompanied by an autoimmune response against apolipoprotein B-100, the core protein of low-density lipoprotein, which manifests as CD4 T cell and antibody responses. To assess the role of the autoimmune response in atherosclerosis, the nature of the CD4 T cell response against apolipoprotein B-100 was studied with and without vaccination with major histocompatibility complex-II-restricted apolipoprotein B-100 peptides. The immunologic basis of autoimmunity in atherosclerosis is discussed in the framework of theories of adaptive immunity. Older vaccination approaches are also discussed. Vaccinating Apoe(-/-) mice with major histocompatibility complex-II-restricted apolipoprotein B-100 peptides reduces atheroma burden in the aorta by ≈40%. The protective mechanism likely includes secretion of interleukin-10. Protective autoimmunity limits atherosclerosis in mice and suggests potential for developing preventative and therapeutic vaccines for humans.

  16. Atherosclerosis in Sjögren's syndrome: evidence, possible mechanisms and knowledge gaps.

    PubMed

    Valim, Valéria; Gerdts, Eva; Jonsson, Roland; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida; Brokstad, Karl Albert; Brun, Johan G; Midtbø, Helga; Mydel, Piotr Mateusz

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation has been associated with higher cardiovascular risk in rheumatic autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus. More recently, primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) was also demonstrated as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, emerging as a new interesting model to study atherosclerosis in autoimmune diseases. Patients with pSS have a higher prevalence of developing traditional cardiovascular risk factors like hypertension and dyslipidaemia predisposing for endothelial dysfunction and premature atherosclerosis. However, the disease-specific mechanisms for premature atherosclerosis in pSS are not fully understood. The aim of this review was to critically analyse the current literature on cardiovascular risks in pSS and to discuss the traditional and disease-associated risk factors. We also suggest possible new mechanisms that should be explored in future research to close the current knowledge gaps on the association of pSS, premature atherosclerosis, and clinical cardiovascular disease. PMID:26812164

  17. Stress-induced cardiac autonomic reactivity and preclinical atherosclerosis: does arterial elasticity modify the association?

    PubMed

    Chumaeva, Nadja; Hintsanen, Mirka; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Merjonen, Päivi; Elovainio, Marko; Hintsa, Taina; Juonala, Markus; Kähönen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli T; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa

    2015-01-01

    The effect of acute mental stress on atherosclerosis can be estimated using arterial elasticity measured by carotid artery distensibility (Cdist). We examined the interactive effect of acute stress-induced cardiac reactivity and Cdist to preclinical atherosclerosis assessed by carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in 58 healthy adults aged 24-39 years participated in the epidemiological Young Finns Study. Cdist and IMT were measured ultrasonographically. Impedance electrocardiography was used to measure acute mental stress-induced cardiac autonomic responses: heart rate (HR), respiratory sinus arrhythmia and pre-ejection period after the mental arithmetic and the public speaking tasks. Interactions between HR reactivity and Cdist in relation to preclinical atherosclerosis were found. The results imply that elevated HR reactivity to acute mental stress is related to less atherosclerosis among healthy participants with higher arterial elasticity. Possibly, increased cardiac reactivity in response to challenging tasks is an adaptive reaction related to better cardiovascular health.

  18. Coronary atherosclerosis among Hong Kong Chinese--a histological and morphometric study using electronic digitizer.

    PubMed

    Cheung, F M; Pang, S W; Loke, S L; Lau, S H

    1984-10-01

    In order to document the prevalence of atherosclerosis of the major coronary arteries among Hong Kong Chinese, a study on material from autopsies done during the year 1981 in Queen Mary Hospital was carried out. The narrowest part of the proximal coronary arteries was studied by light microscopy and morphometrically by electronic digitizer. We found an onset of atherosclerosis in young adult males and a linear progression with age. Females had a delayed onset with a sharp rise after menopause. We were surprised to find an incidence of atherosclerosis among Hong Kong Chinese comparable with that in western populations, as distinct from Chinese in Mainland China. However, mortality due to ischemic heart disease remained relatively low. Racial factors may contribute to this partial dissociation between coronary atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease.

  19. Atherosclerosis in Sjögren's syndrome: evidence, possible mechanisms and knowledge gaps.

    PubMed

    Valim, Valéria; Gerdts, Eva; Jonsson, Roland; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida; Brokstad, Karl Albert; Brun, Johan G; Midtbø, Helga; Mydel, Piotr Mateusz

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation has been associated with higher cardiovascular risk in rheumatic autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus. More recently, primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) was also demonstrated as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, emerging as a new interesting model to study atherosclerosis in autoimmune diseases. Patients with pSS have a higher prevalence of developing traditional cardiovascular risk factors like hypertension and dyslipidaemia predisposing for endothelial dysfunction and premature atherosclerosis. However, the disease-specific mechanisms for premature atherosclerosis in pSS are not fully understood. The aim of this review was to critically analyse the current literature on cardiovascular risks in pSS and to discuss the traditional and disease-associated risk factors. We also suggest possible new mechanisms that should be explored in future research to close the current knowledge gaps on the association of pSS, premature atherosclerosis, and clinical cardiovascular disease.

  20. Apple Polyphenols Decrease Atherosclerosis and Hepatic Steatosis in ApoE−/− Mice through the ROS/MAPK/NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhe-Rong; Li, Jin-You; Dong, Xin-Wei; Tan, Zhong-Ju; Wu, Wei-Zhen; Xie, Qiang-Min; Yang, Yun-Mei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of apple polyphenols (APs) on hyperlipidemia, atherosclerosis, hepatic steatosis and endothelial function and investigated the potential mechanisms. ApoE−/− mice were fed a western-type diet and orally treated with APs (100 mg/kg) or atorvastatin (10 mg/kg) for 12 weeks. Hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in the aortic sinuses and, and hepatic lipidosis were measured. The treatment with APs or atorvastatin induced a remarkable reduction in the atherosclerotic lesions and hepatic steatosis and decreased the levels of low-density lipoprotein, triglyceride, CCL-2 and VCAM-1 levels in the plasma. Conversely, the APs significantly increased the plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and markedly up-regulated the glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels in liver tissues. Moreover, the APs treatment modulated lipid metabolism by up-regulating the transcription of associated hepatic genes including PPARα, while down-regulating the transcription of SCAP and its downstream genes associated with lipid synthesis in the liver. Histological assessment showed that the APs treatment also reduced the macrophage infiltration in the aortic root plaque and the inflammatory cells infiltrations to the liver tissues. Moreover, we confirmed that the APs treatment greatly reduced the ox-LDL-induced endothelial dysfunction and monocyte adhesion to rat aortic endothelial cells (RAECs). Mechanistically, the APs treatment suppressed the ROS/MAPK/NF-κB signaling pathway, and consequently, reduced CCL-2, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. Our results suggest that the APs are a beneficial nutritional supplement for the attenuation of atherosclerosis. PMID:26305254

  1. Visceral fat thickness is associated with carotid atherosclerosis in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Jung; Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Seung Jun; Oh, Hyung Jung; Yoo, Dong Eun; Kim, Jwa-Kyung; Park, Jung Tak; Han, Seung Hyeok; Kang, Shin-Wook; Choi, Kyu Hun; Yoo, Tae-Hyun

    2012-06-01

    Visceral fat has been known to associate with atherosclerosis, inflammation, and insulin resistance. However, the influence of visceral fat on cardiovascular disease (CVD) in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients has never been elucidated. We investigated whether visceral fat thickness (VFT) has a predictive role in carotid atherosclerosis determined by carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in PD patients. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in 88 prevalent PD patients. BMI and waist circumference (WC) were measured as anthropometric indexes of obesity. VFT and subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT) were determined by sonographic measurement of abdominal fat. Carotid atherosclerosis was defined as increased cIMT (>1.0 mm) or presence of plaque. Thirty-two (36.3%) patients had carotid atherosclerosis. Patients with carotid atherosclerosis showed significantly higher VFT, BMI, and WC. In univariate logistic analysis, BMI, WC, and VFT except SFT were significant risk factors of carotid atherosclerosis. However, multivariate analysis revealed VFT was an independent factor associated with carotid atherosclerosis after adjusting for demographic, biochemical parameters, and anthropometric indexes (per 1 mm increase, odds ratio (OR) = 2.294, 95% confidence interval: 1.048-5.021, P = 0.038). When the patients were divided into three groups according to VFT, log high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA(IR)) were both higher in the third tertile compared to other tertiles. In conclusion, VFT, not SFT, is independently associated with carotid atherosclerosis in PD patients. Therefore sonographic measurement of VFT could be useful to stratify the risk of cardiovascular disease in PD patients.

  2. Betulin attenuates atherosclerosis in apoE−/− mice by up-regulating ABCA1 and ABCG1

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Yu-zhou; Yan, Hong; Gao, Fei; Xi, Cong; Li, Hui-hui; Wang, Yi-ping

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Betulin is a pentacyclic triterpenoid isolated from the bark of yellow and white birch trees with anti-cancer and anti-malaria activities. In this study we examined the effects of betulin on atherosclerosis in apoE−/− mice and the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells and human monocyte-derived THP-1 cells were tested. Foam cell formation was detected with Oil Red O staining. Cholesterol efflux was assessed using [3H]-cholesterol efflux assay. The expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 and G1 (ABCA1 and ABCG1) was examined using RT-PCR and Western-blotting. The ABCA1 promoter activity was evaluated using luciferase activity assay. Male apoE−/− mice fed on a high-fat-diet (HFD), and received betulin (20 and 40 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 12 weeks. The macrophage content and ABCA1 expression in the aortic sinuses were evaluated with immunofluorescence staining. The hepatic, intestinal and fecal cholesterol were also analyzed in the mice. Results: In RAW264.7 cells, betulin (0.1–2.5 μg/mL) dose-dependently ameliorated oxLDL-induced cholesterol accumulation and enhanced cholesterol efflux. In both RAW264.7 and THP-1 cells, betulin increased the expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 via suppressing the transcriptional repressors sterol-responsive element-binding proteins (SREBPs) that bound to E-box motifs in ABCA1 promoter, whereas E-box binding site mutation markedly attenuated betulin-induced ABCA1 promoter activity. In HFD-fed apoE−/− mice, betulin administration significantly reduced lesions in en face aortas and aortic sinuses. Furthermore, betulin administration significantly increased ABCA1 expression and suppressed macrophage positive areas in the aortic sinuses. Moreover, betulin administration improved plasma lipid profiles and enhanced fecal cholesterol excretion in the mice. Conclusion: Betulin attenuates atherosclerosis in apoE−/− mice by promoting cholesterol efflux in macrophages. PMID:27374487

  3. NLRP3 inflammasome: a novel link between lipoproteins and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wang Li; Hua, Li Gui; Yan, Wang Hong; Ming, Cui; Jun, Yuan Da; Yuan, Lou Da; Nan, Niu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pattern recognition receptor-mediated signaling pathways have recently been elucidated to bridge the innate immune system and atherosclerosis. NLRP3 is a member of the NLR family. Upon activation, it initiates IL-1β and IL-18 processing, a key step in the inflammatory process of atherosclerosis. Material and methods We used three different types of lipoproteins, ox-LDL, ox-HDL, and HDL, in Thp-1 at the concentration of 50 mg/l, 100 mg/l, and 150 mg/l respectively. Using real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot, ELISA detected the expression of NLRP3 and downstream cytokines. NLRP3 siRNA was constructed to down-regulate expression of the NLRP3 gene via the RNA interference technique. 150 mg/l of ox-LDL, ox-HDL and HDL was added to the Thp-1 cell line respectively. We observed the changes in the expression of caspase-1, IL-1β and IL-18 when the NLRP3 gene was down-regulated. Results Ox-LDL and ox-HDL addition not only increases the expression of NLRP3, but also activates the NLRP3 downstream cytokines and caspase-1 and induces IL-1β and IL-18 secretion. Moreover, the effects of activation and induction are shown to have a dose-dependent manner. Expression of NLRP3 and its downstream inflammatory cytokines is reduced in the presence of HDL (p < 0.05). Furthermore, our data demonstrated that NLRP3 siRNA downregulates NLRP3 expression in mononuclear cells, thus leading to a dramatic reduction in the expression of caspase-1, IL-1β and IL-18 (p < 0.05). Conclusions The data suggest that activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome is a critical step in caspase-1 activation and IL-1β and IL-18 secretion. Interference with the NLRP3 inflammasome can significantly inhibit the generation of cytokines, thus impeding the pathogenesis of inflammation. PMID:27695484

  4. [Risk factors for coronary atherosclerosis. Comparison between two Argentine regions].

    PubMed

    Coniglio, R I; Castillo, S; Dahinten, E; Doubnia, M I; Vasquez, L A; Colombo, O; Estevez, S; Duffard, M C; Lopez Torres, J; Rodriguez, M D

    1994-01-01

    The prevalence of risk factors for coronary atherosclerosis were studied in two population samples, Northeast (Posadas, n = 498) and South (Viedma, C. Rivadavia and Cipolletti, n = 652) of 20 years and older, males and females. The diet in the Northeast (n = 102) contained more monounsaturated acids and polyunsaturated acids than the one in the South (n = 62), 9.5 +/- 4.1 vs. 8.1 +/- 3.5% TCV (Total Caloric Value) (P < 0.02) and 8.1 +/- 4.1 vs. 6.2 +/- 3.0% TCV (P < 0.001) respectively. The P/S relationship was greater in the Northeast, 1.02 +/- 0.44 vs. 0.85 +/- 0.50 (P < 0.001). Total cholesterol (TC) in the Northeast was less than in the South, in males 176 +/- 41 vs. 213 +/- 43 mg/dl (P < 0.001); CLDL (LDL cholesterol) 109 +/- 37 vs. 141 +/- 41 mg/dl (P < 0.001). The most frequent risk factors in the South vs. Northeast (males) were: TC > or = 240 mg/dl, 26.7% vs. 9.5% (P < 0.001); LDL-C > or = 160 mg/dl, 30.3% vs. 10.9% (P < 0.001); Cig > or = 10/d (equal or more than 10 cigarettes per day), 30.0% vs. 16.4% (P < 0.001). The hypertension prevalence (HTA, 160/95), in males, was higher in the Northeast than in the South, 23.7% vs. 11.5% (P < 0.001). BMI > 27 Kg/m2 was higher in the women of Northeast than in the South, 38.4% vs. 24.2% (P < 0.001). In the males of the Northeast, the combination Cig > or = 10/d and HTA, 4.1 vs 0.9% was more common; in the South Cig > or = 10/d and LDL-C > or = 160 mg/d, 8.2% vs. 1.8% (P < 0.001) was more common. The differences in the prevalence of the risk factors between the population samples indicate the need to plan the prevention of coronary atherosclerosis locally. PMID:7997127

  5. Asymptomatic Atherosclerosis in Egyptian Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients and Its Relation to Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Elshereef, Rawhya R.; Darwish, Aymen; Ali, Amal; Abdel-kadar, Mohammed; Hamdy, Lamiaa

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To detect the frequency of subclinical atherosclerosis in rheumatoid arthritis patients without clinically evident atherosclerosis and to correlate its presence with the disease activity. Patients and Methods. Our study includes 112 RA patients (group 1) and 40 healthy controls (group 11). All patients and controls were subjected to full history taking, clinical examination, and laboratory investigations. Carotid intima media wall thickness (IMT) and carotid plaques were measured in both groups by B-mode ultrasonography; also color duplex Doppler ultrasound of the brachial artery was done to detect endothelial function. Results. There is atherosclerosis in 31.3% of asymptomatic RA patients compared with only 5% in controls (P = 0.003**). A significant difference was detected in patients with and without atherosclerosis regarding duration of the disease (P = 0.0001***) and patient's age (P = 0.01*). There is highly statistical significant correlation between atherosclerosis and disease activity index. Conclusion. The frequency of subclinical atherosclerosis was high in long-term active RA patients. PMID:25737726

  6. Computer densitometry for angiographic assessment of arterial cholesterol content and gross pathology in human atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Crawford, D W; Brooks, S H; Selzer, R H; Barndt, R; Beckenbach, E S; Blankenhorn, D H

    1977-02-01

    Sequential change studies in human atherosclerosis are desirable in disease regression trials but are now limited by dependence on the occurrence of epidemiologic end-points. Prior radiographic studies have pertained to advanced obstructive atherosclerosis. This is a study of measures applied by computer-generated densitometry of angiograms to assess early to advanced nonobstructive atherosclerosis. Measures are based on pathologic and angiographic appearance of all stages of atherosclerosis and include image edge roughness, local width, and local contrast density changes. Femoral angiograms were made in 21 cadavers under simulated clinical conditions, with a pressurized radiopaque casting material. Full-size color photographs were made of 10 cm. segments of opened artery, with matching cast and arterial specimens analyzed for cholesterol content. Four graders, on two occasions, sequenced the photographs in increasing order of disease on the basis of the International Atherosclerosis Grading scheme. The correlation between the two sessions was 0.93. Thirteen computer indices correlated significantly with visual grade and cholesterol and were allowed to compete in a step-wise regression for best indices of prediction. Computer index correlation coefficient for visual grade prediction was 0.86, and for cholesterol content, 0.84. Computer densitometry measurement appears useful in the evaluation of all stages of atherosclerosis as recorded angiographically and obviates the necessity for exacting visual comparisons of large numbers of films.

  7. Relation between preclinical atherosclerosis and venous thromboembolism in patients with thrombophilias - longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Auzký, O; Dembovská, R; Mrázková, J; Nováková, Š; Pagáčová, L; Piťha, J

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical atherosclerosis may represent a risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE). In longitudinal study we followed longitudinally 96 patients (32 men) with thrombophilias with (n=51) and without (n=45) history of VTE. In both groups we studied the changes of preclinical atherosclerosis at peripherally located arteries detected by ultrasound. In addition, we assessed changes in selected risk factors of atherosclerosis. During the mean follow-up of 56.0+/-7.62 months we did not find significant change in preclinical atherosclerosis defined as Belcaro score in either group (-3 % in the VTE group vs 0 % in non VTE group). Significant increase in body mass index (1.03+/-1.98 kg*m(-2), resp. 1.21+/-1.67 kg*m(-2), p<0.01) and non-significant increase in systolic blood pressure were detected in both groups. Waist circumference increased significantly only in patients without VTE (4.11+/-7.84 cm, p<0.05). No differences in changes of risk factors under study between both groups were detected. In summary, patients with thrombophilia and history of VTE showed no evidence of greater progression of atherosclerosis or increase in traditional risk factors of atherosclerosis than patients with thrombophilia without history of VTE. Unfavorable changes of body mass index, waist circumference and systolic blood pressure were detected in both groups during study period.

  8. Allergic lung inflammation promotes atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong-Lin; Wang, Yi; Liao, Mengyang; Santos, Marcela M; Fernandes, Cleverson; Sukhova, Galina K; Zhang, Jin-Ying; Cheng, Xiang; Yang, Chongzhe; Huang, Xiaozhu; Levy, Bruce; Libby, Peter; Wu, Gongxiong; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation drives asthma and atherosclerosis. Clinical studies suggest that asthmatic patients have a high risk of atherosclerosis. Yet this hypothesis remains uncertain, given that Th2 imbalance causes asthma whereas Th1 immunity promotes atherosclerosis. In this study, chronic allergic lung inflammation (ALI) was induced in mice by ovalbumin sensitization and challenge. Acute ALI was induced in mice by ovalbumin and aluminum sensitization and ovalbumin challenge. Atherosclerosis was produced in apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe(-/-)) mice with a Western diet. When chronic ALI and atherosclerosis were produced simultaneously, ALI increased atherosclerotic lesion size, lesion inflammatory cell content, elastin fragmentation, smooth muscle cell (SMC) loss, lesion cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Production of acute ALI before atherogenesis did not affect lesion size, but increased atherosclerotic lesion CD4(+) T cells, lesion SMC loss, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. Production of acute ALI after atherogenesis also did not change atherosclerotic lesion area, but increased lesion elastin fragmentation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. In mice with chronic ALI and diet-induced atherosclerosis, daily inhalation of a mast cell inhibitor or corticosteroid significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion T-cell and mast cell contents, SMC loss, angiogenesis, and cell proliferation and apoptosis, although these drugs did not affect lesion area, compared with those that received vehicle treatment. In conclusion, both chronic and acute ALI promote atherogenesis or aortic lesion pathology, regardless whether ALI occurred before, after, or at the same time as atherogenesis. Antiasthmatic medication can efficiently mitigate atherosclerotic lesion pathology.

  9. Preclinical mouse models and methods for the discovery of the causes and treatments of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hewing, Bernd; Fisher, Edward A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death in the Western world. Despite huge advances in understanding its pathophysiological mechanisms, current treatment is mostly based on ‘traditional’ risk factors. The introduction of statins more than 20 years ago reduced morbidity and mortality of atherosclerosis by 30%, leaving a residual cardiovascular risk. Therefore, efforts continue toward the development of novel therapies that can be added to established treatments. Besides targeting dyslipidemia, recent focus has been put on preventing or resolving inflammatory processes involved in atherosclerosis. Areas covered The article discusses therapeutic and diagnostic targets in atherosclerosis and how they can be discovered and studied in preclinical animal models. The roles of immune cells, specifically macrophages and monocytes, in plaque inflammation are discussed. The article also describes current preclinical models of atherosclerosis, specifically the mouse, study designs (for progression and regression studies), basic and advanced methods of analysis of atherosclerotic lesions, and discusses the challenges of translating the findings to humans. Expert opinion Advances in genomics, proteomics, lipidomics and the development of high-throughput screening techniques help to improve our understanding of atherosclerosis disease mechanisms immensely and facilitate the discovery of new diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Preclinical studies in animals are still indispensable to uncover pathways involved in atherosclerotic disease and to evaluate novel drug targets. The translation of these targets, however, from animal studies to humans remains challenging. There is a strong need for novel biomarkers that can be used to prove the concept of a new target in humans. PMID:22468952

  10. TWIST1 Integrates Endothelial Responses to Flow in Vascular Dysfunction and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Marwa M.; Kim, Hyejeong Rosemary; Xing, Rouyu; Hsiao, Sarah; Mammoto, Akiko; Chen, Jing; Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; Feng, Shuang; Bowden, Neil P.; Maguire, Richard; Ariaans, Markus; Francis, Sheila E.; Weinberg, Peter D.; van der Heiden, Kim; Jones, Elizabeth A.; Chico, Timothy J.A.; Ridger, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Blood flow–induced shear stress controls endothelial cell (EC) physiology during atherosclerosis via transcriptional mechanisms that are incompletely understood. The mechanosensitive transcription factor TWIST is expressed during embryogenesis, but its role in EC responses to shear stress and focal atherosclerosis is unknown. Objective: To investigate whether TWIST regulates endothelial responses to shear stress during vascular dysfunction and atherosclerosis and compare TWIST function in vascular development and disease. Methods and Results: The expression and function of TWIST1 was studied in EC in both developing vasculature and during the initiation of atherosclerosis. In zebrafish, twist was expressed in early embryonic vasculature where it promoted angiogenesis by inducing EC proliferation and migration. In adult porcine and murine arteries, TWIST1 was expressed preferentially at low shear stress regions as evidenced by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and en face staining. Moreover, studies of experimental murine carotid arteries and cultured EC revealed that TWIST1 was induced by low shear stress via a GATA4-dependent transcriptional mechanism. Gene silencing in cultured EC and EC-specific genetic deletion in mice demonstrated that TWIST1 promoted atherosclerosis by inducing inflammation and enhancing EC proliferation associated with vascular leakiness. Conclusions: TWIST expression promotes developmental angiogenesis by inducing EC proliferation and migration. In addition to its role in development, TWIST is expressed preferentially at low shear stress regions of adult arteries where it promotes atherosclerosis by inducing EC proliferation and inflammation. Thus, pleiotropic functions of TWIST control vascular disease and development. PMID:27245171

  11. Endothelial Dysfunction: The Role of SREBP-Induced NLRP3 Inflammasome in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen; Martin, Marcy; Li, Zhao; Shyy, John Y-J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Great effort has been devoted to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which inflammasome in macrophages contributes to atherosclerosis. Inflammasome in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and its causal relationship with endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis are less understood. Here we review recent studies of inflammasome and its activation in ECs, and highlight such endothelial inflammatory response in atherosclerosis. Recent findings Inflammasomes are critical effectors in innate immunity, and their activation in macrophages and the arterial wall contributes to atherogenesis. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP2), a master regulator in cholesterol biosynthesis, can be activated in a non-canonical manner, which leads to activation of the inflammasome NOD-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing protein (NLRP) in macrophages and ECs. Results from in vitro and in vivo models suggest that SREBP2 is a key molecule in aggravating pro-inflammatory responses in ECs, and promoting atherosclerosis. Summary The SREBP-induced NLRP inflammasome and its instigation of innate immunity is an important contributor to atherosclerosis. Elucidating the underlying mechanisms will expand our understanding of endothelial dysfunction and its dynamic interaction with vascular inflammation. Furthermore, targeting SREBP-inflammasome pathways can be a therapeutic strategy for attenuating atherosclerosis. PMID:25188917

  12. Decrease in circulating myeloid dendritic cell precursors in patients with intracranial large artery atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Xia; Li, Bing-Ling; Lin, Zhong-Qiu; Zhang, Ni; Peng, Xiong; Gong, Zhi-Hua; Long, Liu-Cheng; Zhou, Xuan; Xiang, Ding-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial large artery atherosclerosis (ILAA) is a major cause of ischemic cerebrovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the levels of circulating dendritic cell precursors (DCP) could reflect the severity of intracranial large artery atherosclerosis (ILAA). For this purpose, a series of angiography were taken to determine the severity and extent of coronary artery and intracranial large artery stenosis, and flow cytometry were taken to determine the levels of circulating mDC precursors and pDC precursors in patients with severe intracranial large artery atherosclerosis (ILAA) (n = 101) and mild intracranial large artery atherosclerosis (ILAA) (n = 123) according to the angiography. Circulating mDC precursors were lower in patients with severe intracranial large artery atherosclerosis (ILAA) than in mild intracranial large artery atherosclerosis (ILAA) (P < 0.05), but circulating pDC precursors were not significant differences (P > 0.05). According to these data, circulating mDC precursors could predict the severity of ILAA, which also could be able to reflect the severity of ILAA.

  13. Progression and regression of atherosclerosis in APOE3-Leiden transgenic mice: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Gijbels, M J; van der Cammen, M; van der Laan, L J; Emeis, J J; Havekes, L M; Hofker, M H; Kraal, G

    1999-03-01

    Apolipoprotein E3-Leiden (APOE3-Leiden) transgenic mice develop hyperlipidemia and are highly susceptible to diet-induced atherosclerosis. We have studied the progression and regression of atherosclerosis using immunohistochemistry. Female transgenic mice were fed a moderate fat diet to study atherosclerosis over a longer time period. Fatty streaks arose in the intima and consisted of lipid filled macrophages which differed in origin. All macrophages expressed the macrophage scavenger receptor while two thirds expressed sialoadhesin and were positive for an antibody recognizing marginal zone macrophages (MOMA-1). All macrophages were negative for the scavenger receptor MARCO and 50% were positive for CD4. Small fatty streaks contained CD-3 positive T-lymphocytes which were for more than 70% CD4-positive. ICAM-1 was positive both in atherosclerotic and control mice. In early plaques, fibrosis was observed on the luminal and medial site of the foam cells while smooth muscle cells were only observed in the fibrous cap. To study regression, we used a high fat, high cholesterol diet to rapidly induce atherosclerosis (14 weeks). The animals were then fed normal chow. Subsequently, atherosclerosis was assayed over time (4, 8, 16 weeks). Cholesterol levels dropped in 4 weeks to control levels. The animals did not show a significantly decrease in plaque size over time. but the percentage macrophages was significantly smaller in the animals after 4 weeks. In conclusion, the APOE3-Leiden mouse is a useful model to study the progression and regression of atherosclerosis.

  14. Decreased bone mineral density is associated with coronary atherosclerosis in healthy postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Seok Kyo; Yun, Bo Hyon; Noe, Eun Bee; Suh, Jong Wook; Choi, Young Sik

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the association between bone mineral density (BMD) and coronary atherosclerosis in healthy postmenopausal women. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 252 postmenopausal women who had visited a health promotion center for a routine checkup. BMD of the lumbar spine (L1-L4) and femoral neck was evaluated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and coronary atherosclerosis was assessed using 64-row multidetector computed tomography. Participants were divided into normal BMD and osteopenia-osteoporosis groups, according to the T-scores of their lumbar spine or femoral neck. Results Participants with osteopenia-osteoporosis had a significantly higher proportion of coronary atherosclerosis than did those with normal BMD at the lumbar spine (P=0.003) and femoral neck (P=0.004). Osteopenia-osteoporosis at the lumbar spine (odds ratio [OR], 2.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12 to 7.27) or femoral neck (OR, 3.35; 95% CI, 1.07 to 10.57) was associated with coronary atherosclerosis, after controlling for age and cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusion Decreased BMD is associated with coronary atherosclerosis in healthy postmenopausal women, independent of age and cardiovascular risk factors. Postmenopausal women with decreased BMD may have a higher risk of developing coronary atherosclerosis. PMID:25798428

  15. Omics-based approaches to understand mechanosensitive endothelial biology and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Rachel D; Kumar, Sandeep; Thabet, Salim Raid; Sur, Sanjoli; Jo, Hanjoong

    2016-09-01

    Atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease that preferentially occurs in arterial regions exposed to d-flow can be used to indicate disturbed flow or disturbed blood flow. The mechanisms by which d-flow induces atherosclerosis involve changes in the transcriptome, methylome, proteome, and metabolome of multiple vascular cells, especially endothelial cells. Initially, we begin with the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and the changes that occur at multiple levels owing to d-flow, especially in the endothelium. Also, there are a variety of strategies used for the global profiling of the genome, transcriptome, miRNA-ome, DNA methylome, and metabolome that are important to define the biological and pathophysiological mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Finally, systems biology can be used to integrate these 'omics' datasets, especially those that derive data based on a single animal model, in order to better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis development in a holistic manner and how this integrative approach could be used to identify novel molecular diagnostics and therapeutic targets to prevent or treat atherosclerosis. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:378-401. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1344 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27341633

  16. The role of endothelial mechanosensitive genes in atherosclerosis and omics approaches.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Rachel D; Kumar, Sandeep; Jo, Hanjoong

    2016-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the U.S., and is a multifactorial disease that preferentially occurs in regions of the arterial tree exposed to disturbed blood flow. The detailed mechanisms by which d-flow induces atherosclerosis involve changes in the expression of genes, epigenetic patterns, and metabolites of multiple vascular cells, especially endothelial cells. This review presents an overview of endothelial mechanobiology and its relation to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis with special reference to the anatomy of the artery and the underlying fluid mechanics, followed by a discussion of a variety of experimental models to study the role of fluid mechanics and atherosclerosis. Various in vitro and in vivo models to study the role of flow in endothelial biology and pathobiology are discussed in this review. Furthermore, strategies used for the global profiling of the genome, transcriptome, miR-nome, DNA methylome, and metabolome, as they are important to define the biological and pathophysiological mechanisms of atherosclerosis. These "omics" approaches, especially those which derive data based on a single animal model, provide unprecedented opportunities to not only better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis development in a holistic and integrative manner, but also to identify novel molecular and diagnostic targets.

  17. Allergic lung inflammation promotes atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cong-Lin; Wang, Yi; Liao, Mengyang; Santos, Marcela M; Fernandes, Cleverson; Sukhova, Galina K; Zhang, Jin-Ying; Cheng, Xiang; Yang, Chongzhe; Huang, Xiaozhu; Levy, Bruce; Libby, Peter; Wu, Gongxiong; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation drives asthma and atherosclerosis. Clinical studies suggest that asthmatic patients have a high risk of atherosclerosis. Yet this hypothesis remains uncertain, given that Th2 imbalance causes asthma whereas Th1 immunity promotes atherosclerosis. In this study, chronic allergic lung inflammation (ALI) was induced in mice by ovalbumin sensitization and challenge. Acute ALI was induced in mice by ovalbumin and aluminum sensitization and ovalbumin challenge. Atherosclerosis was produced in apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe(-/-)) mice with a Western diet. When chronic ALI and atherosclerosis were produced simultaneously, ALI increased atherosclerotic lesion size, lesion inflammatory cell content, elastin fragmentation, smooth muscle cell (SMC) loss, lesion cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Production of acute ALI before atherogenesis did not affect lesion size, but increased atherosclerotic lesion CD4(+) T cells, lesion SMC loss, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. Production of acute ALI after atherogenesis also did not change atherosclerotic lesion area, but increased lesion elastin fragmentation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. In mice with chronic ALI and diet-induced atherosclerosis, daily inhalation of a mast cell inhibitor or corticosteroid significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion T-cell and mast cell contents, SMC loss, angiogenesis, and cell proliferation and apoptosis, although these drugs did not affect lesion area, compared with those that received vehicle treatment. In conclusion, both chronic and acute ALI promote atherogenesis or aortic lesion pathology, regardless whether ALI occurred before, after, or at the same time as atherogenesis. Antiasthmatic medication can efficiently mitigate atherosclerotic lesion pathology. PMID:26898714

  18. The role of endothelial mechanosensitive genes in atherosclerosis and omics approaches.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Rachel D; Kumar, Sandeep; Jo, Hanjoong

    2016-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the U.S., and is a multifactorial disease that preferentially occurs in regions of the arterial tree exposed to disturbed blood flow. The detailed mechanisms by which d-flow induces atherosclerosis involve changes in the expression of genes, epigenetic patterns, and metabolites of multiple vascular cells, especially endothelial cells. This review presents an overview of endothelial mechanobiology and its relation to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis with special reference to the anatomy of the artery and the underlying fluid mechanics, followed by a discussion of a variety of experimental models to study the role of fluid mechanics and atherosclerosis. Various in vitro and in vivo models to study the role of flow in endothelial biology and pathobiology are discussed in this review. Furthermore, strategies used for the global profiling of the genome, transcriptome, miR-nome, DNA methylome, and metabolome, as they are important to define the biological and pathophysiological mechanisms of atherosclerosis. These "omics" approaches, especially those which derive data based on a single animal model, provide unprecedented opportunities to not only better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis development in a holistic and integrative manner, but also to identify novel molecular and diagnostic targets. PMID:26686737

  19. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  20. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  1. Nonsense suppression in archaea

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Arpita; Köhrer, Caroline; Mandal, Debabrata; RajBhandary, Uttam L.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial strains carrying nonsense suppressor tRNA genes played a crucial role in early work on bacterial and bacterial viral genetics. In eukaryotes as well, suppressor tRNAs have played important roles in the genetic analysis of yeast and worms. Surprisingly, little is known about genetic suppression in archaea, and there has been no characterization of suppressor tRNAs or identification of nonsense mutations in any of the archaeal genes. Here, we show, using the β-gal gene as a reporter, that amber, ochre, and opal suppressors derived from the serine and tyrosine tRNAs of the archaeon Haloferax volcanii are active in suppression of their corresponding stop codons. Using a promoter for tRNA expression regulated by tryptophan, we also show inducible and regulatable suppression of all three stop codons in H. volcanii. Additionally, transformation of a ΔpyrE2 H. volcanii strain with plasmids carrying the genes for a pyrE2 amber mutant and the serine amber suppressor tRNA yielded transformants that grow on agar plates lacking uracil. Thus, an auxotrophic amber mutation in the pyrE2 gene can be complemented by expression of the amber suppressor tRNA. These results pave the way for generating archaeal strains carrying inducible suppressor tRNA genes on the chromosome and their use in archaeal and archaeviral genetics. We also provide possible explanations for why suppressor tRNAs have not been identified in archaea. PMID:25918386

  2. Nonsense suppression in archaea.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Arpita; Köhrer, Caroline; Mandal, Debabrata; RajBhandary, Uttam L

    2015-05-12

    Bacterial strains carrying nonsense suppressor tRNA genes played a crucial role in early work on bacterial and bacterial viral genetics. In eukaryotes as well, suppressor tRNAs have played important roles in the genetic analysis of yeast and worms. Surprisingly, little is known about genetic suppression in archaea, and there has been no characterization of suppressor tRNAs or identification of nonsense mutations in any of the archaeal genes. Here, we show, using the β-gal gene as a reporter, that amber, ochre, and opal suppressors derived from the serine and tyrosine tRNAs of the archaeon Haloferax volcanii are active in suppression of their corresponding stop codons. Using a promoter for tRNA expression regulated by tryptophan, we also show inducible and regulatable suppression of all three stop codons in H. volcanii. Additionally, transformation of a ΔpyrE2 H. volcanii strain with plasmids carrying the genes for a pyrE2 amber mutant and the serine amber suppressor tRNA yielded transformants that grow on agar plates lacking uracil. Thus, an auxotrophic amber mutation in the pyrE2 gene can be complemented by expression of the amber suppressor tRNA. These results pave the way for generating archaeal strains carrying inducible suppressor tRNA genes on the chromosome and their use in archaeal and archaeviral genetics. We also provide possible explanations for why suppressor tRNAs have not been identified in archaea.

  3. Denervation suppresses gastric tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Yosuke; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Westphalen, Christoph B.; Andersen, Gøran T.; Flatberg, Arnar; Johannessen, Helene; Friedman, Richard A.; Renz, Bernhard W.; Sandvik, Arne K.; Beisvag, Vidar; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Hara, Akira; Quante, Michael; Li, Zhishan; Gershon, Michael D.; Kaneko, Kazuhiro; Fox, James G.; Wang, Timothy C.; Chen, Duan

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system plays an important role in the regulation of epithelial homeostasis and has also been postulated to play a role in tumorigenesis. We provide evidence that proper innervation is critical at all stages of gastric tumorigenesis. In three separate mouse models of gastric cancer, surgical or pharmacological denervation of the stomach (bilateral or unilateral truncal vagotomy, or local injection of botulinum toxin type A) markedly reduced tumor incidence and progression, but only in the denervated portion of the stomach. Vagotomy or botulinum toxin type A treatment also enhanced the therapeutic effects of systemic chemotherapy and prolonged survival. Denervation-induced suppression of tumorigenesis was associated with inhibition of Wnt signaling and suppression of stem cell expansion. In gastric organoid cultures, neurons stimulated growth in a Wnt-mediated fashion through cholinergic signaling. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition or genetic knockout of the muscarinic acetylcholine M3 receptor suppressed gastric tumorigenesis. In gastric cancer patients, tumor stage correlated with neural density and activated Wnt signaling, whereas vagotomy reduced the risk of gastric cancer. Together, our findings suggest that vagal innervation contributes to gastric tumorigenesis via M3 receptor–mediated Wnt signaling in the stem cells, and that denervation might represent a feasible strategy for the control of gastric cancer. PMID:25143365

  4. Nonsense suppression in archaea.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Arpita; Köhrer, Caroline; Mandal, Debabrata; RajBhandary, Uttam L

    2015-05-12

    Bacterial strains carrying nonsense suppressor tRNA genes played a crucial role in early work on bacterial and bacterial viral genetics. In eukaryotes as well, suppressor tRNAs have played important roles in the genetic analysis of yeast and worms. Surprisingly, little is known about genetic suppression in archaea, and there has been no characterization of suppressor tRNAs or identification of nonsense mutations in any of the archaeal genes. Here, we show, using the β-gal gene as a reporter, that amber, ochre, and opal suppressors derived from the serine and tyrosine tRNAs of the archaeon Haloferax volcanii are active in suppression of their corresponding stop codons. Using a promoter for tRNA expression regulated by tryptophan, we also show inducible and regulatable suppression of all three stop codons in H. volcanii. Additionally, transformation of a ΔpyrE2 H. volcanii strain with plasmids carrying the genes for a pyrE2 amber mutant and the serine amber suppressor tRNA yielded transformants that grow on agar plates lacking uracil. Thus, an auxotrophic amber mutation in the pyrE2 gene can be complemented by expression of the amber suppressor tRNA. These results pave the way for generating archaeal strains carrying inducible suppressor tRNA genes on the chromosome and their use in archaeal and archaeviral genetics. We also provide possible explanations for why suppressor tRNAs have not been identified in archaea. PMID:25918386

  5. 3-(4'-hydroxyl-3',5'-dimethoxyphenyl)propionic acid, an active principle of kimchi, inhibits development of atherosclerosis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Lee, Jin Su; Chung, Hae Young; Song, Su Hee; Suh, Hongsuk; Noh, Jung Sook; Song, Yeong Ok

    2007-12-12

    The effects of 3-(4'-hydroxyl-3',5'-dimethoxyphenyl)propionic acid (HDMPPA) originating from Korean cabbage kimchi were investigated, showing an antioxidant effect on the prevention of atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Twenty-one 3-month-old rabbits were fed an atherogenic diet containing 0.5% (w/w) cholesterol and 10% (w/w) coconut oil, whereas another two groups were given an atherogenic diet with intravenous injection of either HDMPPA or simvastatin (0.33 mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks. HDMPPA inhibited the oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (IC 50 = 1.4 microg/mL) and increased 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity (IC 50 = 0.78 microg/mL) in a dose-dependent manner. In hypercholesterolemic rabbits, the thickness of intima of aorta of the HDMPPA group was significantly reduced (control versus HDMPPA, 42%; simvastatin, 38%) without a plasma cholesterol-lowering effect. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substance formation in the plasma of the HDMPPA group was significantly decreased compared to that of the control group. Furthermore, the generation of vascular reactive oxygen species in HDMPPA group was suppressed as the cyclooxygenase-2 protein level decreased. These findings suggest that HDMPPA prevents the development of aortic atherosclerosis in high-cholesterol-fed rabbits. The antiatherosclerotic effect of HDMPPA may be due to an antioxidative effect at a low dose without cholesterol-lowering effects. PMID:18004805

  6. The simulation of magnetic resonance elastography through atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Seale, L E J; Hollis, L; Klatt, D; Sack, I; Roberts, N; Pankaj, P; Hoskins, P R

    2016-06-14

    The clinical diagnosis of atherosclerosis via the measurement of stenosis size is widely acknowledged as an imperfect criterion. The vulnerability of an atherosclerotic plaque to rupture is associated with its mechanical properties. The potential to image these mechanical properties using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) was investigated through synthetic datasets. An image of the steady state wave propagation, equivalent to the first harmonic, can be extracted directly from finite element analysis. Inversion of this displacement data yields a map of the shear modulus, known as an elastogram. The variation of plaque composition, stenosis size, Gaussian noise, filter thresholds and excitation frequency were explored. A decreasing mean shear modulus with an increasing lipid composition was identified through all stenosis sizes. However the inversion algorithm showed sensitivity to parameter variation leading to artefacts which disrupted both the elastograms and quantitative trends. As noise was increased up to a realistic level, the contrast was maintained between the fully fibrous and lipid plaques but lost between the interim compositions. Although incorporating a Butterworth filter improved the performance of the algorithm, restrictive filter thresholds resulted in a reduction of the sensitivity of the algorithm to composition and noise variation. Increasing the excitation frequency improved the techniques ability to image the magnitude of the shear modulus and identify a contrast between compositions. In conclusion, whilst the technique has the potential to image the shear modulus of atherosclerotic plaques, future research will require the integration of a heterogeneous inversion algorithm. PMID:27130475

  7. Pulp Stone, Haemodialysis, End-stage Renal Disease, Carotid Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Santosh; Sinha, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the presence of pulp calcification and carotid artery calcification on the dental panoramic radiographs in End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients who were on haemodialysis. Methods: A total of 112 End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) patients on who were haemodialysis participated in this study. The periapical and the panoramic radiographs for all the patients were evaluated for the presence or absence of the narrowing of the dental pulps and for pulp stones in the pulp chambers and the pulp canals. The panoramic radiographs were also evaluated to determine the carotid calcification. Results: Carotid calcifications were detected in none of the patients. 84 (74.99%) patients had dental pulp narrowing, and 38 (33.92%) patients had pulp stones. There was no statistical correlation between pulp narrowing and Carotid Artery Calcification (CAC) in the haemodialysis patient group. There was also no statistical correlation between pulp stones and CAC in the haemodialysis patients. Conclusion: However, the incidental finding of CAC on a panoramic radiograph can provide life-saving information for the vascular disease patients, but in the present study, no significant relationship was found between the presence of the pulpal calcification and CAC in the ESRD patients who were on haemodialysis. Therefore, the presence of pulp calcification does not seem to serve as a diagnostic marker for carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:23905147

  8. HDL-mimetic PLGA nanoparticle to target atherosclerosis plaque macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L; Fay, Francois; Lobatto, Mark E; Tang, Jun; Ouimet, Mireille; Kim, YongTae; van der Staay, Susanne E M; van Rijs, Sarian M; Priem, Bram; Zhang, Liangfang; Fisher, Edward A; Moore, Kathryn J; Langer, Robert; Fayad, Zahi A; Mulder, Willem J M

    2015-03-18

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a natural nanoparticle that exhibits an intrinsic affinity for atherosclerotic plaque macrophages. Its natural targeting capability as well as the option to incorporate lipophilic payloads, e.g., imaging or therapeutic components, in both the hydrophobic core and the phospholipid corona make the HDL platform an attractive nanocarrier. To realize controlled release properties, we developed a hybrid polymer/HDL nanoparticle composed of a lipid/apolipoprotein coating that encapsulates a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core. This novel HDL-like nanoparticle (PLGA-HDL) displayed natural HDL characteristics, including preferential uptake by macrophages and a good cholesterol efflux capacity, combined with a typical PLGA nanoparticle slow release profile. In vivo studies carried out with an ApoE knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis showed clear accumulation of PLGA-HDL nanoparticles in atherosclerotic plaques, which colocalized with plaque macrophages. This biomimetic platform integrates the targeting capacity of HDL biomimetic nanoparticles with the characteristic versatility of PLGA-based nanocarriers.

  9. Occupational stress and subclinical atherosclerosis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mark D; Conroy, Lorraine M; Dorevitch, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Background: Stress is a common hazard in the work environment and is associated with multiple adverse health effects. The association between work-related stress (WRS) and cardiovascular disease has been established in a number of epidemiological studies. Methods: A systematic review was conducted according to the PRISMA statement of the English literature involving WRS and carotid artery intima media thickness (CIMT). Results: Four cohorts and six cross-sectional studies of occupational stress and CIMT were identified. All cohorts and five of the cross-sectional studies reported a significant positive association, while one reported an inverse association of WRS and CIMT. Discussion: The weight of the evidence that we were able to identify suggests that occupational stress results in an increased risk of atherosclerosis, assessed via CIMT. Studies that include longitudinal measures of stress and intermediate cardiac endpoints, with adequate accounting for confounders, are needed. Interventional studies should also be conducted to determine whether CIMT progression can be prevented with workplace stress reduction. PMID:25072637

  10. The simulation of magnetic resonance elastography through atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Seale, L E J; Hollis, L; Klatt, D; Sack, I; Roberts, N; Pankaj, P; Hoskins, P R

    2016-06-14

    The clinical diagnosis of atherosclerosis via the measurement of stenosis size is widely acknowledged as an imperfect criterion. The vulnerability of an atherosclerotic plaque to rupture is associated with its mechanical properties. The potential to image these mechanical properties using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) was investigated through synthetic datasets. An image of the steady state wave propagation, equivalent to the first harmonic, can be extracted directly from finite element analysis. Inversion of this displacement data yields a map of the shear modulus, known as an elastogram. The variation of plaque composition, stenosis size, Gaussian noise, filter thresholds and excitation frequency were explored. A decreasing mean shear modulus with an increasing lipid composition was identified through all stenosis sizes. However the inversion algorithm showed sensitivity to parameter variation leading to artefacts which disrupted both the elastograms and quantitative trends. As noise was increased up to a realistic level, the contrast was maintained between the fully fibrous and lipid plaques but lost between the interim compositions. Although incorporating a Butterworth filter improved the performance of the algorithm, restrictive filter thresholds resulted in a reduction of the sensitivity of the algorithm to composition and noise variation. Increasing the excitation frequency improved the techniques ability to image the magnitude of the shear modulus and identify a contrast between compositions. In conclusion, whilst the technique has the potential to image the shear modulus of atherosclerotic plaques, future research will require the integration of a heterogeneous inversion algorithm.

  11. [Glycation of extracellular matrix proteins and its role in atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Kuzan, Aleksandra; Chwiłkowska, Agnieszka; Kobielarz, Magdalena; Pezowicz, Celina; Gamian, Andrzej

    2012-10-29

    Glycation consists in formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) during non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. This review is focused mainly on glycation of collagen and its role in acceleration of vascular disease. Collagen is an extracellular matrix protein characterized by unique structure forming fibrils with great anti-tensile and anti-breaking strength. The protein builds the connective tissue and is responsible for biomechanical properties of blood vessels. It is reported that higher content of glycated collagen correlates with lower elasticity and greater toughness of the vessel walls and, as a consequence, a faster rate of atherosclerosis development. Numerous mechanisms connected with AGE formation are involved in atherogenesis, among others: receptor-mediated production of free radicals, triggering an inflammatory process, activation of leukocytes and thrombocytes, facilitation of LDL binding, change in level of growth factors, adhesion molecules, MMP and some other proteins' expression. The coverages allow the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent or slow down the pathological processes connected with glycation of collagen and other proteins in the artery wall. The main strategies are based on limitation of exogenous AGE, consumption of products which contain rutin, treatment with drugs which inhibit AGE formation, such as pyridoxamine, and chemicals which are able to cleave already formed AGE protein-protein crosslinks, such as ALT-711.

  12. Immunological and microbiological factors in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Virella, M F; Virella, G

    1985-12-01

    Among the several pathological events that lead to the formation of an atheromatous lesion, endothelial cell damage, smooth muscle cell proliferation, and foam cell formation, are considered as particularly significant. In this review we summarize data suggesting that immunological and microbial factors may cause, directly or indirectly, these pathological events. Binding of immunocomplexes to endothelial cells, phagocytic cells, platelets, or erythrocytes could be the starting point for a variety of circuits leading to endothelial cell cytotoxicity and to the release of a variety of mediators, including cell proliferative factors. Endothelial cell toxicity could also be induced, directly or indirectly, by endotoxin; however, the possibility that endotoxin and other microbial factors may induce abnormalities in lipid metabolism at the monocyte/macrophage level which eventually result in intracellular accumulation of cholesterol (particularly if cholesterol levels are elevated) is specially attractive as a potential pathogenic mechanism. The various pathologic pathways discussed in this review appear plausible on the basis of our current knowledge and point to the need to investigate the potential role of infectious processes, autoimmune reactions, and administration of antigenic compounds as possible risk factors for the development of atherosclerosis.

  13. Atherosclerosis: A Link Between Lipid Intake and Protein Tyrosine Nitration

    PubMed Central

    Upmacis, Rita K.

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, a disease characterized by plaque formation in the arterial wall that can lead to heart attack and stroke, is a principal cause of death in the world. Since the 1990’s, protein nitrotyrosine formation has been known to occur in the atherosclerotic plaque. This potentially damaging reaction occurs as a result of tyrosine modification by reactive nitrogen species, such as nitrogen dioxide radical, which forms upon peroxynitrite decomposition or nitrite oxidation by hydrogen peroxide-activated peroxidase enzymes. The presence of protein-bound nitrotyrosine can be considered an indicator of a loss in the natural balance of oxidants and antioxidants, and as such, there is an emerging view that protein-bound nitrotyrosine may be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. This review brings together evidence that the accumulation of protein nitrotyrosine during atherogenesis is more widespread than initially thought (as its presence can be detected not only in the lesion but also in the blood stream and other organs) and is closely linked to lipid intake. PMID:20157638

  14. High-Density Lipoprotein, Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase, and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ossoli, Alice; Pavanello, Chiara; Calabresi, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological data clearly show the existence of a strong inverse correlation between plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and the incidence of coronary heart disease. This relation is explained by a number of atheroprotective properties of HDL, first of all the ability to promote macrophage cholesterol transport. HDL are highly heterogeneous and are continuously remodeled in plasma thanks to the action of a number of proteins and enzymes. Among them, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) plays a crucial role, being the only enzyme able to esterify cholesterol within lipoproteins. LCAT is synthetized by the liver and it has been thought to play a major role in reverse cholesterol transport and in atheroprotection. However, data from animal studies, as well as human studies, have shown contradictory results. Increased LCAT concentrations are associated with increased HDL-C levels but not necessarily with atheroprotection. On the other side, decreased LCAT concentration and activity are associated with decreased HDL-C levels but not with increased atherosclerosis. These contradictory results confirm that HDL-C levels per se do not represent the functionality of the HDL system. PMID:27302716

  15. High-Density Lipoprotein, Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ossoli, Alice; Pavanello, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data clearly show the existence of a strong inverse correlation between plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations and the incidence of coronary heart disease. This relation is explained by a number of atheroprotective properties of HDL, first of all the ability to promote macrophage cholesterol transport. HDL are highly heterogeneous and are continuously remodeled in plasma thanks to the action of a number of proteins and enzymes. Among them, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) plays a crucial role, being the only enzyme able to esterify cholesterol within lipoproteins. LCAT is synthetized by the liver and it has been thought to play a major role in reverse cholesterol transport and in atheroprotection. However, data from animal studies, as well as human studies, have shown contradictory results. Increased LCAT concentrations are associated with increased HDL-C levels but not necessarily with atheroprotection. On the other side, decreased LCAT concentration and activity are associated with decreased HDL-C levels but not with increased atherosclerosis. These contradictory results confirm that HDL-C levels per se do not represent the functionality of the HDL system. PMID:27302716

  16. An Early-Stage Atherosclerosis Research Model Based on Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenfu; Huang, Rong; Jiang, Bo; Zhao, Yuyun; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-04-01

    The arterial microenvironment plays a vital role in the pathology of atherosclerosis (AS). However, the interplay between the arterial microenvironment and atherogenesis remains unclear, partially due to the gap between cell culture and animal experiments. Addressing this problem, the present study reports a microfluidic AS model reconstituting early-stage AS. Physiological or AS-prone hemodynamic conditions are recapitulated on the model. The on-chip model recaptures the atherogenic responses of endothelial cells (ECs) in ways that the Petri dish could not. Significant cytotoxicity of a clinical anti-atherosclerotic drug probucol is discovered on the model, which does not appear on Petri dish but is supported by previous clinical evidence. Moreover, the anti-AS efficiency of platinum-nanoparticles (Pt-NPs) on the model shows excellent consistency with animal experiments. The early-stage AS model shows an excellent connection between Petri dish and animal experiments and highlights its promising role in bridging fundamental AS research, drug screening, and clinical trials. PMID:26890624

  17. Systemic Delivery of MicroRNA-181b Inhibits Nuclear Factor-κB Activation, Vascular Inflammation, and Atherosclerosis in Apolipoprotein E–Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wara, A.K.M.; Icli, Basak; Shvartz, Eugenia; Tesmenitsky, Yevgenia; Belkin, Nathan; Li, Dazhu; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Sukhova, Galina K.; Croce, Kevin; Feinberg, Mark W.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Activated nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling in the vascular endothelium promotes the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Targeting endothelial NF-κB may provide a novel strategy to limit chronic inflammation. Objective To examine the role of microRNA-181b (miR-181b) in endothelial NF-κB signaling and effects on atherosclerosis. Methods and Results MiR-181b expression was reduced in the aortic intima and plasma in apolipoprotein E–deficient mice fed a high-fat diet. Correspondingly, circulating miR-181b in the plasma was markedly reduced in human subjects with coronary artery disease. Systemic delivery of miR-181b resulted in a 2.3-fold overexpression of miR-181b in the aortic intima of apolipoprotein E–deficient mice and suppressed NF-κB signaling revealed by bioluminescence imaging and reduced target gene expression in the aortic arch in apolipoprotein E–deficient/NF-κB-luciferase transgenic mice. MiR-181b significantly inhibited atherosclerotic lesion formation, proinflammatory gene expression and the influx of lesional macrophages and CD4+ T cells in the vessel wall. Mechanistically, miR-181b inhibited the expression of the target gene importin-α3, an effect that reduced NF-κB nuclear translocation specifically in the vascular endothelium of lesions, whereas surprisingly leukocyte NF-κB signaling was unaffected despite a 7-fold overexpression of miR-181b. Our findings uncover that NF-κB nuclear translocation in leukocytes does not involve importin-α3, but rather importin-α5, which miR-181b does not target, highlighting that inhibition of NF-κB signaling in the endothelium is sufficient to mediate miR-181b's protective effects. Conclusions Systemic delivery of miR-181b inhibits the activation of NF-κB and atherosclerosis through cell-specific mechanisms in the vascular endothelium. These findings support the rationale that delivery of miR-181b may provide a novel therapeutic approach to treat chronic inflammatory diseases

  18. Risk factors for atherosclerosis in survivors of myocardial infarction and their spouses: comparison to controls without personal and family history of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Raslová, K; Smolková, B; Vohnout, B; Gasparovic, J; Frohlich, J J

    2001-01-01

    To explore the hypothesis that an interplay between genetic and environmental factors contributes to the development of coronary atherosclerosis, we compared the prevalence of risk factors for atherosclerosis among survivors of myocardial infarction (MI) and their spouses and apparently healthy men and women (spousal pairs) with no personal and family history of atherosclerosis in three generations. There were no significant differences in life-style and dietary habits between the groups. The daily vegetable and/or fruit intake was generally low and did not differ between the groups. Thirty percent and 25% of men and women did not consume any vegetables or fruits, respectively. All differences found in the male MI survivors and control men were also found between the female groups: MI survivors and their spouses were significantly more obese and had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure and more pathologic plasma lipid levels compared with control males and females, respectively. Compared with the control men and women, MI survivors and spouses had higher plasma homocysteine (Hcgamma) levels (15.3 +/- 10.5, 11.9 +/- 4.0, 16.9 +/- 5.5, and 14.3 +/- 4.0, micromol/L, respectively, P = .01). The frequency of the homozygous C677T 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) polymorphism in MI survivors was twice that observed in their spouses and controls (12.1%, 4.8%, and 5.8%, respectively), but this difference did not reach statistical significance. A statistically significant association of the MTHFR genotype and Hcgamma concentration (multiple ANOVA) was shown. Neither the frequencies of apolipoprotein E (apoE) alleles nor Asp9Asn mutation of exon 2, Asn29lSer mutation of exon 6, and Ser447Ter of exon 9 of the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene varied significantly among the groups. A possible explanation for our findings is that individuals with a genetic predisposition for atherosclerosis and their spouses share a life-style that results in a higher body

  19. Next generation fire suppressants

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral band microprocessor controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  20. Next generation fire suppressants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jerry A.

    1995-01-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral ban microprocessors controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  1. Reality of a Vaccine in the Prevention and Treatment of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    García-González, Victor; Delgado-Coello, Blanca; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Mas-Oliva, Jaime

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis together with multiple sclerosis, psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis can be used as examples of chronic inflammatory diseases associated with multifactorial components that evolve over the years. Nevertheless, an important difference between these diseases relies on the fact that atherosclerosis develops from early ages where inflammation dominates the very beginning of the disease. This review highlights the inflammatory nature of atherosclerosis and the role the immune system plays in the process of atherogenesis. Although treatment of atherosclerosis has been for years based on lipid-lowering therapies reducing a series of risk factors, the degree of success has been only limited because cardiovascular complications related to the evolution of atherosclerotic lesions continue to appear in the population worldwide. In this sense, alternative treatments for atherosclerosis have come into play where both innate and adaptive immunity have been proposed to modulate atherosclerosis-associated inflammatory phenomena. When tested for their atheroprotective properties, several immunogens have been studied through passive and active immunization with good results and, therefore, the strategy through vaccination to control the disease has been made possible. Many experimental pre-clinical studies demonstrating proof of concept that vaccination using DNA and protein with an effective use of adjuvants and the optimal route of administration now provide a tangible new therapeutic approach that sets the stage for several of these vaccines to be tested in large, randomized, long-term clinical studies. A vaccine ready for human use will only be accomplished through the close association between academia, regulatory government organizations and private industry, allowing the reality of a simple and successful therapy to reduce atherosclerosis and its severe clinical complications.

  2. Impact of Hydroxychloroquine on Atherosclerosis and Vascular Stiffness in the Presence of Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Ashutosh M.; Bose, Chhanda; Karaduta, Oleg K.; Apostolov, Eugene O.; Kaushal, Gur P.; Fahmi, Tariq; Segal, Mark S.; Shah, Sudhir V.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the largest cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage kidney disease, with nearly half of all deaths attributed to cardiovascular disease. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to have multiple pleiotropic actions relevant to atherosclerosis. We conducted a proof-of-efficacy study to evaluate the effects of hydroxychloroquine in an animal model of atherosclerosis in ApoE knockout mice with and without chronic kidney disease. Forty male, 6-week-old mice were divided into four groups in a 2 x 2 design: sham placebo group; sham treatment group; CKD placebo group; and CKD treatment group. CKD was induced by a two-step surgical procedure. All mice received a high-fat diet through the study duration and were sacrificed after 16 weeks of therapy. Mice were monitored with ante-mortem ultrasonic echography (AUE) for atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness and with post-mortem histology studies for atherosclerosis. Therapy with HCQ significantly reduced the severity of atherosclerosis in CKD mice and sham treated mice. HCQ reduced the area of aortic atherosclerosis on en face examination by approximately 60% in HCQ treated groups compared to the non-treated groups. Additionally, therapy with HCQ resulted in significant reduction in vascular endothelial dysfunction with improvement in vascular elasticity and flow patterns and better-preserved vascular wall thickness across multiple vascular beds. More importantly, we found that presence of CKD had no mitigating effect on HCQ’s anti-atherosclerotic and vasculoprotective effects. These beneficial effects were not due to any significant effect of HCQ on inflammation, renal function, or lipid profile at the end of 16 weeks of therapy. This study, which demonstrates structural and functional protection against atherosclerosis by HCQ, provides a rationale to evaluate its use in CKD patients. Further studies are needed to

  3. Reduction of mouse atherosclerosis by urokinase inhibition or with a limited-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jie Hong; Touch, Phanith; Zhang, Jingwan; Wei, Hao; Liu, Shihui; Lund, Ida K.; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla; Dichek, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Elevated activity of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and MMPs in human arteries is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis, aneurysms, and plaque rupture. We used Apoe-null mice with macrophage-specific uPA overexpression (SR-uPA mice; a well-characterized model of protease-accelerated atherosclerosis) to investigate whether systemic inhibition of proteolytic activity of uPA or a subset of MMPs can reduce protease-induced atherosclerosis and aortic dilation. Methods and results SR-uPA mice were fed a high-fat diet for 10 weeks and treated either with an antibody inhibiting mouse uPA (mU1) or a control antibody. mU1-treated mice were also compared with PBS-treated non-uPA-overexpressing Apoe-null mice. Other SR-uPA mice were treated with one of three doses of a limited-spectrum synthetic MMP inhibitor (XL784) or vehicle. mU1 reduced aortic root intimal lesion area (20%; P = 0.05) and aortic root circumference (12%; P = 0.01). All XL784 doses reduced aortic root intimal lesion area (22–29%) and oil-red-O-positive lesion area (36–42%; P < 0.05 for all doses and both end points), with trends towards reduced aortic root circumference (6–10%). Neither mU1 nor XL784 significantly altered percent aortic surface lesion coverage. Several lines of evidence identified MMP-13 as a mediator of uPA-induced aortic MMP activity. Conclusions Pharmacological inhibition of either uPA or selected MMPs decreased atherosclerosis in SR-uPA mice. uPA inhibition decreased aortic dilation. Differential effects of both agents on aortic root vs. distal aortic atherosclerosis suggest prevention of atherosclerosis progression vs. initiation. Systemic inhibition of uPA or a subset of MMPs shows promise for treating atherosclerosis. PMID:25616415

  4. Impact of Hydroxychloroquine on Atherosclerosis and Vascular Stiffness in the Presence of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Ashutosh M; Bose, Chhanda; Karaduta, Oleg K; Apostolov, Eugene O; Kaushal, Gur P; Fahmi, Tariq; Segal, Mark S; Shah, Sudhir V

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the largest cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage kidney disease, with nearly half of all deaths attributed to cardiovascular disease. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to have multiple pleiotropic actions relevant to atherosclerosis. We conducted a proof-of-efficacy study to evaluate the effects of hydroxychloroquine in an animal model of atherosclerosis in ApoE knockout mice with and without chronic kidney disease. Forty male, 6-week-old mice were divided into four groups in a 2 x 2 design: sham placebo group; sham treatment group; CKD placebo group; and CKD treatment group. CKD was induced by a two-step surgical procedure. All mice received a high-fat diet through the study duration and were sacrificed after 16 weeks of therapy. Mice were monitored with ante-mortem ultrasonic echography (AUE) for atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness and with post-mortem histology studies for atherosclerosis. Therapy with HCQ significantly reduced the severity of atherosclerosis in CKD mice and sham treated mice. HCQ reduced the area of aortic atherosclerosis on en face examination by approximately 60% in HCQ treated groups compared to the non-treated groups. Additionally, therapy with HCQ resulted in significant reduction in vascular endothelial dysfunction with improvement in vascular elasticity and flow patterns and better-preserved vascular wall thickness across multiple vascular beds. More importantly, we found that presence of CKD had no mitigating effect on HCQ's anti-atherosclerotic and vasculoprotective effects. These beneficial effects were not due to any significant effect of HCQ on inflammation, renal function, or lipid profile at the end of 16 weeks of therapy. This study, which demonstrates structural and functional protection against atherosclerosis by HCQ, provides a rationale to evaluate its use in CKD patients. Further studies are needed to

  5. Antisense oligonucleotide reduction of apoB-ameliorated atherosclerosis in LDL receptor-deficient mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Mullick, Adam E.; Fu, Wuxia; Graham, Mark J.; Lee, Richard G.; Witchell, Donna; Bell, Thomas A.; Whipple, Charles P.; Crooke, Rosanne M.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic elevations of plasma apolipoprotein B (apoB) are strongly associated with cardiovascular disease. We have previously demonstrated that inhibition of hepatic apoB mRNA using antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) results in reductions of apoB, VLDL, and LDL in several preclinical animal models and humans. In this study, we evaluated the anti-atherogenic effects of a murine-specific apoB ASO (ISIS 147764) in hypercholesterolemic LDLr deficient (LDLr−/−) mice. ISIS 147764 was administered weekly at 25-100 mg/kg for 10-12 weeks and produced dose-dependent reductions of hepatic apoB mRNA and plasma LDL by 60-90%. No effects on these parameters were seen in mice receiving control ASOs. ApoB ASO treatment also produced dose-dependent reductions of aortic en face and sinus atherosclerosis from 50-90%, with high-dose treatment displaying less disease than the saline-treated, chow-fed LDLr−/− mice. No changes in intestinal cholesterol absorption were seen with apoB ASO treatment, suggesting that the cholesterol-lowering pharmacology of 147764 was primarily due to inhibition of hepatic apoB synthesis and secretion. In summary, ASO-mediated suppression of apoB mRNA expression profoundly reduced plasma lipids and atherogenesis in LDLr−/− mice, leading to the hypothesis that apoB inhibition in humans with impaired LDLr activity may produce similar effects. PMID:21343632

  6. Prevention of atherosclerosis in patients living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    De Lorenzo, Ferruccio; Boffito, Marta; Collot-Teixeira, Sophie; Gazzard, Brian; McGregor, John L; Shotliff, Kevin; Xiao, Han

    2009-01-01

    Investigational product: Rosuvastatin (Crestor®; Astra Zeneca). Active ingredients: Rosuvastatin (5 mg). Study title: Prevention of Atherosclerosis in Patients Living with HIV. Phase of study: Phase III. Aims: Primary aim: To assess whether rosuvastatin therapy could slow the progression of the carotid intima-media thickness (C-IMT; as measured by the change in the mean IMT of the near and far walls of the distal common carotid arteries) over 2 years in HIV-infected patients (HIV-IP). Secondary aims: To assess whether rosuvastatin therapy could reduce highly sensitive C reactive protein (hs-CRP) inflammatory marker that is increased in HIV-IP.To assess the effect of rosuvastatin therapy on serum lipid levels (total cholesterol [TC], low-density lipoprotein [LDL] cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol and triglycerides [TG]) and apolipoproteins (APO A1, APO B and APO B/A1).To assess the safety of rosuvastatin in HIV-IP through the evaluation of clinical laboratory analyses (liver function tests and creatine kinase) and adverse events (AEs). Study design: Two-year randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study. Planned sample size: 320 HIV-IP. Summary of eligibility criteria: HIV-IP who are aged between 30 and 60 years, with a CD4 count. greater than 200 cells/mm3. Patients must be stable on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) for at least 12 months and have a 10-year CVD risk of less than 20% (using the Framingham risk score). Number of study centers: One. Duration of treatment: Two years (5 mg rosuvastatin or placebo once daily). Dose and route of administration: Oral rosuvastatin (5 mg) once daily. The incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in HIV-IP is at least three times higher than in the general population and further increases each year with combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART). The carotid atherosclerosis progression rate is 10 times higher in HIV-IP than in uninfected individuals. The aim of this study

  7. p62-enriched inclusion bodies in macrophages protect against atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sergin, Ismail; Bhattacharya, Somashubhra; Emanuel, Roy; Esen, Emel; Stokes, Carl J.; Evans, Trent D.; Arif, Batool; Curci, John A.; Razani, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic cellular mechanism that degrades dysfunctional proteins and organelles. Atherosclerotic plaque formation is enhanced in mice with macrophages that cannot undergo autophagy because of a deficiency of an autophagy component such as ATG5. We showed that exposure of macrophages to atherogenic lipids led to an increase in the abundance of the autophagy chaperone p62, which colocalized with polyubiquitinated proteins in cytoplasmic inclusions. p62 accumulation was increased in ATG5-null macrophages, which had large cytoplasmic ubiquitin-positive p62 inclusions. Aortas from atherosclerotic mice and plaques from human endarterectomy samples showed increased abundance of p62 and polyubiquitinated proteins that co-localized with plaque macrophages, suggesting that p62-enriched protein aggregates were characteristic of atherosclerosis. The formation of the cytoplasmic inclusions depended on p62 because lipid-loaded p62-null macrophages accumulated polyubiquitinated proteins in a diffuse cytoplasmic pattern. The failure of these aggregates to form was associated with increased secretion of IL-1β and enhanced macrophage apoptosis, which depended on the p62 ubiquitin-binding domain and at least partly involved p62-mediated clearance of NLRP3 inflammasomes. Consistent with our in vitro observations, p62-deficient mice formed greater numbers of more complex atherosclerotic plaques, and p62 deficiency further increased atherosclerotic plaque burden in mice with a macrophage-specific ablation of ATG5. Together, these data suggested that sequestration of cytotoxic ubiquitinated proteins by p62 protects against atherogenesis, a condition in which the clearance of protein aggregates is disrupted. PMID:26732762

  8. Lipids, Menopause and Early Atherosclerosis in SWAN Heart Women

    PubMed Central

    Woodard, Genevieve A.; Brooks, Maria M.; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Mackey, Rachel H.; Matthews, Karen A.; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Objective The risk of cardiovascular disease increases after menopause. Recent evidence suggests that it is possible for HDL to become proatherogenic or dysfunctional in certain situations. Our objective was to evaluate whether the relationship of HDL-C to subclinical cardiovascular disease differed across the menopausal transition, which would provide insight for this increased risk. Methods Aortic calcification (AC), coronary artery calcification (CAC), carotid plaque and intima media thickness (IMT) were measured in the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN Heart). Women, not using hormone therapy, were stratified into premenopausal or early-perimenopausal (Pre/EP, n=316) and late-perimenopausal or postmenopausal (LP/Post, n=224). Results The inverse relationship of HDL-C to subclinical atherosclerosis measures among Pre/EP women was weaker or reversed among LP/post women, adjusted for age, site, race, SBP, glucose, BMI, smoking, menopausal status and LDL-C. Specifically: Multivariable modeling demonstrated an inverse association between HDL-C and AC and IMT, among Pre/EP women; however, the protective effect of HDL-C for AC, left main CAC, carotid plaque and IMT was not seen in LP/Post women. In a small subset (n=53), LP/Post women had more total and small HDL particles, higher triglycerides and more total LDL particles compared to Pre/EP women (p<0.05). Conclusion These results suggest that the protective effect of HDL may be diminished as women transition the menopause. Future studies should examine whether this may be due to changes in HDL size, functionality, or related changes in other lipids or lipoproteins. PMID:21107300

  9. Atherosclerosis diagnostic imaging by optical spectroscopy and optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewko, M. D.; Choo-Smith, L. P.; Ko, A. C. T.; Smith, M. S. D.; Kohlenberg, E. M.; Bock, E. R.; Leonardi, L.; Sowa, M. G.

    2006-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is traditionally viewed as a disease of uncontrolled plaque growth leading to arterial occlusion. More recently, however, occlusion of the arterial lumen is being viewed as an acute event triggered by plaque rupture and thrombosis. An atheromatous plaque becomes vulnerable to sudden activation and/or rupture when a constellation of processes are activated by various trigger mechanisms. There is growing evidence that the vulnerability (i.e. susceptibility to rupture) and thrombogenic nature of the plaque need to be taken into account in the planning and treatment of the disease. X-ray fluoroscopy and intravascular ultrasound, the current clinical diagnostic tools are not capable of the providing a complete histological picture of the plaque region. Intravascular diagnostic imaging of coronary atherosclerotic plaques by optical means to assess plaque, patient risk and assist in planning treatment strategies represents the future in angioplasty treatment by interventional cardiologists. The techniques which will enable a clinically acceptable and reliable intravascular diagnostic platform are currently being investigated and compared to the clinical standard of histology. Currently, we are investigating the use of a number of optical and imaging techniques for biochemical analysis of arterial tissue including Raman, near infrared and fluorescence spectroscopies. Biochemical imaging will provide compositional information on collagen, elastin, lipid and thrombogenic by-products as well as gauging inflammation and tissue remodeling activity levels. To complement the functional biochemical imaging, optical coherence tomography will be provide structural morphological imaging. The synergistic combination of functional and structural imagery will provide the interventional cardiologist with a complete clinical picture of the atherosclerotic plaque region. The clinician can use this diagnostic information to plan a personalized treatment procedure based on

  10. Summation of punishment suppression.

    PubMed

    Van Houten, R; Rudolph, R

    1971-01-01

    In two experiments, eight rats were trained to lever press with food on a variable-interval schedule. Bar pressing produced shock on a variable-interval schedule in the presence of two independently presented stimuli, a light and a tone. Two rats in each experiment received alternative presentations of the light and the tone and were consequently always in the presence of a stimulus that signalled variable-interval punishment. The other two rats in each experiment were treated similarly except that they received periods in which neither light nor tone was present. During these periods, bar pressing was not punished. The two stimuli that signalled punishment were then presented simultaneously to evaluate the effect of stimulus compounding on response suppression. The subjects trained without punishment-free periods did not show summation to the compound stimulus; the subjects trained with punishment-free periods showed summation of suppression. The major difference between the two experiments was the longer mean interval of variable-interval punishment used in the second experiment. This manipulation made the summation effect more resistant to extinction and thus increased its magnitude. PMID:16811483

  11. Mannose binding lectin gene polymorphism and preclinical carotid atherosclerosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    El-Sherif, Wafaa T; Herdan, Omar M; Osman, Mustafa H; Alkady, Eman A M

    2010-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have increased risk of atherosclerosis and CVD that cannot be explained by traditional risk factors. Previous studies indicated that mannose binding lectin (MBL) may modify the development of atherosclerosis. This study was designed to investigate association of MBL gene polymorphism with occurrence of preclinical atherosclerosis in SLE. The study included 46 patients with SLE and 17 age and sex matched controls. MBL2 genotypes were assessed in patients and controls by the PCR-RFLP method and intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery (cclMT) was determined by means of ultrasonography. Also, serological markers were measured and the disease activity index (SLEDAI) was estimated. SLE patients had higher frequency of MBL A/B + B/B genotypes (47.8%) than controls (29.4%). ccIMT was higher in patients having A/B, B/B, A/B+B/B genotypes when compared with wild genotype (A/A). Patients with A/B+B/B genotypes showed high serum level of LDL, TG, ESRI, CRP and SLEDAI score, but low level of HDL, C3, and C4 compared to wild genotype. ccIMT of mutant SLE subgroup correlated well with SLE risk factors for atherosclerosis. In conclusion, mutant genotypes of MBL may be atherogenic as SLE patients had a higher IMT, which correlated significantly with SLE risk factors for atherosclerosis. PMID:23082493

  12. Low dose oral cannabinoid therapy reduces progression of atherosclerosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Steffens, Sabine; Veillard, Niels R; Arnaud, Claire; Pelli, Graziano; Burger, Fabienne; Staub, Christian; Karsak, Meliha; Zimmer, Andreas; Frossard, Jean-Louis; Mach, François

    2005-04-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease, and is the primary cause of heart disease and stroke in Western countries. Derivatives of cannabinoids such as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) modulate immune functions and therefore have potential for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. We investigated the effects of THC in a murine model of established atherosclerosis. Oral administration of THC (1 mg kg(-1) per day) resulted in significant inhibition of disease progression. This effective dose is lower than the dose usually associated with psychotropic effects of THC. Furthermore, we detected the CB2 receptor (the main cannabinoid receptor expressed on immune cells) in both human and mouse atherosclerotic plaques. Lymphoid cells isolated from THC-treated mice showed diminished proliferation capacity and decreased interferon-gamma secretion. Macrophage chemotaxis, which is a crucial step for the development of atherosclerosis, was also inhibited in vitro by THC. All these effects were completely blocked by a specific CB2 receptor antagonist. Our data demonstrate that oral treatment with a low dose of THC inhibits atherosclerosis progression in the apolipoprotein E knockout mouse model, through pleiotropic immunomodulatory effects on lymphoid and myeloid cells. Thus, THC or cannabinoids with activity at the CB2 receptor may be valuable targets for treating atherosclerosis.

  13. Protein kinase C isoforms in atherosclerosis: pro- or anti-inflammatory?

    PubMed

    Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos; Lai, Jenn-Haung

    2014-03-15

    Atherosclerosis is a pathologic condition caused by chronic inflammation in response to lipid deposition in the arterial wall. There are many known contributing factors such as long-term abnormal glucose levels, smoking, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. Under the influence of such factors, immune and non-immune effectors cells are activated and participate during the progression of atherosclerosis. Protein kinase C (PKC) family isoforms are key players in the signal transduction pathways of cellular activation and have been associated with several aspects of the atherosclerotic vascular disease. This review article summarizes the current knowledge of PKC isoforms functions during atherogenesis, and addresses differential roles and disputable observations of PKC isoforms. Among PKC isoforms, both PKCβ and PKCδ are the most attractive and potential therapeutic targets. This commentary discusses in detail the outcomes and current status of clinical trials on PKCβ and PKCδ inhibitors in atherosclerosis-associated disorders like diabetes and myocardial infarction. The risk and benefit of these inhibitors for clinical purposes will be also discussed. This review summarizes what is already being done and what else needs to be done in further targeting PKC isoforms, especially PKCβ and PKCδ, for therapy of atherosclerosis and atherosclerosis-associated vasculopathies in the future. PMID:24440741

  14. Obesity, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia as risk factors for atherosclerosis leading to ischemic events.

    PubMed

    van Rooy, Mia-Jeanne; Pretorius, E

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a widespread disease of the arterial system that is generated by injury to the vasculature due to hypercholesterolemia, hypertension and inflammatory diseases. In the current review, we discuss the role of different risk factors, including obesity, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia in atherosclerosis, which may ultimately lead to either cardiovascular or cerebral complication. Inflammation plays a pivotal role in conjunction with obesity, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia in the etiology of atherosclerosis. We discuss the role of inflammation with regards to reactive oxygen species (ROS) linked to the specific risk factors. The role of nitric oxide (NO) in conjunction with ROS is also important. Correlations of inflammatory cytokines and their functions in the mentioned risk factors are also discussed. The risk factors may ultimately lead to ischemic events, including transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), thrombotic stroke and myocardial infarction. Importantly, it seems as if there is a combination of pathophysiological triggers that may eventually result in atherosclerosis. Therefore, atherosclerosis is not the result of only one risk factor, but a combination of various physiological processes such as homeostasis and the inflammatory response. Ultimately, each patient's risk profile is unique and determines their immediate risk for acute thrombotic events or lethal ischemia.

  15. [Age-related macular degeneration as a local manifestation of atherosclerosis - a novel insight into pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Machalińska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible visual impairment and disability among the elderly in developed countries. There is compelling evidence that atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration share a similar pathogenic process. The association between atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration has been inferred from histological, biochemical and epidemiological studies. Many published data indicate that drusen are similar in molecular composition to plaques in atherosclerosis. Furthermore, a great body of evidence has emerged over the past decade that implicates the chronic inflammatory processes in the pathogenesis and progression of both disorders. We speculate that vascular atherosclerosis and age-related macular degeneration may represent different manifestations of the same disease induced by a pathologic tissue response to the damage caused by oxidative stress and local ischemia. In this review, we characterise in detail a strong association between age-related macular degeneration and atherosclerosis development, and we postulate the hypothesis that age-related macular degeneration is a local manifestation of a systemic disease. This provides a new approach for understanding the aspects of pathogenesis and might improve the prevention and treatment of both diseases which both result from ageing of the human body.

  16. Treg/Th17 balance in stable CAD patients with different stages of coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Potekhina, Alexandra V; Pylaeva, Ekaterina; Provatorov, Sergey; Ruleva, Natalya; Masenko, Valery; Noeva, Elena; Krasnikova, Tatiana; Arefieva, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Immune processes play a significant role in atherosclerosis plaque progression. Regulatory T cells and T helpers 17 were shown to possess anti- and pro-atherogenic activity, respectively. We aimed to investigate the balance of circulating Treg and Th17 in stable angina patients with different stages of coronary atherosclerosis. Methods. Treg, Th17 and Th1 cell frequencies were studied in 117 patients via direct immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry. Group 1 had intact coronary arteries. Group 2 and Group 3 had undergone previous coronary stenting; in Group 2 no coronary atherosclerosis progression was found, in Group 3 patients had disease progression in non-invaded coronary arteries. Group 4 had severe coronary atherosclerosis. Results. The frequencies of CD4+CD25highCD127low, CD4+foxp3+, and CD4+IL10 + T cells were decreased, and CD4+IL17 + T cells frequencies were increased in group 4 vs. 1. Treg/Th17 ratios were declined in groups 3 and 4 vs. groups 1 and 2. IL-10 level was lower while hsCRP and sCD25 levels were higher in group 4 vs. 1. Conclusion. We assume that the imbalance in pro- and anti-inflammatory/atherogenic lymphocyte subpopulations is associated with atherosclerosis progression.

  17. Mitral and aortic valve sclerosis/calcification and carotid atherosclerosis: results from 1065 patients.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andrea; Faggiano, Pompilio; Amado, Alexandra E; Cicoira, Mariantonietta; Bonapace, Stefano; Franceschini, Lorenzo; Dini, Frank L; Ghio, Stefano; Agricola, Eustachio; Temporelli, Pier Luigi; Vassanelli, Corrado

    2014-11-01

    This study assesses whether aortic valve sclerosis (AVS) and mitral annulus calcification (MAC) are associated with carotid artery atherosclerosis, independently of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. A total of 1065 patients underwent both echocardiography and carotid artery ultrasound scanning. AVS and MAC were defined as focal areas of increased echogenicity and thickening of the aortic leaflets or mitral valve annulus. Carotid artery atherosclerosis was defined as presence/absence of any atherosclerotic plaque or presence/absence of plaque >50 %. Of 1065 patients (65 ± 9 years; 38 % female) who comprised the study population, 642 (60 %) had at least one atherosclerotic plaque. AVS, but not mitral valve sclerosis; was associated with the presence of carotid atherosclerosis (odds ratio (OR) 1.9, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.2-3.9; P = 0.005) and the degree of carotid atherosclerosis (OR 2.1, 95 % CI 1.2-3.9; P = 0.01) in a multivariate model including age, gender, previous ischemic heart disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, diabetes, family cardiovascular history, left ventricular size, mass, and ejection fraction, and left atrial size. AVS is a significant predictor of carotid atherosclerosis, independently of other cardiovascular clinical and echocardiographic risk factors.

  18. Endothelium-mediated coronary blood flow modulation in humans. Effects of age, atherosclerosis, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Zeiher, A M; Drexler, H; Saurbier, B; Just, H

    1993-01-01

    The effects of age, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia on vascular function of the coronary circulation were studied by subselective intracoronary infusions of acetylcholine, which releases endothelium-derived relaxing factor, and papaverine, which directly relaxes vascular smooth muscle, in normal patients (n = 18; no risk factors for coronary artery disease), in patients with evidence of early atherosclerosis but normal cholesterol levels and normal blood pressure (n = 12), in patients with hypertension without left ventricular hypertrophy (n = 12), and in patients with hypercholesterolemia (n = 20). Papaverine-induced maximal increases in coronary blood flow were significantly greater in normals, but no differences were noted between the groups of patients with early atherosclerosis, with hypertension, and with hypercholesterolemia. The capacity of the coronary system to increase blood flow in response to acetylcholine was similar in normal and normocholesterolemic patients with epicardial atherosclerosis and/or hypertension but was significantly impaired in patients with hypercholesterolemia, irrespective of evidence of epicardial atherosclerotic lesions. Age (r = -0.62, P < 0.0001) and total serum cholesterol levels (r = -0.70; P < 0.0001) were the only significant independent predictors of a blunted coronary blood flow response to acetylcholine. Thus, hypercholesterolemia and advanced age selectively impair endothelium-mediated relaxation of the coronary microvasculature in response to acetylcholine, whereas endothelial dysfunction is restricted to epicardial arteries in age-matched normocholesterolemic patients with evidence of coronary atherosclerosis and/or hypertension. Images PMID:8349804

  19. Heparin Cofactor II in Atherosclerotic Lesions from the Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth (PDAY) Study

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Jill C.; Deans, Carolyn; Hoffman, Maureane R.; Thomas, David B.; Malcom, Gray T.; Zieske, Arthur W.; Strong, Jack P.; Koch, Gary G.; Church, Frank C.

    2009-01-01

    Heparin cofactor II (HCII) is a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) that has been shown to be a predictor of decreased atherosclerosis in the elderly and protective against atherosclerosis in mice. HCII inhibits thrombin in vitro and HCII-thrombin complexes have been detected in human plasma. Moreover, the mechanism of protection against atherosclerosis in mice was determined to be the inhibition of thrombin. Despite this evidence, the presence of HCII in human atherosclerotic tissue has not been reported. In this study, using samples of coronary arteries obtained from the Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth (PDAY) study, we explore the local relationship between HCII and (pro)thrombin in atherosclerosis. We found that HCII and (pro)thrombin are co-localized in the lipid-rich necrotic core of atheromas. A significant positive correlation between each protein and the severity of the atherosclerotic lesion was present. These results suggest that HCII is in a position to inhibit thrombin in atherosclerotic lesions where thrombin can exert a proatherogenic inflammatory response. However, these results should be tempered by the additional findings from this, and other studies, that indicate the presence of other plasma proteins (antithrombin, albumin, and α1-protease inhibitor) in the same localized region of the atheroma. PMID:19747479

  20. Effect of MTHFR Gene Polymorphism Impact on Atherosclerosis via Genome-Wide Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xuefeng; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Qun; Lei, Xinjun; Wang, Tingzhong; Han, Xuanmao; Ma, Aiqun

    2016-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis seriously threats human health. Homocysteine is an independent risk factor closely related to DNA methylation. MTHFR C667T loci polymorphism is closely associated with homocysteine level. This study aimed to investigate the relationship among MTHFR C667T loci polymorphism, genome-wide methylation, and atherosclerosis. Material/Methods Blood sample was collected from 105 patients with coronary atherosclerosis and 105 healthy controls. Pyrosequencing methylation was used to detect LINE-1 methylation level. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction enzyme fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was used to test MTHFR. Results LINE-1 methylation level in the patient group was significantly lower than in the controls (t=5.007, P<0.001). MTHFR C667T genotype distribution presented marked differences in the 2 groups. TT genotype carriers had significantly increased risk of atherosclerosis (OR=3.56, P=0.009). Three different genotypes of MTHFR C667T loci showed different LINE-1 methylation level between the 2 groups (P<0.01). LINE-1 methylation level in TT and CT genotype carriers was obviously lower than in CC genotype carriers (P<0.05). Conclusions MTHFR C667T loci polymorphism may affect atherosclerosis by regulating genome methylation level. PMID:26828698

  1. The role of a murine transplantation model of atherosclerosis regression in drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Feig, Jonathan E; Quick, John S

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death worldwide. To date, the use of statins to lower LDL levels has been the major intervention used to delay or halt disease progression. These drugs have an incomplete impact on plaque burden and risk, however, as evidenced by the substantial rates of myocardial infarctions that occur in large-scale clinical trials of statins. Thus, it is hoped that by understanding the factors that lead to plaque regression, better approaches to treating atherosclerosis may be developed. A transplantation-based mouse model of atherosclerosis regression has been developed by allowing plaques to form in a model of human atherosclerosis, the apoE-deficient mouse, and then placing these plaques into recipient mice with a normolipidemic plasma environment. Under these conditions, the depletion of foam cells occurs. Interestingly, the disappearance of foam cells was primarily due to migration in a CCR7-dependent manner to regional and systemic lymph nodes after 3 days in the normolipidemic (regression) environment. Further studies using this transplant model demonstrated that liver X receptor and HDL are other factors likely to be involved in plaque regression. In conclusion, through the use of this transplant model, the process of uncovering the pathways regulating atherosclerosis regression has begun, which will ultimately lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:19333880

  2. Keloid scarring, but not Dupuytren’s contracture, is associated with unexplained carotid atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bhavsar, Sankalp; Nimigan, Andre; Hackam, Daniel G.; O’Gorman, David B.; Gan, Bing Siang; Spence, J. David

    2016-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis, a response to injury, may be thought of as scarring in the artery wall. TGF-β and associated signaling molecules have been implicated in the pathophysiology of keloid scarring, Dupuytren’s Contracture and atherosclerotic plaques in independent studies. Purpose To test the hypothesis that excess cutaneous scarring and Dupuytren’s contractures predispose independently to carotid atherosclerosis. Methods Among 1,747 patients with plaque measurements and complete data for multivariable regression analysis, 57 Caucasian patients had Dupuytren’s contractures and 12 had keloid scars. Carotid total plaque area (TPA) was measured by 2-Dimensional ultrasound. Results In linear multivariable regression analysis with coronary risk factors, keloid scars were associated with TPA (P= 0.018), but Dupuytren’s contractures were not. Patients with keloid scarring were younger (P<0.0001), and more likely to be diabetic (P<0.0001) Conclusions Keloid scarring is a clinical clue to excess atherosclerosis not explained by traditional risk factors. Such patients may benefit from therapy directed at targets related to signalling molecules common to both the process of keloid scarring and atherosclerosis. These findings suggest previously unexplored possibilities for the prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis. The differences between Dupuytren’s and keloid scars that may identify such targets are discussed. PMID:19331810

  3. Early Onset Intrauterine Growth Restriction in a Mouse Model of Gestational Hypercholesterolemia and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Busso, Dolores; Mascareño, Lilian; Salas, Francisca; Berkowitz, Loni; Santander, Nicolás; Quiroz, Alonso; Amigo, Ludwig; Valdés, Gloria; Rigotti, Attilio

    2014-01-01

    The susceptibility to develop atherosclerosis is increased by intrauterine growth restriction and prenatal exposure to maternal hypercholesterolemia. Here, we studied whether mouse gestational hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis affected fetal development and growth at different stages of gestation. Female LDLR KO mice fed a proatherogenic, high cholesterol (HC) diet for 3 weeks before conception and during pregnancy exhibited a significant increase in non-HDL cholesterol and developed atherosclerosis. At embryonic days 12.5 (E12.5), E15.5, and E18.5, maternal gestational hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis were associated to a 22–24% reduction in male and female fetal weight without alterations in fetal number/litter or morphology nor placental weight or structure. Feeding the HC diet exclusively at the periconceptional period did not alter fetal growth, suggesting that maternal hypercholesterolemia affected fetal weight only after implantation. Vitamin E supplementation (1,000 UI of α-tocopherol/kg) of HC-fed females did not change the mean weight of E18.5 fetuses but reduced the percentage of fetuses exhibiting body weights below the 10th percentile of weight (HC: 90% vs. HC/VitE: 68%). In conclusion, our results showed that maternal gestational hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in mice were associated to early onset fetal growth restriction and that dietary vitamin E supplementation had a beneficial impact on this condition. PMID:25295255

  4. Coronary, aortic and cerebral atherosclerosis in swine of 3 age-groups: implications*

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliffe, H. L.; Luginbühl, H.; Pivnik, L.

    1970-01-01

    Coronary, aortic and intercranial atherosclerosis has been compared in swine maintained under the following conditions: (1) adequate food and housing but animals held in test social situations for 1 year; postmortem examination at ages of 13 to 15 months; (2) food and management designed for high productivity; postmortem examination at ages of 6 to 9 years; (3) an outdoor system of husbandry and a cooked garbage diet; postmortem examination at ages of 8 to 14 years. Extramural coronary, aortic and intracranial atherosclerosis was most advanced in swine that were fed garbage. Cerebral infarction (cerebromalacia) also was most advanced in these swine but developed in swine of the younger groups in which it was associated with atherosclerosis of small intracranial extracerebral arteries rather than with stenosis of the larger intracranial extracerebral arteries as in the oldest swine. The lesions of atherosclerosis in swine of these 3 age-groups form a continuous series and are morphologically identical with corresponding stages of atherosclerosis of man. It is concluded that swine can replace non-human primates as subjects for studies of atherosclerotic vascular disease, and that experimental designs must allow for age and behaviour patterns of the species. ImagesFIG. 4-7FIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3 PMID:5310139

  5. Matrix Metalloproteinases and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kousios, Andreas; Kouis, Panayiotis

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains a significant problem in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Subclinical atherosclerosis identified by noninvasive methods could improve CVD risk prediction in CKD but these methods are often unavailable. We therefore systematically reviewed whether circulating levels of Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) are associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in CKD, as this would support their use as biomarkers or pharmacologic targets. Methods. All major electronic databases were systematically searched from inception until May 2015 using appropriate terms. Studies involving CKD patients with data on circulating MMPs levels and atherosclerosis were considered and subjected to quality assessment. Results. Overall, 16 studies were identified for qualitative synthesis and 9 studies were included in quantitative synthesis. MMP-2 and TIMP-1 were most frequently studied while most studies assessed carotid Intima-Media Thickness (cIMT) as a measure of subclinical atherosclerosis. Only MMP-2 demonstrated a consistent positive association with cIMT. Considerable variability in cIMT measurement methodology and poor plaque assessment was found. Conclusions. Although MMPs demonstrate great potential as biomarkers of subclinical atherosclerosis, they are understudied in CKD and not enough data existed for meta-analysis. Larger studies involving several MMPs, with more homogenized approaches in determining the atherosclerotic burden in CKD, are needed. PMID:27042350

  6. Association of Early Atherosclerosis with Vascular Wall Shear Stress in Hypercholesterolemic Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Joon; Choi, Woorak; Seo, Eunseok; Yeom, Eunseop

    2015-01-01

    Although atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease, the role of hemodynamic information has become more important. Low and oscillating wall shear stress (WSS) that changes its direction is associated with the early stage of atherosclerosis. Several in vitro and in vivo models were proposed to reveal the relation between the WSS and the early atherosclerosis. However, these models possess technical limitations in mimicking real physiological conditions and monitoring the developmental course of the early atherosclerosis. In this study, a hypercholesterolaemic zebrafish model is proposed as a novel experimental model to resolve these limitations. Zebrafish larvae are optically transparent, which enables temporal observation of pathological variations under in vivo condition. WSS in blood vessels of 15 days post-fertilisation zebrafish was measured using a micro particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique, and spatial distribution of lipid deposition inside the model was quantitatively investigated after feeding high cholesterol diet for 10 days. Lipids were mainly deposited in blood vessel of low WSS. The oscillating WSS was not induced by the blood flows in zebrafish models. The present hypercholesterolaemic zebrafish would be used as a potentially useful model for in vivo study about the effects of low WSS in the early atherosclerosis. PMID:26561854

  7. Angiopoietin-like 4: A double-edged sword in atherosclerosis and ischemic stroke?

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Guo, Zhen-Ni; Yang, Yi; Xu, Jun; Burchell, Sherrefa R; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, Jianmin; Xu, Jing; Zhang, John H

    2015-10-01

    Ischemic stroke is one of the leading causes of death in the world, and thus is a major public health concern. Atherosclerosis, also known as atherogenesis, is a crucial risk factor for cerebral ischemia, yet how it develops remains largely unknown. It has been found, however, that angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4), a protein expressed in vascular endothelial cells, plays a role in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and may therefore be involved in ischemic stroke. ANGPTL4 activity is associated with endothelial cell integrity, inflammation, oxidative stress, and lipid metabolism. ANGPTL4 also serves as a potent inhibitor of the lipoprotein lipase, and may inhibit atherogenesis via regulating inflammatory signaling and lipid metabolism. In addition, ANGPTL4 plays a role in the regulation of oxidative stress. However, there currently exists a controversy on the role of ANGPTL4 in endothelial cells. Some studies indicate that ANGPTL4 can protect the integrity of endothelial cells, while others have shown that it can be destructive to the endothelium, thereby leading to the initiation of atherosclerosis. Thus, the effects of ANGPTL4 on development of atherosclerosis and thereby ischemic stroke, are undefined. Further research is needed to better understand ANGPTL4-mediated signaling pathways in endothelial function and to determine its potentials as therapeutic target for atherosclerosis and ischemic stroke. PMID:26033474

  8. Possible Therapeutic Effect of Stem Cell in Atherosclerosis in Albino Rats. A Histological and Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Kawi, Samraa H; Hashem, Khalid S

    2015-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death worldwide. there are no effective approaches to regressing atherosclerosis due to not fully understood mechanisms. Recently, stem cell-based therapies have held promises to various diseases, including vascular diseases. Aim The present study aimed at investigating the possible effect of cord blood mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy on atherosclerosis. Material and Methods Eighty adult male albino rats were divided into control group (I), atherogenic group (II): subjected to high cholesterol fed diet (200~300 mg/kg body weight) for 12 weeks and 1.8 million units of vitamin D / kg of diet for 6 weeks. Stem cell therapy group (III): injected with stem cells in the tail vein following confirmation of atherosclerosis. Histological, Immunohistochemical and morphometric studies were performed were conducted. Results Atherogenic group (II) showed increased aortic thickness, intimal proliferation, smooth muscle proliferation and migration. Increased area % of collagen fibers, iNOS and vimentin immunoreactions were recorded and proved morphometrically. All findings regressed on stem cell therapy. Conclusion A definite therapeutic effect of mesenchymal stem cells was found on atherosclerosis. PMID:26634068

  9. (Second) Harmonic Disharmony: Nonlinear Microscopy Shines New Light on the Pathology of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Watson, Shana R; Lessner, Susan M

    2016-06-01

    There has been increasing interest in second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging approaches for the investigation of atherosclerosis due to the deep penetration and three-dimensional sectioning capabilities of the nonlinear optical microscope. Atherosclerosis involves remodeling or alteration of the collagenous framework in affected vessels. The disease is often characterized by excessive collagen deposition and altered collagen organization. SHG has the capability to accurately characterize collagen structure, which is an essential component in understanding atherosclerotic lesion development and progression. As a structure-based imaging modality, SHG is most impactful in atherosclerosis evaluation in conjunction with other, chemically specific nonlinear optics (NLO) techniques to identify additional components of the lesion. These include the use of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and two-photon excitation fluorescence for studying atherosclerosis burden, and application of stimulated Raman scattering to image cholesterol crystals. However, very few NLO studies have attempted to quantitate differences in control versus atherosclerotic states or to correlate the application to clinical situations. This review highlights the potential of SHG imaging to directly and indirectly describe atherosclerosis as a pathological condition. PMID:27329310

  10. LDL particle core enrichment in cholesteryl oleate increases proteoglycan binding and promotes atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Melchior, John T.; Sawyer, Janet K.; Kelley, Kathryn L.; Shah, Ramesh; Wilson, Martha D.; Hantgan, Roy R.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies in humans and animals suggest that LDL particle core enrichment in cholesteryl oleate (CO) is associated with increased atherosclerosis. Diet enrichment with MUFAs enhances LDL CO content. Steroyl O-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2) is the enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of much of the CO found in LDL, and gene deletion of SOAT2 minimizes CO in LDL and protects against atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the increased atherosclerosis associated with LDL core enrichment in CO results from an increased affinity of the LDL particle for arterial proteoglycans. ApoB-100-only Ldlr−/− mice with and without Soat2 gene deletions were fed diets enriched in either cis-MUFA or n-3 PUFA, and LDL particles were isolated. LDL:proteogylcan binding was measured using surface plasmon resonance. Particles with higher CO content consistently bound with higher affinity to human biglycan and the amount of binding was shown to be proportional to the extent of atherosclerosis of the LDL donor mice. The data strongly support the thesis that atherosclerosis was induced through enhanced proteoglycan binding of LDL resulting from LDL core CO enrichment. PMID:23804810

  11. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein.

  12. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1994-10-04

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein. 3 figs.

  13. ZERO SUPPRESSION FOR RECORDERS

    DOEpatents

    Fort, W.G.S.

    1958-12-30

    A zero-suppression circuit for self-balancing recorder instruments is presented. The essential elements of the circuit include a converter-amplifier having two inputs, one for a reference voltage and the other for the signal voltage under analysis, and a servomotor with two control windings, one coupled to the a-c output of the converter-amplifier and the other receiving a reference input. Each input circuit to the converter-amplifier has a variable potentiometer and the sliders of the potentiometer are ganged together for movement by the servoinotor. The particular noveity of the circuit resides in the selection of resistance values for the potentiometer and a resistor in series with the potentiometer of the signal circuit to ensure the full value of signal voltage variation is impressed on a recorder mechanism driven by servomotor.

  14. Factors influencing dust suppressant effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, C.R.; Eisele, T.C.; Chesney, D.J.; Kawatra, S.K.

    2008-11-15

    Water sprays are a common method used to reduce particulate matter (PM) emissions. Various factors such as wettability, surface area coverage, fine particle engulfment rates, interparticle adhesion forces, suppressant penetration and suppressant longevity have all been suggested as critical factors in achieving effective PM control. However, it has not been established which of these factors are the most important. Experimental work indicated that suppressant penetration is the most critical of these factors. The length of time after application that suppressants were effective was also improved by using hygroscopic reagents that retained moisture to prevent evaporation. Maximizing suppressant penetration and improving suppressant longevity led to an average 86% reduction in PM10 concentrations in laboratory dust tower tests.

  15. The Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2016-02-01

    Pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is a complex process involving several metabolic and signalling pathways. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that endoplasmic reticulum stress and associated apoptosis can be induced in the pathological conditions of atherosclerotic lesions and contribute to the disease progression. Notably, they may play a role in the development of vulnerable plaques that induce thrombosis and are therefore especially dangerous. Endoplasmic reticulum stress response is regulated by several signaling mechanisms that involve protein kinases and transcription factors. Some of these molecules can be regarded as potential therapeutic targets to improve treatment of atherosclerosis. In this review we will discuss the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in atherosclerosis development in different cell types and summarize the current knowledge on potential therapeutic agents targeting molecules regulating these pathways and their possible use for anti-atherosclerotic therapy.

  16. Visceral adipose tissue as a source of inflammation and promoter of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Nikolaos; Katritsis, Demosthenes; Raggi, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    The current epidemic of obesity with the associated increasing incidence of insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis affecting a large proportion of the North American and Western populations, has generated a strong interest in the potential role of visceral adipose tissue in the development of atherosclerosis and its complications. The intra-abdominal and epicardial space are two compartments that contain visceral adipose tissue with a similar embryological origin. These visceral fats are highly inflamed in obese patients, patients with the metabolic syndrome and in those with established coronary artery disease; additionally they are capable of secreting large quantities of pro-inflammatory cytokines and free fatty acids. There is accumulating evidence to support a direct involvement of these regional adipose tissue deposits in the development of atherosclerosis and its complicating events, as will be reviewed in this article.

  17. A new piece in the puzzling effect of n-3 fatty acids on atherosclerosis?

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Wilfried

    2014-08-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids (n-3) FA are reported to be protective against cardiovascular disease (CVD), notably through their beneficial action on atherosclerosis development. In this context dietary intake of long-chain marine eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is recommended and randomised trials largely support that EPA and DHA intake is associated with a reduction of CVD. However, mechanisms governing the atheroprotective action of n-3 FA are still unclear and numerous studies using mouse models conducted so far do not allow to reach a precise view of the cellular and molecular effects of n-3 FA on atherosclerosis. In the current issue of Atherosclerosis, Chang et al. provide important new information on the anti-atherogenic properties of n-3 FA by analysing the incremental replacement of saturated FA by pure fish oil as a source of EPA and DHA in Ldlr(-/-) mice fed a high fat/high cholesterol diet.

  18. Development of Integrated Multimodality Intravascular Imaging System for Assessing and Characterizing Atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhongping

    Atherosclerosis is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Early detection of plaque lesions is the first and most necessary step towards preventing the lethal consequences of atherosclerosis. Currently, many biomedical imaging techniques aimed at imaging and assessing vulnerable plaques have been reported in literature. Unfortunately, atherosclerosis is often asymptomatic, as vulnerable plaques grow without causing any detrimental side effects until rupturing. Due to this complication, the information provided by a single clinical arterial imaging technique is often insufficient to diagnose vulnerable plaque formation at an early stage. Therefore, an optimal imaging modality for diagnosis and characterization of plaques should combine high spatial resolution capable of resolving fibrous cap thickness, deep imaging depth capable of assessing plaque burden and vessel remodeling, and molecular sensitivity capable of determining tissue composition and mechanical properties.

  19. Wall Shear Stress Characteristics for the Progression of the Disease, Atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, P.; Mandal, D. K.; Manna, N. K.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2014-12-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS) characteristics of a stenosed artery which are the important physiological parameters for the progression of the arterial diseases atherosclerosis, are studied and compared for different Reynolds numbers and different Womersley numbers. Numerical simulations of physiological pulsatile flow through a model stenotic artery are performed by finite volume method. From this study, it is revealed that the chance of formation of atherosclerosis increases with increase in Reynolds number and decreases with increase in Womersley number. The phenomenon of mass transportation across arterial wall is more in case of increase in Womersley number rather than Reynolds number. The chance of formation of atheromatous plaque will be high with higher Reynolds number and Womersley number. In the low WSS region, high magnitude of Womersley number indicates high chance of progression of the disease atherosclerosis. High magnitude of Womersley number with low Reynolds number is more dangerous for the progression of the disease in the low WSS region.

  20. In Vivo ¹⁸F-FDG-PET Imaging in Mouse Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Jesús; Bilbao, Izaskun; Vaquero, Juan José; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; España, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an important technique in cardiovascular research. Vascular inflammation detected by fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET has been shown to predict cardiovascular (CV) events independent of traditional risk factors and is also highly associated with overall burden of atherosclerosis. The use of PET imaging in mouse models of atherosclerosis is challenged by the reduced size of the scanned organs. However, the last generation of dedicated PET scanners has an improved spatial resolution (<1 mm) and increased sensitivity allowing those studies to be performed. Here, we describe a procedure to perform FDG-PET experiments in atherosclerosis mouse models, the required equipment for animal handling and imaging, and the tools and procedures for image analysis and validation of the results.

  1. Apolipoprotein A-I and its mimetics for the treatment of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jonathan D

    2011-01-01

    Although statin treatment leads consistently to a reduction in major adverse coronary events and death in clinical trials, approximately 60 to 70% residual risk of these outcomes still remains. One frontier of investigational drug research is treatment to increase HDL, the ‘good cholesterol’ that is associated with a reduced risk of coronary artery disease. HDL and its major protein apolipoprotein A-I (apoAI) are protective against atherosclerosis through several mechanisms, including the ability to mediate reverse cholesterol transport. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical findings for two types of therapies for the treatment of atherosclerosis: apoAI-containing compounds and apoAI mimetic peptides. Both of these therapies have excellent potential to be useful clinically to promote atherosclerosis regression and stabilize existing plaques, but significant hurdles must be overcome in order to develop these approaches into safe and effective therapies. PMID:20730693

  2. [Effects of coconut juice on the formation of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Zhao, G; Dai, Y; Wang, Y

    1995-07-01

    Eight-week old male quails were fed with high-fat fodder supplemented by 20 milliliters of coconut juice daily for each one for 12 weeks. Results showed coconut juice could increase their serum high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels by 46.2% and reduce their index of atherosclerosis by 41.1% and liver total cholesterol levels by 26.3% in quails, all with a P-value of less than 0.01, as compared in those with high-fat fodder only. Coconut juice could inhibit the formation of atherosclerosis in animals obviously. Coconut juice, as a kind of natural and nutritious drink with an action of keeping-fit, can play certain roles in preventing from hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis with a dose used in animal experiments.

  3. Echium Oil Reduces Atherosclerosis in apoB100-only LDLrKO Mice

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Lolita M.; Boudyguina, Elena; Wilson, Martha D.; Parks, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The anti-atherogenic and hypotriglyceridemic properties of fish oil are attributed to its enrichment in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5, n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6, n-3). Echium oil contains stearidonic acid (SDA; 18:4, n-3), which is metabolized to EPA in humans and mice, resulting in decreased plasma triglycerides. Objective We used apoB100 only, LDLrKO mice to investigate whether echium oil reduces atherosclerosis. Methods Mice were fed palm, echium, or fish oil-containing diets for 16 weeks and plasma lipids, lipoproteins, and atherosclerosis were measured. Results Compared to palm oil, echium oil feeding resulted in significantly less plasma triglyceride and cholesterol levels, and atherosclerosis, comparable to that of fish oil. Conclusion This is the first report that echium oil is anti-atherogenic, suggesting that it may be a botanical alternative to fish oil for atheroprotection. PMID:22100249

  4. Computed tomographic evidence of atherosclerosis in the mummified remains of humans from around the world.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Randall C; Allam, Adel H; Zink, Albert; Wann, L Samuel; Lombardi, Guido P; Cox, Samantha L; Frohlich, Bruno; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Frohlich, Thomas C; King, Samantha I; Miyamoto, Michael I; Monge, Janet M; Valladolid, Clide M; El-Halim Nur El-Din, Abd; Narula, Jagat; Thompson, Adam M; Finch, Caleb E; Thomas, Gregory S

    2014-06-01

    Although atherosclerosis is widely thought to be a disease of modernity, computed tomographic evidence of atherosclerosis has been found in the bodies of a large number of mummies. This article reviews the findings of atherosclerotic calcifications in the remains of ancient people-humans who lived across a very wide span of human history and over most of the inhabited globe. These people had a wide range of diets and lifestyles and traditional modern risk factors do not thoroughly explain the presence and easy detectability of this disease. Nontraditional risk factors such as the inhalation of cooking fire smoke and chronic infection or inflammation might have been important atherogenic factors in ancient times. Study of the genetic and environmental risk factors for atherosclerosis in ancient people may offer insights into this common modern disease. PMID:25667088

  5. AIBP: A Novel Molecule at the Interface of Cholesterol Transport, Angiogenesis, and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Laurence; Fang, Longhou

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease, which is often driven by hypercholesterolemia and subsequent coronary atherosclerosis, is the number-one cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Based on long-term epidemiological studies, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are inversely correlated with risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). HDL-mediated reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) is responsible for cholesterol removal from the peripheral tissues and return to the liver for final elimination.1 In atherosclerosis, intraplaque angiogenesis promotes plaque growth and increases plaque vulnerability. Conceivably, the acceleration of RCT and disruption of intraplaque angiogenesis would inhibit atherosclerosis and reduce CAD. We have identified a protein called apoA-I binding protein (AIBP) that augments HDL functionality by accelerating cholesterol efflux. Furthermore, AIBP inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 activation in endothelial cells and limits angiogenesis.2 The following discusses the prospect of using AIBP as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of CAD. PMID:26634023

  6. The Role and Predictive Value of Cytokines in Atherosclerosis and Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Tousoulis, Dimitris; Economou, Evangelos K; Oikonomou, Evangelos; Papageorgiou, Nikolaos; Siasos, Gerasimos; Latsios, George; Kokkou, Eleni; Mourouzis, Kostantinos; Papaioannou, Spyridon; Deftereos, Spyridon; Cleman, Michael W; Lymberi, Maria; Gennimata, Vasiliki; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is currently regarded as a chronic inflammatory disease that is mediated by several types of cells and molecules. Emphasis has been placed on the role of cytokines and the way they act and interact to initiate and sustain inflammation in the microenvironment of an atherosclerotic plaque. Cytokines are invariably expressed by all cells involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, act on a variety of targets exerting multiple effects and are largely responsible for the crosstalk among endothelial, smooth muscle cells, leukocytes and other vascular residing cells. In the present paper our aim is to review current information on the role of the most commonly discussed cytokines in the process of atherogenesis and to discuss the prognostic significance of these cytokines in atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. PMID:25876746

  7. Endometriosis and atherosclerosis: what we already know and what we have yet to discover.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Luca; D'Onofrio, Ferruccio; Flore, Roberto; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Santoliquido, Angelo

    2015-09-01

    The possible association between endometriosis and atherosclerosis represents an emerging topic in the field of women's health. In this Clinical Opinion paper, we analyze this theme focusing on the pathogenetic mechanisms of both diseases, deeply discussing about what is already known about this association and producing starting points about what we consider suitable to research in the near future with regard to cardiovascular involvement in women affected by endometriosis. We have identified 5 reports specifically carried out to investigate the relationship between atherosclerosis and endometriosis; these studies show the presence of subclinical atherosclerosis in women affected by endometriosis, susceptible of regression after surgical removal of endometriosis, with a possible prognostic relevance for variations of cardiovascular risk in these women. However, to date, no studies in literature have been carried out to investigate the real incidence of cardiovascular events in women with endometriosis.

  8. Recent Advances in Targeted, Self-Assembling Nanoparticles to Address Vascular Damage Due to Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eun Ji; Tirrell, Matthew

    2015-11-18

    Self-assembling nanoparticles functionalized with targeting moieties have significant potential for atherosclerosis nanomedicine. While self-assembly allows the easy construction (and degradation) of nanoparticles with therapeutic or diagnostic functionality, or both, the targeting agent can direct them to a specific molecular marker within a given stage of the disease. Therefore, supramolecular nanoparticles have been investigated in the last decade as molecular imaging agents or explored as nanocarriers that can decrease the systemic toxicity of drugs by producing accumulation predominantly in specific tissues of interest. In this Progress Report, the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and the damage caused to vascular tissue are described, as well as the current diagnostic and treatment options. An overview of targeted strategies using self-assembling nanoparticles is provided, including liposomes, high density lipoproteins, protein cages, micelles, proticles, and perfluorocarbon nanoparticles. Finally, an overview is given of current challenges, limitations, and future applications for personalized medicine in the context of atherosclerosis of self-assembling nanoparticles.

  9. Computed tomographic evidence of atherosclerosis in the mummified remains of humans from around the world.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Randall C; Allam, Adel H; Zink, Albert; Wann, L Samuel; Lombardi, Guido P; Cox, Samantha L; Frohlich, Bruno; Sutherland, M Linda; Sutherland, James D; Frohlich, Thomas C; King, Samantha I; Miyamoto, Michael I; Monge, Janet M; Valladolid, Clide M; El-Halim Nur El-Din, Abd; Narula, Jagat; Thompson, Adam M; Finch, Caleb E; Thomas, Gregory S

    2014-06-01

    Although atherosclerosis is widely thought to be a disease of modernity, computed tomographic evidence of atherosclerosis has been found in the bodies of a large number of mummies. This article reviews the findings of atherosclerotic calcifications in the remains of ancient people-humans who lived across a very wide span of human history and over most of the inhabited globe. These people had a wide range of diets and lifestyles and traditional modern risk factors do not thoroughly explain the presence and easy detectability of this disease. Nontraditional risk factors such as the inhalation of cooking fire smoke and chronic infection or inflammation might have been important atherogenic factors in ancient times. Study of the genetic and environmental risk factors for atherosclerosis in ancient people may offer insights into this common modern disease.

  10. The Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is a complex process involving several metabolic and signalling pathways. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that endoplasmic reticulum stress and associated apoptosis can be induced in the pathological conditions of atherosclerotic lesions and contribute to the disease progression. Notably, they may play a role in the development of vulnerable plaques that induce thrombosis and are therefore especially dangerous. Endoplasmic reticulum stress response is regulated by several signaling mechanisms that involve protein kinases and transcription factors. Some of these molecules can be regarded as potential therapeutic targets to improve treatment of atherosclerosis. In this review we will discuss the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in atherosclerosis development in different cell types and summarize the current knowledge on potential therapeutic agents targeting molecules regulating these pathways and their possible use for anti-atherosclerotic therapy. PMID:26840309

  11. Nature and nurture in atherosclerosis: The roles of acylcarnitine and cell membrane-fatty acid intermediates.

    PubMed

    Blair, Harry C; Sepulveda, Jorge; Papachristou, Dionysios J

    2016-03-01

    Macrophages recycle components of dead cells, including cell membranes. When quantities of lipids from cell membranes of dead cells exceed processing capacity, phospholipid and cholesterol debris accumulate as atheromas. Plasma lipid profiles, particularly HDL and LDL cholesterol, are important tools to monitor atherosclerosis risk. Membrane lipids are exported, as triglycerides or phospholipids, or as cholesterol or cholesterol esters, via lipoproteins for disposal, for re-use in cell membranes, or for fat storage. Alternative assays evaluate other aspects of lipid pathology. A key process underlying atherosclerosis is backup of macrophage fatty acid catabolism. This can be quantified by accumulation of acylcarnitine intermediates in extracellular fluid, a direct assay of adequacy of β-oxidation to deal with membrane fatty acid recycling. Further, membranes of somatic cells, such as red blood cells (RBC), incorporate fatty acids that reflect dietary intake. Changes in RBC lipid composition occur within days of ingesting modified fats. Since diets with high saturated fat content or artificial trans-fatty acids promote atherosclerosis, RBC lipid content shifts occur with atherosclerosis, and can show cellular adaptation to pathologically stiff membranes by increased long-chain doubly unsaturated fatty acid production. Additional metabolic changes with atherosclerosis of potential utility include inflammatory cytokine production, modified macrophage signaling pathways, and altered lipid-handling enzymes. Even after atherosclerotic lesions appear, approaches to minimize macrophage overload by reducing rate of fat metabolism are promising. These include preventive measures, and drugs including statins and the newer PCSK9 inhibitors. New cell-based biochemical and cytokine assays provide data to prevent or monitor atherosclerosis progression. PMID:26133667

  12. The “Mevalonate hypothesis”: a cholesterol-independent alternative for the etiology of atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The “cholesterol hypothesis” is the leading theory to explain the cause of atherosclerosis. The “cholesterol hypothesis” assumes that plasma (LDL) cholesterol is an important causal factor for atherosclerosis. However, data of at least seven placebo controlled randomized prospective trials with various cholesterol lowering drugs show that plasma cholesterol lowering does not necessarily lead to protection against cardiovascular disease. Therefore an alternative hypothesis for the etiology of cardiovascular disease is formulated. This alternative hypothesis, the “mevalonate hypothesis”, assumes that after stimulation of the mevalonate pathway in endothelial cells by inflammatory factors, these cells start producing cholesterol and free radicals. In this hypothesis, only the latter play a role in the etiology of atherosclerosis by contributing to the formation of oxidized cholesterol which is a widely accepted causal factor for atherosclerosis. Regardless of how the mevalonate pathway is activated (by withdrawal of statin drugs, by inflammatory factors or indirectly by reduced intracellular cholesterol levels) in all these cases free radical production is observed as well as cardiovascular disease. Since in the “mevalonate hypothesis” cholesterol is produced at the same time as the free radicals causing atherosclerosis, this hypothesis provides an explanation for the correlation which exists between cardiovascular disease and plasma cholesterol levels. From an evolutionary perspective, concomitant cholesterol production and free radical production in response to inflammatory factors makes sense if one realizes that both activities potentially protect cells and organisms from infection by gram-negative bacteria. In conclusion, data have been collected which suggest that activation of the mevalonate pathway in endothelial cells is likely to be a causal factor for atherosclerosis. This “mevalonate hypothesis” provides a better explanation for results

  13. The androgen receptor confers protection against diet-induced atherosclerosis, obesity, and dyslipidemia in female mice

    PubMed Central

    Fagman, Johan B.; Wilhelmson, Anna S.; Motta, Benedetta M.; Pirazzi, Carlo; Alexanderson, Camilla; De Gendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido; Holmäng, Agneta; Anesten, Fredrik; Jansson, John-Olov; Levin, Malin; Borén, Jan; Ohlsson, Claes; Krettek, Alexandra; Romeo, Stefano; Tivesten, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    Androgens have important cardiometabolic actions in males, but their metabolic role in females is unclear. To determine the physiologic androgen receptor (AR)–dependent actions of androgens on atherogenesis in female mice, we generated female AR-knockout (ARKO) mice on an atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E (apoE)–deficient background. After 8 weeks on a high-fat diet, but not on a normal chow diet, atherosclerosis in aorta was increased in ARKO females (+59% vs. control apoE-deficient mice with intact AR gene). They also displayed increased body weight (+18%), body fat percentage (+62%), and hepatic triglyceride levels, reduced insulin sensitivity, and a marked atherogenic dyslipidemia (serum cholesterol, +52%). Differences in atherosclerosis, body weight, and lipid levels between ARKO and control mice were abolished in mice that were ovariectomized before puberty, consistent with a protective action of ovarian androgens mediated via the AR. Furthermore, the AR agonist dihydrotestosterone reduced atherosclerosis (−41%; thoracic aorta), subcutaneous fat mass (−44%), and cholesterol levels (−35%) in ovariectomized mice, reduced hepatocyte lipid accumulation in hepatoma cells in vitro, and regulated mRNA expression of hepatic genes pivotal for lipid homeostasis. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the AR protects against diet-induced atherosclerosis in female mice and propose that this is mediated by modulation of body composition and lipid metabolism.—Fagman, J. B., Wilhelmson, A. S., Motta, B. M., Pirazzi, C., Alexanderson