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Sample records for iridium oxide microelectrode

  1. Optimization and electrochemical characterization of RF-sputtered iridium oxide microelectrodes for electrical stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Jingquan; Tian, Hongchang; Yang, Bin; NuLi, Yanna; Yang, Chunsheng

    2014-02-01

    A reactively sputtered iridium oxide (IrOx) thin film has been developed as electrochemical modification material for microelectrodes to obtain high stability and charge storage capacity (CSC) in functional electrical stimulation. The effect of the oxygen flow and oxygen to argon ratio during sputtering process on the microstructure and electrochemical properties of the IrOx film is characterized. After optimization, the activated IrOx microelectrode shows the highest CSC of 36.15 mC cm-2 at oxygen flow of 25 sccm and oxygen to argon ratio of (2.5:1). Because the deposition process of the reactively sputtered iridium oxide is an exothermic reaction, it is difficult to form film patterning by the lift-off process. The lift-off process was focused on the partially carbonized photoresist (PR) and normal PR. The higher of the carbonization degree of PR reaches, the longer the immersion duration. However, the patterning process of the iridium oxide film becomes feasible when the sputtering pressure is increasing. The experimental results show that the iridium oxide films forms the pattern with the lowest duration of ultrasonic agitation when the deposition pressure is 4.2 Pa and pressure ratio between O2 and Ar pressure is 3:4.

  2. Penetrating microelectrode arrays with low-impedance sputtered iridium oxide electrode coatings.

    PubMed

    Cogan, Stuart F; Ehrlich, Julia; Plante, Timothy D; Van Wagenen, Rick

    2009-01-01

    Sputtered iridium oxide (SIROF) is a candidate low-impedance coating for neural stimulation and recording electrodes. SIROF on planar substrates has exhibited a high charge-injection capacity and impedance suitable for indwelling cortical microelectrode applications. In the present work, the properties of SIROF electrode coatings deposited onto multi-shank penetrating arrays intended for intracortical and intraneural applications were examined. The charge-injection properties under constant current pulsing were evaluated for a range of pulsewidths and current densities using voltage transients to determine maximum potential excursions in an inorganic model of interstitial fluid at 37 degrees C. The charge-injection capacity of the SIROFs was significantly improved by the use of positive potential biasing in the interpulse period, but even without bias, the SIROFs reversibly inject higher charge than other iridium oxides or platinum. Typical deliverable charge levels of 25 to 160 nC/phase were obtained with 2000 mum(2) electrodes depending on pulsewidth and interpulse bias. Similar sized platinum electrodes could inject 3 to 8 nC/phase.

  3. Iridium Oxide Microelectrode Arrays for In Vitro Stimulation of Individual Rat Neurons from Dissociated Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Eick, Stefan; Wallys, Jens; Hofmann, Boris; van Ooyen, André; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Ingebrandt, Sven; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    We present the first in vitro extracellular stimulation of individual neurons from dissociated cultures with iridium oxide (IrOx) electrodes. Microelectrode arrays with sputtered IrOx films (SIROF) were developed for electrophysiological investigations with electrogenic cells. The microelectrodes were characterized with scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, revealing rough and porous electrodes with enlarged surface areas. As shown by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, the large surface area in combination with the good electrochemical properties of SIROF resulted in high charge storage capacity and low electrode impedance. Thus, we could transfer the good properties of IrOx as material for in vivo stimulation electrodes to multi-electrode arrays with electrode diameters as small as 10 μm for in vitro applications. Single rat cortical neurons from dissociated cultures were successfully stimulated to fire action potentials using single or trains of biphasic rectangular voltage-controlled stimulation pulses. The stimulated cell's membrane potential was simultaneously monitored using whole-cell current-clamp recordings. This experimental configuration allowed direct evaluation of the influence of pulse phase sequence, amplitude, and number on the stimulation success ratio and action potential latency. Negative phase first pulses were more effective for extracellular stimulation and caused reduced latency in comparison to positive phase first pulses. Increasing the pulse amplitude also improved stimulation reliability. However, in order to prevent cell or electrode damage, the pulse amplitude is limited to voltages below the threshold for irreversible electrochemical reactions at the electrode. As an alternative to increasing the amplitude, a higher number of stimulation pulses was also shown to increase stimulation success. PMID:19949459

  4. Iridium oxide microelectrode arrays for in vitro stimulation of individual rat neurons from dissociated cultures.

    PubMed

    Eick, Stefan; Wallys, Jens; Hofmann, Boris; van Ooyen, André; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Ingebrandt, Sven; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    We present the first in vitro extracellular stimulation of individual neurons from dissociated cultures with iridium oxide (IrO(x)) electrodes. Microelectrode arrays with sputtered IrO(x) films (SIROF) were developed for electrophysiological investigations with electrogenic cells. The microelectrodes were characterized with scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, revealing rough and porous electrodes with enlarged surface areas. As shown by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, the large surface area in combination with the good electrochemical properties of SIROF resulted in high charge storage capacity and low electrode impedance. Thus, we could transfer the good properties of IrO(x) as material for in vivo stimulation electrodes to multi-electrode arrays with electrode diameters as small as 10 mum for in vitro applications. Single rat cortical neurons from dissociated cultures were successfully stimulated to fire action potentials using single or trains of biphasic rectangular voltage-controlled stimulation pulses. The stimulated cell's membrane potential was simultaneously monitored using whole-cell current-clamp recordings. This experimental configuration allowed direct evaluation of the influence of pulse phase sequence, amplitude, and number on the stimulation success ratio and action potential latency. Negative phase first pulses were more effective for extracellular stimulation and caused reduced latency in comparison to positive phase first pulses. Increasing the pulse amplitude also improved stimulation reliability. However, in order to prevent cell or electrode damage, the pulse amplitude is limited to voltages below the threshold for irreversible electrochemical reactions at the electrode. As an alternative to increasing the amplitude, a higher number of stimulation pulses was also shown to increase stimulation success.

  5. An iridium oxide microelectrode for monitoring acute local pH changes of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ng, Shu Rui; O'Hare, Danny

    2015-06-21

    pH sensors were fabricated by anodically electrodepositing iridium oxide films (AEIROFs) onto microelectrodes on chips and coated with poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) for mechanical stability. These demonstrate super-Nernstian response to pH from pH 4.0 to 7.7 in chloride-free phosphate buffer. The surface of the chip was coated with fibronectin for the attachment of porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAECs). The working capability of the pH sensor for monitoring acute local pH changes was investigated by stimulating the PAECs with thrombin. Our results show that thrombin induced acute extracellular acidification of PAECs and dissolution of fibronectin, causing the local pH to decrease. The use of PD98059, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor, reduced extracellular acidification and an increase in local pH was observed. This study shows that our pH sensors can facilitate the investigation of acute cellular responses to stimulation by monitoring the real-time, local pH changes of cells attached to the sensors.

  6. Iridium material for hydrothermal oxidation environments

    DOEpatents

    Hong, Glenn T.; Zilberstein, Vladimir A.

    1996-01-01

    A process for hydrothermal oxidation of combustible materials in which, during at least a part of the oxidation, corrosive material is present and makes contact with at least a portion of the apparatus over a contact area on the apparatus. At least a portion of the contact surface area comprises iridium, iridium oxide, an iridium alloy, or a base metal overlaid with an iridium coating. Iridium has been found to be highly resistant to environments encountered in the process of hydrothermal oxidation. Such environments typically contain greater than 50 mole percent water, together with oxygen, carbon dioxide, and a wide range of acids, bases and salts. Pressures are typically about 27.5 to about 1000 bar while temperatures range as high as 800.degree. C.

  7. Sputtered iridium oxide for stimulation electrode coatings.

    PubMed

    Mokwa, Wilfried; Wessling, Boerge; Schnakenberg, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    This work deals with the reactive RF-powered sputter deposition of iridium oxide for use as the active stimulation layer in functional medical implants. The oxygen gettered by the growing films is determined by an approach based on generic curves. Films deposited at different stages of oxygen integration show strong differences in electrochemical behaviour, caused by different morphologies. The dependence of electrochemical activity on morphology is further illustrated by RF sputtering onto heated substrates, as well as DC sputtering onto cold substrates.

  8. On the Extreme Oxidation States of Iridium.

    PubMed

    Pyykkö, Pekka; Xu, Wen-Hua

    2015-06-22

    It has recently been suggested that the oxidation states of Ir run from the putative -III in the synthesized solid Na3 [Ir(CO)3 ] to the well-documented +IX in the species IrO4 (+) . Furthermore, [Ir(CO)3 ](3-) was identified as an 18-electron species. A closer DFT study now finds support for this picture: The orbitals spanned by the 6s,6p,5d orbitals of the iridium are all occupied. Although some have considerable ligand character, the deviations from 18 e leave the orbital symmetries unchanged. The isoelectronic systems from Os(-IV) to Au(-I) behave similarly, suggesting further possible species. To paraphrase Richard P. Feynmann "there is plenty of room at the bottom".

  9. Homogeneous and heterogenized iridium water oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchioni, Alceo

    2014-10-01

    The development of an efficient catalyst for the oxidative splitting of water into molecular oxygen, protons and electrons is of key importance for producing solar fuels through artificial photosynthesis. We are facing the problem by means of a rational approach aimed at understanding how catalytic performance may be optimized by the knowledge of the reaction mechanism of water oxidation and the fate of the catalytic site under the inevitably harsh oxidative conditions. For the purposes of our study we selected iridium water oxidation catalysts, exhibiting remarkable performance (TOF > 5 s-1 and TON > 20000). In particular, we recently focused our attention on [Cp*Ir(N,O)X] (N,O = 2-pyridincarboxylate; X = Cl or NO3) and [IrCl(Hedta)]Na water oxidation catalysts. The former exhibited a remarkable TOF whereas the latter showed a very high TON. Furthermore, [IrCl(Hedta)]Na was heterogenized onto TiO2 taking advantage of the presence of a dandling -COOH functionality. The heterogenized catalyst maintained approximately the same catalytic activity of the homogeneous analogous with the advantage that could be reused many times. Mechanistic studies were performed in order to shed some light on the rate-determining step and the transformation of catalysts when exposed to "oxidative stress". It was found that the last oxidative step, preceding oxygen liberation, is the rate-determining step when a small excess of sacrificial oxidant is used. In addition, several intermediates of the oxidative transformation of the catalyst were intercepted and characterized by NMR, X-Ray diffractometry and ESI-MS.

  10. IRIDIUM OXIDE PH MICROELECTRODE. (R825549C027)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  11. IRIDIUM OXIDE PH MICROELECTRODE. (R825549C027)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  12. Contribution of oxygen reduction to charge injection on platinum and sputtered iridium oxide neural stimulation electrodes.

    PubMed

    Cogan, Stuart F; Ehrlich, Julia; Plante, Timothy D; Gingerich, Marcus D; Shire, Douglas B

    2010-09-01

    The extent to which oxygen reduction occurs on sputtered iridium oxide (SIROF) and platinum neural stimulation electrodes was quantified by cyclic voltammetry and voltage-transient measurements in oxygen-saturated physiological saline. Oxygen reduction was the dominant charge-admittance reaction on platinum electrodes during slow-sweep-rate cyclic voltammetry, contributing approximately 12 mC/cm(2) (88% of total charge) to overall cathodal charge capacity. For a 300-nm-thick SIROF electrode, oxygen reduction was a minor reaction contributing 1.3 mC/cm(2), approximately 3% of total charge. During current pulsing with platinum electrodes, oxygen reduction was observed at a level of 7% of the total injected charge. There was no indication of oxygen reduction on pulsed SIROF electrodes. A sweep-rate-dependent contribution of oxygen reduction was observed on penetrating SIROF microelectrodes (nominal surface area 2000 microm(2)) and is interpreted in terms of rate-limited diffusion of oxygen in electrolyte that penetrates the junction between the insulation and electrode shaft. For typical neural stimulation pulses, no oxygen reduction could be observed on penetrating SIROF microelectrodes. Based on the in vivo concentration of dissolved oxygen, it is estimated that oxygen reduction on platinum microelectrodes will contribute less than 0.5% of the total injected charge and considerably less on SIROF electrodes.

  13. Electrodeposited iridium oxide for neural stimulation and recording electrodes.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R D; Cogan, S F; Nguyen, T H; Rauh, R D

    2001-03-01

    Iridium oxide films formed by electrodeposition onto noniridium metal substrates are compared with activated iridium oxide films (AIROFs) as a low impedance, high charge capacity coating for neural stimulation and recording electrodes. The electrodeposited iridium oxide films (EIROFs) were deposited on Au, Pt, PtIr, and 316 LVM stainless steel substrates from a solution of IrCl4, oxalic acid, and K2CO3. A deposition protocol involving 50 potential sweeps at 50 mV/s between limits of 0.0 V and 0.55 V (versus Ag AgCl) followed by potential pulsing between the same limits produced adherent films with a charge storage capacity of >25 mC/cm2. Characterization by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy revealed no differences in the electrochemical behavior of EIROF on non-Ir substrates and AIROF. The mechanical stability of the oxides was evaluated by ultrasonication in distilled water followed by dehydration and rehydration. Stability under charge injection was evaluated using 200 micros, 5.9 A/cm2 (1.2 mC/cm2) cathodal pulses. Loss of iridium oxide charge capacity was comparable for AIROFs and the EIROFs, ranging from 1% to 8% of the capacity immediately after activation or deposition. The EIROFs were deposited and evaluated on silicon microprobe electrodes and on metallized polyimide electrodes being developed for neural recording and stimulation applications.

  14. Highly sensitive reduced graphene oxide microelectrode array sensor.

    PubMed

    Ng, Andrew M H; Kenry; Teck Lim, Chwee; Low, Hong Yee; Loh, Kian Ping

    2015-03-15

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) has been fabricated into a microelectrode array (MEA) using a modified nanoimprint lithography (NIL) technique. Through a modified NIL process, the rGO MEA was fabricated by a self-alignment of conducting Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) and rGO layer without etching of the rGO layer. The rGO MEA consists of an array of 10μm circular disks and microelectrode signature has been found at a pitch spacing of 60μm. The rGO MEA shows a sensitivity of 1.91nAμm(-1) to dopamine (DA) without the use of mediators or functionalization of the reduced graphene oxide (rGO) active layer. The performance of rGO MEA remains stable when tested under highly resistive media using a continuous flow set up, as well as when subjecting it to mechanical stress. The successful demonstration of NIL for fabricating rGO microelectrodes on flexible substrate presents a route for the large scale fabrication of highly sensitive, flexible and thin biosensing platform.

  15. Iridium-Doped Ruthenium Oxide Catalyst for Oxygen Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Narayan, Sri R.; Billings, Keith J.

    2011-01-01

    NASA requires a durable and efficient catalyst for the electrolysis of water in a polymer-electrolyte-membrane (PEM) cell. Ruthenium oxide in a slightly reduced form is known to be a very efficient catalyst for the anodic oxidation of water to oxygen, but it degrades rapidly, reducing efficiency. To combat this tendency of ruthenium oxide to change oxidation states, it is combined with iridium, which has a tendency to stabilize ruthenium oxide at oxygen evolution potentials. The novel oxygen evolution catalyst was fabricated under flowing argon in order to allow the iridium to preferentially react with oxygen from the ruthenium oxide, and not oxygen from the environment. Nanoparticulate iridium black and anhydrous ruthenium oxide are weighed out and mixed to 5 18 atomic percent. They are then heat treated at 300 C under flowing argon (in order to create an inert environment) for a minimum of 14 hours. This temperature was chosen because it is approximately the creep temperature of ruthenium oxide, and is below the sintering temperature of both materials. In general, the temperature should always be below the sintering temperature of both materials. The iridium- doped ruthenium oxide catalyst is then fabricated into a PEM-based membrane- electrode assembly (MEA), and then mounted into test cells. The result is an electrolyzer system that can sustain electrolysis at twice the current density, and at the same efficiency as commercial catalysts in the range of 100-200 mA/sq cm. At 200 mA/sq cm, this new system operates at an efficiency of 85 percent, which is 2 percent greater than commercially available catalysts. Testing has shown that this material is as stable as commercially available oxygen evolution catalysts. This means that this new catalyst can be used to regenerate fuel cell systems in space, and as a hydrogen generator on Earth.

  16. Phase control of iridium and iridium oxide thin films in atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung-Wook; Kwon, Se-Hun; Kwak, Dong-Kee; Kang, Sang-Won

    2008-01-15

    The atomic layer deposition of iridium (Ir) and iridium oxide (IrO{sub 2}) films was investigated using an alternating supply of (ethylcyclopentadienyl)(1,5-cyclooctadiene) iridium and oxygen gas at temperatures between 230 and 290 deg. C. The phase transition between Ir and IrO{sub 2} occurred at the critical oxygen partial pressure during the oxygen injection pulse. The oxygen partial pressure was controlled by the O{sub 2}/(Ar+O{sub 2}) ratio or deposition pressures. The resistivity of the deposited Ir and IrO{sub 2} films was about 9 and 120 {mu}{omega} cm, respectively. In addition, the critical oxygen partial pressure for the phase transition between Ir and IrO{sub 2} was increased with increasing the deposition temperature. Thus, the phase of the deposited film, either Ir or IrO{sub 2}, was controlled by the oxygen partial pressure and the deposition temperature. However, the formation of a thin Ir layer was detected between the IrO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} substrate. To remove this interfacial layer, the oxygen partial pressure is increased to a severe condition. And the impurity contents were below the detection limit of Auger electron spectroscopy in both Ir and IrO{sub 2} films.

  17. Excimer laser deinsulation of Parylene-C on iridium for use in an activated iridium oxide film-coated Utah electrode array.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Je-Min; Negi, Sandeep; Tathireddy, Prashant; Solzbacher, Florian; Song, Jong-In; Rieth, Loren W

    2013-04-30

    Implantable microelectrodes provide a measure to electrically stimulate neurons in the brain and spinal cord and record their electrophysiological activity. A material with a high charge capacity such as activated or sputter-deposited iridium oxide film (AIROF or SIROF) is used as an interface. The Utah electrode array (UEA) uses SIROF for its interface material with neural tissue and oxygen plasma etching (OPE) with an aluminium foil mask to expose the active area, where the interface between the electrode and neural tissue is formed. However, deinsulation of Parylene-C using OPE has limitations, including the lack of uniformity in the exposed area and reproducibility. While the deinsulation of Parylene-C using an excimer laser is proven to be an alternative for overcoming the limitations, the iridium oxide (IrOx) suffers from fracture when high laser fluence (>1000 mJ/cm2) is used. Iridium (Ir), which has a much higher fracture resistance than IrOx, can be deposited before excimer laser deinsulation and then the exposed Ir film area can be activated by electrochemical treatment to acquire the AIROF. Characterisation of the laser-ablated Ir film and AIROF by surface analysis (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, and atomic force microscope) and electrochemical analysis (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry) shows that the damage on the Ir film induced by laser irradiation is significantly less than that on SIROF, and the AIROF has a high charge storage capacity. The results show the potential of the laser deinsulation technique for use in high performance AIROF-coated UEA fabrication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Excimer laser deinsulation of Parylene-C on iridium for use in an activated iridium oxide film-coated Utah electrode array

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Je-Min; Negi, Sandeep; Tathireddy, Prashant; Solzbacher, Florian; Song, Jong-In; Rieth, Loren W.

    2013-01-01

    Implantable microelectrodes provide a measure to electrically stimulate neurons in the brain and spinal cord and record their electrophysiological activity. A material with a high charge capacity such as activated or sputter-deposited iridium oxide film (AIROF or SIROF) is used as an interface. The Utah electrode array (UEA) uses SIROF for its interface material with neural tissue and oxygen plasma etching (OPE) with an aluminium foil mask to expose the active area, where the interface between the electrode and neural tissue is formed. However, deinsulation of Parylene-C using OPE has limitations, including the lack of uniformity in the exposed area and reproducibility. While the deinsulation of Parylene-C using an excimer laser is proven to be an alternative for overcoming the limitations, the iridium oxide (IrOx) suffers from fracture when high laser fluence (>1000 mJ/cm2) is used. Iridium (Ir), which has a much higher fracture resistance than IrOx, can be deposited before excimer laser deinsulation and then the exposed Ir film area can be activated by electrochemical treatment to acquire the AIROF. Characterisation of the laser-ablated Ir film and AIROF by surface analysis (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, and atomic force microscope) and electrochemical analysis (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry) shows that the damage on the Ir film induced by laser irradiation is significantly less than that on SIROF, and the AIROF has a high charge storage capacity. The results show the potential of the laser deinsulation technique for use in high performance AIROF-coated UEA fabrication. PMID:23458659

  19. Mercury Underpotential Deposition to Determine Iridium and Iridium Oxide Electrochemical Surface Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Alia, Shaun M.; Hurst, Katherine E.; Kocha, Shyam S.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2016-06-02

    Determining the surface areas of electrocatalysts is critical for separating the key properties of area-specific activity and electrochemical surface area from mass activity. Hydrogen underpotential deposition and carbon monoxide oxidation are typically used to evaluate iridium (Ir) surface areas, but are ineffective on oxides and can be sensitive to surface oxides formed on Ir metals. Mercury underpotential deposition is presented in this study as an alternative, able to produce reasonable surface areas on Ir and Ir oxide nanoparticles, and able to produce similar surface areas prior to and following characterization in oxygen evolution. Reliable electrochemical surface areas allow for comparative studies of different catalyst types and the characterization of advanced oxygen evolution catalysts. Lastly, they also enable the study of catalyst degradation in durability testing, both areas of increasing importance within electrolysis and electrocatalysis.

  20. Mercury Underpotential Deposition to Determine Iridium and Iridium Oxide Electrochemical Surface Areas

    DOE PAGES

    Alia, Shaun M.; Hurst, Katherine E.; Kocha, Shyam S.; ...

    2016-06-02

    Determining the surface areas of electrocatalysts is critical for separating the key properties of area-specific activity and electrochemical surface area from mass activity. Hydrogen underpotential deposition and carbon monoxide oxidation are typically used to evaluate iridium (Ir) surface areas, but are ineffective on oxides and can be sensitive to surface oxides formed on Ir metals. Mercury underpotential deposition is presented in this study as an alternative, able to produce reasonable surface areas on Ir and Ir oxide nanoparticles, and able to produce similar surface areas prior to and following characterization in oxygen evolution. Reliable electrochemical surface areas allow for comparativemore » studies of different catalyst types and the characterization of advanced oxygen evolution catalysts. Lastly, they also enable the study of catalyst degradation in durability testing, both areas of increasing importance within electrolysis and electrocatalysis.« less

  1. Photochemical Oxidative Growth of Iridium Oxide Nanoparticles on CdSe@CdS Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Kalisman, Philip; Nakibli, Yifat; Amirav, Lilac

    2016-02-11

    We demonstrate a procedure for the photochemical oxidative growth of iridium oxide catalysts on the surface of seeded cadmium selenide-cadmium sulfide (CdSe@CdS) nanorod photocatalysts. Seeded rods are grown using a colloidal hot-injection method and then moved to an aqueous medium by ligand exchange. CdSe@CdS nanorods, an iridium precursor and other salts are mixed and illuminated. The deposition process is initiated by absorption of photons by the semiconductor particle, which results with formation of charge carriers that are used to promote redox reactions. To insure photochemical oxidative growth we used an electron scavenger. The photogenerated holes oxidize the iridium precursor, apparently in a mediated oxidative pathway. This results in the growth of high quality crystalline iridium oxide particles, ranging from 0.5 nm to about 3 nm, along the surface of the rod. Iridium oxide grown on CdSe@CdS heterostructures was studied by a variety of characterization methods, in order to evaluate its characteristics and quality. We explored means for control over particle size, crystallinity, deposition location on the CdS rod, and composition. Illumination time and excitation wavelength were found to be key parameters for such control. The influence of different growth conditions and the characterization of these heterostructures are described alongside a detailed description of their synthesis. Of significance is the fact that the addition of iridium oxide afforded the rods astounding photochemical stability under prolonged illumination in pure water (alleviating the requirement for hole scavengers).

  2. Multi-unit recording with iridium oxide modified stereotrodes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Cheng; Zhang, Yuanyuan; He, Wei; Wei, Pengfei; Lu, Yi; Zhu, Yan; Liu, Li; Wang, Liping

    2014-01-30

    Drosophila is a very favorable animal model for the studies of neuroscience. However, it remains a great challenge to employ electrophysiological approaches in Drosophila to study the neuronal assembly dynamics in vivo, partially due to the small size of the Drosophila brain. Small and sensitive microelectrodes for multi-unit recordings are greatly desired. We fabricated micro-scale stereotrodes for electrical recordings in Drosophila melanogaster. The stereotrodes were modified with iridium oxide (IrO2) under a highly controllable deposition procedure to improve their electrochemical properties. Electrical recordings were carried out using the IrO2 stereotrodes to detect spontaneous action potentials and LFPs in vivo. The IrO2 electrodes exhibited significantly higher capacitance and lower impedance at 1 kHz. Electrical recording with the IrO2 stereotrodes in vivo demonstrated an average signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 7.3 and a significantly improved LFP sensitivity. 5 types of different neurons recorded were clearly separated. Electrophysiological responses to visual and odor stimulation were also detected, respectively. The most widely used electrodes for electrical recording in Drosophila are glass microelectrode and sharpened tungsten microelectrode, which are typically used for single-unit recordings. Although tetrode technology has been used to record multi-neuronal activities from Drosophila, the fabricated IrO2 stereotrodes possess smaller geometry size but exhibited comparable recording signal-to noise ration and better sorting quality. The IrO2 stereotrodes are capable to meet the requirements of multi-unit recording and spike sorting, which will be a useful tool for the electrophysiology-based researches especially in Drosophila and other small animals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of sputtered iridium oxide as a stimulating/sensing material for neural prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negi, Sandeep

    Neural interface devices are developed for neuroscience and neuroprosthetics applications to record and stimulate nerve signals. Microelectrodes represent the direct interface between the biological tissue and the electronic system in neural prostheses that serve to record electrical signals from the nerves to obtain information from the natural sensors of the body or the motor fibers of the muscles. Also, the microelectrodes can inject charge into the targeted tissue to functionally excite nerves and muscles by electrical stimulation. Overall, the neural microelectrodes have to measure electrical potentials and have to exchange charge between the solid state of the electrode and the fluid state of the electrolyte in the body. Therefore, the interface between the microelectrode and biological fluid is a critical factor for the performance of the neural device. The interface properties depend mainly on the physical, electrical and chemical property of the electrode material. Even though a large selection of electrode materials has been tested for this purpose, to date no electrode material or coating process presented in scientific literature has been identified or qualified for long-term stimulation and recording neural signals. In this work, sputtered iridium oxide film (SIROF) was investigated as a potential electrode material. SIROF was deposited on the microelectrodes by reactive pulsed DC sputtering. The deposition parameters and corresponding film properties were examined and correlated with the stimulation and recording characteristics. Furthermore, for chronic applications, the stability of SIROF was investigated and stimulation protocol was determined for damage threshold of the film. The sputtering pressure was varied to obtain SIROF with desired properties. The SIROF properties were optimized based on its ability to inject charge in the tissue and its mechanical strength. The electrochemical characterization of SIROF was studied by electrochemical

  4. Sputtered iridium oxide films (SIROFs) for neural stimulation electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Ehrlich, Julia; Plante, Timothy D.; Smirnov, Anton; Shire, Douglas B.; Gingerich, Marcus; Rizzo, Joseph F.

    2009-01-01

    Sputtered iridium oxide films (SIROFs) deposited by DC reactive sputtering from an iridium metal target have been characterized in vitro for their potential as neural recording and stimulation electrodes. SIROFs were deposited over gold metallization on flexible multielectrode arrays fabricated on thin (15 µm) polyimide substrates. SIROF thickness and electrode areas of 200–1300 nm and 1960–125600 µm2, respectively, were investigated. The charge-injection capacities of the SIROFs were evaluated in an inorganic interstitial fluid model in response to charge-balanced, cathodal-first current pulses. Charge injection capacities were measured as a function of cathodal pulse width (0.2 – 1 ms) and potential bias in the interpulse period (0.0 to 0.7 V vs. Ag|AgCl). Depending on the pulse parameters and electrode area, charge-injection capacities ranged from 1–9 mC/cm2, comparable with activated iridium oxide films (AIROFs) pulsed under similar conditions. Other parameters relevant to the use of SIROF on nerve electrodes, including the thickness dependence of impedance (0.05–105 Hz) and the current necessary to maintain a bias in the interpulse region were also determined. PMID:17271216

  5. Sol-Gel Deposition of Iridium Oxide for Biomedical Micro-Devices

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Cuong M.; Rao, Smitha; Yang, Xuesong; Dubey, Souvik; Mays, Jeffrey; Cao, Hung; Chiao, Jung-Chih

    2015-01-01

    Flexible iridium oxide (IrOx)-based micro-electrodes were fabricated on flexible polyimide substrates using a sol-gel deposition process for utilization as integrated pseudo-reference electrodes for bio-electrochemical sensing applications. The fabrication method yields reliable miniature on-probe IrOx electrodes with long lifetime, high stability and repeatability. Such sensors can be used for long-term measurements. Various dimensions of sol-gel iridium oxide electrodes including 1 mm × 1 mm, 500 μm × 500 μm, and 100 μm × 100 μm were fabricated. Sensor longevity and pH dependence were investigated by immersing the electrodes in hydrochloric acid, fetal bovine serum (FBS), and sodium hydroxide solutions for 30 days. Less pH dependent responses, compared to IrOx electrodes fabricated by electrochemical deposition processes, were measured at 58.8 ± 0.4 mV/pH, 53.8 ± 1.3 mV/pH and 48 ± 0.6 mV/pH, respectively. The on-probe IrOx pseudo-reference electrodes were utilized for dopamine sensing. The baseline responses of the sensors were higher than the one using an external Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Using IrOx reference electrodes integrated on the same probe with working electrodes eliminated the use of cytotoxic Ag/AgCl reference electrode without loss in sensitivity. This enables employing such sensors in long-term recording of concentrations of neurotransmitters in central nervous systems of animals and humans. PMID:25686309

  6. Sol-gel deposition of iridium oxide for biomedical micro-devices.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong M; Rao, Smitha; Yang, Xuesong; Dubey, Souvik; Mays, Jeffrey; Cao, Hung; Chiao, Jung-Chih

    2015-02-12

    Flexible iridium oxide (IrOx)-based micro-electrodes were fabricated on flexible polyimide substrates using a sol-gel deposition process for utilization as integrated pseudo-reference electrodes for bio-electrochemical sensing applications. The fabrication method yields reliable miniature on-probe IrOx electrodes with long lifetime, high stability and repeatability. Such sensors can be used for long-term measurements. Various dimensions of sol-gel iridium oxide electrodes including 1 mm × 1 mm, 500 µm × 500 µm, and 100 µm × 100 µm were fabricated. Sensor longevity and pH dependence were investigated by immersing the electrodes in hydrochloric acid, fetal bovine serum (FBS), and sodium hydroxide solutions for 30 days. Less pH dependent responses, compared to IrOx electrodes fabricated by electrochemical deposition processes, were measured at 58.8 ± 0.4 mV/pH, 53.8 ± 1.3 mV/pH and 48 ± 0.6 mV/pH, respectively. The on-probe IrOx pseudo-reference electrodes were utilized for dopamine sensing. The baseline responses of the sensors were higher than the one using an external Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Using IrOx reference electrodes integrated on the same probe with working electrodes eliminated the use of cytotoxic Ag/AgCl reference electrode without loss in sensitivity. This enables employing such sensors in long-term recording of concentrations of neurotransmitters in central nervous systems of animals and humans.

  7. Properties of mixed molybdenum oxide iridium oxide thin films synthesized by spray pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, P. S.; Kawar, R. K.; Sadale, S. B.; Inamdar, A. I.; Deshmukh, H. P.

    2006-09-01

    Molybdenum-doped iridium oxide thin films have been deposited onto corning glass- and fluorine-doped tin oxide coated corning glass substrates at 350 °C by using a pneumatic spray pyrolysis technique. An aqueous solution of 0.01 M ammonium molybdate was mixed with 0.01 M iridium trichloride solution in different volume proportions and the resultant solution was used as a precursor solution for spraying. The as-deposited samples were annealed at 600 °C in air medium for 1 h. The structural, electrical and optical properties of as-deposited and annealed Mo-doped iridium oxide were studied and values of room temperature electrical resistivity, and thermoelectric power were estimated. The as-deposited samples with 2% Mo doping exhibit more pronounced electrochromism than other samples, including pristine Ir oxide.

  8. Sputtered iridium oxide films (SIROFs) for low-impedance neural stimulation and recording electrodes.

    PubMed

    Cogan, S F; Plante, T D; Ehrlich, J

    2004-01-01

    Iridium oxide films formed by electrochemical activation of iridium metal (AIROF) or by electrochemical deposition (EIROF) are being evaluated as low-impedance charge-injection coatings for neural stimulation and recording. Iridium oxide may also be deposited by reactive sputtering from iridium metal in an oxidizing plasma. The characterization of sputtered iridium oxide films (SIROFs) as coatings for nerve electrodes is reported. SIROFs were characterized by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and potential transient measurements during charge-injection. The surface morphology of the SIROF transitions from smooth to highly nodular with increasing film thickness from 80 nm to 4600 nm. Charge-injection capacities exceed 0.75 mC/cm(2) with 0.75 ms current pulses in thicker films. The SIROF was deposited on both planar and non-planar substrates and photolithographically patterned by lift-off.

  9. Evaluation of oxide-coated iridium-rhenium chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    1994-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium (Ir-Re) provides long life operation of radiation-cooled rockets at temperatures up to 2200 C. Ceramic oxide coatings could be used to increase Ir-Re rocket lifetimes and allow operation in highly oxidizing environments. Ceramic oxide coatings promise to serve as both thermal and diffusion barriers for the iridium layer. Seven ceramic oxide-coated Ir-Re, 22-N rocket chambers were tested with gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen (GHz/G02) propellants. Five chambers had thick (over 10 mils), monolithic coatings of either hafnia (HfO2) or zirconia (ZrO2). Two chambers had coatings with thicknesses less than 5 mils. One of these chambers had a thin-walled coating of ZrO2 infiltrated with sol gel HfO2. The other chamber had a coating composed of an Ir-oxide composite. The purpose of this test program was to assess the ability of the oxide coatings to withstand the thermal shock of combustion initiation, adhere under repeated thermal cycling, and operate in aggressively oxidizing environments. All of the coatings survived the thermal shock of combustion and demonstrated operation at mixture ratios up to 11. Testing the Ir-oxide composite-coated chamber included over 29 min at mixture ratio 16. The thicker walled coatings provided the larger temperature drops across the oxide layer (up to 570 C), but were susceptible to macrocracking and eventual chipping at a stress concentrator. The cracks apparently resealed during firing, under compression of the oxide layer. The thinner walled coatings did not experience the macrocracking and chipping of the chambers that was seen with the thick, monolithic coatings. However, burn-throughs in the throat region did occur in both of the thin-walled chambers at mixture ratios well above stoichiometric. The burn-throughs were probably the result of oxygen diffusion through the oxide coating that allowed the underlying Ir and Re layers to be oxidized. The results of this test program indicated that the thin-walled oxide

  10. Development and Testing of High Surface Area Iridium Anodes for Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy; McKechnie, Timothy; Sadoway, Donald R.; Paramore, James; Melendez, Orlando; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Processing of lunar regolith into oxygen for habitat and propulsion is needed to support future space missions. Direct electrochemical reduction of molten regolith is an attractive method of processing, because no additional chemical reagents are needed. The electrochemical processing of molten oxides requires high surface area, inert anodes. Such electrodes need to be structurally robust at elevated temperatures (1400-1600?C), be resistant to thermal shock, have good electrical conductivity, be resistant to attack by molten oxide (silicate), be electrochemically stable and support high current density. Iridium with its high melting point, good oxidation resistance, superior high temperature strength and ductility is the most promising candidate for anodes in high temperature electrochemical processes. Several innovative concepts for manufacturing such anodes by electrodeposition of iridium from molten salt electrolyte (EL-Form? process) were evaluated. Iridium electrodeposition to form of complex shape components and coating was investigated. Iridium coated graphite, porous iridium structure and solid iridium anodes were fabricated. Testing of electroformed iridium anodes shows no visible degradation. The result of development, manufacturing and testing of high surface, inert iridium anodes will be presented.

  11. Development and Testing of High Surface Area Iridium Anodes for Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy; McKechnie, Timothy; Sadoway, Donald R.; Paramore, James; Melendez, Orlando; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Processing of lunar regolith into oxygen for habitat and propulsion is needed to support future space missions. Direct electrochemical reduction of molten regolith is an attractive method of processing, because no additional chemical reagents are needed. The electrochemical processing of molten oxides requires high surface area, inert anodes. Such electrodes need to be structurally robust at elevated temperatures (1400-1600 C), be resistant to thermal shock, have good electrical conductivity, be resistant to attack by molten oxide (silicate), be electrochemically stable and support high current density. Iridium with its high melting point, good oxidation resistance, superior high temperature strength and ductility is the most promising candidate for anodes in high temperature electrochemical processes. Several innovative concepts for manufacturing such anodes by electrodeposition of iridium from molten salt electrolyte (EL-Form process) were evaluated. Iridium electrodeposition to form of complex shape components and coating was investigated. Iridium coated graphite, porous iridium structure and solid iridium anodes were fabricated. Testing of electroformed iridium anodes shows no visible degradation. The result of development, manufacturing and testing of high surface, inert iridium anodes will be presented.

  12. Development and Testing of High Surface Area Iridium Anodes for Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy; McKechnie, Timothy; Sadoway, Donald R.; Paramore, James; Melendez, Orlando; Curreri, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Processing of lunar regolith into oxygen for habitat and propulsion is needed to support future space missions. Direct electrochemical reduction of molten regolith is an attractive method of processing, because no additional chemical reagents are needed. The electrochemical processing of molten oxides requires high surface area, inert anodes. Such electrodes need to be structurally robust at elevated temperatures (1400-1600 C), be resistant to thermal shock, have good electrical conductivity, be resistant to attack by molten oxide (silicate), be electrochemically stable and support high current density. Iridium with its high melting point, good oxidation resistance, superior high temperature strength and ductility is the most promising candidate for anodes in high temperature electrochemical processes. Several innovative concepts for manufacturing such anodes by electrodeposition of iridium from molten salt electrolyte (EL-Form process) were evaluated. Iridium electrodeposition to form of complex shape components and coating was investigated. Iridium coated graphite, porous iridium structure and solid iridium anodes were fabricated. Testing of electroformed iridium anodes shows no visible degradation. The result of development, manufacturing and testing of high surface, inert iridium anodes will be presented.

  13. High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Iridium-Rhenium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    1995-01-01

    The life-limiting mechanism for radiation-cooled rockets made from iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) is the diffusion of Re into the Ir layer and the subsequent oxidation of the resulting Ir-Re alloy from the inner surface. In a previous study, a life model for Ir/Re rockets was developed. It incorporated Ir-Re diffusion and oxidation data to predict chamber lifetimes as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Oxidation testing at 1540 deg C suggested that a 20-wt percent Re concentration at the inner wall surface should be established as the failure criterion. The present study was performed to better define Ir-oxidation behavior as a function of Re concentration and to supplement the data base for the life model. Samples ranging from pure Ir to Ir-40 wt percent Re (Ir-40Re) were tested at 1500 deg C, in two different oxygen environments. There were indications that the oxidation rate of the Ir-Re alloy increased significantly when it went from a single-phase solid solution to a two-phase mixture, as was suggested in previous work. However, because of testing anomalies in this study, there were not enough dependable oxidation data to definitively raise the Ir/Re rocket failure criterion from 20-wt percent Re to a Re concentration corresponding to entry into the two-phase region.

  14. Iridium-based double perovskites for efficient water oxidation in acid media

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Raaijman, Stefan; Kortlever, Ruud; Kooyman, Patricia J.; Wezendonk, Tim; Gascon, Jorge; Fu, W. T.; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2016-01-01

    The development of active, cost-effective and stable oxygen-evolving catalysts is one of the major challenges for solar-to-fuel conversion towards sustainable energy generation. Iridium oxide exhibits the best available compromise between catalytic activity and stability in acid media, but it is prohibitively expensive for large-scale applications. Therefore, preparing oxygen-evolving catalysts with lower amounts of the scarce but active and stable iridium is an attractive avenue to overcome this economical constraint. Here we report on a class of oxygen-evolving catalysts based on iridium double perovskites which contain 32 wt% less iridium than IrO2 and yet exhibit a more than threefold higher activity in acid media. According to recently suggested benchmarking criteria, the iridium double perovskites are the most active catalysts for oxygen evolution in acid media reported until now, to the best of our knowledge, and exhibit similar stability to IrO2. PMID:27498694

  15. Iridium-based double perovskites for efficient water oxidation in acid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Raaijman, Stefan; Kortlever, Ruud; Kooyman, Patricia J.; Wezendonk, Tim; Gascon, Jorge; Fu, W. T.; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2016-08-01

    The development of active, cost-effective and stable oxygen-evolving catalysts is one of the major challenges for solar-to-fuel conversion towards sustainable energy generation. Iridium oxide exhibits the best available compromise between catalytic activity and stability in acid media, but it is prohibitively expensive for large-scale applications. Therefore, preparing oxygen-evolving catalysts with lower amounts of the scarce but active and stable iridium is an attractive avenue to overcome this economical constraint. Here we report on a class of oxygen-evolving catalysts based on iridium double perovskites which contain 32 wt% less iridium than IrO2 and yet exhibit a more than threefold higher activity in acid media. According to recently suggested benchmarking criteria, the iridium double perovskites are the most active catalysts for oxygen evolution in acid media reported until now, to the best of our knowledge, and exhibit similar stability to IrO2.

  16. Transformation of a Cp*-iridium(III) precatalyst for water oxidation when exposed to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zuccaccia, Cristiano; Bellachioma, Gianfranco; Bortolini, Olga; Bucci, Alberto; Savini, Arianna; Macchioni, Alceo

    2014-03-17

    The reaction of [Cp*Ir(bzpy)NO3 ] (1; bzpy=2-benzoylpyridine, Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl anion), a competent water-oxidation catalyst, with several oxidants (H2 O2 , NaIO4 , cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN)) was studied to intercept and characterize possible intermediates of the oxidative transformation. NMR spectroscopy and ESI-MS techniques provided evidence for the formation of many species that all had the intact Ir-bzpy moiety and a gradually more oxidized Cp* ligand. Initially, an oxygen atom is trapped in between two carbon atoms of Cp* and iridium, which gives an oxygen-Ir coordinated epoxide, whereas the remaining three carbon atoms of Cp* are involved in a η(3) interaction with iridium (2 a). Formal addition of H2 O to 2 a or H2 O2 to 1 leads to 2 b, in which a double MeCOH functionalization of Cp* is present with one MeCOH engaged in an interaction with iridium. The structure of 2 b was unambiguously determined in the solid state and in solution by X-ray single-crystal diffractometry and advanced NMR spectroscopic techniques, respectively. Further oxidation led to the opening of Cp* and transformation of the diol into a diketone with one carbonyl coordinated at the metal (2 c). A η(3) interaction between the three non-oxygenated carbons of "ex-Cp*" and iridium is also present in both 2 b and 2 c. Isolated 2 b and mixtures of 2 a-c species were tested in water-oxidation catalysis by using CAN as sacrificial oxidant. They showed substantially the same activity than 1 (turnover frequency values ranged from 9 to 14 min(-1) ). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Toward a comparison of microelectrodes for acute and chronic recordings.

    PubMed

    Ward, Matthew P; Rajdev, Pooja; Ellison, Casey; Irazoqui, Pedro P

    2009-07-28

    Several variations of microelectrode arrays are used to record and stimulate intracortical neuronal activity. Bypassing the immune response to maintain a stable recording interface remains a challenge. Companies and researchers are continuously altering the material compositions and geometries of the arrays in order to discover a combination that allows for a chronic and stable electrode-tissue interface. From this interface, they wish to obtain consistent quality recordings and a stable, low impedance pathway for charge injection over extended periods of time. Despite numerous efforts, no microelectrode array design has managed to evade the host immune response and remain fully functional. This study is an initial effort comparing several microelectrode arrays with fundamentally different configurations for use in an implantable epilepsy prosthesis. Specifically, NeuroNexus (Michigan) probes, Cyberkinetics (Utah) Silicon and Iridium Oxide arrays, ceramic-based thin-film microelectrode arrays (Drexel), and Tucker-Davis Technologies (TDT) microwire arrays are evaluated over a 31-day period in an animal model. Microelectrodes are compared in implanted rats through impedance, charge capacity, signal-to-noise ratio, recording stability, and elicited immune response. Results suggest significant variability within and between microelectrode types with no clear superior array. Some applications for the microelectrode arrays are suggested based on data collected throughout the longitudinal study. Additionally, specific limitations of assaying biological phenomena and comparing fundamentally different microelectrode arrays in a highly variable system are discussed with suggestions on how to improve the reliability of observed results and steps needed to develop a more standardized microelectrode design.

  18. Design, analysis, and fabrication of oxide-coated iridium/rhenium combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Q.; Tuffias, R. H.; Laferla, R.; Ghoniem, N. M.

    1993-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) combustion chambers provide high temperature, oxidation-resistant operation for radiation-cooled liquid-fueled rocket engines. A 22-N (5-lb(sub f)) chamber has been operated for 15 hours at 2200 C (4000 F) using nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine (NTO/MMH) propellant, with negligible internal erosion. The oxidation resistance of these chambers could be further increased by the addition of refractory oxide coatings, providing longer life and/or operation in more oxidizing and higher temperature environments. The oxide coatings would serve as a thermal and diffusion barrier for the iridium coating, lowering the temperature of the iridium layer while also preventing the ingress of oxygen and egress of iridium oxides. This would serve to slow the failure mechanisms of Ir/Re chambers, namely the diffusion of rhenium to the inner surface and the oxidation of iridium. Such protection could extend chamber lifetimes by tens or perhaps hundreds of hours, and allow chamber operation on stoichiometric or higher mixture ratio oxygen/hydrogen (O2/H2) propellant. Extensive thermomechanical, thermochemical, and mass transport modeling was performed as a key material/structure design tool. Based on the results of these analyses, several 22-N oxide-coated Ir/Re chambers were fabricated and delivered to NASA Lewis Research Center for hot-fire testing.

  19. Design, analysis, and fabrication of oxide-coated iridium/rhenium combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Q.; Tuffias, R. H.; Laferla, R.; Ghoniem, N. M.

    1993-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) combustion chambers provide high temperature, oxidation-resistant operation for radiation-cooled liquid-fueled rocket engines. A 22-N (5-lb(sub f)) chamber has been operated for 15 hours at 2200 C (4000 F) using nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine (NTO/MMH) propellant, with negligible internal erosion. The oxidation resistance of these chambers could be further increased by the addition of refractory oxide coatings, providing longer life and/or operation in more oxidizing and higher temperature environments. The oxide coatings would serve as a thermal and diffusion barrier for the iridium coating, lowering the temperature of the iridium layer while also preventing the ingress of oxygen and egress of iridium oxides. This would serve to slow the failure mechanisms of Ir/Re chambers, namely the diffusion of rhenium to the inner surface and the oxidation of iridium. Such protection could extend chamber lifetimes by tens or perhaps hundreds of hours, and allow chamber operation on stoichiometric or higher mixture ratio oxygen/hydrogen (O2/H2) propellant. Extensive thermomechanical, thermochemical, and mass transport modeling was performed as a key material/structure design tool. Based on the results of these analyses, several 22-N oxide-coated Ir/Re chambers were fabricated and delivered to NASA Lewis Research Center for hot-fire testing.

  20. Design, analysis, and fabrication of oxide-coated iridium/rhenium combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Q.; Tuffias, R. H.; Laferla, R.; Ghoniem, N. M.

    1993-11-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) combustion chambers provide high temperature, oxidation-resistant operation for radiation-cooled liquid-fueled rocket engines. A 22-N (5-lb(sub f)) chamber has been operated for 15 hours at 2200 C (4000 F) using nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine (NTO/MMH) propellant, with negligible internal erosion. The oxidation resistance of these chambers could be further increased by the addition of refractory oxide coatings, providing longer life and/or operation in more oxidizing and higher temperature environments. The oxide coatings would serve as a thermal and diffusion barrier for the iridium coating, lowering the temperature of the iridium layer while also preventing the ingress of oxygen and egress of iridium oxides. This would serve to slow the failure mechanisms of Ir/Re chambers, namely the diffusion of rhenium to the inner surface and the oxidation of iridium. Such protection could extend chamber lifetimes by tens or perhaps hundreds of hours, and allow chamber operation on stoichiometric or higher mixture ratio oxygen/hydrogen (O2/H2) propellant. Extensive thermomechanical, thermochemical, and mass transport modeling was performed as a key material/structure design tool. Based on the results of these analyses, several 22-N oxide-coated Ir/Re chambers were fabricated and delivered to NASA Lewis Research Center for hot-fire testing.

  1. Oxygen atom transfer to a half-sandwich iridium complex: clean oxidation yielding a molecular product.

    PubMed

    Turlington, Christopher R; White, Peter S; Brookhart, Maurice; Templeton, Joseph L

    2014-03-12

    The oxidation of [Ir(Cp*)(phpy)(NCAr(F))][B(Ar(F))4] (1; Cp* = η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl, phpy = 2-phenylene-κC(1')-pyridine-κN, NCAr(F) = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzonitrile, B(Ar(F))4 = tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate) with the oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reagent 2-tert-butylsulfonyliodosobenzene (sPhIO) yielded a single, molecular product at -40 °C. New Ir(Cp*) complexes with bidentate ligands derived by oxidation of phpy were synthesized to model possible products resulting from oxygen atom insertion into the iridium-carbon and/or iridium-nitrogen bonds of phpy. These new ligands were either cleaved from iridium by water or formed unreactive, phenoxide-bridged iridium dimers. The reactivity of these molecules suggested possible decomposition pathways of Ir(Cp*)-based water oxidation catalysts with bidentate ligands that are susceptible to oxidation. Monitoring the [Ir(Cp*)(phpy)(NCAr(F))](+) oxidation reaction by low-temperature NMR techniques revealed that the reaction involved two separate OAT events. An intermediate was detected, synthesized independently with trapping ligands, and characterized. The first oxidation step involves direct attack of the sPhIO oxidant on the carbon of the coordinated nitrile ligand. Oxygen atom transfer to carbon, followed by insertion into the iridium-carbon bond of phpy, formed a coordinated organic amide. A second oxygen atom transfer generated an unidentified iridium species (the "oxidized complex"). In the presence of triphenylphosphine, the "oxidized complex" proved capable of transferring one oxygen atom to phosphine, generating phosphine oxide and forming an Ir-PPh3 adduct in 92% yield. The final Ir-PPh3 product was fully characterized.

  2. Heterogeneous Catalysis for Water Oxidation by an Iridium Complex Immobilized on Bipyridine-Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Maegawa, Yoshifumi; Goto, Yasutomo; Hara, Kenji; Inagaki, Shinji

    2016-07-04

    Heterogenization of metal-complex catalysts for water oxidation without loss of their catalytic activity is important for the development of devices simulating photosynthesis. In this study, efficient heterogeneous iridium complexes for water oxidation were prepared using bipyridine-bridged periodic mesoporous organosilica (BPy-PMO) as a solid chelating ligand. The BPy-PMO-based iridium catalysts (Ir-BPy-PMO) were prepared by postsynthetic metalation of BPy-PMO and characterized through physicochemical analyses. The Ir-BPy-PMOs showed high catalytic activity for water oxidation. The turnover frequency (TOF) values for Ir-BPy-PMOs were one order of magnitude higher than those of conventional heterogeneous iridium catalysts. The reusability and stability of Ir-BPy-PMO were also examined, and detailed characterization was conducted using powder X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, (13) C DD MAS NMR spectroscopy, TEM, and XAFS methods.

  3. Implications of chronic daily anti-oxidant administration on the inflammatory response to intracortical microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter-Baker, Kelsey A.; Stewart, Wade G.; Tomaszewski, William H.; Wong, Chun T.; Meador, William D.; Ziats, Nicholas P.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Oxidative stress events have been implicated to occur and facilitate multiple failure modes of intracortical microelectrodes. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the ability of a sustained concentration of an anti-oxidant and to reduce oxidative stress-mediated neurodegeneration for the application of intracortical microelectrodes. Approach. Non-functional microelectrodes were implanted into the cortex of male Sprague Dawley rats for up to sixteen weeks. Half of the animals received a daily intraperitoneal injection of the natural anti-oxidant resveratrol, at 30 mg kg-1. The study was designed to investigate the biodistribution of the resveratrol, and the effects on neuroinflammation/neuroprotection following device implantation. Main results. Daily maintenance of a sustained range of resveratrol throughout the implantation period resulted in fewer degenerating neurons in comparison to control animals at both two and sixteen weeks post implantation. Initial and chronic improvements in neuronal viability in resveratrol-dosed animals were correlated with significant reductions in local superoxide anion accumulation around the implanted device at two weeks after implantation. Controls, receiving only saline injections, were also found to have reduced amounts of accumulated superoxide anion locally and less neurodegeneration than controls at sixteen weeks post-implantation. Despite observed benefits, thread-like adhesions were found between the liver and diaphragm in resveratrol-dosed animals. Significance. Overall, our chronic daily anti-oxidant dosing scheme resulted in improvements in neuronal viability surrounding implanted microelectrodes, which could result in improved device performance. However, due to the discovery of thread-like adhesions, further work is still required to optimize a chronic anti-oxidant dosing regime for the application of intracortical microelectrodes.

  4. Implications of Chronic Daily Anti-Oxidant Administration on the Inflammatory Response to Intracortical Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Potter-Baker, Kelsey A.; Stewart, Wade G.; Tomaszewski, William H.; Wong, Chun T.; Meador, William D.; Ziats, Nicholas P.; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Oxidative stress events have been implicated to occur and facilitate multiple failure modes of intracortical microelectrodes. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the ability of a sustained concentration of an anti-oxidant and to reduce oxidative stress-mediated neurodegeneration for the application of intracortical microelectrodes. Approach Non-functional microelectrodes were implanted into the cortex of male Sprague Dawley rats for up to sixteen weeks. Half of the animals received a daily intraperitoneal injection of the natural anti-oxidant resveratrol, at 30 mg/kg. The study was designed to investigate the biodistribution of the resveratrol, and the effects on neuroinflammation/neuroprotection following device implantation. Main Results Daily maintenance of a sustained range of resveratrol throughout the implantation period resulted in fewer degenerating neurons in comparison to control animals at both two and sixteen weeks post implantation. Initial and chronic improvements in neuronal viability in resveratrol-dosed animals were correlated with significant reductions in local superoxide anion accumulation around the implanted device at two weeks after implantation. Controls, receiving only saline injections, were also found to have reduced amounts of accumulated superoxide anion locally and less neurodegeneration than controls at sixteen weeks post-implantation. Despite observed benefits, thread-like adhesions were found between the liver and diaphragm in resveratrol-dosed animals. Significance Overall, our chronic daily anti-oxidant dosing scheme resulted in improvements in neuronal viability surrounding implanted microelectrodes, which could result in improved device performance. However, due to the discovery of thread-like adhesions, further work is still required to optimize a chronic anti-oxidant dosing regime for the application of intracortical microelectrodes. PMID:26015427

  5. Cytotoxic activity and protein binding through an unusual oxidative mechanism by an iridium(I)-NHC complex.

    PubMed

    Gothe, Y; Marzo, T; Messori, L; Metzler-Nolte, N

    2015-02-21

    A new NHC iridium(I) complex (1) showing significant antiproliferative properties in vitro is described here. Its crystal structure, solution behaviour and interactions with the model proteins cytochrome c (cyt c) and lysozyme were investigated. High resolution ESI-MS measurements suggest that this iridium(i) complex acts as a prodrug and binds cyt c tightly through an unusual "oxidative" mechanism. Eventually, an iridium(III)-NHC fragment is found associated to the protein.

  6. Testing and evaluation of oxide-coated iridium/rhenium chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    1993-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium provides long life operation of radiation-cooled rockets at temperatures up to 2200 C. Ceramic oxide coatings could be used to increase iridium/rhenium rocket lifetimes and allow operation in highly oxidizing environments. Ceramic oxide coatings promise to serve as both thermal and diffusion barriers for the iridium layer. Seven ceramic oxide-coated iridium/rhenium, 22 N rocket chambers were tested on gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen propellants. Five chambers had thick (over 10 mils), monolithic coatings of either hafnia or zirconia. Two chambers had coatings with thicknesses less than 5 mils. One of these chambers had a thin-walled coating of zirconia infiltrated with sol gel hafnia. The other chamber had a coating composed of an iridium/oxide composite. The purpose of this test program was to assess the ability of the oxide coatings to withstand the thermal shock of combustion initiation, adhere under repeated thermal cycling, and operate in aggressively oxidizing environments. All of the coatings survived the thermal shock of combustion and demonstrated operation at mixture ratios up to 11. The iridium/oxide composite coated chamber included testing for over 29 minutes at mixture ratio 16. The thicker-walled coatings provided the larger temperature drops across the oxide layer (up to 570 C), but were susceptible to macrocracking and eventual chipping at a stress concentrator. The cracks apparently resealed during firing, under compression of the oxide layer. The thinner-walled coatings did not experience the macrocracking and chipping of the chambers seen with the thick, monolithic coatings. However, burnthroughs in the throat region did occur in both of the thin-walled chambers at mixture ratios well above stochiometric. The burn-throughs were probably the result of oxygen-diffusion through the oxide coating that allowed the underlying iridium and rhenium layers to be oxidized. The results of this test program indicated that the thin

  7. Testing and evaluation of oxide-coated iridium/rhenium chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    1993-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium provides long life operation of radiation-cooled rockets at temperatures up to 2200 C. Ceramic oxide coatings could be used to increase iridium/rhenium rocket lifetimes and allow operation in highly oxidizing environments. Ceramic oxide coatings promise to serve as both thermal and diffusion barriers for the iridium layer. Seven ceramic oxide-coated iridium/rhenium, 22 N rocket chambers were tested on gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen propellants. Five chambers had thick (over 10 mils), monolithic coatings of either hafnia or zirconia. Two chambers had coatings with thicknesses less than 5 mils. One of these chambers had a thin-walled coating of zirconia infiltrated with sol gel hafnia. The other chamber had a coating composed of an iridium/oxide composite. The purpose of this test program was to assess the ability of the oxide coatings to withstand the thermal shock of combustion initiation, adhere under repeated thermal cycling, and operate in aggressively oxidizing environments. All of the coatings survived the thermal shock of combustion and demonstrated operation at mixture ratios up to 11. The iridium/oxide composite coated chamber included testing for over 29 minutes at mixture ratio 16. The thicker-walled coatings provided the larger temperature drops across the oxide layer (up to 570 C), but were susceptible to macrocracking and eventual chipping at a stress concentrator. The cracks apparently resealed during firing, under compression of the oxide layer. The thinner-walled coatings did not experience the macrocracking and chipping of the chambers seen with the thick, monolithic coatings. However, burnthroughs in the throat region did occur in both of the thin-walled chambers at mixture ratios well above stochiometric. The burn-throughs were probably the result of oxygen-diffusion through the oxide coating that allowed the underlying iridium and rhenium layers to be oxidized. The results of this test program indicated that the thin

  8. A pH Sensor Based on a Stainless Steel Electrode Electrodeposited with Iridium Oxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, C. C. M.; Madrid, R. E.; Felice, C. J.

    2009-01-01

    A simple procedure to make an iridium oxide (IrO[subscript 2]) electrodeposited pH sensor, that can be used in a chemical, biomedical, or materials laboratory, is presented here. Some exercises, based on this sensor, that can be used to teach important concepts in the field of biomedical, biochemical, tissue, or materials engineering, are also…

  9. A pH Sensor Based on a Stainless Steel Electrode Electrodeposited with Iridium Oxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, C. C. M.; Madrid, R. E.; Felice, C. J.

    2009-01-01

    A simple procedure to make an iridium oxide (IrO[subscript 2]) electrodeposited pH sensor, that can be used in a chemical, biomedical, or materials laboratory, is presented here. Some exercises, based on this sensor, that can be used to teach important concepts in the field of biomedical, biochemical, tissue, or materials engineering, are also…

  10. Comparative assessment of iridium oxide and platinum alloy wires using an in vitro glial scar assay.

    PubMed

    Ereifej, Evon S; Khan, Saida; Newaz, Golam; Zhang, Jinsheng; Auner, Gregory W; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2013-12-01

    The long-term effect of chronically implanted electrodes is the formation of a glial scar. Therefore, it is imperative to assess the biocompatibility of materials before employing them in neural electrode fabrication. Platinum alloy and iridium oxide have been identified as good candidates as neural electrode biomaterials due to their mechanical and electrical properties, however, effect of glial scar formation for these two materials is lacking. In this study, we applied a glial scarring assay to observe the cellular reactivity to platinum alloy and iridium oxide wires in order to assess the biocompatibility based on previously defined characteristics. Through real-time PCR, immunostaining and imaging techniques, we will advance the understanding of the biocompatibility of these materials. Results of this study demonstrate iridium oxide wires exhibited a more significant reactive response as compared to platinum alloy wires. Cells cultured with platinum alloy wires had less GFAP gene expression, lower average GFAP intensity, and smaller glial scar thickness. Collectively, these results indicated that platinum alloy wires were more biocompatible than the iridium oxide wires.

  11. Luminescent Iridium(III) Complex Labeled DNA for Graphene Oxide-Based Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qingcheng; Zhou, Yuyang; Li, Yingying; Gu, Wei; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Jian

    2016-02-02

    There has been growing interest in utilizing highly photostable iridium(III) complexes as new luminescent probes for biotechnology and life science. Herein, iridium(III) complex with carboxyl group was synthesized and activated with N-hydroxysuccinimide, followed by tagging to the amino terminate of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The Ir-ssDNA probe was further combined with graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets to develop a GO-based biosensor for target ssDNA detection. The quenching efficiency of GO, and the photostability of iridium(III) complex and GO-Ir-ssDNA biosensor, were also investigated. On the basis of the high luminescence quenching efficiency of GO toward iridium(III) complex, the GO-Ir-ssDNA biosensor exhibited minimal background signals, while strong emission was observed when Ir-ssDNA desorbed from GO nanosheets and formed a double helix with the specific target, leading to a high signal-to-background ratio. Moreover, it was found that luminescent intensities of iridium(III) complex and GO-Ir-ssDNA biosensor were around 15 and 3 times higher than those of the traditional carboxyl fluorescein (FAM) dye and the GO-FAM-ssDNA biosensor after UV irradiation, respectively. Our study suggested the sensitive and selective Ir-ssDNA probe was suitable for the development of highly photostable GO-based detection platforms, showing promise for application beyond the OLED (organic light emitting diode) area.

  12. Highly Active Iridium/Iridium Tin/Tin Oxide Heterogeneous Nanoparticles as Alternative Electrocatalysts for the Ethanol Oxidation Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Du W.; Su D.; Wang Q.; Saxner D.; Deskins N.A.; Krzanowski J.E.; Frenkel A.I.; Teng X.

    2011-08-03

    Ethanol is a promising fuel for low-temperature direct fuel cell reactions due to its low toxicity, ease of storage and transportation, high-energy density, and availability from biomass. However, the implementation of ethanol fuel cell technology has been hindered by the lack of low-cost, highly active anode catalysts. In this paper, we have studied Iridium (Ir)-based binary catalysts as low-cost alternative electrocatalysts replacing platinum (Pt)-based catalysts for the direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) reaction. We report the synthesis of carbon supported Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29} catalysts with an average diameter of 2.7 {+-} 0.6 nm through a 'surfactant-free' wet chemistry approach. The complementary characterization techniques, including aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, are used to identify the 'real' heterogeneous structure of Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29}/C particles as Ir/Ir-Sn/SnO{sub 2}, which consists of an Ir-rich core and an Ir-Sn alloy shell with SnO{sub 2} present on the surface. The Ir{sub 71}Sn{sub 29}/C heterogeneous catalyst exhibited high electrochemical activity toward the ethanol oxidation reaction compared to the commercial Pt/C (ETEK), PtRu/C (Johnson Matthey) as well as PtSn/C catalysts. Electrochemical measurements and density functional theory calculations demonstrate that the superior electro-activity is directly related to the high degree of Ir-Sn alloy formation as well as the existence of nonalloyed SnO{sub 2} on surface. Our cross-disciplinary work, from novel 'surfactant-free' synthesis of Ir-Sn catalysts, theoretical simulations, and catalytic measurements to the characterizations of 'real' heterogeneous nanostructures, will not only highlight the intriguing structure-property correlations in nanosized catalysts but also have a transformative impact on the commercialization of DEFC

  13. Highly active iridium/iridium-tin/tin oxide heterogeneous nanoparticles as alternative electrocatalysts for the ethanol oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Du, Wenxin; Wang, Qi; Saxner, David; Deskins, N Aaron; Su, Dong; Krzanowski, James E; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Teng, Xiaowei

    2011-09-28

    Ethanol is a promising fuel for low-temperature direct fuel cell reactions due to its low toxicity, ease of storage and transportation, high-energy density, and availability from biomass. However, the implementation of ethanol fuel cell technology has been hindered by the lack of low-cost, highly active anode catalysts. In this paper, we have studied Iridium (Ir)-based binary catalysts as low-cost alternative electrocatalysts replacing platinum (Pt)-based catalysts for the direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) reaction. We report the synthesis of carbon supported Ir(71)Sn(29) catalysts with an average diameter of 2.7 ± 0.6 nm through a "surfactant-free" wet chemistry approach. The complementary characterization techniques, including aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy equipped with electron energy loss spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, are used to identify the "real" heterogeneous structure of Ir(71)Sn(29)/C particles as Ir/Ir-Sn/SnO(2), which consists of an Ir-rich core and an Ir-Sn alloy shell with SnO(2) present on the surface. The Ir(71)Sn(29)/C heterogeneous catalyst exhibited high electrochemical activity toward the ethanol oxidation reaction compared to the commercial Pt/C (ETEK), PtRu/C (Johnson Matthey) as well as PtSn/C catalysts. Electrochemical measurements and density functional theory calculations demonstrate that the superior electro-activity is directly related to the high degree of Ir-Sn alloy formation as well as the existence of nonalloyed SnO(2) on surface. Our cross-disciplinary work, from novel "surfactant-free" synthesis of Ir-Sn catalysts, theoretical simulations, and catalytic measurements to the characterizations of "real" heterogeneous nanostructures, will not only highlight the intriguing structure-property correlations in nanosized catalysts but also have a transformative impact on the commercialization of DEFC technology by replacing Pt with low

  14. Theoretical study of structure, stability, and the hydrolysis reactions of small iridium oxide nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Yang, Jingxiu; Li, Can

    2012-10-11

    The geometric structures and relative stabilities of small iridium oxide nanoclusters, Ir(m)O(n) (m = 1-5 and n = 1-2m), have been systematically investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3LYP level. Our results show that the lowest-energy structures of these clusters can be obtained by the sequential oxidation of small "core" iridium clusters. The iridium-monoxide-like clusters have relatively higher stability because of their relatively high binding energy and second difference in energies. On the basis of the optimized lowest-energy structures of neutral and cationic (IrO(2))(n) (n = 1-5), DFT has been used to study the hydrolysis reaction of these clusters with water molecules. The calculated results show that the addition of water molecules to the cationic species is much easier than the neutral ones. The overall hydrolysis reaction energies are more exothermic for the cationic clusters than for the neutral clusters. Our calculations indicate that H(2)O can be more easily split on the cationic iridium oxide clusters than on the neutral clusters.

  15. Microelectrode arrays: a general strategy for using oxidation reactions to site selectively modify electrode surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Bichlien H; Kesselring, David; Tesfu, Eden; Moeller, Kevin D

    2014-03-04

    Oxidation reactions are powerful tools for synthesis because they allow for the functionalization of molecules. Here, we present a general method for conducting these reactions on a microelectrode array in a site-selective fashion. The reactions are run as a competition between generation of a chemical oxidant at the electrodes in the array and reduction of the oxidant by a "confining agent" in the solution above the array. The "confining agent" does not need to be more reactive than the substrate fixed to the surface of the array. In many cases, the same substrate placed on the surface of the array can also be used in solution as the confining agent.

  16. Iridium/Iridium Silicide as an Oxidation Resistant Capping Layer for Soft X-ray Mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Prisbrey, S; Vernon, S

    2004-04-05

    Rust on a sword, tarnish on the silverware, and a loss in reflectivity for soft x-ray mirrors are all caused by oxidation that changes the desired characteristics of a material. Methods to prevent the oxidation have varied over the centuries with the default method of a protective coating being the most common. The protective coating for x-ray mirrors is usually a self-limiting oxidized layer on the surface of the material that stops further oxidation of the material by limiting the diffusion of oxygen to the material underneath.

  17. Spatial Distribution of pH at Mild Steel Surfaces Using an Iridium Oxide Microelectrode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    0.04c inxposed surface. indicating at-ot coupon also displayed a ...- beregi outside o e coating ap- M7 control coupon : The ta is displayed 7 tour...Oanimz.Uon Name(s) and Address( e ). 8. Performing Organization Naval Research Laboratory Report Number. Oceanography Division American Society for Testing...computer controlled micropositioner and data acquisition system. Two systems were analyzed: (1) a bare mild steel coupon exposed to artificial seawater, and

  18. Nitric oxide determination by amperometric carbon fiber microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Katrlík, Jaroslav; Zálesáková, Pavlína

    2002-05-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) amperometric microsensor was prepared by the modification of bare carbon fiber electrode by Nafion and cellulose acetate (CA). Detection limit, response time, reproducibility and influence of some possible interferences (nitrite, nitrate, arginine) were tested and evaluated. This sensor was used for in vitro determination of NO release from fresh porcine aorta induced by calcium ionophore A23187 (CI).

  19. A 96-channel neural stimulation system for driving AIROF microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Troyk, P; Cogan, S

    2004-01-01

    We present the design and testing of a 96-channel stimulation system to drive activated iridium oxide (AIROF) microelectrodes within safe charge-injection limits. Our system improves upon the traditional capacitively coupled, symmetric charge-balanced biphasic stimulation waveform so as to maximize charge-injection capacity without endangering the microelectrodes. It can deliver computer-controlled cathodic current pulse for to up to 96 AIROF microelectrodes and positively bias them during the inter-pulse interval. The stimulation system is comprised of (1) 12 custom-designed PCB boards each hosting an 8-channel ASIC chip, (2) a motherboard to communicate between these 12 boards and the PC, (3) the PC interface equipped with a DIO card and the corresponding software. We plan to use this system in animal experiments for intracortical neural stimulation of implanted electrodes within our visual prosthesis project.

  20. Strongly improved electrochemical cycling durability by adding iridium to electrochromic nickel oxide films.

    PubMed

    Wen, Rui-Tao; Niklasson, Gunnar A; Granqvist, Claes G

    2015-05-13

    Anodically colored nickel oxide (NiO) thin films are of much interest as counter electrodes in tungsten oxide based electrochromic devices such as "smart windows" for energy-efficient buildings. However, NiO films are prone to suffering severe charge density degradation upon prolonged electrochemical cycling, which can lead to insufficient device lifetime. Therefore, a means to improve the durability of NiO-based films is an important challenge at present. Here we report that the incorporation of a modest amount of iridium into NiO films [Ir/(Ir + Ni) = 7.6 atom %] leads to remarkable durability, exceeding 10000 cycles in a lithium-conducting electrolyte, along with significantly improved optical modulation during extended cycling. Structure characterization showed that the face-centered-cubic-type NiO structure remained after iridium addition. Moreover, the crystallinity of these films was enhanced upon electrochemical cycling.

  1. Flexible Nerve Stimulation Electrode with Iridium Oxide Sputtered on Liquid Crystal Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kevin; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Durand, Dominique M.

    2009-01-01

    Current electrode designs require flexible substrates that absorb little moisture and provide large charge injection capability. Sputtered iridium oxide films have superior charge injection capabilities versus noble metals and can adhere to various substrates. Liquid crystal polymers (LCP) have very little water absorption compared to other flexible substrates. Therefore, the combination of sputtered iridium oxide film on liquid crystal polymer substrate was studied using 50Hz, 100μs duration, 10mA biphasic current waveforms for 700 hours at 67°C in bicarbonate buffer saline. Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) analysis showed no delamination and approximately 1% of electrode material was lost to the bicarbonate buffer. The charge injection limit and the cathodic charge storage capacity within the water window were 4.6 +/− 1.0mC/cm2 and 31.5 +/− 6.6mC/cm2 respectively. Additional electrochemical analysis revealed significant charge imbalance attributed to oxygen reduction within the water window. These results, along with the flexible, chemically inert, biocompatible substrate, indicate that sputtered iridium oxide films on liquid crystal polymer could become the method of choice for flexible substrate nerve electrodes. PMID:19224713

  2. Nanoporous gold supported cobalt oxide microelectrodes as high-performance electrochemical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Lang, Xing-You; Fu, Hong-Ying; Hou, Chao; Han, Gao-Feng; Yang, Ping; Liu, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Tremendous demands for electrochemical biosensors with high sensitivity and reliability, fast response and excellent selectivity have stimulated intensive research on developing versatile materials with ultrahigh electrocatalytic activity. Here we report flexible and self-supported microelectrodes with a seamless solid/nanoporous gold/cobalt oxide hybrid structure for electrochemical nonenzymatic glucose biosensors. As a result of synergistic electrocatalytic activity of the gold skeleton and cobalt oxide nanoparticles towards glucose oxidation, amperometric glucose biosensors based on the hybrid microelectrodes exhibit multi-linear detection ranges with ultrahigh sensitivities at a low potential of 0.26 V (versus Ag/AgCl). The sensitivity up to 12.5 mA mM⁻¹ cm⁻² with a short response time of less than 1 s gives rise to ultralow detection limit of 5 nM. The outstanding performance originates from a novel nanoarchitecture in which the cobalt oxide nanoparticles are incorporated into pore channels of the seamless solid/nanoporous Au microwires, providing excellent electronic/ionic conductivity and mass transport for the enhanced electrocatalysis.

  3. Iridium dihydroxybipyridine complexes show that ligand deprotonation dramatically speeds rates of catalytic water oxidation.

    PubMed

    DePasquale, Joseph; Nieto, Ismael; Reuther, Lauren E; Herbst-Gervasoni, Corey J; Paul, Jared J; Mochalin, Vadym; Zeller, Matthias; Thomas, Christine M; Addison, Anthony W; Papish, Elizabeth T

    2013-08-19

    We report highly active iridium precatalysts, [Cp*Ir(N,N)Cl]Cl (1-4), for water oxidation that are supported by recently designed dihydroxybipyridine (dhbp) ligands. These ligands can readily be deprotonated in situ to alter the electronic properties at the metal; thus, these catalyst precursors have switchable properties that are pH-dependent. The pKa values in water of the iridium complexes are 4.6(1) and 4.4(2) with (N,N) = 6,6'-dhbp and 4,4'-dhbp, respectively, as measured by UV-vis spectroscopy. For homogeneous water oxidation catalysis, the sacrificial oxidant NaIO4 was found to be superior (relative to CAN) and allowed for catalysis to occur at higher pH values. With NaIO4 as the oxidant at pH 5.6, water oxidation occurred most rapidly with (N,N) = 4,4'-dhbp, and activity decreased in the order 4,4'-dhbp (3) > 6,6'-dhbp (2) ≫ 4,4'-dimethoxybipyridine (4) > bipy (1). Furthermore, initial rate studies at pH 3-6 showed that the rate enhancement with dhbp complexes at high pH is due to ligand deprotonation rather than the pH alone accelerating water oxidation. Thus, the protic groups in dhbp improve the catalytic activity by tuning the complexes' electronic properties upon deprotonation. Mechanistic studies show that the rate law is first-order in an iridium precatalyst, and dynamic light scattering studies indicate that catalysis appears to be homogeneous. It appears that a higher pH facilitates oxidation of precatalysts 2 and 3 and their [B(Ar(F))4](-) salt analogues 5 and 6. Both 2 and 5 were crystallographically characterized.

  4. Iridium in natural waters

    SciTech Connect

    Anbar, A.D.; Wasserburg, G.J.; Papanastassiou, D.A.

    1996-09-13

    Iridium, commonly used as a tracer of extraterrestrial material, was measured in rivers, oceans, and an estuarine environment. The concentration of iridium in the oceans ranges from 3.0 ({+-}1.3) x 10{sup 8} to 5.7 ({+-}0.8) x 10{sup 8} atoms per kilogram. Rivers contain from 17.4 ({+-}0.9) x 10{sup 8} to 92.9 ({+-}2.2) x 10{sup 8} atoms per kilogram and supply more dissolved iridium to the oceans than do extraterrestrial sources. In the Baltic Sea, {approximately}75% of riverine iridium is removed from solution. Iron-manganese oxyhydroxides scavenge iridium under oxidizing conditions, but anoxic environments are not a major sink for iridium. The ocean residence time of iridium is between 2 x 10{sup 3} and 2 x 10{sup 4} years. 32 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. The next step in chemical propulsion: Oxide-iridium/rhenium combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Fortini, Arthur J.; Tuffias, Robert H.

    1999-01-22

    Chemical propulsion systems are currently limited by materials issues. Until recently, the state-of-the-art material for liquid propellant combustion chambers was silicide-coated niobium. However, combustion chamber performance demands have exceeded the capabilities of this material system, requiring development of better materials. The iridium/rhenium combustion chamber, comprising a rhenium structural shell with an iridium inner liner for oxidation protection, represents the current state of the art in high-performance, high temperature, long-life propulsion systems using nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine propellant. However, oxygen/hydrogen (O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}) and new 'green' monopropellants under development to replace hydrazine will be significantly more oxidizing at operating temperature. For these more highly aggressive combustion environments, Ultramet has shown that substantial additional life can be obtained by lining the interior of the combustion chamber with a refractory metal oxide, which functions as a thermal and gas diffusion barrier and provides dramatically increased oxidation resistance. Ultramet has fabricated numerous 22-N (5-lb{sub f}) thrust chambers with this oxide-iridium/rhenium architecture that have been hot-fire tested at NASA Lewis Research Center in O{sub 2}/H{sub 2} propellant at mixture ratios of 6 and 16, with steady-state exterior wall temperatures ranging from 2433 to 2899 K, comprising the most severe temperature and oxidizing conditions ever utilized. Of the seven chambers tested to date, three failed due to facility problems, and two never failed. The best-performing chamber was hot-fired for 13,595 seconds (227 minutes; 3.8 hours) and showed no visible signs of degradation. Additional chambers are being fabricated for future testing.

  6. The next step in chemical propulsion: Oxide-iridium/rhenium combustion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortini, Arthur J.; Tuffias, Robert H.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical propulsion systems are currently limited by materials issues. Until recently, the state-of-the-art material for liquid propellant combustion chambers was silicide-coated niobium. However, combustion chamber performance demands have exceeded the capabilities of this material system, requiring development of better materials. The iridium/rhenium combustion chamber, comprising a rhenium structural shell with an iridium inner liner for oxidation protection, represents the current state of the art in high-performance, high temperature, long-life propulsion systems using nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine propellant. However, oxygen/hydrogen (O2/H2) and new ``green'' monopropellants under development to replace hydrazine will be significantly more oxidizing at operating temperature. For these more highly aggressive combustion environments, Ultramet has shown that substantial additional life can be obtained by lining the interior of the combustion chamber with a refractory metal oxide, which functions as a thermal and gas diffusion barrier and provides dramatically increased oxidation resistance. Ultramet has fabricated numerous 22-N (5-lbf) thrust chambers with this oxide-iridium/rhenium architecture that have been hot-fire tested at NASA Lewis Research Center in O2/H2 propellant at mixture ratios of 6 and 16, with steady-state exterior wall temperatures ranging from 2433 to 2899 K, comprising the most severe temperature and oxidizing conditions ever utilized. Of the seven chambers tested to date, three failed due to facility problems, and two never failed. The best-performing chamber was hot-fired for 13,595 seconds (227 minutes; 3.8 hours) and showed no visible signs of degradation. Additional chambers are being fabricated for future testing.

  7. Determination of surface coverage of catalysts: Temperature programmed experiments on platinum and iridium sponge catalysts after low temperature ammonia oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Broek, A.C.M. van den; Grondelle, J. van; Santen, R.A. van

    1999-07-25

    The activity of iridium and platinum sponge catalysts was studied in the low temperature gas phase oxidation of ammonia with oxygen. Under the reaction conditions used, iridium was found to be more active and more selective to nitrogen than platinum. Furthermore it was established from activity measurements that both catalysts lose activity as a function of time on stream due to inhibition of the surface by reaction intermediates. The used catalysts were studied by XPS and temperature programmed techniques. It was found that the surface of the catalysts had a high coverage of NH and OH and some additional NH{sub 2}. It seems most likely that the reaction mechanism proceeds through a stepwise dehydrogenation of the ammonia molecule. It appears that the last dehydrogenation step (NH by OH to N and water) is the rate determining step. The high selectivity of iridium to nitrogen can be explained by the higher activity of iridium in dissociating NO.

  8. Synthesis of nanoporous activated iridium oxide films by anodized aluminum oxide templated atomic layer deposition.

    SciTech Connect

    Comstock, D. J.; Christensen, S. T.; Elam, J. W.; Pellin, M. J.; Hersam, M. C.

    2010-08-01

    Iridium oxide (IrOx) has been widely studied due to its applications in electrochromic devices, pH sensing, and neural stimulation. Previous work has demonstrated that both Ir and IrOx films with porous morphologies prepared by sputtering exhibit significantly enhanced charge storage capacities. However, sputtering provides only limited control over film porosity. In this work, we demonstrate an alternative scheme for synthesizing nanoporous Ir and activated IrOx films (AIROFs). This scheme utilizes atomic layer deposition to deposit a thin conformal Ir film within a nanoporous anodized aluminum oxide template. The Ir film is then activated by potential cycling in 0.1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to form a nanoporous AIROF. The morphologies and electrochemical properties of the films are characterized by scanning electron microscopy and cyclic voltammetry, respectively. The resulting nanoporous AIROFs exhibit a nanoporous morphology and enhanced cathodal charge storage capacities as large as 311 mC/cm{sup 2}.

  9. Electrochemical water oxidation with carbon-grafted iridium complexes.

    PubMed

    deKrafft, Kathryn E; Wang, Cheng; Xie, Zhigang; Su, Xin; Hinds, Bruce J; Lin, Wenbin

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen production from water splitting provides a potential solution to storing harvested solar energy in chemical fuels, but this process requires active and robust catalysts that can oxidize water to provide a source of electrons for proton reduction. Here we report the direct, covalent grafting of molecular Ir complexes onto carbon electrodes, with up to a monolayer coverage. Carbon-grafted Ir complexes electrochemically oxidize water with a turnover frequency of up to 3.3 s(-1) and a turnover number of 644 during the first hour. Electrochemical water oxidation with grafted catalysts gave enhanced rates and stability compared to chemically driven water oxidation with the corresponding molecular catalysts. This strategy provides a way to systematically evaluate catalysts under tunable conditions, potentially providing new insights into electrochemical water oxidation processes and water oxidation catalyst design.

  10. Evaluation of microelectrode materials for direct-current electrocorticography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyan; Narayan, Raj K.; Wu, Pei-Ming; Rajan, Neena; Wu, Zhizhen; Mehan, Neal; Golanov, Eugene V.; Ahn, Chong H.; Hartings, Jed A.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Direct-current electrocorticography (DC-ECoG) allows a more complete characterization of brain states and pathologies than traditional alternating-current recordings (AC-ECoG). However, reliable recording of DC signals is challenging because of electrode polarization-induced potential drift, particularly at low frequencies and for more conducting materials. Further challenges arise as electrode size decreases, since impedance is increased and the potential drift is augmented. While microelectrodes have been investigated for AC-ECoG recordings, little work has addressed microelectrode properties for DC-signal recording. In this paper, we investigated several common microelectrode materials used in biomedical application for DC-ECoG. Approach. Five of the most common materials including gold (Au), silver/silver chloride (Ag/AgCl), platinum (Pt), Iridium oxide (IrOx), and platinum-iridium oxide (Pt/IrOx) were investigated for electrode diameters of 300 μm. The critical characteristics such as polarization impedance, AC current-induced polarization, long-term stability and low-frequency noise were studied in vitro (0.9% saline). The two most promising materials, Pt and Pt/lrOx were further investigated in vivo by recording waves of spreading depolarization, one of the most important applications for DC-ECoG in clinical and basic science research. Main results. Our experimental results indicate that IrOx-based microelectrodes, particularly with composite layers of nanostructures, are excellent in all of the common evaluation characteristics both in vitro and in vivo and are most suitable for multimodal monitoring applications. Pt electrodes suffer high current-induced polarization, but have acceptable long-term stability suitable for DC-ECoG. Major significance. The results of this study provide quantitative data on the electrical properties of microelectrodes with commonly-used materials and will be valuable for development of neural recordings inclusive of

  11. Evaluation of microelectrode materials for direct-current electrocorticography.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Narayan, Raj K; Wu, Pei-Ming; Rajan, Neena; Wu, Zhizhen; Mehan, Neal; Golanov, Eugene V; Ahn, Chong H; Hartings, Jed A

    2016-02-01

    Direct-current electrocorticography (DC-ECoG) allows a more complete characterization of brain states and pathologies than traditional alternating-current recordings (AC-ECoG). However, reliable recording of DC signals is challenging because of electrode polarization-induced potential drift, particularly at low frequencies and for more conducting materials. Further challenges arise as electrode size decreases, since impedance is increased and the potential drift is augmented. While microelectrodes have been investigated for AC-ECoG recordings, little work has addressed microelectrode properties for DC-signal recording. In this paper, we investigated several common microelectrode materials used in biomedical application for DC-ECoG. Five of the most common materials including gold (Au), silver/silver chloride (Ag/AgCl), platinum (Pt), Iridium oxide (IrOx), and platinum-iridium oxide (Pt/IrOx) were investigated for electrode diameters of 300 μm. The critical characteristics such as polarization impedance, AC current-induced polarization, long-term stability and low-frequency noise were studied in vitro (0.9% saline). The two most promising materials, Pt and Pt/lrOx were further investigated in vivo by recording waves of spreading depolarization, one of the most important applications for DC-ECoG in clinical and basic science research. Our experimental results indicate that IrOx-based microelectrodes, particularly with composite layers of nanostructures, are excellent in all of the common evaluation characteristics both in vitro and in vivo and are most suitable for multimodal monitoring applications. Pt electrodes suffer high current-induced polarization, but have acceptable long-term stability suitable for DC-ECoG. Major significance. The results of this study provide quantitative data on the electrical properties of microelectrodes with commonly-used materials and will be valuable for development of neural recordings inclusive of low frequencies.

  12. An analysis of the kinetics of oxidation of ascorbate at poly(aniline)-poly(styrene sulfonate) modified microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Bonastre, A M; Sosna, M; Bartlett, P N

    2011-03-28

    A detailed kinetic study is provided for the oxidation of ascorbate at poly(aniline)-poly(styrene sulfonate) coated microelectrodes. Flat films with a low degree of polymer spillover and a thickness much lower than the microelectrode radius were produced by controlled potentiodynamic electrodeposition. The currents for ascorbate oxidation are found to be independent of the polymer thickness, indicating that the reaction occurs at the outer surface of the polymer film. At low ascorbate concentrations, below around 40 mM, the currents are found to be mass transport limited. At higher ascorbate concentrations the currents became kinetically limited. The experimental data for measurements at a range of potentials are fitted to a consistent kinetic model and the results summarized in a case diagram. The results obtained for the poly(aniline)-(polystyrene sulfonate) coated microelectrode are compared to those for a poly(aniline)-poly(vinyl sulfonate) coated microelectrode and to the results of an earlier study of the reaction at poly(aniline)-poly(vinyl sulfonate) coated rotating disc electrodes. For poly(aniline)-poly(styrene sulfonate) the oxidation of ascorbate is found to proceed by one electron reaction whereas for poly(aniline)-poly(vinyl sulfonate) the reaction is found to be a two electron oxidation.

  13. Possible Superconductivity Induced by Strong Spin-Orbit Coupling in Carrier Doped Iridium Oxides Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiguchi, Kazutaka; Shirakawa, Tomonori; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Arita, Ryotaro; Yunoki, Seiji

    2014-03-01

    5 d transition metal oxide Sr2IrO4 and its relevant Iridium oxides have attracted much interest because of exotic properties arising from highly entangled spin and orbital degrees of freedom due to strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Sr2IrO4 crystalizes in the layered perovskite structure, similar to cuprates. Five 5 d electrons in Ir occupy its t2 g orbitals which are split by strong SOC, locally inducing an effective total angular momentum Jeff = 1 / 2 , analogous to a S = 1 / 2 state in cuprates. Because of the similarities to cuprates, the possibility of superconductivity (SC) in Iridium oxides has been expected theoretically once mobile carriers are introduced into the Jeff = 1 / 2 antiferromagnetic insulator. To study theoretically possible SC in carrier doped Sr2IrO4, we investigate a three-orbital Hubbard model with SOC. By solving the Eliashberg equation in the random phase approximation, we find that Jeff = 1 / 2 antiferromagnetic fluctuations favor dx2 -y2-wave SC with a mixture of singlet and triplet Cooper pairings. We will also discuss the particle-hole asymmetry of the SC induced by electron and hole doping.

  14. Anodic Deposition of a Robust Iridium-Based Water-Oxidation Catalyst from Organometallic Precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Blakemore, James D; Schley, Nathan D; Olack, G.; Incarvito, Christopher D; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Artificial photosynthesis, modeled on natural light-driven oxidation of water in Photosystem II, holds promise as a sustainable source of reducing equivalents for producing fuels. Few robust water-oxidation catalysts capable of mediating this difficult four-electron, four-proton reaction have yet been described. We report a new method for generating an amorphous electrodeposited material, principally consisting of iridium and oxygen, which is a robust and long-lived catalyst for water oxidation, when driven electrochemically. The catalyst material is generated by a simple anodic deposition from Cp*Ir aqua or hydroxo complexes in aqueous solution. This work suggests that organometallic precursors may be useful in electrodeposition of inorganic heterogeneous catalysts.

  15. Iridium nanoparticles with high catalytic activity in degradation of acid red-26: an oxidative approach.

    PubMed

    Goel, Anjali; Lasyal, Rajni

    2016-12-01

    Nanocatalysis using metal nanoparticles constitutes one of the emerging technologies for destructive oxidation of organics such as dyes. This paper deals with the degradation of acid red-26 (AR-26), an azo dye by hexacyanoferrate (abbreviated as HCF) (III) using iridium nanoparticles. UV-vis spectroscopy has been employed to obtain the details of the oxidative degradation of the selected dye. The effect of various operational parameters such as HCF(III) concentration, pH, initial dye concentration, catalyst and temperature was investigated systematically at the λmax, 507 nm, of the reaction mixture. Degradation kinetics follows the first order kinetic model with respect to AR-26 and Ir nano concentrations, while with respect to the HCF(III) concentration reaction it follows first order kinetics at lower concentrations, tending towards zero order at higher concentrations. Thermodynamic parameters have been calculated by studying the reaction rate at four different temperatures. The UV-vis, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis of degradation products showed the formation of carboxylic acid and substituted carboxylic acids as major degradation products, which are simple and less hazardous compounds. The big advantage of the present method is the recovery and reuse of iridium nanoparticles. Moreover, turnover frequencies for each catalytic cycle have been determined, indicating the long life span of Ir nanoparticles. Thus, the finding is a novel and highly economical alternative for environmental safety against pollution by dyes, and extendable for other contaminants as well.

  16. Partially oxidized iridium clusters within dendrimers: size-controlled synthesis and selective hydrogenation of 2-nitrobenzaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higaki, Tatsuya; Kitazawa, Hirokazu; Yamazoe, Seiji; Tsukuda, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    Iridium clusters nominally composed of 15, 30 or 60 atoms were size-selectively synthesized within OH-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of generation 6. Spectroscopic characterization revealed that the Ir clusters were partially oxidized. All the Ir clusters efficiently converted 2-nitrobenzaldehyde to anthranil and 2-aminobenzaldehyde under atmospheric hydrogen at room temperature in toluene via selective hydrogenation of the NO2 group. The selectivity toward 2-aminobenzaldehyde over anthranil was improved with the reduction of the cluster size. The improved selectivity is ascribed to more efficient reduction than intramolecular heterocyclization of a hydroxylamine intermediate on smaller clusters that have a higher Ir(0)-phase population on the surface.Iridium clusters nominally composed of 15, 30 or 60 atoms were size-selectively synthesized within OH-terminated poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of generation 6. Spectroscopic characterization revealed that the Ir clusters were partially oxidized. All the Ir clusters efficiently converted 2-nitrobenzaldehyde to anthranil and 2-aminobenzaldehyde under atmospheric hydrogen at room temperature in toluene via selective hydrogenation of the NO2 group. The selectivity toward 2-aminobenzaldehyde over anthranil was improved with the reduction of the cluster size. The improved selectivity is ascribed to more efficient reduction than intramolecular heterocyclization of a hydroxylamine intermediate on smaller clusters that have a higher Ir(0)-phase population on the surface. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01460g

  17. Characterization of sputtered iridium oxide thin films on planar and laser micro-structured platinum thin film surfaces for neural stimulation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanawala, Sachin

    Electrical stimulation of neurons provides promising results for treatment of a number of diseases and for restoration of lost function. Clinical examples include retinal stimulation for treatment of blindness and cochlear implants for deafness and deep brain stimulation for treatment of Parkinsons disease. A wide variety of materials have been tested for fabrication of electrodes for neural stimulation applications, some of which are platinum and its alloys, titanium nitride, and iridium oxide. In this study iridium oxide thin films were sputtered onto laser micro-structured platinum thin films by pulsed-DC reactive sputtering of iridium metal in oxygen-containing atmosphere, to obtain high charge capacity coatings for neural stimulation applications. The micro-structuring of platinum films was achieved by a pulsed-laser-based technique (KrF excimer laser emitting at lambda=248nm). The surface morphology of the micro-structured films was studied using different surface characterization techniques. In-vitro biocompatibility of these laser micro-structured films coated with iridium oxide thin films was evaluated using cortical neurons isolated from rat embryo brain. Characterization of these laser micro-structured films coated with iridium oxide, by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy has revealed a considerable decrease in impedance and increase in charge capacity. A comparison between amorphous and crystalline iridium oxide thin films as electrode materials indicated that amorphous iridium oxide has significantly higher charge capacity and lower impedance making it preferable material for neural stimulation application. Our biocompatibility studies show that neural cells can grow and differentiate successfully on our laser micro-structured films coated with iridium oxide. This indicates that reactively sputtered iridium oxide (SIROF) is biocompatible.

  18. Nd2K2IrO7 and Sm2K2IrO7: Iridium(VI) Oxides Prepared under Ambient Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Mugavero, III, S.; Smith, M; Yoon, W; zur Loye, H

    2009-01-01

    The most-oxidized iridium oxides known to date are prepared in a hydroxide flux under normal pressure. They contain iridium centers exclusively in the +VI oxidation state and are characterized crystallographically. The picture shows the structure of the Ln2K2IrO7 (Ln=Nd, Sm) and its structural components: IrO6 octahedra (black), KO10 polyhedra (beige), LnO10 polyhedra (blue).

  19. Electrodeposition of PANi films on platinum needle type microelectrodes. Application to the oxidation of ascorbate in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Bonastre, A M; Bartlett, P N

    2010-08-31

    Needle type (165 microm(2)) and small Pt disc (3-11 microm(2)) microelectrodes were used for the electrodeposition of composite poly(aniline), PANi, films by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry for the oxidation of ascorbate. PANi electroactivity at neutral pH was retained through polymer alkylation or by using large poly-anions, such as poly(vinylsulfonate), PVS, and poly(styrenesulfonate), PSS. Hence the growth of the composite films was studied in the presence of different counter ions such as SO(4)(2-), Cl(-), NaPVS and NaPSS. The morphology of the resulting films was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Results showed that flat PANi films with thicknesses much lower than the microelectrode radius were obtained by potentiodynamic electrodeposition. On the other hand films with mushroom shapes, with significant spill over, were obtained under constant potential. The resulting polymer modified microelectrodes films were shown to be suitable for the oxidation of ascorbate at 0.1 V vs. SCE and pH 7 with a detection limit of 1 microM for PANi/PSS composites. The current was independent of film thickness, mass transport controlled at low ascorbate concentrations and not affected by the presence of common interferences such as uric acid, glutathione or vitamin E. Due to their excellent properties the PANi-PSS film coated microelectrodes were used for the amperometric detection of ascorbate in human plasma. The results are encouraging for the use of small polymer modified Pt needle type microelectrodes for the detection of ascorbate in biological systems.

  20. Long Life Testing of Oxide-Coated Iridium/Rhenium Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    1995-01-01

    22-N class rockets, composed of a rhenium (Re) substrate, an iridium (Ir) coating, and an additional composite coating consisting of Ir and a ceramic oxide, were tested on gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen (GO2/GH2) propellants. Two rockets were tested, one for nearly 39 hours at a nominal mixture ratio (MR) of 4.6 and chamber pressure (Pc) of 469 kPa, and the other for over 13 hours at a nominal MR of 5.8 and 621 kPa Pc. Four additional Ir/Re rockets, with a composite Ir-oxide coating fabricated using a modified process, were also tested, including one for 1.3 hours at a nominal MR of 16.7 and Pc of 503 kPa. The long lifetimes demonstrated on low MR GO2/GH2 suggest greatly extended chamber lifetimes (tens of hours) in the relatively low oxidizing combustion environments of Earth storable propellants. The oxide coatings could also serve as a protective coating in the near injector region, where a still-mixing flowfield may cause degradation of the Ir layer. Operation at MR close to 17 suggests that oxide-coated Ir/Re rockets could be used in severely oxidizing combustion environments, such as high MR GO2/GH2, oxygen/hydrocarbon, and liquid gun propellants.

  1. Electrochemically reduced graphene and iridium oxide nanoparticles for inhibition-based angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor detection.

    PubMed

    Kurbanoglu, Sevinc; Rivas, Lourdes; Ozkan, Sibel A; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-02-15

    In this work, a novel biosensor based on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide and iridium oxide nanoparticles for the detection of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor drug, captopril, is presented. For the preparation of the biosensor, tyrosinase is immobilized onto screen printed electrode by using 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and N-Hydroxysuccinimide coupling reagents, in electrochemically reduced graphene oxide and iridium oxide nanoparticles matrix. Biosensor response is characterized towards catechol, in terms of graphene oxide concentration, number of cycles to reduce graphene oxide, volume of iridium oxide nanoparticles and tyrosinase solution. The designed biosensor is used to inhibit tyrosinase activity by Captopril, which is generally used to treat congestive heart failure. It is an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor that operates via chelating copper at the active site of tyrosinase and thioquinone formation. The captopril detections using both inhibition ways are very sensitive with low limits of detection: 0.019µM and 0.008µM for chelating copper at the active site of tyrosinase and thioquinone formation, respectively. The proposed methods have been successfully applied in captopril determination in spiked human serum and pharmaceutical dosage forms with acceptable recovery values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Iridium oxide nanotube electrodes for sensitive and prolonged intracellular measurement of action potentials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ziliang Carter; Xie, Chong; Osakada, Yasuko; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular recording of action potentials is important to understand electrically-excitable cells. Recently, vertical nanoelectrodes have been developed to achieve highly sensitive, minimally invasive and large-scale intracellular recording. It has been demonstrated that the vertical geometry is crucial for the enhanced signal detection. Here we develop nanoelectrodes of a new geometry, namely nanotubes of iridium oxide. When cardiomyocytes are cultured upon those nanotubes, the cell membrane not only wraps around the vertical tubes but also protrudes deep into the hollow centre. We show that this nanotube geometry enhances cell-electrode coupling and results in larger signals than solid nanoelectrodes. The nanotube electrodes also afford much longer intracellular access and are minimally invasive, making it possible to achieve stable recording up to an hour in a single session and more than 8 days of consecutive daily recording. This study suggests that the nanoelectrode performance can be significantly improved by optimizing the electrode geometry.

  3. Noisy CO oxidation on Iridium(111) surfaces. Experiments explained by theory under realistic assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, S.; Cisternas, J.; Descalzi, O.; Küppers, J.

    2014-01-01

    Noise is an everywhere phenomenon. Its influence could be described theoretically quite easily, but is hard to measure in an experiment. Catalytic reactions on surfaces can be described by nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations. For one of such surface reactions - CO oxidation on Iridium(111) surfaces - the probability distribution of CO2 rates around the mean value - showing the influence of noise - could be measured directly in a ultra high vacuum (UHV) experiment. This opens the way to address such a fundamental phenomenon like noise by all three modern methods of physics - experimental, computational and analytical. We show the measured effect of colored noise on a bistable surface reaction and explain all observations directly with the underlying theoretical description - the Langmuir-Hinshelwood reaction scheme - by solving the equations under realistic assumptions. It is a great pleasure to dedicate this work to Prof. Dr. Helmut R. Brand on the occasion of his 60th birthday.

  4. Iridium Oxide Nanotube Electrodes for Highly Sensitive and Prolonged Intracellular Measurement of Action Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ziliang Carter; Xie, Chong; Osakada, Yasuko; Cui, Yi; Cui, Bianxiao

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular recording of action potentials is important to understand electrically-excitable cells. Recently, vertical nanoelectrodes have been developed to achieve highly sensitive, minimally invasive, and large scale intracellular recording. It has been demonstrated that the vertical geometry is crucial for the enhanced signal detection. Here we develop nanoelectrodes made up of nanotubes of iridium oxide. When cardiomyocytes are cultured upon those nanotubes, the cell membrane not only wraps around the vertical tubes but also protrudes deep into the hollow center. We show that this geometry enhances cell-electrode coupling and results in measuring much larger intracellular action potentials. The nanotube electrodes afford much longer intracellular access and are minimally invasive, making it possible to achieve stable recording up to an hour in a single session and more than 8 days of consecutive daily recording. This study suggests that the electrode performance can be significantly improved by optimizing the electrode geometry. PMID:24487777

  5. Partially reduced iridium oxide clusters dispersed on titania as efficient catalysts for facile synthesis of dimethylformamide from CO2, H2 and dimethylamine.

    PubMed

    Bi, Qing-Yuan; Lin, Jian-Dong; Liu, Yong-Mei; Xie, Song-Hai; He, He-Yong; Cao, Yong

    2014-08-21

    A novel bifunctional catalyst based on partially reduced iridium oxide supported on TiO2 was found to be exceedingly efficient for the organic-solvent-free synthesis of dimethylformamide from CO2, H2 and dimethylamine.

  6. Te/Pt nanonetwork modified carbon fiber microelectrodes for methanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsiang-Yu; Shih, Zih-Yu; Lin, Zong-Hong; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-05-17

    Te/Pt nanonetwork-decorated carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) have been fabricated and employed as anodic catalysts in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Te nanowires were prepared from tellurite ions (TeO3(2-)) through a seed-mediated growth process and were deposited onto CFMEs to form three-dimensional Te nanonetworks. The Te nanonetworks then acted as a framework and reducing agent to reduce PtCl6(2-) ions to form Te/Pt through a galvanic replacement reaction, leading to the formation of Te/PtCFMEs. By controlling the reaction time, the amount of Pt and morphology of Te/Pt nanonetworks were controlled, leading to various degrees of electrocatalytic activity. The Te/PtCFMEs provide a high electrochemical active surface area (129.2 m(2) g(-1)), good catalytic activity (1.2 A mg(-1)), high current density (20.0 mA cm(-2)), long durability, and tolerance toward the poisoning species for methanol oxidation in 0.5 M sulfuric acid containing 1 M methanol. We have further demonstrated an enhanced current density by separately using 3 and 5 Te/PtCFMEs. Our results show that the low-cost, stable, and effective Te/PtCFMEs have great potential in the fabrication of cost-effective fuel cells.

  7. Te/Pt nanonetwork modified carbon fiber microelectrodes for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsiang-Yu; Shih, Zih-Yu; Lin, Zong-Hong; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-05-01

    Te/Pt nanonetwork-decorated carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) have been fabricated and employed as anodic catalysts in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Te nanowires were prepared from tellurite ions (TeO32-) through a seed-mediated growth process and were deposited onto CFMEs to form three-dimensional Te nanonetworks. The Te nanonetworks then acted as a framework and reducing agent to reduce PtCl62- ions to form Te/Pt through a galvanic replacement reaction, leading to the formation of Te/PtCFMEs. By controlling the reaction time, the amount of Pt and morphology of Te/Pt nanonetworks were controlled, leading to various degrees of electrocatalytic activity. The Te/PtCFMEs provide a high electrochemical active surface area (129.2 m2 g-1), good catalytic activity (1.2 A mg-1), high current density (20.0 mA cm-2), long durability, and tolerance toward the poisoning species for methanol oxidation in 0.5 M sulfuric acid containing 1 M methanol. We have further demonstrated an enhanced current density by separately using 3 and 5 Te/PtCFMEs. Our results show that the low-cost, stable, and effective Te/PtCFMEs have great potential in the fabrication of cost-effective fuel cells.

  8. Highly effective water oxidation catalysis with iridium complexes through the use of NaIO4.

    PubMed

    Codolà, Zoel; Cardoso, João M S; Royo, Beatriz; Costas, Miquel; Lloret-Fillol, Julio

    2013-05-27

    Exceptional water oxidation (WO) turnover frequencies (TOF=17,000 h(-1)), and turnover numbers (TONs) close to 400,000, the largest ever reported for a metal-catalyzed WO reaction, have been found by using [Cp*Ir(III)(NHC)Cl2] (in which NHC=3-methyl-1-(1-phenylethyl)-imidazoline-2-ylidene) as the pre-catalyst and NaIO4 as oxidant in water at 40 °C. The apparent TOF for [Cp*Ir(III)(NHC)X2] (1X, in which X stands for I (1I), Cl (1Cl), or triflate anion (1OTf)) and [(Cp*-NHCMe)Ir(III)I2] (2) complexes, is kept constant during almost all of the O2 evolution reaction when using NaIO4 as oxidant. The TOF was found to be dependent on the ligand and on the anion (TOF ranging from ≈600 to ≈1100 h(-1) at 25 °C). Degradation of the complexes by oxidation of the organic ligands upon reaction with NaIO4 has been investigated. (1)H NMR, ESI-MS, and dynamic light-scattering measurements (DLS) of the reaction medium indicated that the complex undergoes rapid degradation, even at low equivalents of oxidant, but this process takes place without formation of nanoparticles. Remarkably, three-month-old solution samples of oxidized pre-catalysts remain equally as active as freshly prepared solutions. A UV/Vis feature band at λmax =405 nm is observed in catalytic reaction solutions only when O2 evolves, which may be attributed to a resting state iridium speciation, most probably Ir-oxo species with an oxidation state higher than IV.

  9. Iridium Oxide Coatings with Templated Porosity as Highly Active Oxygen Evolution Catalysts: Structure-Activity Relationships.

    PubMed

    Bernicke, Michael; Ortel, Erik; Reier, Tobias; Bergmann, Arno; Ferreira de Araujo, Jorge; Strasser, Peter; Kraehnert, Ralph

    2015-06-08

    Iridium oxide is the catalytic material with the highest stability in the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) performed under acidic conditions. However, its high cost and limited availability demand that IrO2 is utilized as efficiently as possible. We report the synthesis and OER performance of highly active mesoporous IrO2 catalysts with optimized surface area, intrinsic activity, and pore accessibility. Catalytic layers with controlled pore size were obtained by soft-templating with micelles formed from amphiphilic block copolymers poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(butadiene)-b-poly(ethylene oxide). A systematic study on the influence of the calcination temperature and film thickness on the morphology, phase composition, accessible surface area, and OER activity reveals that the catalytic performance is controlled by at least two independent factors, that is, accessible surface area and intrinsic activity per accessible site. Catalysts with lower crystallinity show higher intrinsic activity. The catalyst surface area increases linearly with film thickness. As a result of the templated mesopores, the pore surface remains fully active and accessible even for thick IrO2 films. Even the most active multilayer catalyst does not show signs of transport limitations at current densities as high as 75 mA cm(-2) . © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Intramolecular C-H oxidative addition to iridium(I) triggered by trimethyl phosphite in N,N'-diphosphanesilanediamine complexes.

    PubMed

    Passarelli, Vincenzo; Pérez-Torrente, Jesús J; Oro, Luis A

    2015-11-14

    The reaction of [Ir(SiNP)(cod)][PF6] ([1][PF6]) and of IrCl(SiNP)(cod) (5) (SiNP = SiMe2{N(4-C6H4CH3)PPh2}2) with trimethyl phosphite affords the iridium(iii) derivatives of the formula [IrHClx(SiNP-H){P(OMe)3}2-x]((1-x)+) (x = 0, 3(+); x = 1, 6) containing the κ(3)C,P,P'-coordinated SiNP-H ligand (SiNP-H = Si(CH2)(CH3){N(4-C6H4CH3)PPh2}2). The thermally unstable pentacoordinated cation [Ir(SiNP){P(OMe)3}(cod)](+) (2(+)) has been detected as an intermediate of the reaction and has been fully characterised in solution. Also, the mechanism of the C-H oxidative addition has been elucidated by DFT calculations showing that the square planar iridium(i) complexes of the formula [IrClx(SiNP){P(OMe)3}2-x]((1-x)+) (x = 0, 4(+); x = 1, 7) should be firstly obtained from 2(+) and finally should undergo the C-H oxidative addition to iridium(i) via a concerted intramolecular mechanism. The influence of the counterion of 2(+) on the outcome of the C-H oxidative addition reaction has also been investigated.

  11. Nanocomposites of iridium oxide and conducting polymers as electroactive phases in biological media.

    PubMed

    Moral-Vico, J; Sánchez-Redondo, S; Lichtenstein, M P; Suñol, C; Casañ-Pastor, N

    2014-05-01

    Much effort is currently devoted to implementing new materials in electrodes that will be used in the central nervous system, either for functional electrostimulation or for tests on nerve regeneration. Their main aim is to improve the charge capacity of the electrodes, while preventing damaging secondary reactions, such as peroxide formation, occurring while applying the electric field. Thus, hybrids may represent a new generation of materials. Two novel hybrid materials are synthesized using three known biocompatible materials tested in the neural system: polypyrrole (PPy), poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and iridium oxide (IrO2). In particular, PPy-IrO2 and PEDOT-IrO2 hybrid nanocomposite materials are prepared by chemical polymerization in hydrothermal conditions, using IrO2 as oxidizing agent. The reaction yields a significant ordered new hybrid where the conducting polymer is formed around the IrO2 nanoparticles, encapsulating them. Scanning electron microscopy and backscattering techniques show the extent of the encapsulation. Both X-ray photoelectron and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies identify the components of the phases, as well as the absence of impurities. Electrochemical properties of the final phases in powder and pellet form are evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. Biocompatibility is tested with MTT toxicity tests using primary cultures of cortical neurons grown in vitro for 6 and 9days. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Co-deposition of carbon dots and reduced graphene oxide nanosheets on carbon-fiber microelectrode surface for selective detection of dopamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jian; Xie, Zhigang; Wallace, Gordon; Wang, Xungai

    2017-08-01

    In this work, carbon dots (CD) decorated graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were electrochemically reduced and deposited onto carbon fiber (CF) to fabricate microelectrodes for highly sensitive and selective dopamine (DA) detection, in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA). The results have shown that surface modification considerably increases the electrocatalytic activity of the carbon fiber microelectrode. Due to possible aggregation of the rGO sheets during deposition, modifying the microelectrode surface with rGO sheets alone cannot achieve the selectivity required for simultaneous detection of DA, AA and UA. Through attaching CD onto GO sheets, the rGO + CD/CF microelectrode performance was significantly improved. The existence of CD on GO sheets can effectively avoid inter-layer stacking of the rGO sheets and provide increased surface area for neurotransmitter-electrode interaction enhancement. The CD can also increase the charge storage capacity of GO sheets. This is the first report on applying both CD and rGO for surface modification of carbon fiber microelectrode. The rGO + CD/CF microelectrode has achieved a linear DA detection concentration range of 0.1-100 μM, with a detection limit of 0.02 μM. The sensitivity of the microelectrode towards DA was as high as 6.5 nA/μM, which is significantly higher than previously reported carbon fiber microelectrodes. The highly sensitive all-carbon based microelectrodes should find use in a number of biomedical applications, such as neurotransmitter detection, neural signal recording and cell physiology studies.

  13. Ultrathin Vein-Like Iridium-Tin Nanowires with Abundant Oxidized Tin as High-Performance Ethanol Oxidation Electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Meiwu; Shao, Qi; Pi, Yecan; Guo, Jun; Huang, Bin; Qian, Yong; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2017-09-01

    Iridium (Ir) holds great promise for ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR), while its practical applications suffer from the limited shape-controlled synthesis due to its low-energy barrier for nucleation. To overcome this limitation, the preparation of a new class of ultrathin vein-like Ir-tin nanowires (IrSn NWs) with abundant oxidized Sn is reported. By tuning the ratio of Ir to Sn, the optimized Ir67 Sn33 /C exhibits the highest mass density of 95.6 mA mg(-1) Ir for EOR at low potential (0.04 V), which is 4.1-fold and 20-fold higher than that of Ir/C and the commercial Pt/C, respectively. It also exhibits the smallest Tafel slope of 153 mV dec(-1) and superior stability after 2 h chronoamperometric measurement. Electrochemical measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectra results confirm that the abundant oxidized Sn promotes a complete oxidization of ethanol into CO2 at low potential. This work highlights the importance of non-noble metal on enhancing the EOR performance. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Virus-templated iridium oxide-gold hybrid nanowires for electrochromic application.

    PubMed

    Nam, Yoon Sung; Park, Heechul; Magyar, Andrew P; Yun, Dong Soo; Pollom, Thomas S; Belcher, Angela M

    2012-06-07

    A highly porous electrode comprised of biologically templated iridium oxide-gold (IrO(2)-Au) hybrid nanowires is introduced for electrochromic applications. A filamentous M13 virus is genetically engineered to display IrO(2)-binding peptides on the viral surface and used as a template for the self-assembly of IrO(2) nanoclusters into a nanowire. The open porous morphology of the prepared nanowire film facilitates ion transport. Subsequently, the redox kinetics of the IrO(2) nanowires seems to be limited by the electric resistance of the nanowire film. To increase the electron mobility in the nanowires, gold nanoparticles are chemically linked to the virus prior to the IrO(2) mineralization, forming a gold nanostring structure along the long axis of the virus. The resulting IrO(2)-Au hybrid nanowires exhibit a switching time of 35 ms for coloration and 25 ms for bleaching with a transmission change of about 30.5% at 425 nm. These values represent almost an order of magnitude faster switching responses than those of an IrO(2) nanowire film having the similar optical contrast. This work shows that genetically engineered viruses can serve as versatile templates to co-assemble multiple functional molecules, enabling control of the electrochemical properties of nanomaterials.

  15. Characterization of secondary phosphine oxide ligands on the surface of iridium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cano, Israel; Martínez-Prieto, Luis M; Fazzini, Pier F; Coppel, Yannick; Chaudret, Bruno; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M

    2017-08-16

    The synthesis of iridium nanoparticles (IrNPs) ligated by various secondary phosphine oxides (SPOs) is described. This highly reproducible and simple method via H2 reduction produces well dispersed, small nanoparticles (NPs), which were characterized by the state-of-the-art techniques, such as TEM, HRTEM, WAXS and ATR FT-IR spectroscopy. In particular, multinuclear solid state MAS-NMR spectroscopy with and without cross polarization (CP) enabled us to investigate the different binding modes adopted by the ligand at the nanoparticle surface, suggesting the presence of three possible types of coordination: as a purely anionic ligand Ir-P(O)R2, as a neutral acid R2P-O-H and as a monoanionic bidentate H-bonded dimer R2P-O-HO[double bond, length as m-dash]PR2. Specifically, the higher basicity of the dicyclohexyl system leads to the formation of IrNPs in which the bidentate binding mode is most abundant. Such cyclohexyl groups are bent towards the edges, as is suggested by the study of (13)CO coordination on the NP surface. This study also showed that the number of surface sites on faces available for bridging CO molecules is higher than the number of sites for terminal CO species on edges and apices, which is unexpected taking into account the small size of the nanoparticles. In addition, the IrNPs present a high chemoselectivity in the hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde to the unsaturated alcohol.

  16. Electrochemical detection of catecholamine exocytosis using planar iridium oxide electrodes in nanoliter microfluidic cell culture volumes

    PubMed Central

    Ges, Igor A.; Currie, Kevin P.M.; Baudenbacher, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Release of neurotransmitters and hormones by Ca2+ regulated exocytosis is a fundamental cellular/molecular process that is disrupted in a variety of psychiatric, neurological, and endocrine disorders. Therefore, this area represents a relevant target for drug and therapeutic development, efforts that will be aided by novel analytical tools and devices that provide mechanistically rich data with increased throughput. Toward this goal, we have electrochemically deposited iridium oxide (IrOx) films onto planar thin film platinum electrodes (20×300µm2) and utilized these for quantitative detection of catecholamine exocytosis from adrenal chromaffin cells trapped in a microfluidic network. The IrOx electrodes show a linear response to norepinephrine in the range of 0–400µM, with a sensitivity of 23.1±0.5mA/(M·mm2). The sensitivity of the IrOx electrodes does not change in the presence of ascorbic acid, a substance commonly found in biological samples. A replica molded polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device with nanoliter sensing volumes was aligned and sealed to a glass substrate with the sensing electrodes. Small populations of chromaffin cells were trapped in the microfluidic sensing chamber and stimulated by rapid perfusion with high potassium (50mM) containing Tyrode’s solution at a flow rate of 1nL/s. Stimulation of the cells produced a rapid increase in current due to oxidation of the released catecholamines, with an estimated maximum concentration in the microfluidic device ~52µM. Thus, we demonstrate the utility of an integrated microfluidic network with IrOx electrodes for real-time quantitative detection of catecholamines released from small populations of cells. PMID:22398270

  17. Determination of glutathione in single HepG2 cells by capillary electrophoresis with reduced graphene oxide modified microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolei; Wang, Jun; Fu, Hongyan; Liu, Dongju; Chen, Zhenzhen

    2014-12-01

    Determination of intracellular bioactive species will afford beneficial information related to cell metabolism, signal transduction, cell function, and disease treatment. In this study, the electrochemically reduced graphene oxide modified carbon fiber microdisk electrode (ER-GOME) was used as a detector of CZE-electrochemical detection and developed to detect glutathione (GSH). The electrocatalytic activity of the modified microelectrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry. Under optimized experimental conditions, the concentration linear range of GSH was from 1 to 60 μM. When the S/N ratio was 3, the concentration detection limit was 1 μM. Compared with the unmodified carbon fiber microdisk electrode, the sensitivity was enhanced more than five times. With the use of this method, the average contents of GSH in single HepG2 cells were found to be 7.13 ± 1.11 fmol (n = 10). Compared with gold/mercury amalgam microelectrode, which was usually used in determining GSH, the electrochemically reduced graphene oxide modified carbon fiber microdisk electrode was friendly to environment for free mercury. Furthermore, there were several merits of the novel electrochemical detector coupled with CE, such as comparative repeatability, easy fabrication, and high sensitivity, hold great potential for the single-cell assay.

  18. Hot microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Baranski, Andrzej S

    2002-03-15

    Heat generation at disk microelectrodes by a high-amplitude (few volt) and high-frequency (0.1-2 GHz) alternating voltage is described. This method allows changing electrode temperature very rapidly and maintaining it well above the boiling point of solution for a very long time without any indication of boiling. The size of the hot zone in solution is determined by the radius of the electrode. There is no obvious limit in regard to the electrode size, so theoretically, by this method, it should be possible to create hot spots that are much smaller than those created with laser beams. That could lead to potential applications in medicine and biology. The heat-generating waveform does not electrically interfere with normal electroanalytical measurements. The noise level at hot microelectrodes is only slightly higher, as compared to normal microelectodes, but diffusion-controlled currents at hot microelectrodes may be up to 7 times higher, and an enhancement of kinetically controlled currents may be even larger. Hot microelectrodes can be used for end-column detection in capillary electrophoresis and for in-line or in vivo analyses. Temperature gradients at hot microelectrodes may exceed 1.5 x 10(5) K/cm, which makes them useful in studies of Soret diffusion and thermoelectric phenomena.

  19. Virus-templated iridium oxide-gold hybrid nanowires for electrochromic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Yoon Sung; Park, Heechul; Magyar, Andrew P.; Yun, Dong Soo; Pollom, Thomas S.; Belcher, Angela M.

    2012-05-01

    A highly porous electrode comprised of biologically templated iridium oxide-gold (IrO2-Au) hybrid nanowires is introduced for electrochromic applications. A filamentous M13 virus is genetically engineered to display IrO2-binding peptides on the viral surface and used as a template for the self-assembly of IrO2 nanoclusters into a nanowire. The open porous morphology of the prepared nanowire film facilitates ion transport. Subsequently, the redox kinetics of the IrO2 nanowires seems to be limited by the electric resistance of the nanowire film. To increase the electron mobility in the nanowires, gold nanoparticles are chemically linked to the virus prior to the IrO2 mineralization, forming a gold nanostring structure along the long axis of the virus. The resulting IrO2-Au hybrid nanowires exhibit a switching time of 35 ms for coloration and 25 ms for bleaching with a transmission change of about 30.5% at 425 nm. These values represent almost an order of magnitude faster switching responses than those of an IrO2 nanowire film having the similar optical contrast. This work shows that genetically engineered viruses can serve as versatile templates to co-assemble multiple functional molecules, enabling control of the electrochemical properties of nanomaterials.A highly porous electrode comprised of biologically templated iridium oxide-gold (IrO2-Au) hybrid nanowires is introduced for electrochromic applications. A filamentous M13 virus is genetically engineered to display IrO2-binding peptides on the viral surface and used as a template for the self-assembly of IrO2 nanoclusters into a nanowire. The open porous morphology of the prepared nanowire film facilitates ion transport. Subsequently, the redox kinetics of the IrO2 nanowires seems to be limited by the electric resistance of the nanowire film. To increase the electron mobility in the nanowires, gold nanoparticles are chemically linked to the virus prior to the IrO2 mineralization, forming a gold nanostring

  20. Electrodeposited iridium oxide pH electrode for measurement of extracellular myocardial acidosis during acute ischemia.

    PubMed

    Marzouk, S A; Ufer, S; Buck, R P; Johnson, T A; Dunlap, L A; Cascio, W E

    1998-12-01

    In the present paper, fabrication, characterization, and physiological applications of a solid-state pH electrode are described. The pH sensing layer was based on an anodic electrodeposited iridium oxide film (AEIROF). Sputtered platinum electrodes (1 mm diameter) fabricated on flexible Kapton films or platinum wires were used as planar or cylindrical supports. Each electrode site was coated with Nafion to attenuate the interference of anionic redox species and to protect the electrode surface during in vivo measurements. Performance of the AEIROF was evaluated, for the first time, as a pH electrode and proved to have a slightly super-Nernstian response with slope of -63.5 +/- 2.2 mV/pH unit for both wire and planar sputtered platinum electrodes. Linear pH responses were obtained in the pH range 2-10. The electrodes have a working lifetime of at least 1 month with accuracy of about 0.02 pH unit and fast response time. The electrodes showed very low sensitivities for different species, such as Na+, K+, Li+, NH4+, Ca2+, Mg2+, dissolved oxygen, lactate, ascorbate, and urate, which are important for physiological applications. The electrodes were applied in extracellular pH measurements during brief regional ischemia in a swine heart and no-flow ischemia in an isolated rabbit papillary muscle. A first report on extracellular pH, K+, and lactate simultaneous measurements during no-flow ischemia using the AEIROF pH electrode and the previously described K+ and lactate electrodes is presented as well.

  1. Enantioselective Iridium Catalyzed Carbonyl Allylation from the Alcohol Oxidation Level via Transfer Hydrogenation: Minimizing Pre-Activation for Synthetic Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Han, Soo Bong; Kim, In Su; Krische, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Existing methods for enantioselective carbonyl allylation, crotylation and tert-prenylation require stoichiometric generation of pre-metallated nucleophiles and often employ stoichiometric chiral modifiers. Under the conditions of transfer hydrogenation employing an ortho-cyclometallated iridium C,O-benzoate catalyst, enantioselective carbonyl allylations, crotylations and tert-prenylations are achieved in the absence of stoichiometric metallic reagents or stoichiometric chiral modifiers. Moreover, under transfer hydrogenation conditions, primary alcohols function dually as hydrogen donors and aldehyde precursors, enabling enantioselective carbonyl addition directly from the alcohol oxidation level. PMID:20024203

  2. Mixed N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Bis(oxazolinyl)borato Rhodium and Iridium Complexes in Photochemical and Thermal Oxidative Addition Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Songchen; Manna, Kuntal; Ellern, Arkady; Sadow, Aaron D

    2014-12-08

    In order to facilitate oxidative addition chemistry of fac-coordinated rhodium(I) and iridium(I) compounds, carbene–bis(oxazolinyl)phenylborate proligands have been synthesized and reacted with organometallic precursors. Two proligands, PhB(OxMe2)2(ImtBuH) (H[1]; OxMe2 = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImtBuH = 1-tert-butylimidazole) and PhB(OxMe2)2(ImMesH) (H[2]; ImMesH = 1-mesitylimidazole), are deprotonated with potassium benzyl to generate K[1] and K[2], and these potassium compounds serve as reagents for the synthesis of a series of rhodium and iridium complexes. Cyclooctadiene and dicarbonyl compounds {PhB(OxMe2)2ImtBu}Rh(η4-C8H12) (3), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(η4-C8H12) (4), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(CO)2 (5), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(η4-C8H12) (6), and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(CO)2 (7) are synthesized along with ToMM(η4-C8H12) (M = Rh (8); M = Ir (9); ToM = tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate). The spectroscopic and structural properties and reactivity of this series of compounds show electronic and steric effects of substituents on the imidazole (tert-butyl vs mesityl), effects of replacing an oxazoline in ToM with a carbene donor, and the influence of the donor ligand (CO vs C8H12). The reactions of K[2] and [M(μ-Cl)(η2-C8H14)2]2 (M = Rh, Ir) provide {κ4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes'CH2}Rh(μ-H)(μ-Cl)Rh(η2-C8H14)2 (10) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(η3-C8H13) (11). In the former compound, a spontaneous oxidative addition of a mesityl ortho-methyl to give a mixed-valent dirhodium species is observed, while the iridium compound forms a monometallic allyl hydride. Photochemical reactions of dicarbonyl compounds 5 and 7 result in C–H bond oxidative addition providing the compounds {κ4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes'CH2}RhH(CO) (12) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(Ph)CO (13). In 12, oxidative addition results in cyclometalation of the mesityl ortho-methyl similar to 10, whereas the iridium compound reacts with the benzene solvent to give a rare crystallographically characterized cis

  3. An Iridium(IV) Species, [Cp*Ir(NHC)Cl]+, Related to a Water-Oxidation Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, Timothy P.; Blakemore, James D.; Schley, Nathan D.; Incarvito, Christopher D.; Hazari, Nilay; Brudvig, Gary W.; Crabtree, Robert H.

    2011-02-08

    The Ir precatalyst (3) contains both a Cp* and a κ2C2,C2'-1,3-diphenylimidazol-2-ylidene ligand, a C-C chelate, where one C donor is the NHC and the other is a cyclometalated N-phenyl wingtip group. The structure of 3 was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Like our other recently described Cp*Ir catalysts, this compound is a precursor to a catalyst that can oxidize water to dioxygen. Electrochemical characterization of the new compound shows that it has a stable iridium(IV) oxidation state, [Cp*IrIV(NHC)Cl]+, in contrast with the unstable Ir(IV) state seen in our previous cyclometalated [Cp*IrIV(2-pyridyl-2'-phenyl)Cl] catalyst. The new iridium(IV) species has been characterized by EPR spectroscopy and has a rhombic symmetry, a consequence of the ligand environment. These results both support previous studies which suggest that Cp*Ir catalysts can be advanced through the relevant catalytic cycle(s) in one-electron steps and help clarify the electrochemical behavior of this class of water-oxidation catalysts.

  4. Electrostatic Spray Deposition-Based Manganese Oxide Films—From Pseudocapacitive Charge Storage Materials to Three-Dimensional Microelectrode Integrands

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Richa; Adelowo, Ebenezer; Baboukani, Amin Rabiei; Villegas, Michael Franc; Henriques, Alexandra; Wang, Chunlei

    2017-01-01

    In this study, porous manganese oxide (MnOx) thin films were synthesized via electrostatic spray deposition (ESD) and evaluated as pseudocapacitive electrode materials in neutral aqueous media. Very interestingly, the gravimetric specific capacitance of the ESD-based electrodes underwent a marked enhancement upon electrochemical cycling, from 72 F∙g−1 to 225 F∙g−1, with a concomitant improvement in kinetics and conductivity. The change in capacitance and resistivity is attributed to a partial electrochemical phase transformation from the spinel-type hausmannite Mn3O4 to the conducting layered birnessite MnO2. Furthermore, the films were able to retain 88.4% of the maximal capacitance after 1000 cycles. Upon verifying the viability of the manganese oxide films for pseudocapacitive applications, the thin films were integrated onto carbon micro-pillars created via carbon microelectromechanical systems (C-MEMS) for examining their application as potential microelectrode candidates. In a symmetric two-electrode cell setup, the MnOx/C-MEMS microelectrodes were able to deliver specific capacitances as high as 0.055 F∙cm−2 and stack capacitances as high as 7.4 F·cm−3, with maximal stack energy and power densities of 0.51 mWh·cm−3 and 28.3 mW·cm−3, respectively. The excellent areal capacitance of the MnOx-MEs is attributed to the pseudocapacitive MnOx as well as the three-dimensional architectural framework provided by the carbon micro-pillars. PMID:28933755

  5. Carbon fiber on polyimide ultra-microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Winthrop F; Lissandrello, Charles A; Shen, Jun; Pearre, Ben W; Mertiri, Alket; Deku, Felix; Cogan, Stuart; Holinski, Bradley J; Chew, Daniel J; White, Alice E; Otchy, Timothy M; Gardner, Timothy

    2017-09-14

    Objective. Most preparations for making neural recordings degrade over time and eventually fail due to insertion trauma and reactive tissue response. The magnitudes of these responses are thought to be related to the electrode size (specifically, the cross-sectional area), the relative stiffness of the electrode, and the degree of tissue tolerance for the material. Flexible carbon fiber ultra-microelectrodes have a much smaller cross-section than traditional electrodes and low tissue reactivity, and thus may enable improved longevity of neural recordings in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Only two carbon fiber array designs have been described previously, each with limited channel densities due to limitations of the fabrication processes or interconnect strategies. Here, we describe a method for assembling carbon fiber electrodes on a flexible polyimide substrate that is expected to facilitate the construction of high-density recording and stimulating arrays. Approach. Individual carbon fibers were aligned using an alignment tool that was 3D-printed with sub-micron resolution using direct laser writing. Indium deposition on the carbon fibers, followed by low-temperature microsoldering, provided a robust and reliable method of electrical connection to the polyimide interconnect. Main Results. Spontaneous multiunit activity and stimulation-evoked compound responses with SNR > 10 and > 120, respectively, were recorded from a small (125 µm) peripheral nerve. We also improved the typically poor charge injection capacity of small diameter carbon fibers by electrodepositing 100 nm thick iridium oxide films, making the carbon fiber arrays usable for electrical stimulation as well as recording. Significance. Our innovations in fabrication technique pave the way for further miniaturization of carbon fiber ultra-microelectrode arrays. We believe these advances to be key steps to enable a shift from labor intensive, manual assembly to a more automated

  6. Electrochemical deposition of iridium and iridium-nickel-alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näther, J.; Köster, F.; Freudenberger, R.; Schöberl, C.; Lampke, T.

    2017-03-01

    To develop durable and reliable electronic contacts, precious metals are still very important for finish plating of contact surfaces. The lesser-known iridium might be an interesting alternative to substitute gold alloys, platinum or rhodium for applications with highest demands to wear and corrosion resistance such as sliding and plug contacts. As matters stand there is no commercial electrolyte for iridium plating. Initial investigation screened the parameter range for different iridium compounds when an iridium layer occurred on the substrates. This approach showed that the oxidation state of iridium is crucial to reach contenting deposits. Best results came from Ir(IV) electrolyte with high bromine concentration coming from the starting compound, while electrolytes made from Ir(III) compounds gave very poor deposits. In subsequent experiments different organic compounds were added to the electrolytes to improve plating efficiency and stability of the solutions. So found electrolytes gave crack-free deposits up to two microns with a micro-hardness of 600 HV. To reduce the iridium content in the layer, iridium-nickel-alloys were investigated, finding that a nickel-content of 10 wt% raised the layer hardness to more than 900 HV.

  7. Homogeneous water oxidation by half-sandwich iridium(III)NHC complexes with pendant hydroxy and amino groups.

    PubMed

    Mahanti, Bani; González Miera, Greco; Martínez-Castro, Elisa; Bedin, Michele; Martín-Matute, Belén; Ott, Sascha; Thapper, Anders

    2017-09-08

    Herein we report three Ir(III)Cp* complexes with hydroxy- (1, 2) or amino- (3) functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands as catalysts for efficient water oxidation induced by addition of ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN). The pendant hydroxy- or amino- groups are very important for activity and the complexes with heteroatom-functionalized NHC ligands show up to 15 times higher rate of oxygen evolution in CAN-induced water oxidation compared to a reference Ir(III)Cp* complex without heteroatom functionalization (4). The presence of molecular high-valent Ir intermediates that are presumably involved in the rate-determining step for water oxidation is established by UV-vis spectroscopic and ESI mass spectrometric analyses during turnover conditions. The hydroxy-groups on the NHC ligands, as well as chloride ligands on the iridium center are proposed to structurally stabilize the high-valent species, and thereby improve the catalytic activity. The Ir(III) complex 1 with a hydroxy-functionalized NHC shows the highest catalytic activity with a TON of 2500 obtained in 3 h and with >90% yield relative to the amount of used oxidant. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Biomimetic sensor based on hemin/carbon nanotubes/chitosan modified microelectrode for nitric oxide measurement in the brain.

    PubMed

    Santos, Ricardo M; Rodrigues, Marcelo S; Laranjinha, João; Barbosa, Rui M

    2013-06-15

    A novel biomimetic microsensor for measuring nitric oxide (NO) in the brain in vivo was developed. The sensor consists of hemin and functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotubes covalently attached to chitosan via the carbodiimide crosslinker EDC followed by chitosan electrodeposition on the surface of carbon fiber microelectrodes. Cyclic voltammetry supported direct electron transfer from the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple of hemin to the carbon surface at -0.370 V and -0.305 V vs. Ag/AgCl for cathodic and anodic peaks, respectively. Square wave voltammetry revealed a NO reduction peak at -0.762 V vs. Ag/AgCl that increased linearly with NO concentration between 0.25 and 1 μM. The average sensitivity of the microsensors was 1.72 nA/μM and the limit of detection was 25 nM. Oxygen and hydrogen peroxide reduction peaks were observed at -0.269 V and -0.332 V vs. Ag/AgCl, respectively and no response was observed for other relevant interferents, namely ascorbate, nitrite and dopamine. The microsensor was successfully applied to the measurement of exogenously applied NO in the rat brain in vivo.

  9. Epitaxially stabilized iridium spinel oxide without cations in the tetrahedral site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriyama, Hiromichi; Matsuno, Jobu; Niitaka, Seiji; Uchida, Masaya; Hashizume, Daisuke; Nakao, Aiko; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Ohsumi, Hiroyuki; Takata, Masaki; Takagi, Hidenori

    2010-05-01

    Single-crystalline thin film of an iridium dioxide polymorph Ir2O4 has been fabricated by the pulsed laser deposition of LixIr2O4 precursor and the subsequent Li-deintercalation using soft chemistry. Ir2O4 crystallizes in a spinel (AB2O4) without A cations in the tetrahedral site, which is isostructural to λ-MnO2. Ir ions form a pyrochlore sublattice, which is known to give rise to a strong geometrical frustration. This Ir spinel was found to be a narrow gap insulator, in remarkable contrast to the metallic ground state of rutile-type IrO2. We argue that an interplay of a strong spin-orbit coupling and a Coulomb repulsion gives rise to an insulating ground state as in a layered perovskite Sr2IrO4.

  10. Facilitated extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella loihica PV-4 by antimony-doped tin oxide nanoparticles as active microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaojian; Liu, Huan; Wang, Jinrong; Ren, Guangyuan; Xie, Beizhen; Liu, Hong; Zhu, Ying; Jiang, Lei

    2015-11-01

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria are capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) to insoluble metal oxides as external electron acceptors for their anaerobic respiration, which is recognized as an important energy-conversion process in natural and engineered environments, such as in mineral cycling, bioremediation, and microbial fuel/electrolysis cells. However, the low EET efficiency remains one of the major bottlenecks for its practical application. We report firstly that the microbial current generated by Shewanella loihica PV-4 (S. loihica PV-4) could be greatly improved that is up to ca. 115 fold, by adding antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) nanoparticles in the electrochemical reactor. The results demonstrate that the biocompatible, electrically conductive ATO nanoparticles acted as active microelectrodes could facilitate the formation of a cells/ATO composite biofilm and the reduction of the outer membrane c-type cytochromes (OM c-Cyts) that are beneficial for the electron transfer from cells to electrode. Meanwhile, a synergistic effect between the participation of OM c-Cyts and the accelerated EET mediated by cell-secreted flavins may play an important role for the enhanced current generation in the presence of ATO nanoparticles. Moreover, it is worth noting that the TCA cycle in S. loihica PV-4 cells is activated by adding ATO nanoparticles, even if the potential is poised at +0.2 V, thereby also improving the EET process. The results presented here may provide a simple and effective strategy to boost the EET of S. loihica PV-4 cells, which is conducive to providing potential applications in bioelectrochemical systems.Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria are capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) to insoluble metal oxides as external electron acceptors for their anaerobic respiration, which is recognized as an important energy-conversion process in natural and engineered environments, such as in mineral cycling, bioremediation, and

  11. Facilitated extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella loihica PV-4 by antimony-doped tin oxide nanoparticles as active microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojian; Liu, Huan; Wang, Jinrong; Ren, Guangyuan; Xie, Beizhen; Liu, Hong; Zhu, Ying; Jiang, Lei

    2015-11-28

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria are capable of extracellular electron transfer (EET) to insoluble metal oxides as external electron acceptors for their anaerobic respiration, which is recognized as an important energy-conversion process in natural and engineered environments, such as in mineral cycling, bioremediation, and microbial fuel/electrolysis cells. However, the low EET efficiency remains one of the major bottlenecks for its practical application. We report firstly that the microbial current generated by Shewanella loihica PV-4 (S. loihica PV-4) could be greatly improved that is up to ca. 115 fold, by adding antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) nanoparticles in the electrochemical reactor. The results demonstrate that the biocompatible, electrically conductive ATO nanoparticles acted as active microelectrodes could facilitate the formation of a cells/ATO composite biofilm and the reduction of the outer membrane c-type cytochromes (OM c-Cyts) that are beneficial for the electron transfer from cells to electrode. Meanwhile, a synergistic effect between the participation of OM c-Cyts and the accelerated EET mediated by cell-secreted flavins may play an important role for the enhanced current generation in the presence of ATO nanoparticles. Moreover, it is worth noting that the TCA cycle in S. loihica PV-4 cells is activated by adding ATO nanoparticles, even if the potential is poised at +0.2 V, thereby also improving the EET process. The results presented here may provide a simple and effective strategy to boost the EET of S. loihica PV-4 cells, which is conducive to providing potential applications in bioelectrochemical systems.

  12. Iridium(III) Bis-Pyridine-2-Sulfonamide Complexes as Efficient and Durable Catalysts for Homogeneous Water Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo; Takada, Kazutake; Goldsmith, Jonas I; Bernhard, Stefan

    2016-01-19

    A family of tetradentate bis(pyridine-2-sulfonamide) (bpsa) compounds was synthesized as a ligand platform for designing resilient and electronically tunable catalysts capable of performing water oxidation catalysis and other processes in highly oxidizing environments. These wrap-around ligands were coordinated to Ir(III) octahedrally, forming an anionic complex with chloride ions bound to the two remaining coordination sites. NMR spectroscopy documented that the more rigid ligand frameworks-[Ir(bpsa-Cy)Cl2](-) and [Ir(bpsa-Ph)Cl2](-)-produced C1-symmetric complexes, while the complex with the more flexible ethylene linker in [Ir(bpsa-en)Cl2](-) displays C2 symmetry. Their electronic structure was explored with DFT calculations and cyclic voltammetry in nonaqueous environments, which unveiled highly reversible Ir(III)/Ir(IV) redox processes and more complex, irreversible reduction chemistry. Addition of water to the electrolyte revealed the ability of these complexes to catalyze the water oxidation reaction efficiently. Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance studies confirmed that a molecular species is responsible for the observed electrocatalytic behavior and ruled out the formation of active IrOx. The electrochemical studies were complemented by work on chemically driven water oxidation, where the catalytic activity of the iridium complexes was studied upon exposure to ceric ammonium nitrate, a strong, one-electron oxidant. Variation of the catalyst concentrations helped to illuminate the kinetics of these water oxidation processes and highlighted the robustness of these systems. Stable performance for over 10 days with thousands of catalyst turnovers was observed with the C1-symmetric catalysts. Dynamic light scattering experiments ascertained that a molecular species is responsible for the catalytic activity and excluded the formation of IrOx particles.

  13. Magnetic symmetries in neutron and resonant x-ray Bragg diffraction patterns of four iridium oxides.

    PubMed

    Lovesey, S W; Khalyavin, D D; Manuel, P; Chapon, L C; Cao, G; Qi, T F

    2012-12-12

    The magnetic properties of Sr(2)IrO(4), Na(2)IrO(3), Sr(3)Ir(2)O(7) and CaIrO(3) are discussed, principally in the light of experimental data in recent literature for Bragg intensities measured in x-ray diffraction with enhancement at iridium L-absorption edges. The electronic structure factors we report, which incorporate parity-even and acentric entities, serve the immediate purpose of making full use of crystal and magnetic symmetry to refine our knowledge of the magnetic properties of the four iridates from resonant x-ray diffraction data. They also offer a platform on which to interpret future investigations, using dichroic signals, resonant x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction, for example, as well as ab initio calculations of electronic structure. Unit-cell structure factors, suitable for x-ray Bragg diffraction enhanced by an electric dipole-electric dipole (E1-E1) event, reveal exactly which iridium multipoles are visible, e.g., a magnetic dipole parallel to the crystal c-axis (z-axis) and an electric quadrupole with yz-like symmetry in the specific case of CaIrO(3). Magnetic space-groups are assigned to Sr(2)IrO(4), Sr(3)Ir(2)O(7) and CaIrO(3), namely, P(I)cca, P(A)ban and Cm'cm', respectively, in the Belov-Neronova-Smirnova notation. The assignment for Sr(2)IrO(4) is possible because of our new high-resolution neutron diffraction data, gathered on a powder sample. In addition, the new data are used to show that the ordered magnetic moment of an Ir(4+) ion in Sr(2)IrO(4) does not exceed 0.29(4) μ(B). Na(2)IrO(3) has two candidate magnetic space-groups that are not resolved with currently available resonant x-ray data.

  14. Multilayer microfluidic systems with indium-tin-oxide microelectrodes for studying biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsiang-Chiu; Lyau, Jia-Bo; Lin, Min-Hsuan; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chen, Hsin

    2017-07-01

    Contemporary semiconductor and micromachining technologies have been exploited to develop lab-on-a-chip microsystems, which enable parallel and efficient experiments in molecular and cellular biology. In these microlab systems, microfluidics play an important role for automatic transportation or immobilization of cells and bio-molecules, as well as for separation or mixing of different chemical reagents. However, seldom microlab systems allow both morphology and electrophysiology of biological cells to be studied in situ. This kind of study is important, for example, for understanding how neuronal networks grow in response to environmental stimuli. To fulfill this application need, this paper investigates the possibility of fabricating multi-layer photoresists as microfluidic systems directly above a glass substrate with indium-tin-oxide (ITO) electrodes. The microfluidic channels are designed to guide and trap biological cells on top of ITO electrodes, through which the electrical activities of cells can be recorded or elicited. As both the microfluidic system and ITO electrodes are transparent, the cellular morphology is observable easily during electrophysiological studies. Two fabrication processes are proposed and compared. One defines the structure and curing depth of each photoresist layer simply by controlling the exposure time in lithography, while the other further utilizes a sacrificial layer to defines the structure of the bottom layer. The fabricated microfluidic system is proved bio-compatible and able to trap blood cells or neurons. Therefore, the proposed microsystem will be useful for studying cultured cells efficiently in applications such as drug-screening.

  15. Basic ancillary ligands promote O-O bond formation in iridium-catalyzed water oxidation: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Vilella, Laia; Vidossich, Pietro; Balcells, David; Lledós, Agustí

    2011-11-14

    The cationic iridium complex [Ir(OH(2))(2)(phpy)(2)](+) (phpy = o-phenylpyridine) is among the most efficient mononuclear catalysts for water oxidation. The postulated active species is the oxo complex [Ir(O)(X)(phpy)(2)](n), with X = OH(2) (n = +1), OH(-) (n = 0) or O(2-) (n = -1), depending on the pH. The reactivity of these species has been studied computationally at the DFT(B3LYP) level. The three [Ir(O)(X)(phpy)(2)](n) complexes have an electrophilic Ir(v)-oxo moiety, which yields an O-O bond by undergoing a nucleophilic attack of water in the critical step of the mechanism. In this step, water transfers one proton to either the Ir(V)-oxo moiety or the ancillary X ligand. Five different reaction pathways associated with this acid/base mechanism have been characterized. The calculations show that the proton is preferably accepted by the X ligand, which plays a key role in the reaction. The higher the basicity of X, the lower the energy barrier associated with O-O bond formation. The anionic species, [Ir(O)(2)(phpy)(2)](-), which has the less electrophilic Ir(V)-oxo moiety but the most basic X ligand, promotes O-O bond formation through the lowest energy barrier, 14.5 kcal mol(-1). The other two active species, [Ir(O)(OH)(phpy)(2)] and [Ir(O)(OH(2))(phpy)(2)](+), which have more electrophilic Ir(V)-oxo moieties but less basic X ligands, involve higher energy barriers, 20.2 kcal mol(-1) and 25.9 kcal mol(-1), respectively. These results are in good agreement with experiments showing important pH effects in similar catalytic systems. The theoretical insight given by the present study can be useful in the design of more efficient water oxidation catalysts. The catalytic activity may increase by using ligand scaffolds bearing internal bases.

  16. Benchmarking Water Oxidation Catalysts Based on Iridium Complexes: Clues and Doubts on the Nature of Active Species.

    PubMed

    Macchioni, Alceo; Menendez Rodriguez, Gabriel; Gatto, Giordano; Zuccaccia, Cristiano

    2017-10-10

    Water Oxidation (WO) is a central reaction in the photo- and electro-synthesis of fuels. Iridium complexes have been successfully exploited as water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) with remarkable performances. Herein we report a systematic study aimed at benchmarking well-known Ir WOCs, when NaIO4 is used to drive the reaction. In particular, the following complexes were studied: cis-[Ir(ppy)2(H2O)2]OTf (ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) 1, [Cp*Ir(H2O)3]NO3 (Cp* = cyclopentadienyl anion) 2, [Cp*Ir(bzpy)Cl] (bzpy = 2-benzoylpyridine) 3, [Cp*IrCl2(Me2-NHC)] (NHC = N-heterocyclic carbene) 4, [Cp*Ir(pyalk)Cl] (pyalk = 2-pyridine-isopropanoate) 5, [Cp*Ir(pic)NO3] (pic = 2-pyridine-carboxylate) 6, [Cp*Ir{(P(O)(OH)2}3]Na 7, and mer-[IrCl3(pic)(HOMe)]K 8. Their reactivity was compared with that of IrCl3.nH2O 9 and [Ir(OH)6]2- 10. Most measurements were carried out in phosphate buffer (0.2 M), where 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 10 showed very high activity (yield close to 100%, TOF up to 554 min-1 with 10, the highest ever observed for a WO driven by NaIO4). The found order of activity is: 10 > 2 ≈ 4 > 6 > 5 > 7 > 1 > 9 > 3 > 8. Clues concerning the molecular nature of the active species were obtained, whereas its exact nature remains doubtfully. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. In vitro study of iridium electrodes for neural stimulation.

    PubMed

    Aryan, Naser Pour; Brendler, Christian; Rieger, Viola; Schleehauf, Sebastian; Heusel, Gerhard; Rothermel, Albrecht

    2012-01-01

    Iridium is one of the main electrode materials for applications like neural stimulation. Iridium has a higher charge injection capacity when activated and transformed into AIROF (activated iridium oxide film) using specific electrical signals. Activation is not possible in stimulating devices, if they do not include the necessary circuitry for activation. We introduce a method for iridium electrode activation requiring minimum additional on-chip hardware. In the main part, the lifetime behavior of iridium electrodes is investigated. These results may be interesting for applications not including on-chip activation hardware, and also because activation has drawbacks such as worse mechanical properties and reproducibility of AIROF.

  18. Optimization of Photoanodes for Photocatalytic Water Oxidation by Combining a Heterogenized Iridium Water-Oxidation Catalyst with a High-Potential Porphyrin Photosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Materna, Kelly L; Jiang, Jianbing; Regan, Kevin P; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A; Crabtree, Robert H; Brudvig, Gary

    2017-09-06

    Development of water-splitting dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells (WS-DSPECs) has gained interest due to their ability to generate renewable fuels using solar energy. In this study, photoanodes were assembled composed of a SnO2 film sensitized with a combination of a high potential CF3-substituted porphyrin dye with a THP-protected hydroxamic acid surface-anchoring group, and a Cp*-iridium water-oxidation catalyst containing a silatrane anchoring group. The dye-to-catalyst ratios were varied from 2:1 to 32:1 to optimize photocatalytic water oxidation. Photoelectrochemical measurements not only showed more stable and reproducible photocurrents for lower dye-to-catalyst ratios, but photostability was also improved. O2 production was confirmed in real-time over a 20-hour period using a Clark electrode. Photoanodes prepared from 2:1 and 8:1 dye-to-catalyst sensitization solutions provided the most active electrodes for photocatalytic water oxidation, performing approximately 30-35 turnovers in 20 hours. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Computationally Probing the Performance of Hybrid, Heterogeneous, and Homogeneous Iridium-Based Catalysts for Water Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    García-Melchor, Max; Vilella, Laia; López, Núria; Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2016-04-29

    An attractive strategy to improve the performance of water oxidation catalysts would be to anchor a homogeneous molecular catalyst on a heterogeneous solid surface to create a hybrid catalyst. The idea of this combined system is to take advantage of the individual properties of each of the two catalyst components. We use Density Functional Theory to determine the stability and activity of a model hybrid water oxidation catalyst consisting of a dimeric Ir complex attached on the IrO2(110) surface through two oxygen atoms. We find that homogeneous catalysts can be bound to its matrix oxide without losing significant activity. Hence, designing hybrid systems that benefit from both the high tunability of activity of homogeneous catalysts and the stability of heterogeneous systems seems feasible.

  20. Iridium-Tin oxide solid-solution nanocatalysts with enhanced activity and stability for oxygen evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangfu; Yu, Hongmei; Yang, Donglei; Chi, Jun; Wang, Xunying; Sun, Shucheng; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian

    2016-09-01

    Addressing major challenges from the material cost, efficiency and stability, it is highly desirable to develop high-performance catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Herein we explore a facile surfactant-assisted approach for fabricating Irsbnd Sn (Ir/Sn = 0.6/0.4, by mol.) nano-oxide catalysts with good morphology control. Direct proofs from XRD and X-ray photoelectron spectra indicate hydrophilic triblock polymer (TBP, like Pluronic® F108) surfactant can boost the formation of stable solid-solution structure. With the TBP hydrophilic and block-length increase, the fabricated Irsbnd Sn oxides undergoing the rod-to-sphere transition obtain the relatively lower crystallization, decreased crystallite size, Ir-enriched surface and incremental available active sites, all of which can bolster the OER activity and stability. Meanwhile, it is observed that the coupled Ir oxidative etching takes a crucial role in determining the material structure and performance. Compared with commercial Ir black, half-cell tests confirm F108-assistant catalysts with over 40 wt% Ir loading reduction show 2-fold activity enhancement as well as significant stability improvement. The lowest cell voltage using 0.88 mg cm-2 Ir loading is only 1.621 V at 1000 mA cm-2 and 80 °C with a concomitant energy efficiency of 75.8% which is beyond the DOE 2017 efficiency target of 74%.

  1. Magnetic field perturbation of neural recording and stimulating microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Santiesteban, Francisco M.; Swanson, Scott D.; Noll, Douglas C.; Anderson, David J.

    2007-04-01

    To improve the overall temporal and spatial resolution of brain mapping techniques, in animal models, some attempts have been reported to join electrophysiological methods with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, little attention has been paid to the image artefacts produced by the microelectrodes that compromise the anatomical or functional information of those studies. This work presents a group of simulations and MR images that show the limitations of wire microelectrodes and the potential advantages of silicon technology, in terms of image quality, in MRI environments. Magnetic field perturbations are calculated using a Fourier-based method for platinum (Pt) and tungsten (W) microwires as well as two different silicon technologies. We conclude that image artefacts produced by microelectrodes are highly dependent not only on the magnetic susceptibility of the materials used but also on the size, shape and orientation of the electrodes with respect to the main magnetic field. In addition silicon microelectrodes present better MRI characteristics than metallic microelectrodes. However, metallization layers added to silicon materials can adversely affect the quality of MR images. Therefore only those silicon microelectrodes that minimize the amount of metallic material can be considered MR-compatible and therefore suitable for possible simultaneous fMRI and electrophysiological studies. High resolution gradient echo images acquired at 2 T (TR/TE = 100/15 ms, voxel size = 100 × 100 × 100 µm3) of platinum-iridium (Pt-Ir, 90%-10%) and tungsten microwires show a complete signal loss that covers a volume significantly larger than the actual volume occupied by the microelectrodes: roughly 400 times larger for Pt-Ir and 180 for W, at the tip of the microelectrodes. Similar MR images of a single-shank silicon microelectrode only produce a partial volume effect on the voxels occupied by the probe with less than 50% of signal loss.

  2. Composite wire microelectrode and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Isaacs, H.S.; Aldykiewicz, A.J. Jr.

    1996-12-03

    A composite wire microelectrode for making electro-chemical measurements, and method of making same, are disclosed. The microelectrode includes an inner conductive sensing wire and an outer tube that is oxidized to form a dielectric, self-healing oxide layer around the sensing wire. 4 figs.

  3. Composite wire microelectrode and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Isaacs, Hugh S.; Aldykiewicz, Jr., Antonio J.

    1996-12-03

    A composite wire microelectrode for making electro-chemical measurements, and method of making same. The microelectrode includes an inner conductive sensing wire and an outer tube that is oxidized to form a dielectric, self-healing oxide layer around the sensing wire.

  4. Microelectrodes for Studying Neurobiology

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Justin M.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2008-01-01

    Summary of recent advances Microelectrodes have emerged as an important tool used by scientists to study biological changes in the brain and in single cells. This review briefly summarizes the ways in which microelectrodes as chemical sensors have furthered the field of neurobiology by reporting on changes that occur on the sub-second time scale. Microelectrodes have been used in a variety of fields including their use by electrophysiologists to characterize neuronal action potentials and development of neural prosthetics. Here we restrict our review to microelectrodes that have been used as chemical sensors. They have played a major role in many important neurobiological findings. PMID:18675377

  5. Anisotropic magnetic interactions in 5d iridium oxides by many-body quantum chemistry calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katukuri, Vamshi M.; Nishimoto, Satoshi; Yushankhai, Viktor; Rousochatzakis, Ioannis; Hozoi, Liviu; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2014-03-01

    Ir 5d5 oxides are being actively studied due to the realization of novel spin-orbit coupled jeff ~ 1/2 ground states. One remarkable feature in these compounds is the highly anisotropic magnetic interactions, orders of magnitude stronger than in 3d oxides. We address the nature of the anisotropic exchange in the 2D honeycomb (Na/Li)2IrO3 ((Na/Li)213) and square-lattice (Sr/Ba)2IrO4 ((Sr/Ba)213) iridates, by ab initio multireference configuration-interaction calculations on large embedded clusters. For Na213 we find that the Kitaev term is ferromagnetic and defines the dominant energy scale while the nearest-neighbor Heisenberg contribution is antiferromagnetic. Although Li213 is structurally similar, we predict quite different set of interaction parameters in Li213. We further analyze the magnetic order and the essential differences between these two materials by exact diagonalization and density-matrix renormalization-group calculations that additionally include 2nd and 3rd neighbor couplings. Sizable symmetric anisotropic interactions are also computed for Ba214. From the ab initio data, the relevant in-plane spin model for Ba214 turns out to be a Heisenberg-compass effective model. We finally discuss the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange in Sr214.

  6. Water oxidation with molecularly defined iridium complexes: insights into homogeneous versus heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Junge, Henrik; Marquet, Nicolas; Kammer, Anja; Denurra, Stefania; Bauer, Matthias; Wohlrab, Sebastian; Gärtner, Felix; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Spannenberg, Anke; Gladiali, Serafino; Beller, Matthias

    2012-10-01

    Molecularly defined Ir complexes and different samples of supported IrO(2) nanoparticles have been tested and compared in the catalytic water oxidation with cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN) as the oxidant. By comparing the activity of nano-scaled supported IrO(2) particles to the one of organometallic complexes it is shown that the overall activity of the homogeneous Ir precursors is defined by both the formation of the homogeneous active species and its conversion to Ir(IV)-oxo nanoparticles. In the first phase of the reaction the activity is dominated by the homogeneous active species. With increasing reaction time, the influence of nano-sized Ir-oxo particles becomes more evident. Notably, the different conversion rates of the homogeneous precursor into the active species as well as the conversion into Ir-oxo nanoparticles and the different particle sizes have a significant influence on the overall activity. In addition to the homogeneous systems, IrO(2)@MCM-41 has also been synthesized, which contains stabilized nanoparticles of between 1 and 3 nm in size. This latter system shows a similar activity to IrCl(3)⋅xH(2)O and complexes 4 and 5. Mechanistic insights were obtained by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy.

  7. Modification of Microelectrode Arrays: New Microelectrochemical Devices for Sensor Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-22

    and has been widely studied in connection with electrochromic display devices (Dautremont-Smith, 1982). Scheme IV illustrates a W03-based...oxides do provide an entry to a wide variety of new adcroelectrochemical devices . Quinone- Viologen Connected Microelectrodes: Use of an Electroactive...REPORT & PERIOO COVERED Modification of Microelectrode Arrays: New Interim Techni:cal Report Microelectrochemical Devices for Sensor Applications 6

  8. Processing of Iridium and Iridium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2008-01-01

    Iridium and its alloys have been considered to be difficult to fabricate due to their high melting temperatures, limited ductility, sensitivity to impurity content, and chemical properties. The variety of processing methods used for iridium and its alloys are reviewed, including purification, melting, forming, joining, and powder metallurgy techniques. Also included are coating and forming by the methods of electroplating, chemical and physical vapor deposition, and melt particle deposition.

  9. Hierarchical nanostructured noble metal/metal oxide/graphene-coated carbon fiber: in situ electrochemical synthesis and use as microelectrode for real-time molecular detection of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abdurhman, Abduraouf Alamer Mohamed; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Guoan; Wang, Shuai

    2015-10-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a new type of nanohybrid microelectrode based on a hierarchical nanostructured Au/MnO2/graphene-modified carbon fiber (CF) via in situ electrochemical synthesis, which leads to better structural integration of different building blocks into the CF microelectrode. Our finding demonstrates that wrapping CF with graphene nanosheets has dramatically increased the surface area and electrical conductivity of the CF microelectrode. The subsequent template-free electrodeposition of MnO2 on graphene-wrapped CF gives rise to a porous nanonest architecture built up from twisted and intersectant MnO2 nanowires, which serves as an ideal substrate for the direct growth of Au nanoparticles. Owing to the structural merit and synergy effect between different components, the hierarchical nanostructured noble metal/metal oxide/graphene-coated CF demonstrates dramatically enhanced electrocatalytic activity. When used for nonenzymatic H2O2 sensing, the resultant modified microelectrode exhibits acceptable sensitivity, reproducibility, stability, and selectivity, which enable it to be used for real-time tracking H2O2 secretion in human cervical cancer cells. Graphical abstract A schematic illustration of preparation of hierarchical Au/MnO2/ERGO/CF nanohybrid electrode for real-time molecular detection of cancer cells.

  10. Iridium ultrasmall nanoparticles, worm-like chain nanowires, and porous nanodendrites: One-pot solvothermal synthesis and catalytic CO oxidation activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Li, Shuai-Chen; Zhu, Wei; Ke, Jun; Yu, Jing-Wen; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Dai, Lin-Xiu; Gu, Jun; Zhang, Ya-Wen

    2016-06-01

    We report a facile one-pot solvothermal synthesis of monodisperse iridium (Ir) ultrasmall (1.5-2.5 nm in diameter) nanoparticles (NPs), worm-like chain nanowires (NWs), and porous nanodendrites (NDs), for which CO oxidation reaction has been employed as a probe reaction to investigate the effects of nanoparticle size and surface-capping organics on the catalytic activities. Time-dependent experiments revealed that an oriented attachment mechanism induced by the strong adsorption of halide anions (Br- and I-) on specific facet of Ir nanoclusters or by decreasing the reduction rate of Ir precursors with changing their concentrations during the synthesis was responsible for the formation of Ir NWs and NDs. Annealing tests indicated that an O2-H2 atmosphere treatment turned out to be an effective measure to clean up the surface-capping organics of Ir NPs supported on commercial SiO2. Catalytic CO oxidation reaction illustrated that a significant improvement in the catalytic activity of CO oxidation reaction was achieved together with the changing of activation energies after such atmosphere treatment for the supported catalysts of the ultrasmall Ir NPs. It is noteworthy that this enhancement in catalytic activity could be ascribed to the changes in the surface status (including populations of Ir species in metallic and oxidized states, removal of surface capping organics, the variety of active sites, and total effective active site number) for the supported nanocatalysts during the atmosphere treatment.

  11. Vascular lumen simulation and highly-sensitive nitric oxide detection using three-dimensional gelatin chip coupled to TiC/C nanowire arrays microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin-Mei; Wang, Xue-Ying; Hu, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Rong-Sheng; Huang, Ying; Chen, Shi-Jing; Huang, Wei-Hua; Huo, Kai-Fu; Chu, Paul K

    2012-11-07

    Reproducing the physiological environment of blood vessels for the in vitro investigation of endothelial cell functions is very challenging. Here, we describe a vascular-like structure based on a three-dimensional (3D) gelatin chip with good compatibility and permeability which is also cost-effective and easy to produce. The controllable lumen diameter and wall thickness enable close mimicking of blood vessels in vitro. The 3D gelatin matrix between adjacent lumens is capable of generating soluble-factor gradients inside, and diffusion of molecules with different molecular weights through the matrix is studied. The cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells proliferate on the gelatin lumen linings to form a vascular lumen. The hemodynamic behavior including adhesion, alignment of endothelial cells (ECs) under shear stress and pulsatile stretch is studied. Furthermore, a microelectrode comprising TiC/C nanowire arrays is fabricated to detect nitric oxide with sub-nM detection limits and NO generation from the cultured ECs is monitored in real time. This vascular model reproduces the surrounding parenchyma of endothelial cells and mimics the hemodynamics inside blood vessels very well, thereby enabling potential direct investigation of hemodynamics, angiogenesis, and tumor metastasis in vitro.

  12. Structure, electrochemical properties and capacitance performance of polypyrrole electrodeposited onto 1-D crystals of iridium complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocka-Żołopa, Monika; Winkler, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Composites of polypyrrole and one-dimensional iridium complex crystals [(C2H5)4N]0.55[IrCl2(CO)2] were prepared by in situ two-step electrodeposition. Initially, iridium complex crystals were formed during [IrCl2(CO)2]- complex oxidation. Next, pyrrole was electropolymerized on the surface of the iridium needles. The morphology of the composite was investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. At positive potentials, the iridium complex crystals and the polypyrrole were oxidized. In aprotic solvents, oxidation of the iridium complex crystals resulted in their dissolution. In water containing tetra(n-butyl)ammonium chlorides, the 1-D iridium complex crystals were reversibly oxidized. The product of the iridium complex oxidation remained on the electrode surface in crystalline form. The iridium complex needles significantly influenced the redox properties of the polymer. The polypyrrole involved electrode processes become more reversible in presence of crystals of iridium complex. The current of polypyrrole oxidation was higher compared to that of pure polypyrrole and the capacitance properties of the polymer were significantly enhanced. A specific capacitance as high as 590 F g-1 was obtained for a composite of polypyrrole and 1-D crystals of the iridium complex in water containing tetra(n-butyl)ammonium chloride. This value is approximately twice as high as the capacitance of the pure polymer deposited onto the electrode surface.

  13. Enantioselective Iridium-Catalyzed Carbonyl Allylation from the Alcohol or Aldehyde Oxidation Level Using Allyl Acetate as an Allyl Metal Surrogate

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In Su; Ngai, Ming-Yu; Krische, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    A method for carbonyl allylation and crotylation from the alcohol oxidation state via allyl acetate-alcohol transfer hydrogenative C-C coupling is described. Exposure of allyl acetate to benzylic and allylic alcohols 1a-9a in the presence of an iridium catalyst derived from [IrCl(cod)]2 and BIPHEP delivers products of C-allylation 1b-9b. Similarly, 3-acetoxy-1-butene couples to allylic alcohols 1a-9a to furnish crotylation products 1c-9c. The ability of this allylation protocol to transcend the boundaries imposed by oxidation level are demonstrated by the coupling of allyl acetate to aldehydes 1d-3d under standard conditions, but employing isopropanol as terminal reductant. The products of C-allylation 1b-3b are obtained in isolated yields comparable to those obtained in the corresponding alcohol coupling reactions. These studies contribute to a paradigm shift in carbonyl addition chemistry that defines a departure from preformed organometallic reagents. PMID:18444616

  14. Tuning the Selectivity of Catalytic Carbon Dioxide Hydrogenation over Iridium/Cerium Oxide Catalysts with a Strong Metal-Support Interaction.

    PubMed

    Li, Siwei; Xu, Yao; Chen, Yifu; Li, Weizhen; Lin, Lili; Li, Mengzhu; Deng, Yuchen; Wang, Xiaoping; Ge, Binghui; Yang, Ce; Yao, Siyu; Xie, Jinglin; Li, Yongwang; Liu, Xi; Ma, Ding

    2017-08-28

    A one-step ligand-free method based on an adsorption-precipitation process was developed to fabricate iridium/cerium oxide (Ir/CeO2 ) nanocatalysts. Ir species demonstrated a strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) with the CeO2 substrate. The chemical state of Ir could be finely tuned by altering the loading of the metal. In the carbon dioxide (CO2 ) hydrogenation reaction it was shown that the chemical state of Ir species-induced by a SMSI-has a major impact on the reaction selectivity. Direct evidence is provided indicating that a single-site catalyst is not a prerequisite for inhibition of methanation and sole production of carbon monoxide (CO) in CO2 hydrogenation. Instead, modulation of the chemical state of metal species by a strong metal-support interaction is more important for regulation of the observed selectivity (metallic Ir particles select for methane while partially oxidized Ir species select for CO production). The study provides insight into heterogeneous catalysts at nano, sub-nano, and atomic scales. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Luminogenic iridium azide complexes.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Jun; Vohidov, Farrukh; Aliyan, Amirhossein; Huang, Kewei; Martí, Angel A; Ball, Zachary T

    2015-10-21

    The synthesis and characterization of luminogenic, bioorthogonal iridium probes is described. These probes exhibit long photoluminescence lifetimes amenable to time-resolved applications. A simple, modular synthesis via 5-azidophenanthroline allows structural variation and allows optimization of cell labeling.

  16. Iridium Interfacial Stack (IRIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David James (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An iridium interfacial stack ("IrIS") and a method for producing the same are provided. The IrIS may include ordered layers of TaSi.sub.2, platinum, iridium, and platinum, and may be placed on top of a titanium layer and a silicon carbide layer. The IrIS may prevent, reduce, or mitigate against diffusion of elements such as oxygen, platinum, and gold through at least some of its layers.

  17. Composition-dependent electrocatalytic activity of palladium-iridium binary alloy nanoparticles supported on the multiwalled carbon nanotubes for the electro-oxidation of formic acid.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jianming; Dou, Meiling; Liu, Haijing; Wang, Feng; Liu, Jingjun; Li, Zhilin; Ji, Jing

    2015-07-22

    Surface-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) supported Pd100-xIrx binary alloy nanoparticles (Pd100-xIrx/MWCNT) with tunable Pd/Ir atomic ratios were synthesized by a thermolytic process at varied ratios of bis(acetylacetonate) palladium(II) and iridium(III) 2,4-pentanedionate precursors and then applied as the electrocatalyst for the formic acid electro-oxidation. The X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis showed that the Pd100-xIrx alloy nanoparticles with the average size of 6.2 nm were uniformly dispersed on the MWCNTs and exhibited a single solid solution phase with a face-centered cubic structure. The electrocatalytic properties were evaluated through the cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry tests, and the results indicated that both the activity and stability of Pd100-xIrx/MWCNT were strongly dependent on the Pd/Ir atomic ratios: the best electrocatalytic performance in terms of onset potential, current density, and stability against CO poisoning was obtained for the Pd79Ir21/MWCNT. Moreover, compared with pure Pd nanoparticles supported on MWCNTs (Pd/MWCNT), the Pd79Ir21/MWCNT exhibited enhanced steady-state current density and higher stability, as well as maintained excellent electrocatalytic activity in high concentrated formic acid solution, which was attributed to the bifunctional effect through alloying Pd with transition metal.

  18. Iridium versus Iridium: Nanocluster and Monometallic Catalysts Carrying the Same Ligand Behave Differently.

    PubMed

    Cano, Israel; Martínez-Prieto, Luis M; Chaudret, Bruno; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M

    2017-01-26

    A specific secondary phosphine oxide (SPO) ligand (tert-butyl(phenyl)phosphine oxide) was employed to generate two iridium catalysts, an Ir-SPO complex and IrNPs (iridium nanoparticles) ligated with SPO ligands, which were compared mutually and with several supported iridium catalysts with the aim to establish the differences in their catalytic properties. The Ir-SPO-based catalysts showed totally different activities and selectivities in the hydrogenation of various substituted aldehydes, in which H2 is likely cleaved by a metal-ligand cooperation, that is, the SPO ligand and a neighboring metal centre operate in tandem to activate the hydrogen molecule. In addition, the supported IrNPs behave very differently from both Ir-SPO catalysts. This study exemplifies perfectly the advantages and disadvantages related to the use of the main types of catalysts, and thus the dissimilarities between them.

  19. Cyclometalated iridium(III) bipyridyl-phenylenediamine complexes with multicolor phosphorescence: synthesis, electrochemistry, photophysics, and intracellular nitric oxide sensing.

    PubMed

    Law, Wendell Ho-Tin; Leung, Kam-Keung; Lee, Lawrence Cho-Cheung; Poon, Che-Shan; Liu, Hua-Wei; Lo, Kenneth Kam-Wing

    2014-06-01

    We present a new class of phosphorescent cyclometalated iridium(III) bipyridyl-phenylenediamine complexes [Ir(N^C)2 (bpy-DA)](PF6 ) (bpy-DA=4-(N-(2-amino-5-methoxyphenyl)aminomethyl)-4'-methyl-2,2'-bipyridine; HN^C=2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyridine (Hdfppy) (1 a), 2-phenylpyridine (Hppy) (2 a), 2-phenylquinoline (Hpq) (3 a), 2-phenylcinchoninic acid methyl ester (Hpqe) (4 a)) and their triazole counterparts [Ir(N^C)2 (bpy-T)](PF6 ) (bpy-T=4-((6-methoxybenzotriazol-1-yl)methyl)-4'-methyl-2,2'-bipyridine; HN^C=Hdfppy (1 b), Hppy (2 b), Hpq (3 b), Hpqe (4 b)). Upon photoexcitation, the diamine complexes exhibited fairly weak green to red phosphorescence under ambient conditions whereas the triazole derivatives emitted strongly. The photophysical properties of complexes 2 a and 2 b have been studied in more detail. Upon protonation, the diamine complex 2 a displayed increased emission intensity, but the emission properties of its triazole counterpart complex 2 b were independent on the pH value of the solution. Also, complex 2 a was found to be readily converted into complex 2 b upon reaction with NO under aerated conditions, resulting in substantial emission enhancement of the solution. The reaction was highly specific toward NO over other reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) as revealed by spectroscopic analyses. The lipophilicity and cellular uptake efficiency of the diamine complexes have been examined and correlated to their molecular structures. Also, cell-based assays showed that these complexes were noncytotoxic toward human cervix epithelioid carcinoma (HeLa) cells (at 10 μM, 4 h, percentage survival ≈80-95%). Additionally, the diamine complexes have been used to visualize intracellular NO generated both exogenously in HeLa cells and endogenously in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages by laser-scanning confocal microscopy.

  20. Iridium wire grid polarizer fabricated using atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas; Käsebier, Thomas; Szeghalmi, Adriana; Knez, Mato; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2011-10-25

    In this work, an effective multistep process toward fabrication of an iridium wire grid polarizer for UV applications involving a frequency doubling process based on ultrafast electron beam lithography and atomic layer deposition is presented. The choice of iridium as grating material is based on its good optical properties and a superior oxidation resistance. Furthermore, atomic layer deposition of iridium allows a precise adjustment of the structural parameters of the grating much better than other deposition techniques like sputtering for example. At the target wavelength of 250 nm, a transmission of about 45% and an extinction ratio of 87 are achieved.

  1. Modification of Microelectrode Arrays: New Microelectrochemical Devices for Sensor Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-08-22

    oxides. W03 is known to be such a redox active material and has been widely studied in connection with electrochromic display devices (Dautremont... devices . Quinone- Viologen Connected Microelectrodes: Use of an Electroactive Molecular Material With An Intrinsic pH Dependence. W03 is an example of an...REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Modification of Microelectrode Arrays: New Interim Technical Report Microelectrochemical Devices for Sensor Applications 6

  2. Dual-Enzyme Characteristics of Polyvinylpyrrolidone-Capped Iridium Nanoparticles and Their Cellular Protective Effect against H2O2-Induced Oxidative Damage.

    PubMed

    Su, Hua; Liu, Dan-Dan; Zhao, Meng; Hu, Wei-Liang; Xue, Shan-Shan; Cao, Qian; Le, Xue-Yi; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2015-04-22

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized iridium nanoparticles (PVP-IrNPs), synthesized by the facile alcoholic reduction method using abundantly available PVP as protecting agents, were first reported as enzyme mimics showing intrinsic catalase- and peroxidase-like activities. The preparation procedure was much easier and more importantly, kinetic studies found that the catalytic activity of PVP-IrNPs was comparable to previously reported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization indicated that PVP-IrNPs had the average size of approximately 1.5 nm and mainly consisted of Ir(0) chemical state. The mechanism of PVP-IrNPs' dual-enzyme activities was investigated using XPS, Electron spin resonance (ESR) and cytochrome C-based electron transfer methods. The catalase-like activity was related to the formation of oxidized species Ir(0)@IrO2 upon reaction with H2O2. The peroxidase-like activity originated from their ability acting as electron transfer mediators during the catalysis cycle, without the production of hydroxyl radicals. Interestingly, the protective effect of PVP-IrNPs against H2O2-induced cellular oxidative damage was investigated in an A549 lung cancer cell model and PVP-IrNPs displayed excellent biocompatibility and antioxidant activity. Upon pretreatment of cells with PVP-IrNPs, the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in response to H2O2 was decreased and the cell viability increased. This work will facilitate studies on the mechanism and biomedical application of nanomaterials-based enzyme mimic.

  3. The influence of iridium chemical oxidation state on the performance and durability of oxygen evolution catalysts in PEM electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siracusano, S.; Baglio, V.; Grigoriev, S. A.; Merlo, L.; Fateev, V. N.; Aricò, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    Nanosized Ir-black (3 nm) and Ir-oxide (5 nm) oxygen evolution electrocatalysts showing high performance in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) water electrolysis based on Aquivion® short-side chain ionomer membrane are investigated to understand the role of the Ir oxidation state on the electrocatalytic activity and stability. Despite the smaller mean crystallite size, the Ir-black electrocatalyst shows significantly lower initial performance than the Ir-oxide. During operation at high current density, the Ir-black shows a decrease of cell potential with time whereas the Ir-oxide catalyst shows increasing cell potential resulting in a degradation rate of about 10 μV/h, approaching 1000 h. The unusual behaviour of the Ir-black results from the oxidation of metallic Ir to IrOx. The Ir-oxide catalyst shows instead a hydrated structure on the surface and a negative shift of about 0.5 eV for the Ir 4f binding energy after 1000 h electrolysis operation. This corresponds to the formation of a sub-stoichiometric Ir-oxide on the surface. These results indicate that a hydrated IrO2 with high oxidation state on the surface is favourable in decreasing the oxygen evolution overpotential. Modifications of the Ir chemical oxidation state during operation can affect significantly the catalytic activity and durability of the electrolysis system.

  4. Iridium: failures & successes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, CarissaBryce; Beard, Suzette

    2001-03-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the Iridium business venture in terms of the challenges faced, the successes achieved, and the causes of the ultimate failure of the venture — bankruptcy and system de-orbit. The paper will address technical, business, and policy issues. The intent of the paper is to provide a balanced and accurate overview of the Iridium experience, to aid future decision-making by policy makers, the business community, and technical experts. Key topics will include the history of the program, the objectives and decision-making of Motorola, the market research and analysis conducted, partnering strategies and their impact, consumer equipment availability, and technical issues — target performance, performance achieved, technical accomplishments, and expected and unexpected technical challenges. The paper will use as sources trade media and business articles on the Iridium program, technical papers and conference presentations, Wall Street analyst's reports, and, where possible, interviews with participants and close observers.

  5. Multi-component nanoporous platinum-ruthenium-copper-osmium-iridium alloy with enhanced electrocatalytic activity towards methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoting; Si, Conghui; Gao, Yulai; Frenzel, Jan; Sun, Junzhe; Eggeler, Gunther; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    Multi-component nanoporous platinum-ruthenium-copper-osmium-iridium (np-PtRuCuOsIr) electrocatalyst has been facilely fabricated by chemical dealloying of mechanically alloyed AlCuPtRuOsIr precursor. The np-PtRuCuOsIr catalyst exhibits a typical three-dimensional bi-continuous interpenetrating ligament/channel structure with a length scale of ∼2.5 nm. The np-PtRuCuOsIr catalyst reaches a higher level in the mass activity (857.5 mA mgPt-1) and specific activity (3.0 mA cm-2) towards methanol oxidation compared to the commercial PtC catalyst (229.5 mA mgPt-1 and 0.5 mA cm-2 respectively). Moreover, the CO stripping peak of np-PtRuCuOsIr is 0.54 V (vs. SCE), 130 mV negative shift in comparison with the commercial PtC (0.67 V vs. SCE). The half-wave potential of np-PtRuCuOsIr is 0.900 V vs. RHE, 36 mV positive compared with that of the commercial PtC (0.864 V vs. RHE). The np-PtRuCuOsIr catalyst also shows 1.8 and 3.8 times enhancement in the mass and specific activity towards oxygen reduction than the commercial PtC. Moreover, the np-PtRuCuOsIr alloy exhibits superior oxygen reduction activities even after 15 K cycles, indicating its excellent long-term stability. The present np-PtRuCuOsIr can act as a promising candidate for the electrocatalyst in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs).

  6. Cp* Iridium Precatalysts for Selective C-H Oxidation via Direct Insertion. A Joint Experimental/Computational Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Meng; Balcells, David; Parent, Alexander R.; Crabtree, Robert H; Eisenstein, Odile

    2012-01-01

    A series of Cp*Ir complexes are active precatalysts in C–H oxidation of cis-decalin, cyclooctane, 1-acetylpyrrolidine, tetrahydrofurans, and γ-lactones. Moderate to high yields were achieved, and surprisingly, high selectivity for mono-oxidation of cyclooctane to cyclooctanone was observed. Kinetic isotope effect experiments in the C–H oxidation of ethylbenezene to acetophenone yield kH/kD = 15.4 ± 0.8 at 23 °C and 17.8 ± 1.2 at 0 °C, which are consistent with C–H oxidation being the rate-limiting step with a significant tunneling contribution. The nature of the active species was investigated by TEM, UV–vis, microfiltration, and control experiments. DFT calculations showed that the C–H oxidation of cis-decalin by Cp*Ir(ppy)(Cl) (ppy = o-phenylpyridine) follows a direct oxygen insertion mechanism on the singlet potential energy surface, rather than the radical rebound route that would be seen for the triplet, in good agreement with the retention of stereochemistry observed in this reaction.

  7. Luminogenic iridium azide complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ohata, Jun; Vohidov, Farrukh; Aliyan, Amirhossein; Huang, Kewei; Martí, Angel A.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of luminogenic, bioorthogonal iridium probes is described. These probes exhibit long fluorescent lifetimes amenable to time-resolved applications. A simple, modular synthesis via 5-azidophenanthroline allows structural variation and allows optimization of cell labeling. PMID:26325066

  8. Hydridomethyl iridium complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, R.G; Buchanan, J.M.; Stryker, J.M.; Wax, M.J.

    1989-07-18

    This patent describes a hydridomethyl complex of the formula: CpIr(P(R{sub 1}){sub 3})HMe. Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkyl cyclopentadienyl radical; Ir represents an iridium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R{sub 1} represents an alkyl group; and Me represents a methyl group.

  9. Iridium-coated rhenium thrusters by CVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, J. T.; Kazaroff, J. M.; Appel, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    Operation of spacecraft thrusters at increased temperature reduces propellant requirements. Inasmuch as propellant comprises the bulk of a satellite's mass, even a small percentage reduction makes possible a significant enhancement of the mission in terms of increased payload. Because of its excellent high temperature strength, rhenium is often the structural material of choice. It can be fabricated into free-standing shapes by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto an expendable mandrel. What rhenium lacks is oxidation resistance, but this can be provided by a coating of iridium, also by CVD. This paper describes the process used by Ultramet to fabricate 22-N (5-lbf) and, more recently, 445-N (100-lbf) Ir/Re thrusters; characterizes the CVD-deposited materials; and summarizes the materials effects of firing these thrusters. Optimal propellant mixture ratios can be employed because the materials withstand an oxidizing environment up to the melting temperature of iridium, 2400 C (4350 F).

  10. Iridium-coated rhenium thrusters by CVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, John T.; Kazaroff, John M.; Appel, Marshall A.

    1988-01-01

    Operation of spacecraft thrusters at increased temperature reduces propellant requirements. Inasmuch as propellant comprises the bulk of a satellite's mass, even a small percentage reduction makes possible a significant enhancement of the mission in terms of increased payload. Because of its excellent high temperature strength, rhenium is often the structural material of choice. It can be fabricated into free-standing shapes by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto an expendable mandrel. What rhenium lacks is oxidation resistance, but this can be provided by a coating of iridium, also by CVD. This paper describes the process used by Ultramet to fabricate 22-N (5-lbf) and, more recently, 445-N (100-lbf) Ir/Re thrusters; characterizes the CVD-deposited materials; and summarizes the materials effects of firing these thrusters. Optimal propellant mixture ratios can be employed because the materials withstand an oxidizing environment up to the meltimg temperature of iridium, 2400 C (4350 F).

  11. Iridium-coated rhenium thrusters by CVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, J. T.; Kazaroff, J. M.; Appel, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    Operation of spacecraft thrusters at increased temperature reduces propellant requirements. Inasmuch as propellant comprises the bulk of a satellite's mass, even a small percentage reduction makes possible a significant enhancement of the mission in terms of increased payload. Because of its excellent high temperature strength, rhenium is often the structural material of choice. It can be fabricated into free-standing shapes by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto an expendable mandrel. What rhenium lacks is oxidation resistance, but this can be provided by a coating of iridium, also by CVD. This paper describes the process used by Ultramet to fabricate 22-N (5-lbf) and, more recently, 445-N (100-lbf) Ir/Re thrusters; characterizes the CVD-deposited materials; and summarizes the materials effects of firing these thrusters. Optimal propellant mixture ratios can be employed because the materials withstand an oxidizing environment up to the melting temperature of iridium, 2400 C (4350 F).

  12. New honeycomb iridium(V) oxides: NaIrO3 and Sr3CaIr2O9.

    PubMed

    Wallace, David C; McQueen, Tyrel M

    2015-12-21

    We report the structures and physical properties of two new iridates, NaIrO3 and Sr3CaIr2O9, both of which contain continuous two-dimensional honeycomb connectivity. NaIrO3 is produced by room temperature oxidative deintercalation of sodium from Na2IrO3, and contains edge-sharing IrO6 octahedra that form a planar honeycomb lattice. Sr3CaIr2O9, produced via conventional solid-state synthesis, hosts a buckled honeycomb lattice with novel corner-sharing connectivity between IrO6 octahedra. Both of these new compounds are comprised of Ir(5+) (5d(4)) and exhibit negligible magnetic susceptibility. They are thus platforms to investigate the origin of the nonmagnetic behavior exhibited by Ir(5+) oxides, and provide the first examples of a J = 0 state on a honeycomb lattice.

  13. Ultrafast photodriven intramolecular electron transfer from an iridium-based water-oxidation catalyst to perylene diimide derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Vagnini, Michael T.; Smeigh, Amanda L.; Blakemore, James D.; Eaton, Samuel W.; Schley, Nathan D.; D’Souza, Francis; Crabtree, Robert H.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Co, Dick T.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Photodriving the activity of water-oxidation catalysts is a critical step toward generating fuel from sunlight. The design of a system with optimal energetics and kinetics requires a mechanistic understanding of the single-electron transfer events in catalyst activation. To this end, we report here the synthesis and photophysical characterization of two covalently bound chromophore-catalyst electron transfer dyads, in which the dyes are derivatives of the strong photooxidant perylene-3,4:9,10-bis(dicarboximide) (PDI) and the molecular catalyst is the Cp∗Ir(ppy)Cl metal complex, where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine. Photoexcitation of the PDI in each dyad results in reduction of the chromophore to PDI•- in less than 10 ps, a process that outcompetes any generation of 3∗PDI by spin-orbit-induced intersystem crossing. Biexponential charge recombination largely to the PDI-Ir(III) ground state is suggestive of multiple populations of the PDI•--Ir(IV) ion-pair, whose relative abundance varies with solvent polarity. Electrochemical studies of the dyads show strong irreversible oxidation current similar to that seen for model catalysts, indicating that the catalytic integrity of the metal complex is maintained upon attachment to the high molecular weight photosensitizer. PMID:22586073

  14. Iridium Aluminide Coats For Protection Against Ox idation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Richard B.; Tuffias, Robert H.; La Ferla, Raffaele; Jang, Qin

    1996-01-01

    Iridium aluminide coats investigated for use in protecting some metallic substrates against oxidation at high temperatures. Investigation prompted by need for cost-effective anti-oxidation coats for walls of combustion chambers in rocket engines. Also useful in special terrestrial applications like laboratory combustion chambers and some chemical-processing chambers.

  15. Iridium Aluminide Coats For Protection Against Ox idation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Richard B.; Tuffias, Robert H.; La Ferla, Raffaele; Jang, Qin

    1996-01-01

    Iridium aluminide coats investigated for use in protecting some metallic substrates against oxidation at high temperatures. Investigation prompted by need for cost-effective anti-oxidation coats for walls of combustion chambers in rocket engines. Also useful in special terrestrial applications like laboratory combustion chambers and some chemical-processing chambers.

  16. Acid-catalyzed oxidative addition of a C-H bond to a square planar d⁸ iridium complex.

    PubMed

    Hackenberg, Jason D; Kundu, Sabuj; Emge, Thomas J; Krogh-Jespersen, Karsten; Goldman, Alan S

    2014-06-25

    While the addition of C-H bonds to three-coordinate Ir(I) fragments is a central theme in the field of C-H bond activation, addition to square planar four-coordinate complexes is far less precedented. The dearth of such reactions may be attributed, at least in part, to kinetic factors elucidated in seminal work by Hoffmann. C-H additions to square planar carbonyl complexes in particular are unprecedented, in contrast to the extensive chemistry of oxidative addition of other substrates (e.g., H2, HX) to Vaska's Complex and related species. We report that Bronsted acids will catalyze the addition of the alkynyl C-H bond of phenylacetylene to the pincer complex (PCP)Ir(CO). The reaction occurs to give exclusively the trans-C-H addition product. Our proposed mechanism, based on kinetics and DFT calculations, involves initial protonation of (PCP)Ir(CO) to generate a highly active five-coordinate cationic intermediate, which forms a phenylacetylene adduct that is then deprotonated to give product.

  17. Cleavage of ether, ester, and tosylate C(sp3)-O bonds by an iridium complex, initiated by oxidative addition of C-H bonds. Experimental and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Sabuj; Choi, Jongwook; Wang, David Y; Choliy, Yuriy; Emge, Thomas J; Krogh-Jespersen, Karsten; Goldman, Alan S

    2013-04-03

    A pincer-ligated iridium complex, (PCP)Ir (PCP = κ(3)-C6H3-2,6-[CH2P(t-Bu)2]2), is found to undergo oxidative addition of C(sp(3))-O bonds of methyl esters (CH3-O2CR'), methyl tosylate (CH3-OTs), and certain electron-poor methyl aryl ethers (CH3-OAr). DFT calculations and mechanistic studies indicate that the reactions proceed via oxidative addition of C-H bonds followed by oxygenate migration, rather than by direct C-O addition. Thus, methyl aryl ethers react via addition of the methoxy C-H bond, followed by α-aryloxide migration to give cis-(PCP)Ir(H)(CH2)(OAr), followed by iridium-to-methylidene hydride migration to give (PCP)Ir(CH3)(OAr). Methyl acetate undergoes C-H bond addition at the carbomethoxy group to give (PCP)Ir(H)[κ(2)-CH2OC(O)Me] which then affords (PCP-CH2)Ir(H)(κ(2)-O2CMe) (6-Me) in which the methoxy C-O bond has been cleaved, and the methylene derived from the methoxy group has migrated into the PCP Cipso-Ir bond. Thermolysis of 6-Me ultimately gives (PCP)Ir(CH3)(κ(2)-O2CR), the net product of methoxy group C-O oxidative addition. Reaction of (PCP)Ir with species of the type ROAr, RO2CMe or ROTs, where R possesses β-C-H bonds (e.g., R = ethyl or isopropyl), results in formation of (PCP)Ir(H)(OAr), (PCP)Ir(H)(O2CMe), or (PCP)Ir(H)(OTs), respectively, along with the corresponding olefin or (PCP)Ir(olefin) complex. Like the C-O bond oxidative additions, these reactions also proceed via initial activation of a C-H bond; in this case, C-H addition at the β-position is followed by β-migration of the aryloxide, carboxylate, or tosylate group. Calculations indicate that the β-migration of the carboxylate group proceeds via an unusual six-membered cyclic transition state in which the alkoxy C-O bond is cleaved with no direct participation by the iridium center.

  18. anti-Diastereo- and Enantioselective Carbonyl Crotylation from the Alcohol or Aldehyde Oxidation Level Employing a Cyclometallated Iridium Catalyst: α-Methyl Allyl Acetate as a Surrogate to Preformed Crotylmetal Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, In Su; Han, Soo Bong; Krische, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Under the conditions of transfer hydrogenation employing an ortho-cyclometallated iridium catalyst generated in situ from [Ir(cod)Cl]2, 4-cyano-3-nitrobenzoic acid and the chiral phosphine ligand (S)-SEGPHOS, α-methyl allyl acetate couples to alcohols 1a–1j with complete levels of branched regioselectivity to furnish products of carbonyl crotylation 3a–3j, which are formed with good levels of anti-diastereoselectivity and exceptional levels of enantioselectivity. An identical set of optically enriched carbonyl crotylation products 3a–3j is accessible from the corresponding aldehydes 2a–2j under the same conditions, but employing isopropanol as the terminal reductant. Experiments aimed at probing the origins of stereoselection establish a matched mode of ionization for the (R)-acetate and the iridium catalyst modified by (S)-SEGPHOS, as well as reversible ionization of the allylic acetate with rapid π-facial interconversion of the resulting π-crotyl intermediate in advance of C-C bond formation. Additionally, rapid alcohol-aldehyde redox equilibration in advance of carbonyl addition is demonstrated. Thus, anti-diastereo- and enantioselective carbonyl crotylation from the alcohol or aldehyde oxidation level is achieved in the absence of any stoichiometric metallic reagents or stoichiometric metallic byproducts. PMID:19191498

  19. Method for refining contaminated iridium

    DOEpatents

    Heshmatpour, Bahman; Heestand, Richard L.

    1983-01-01

    Contaminated iridium is refined by alloying it with an alloying agent selected from the group consisting of manganese and an alloy of manganese and copper, and then dissolving the alloying agent from the formed alloy to provide a purified iridium powder.

  20. Method for refining contaminated iridium

    DOEpatents

    Heshmatpour, B.; Heestand, R.L.

    1982-08-31

    Contaminated iridium is refined by alloying it with an alloying agent selected from the group consisting of manganese and an alloy of manganese and copper, and then dissolving the alloying agent from the formed alloy to provide a purified iridium powder.

  1. Microelectrode investigation of neuroneal ageing from a single identified neurone.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhavik Anil; Arundell, Martin; Parker, Kim H; Yeoman, Mark S; O'Hare, Danny

    2010-09-14

    Microelectrode amperometry is uniquely suited for characterising the dynamics of neurotransmitter release, as it offers unparalleled spatial and temporal resolution. We have used carbon fibre microelectrodes to study release of the monoamine neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) and the gaseous transmitter nitric oxide (NO) in intact central nervous system of the water snail, Lymnaea stagnalis. Analysis of spontaneous vesicular release of 5-HT and depolarisation-induced release of NO reveals significant differences with ageing that may be associated with changes in protein structure and function.

  2. Microelectrodes for in situ voltammetric determination of pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paux, T.; Billon, G.; Pieta, 1.; Ouddane, B.; Fischer, J. C.; Wartel, M.

    2003-05-01

    The toxicity of sediments is often closely bound to the labile toxic elements contents. In porewaters, metal concentrations are generally measured after separation from the solid material by means of pressure or centrifugation. The recent developments of in situ metal measurements by microsensors do not require any pretreatment of the sediment and hence avoid some possible artefacts like oxygen penetration in anoxic sediment and/or temperature modification. Our work describes firstly the preparation of microelectrodes based on a thin solid Silver (diameter: 30 μm) or Iridium (diameter: 75 μm) wire, covered at the tip with a fine layer of mercury. Secondly, an analytical procedure (based on cathodic voltammetry) is presented to measure Mn(II), Fe(II) and S(-II) concentrations, which play a relevant role in the metal pollutant cycle in sediments. By anodic stripping voltammetry, such microsensors are able to detect trace heavy metals such as Cd(II) or Pb(II) at relatively low concentration levels ( 1 μg.dm^{-3}) with 5 minutes accumulation time. Finally, the most important challenge is to install the microelectrodes in natural media and to follow up metal pollution over a long time period.

  3. Electrodeposition of platinum-iridium coatings and nanowires for neurostimulating applications: Fabrication, characterization and in-vivo retinal stimulation/recording. EIS studies of hexavalent and trivalent chromium based military coating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrossians, Artin

    The studies presented in this thesis are composed of two different projects demonstrated in two different parts. The first part of this thesis represents an electrochemical approach to possible improvements of the interface between an implantable device and biological tissue. The second part of this thesis represents electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies on the corrosion resistance behavior of different types of polymer coated Al2024 alloys. In the first part of this thesis, a broad range of investigations on the development of an efficient and reproducible electrochemical deposition method for fabrication of thin-film platinum-iridium alloys were performed. The developed method for production of dense films was then modified to produce very high surface area coatings with ultra-low electrochemical impedance characteristics. The high-surface area platinum-iridium coating was applied on microelectrode arrays for chronic in-vitro stimulation. Using the same method of producing dense films, platinum-iridium nanowires were fabricated using Anodized Aluminum Oxide (AAO) templates for hermetic packaging applications to be used in implantable microelectronics. The implantable microelectronics will be used to perform data reception and transmission management, power recovery, digital processing and analog output of stimulus current. Finally, in-vivo electrical stimulation tests were performed on an animal retina using high surface-area platinum-iridium coated single microelectrodes to verify the charge transfer characteristics of the coatings. In the second part of this thesis, three different sets of samples with different combinations of pretreatments, primers with the same type of topcoat were tested in 0.5 N NaCl for period of 30 days. The surface changes measured by EIS as a function of time were then analyzed. The analysis of the fit parameters of the impedance spectra showed that the different primers had the most effect on the corrosion protection

  4. Iridium-based electrocatalytic systems for the determination of insulin.

    PubMed

    Pikulski, M; Gorski, W

    2000-07-01

    Two electrochemical catalytic systems for the determination of insulin were developed. The homogeneous system was based on the oxidation of insulin by chloro complexes of iridium(IV). Kinetic studies revealed that the aquation of iridium complexes activated them toward the oxidation of insulin in acidic solutions; e.g., the rate constant was equal to 25, 900, and 8,400 L mol(-1) s(-1) for the oxidation of insulin by the IrCl62-, Ir(H2O)CI5-, and Ir(H2O)2Cl4 complexes, respectively. The inertness of the iridium complexes argued for the outer-sphere mechanism of the homogeneous oxidation reaction. Electroplating of aquated iridium complexes on the glassy carbon electrode resulted in the formation of the iridium oxide (IrOx) surface film, which was used in the heterogeneous detection system for insulin. The catalytic activity of the IrOx film toward insulin oxidation was ascribed to a combination of electron-transfer mediation and oxygen transfer which was related to the acid/base chemistry of the film. The IrOx film electrode was used as an amperometric detector for flow injection analysis of insulin in pH 7.40 phosphate buffer. Linear least-squares calibration curves over the range 0.05-0.50 microM (five points) had slopes of 35.2 +/- 0.4 nA microM(-1) and correlation coefficients of 0.999. The detection limit for insulin was 20 nM using the criterion of a signal of 3 times the peak-to-peak noise. The advantageous properties of the detector based on the IrOx film are its inherent stability at physiological pH, high catalytic activity toward insulin oxidation, and simplicity of preparation.

  5. In Vivo Validation of Custom-Designed Silicon-Based Microelectrode Arrays for Long-Term Neural Recording and Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Manoonkitiwongsa, Panya S.; Wang, Cindy X.; McCreery, Douglas B.

    2012-01-01

    We developed and validated silicon-based neural probes for neural stimulating and recording in long-term implantation in the brain. The probes combine the deep reactive ion etching process and mechanical shaping of their tip region, yielding a mechanically sturdy shank with a sharpened tip to reduce insertion force into the brain and spinal cord, particularly, with multiple shanks in the same array. The arrays’ insertion forces have been quantified in vitro. Five consecutive chronically-implanted devices were fully functional from 3 to 18 months. The microelectrode sites were electroplated with iridium oxide, and the charge injection capacity measurements were performed both in vitro and after implantation in the adult feline brain. The functionality of the chronic array was validated by stimulating in the cochlear nucleus and recording the evoked neuronal activity in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. The arrays’ recording quality has also been quantified in vivo with neuronal spike activity recorded up to 566 days after implantation. Histopathology evaluation of neurons and astrocytes using immunohistochemical stains indicated minimal alterations of tissue architecture after chronic implantation. PMID:22020666

  6. Carbon Microelectrodes with a Renewable Surface

    PubMed Central

    Takmakov, Pavel; Zachek, Matthew K.; Keithley, Richard B.; Walsh, Paul L.; Donley, Carrie; McCarty, Gregory S.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2010-01-01

    Electrode fouling decreases sensitivity and can be a substantial limitation in electrochemical experiments. In this work we describe an electrochemical procedure that constantly renews the surface of a carbon microelectrode using periodic triangle voltage excursions to an extended anodic potential at a scan rate of 400 Vs−1. This methodology allows for the regeneration of an electrochemically active surface and restores electrode sensitivity degraded by irreversible adsorption of chemical species. We show that repeated voltammetric sweeps to moderate potentials in aqueous solution causes oxidative etching of carbon thereby constantly renewing the electrochemically active surface. Oxidative etching was established by tracking surface-localized fluorine atoms with XPS, by monitoring changes in carbon surface morphology with AFM on pyrolyzed photoresist films, and also by optical and electron microscopy. The use of waveforms with extended anodic potentials showed substantial increases in sensitivity towards the detection of catechols. This enhancement arose from the adsorption of the catechol moiety that could be maintained with a constant regeneration of the electrode surface. We also demonstrate that application of the extended waveform could restore the sensitivity of carbon microelectrodes diminished by irreversible adsorption (electrode fouling) of byproducts resulting from the electrooxidation and polymerization of tyramine. Overall, this work brings new insight into the factors that affect electrochemical processes at carbon electrodes and provides a simple method to remove or reduce fouling problems associated with many electrochemical experiments. PMID:20146453

  7. Iridium at Kilauea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Trace-element anomalies observed in rocks located stratigraphically at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary are considered significant evidence that the boundary is a record of a large meteorite impact (Science, 208, 1095-1108, 1980). In particular, trace metals, including iridium and other members of the platinum metals group, are thought to be enriched in rocks alien to the earth's surface. These elements are indeed enriched in meteorites relative to earth crustal rocks, but new evidence from analyses of the January 1983 eruption of Kilauea suggest that the analogy may be invalid. W.H. Zoller, J.R. Parrington, and J.M. Phelan Kotra reported neutron activation analyses of airborne particulate matter collected at the Mauna Loa Observatory and found “strikingly” large concentrations of iridium in addition to element concentrations expected from volcanic emissions (Science, 222, 1118, 1983). The only other platinum-group trace metal analyzed was gold, which was also found to be anomalously high. They concede that they need more data of other platinum group elements and more data on other volcanos, but the implication is that the Cretacious-Tertiary boundary may well be volcanic, not due to a large meteorite impact.

  8. Iridium Satellite Signal Exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonough, Peter

    2010-03-01

    The Iridium Satellite constellation is unique to satellite communication networks in that it allows for transmission of data between satellites instead of relying on transmission by the bent pipe methodology. As such, this network is far more secure than other satellite communication networks, and forces interception to occur within the locale of the transmission from modem to satellite or within the locale of the downlink from the satellite other modem. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the security weaknesses within the Iridium protocol, showing that it was possible to track one of these satellites with a high gain antenna, resulting in the ability to anticipate transmission, to acquire the location of that transmission, and to uncover the content of that transmission. This project was completed as part of the summer student program at the Southwest Research Institute. The presentation will demonstrate the thought process used in chronological order, essentially demonstrating how I achieved the result from my point of view as the summer progressed.

  9. Iridium/Rhenium Parts For Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Harding, John T.; Wooten, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidation/corrosion of metals at high temperatures primary life-limiting mechanism of parts in rocket engines. Combination of metals greatly increases operating temperature and longevity of these parts. Consists of two transition-element metals - iridium and rhenium - that melt at extremely high temperatures. Maximum operating temperature increased to 2,200 degrees C from 1,400 degrees C. Increases operating lifetimes of small rocket engines by more than factor of 10. Possible to make hotter-operating, longer-lasting components for turbines and other heat engines.

  10. Iridium/Rhenium Parts For Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Harding, John T.; Wooten, John R.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidation/corrosion of metals at high temperatures primary life-limiting mechanism of parts in rocket engines. Combination of metals greatly increases operating temperature and longevity of these parts. Consists of two transition-element metals - iridium and rhenium - that melt at extremely high temperatures. Maximum operating temperature increased to 2,200 degrees C from 1,400 degrees C. Increases operating lifetimes of small rocket engines by more than factor of 10. Possible to make hotter-operating, longer-lasting components for turbines and other heat engines.

  11. Temperature coefficient of and oxygen effect on the antimony microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Satake, N; Matsumura, Y; Fujimoto, M

    1980-01-01

    With regard to pH measurement of biological fluids in vivo with metal-metal oxide microelectrodes, the effect of temperature and partial pressure of oxygen on antimony (Sb) microelectrodes was examined, and pH of blood was estimated in the bullfrog. The temperature coefficient (dE/dt) of electromotive force (EMF) of Sb-microelectrodes in the range of 7 to 37 degrees C was -1.18 +/- 0.113 mV/degrees C (mean +/- SEM) in Ringer solution, whereas that of the pH glass electrode in the same solution was -0.43 +/- 0.035 mV/degrees C. When estimated in Tris buffer solution, it was -0.06 +/- 0.063 mV/degrees C for Sb-microelectrodes and 1.05 + 0.036 mV/degrees C for glass electrodes. The change of slope constant (alpha in -mV/pH) in the Sb-microelectrode due to temperature change could be predicted empirically from: alpha = 0.40 (t-25) + 55.3, where t represents the measuring temperature in degrees C. The resultant deviation of pH reading between Sb and glass electrodes, delta pHSb-Glass, may be expressed by: delta pHSb-Glass = 0.00183 (t-25) +0.016. In the range of 45 to 760 mmHg of oxygen partial pressure it fixed pH, the EMF increased linearly with the increase of Po2, the slope (dE/dlog(Po2)) being 11.7 +/- 0.42 (SEM) mV (n = 13, t = 25 degrees C). In consideration of the above effects, the blood pH of bullfrog was estimated to be 7.697 +/- 0.092 (SD) and 7.729 +/- 0.111 with glass and Sb-microelectrodes respectively, the difference between the two being relatively minor.

  12. Dielectrophoretic immobilisation of antibodies on microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Otto, Saskia; Kaletta, Udo; Bier, Frank F; Wenger, Christian; Hölzel, Ralph

    2014-03-07

    A silicon based chip device with a regular array of more than 100,000 cylindrical sub-microelectrodes has been developed for the dielectrophoretic (DEP) manipulation of nanoparticles and molecules in solution. It was fabricated by a standard CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) compatible process. The distribution of the electrical field gradient was calculated to predict the applicability of the setup. Heating due to field application was determined microscopically using a temperature sensitive fluorescent dye. Depending on voltage and frequency, temperature increase was found to be compatible with protein function. Successful field controlled immobilisation of biomolecules from solution was demonstrated with the autofluorescent protein R-phycoerythrin (RPE) and with fluorescently labelled IgG antibodies. Biological activity after DEP application was proven by immobilisation of an anti-RPE antibody and subsequent binding of RPE. These results demonstrate that the developed chip system allows the directed immobilisation of proteins onto microelectrodes by dielectrophoresis without the need for any chemical modification and that protein function is preserved. Being based on standard lithographical methods, further miniaturisation and on-chip integration of electronics towards a multiparameter single cell analysis system appear near at hand.

  13. Characterization of Platinum and Iridium Oxyhydrate Surface Layers from Platinum and Iridium Foils.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin; Ranjan, Chinmoy; Greiner, Mark; Arrigo, Rosa; Schuster, Manfred Erwin; Höpfner, Britta; Gorgoi, Mihaela; Lauermann, Iver; Willinger, Marc; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert

    2016-07-07

    Platinum and iridium polycrystalline foils were oxidized electrochemically through anodization to create thin platinum and iridium hydrous oxide layers, which were analyzed through laboratory photoelectron spectroscopy during heating and time series (temperature-programmed spectroscopy). The films contain oxygen in the form of bound oxides, water, and hydroxides and were investigated by depth profiling with high-energy photoelectron spectroscopy. The Pt films are unstable and begin to degrade immediately after removal from the electrolyte to form core-shell structures with a metallic inner core and a hydrous oxide outer shell almost devoid of Pt. However, evidence was found for metastable intermediate states of degradation; therefore, it may be possible to manufacture PtOx phases with increased stability. Heating the film to even 100 °C causes accelerated degradation, which shows that stoichiometric oxides such as PtO2 or PtO are not the active species in the electrolyte. The Ir films exhibit increased stability and higher surface Ir content, and gentle heating at low temperatures leads to a decrease in defect density. Although both layers are based on noble metals, their surface structures are markedly different. The complexity of such hydrous oxide systems is discussed in detail with the goal of identifying the film composition more precisely. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Iridium Oxide-reduced Graphene Oxide Nanohybrid Thin Film Modified Screen-printed Electrodes as Disposable Electrochemical Paper Microfluidic pH Sensors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiang; Kwak, Tae-Joon; Zhang, Xiaodong; McClain, Robert; Chang, Woo-Jin; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2016-11-22

    A facile, controllable, inexpensive and green electrochemical synthesis of IrO2-graphene nanohybrid thin films is developed to fabricate an easy-to-use integrated paper microfluidic electrochemical pH sensor for resource-limited settings. Taking advantages from both pH meters and strips, the pH sensing platform is composed of hydrophobic barrier-patterned paper micropad (µPAD) using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), screen-printed electrode (SPE) modified with IrO2-graphene films and molded acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastic holder. Repetitive cathodic potential cycling was employed for graphene oxide (GO) reduction which can completely remove electrochemically unstable oxygenated groups and generate a 2D defect-free homogeneous graphene thin film with excellent stability and electronic properties. A uniform and smooth IrO2 film in nanoscale grain size is anodically electrodeposited onto the graphene film, without any observable cracks. The resulting IrO2-RGO electrode showed slightly super-Nernstian responses from pH 2-12 in Britton-Robinson (B-R) buffers with good linearity, small hysteresis, low response time and reproducibility in different buffers, as well as low sensitivities to different interfering ionic species and dissolved oxygen. A simple portable digital pH meter is fabricated, whose signal is measured with a multimeter, using high input-impedance operational amplifier and consumer batteries. The pH values measured with the portable electrochemical paper-microfluidic pH sensors were consistent with those measured using a commercial laboratory pH meter with a glass electrode.

  15. Microelectrode Measurements of the Activity Distribution in Nitrifying Bacterial Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    de Beer, D.; van den Heuvel, J. C.; Ottengraf, S. P. P.

    1993-01-01

    Microelectrodes for ammonium, oxygen, nitrate, and pH were used to study nitrifying aggregates grown in a fluidized-bed reactor. Local reactant fluxes and distribution of microbial activity could be determined from the microprofiles. The interfacial fluxes of the reactants closely reflected the stoichiometry of bacterial nitrification. Both ammonium consumption and nitrate production were localized in the outer shells, with a thickness of approximately 100 to 120 μm, of the aggregates. Under conditions in which ammonium and oxygen penetrated the whole aggregate, nitrification was restricted to this zone; oxygen was consumed in the central parts of the aggregates as well, probably because of oxidation of dead biomass. A sudden increase of the oxygen concentration to saturation (pure oxygen) was inhibitory to nitrification. The pH profiles showed acidification in the aggregates, but not to an inhibitory level. The distribution of activity was determined by the penetration depth of oxygen during aggregate development in the reactor. Mass transfer was significantly limited by the boundary layer surrounding the aggregates. Microelectrode measurements showed that the thickness of this layer was correlated with the diffusion coefficient of the species. Determination of the distribution of nitrifying activity required the use of ammonium or nitrate microelectrodes, whereas the use of oxygen microelectrodes alone would lead to erroneous results. Images PMID:16348875

  16. Hydridomethyl iridium complex

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Robert G.; Buchanan, J. Michael; Stryker, Jeffrey M.; Wax, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A process for functionalizing methane comprising: (a) reacting methane with a hydridoalkyl metal complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]H(R.sub.2) wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical having from 1 to 5 carbon atoms; Ir represents an iridium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.1 represents an alkyl group; R.sub.2 represents an alkyl group having at least two carbon atoms; and H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of a liquid alkane R.sub.3 H having at least three carbon atoms to form a hydridomethyl complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]HMe where Me represents a methyl radical. (b) reacting said hydridomethyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X"X'"X"" or CHX'X"X'"; wherein X', X", X"', and X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine and chlorine, to halomethyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]MeX: (c) reacting said halomethyl complex with a mercuric halide of the formula HgX.sub.2 to form a methyl mercuric halide of the formula HgMeX; and (d) reacting said methyl mercuric halide with a molecular halogen of the formula X.sub.2 to form methyl halide.

  17. Distortion/Interaction analysis reveals the origins of selectivities in iridium-catalyzed C-H borylation of substituted arenes and 5-membered heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Green, Aaron G; Liu, Peng; Merlic, Craig A; Houk, K N

    2014-03-26

    The iridium-catalyzed borylation of mono- and disubstituted arenes and heteroarenes has been studied with density functional theory. The distortion/interaction model was employed to understand the origins of selectivities in these reactions. Computations revealed that the transition states for C-H oxidative addition are very late, resembling the aryl iridium hydride intermediate with a fully formed Ir-C bond. Consequently, the regioselectivity is mainly controlled by differences in the interaction energies between the iridium catalyst and arene carbon.

  18. Iridium in sea-water.

    PubMed

    Fresco, J; Weiss, H V; Phillips, R B; Askeland, R A

    1985-08-01

    Iridium in sea-water has been measured (after isolation from the saline matrix by reduction with magnesium) by neutron bombardment, radiochemical purification and high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. The concentration obtained in a Pacific coastal water was 1.02 +/- 0.26 x 10(-14) g per g of sea-water. At such extremely low concentrations, seawater is an extremely unlikely source for anomalously high iridium concentrations measured in the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary layer of deep-sea sediments.

  19. Electrochemical Oxidation of Cysteine at a Film Gold Modified Carbon Fiber Microelectrode Its Application in a Flow—Through Voltammetric Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lai-Hao; Huang, Wen-Shiuan

    2012-01-01

    A flow-electrolytical cell containing a strand of micro Au modified carbon fiber electrodes (CFE) has been designedand characterized for use in a voltammatric detector for detecting cysteine using high-performance liquid chromatography. Cysteine is more efficiently electrochemical oxidized on a Au /CFE than a bare gold and carbon fiber electrode. The possible reaction mechanism of the oxidation process is described from the relations to scan rate, peak potentials and currents. For the pulse mode, and measurements with suitable experimental parameters, a linear concentration from 0.5 to 5.0 mg·L−1 was found. The limit of quantification for cysteine was below 60 ng·mL−1. PMID:22737024

  20. Electrochemical oxidation of cysteine at a film gold modified carbon fiber microelectrode its application in a flow-through voltammetric sensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lai-Hao; Huang, Wen-Shiuan

    2012-01-01

    A flow-electrolytical cell containing a strand of micro Au modified carbon fiber electrodes (CFE) has been designedand characterized for use in a voltammatric detector for detecting cysteine using high-performance liquid chromatography. Cysteine is more efficiently electrochemical oxidized on a Au /CFE than a bare gold and carbon fiber electrode. The possible reaction mechanism of the oxidation process is described from the relations to scan rate, peak potentials and currents. For the pulse mode, and measurements with suitable experimental parameters, a linear concentration from 0.5 to 5.0 mg·L(-1) was found. The limit of quantification for cysteine was below 60 ng·mL(-1).

  1. Synthesis and luminescence properties of iridium(III) azide- and triazole-bisterpyridine complexes.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Daniel C; Peterson, Joshua R; Cheng, Yuen Yap; Clady, Raphael G C; Schmidt, Timothy W; Thordarson, Pall

    2013-07-26

    We describe here the synthesis of azide-functionalised iridium(III) bisterpyridines using the "chemistry on the complex" strategy. The resulting azide-complexes are then used in the copper(I)-catalysed azide-alkyne Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition "click chemistry" reaction to from the corresponding triazole-functionalised iridium(III) bisterpyridines. The photophysical characteristics, including lifetimes, of these compounds were also investigated. Interestingly, oxygen appears to have very little effect on the lifetime of these complexes in aqueous solutions. Unexpectedly, sodium ascorbate acid appears to quench the luminescence of triazole-functionalised iridium(III) bisterpyridines, but this effect can be reversed by the addition of copper(II) sulfate, which is known to oxidize ascorbate under aerobic conditions. The results demonstrate that iridium(III) bisterpyridines can be functionalized for use in "click chemistry" facilitating the use of these photophysically interesting complexes in the modification of polymers or surfaces, to highlight just two possible applications.

  2. Iridium-catalyst-based autonomous bubble-propelled graphene micromotors with ultralow catalyst loading.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Sofer, Zdeněk; Eng, Alex Yong Sheng; Pumera, Martin

    2014-11-10

    A novel concept of an iridium-based bubble-propelled Janus-particle-type graphene micromotor with very high surface area and with very low catalyst loading is described. The low loading of Ir catalyst (0.54 at %) allows for fast motion of graphene microparticles with high surface area of 316.2 m(2)  g(-1). The micromotor was prepared with a simple and scalable method by thermal exfoliation of iridium-doped graphite oxide precursor composite in hydrogen atmosphere. Oxygen bubbles generated from the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide at the iridium catalytic sites provide robust propulsion thrust for the graphene micromotor. The high surface area and low iridium catalyst loading of the bubble-propelled graphene motors offer great possibilities for dramatically enhanced cargo delivery. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Iridium-Catalyzed Allylic Substitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, John F.; Pouy, Mark J.

    Iridium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic substitution has become a valuable method to prepare products from the addition of nucleophiles at the more substituted carbon of an allyl unit. The most active and selective catalysts contain a phosphoramidite ligand possessing at least one arylethyl substituent on the nitrogen atom of the ligand. In these systems, the active catalyst is generated by a base-induced cyclometalation at the methyl group of this substituent to generate an iridium metalacycle bound by the COD ligand of the [Ir(COD)Cl]2 precursor and one additional labile dative ligand. Such complexes catalyze the reactions of linear allylic esters with alkylamines, arylamines, phenols, alcohols, imides, carbamates, ammonia, enolates and enolate equivalents, as well as typical stabilized carbon nucleophiles generated from malonates and cyanoesters. Iridium catalysts for enantioselective allylic substitution have also been generated from phosphorus ligands with substituents bound by heteroatoms, and an account of the studies of such systems, along with a description of the development of iridium catalysts is included.

  4. IRIDIUM LINER FOR NASA 5 LBF CLASS MATERIAL TEST CHAMBER IRIDIUM LINER FOR ATLANTIC RESEARCH CORPORA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    IRIDIUM LINER FOR NASA 5 LBF CLASS MATERIAL TEST CHAMBER IRIDIUM LINER FOR ATLANTIC RESEARCH CORPORATION 5 LBF CLASS ROCKET CHAMBER 25 LBF CLASS 75 HFC 25 TAC CERAMIC COMPOSITE ROCKET CHAMBER FROM REFRACTURY COMPOSITES INC. PURCHASE ORDER C-551941-

  5. Revealing neuronal function through microelectrode array recordings

    PubMed Central

    Obien, Marie Engelene J.; Deligkaris, Kosmas; Bullmann, Torsten; Bakkum, Douglas J.; Frey, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays and microprobes have been widely utilized to measure neuronal activity, both in vitro and in vivo. The key advantage is the capability to record and stimulate neurons at multiple sites simultaneously. However, unlike the single-cell or single-channel resolution of intracellular recording, microelectrodes detect signals from all possible sources around every sensor. Here, we review the current understanding of microelectrode signals and the techniques for analyzing them. We introduce the ongoing advancements in microelectrode technology, with focus on achieving higher resolution and quality of recordings by means of monolithic integration with on-chip circuitry. We show how recent advanced microelectrode array measurement methods facilitate the understanding of single neurons as well as network function. PMID:25610364

  6. Stretchable Micro-Electrode Array

    SciTech Connect

    Maghribi, M; Hamilton, J; Polla, D; Rose, K; Wilson, T; Krulevitch, P

    2002-03-08

    This paper focuses on the design consideration, fabrication processes and preliminary testing of the stretchable micro-electrode array. We are developing an implantable, stretchable micro-electrode array using polymer-based microfabrication techniques. The device will serve as the interface between an electronic imaging system and the human eye, directly stimulating retinal neurons via thin film conducting traces and electroplated electrodes. The metal features are embedded within a thin ({approx}50 micron) substrate fabricated using poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a biocompatible elastomeric material that has very low water permeability. The conformable nature of PDMS is critical for ensuring uniform contact with the curved surface of the retina. To fabricate the device, we developed unique processes for metalizing PDMS to produce robust traces capable of maintaining conductivity when stretched (5%, SD 1.5), and for selectively passivating the conductive elements. An in situ measurement of residual strain in the PDMS during curing reveals a tensile strain of 10%, explaining the stretchable nature of the thin metalized devices.

  7. N-H activation of hydrazines by iridium(I). Double N-H activation to form iridium aminonitrene complexes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zheng; Zhou, Jianrong Steve; Hartwig, John F

    2010-08-25

    Iridium(I) complexes of aromatic (PCP) and aliphatic (D(t)BPP) pincer ligands undergo single cleavage of the N-H bonds of hydrazine derivatives to form hydrazido complexes and geminal double cleavage to form unusual late transition metal aminonitrene complexes. In some cases, the cleavage of the N-N bond in the hydrazine is also observed. Oxidative additions of the N-H bonds of benzophenone hydrazone and 1-aminopiperidine to iridium(I) complexes give the corresponding hydridoiridium(III) hydrazido complexes within minutes. The complex containing an aromatic pincer ligand, (PCP)Ir(H)(NHNC(5)H(10)), slowly undergoes a second N-H bond cleavage at the alpha-N-H bond and elimination of hydrogen to generate an aminonitrene complex and dihydrogen in high yield. The reactions of the (PCP)Ir(I) fragment containing an aromatic pincer ligand with methyl-substituted hydrazines form a mixture of aminonitrene complexes, isocyanide iridium(III) dihydride complexes, and ammonia. The latter two products are likely formed by initial oxidative addition of the methyl C-H bond and the subsequent N-N bond cleavage. Reactions of the aminonitrene complex with CO or reagents that undergo oxidative addition (MeI and PhOH) lead to release of the "isodiazine" fragment to give tetrazene and tetrazine derivatives.

  8. High-rate in-plane micro-supercapacitors scribed onto photo paper using in situ femtolaser-reduced graphene oxide/Au nanoparticle microelectrodes

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Ruozhou; Peng, Rui; Tumuluri, Uma; ...

    2016-02-11

    Direct laser-reduction of graphene oxide (GO), as a lithography-free approach, has been proven effective in manufacturing in-plane micro-supercapacitors (MSCs) with fast ion diffusion. However, the power density and the charge/discharge rate are still limited by the relatively low conductivity of electrodes. Here, we report a facile approach by exploiting femtolaser in situ reduction of the hydrated GO and chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) nanocomposite simultaneously, which incorporates both the patterning of rGO electrodes and the fabrication of Au current collectors in a single step. These flexible MSCs boast achievements of one-hundred fold increase in electrode conductivities of up to 1.1 × 106more » S m–1, which provide superior rate capability (50% for the charging rate increase from 0.1 V s–1 to 100 V s–1), sufficiently high frequency responses (362 Hz, 2.76 ms time constant), and large specific capacitances of 0.77 mF cm–2 (17.2 F cm–3 for volumetric capacitance) at 1 V s–1, and 0.46 mF cm–2 (10.2 F cm–3) at 100 V s–1. The use of photo paper substrates enables the flexibility of this fabrication protocol. Moreover, proof-of-concept 3D MSCs are demonstrated with enhanced areal capacitance (up to 3.84 mF cm–2 at 1 V s–1) while keeping high rate capabilities. As a result, this prototype of all solid-state MSCs demonstrates the broad range of potentials of thin-film based energy storage device applications for flexible, portable, and wearable electronic devices that require a fast charge/discharge rate and high power density.« less

  9. Possibility to realize spin-orbit-induced correlated physics in iridium fluorides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, M.; Retegan, M.; Giacobbe, C.; Fumagalli, R.; Efimenko, A.; Kulka, T.; Wohlfeld, K.; Gubanov, A. I.; Moretti Sala, M.

    2017-06-01

    Recent theoretical predictions of "unprecedented proximity" of the electronic ground state of iridium fluorides to the SU(2) symmetric jeff=1 /2 limit, relevant for superconductivity in iridates, motivated us to investigate their crystal and electronic structure. To this aim, we performed high-resolution x-ray powder diffraction, Ir L3-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, and quantum chemical calculations on Rb2[IrF6] and other iridium fluorides. Our results are consistent with the Mott insulating scenario predicted by Birol and Haule [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 096403 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.096403], but we observe a sizable deviation of the jeff=1 /2 state from the SU(2) symmetric limit. Interactions beyond the first coordination shell of iridium are negligible, hence the iridium fluorides do not show any magnetic ordering down to at least 20 K. A larger spin-orbit coupling in iridium fluorides compared to oxides is ascribed to a reduction of the degree of covalency, with consequences on the possibility to realize spin-orbit-induced strongly correlated physics in iridium fluorides.

  10. Blistering during the atomic layer deposition of iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Genevée, Pascal E-mail: a.szeghalmi@uni-jena.de; Ahiavi, Ernest; Janunts, Norik; Pertsch, Thomas; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Szeghalmi, Adriana E-mail: a.szeghalmi@uni-jena.de; Oliva, Maria

    2016-01-15

    The authors report on the formation of blisters during the atomic layer deposition of iridium using iridium acetylacetonate and oxygen precursors. Films deposited on fused silica substrates led to sparsely distributed large blisters while in the case of silicon with native oxide additional small blisters with a high density was observed. It is found that the formation of blisters is favored by a higher deposition temperature and a larger layer thickness. Postdeposition annealing did not have a significant effect on the formation of blisters. Finally, changing purge duration during the film growth allowed us to avoid blistering and evidenced that impurities released from the film in gas phase were responsible for the formation of blisters.

  11. Carbon-Fiber Microelectrodes for In Vivo Applications

    PubMed Central

    Huffman, Megan L.; Venton, B. Jill

    2009-01-01

    Carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) have been a useful tool for measuring rapid changes in neurotransmitters because of their small size, sensitivity, and good electrochemical properties. In this article, we highlight recent advances using CFMEs for measuring neurotransmitters in vivo. Dopamine has been a primary neurotransmitter of interest but direct electrochemical detection of other neurochemicals including nitric oxide and adenosine has also been investigated. Surface treatments have been studied to enhance electrode sensitivity, such as covalent modification or the addition of a layer of carbon nanotubes. Enzyme-modified microelectrodes that detect non-electroactive compounds further extend the usefulness of CFMEs beyond the traditional monoamines. CFMEs continue to be used in vivo to understand basic neurobiological mechanisms and the actions of pharmacological agents, including drugs of abuse. Advances in sensitivity and instrumentation now allow CFMEs to be used for measurements of natural dopamine release that occur during behavioral experiments. A new technique combining electrochemistry with electrophysiology at a single microelectrode facilitates a better understanding of neurotransmitter concentrations and their effects on cell firing. Future research in this field will likely concentrate on fabricating smaller electrodes and electrode arrays, as well as expanding the use of CFMEs in neuroscience beyond dopamine. PMID:19082168

  12. Excursion of vibrating microelectrodes in tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanabus, E. W.; Feldstein, C.; Crawford, D. W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper deals with a vibrating microelectrode holder consisting of a support rod attached to the cone of a miniature loudspeaker. This holder facilitates a microelectrode penetration into arterial wall tissue, eliminates surface dimpling, and relieves polarographic artifacts believed to be due to tissue compression. The paper presents construction and performance details of the electrode holder, and evaluates the extent of possible damage incurred during such vibration by measuring electrode motion relative to surrounding tissue in an excised segment of femoral artery in the rabbit. It is concluded that under proper vibratory conditions microelectrodes can be easily inserted into the arterial wall with minimum tissue disturbance.

  13. The crystal morphology effect of Iridium tris-acetylacetonate on MOCVD iridium coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jing; Hao, Yupeng; Yu, Xiaodong; Tan, Chengwen

    2017-07-01

    Iridium tris-acetylacetonate is the most commonly used precursor for the metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) of iridium coating. In this paper, the crystal morphology effect of iridium tris-acetylacetonate on iridium coatings prepared by MOCVD was studied. Two kinds of Ir(acac)3 crystalline powder were prepared. A precursor sublimation experiment in a fixed bed reactor and an iridium deposition experiment in a cold-wall atmospheric CVD reactor were designed. It is found that the volatility of the hexagonal columnar crystals is better than that of the tetragonal flake crystals under the experimental conditions. It’s due to the hexagonal columnar crystals exposed more crystal faces than the tetragonal flake crystals, increasing its contact area with the transport gas. An adequate supply of iridium tris-acetylacetonate during the pre-deposition period contributed to obtain an iridium coating with a smooth and uniform continuity surface.

  14. General properties of antimony microelectrode in comparison with glass microelectrode for pH measurement.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, M; Matsumura, Y; Satake, N

    1980-01-01

    Two kinds of pH-sensitive microelectrodes were constructed: 1) glass microelectrode with a pH-sensitive tip of 50--100 micrometers in length, and 2) antimony (Sb) microelectrode with a tip of 1--5 micrometers in outside diameter. Comparisons of the two were made on the change in the electromotive force (EMF) in response to various pHs and biological applicability. The pH sensitivity (slope constant) at 20 degrees C of the glass and Sb-microelectrodes averaged 51.7 and 51.9 (-mV/pH), respectively. Over the pH range of 2 to 9, both electrodes responded linearly to the change of pH. The pH-dependent EMF of the Sb-microelectrode was influenced by phosphate buffers, but not by Tris-HCl buffers. Through the glass microelectrode showed a linear response to all the buffers tested, its slope constant tended to be limited by the surface area of the pH-sensitive tip. The stability of the EMFs was well within 1 mV for 12 hr with the glass microelectrode but more than 10 mV with the Sb-microelectrode. One the other hand, the 95% response time was about 1 min with the glass microelectrode, whereas it was less than a few seconds with the Sb-microelectrode. Blood pH was measured with the two electrodes and reasonable values were obtained with both methods, although the values by use of the Sb-microelectrode were slightly higher than those of the other. In view of the practical ease of manufacturing, maintenance and durability, the use of the Sb-microelectrode in biological measurement should also be re-evaluated, but several restrictions must be imposed on it.

  15. Investigations of iridium-mediated reversible C-H bond cleavage: characterization of a 16-electron iridium(III) methyl hydride complex.

    PubMed

    Bernskoetter, Wesley H; Hanson, Susan Kloek; Buzak, Sara K; Davis, Zoe; White, Peter S; Swartz, Rodney; Goldberg, Karen I; Brookhart, Maurice

    2009-06-24

    New iridium complexes of a tridentate pincer ligand, 2,6-bis(di-tert-butylphosphinito)pyridine (PONOP), have been prepared and used in the study of hydrocarbon C-H bond activation. Intermolecular oxidative addition of a benzene C-H bond was directly observed with [(PONOP)Ir(I)(cyclooctene)][PF(6)] at ambient temperature, resulting in a cationic five-coordinate iridium(III) phenyl hydride product. Protonation of the (PONOP)Ir(I) methyl complex yielded the corresponding iridium(III) methyl hydride cation, a rare five-coordinate, 16-valence electron transition metal alkyl hydride species which was characterized by X-ray diffraction. Kinetic studies of C-H bond coupling and reductive elimination reactions from the five-coordinate complexes have been carried out. Exchange NMR spectroscopy measurements established a barrier of 17.8(4) kcal/mol (22 degrees C) for H-C(aryl) bond coupling in the iridium(III) phenyl hydride cation and of 9.3(4) kcal/mol (-105 degrees C) for the analogous H-C(alkyl) coupling in the iridium(III) methyl hydride cation. The origin of the higher barrier of H-C(aryl) relative to H-C(alkyl) bond coupling is proposed to be influenced by a hindered rotation about the Ir-C(aryl) bond, a result of the sterically demanding PONOP ligand.

  16. SO2 adsorption on silica supported iridium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounechada, Djamela; Anderson, David P.; Skoglundh, Magnus; Carlsson, Per-Anders

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of SO2 with Ir/SiO2 was studied by simultaneous in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, exposing the sample to different SO2 concentrations ranging from 10 to 50 ppm in the temperature interval 200-400 °C. Evidences of adsorption of sulfur species in both absence and presence of oxygen are found. For a pre-reduced sample in the absence of oxygen, SO2 disproportionates such that the iridium surface is rapidly saturated with adsorbed S while minor amounts of formed SO3 may adsorb on SiO2. Adding oxygen to the feed leads to the oxidation of sulfide species that either (i) desorb as SO2 and/or SO3, (ii) remain at metal sites in the form of adsorbed SO2, or (iii) spillover to the oxide support and form sulfates (SO42-). Notably, significant formation of sulfates on silica is possible only in the presence of both SO2 and O2, suggesting that SO2 oxidation to SO3 is a necessary first step in the mechanism of formation of sulfates on silica. During the formation of sulfates, a concomitant removal/rearrangement of surface silanol groups is observed. Finally, the interaction of SO2 with Ir/SiO2 depends primarily on the temperature and type of gas components but only to a minor extent on the inlet SO2 concentration.

  17. Theoretical analysis of intracortical microelectrode recordings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempka, Scott F.; Johnson, Matthew D.; Moffitt, Michael A.; Otto, Kevin J.; Kipke, Daryl R.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2011-08-01

    Advanced fabrication techniques have now made it possible to produce microelectrode arrays for recording the electrical activity of a large number of neurons in the intact brain for both clinical and basic science applications. However, the long-term recording performance desired for these applications is hindered by a number of factors that lead to device failure or a poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The goal of this study was to identify factors that can affect recording quality using theoretical analysis of intracortical microelectrode recordings of single-unit activity. Extracellular microelectrode recordings were simulated with a detailed multi-compartment cable model of a pyramidal neuron coupled to a finite-element volume conductor head model containing an implanted recording microelectrode. Recording noise sources were also incorporated into the overall modeling infrastructure. The analyses of this study would be very difficult to perform experimentally; however, our model-based approach enabled a systematic investigation of the effects of a large number of variables on recording quality. Our results demonstrate that recording amplitude and noise are relatively independent of microelectrode size, but instead are primarily affected by the selected recording bandwidth, impedance of the electrode-tissue interface and the density and firing rates of neurons surrounding the recording electrode. This study provides the theoretical groundwork that allows for the design of the microelectrode and recording electronics such that the SNR is maximized. Such advances could help enable the long-term functionality required for chronic neural recording applications.

  18. Theoretical analysis of intracortical microelectrode recordings

    PubMed Central

    Lempka, Scott F; Johnson, Matthew D; Moffitt, Michael A; Otto, Kevin J; Kipke, Daryl R; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2011-01-01

    Advanced fabrication techniques have now made it possible to produce microelectrode arrays for recording the electrical activity of a large number of neurons in the intact brain for both clinical and basic science applications. However, the long-term recording performance desired for these applications is hindered by a number of factors that lead to device failure or a poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The goal of this study was to identify factors that can affect recording quality using theoretical analysis of intracortical microelectrode recordings of single-unit activity. Extracellular microelectrode recordings were simulated with a detailed multi-compartment cable model of a pyramidal neuron coupled to a finite element volume conductor head model containing an implanted recording microelectrode. Recording noise sources were also incorporated into the overall modeling infrastructure. The analyses of this study would be very difficult to perform experimentally; however, our model-based approach enabled a systematic investigation of the effects of a large number of variables on recording quality. Our results demonstrate that recording amplitude and noise are relatively independent of microelectrode size, but instead are primarily affected by the selected recording bandwidth, impedance of the electrode-tissue interface, and the density and firing rates of neurons surrounding the recording electrode. This study provides the theoretical groundwork that allows for the design of the microelectrode and recording electronics such that the SNR is maximized. Such advances could help enable the long-term functionality required for chronic neural recording applications. PMID:21775783

  19. Carbon Nanotube-based microelectrodes for enhanced detection of neurotransmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher B.

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is one of the common techniques used for rapid measurement of neurotransmitters in vivo. Carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) are typically used for neurotransmitter detection because of sub-second measurement capabilities, ability to measure changes in neurotransmitter concentration during neurotransmission, and the small size electrode diameter, which limits the amount of damage caused to tissue. Cylinder CFMEs, typically 50 -- 100 microm long, are commonly used for in vivo experiments because the electrode sensitivity is directly related to the electrode surface area. However the length of the electrode can limit the spatial resolution of neurotransmitter detection, which can restrict experiments in Drosophila and other small model systems. In addition, the electrode sensitivity toward dopamine and serotonin detection drops significantly for measurements at rates faster than 10 Hz, limiting the temporal resolution of CFMEs. While the use of FSCV at carbon-fiber microelectrodes has led to substantial strides in our understanding of neurotransmission, techniques that expand the capabilities of CFMEs are crucial to fully maximize the potential uses of FSCV. This dissertation introduces new methods to integrate carbon nanotubes (CNT) into microelectrodes and discusses the electrochemical enhancements of these CNT-microelectrodes. The electrodes are specifically designed with simple fabrication procedures so that highly specialized equipment is not necessary, and they utilize commercially available materials so that the electrodes could be easily integrated into existing systems. The electrochemical properties of CNT modified CFMEs are characterized using FSCV and the effect of CNT functionalization on these properties is explored in Chapter 2. For example, CFME modification using carboxylic acid functionalized CNTs yield about a 6-fold increase in dopamine oxidation current, but modification with octadecylamine CNTs results in a

  20. TCP Performance Enhancement Over Iridium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgerson, Leigh; Hutcherson, Joseph; McKelvey, James

    2007-01-01

    In support of iNET maturation, NASA-JPL has collaborated with NASA-Dryden to develop, test and demonstrate an over-the-horizon vehicle-to-ground networking capability, using Iridium as the vehicle-to-ground communications link for relaying critical vehicle telemetry. To ensure reliability concerns are met, the Space Communications Protocol Standards (SCPS) transport protocol was investigated for its performance characteristics in this environment. In particular, the SCPS-TP software performance was compared to that of the standard Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) over the Internet Protocol (IP). This paper will report on the results of this work.

  1. TCP Performance Enhancement Over Iridium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgerson, Leigh; Hutcherson, Joseph; McKelvey, James

    2007-01-01

    In support of iNET maturation, NASA-JPL has collaborated with NASA-Dryden to develop, test and demonstrate an over-the-horizon vehicle-to-ground networking capability, using Iridium as the vehicle-to-ground communications link for relaying critical vehicle telemetry. To ensure reliability concerns are met, the Space Communications Protocol Standards (SCPS) transport protocol was investigated for its performance characteristics in this environment. In particular, the SCPS-TP software performance was compared to that of the standard Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) over the Internet Protocol (IP). This paper will report on the results of this work.

  2. Fabrication Technology of Ruthenium Microelectrode Pattern for RF MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Takeshi; Esashi, Masayoshi; Harada, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Shuji

    Ruthenium (Ru), which is one of noble metals, has been intensively considered as an electrode material of DRAM capacitors, since Ru has high oxidation resistance and high electrical conductivity even in the oxidized state. Furthermore, Ru is also expected to be used as an electrode material of acoustic devices, e.g. FBAR, because of its superior acoustic properties such as high Young's modulus and density. For such applications, a precise etching technique for Ru microelectrode patterns is required. Ru etching proceeds by producing volatile oxidized Ru (RuO4), and is possible using plasma with O2 or O2 plus halogenous gas, e.g. Cl2 and CF4. However, the plasma etching also attacks resist and/or an underlayer of Si, SiN etc. In this study, a wet etching process with cerium (IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN)-based etchant and a dry etching process with O3 gas were investigated as low-damage Ru etching processes. O3 gas etching is better for patterning Ru microelectrodes than CAN-based wet etching. For O3 gas etching, diluted HF pretreatment is effective to reduce side etching and to improve etching uniformity

  3. Study of degradation intermediates formed during electrochemical oxidation of pesticide residue 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) at boron doped diamond (BDD) and platinum-iridium anodes.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Henrik Tækker; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen; Muff, Jens

    2014-08-01

    Electrochemical oxidation is a promising technique for degradation of otherwise recalcitrant organic micropollutants in waters. In this study, the applicability of electrochemical oxidation was investigated concerning the degradation of the groundwater pollutant 2,6-dichlorobenzamide (BAM) through the electrochemical oxygen transfer process with two anode materials: Ti/Pt90-Ir10 and boron doped diamond (Si/BDD). Besides the efficiency of the degradation of the main pollutant, it is also of outmost importance to control the formation and fate of stable degradation intermediates. These were investigated quantitatively with HPLC-MS and TOC measurements and qualitatively with a combined HPLC-UV and HPLC-MS protocol. 2,6-Dichlorobenzamide was found to be degraded most efficiently by the BDD cell, which also resulted in significantly lower amounts of intermediates formed during the process. The anodic degradation pathway was found to occur via substitution of hydroxyl groups until ring cleavage leading to carboxylic acids. For the BDD cell, there was a parallel cathodic degradation pathway that occurred via dechlorination. The combination of TOC with the combined HPLC-UV/MS was found to be a powerful method for determining the amount and nature of degradation intermediates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Non-covalent interactions in water electrolysis: influence on the activity of Pt(111) and iridium oxide catalysts in acidic media.

    PubMed

    Ganassin, Alberto; Colic, Viktor; Tymoczko, Jakub; Bandarenka, Aliaksandr S; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2015-04-07

    Electrolyte components, which are typically not considered to be directly involved in catalytic processes at solid-liquid electrified interfaces, often demonstrate a significant or even drastic influence on the activity, stability and selectivity of electrocatalysts. While there has been certain progress in the understanding of these electrolyte effects, lack of experimental data for various important systems frequently complicates the rational design of new active materials. Modern proton-exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzers utilize Pt- and Ir-based electrocatalysts, which are among the very few materials that are both active and stable under the extreme conditions of water splitting. We use model Pt(111) and Ir-oxide films grown on Ir(111) electrodes and explore the effect of alkali metal cations and sulfate-anions on the hydrogen evolution and the oxygen evolution reactions in acidic media. We demonstrate that sulfate anions decrease the activity of Ir-oxide towards the oxygen evolution reaction while Rb(+) drastically promotes hydrogen evolution reaction at the Pt(111) electrodes as compared to the reference HClO4 electrolytes. Issues related to the activity benchmarking for these catalysts are discussed.

  5. On the dissolution of iridium by aluminum.

    SciTech Connect

    Hewson, John C.

    2009-08-01

    The potential for liquid aluminum to dissolve an iridium solid is examined. Substantial uncertainties exist in material properties, and the available data for the iridium solubility and iridium diffusivity are discussed. The dissolution rate is expressed in terms of the regression velocity of the solid iridium when exposed to the solvent (aluminum). The temperature has the strongest influence in the dissolution rate. This dependence comes primarily from the solubility of iridium in aluminum and secondarily from the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient. This dissolution mass flux is geometry dependent and results are provided for simplified geometries at constant temperatures. For situations where there is negligible convective flow, simple time-dependent diffusion solutions are provided. Correlations for mass transfer are also given for natural convection and forced convection. These estimates suggest that dissolution of iridium can be significant for temperatures well below the melting temperature of iridium, but the uncertainties in actual rates are large because of uncertainties in the physical parameters and in the details of the relevant geometries.

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of the anti-tubercular prodrug isoniazid and its analog by iridium(iv) as models for biological redox systems.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jingran; Ren, Yanli; Sun, Sufang; Yang, Jiao; Nan, Chunxia; Shi, Hongmei; Xu, Jianzhong; Duan, Jie; Shi, Tiesheng; Elding, Lars I

    2017-07-04

    A complex reaction mechanism of oxidation of the anti-tubercular prodrug isoniazid (isonicotinic hydrazide, INH) by [IrCl6](2-) as a model for redox processes of such drugs in biological systems has been studied in aqueous solution as a function of pH between 0 and 8.5. Similar experiments have been performed with its isomer nicotinic hydrazide (NH). All reactions are overall second-order, first-order in [IrCl6](2-) and hydrazide, and the observed second-order rate constants k' have been determined as a function of pH. Spectrophotometric titrations indicate a stoichiometry of [Ir(iv)] : [hydrazide] = 4 : 1. HPLC analysis shows that the oxidation product of INH is isonicotinic acid. The derived reaction mechanism, based on rate law, time-resolved spectra and stoichiometry, involves parallel attacks by [IrCl6](2-) on all four protolytic species of INH and NH as rate-determining steps, depending on pH. These steps are proposed to generate two types of hydrazyl free radicals. These radicals react further in three rapid consecutive processes, leading to the final oxidation products. Rate constants for the rate-determining steps have been determined for all protolytic species I-IV of INH and NH. They are used to calculate reactivity-pH diagrams. These diagrams demonstrate that for both systems, species IV is ca. 10(5) times more reactive in the redox process than the predominant species III at the physiological pH of 7.4. Thus, species IV will be the main reactant, in spite of the fact that its concentration at this pH is extremely low, a fact that has not been considered in previous work. The results indicate that pH changes might be an important factor in the activation process of INH in biological systems also, and that in such systems this process most likely is more complicated than previously assumed.

  7. Enantioselective, iridium-catalyzed monoallylation of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Pouy, Mark J; Stanley, Levi M; Hartwig, John F

    2009-08-19

    Highly enantioselective, iridium-catalyzed monoallylations of ammonia are reported. These reactions occur with electron-neutral, -rich, and -poor cinnamyl carbonates, alkyl and trityloxy-substituted allylic carbonates, and dienyl carbonates in moderate to good yields and excellent enantioselectivities. This process is enabled by the use of an iridium catalyst that does not require a Lewis acid for activation and that is stable toward a large excess of ammonia. This selective formation of primary allylic amines allows for one-pot syntheses of heterodiallylamines and allylic amides that are not otherwise accessible via iridium-catalyzed allylic amination without the use of blocking groups and protective group manipulations.

  8. Determining the Altitude of Iridium Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, James; Owe, Manfred

    1999-01-01

    Iridium flares have nothing to do with the element iridium. Iridium is also the name of a telecommunications company that has been launching satellites into low orbits around the Earth. These satellites are being used for a new type of wireless phone and paging service. Flares have been observed coming from these satellites. These flares have the potential, especially when the full fleet of satellites is in orbit, to disrupt astronomical observations. The paper reviews using simple trigonometry how to calculate the altitude of one of these satellites.

  9. Enantioselective, Iridium-Catalyzed Monoallylation of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Pouy, Mark J.; Stanley, Levi M.; Hartwig, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Highly enantioselective, iridium-catalyzed monoallylations of ammonia are reported. These reactions occur with electron-neutral, -rich, and -poor cinnamyl carbonates, alkyl and trityloxy-substituted allylic carbonates, and dienyl carbonates in moderate to good yields and excellent enantioselectivities. This process is enabled by the use of an iridium catalyst that does not require a Lewis acid for activation and that is stable toward a large excess of ammonia. This selective formation of primary allylic amines allows for one-pot syntheses of heterodiallylamines and allylic amides that are not otherwise accessible via iridium-catalyzed allylic amination without the use of blocking groups and protective group manipulations. PMID:19722644

  10. Determining the Altitude of Iridium Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, James; Owe, Manfred

    1999-01-01

    Iridium flares have nothing to do with the element iridium. Iridium is also the name of a telecommunications company that has been launching satellites into low orbits around the Earth. These satellites are being used for a new type of wireless phone and paging service. Flares have been observed coming from these satellites. These flares have the potential, especially when the full fleet of satellites is in orbit, to disrupt astronomical observations. The paper reviews using simple trigonometry how to calculate the altitude of one of these satellites.

  11. Application of hot platinum microelectrodes for determination of flavonoids in flow injection analysis and capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Magnuszewska, Jolanta; Krogulec, Tadeusz

    2013-07-05

    The determination of quercetin and rutin by flow injection analysis (FIA) and capillary electrophoresis (CE) using electrochemical detection was described. These flavonoids were determined at normal (unheated) and hot platinum microelectrodes using cyclic voltammetry. When quercetin or rutin is reaching the platinum electrode, a change of the current in the region of the platinum oxide formation is observed. Integration of the current changes in this in this region creates analytical signals in the form of peaks. An increase of temperature to about 76°C in a small zone adjacent to the microelectrode causes an increase of the analytical signal by more than 6 times under FIA conditions. This method enables the use of hot microelectrodes as detectors in HPLC or CE. In CE the improvement of the analytical signal at hot microelectrodes is smaller than in FIA and increase only 1.3-3.4 times. Heated microelectrodes were used for analysis of the flavonoids in natural samples of the plant (extract of sea buckthorn) and a pharmaceutical preparation (Cerutin). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Preparation of metal nanoband microelectrode on poly(dimethylsiloxane) for chip-based amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Peng; Wu, Jian; Yu, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2010-04-30

    We proposed herein a novel approach for fabricating nanoband microelectrodes for electrochemical detection on an electrophoresis microchip. The metal films were first obtained via region-selective electroless deposition of gold or copper films on PDMS substrates by selective region plasma oxidation through shadow masking. Both metal films show uniform surfaces with the thickness at the level of 100 nm. By casting another PDMS layer on the metal films, the cross section of the sandwich structures can be used as nanoband microelectrodes, which can be renewed just by cutting. These nanoband microelectrodes are successfully used as electrochemical detectors in microchip electrophoresis for the detection of amino acids, proteins and neurotransmitter molecules. Moreover, integrating an Au-Cu double-metal detector with a double-channel electrophoresis system, we can easily distinguish electroactive amino acids from that of non-electroactive amino acids.

  13. Highly efficient electrochemiluminescence from iridium(III) complexes with 2-phenylquinoline ligand.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuyang; Li, Wanfei; Yu, Linpo; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xiaomei; Zhou, Ming

    2015-01-28

    A series of cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes with 2-phenylquinoline ligand (1-4) were designed and synthesized, which were thoroughly investigated by the photophysics, electrochemistry, theoretical calculations and electrochemiluminescence (ECL). By incorporating methyl groups into the 2-phenylquinoline, the corresponding complexes 2 and 3 displayed lower oxidative potential and higher HOMO energy levels. Most importantly, compared with tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) ([Ru(bipy)3](2+)), these iridium(III) complexes demonstrated more intense ECL in acetonitrile solutions.

  14. Selective DNA purine base photooxidation by bis-terdentate iridium(III) polypyridyl and cyclometalated complexes.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Alexandre; Kirsch-De Mesmaeker, Andrée; Elias, Benjamin

    2014-02-03

    Two bis-terdentate iridium(III) complexes with polypyridyl and cyclometalated ligands have been prepared and characterized. Their spectroscopic and electrochemical properties have been studied, and a photophysical scheme addressing their properties is proposed. Different types of excited states have been considered to account for the deactivation processes in each complex. Interestingly, in the presence of mono- or polynucleotides, a photoinduced electron-transfer process from a DNA purine base (i.e., guanine or adenine) to the excited complex is shown through luminescence quenching experiments. For the first time, this work reports evidence for selective DNA purine bases oxidation by excited iridium(III) bis-terdentate complexes.

  15. Electrodeposition of platinum-iridium alloy nanowires for hermetic packaging of microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Petrossians, Artin; Whalen, John J; Weiland, James D; Mansfeld, Florian

    2012-01-01

    An electrodeposition technique was applied for fabrication of dense platinum-iridium alloy nanowires as interconnect structures in hermetic microelectronic packaging to be used in implantable devices. Vertically aligned arrays of platinum-iridium alloy nanowires with controllable length and a diameter of about 200 nm were fabricated using a cyclic potential technique from a novel electrodeposition bath in nanoporous aluminum oxide templates. Ti/Au thin films were sputter deposited on one side of the alumina membranes to form a base material for electrodeposition. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) were used to characterize the morphology and the chemical composition of the nanowires, respectively. SEM micrographs revealed that the electrodeposited nanowires have dense and compact structures. EDS analysis showed a 60:40% platinum-iridium nanowire composition. Deposition rates were estimated by determining nanowire length as a function of deposition time. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) images revealed that the nanowires have a nanocrystalline structure with grain sizes ranging from 3 nm to 5 nm. Helium leak tests performed using a helium leak detector showed leak rates as low as 1 × 10(-11) mbar L s(-1) indicating that dense nanowires were electrodeposited inside the nanoporous membranes. Comparison of electrical measurements on platinum and platinum-iridium nanowires revealed that platinum-iridium nanowires have improved electrical conductivity.

  16. Monte Carlo study of an unconventional superconducting phase in iridium oxide J(eff)=1/2 Mott insulators induced by carrier doping.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Shirakawa, Tomonori; Yunoki, Seiji

    2013-01-11

    Based on a microscopic theoretical study, we show that novel superconductivity is induced by carrier doping in layered perovskite Ir oxides where a strong spin-orbit coupling causes an effective total angular momentum J(eff)=1/2 Mott insulator. Using a variational Monte Carlo method, we find an unconventional superconducting state in the ground state phase diagram of a t(2g) three-orbital Hubbard model on the square lattice. This superconducting state is characterized by a d(x(2)-y(2))-wave "pseudospin singlet" formed by the J(eff)=1/2 Kramers doublet, which thus contains interorbital as well as both singlet and triplet components of t(2g) electrons. The superconducting state is found stable only by electron doping, but not by hole doping, for the case of carrier doped Sr2IrO4. We also study an effective single-orbital Hubbard model to discuss the similarities to high-T(c) cuprate superconductors and the multiorbital effects.

  17. Broadband iridium wire grid polarizer for UV applications.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas; Käsebier, Thomas; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2011-02-15

    In this Letter, we present an iridium wire grid polarizer with a large spectral working range from IR down to the UV spectral region. The required grating period of 100 nm for an application below a wavelength of 300 nm was realized using a spatial frequency doubling technique based on ultrafast electron beam writing. The optical performance of the polarizer at a wavelength of 300 nm is a transmittance of almost 60% and an extinction ratio of about 30 (15 dB). Furthermore, the oxidation resistance is discussed.

  18. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube-sheathed carbon fibers as pristine microelectrodes for selective monitoring of ascorbate in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Ling; Yu, Ping; Hao, Jie; Zhang, Meining; Zhu, Lin; Dai, Liming; Mao, Lanqun

    2014-04-15

    Using as-synthesized vertically aligned carbon nanotube-sheathed carbon fibers (VACNT-CFs) as microelectrodes without any postsynthesis functionalization, we have developed in this study a new method for in vivo monitoring of ascorbate with high selectivity and reproducibility. The VACNT-CFs are formed via pyrolysis of iron phthalocyanine (FePc) on the carbon fiber support. After electrochemical pretreatment in 1.0 M NaOH solution, the pristine VACNT-CF microelectrodes exhibit typical microelectrode behavior with fast electron transfer kinetics for electrochemical oxidation of ascorbate and are useful for selective ascorbate monitoring even with other electroactive species (e.g., dopamine, uric acid, and 5-hydroxytryptamine) coexisting in rat brain. Pristine VACNT-CFs are further demonstrated to be a reliable and stable microelectrode for in vivo recording of the dynamic increase of ascorbate evoked by intracerebral infusion of glutamate. Use of a pristine VACNT-CF microelectrode can effectively avoid any manual electrode modification and is free from person-to-person and/or electrode-to-electrode deviations intrinsically associated with conventional CF electrode fabrication, which often involves electrode surface modification with randomly distributed CNTs or other pretreatments, and hence allows easy fabrication of highly selective, reproducible, and stable microelectrodes even by nonelectrochemists. Thus, this study offers a new and reliable platform for in vivo monitoring of neurochemicals (e.g., ascorbate) to largely facilitate future studies on the neurochemical processes involved in various physiological events.

  19. IRIDIUM (R): A Lockheed transition to commercial space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadano, Thomas N.

    1995-01-01

    At Lockheed Missiles & Space Company, the IRIDIUM commercial space program is dramatically revolutionizing spacecraft development and manufacturing processes to reduce cost while maintaining quality and reliability. This report includes the following sections: an overview of the IRIDIUM system, the Lockheed IRIDIUM project and challenges; cycle-time reduction through production reorganization; and design for manufacturing and quality.

  20. IRIDIUM (R): A Lockheed transition to commercial space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadano, Thomas N.

    1995-01-01

    At Lockheed Missiles & Space Company, the IRIDIUM commercial space program is dramatically revolutionizing spacecraft development and manufacturing processes to reduce cost while maintaining quality and reliability. This report includes the following sections: an overview of the IRIDIUM system, the Lockheed IRIDIUM project and challenges; cycle-time reduction through production reorganization; and design for manufacturing and quality.

  1. Laser Spectroscopy of Iridium Monochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linton, Colan; Adam, Allan G.; Foran, Samantha; Ma, Tongmei; Steimle, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Iridium monochloride (IrCl) molecules have been produced in the gas phase using laser ablation sources at the University of New Brunswick (UNB) and Arizona State University (ASU). Low resolution laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra, obtained at UNB using a pulsed dye laser, showed three bands at 557, 545 and 534 nm which appeared to form an upper state vibrational progression. Dispersed fluorescence (DF) spectra, obtained by exciting each band at its band head frequency, showed a ground state vibrational progression extending from v=0 to 6. High resolution spectra (FWHM=0.006 wn), taken using a cw ring dye laser, showed resolved rotational lines, broadened by unresolved Ir (I=3/2) hyperfine structure, in both the 193Ir35Cl and 191Ir35Cl isotopologues. Vibrational assignments of 0-0, 1-0 and 2-0 for the three bands were determined from the isotope structure and the rotational analysis showed the transition to be ^3Φ_4 - ^3Φ_4, similar to that previously observed in IrF. Higher resolution spectra (FWHM=0.001 wn) of the 1-0 band, obtained at ASU, showed resolved hyperfine structure from which the magnetic and quadrupole hyperfine parameters in the ground and excited states were determined. The interpretation of the hyperfine parameters in terms of the electron configurations will be presented along with a comparison of the properties of IrCl and IrF.

  2. Electrostatic Microactuators for Precise Positioning of Neural Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Muthuswamy, Jit; Okandan, Murat; Jain, Tilak; Gilletti, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays used for monitoring single and multineuronal action potentials often fail to record from the same population of neurons over a period of time likely due to micromotion of neurons away from the microelectrode, gliosis around the recording site and also brain movement due to behavior. We report here novel electrostatic microactuated microelectrodes that will enable precise repositioning of the microelectrodes within the brain tissue. Electrostatic comb-drive microactuators and associated microelectrodes are fabricated using the SUMMiT V™ (Sandia's Ultraplanar Multilevel MEMS Technology) process, a five-layer polysilicon micromachining technology of the Sandia National labs, NM. The microfabricated microactuators enable precise bidirectional positioning of the microelectrodes in the brain with accuracy in the order of 1 μm. The microactuators allow for a linear translation of the microelectrodes of up to 5 mm in either direction making it suitable for positioning microelectrodes in deep structures of a rodent brain. The overall translation was reduced to approximately 2 mm after insulation of the microelectrodes with epoxy for monitoring multiunit activity. The microactuators are capable of driving the microelectrodes in the brain tissue with forces in the order of several micro-Newtons. Single unit recordings were obtained from the somatosensory cortex of adult rats in acute experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this technology. Further optimization of the insulation, packaging and interconnect issues will be necessary before this technology can be validated in long-term experiments. PMID:16235660

  3. Electrostatic microactuators for precise positioning of neural microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Muthuswamy, Jit; Okandan, Murat; Jain, Tilak; Gilletti, Aaron

    2005-10-01

    Microelectrode arrays used for monitoring single and multineuronal action potentials often fail to record from the same population of neurons over a period of time likely due to micromotion of neurons away from the microelectrode, gliosis around the recording site and also brain movement due to behavior. We report here novel electrostatic microactuated microelectrodes that will enable precise repositioning of the microelectrodes within the brain tissue. Electrostatic comb-drive microactuators and associated microelectrodes are fabricated using the SUMMiT V (Sandia's Ultraplanar Multilevel MEMS Technology) process, a five-layer polysilicon micromachining technology of the Sandia National labs, NM. The microfabricated microactuators enable precise bidirectional positioning of the microelectrodes in the brain with accuracy in the order of 1 microm. The microactuators allow for a linear translation of the microelectrodes of up to 5 mm in either direction making it suitable for positioning microelectrodes in deep structures of a rodent brain. The overall translation was reduced to approximately 2 mm after insulation of the microelectrodes with epoxy for monitoring multiunit activity. The microactuators are capable of driving the microelectrodes in the brain tissue with forces in the order of several micro-Newtons. Single unit recordings were obtained from the somatosensory cortex of adult rats in acute experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this technology. Further optimization of the insulation, packaging and interconnect issues will be necessary before this technology can be validated in long-term experiments.

  4. Carbon nanospikes grown on metal wires as microelectrode sensors for dopamine

    DOE PAGES

    Zestos, Alexander G.; Yang, Cheng; Jacobs, Christopher B.; ...

    2015-09-14

    Carbon nanomaterials are advantageous as electrodes for neurotransmitter detection, but the difficulty of nanomaterials deposition on electrode substrates limits the reproducibility and future applications. In our study, we used plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to directly grow a thin layer of carbon nanospikes (CNS) on cylindrical metal substrates. No catalyst is required and the CNS surface coverage is uniform over the cylindrical metal substrate. We characterized the CNS growth on several metallic substrates including tantalum, niobium, palladium, and nickel wires. Using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), bare metal wires could not detect 1 mu M dopamine while carbon nanospike coatedmore » wires could. Moreover, the highest sensitivity and optimized S/N ratio was recorded from carbon nanospike-tantalum (CNS-Ta) microwires grown for 7.5 minutes, which had a LOD of 8 +/- 2 nM for dopamine with FSCV. CNS-Ta microelectrodes were more reversible and had a smaller Delta E-p for dopamine than carbon-fiber microelectrodes, suggesting faster electron transfer kinetics. The kinetics of dopamine redox were adsorption controlled at CNS-Ta microelectrodes and repeated electrochemical measurements displayed stability for up to ten hours in vitro and over a ten day period as well. The oxidation potential was significantly different for ascorbic acid and uric acid compared to dopamine. Finally, growing carbon nanospikes on metal wires is a promising method to produce uniformly-coated, carbon nanostructured cylindrical microelectrodes for sensitive dopamine detection.« less

  5. Carbon nanospikes grown on metal wires as microelectrode sensors for dopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Zestos, Alexander G.; Yang, Cheng; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Hensley, Dale; Venton, B. Jill

    2015-09-14

    Carbon nanomaterials are advantageous as electrodes for neurotransmitter detection, but the difficulty of nanomaterials deposition on electrode substrates limits the reproducibility and future applications. In our study, we used plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to directly grow a thin layer of carbon nanospikes (CNS) on cylindrical metal substrates. No catalyst is required and the CNS surface coverage is uniform over the cylindrical metal substrate. We characterized the CNS growth on several metallic substrates including tantalum, niobium, palladium, and nickel wires. Using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), bare metal wires could not detect 1 mu M dopamine while carbon nanospike coated wires could. Moreover, the highest sensitivity and optimized S/N ratio was recorded from carbon nanospike-tantalum (CNS-Ta) microwires grown for 7.5 minutes, which had a LOD of 8 +/- 2 nM for dopamine with FSCV. CNS-Ta microelectrodes were more reversible and had a smaller Delta E-p for dopamine than carbon-fiber microelectrodes, suggesting faster electron transfer kinetics. The kinetics of dopamine redox were adsorption controlled at CNS-Ta microelectrodes and repeated electrochemical measurements displayed stability for up to ten hours in vitro and over a ten day period as well. The oxidation potential was significantly different for ascorbic acid and uric acid compared to dopamine. Finally, growing carbon nanospikes on metal wires is a promising method to produce uniformly-coated, carbon nanostructured cylindrical microelectrodes for sensitive dopamine detection.

  6. Carbon Nanospikes Grown on Metal Wires as Microelectrode Sensors for Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Zestos, Alexander G.; Yang, Cheng; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Hensley, Dale; Venton, B. Jill

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials are advantageous as electrodes for neurotransmitter detection, but the difficulty of nanomaterials deposition on electrode substrates limits the reproducibility and future applications. In this study, we used plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to directly grow a thin layer of carbon nanospikes (CNS) on cylindrical metal substrates. No catalyst is required and the CNS surface coverage is uniform over the cylindrical metal substrate. The CNS growth was characterized on several metallic substrates including tantalum, niobium, palladium, and nickel wires. Using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), bare metal wires could not detect 1 μM dopamine while carbon nanospike coated wires could. The highest sensitivity and optimized S/N ratio was recorded from carbon nanospike-tantalum (CNS-Ta) microwires grown for 7.5 minutes, which had a LOD of 8 ± 2 nM for dopamine with FSCV. CNS-Ta microelectrodes were more reversible and had a smaller ΔEp for dopamine than carbon-fiber microelectrodes, suggesting faster electron transfer kinetics. The kinetics of dopamine redox were adsorption controlled at CNS-Ta microelectrodes and repeated electrochemical measurements displayed stability for up to ten hours in vitro and over a ten day period as well. The oxidation potential was significantly different for ascorbic acid and uric acid compared to dopamine. Growing carbon nanospikes on metal wires is a promising method to produce uniformly-coated, carbon nanostructured cylindrical microelectrodes for sensitive dopamine detection. PMID:26389138

  7. Carbon nanotube fiber microelectrodes show a higher resistance to dopamine fouling.

    PubMed

    Harreither, Wolfgang; Trouillon, Raphaël; Poulin, Philippe; Neri, Wilfrid; Ewing, Andrew G; Safina, Gulnara

    2013-08-06

    We have compared the properties and resistance to DA fouling of a carbon nanotube fiber (CNTF) microelectrode to a traditional carbon fiber (CF) microelectrode. These two materials show comparable electrochemical activities for outer-sphere and inner-sphere redox reactions. Although the CNTF might have a higher intrinsic RC constant, thus limiting its high-frequency behavior, the CNTF shows a significantly higher durability than the CF in terms of electrode stability. During constant oxidation of 100 μM DA, the signal measured by the CNTF microelectrode shows a 2-h window over which no decrease in current is observed. Under the same conditions, the current obtained at the CF microelectrode decreases by almost 50%. A model of the fouling process, assuming the formation of growing patches of insulator on the surface, has been compared to the data. This model is found to be in good agreement with our results and indicates a growth rate of the patches in the 0.1-2 nm s(-1) range.

  8. Carbon nanospikes grown on metal wires as microelectrode sensors for dopamine.

    PubMed

    Zestos, Alexander G; Yang, Cheng; Jacobs, Christopher B; Hensley, Dale; Venton, B Jill

    2015-11-07

    Carbon nanomaterials are advantageous as electrodes for neurotransmitter detection, but the difficulty of nanomaterials deposition on electrode substrates limits the reproducibility and future applications. In this study, we used plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) to directly grow a thin layer of carbon nanospikes (CNS) on cylindrical metal substrates. No catalyst is required and the CNS surface coverage is uniform over the cylindrical metal substrate. The CNS growth was characterized on several metallic substrates including tantalum, niobium, palladium, and nickel wires. Using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), bare metal wires could not detect 1 μM dopamine while carbon nanospike coated wires could. The highest sensitivity and optimized S/N ratio was recorded from carbon nanospike-tantalum (CNS-Ta) microwires grown for 7.5 minutes, which had a LOD of 8 ± 2 nM for dopamine with FSCV. CNS-Ta microelectrodes were more reversible and had a smaller ΔE(p) for dopamine than carbon-fiber microelectrodes, suggesting faster electron transfer kinetics. The kinetics of dopamine redox were adsorption controlled at CNS-Ta microelectrodes and repeated electrochemical measurements displayed stability for up to ten hours in vitro and over a ten day period as well. The oxidation potential was significantly different for ascorbic acid and uric acid compared to dopamine. Growing carbon nanospikes on metal wires is a promising method to produce uniformly-coated, carbon nanostructured cylindrical microelectrodes for sensitive dopamine detection.

  9. Annealing Increases Stability Of Iridium Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germain, Edward F.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Alderfer, David W.; Wright, Robert E.; Ahmed, Shaffiq

    1989-01-01

    Metallurgical studies carried out on samples of iridium versus iridium/40-percent rhodium thermocouples in condition received from manufacturer. Metallurgical studies included x-ray, macroscopic, resistance, and metallographic studies. Revealed large amount of internal stress caused by cold-working during manufacturing, and large number of segregations and inhomogeneities. Samples annealed in furnace at temperatures from 1,000 to 2,000 degree C for intervals up to 1 h to study effects of heat treatment. Wire annealed by this procedure found to be ductile.

  10. Annealing Increases Stability Of Iridium Thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germain, Edward F.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Alderfer, David W.; Wright, Robert E.; Ahmed, Shaffiq

    1989-01-01

    Metallurgical studies carried out on samples of iridium versus iridium/40-percent rhodium thermocouples in condition received from manufacturer. Metallurgical studies included x-ray, macroscopic, resistance, and metallographic studies. Revealed large amount of internal stress caused by cold-working during manufacturing, and large number of segregations and inhomogeneities. Samples annealed in furnace at temperatures from 1,000 to 2,000 degree C for intervals up to 1 h to study effects of heat treatment. Wire annealed by this procedure found to be ductile.

  11. Electronic Transitions of Iridium Monoboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, A. S.-C.; Pang, H. F.; Ng, Y. W.; Chen, G.

    2010-06-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectrum of iridium monoboride (IrB) in the spectral region between 420 and 480nm has been studied. New electronic transition system observed at 435nm has been assigned to be the [22.3] ^3Φ3 - X^3Δ3μ transition. Isotopic relationship confirmed the vibrational numbering. Molecular constants obtained will be reported. Resolved fluorescence spectrum of the [22.3] ^3Φ3 - X^3Δ3 transition showed that the ΔG1/2 of the X^3Δ3 state is 917 cm-1. Theoretical study using complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations followed by MS-CASPT2 including scalar relativistic effect has been performed to the IrB molecule; molecular bond length, electronic configurations and relative energies of the ground and low-lying electronic states have been obtained. Our computed results indicated that the ground state of IrB is an inverted X^3Δ state with a bond length, r_0, equal to1.767 Å, which is in very good agreement with our experimental determination earlier. The electronic configuration giving rises to the ground state is 1σ^2 2σ^21π^4 3σ^11δ^3. Our calculations also showed that the earlier observed [16.5] ^3Π state and the [22.3] ^3Φ state in this work are the (2)^3Π and the (2)^3Φ states, respectively. The molecular properties obtained in our calculations agree reasonably well with those determined. Financial support from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (Project No. HKU 701008P) is gratefully acknowledged

  12. Iridium emissions from Hawaiian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnegan, D. L.; Zoller, W. H.; Miller, T. M.

    1988-01-01

    Particle and gas samples were collected at Mauna Loa volcano during and after its eruption in March and April, 1984 and at Kilauea volcano in 1983, 1984, and 1985 during various phases of its ongoing activity. In the last two Kilauea sampling missions, samples were collected during eruptive activity. The samples were collected using a filterpack system consisting of a Teflon particle filter followed by a series of 4 base-treated Whatman filters. The samples were analyzed by INAA for over 40 elements. As previously reported in the literature, Ir was first detected on particle filters at the Mauna Loa Observatory and later from non-erupting high temperature vents at Kilauea. Since that time Ir was found in samples collected at Kilauea and Mauna Loa during fountaining activity as well as after eruptive activity. Enrichment factors for Ir in the volcanic fumes range from 10,000 to 100,000 relative to BHVO. Charcoal impregnated filters following a particle filter were collected to see if a significant amount of the Ir was in the gas phase during sample collection. Iridium was found on charcoal filters collected close to the vent, no Ir was found on the charcoal filters. This indicates that all of the Ir is in particulate form very soon after its release. Ratios of Ir to F and Cl were calculated for the samples from Mauna Loa and Kilauea collected during fountaining activity. The implications for the KT Ir anomaly are still unclear though as Ir was not found at volcanoes other than those at Hawaii. Further investigations are needed at other volcanoes to ascertain if basaltic volcanoes other than hot spots have Ir enrichments in their fumes.

  13. Iridium-Catalyzed Arylative Cyclization of Alkynones by 1,4-Iridium Migration**

    PubMed Central

    Partridge, Benjamin M; Solana González, Jorge; Lam, Hon Wai

    2014-01-01

    1,4-Metal migrations enable the remote functionalization of C—H bonds, and have been utilized in a wide variety of valuable synthetic methods. The vast majority of existing examples involve the 1,4-migration of palladium or rhodium. Herein, the stereoselective synthesis of complex polycycles by the iridium-catalyzed arylative cyclization of alkynones with arylboronic acids is described. To our knowledge, these reactions involve the first reported examples of 1,4-iridium migration. PMID:24842318

  14. Localized electron transfer rates and microelectrode-based enrichment of microbial communities within a phototrophic microbial mat

    SciTech Connect

    Babauta, Jerome T.; Atci, Erhan; Ha, Phuc T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Ewing, Timothy; Call, Douglas R.; Fredrickson, James K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats frequently exhibit sharp, light-dependent redox gradients that regulate microbial respiration on specific electron acceptors as a function of depth. In this work, a benthic phototrophic microbial mat from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville in north-central Washington, was used to develop a microscale electrochemical method to study local electron transfer processes within the mat. To characterize the physicochemical variables influencing electron transfer, we initially quantified redox potential, pH, and dissolved oxygen gradients by depth in the mat under photic and aphotic conditions. We further demonstrated that power output of a mat fuel cell was light-dependent. To study local electron transfer processes, we deployed a microscale electrode (microelectrode) with tip size ~20 μm. To enrich a subset of microorganisms capable of interacting with the microelectrode, we anodically polarized the microelectrode at depth in the mat. Subsequently, to characterize the microelectrode- associated community and compare it to the neighboring mat community, we performed amplicon sequencing of the V1-V3 region of the 16S gene. Differences in Bray-Curtis beta diversity, illustrated by large changes in relative abundance at the phylum level, suggested successful enrichment of specific mat community members on the microelectrode surface. The microelectrode-associated community exhibited substantially reduced alpha diversity and elevated relative abundances of Prosthecochloris, Loktanella, Catellibacterium, other unclassified members of Rhodobacteraceae, Thiomicrospira, and Limnobacter, compared with the community at an equivalent depth in the mat. Our results suggest that local electron transfer to an anodically polarized microelectrode selected for a specific microbial population, with substantially more abundance and diversity of sulfur-oxidizing phylotypes compared with the neighboring mat community.

  15. Localized electron transfer rates and microelectrode-based enrichment of microbial communities within a phototrophic microbial mat

    PubMed Central

    Babauta, Jerome T.; Atci, Erhan; Ha, Phuc T.; Lindemann, Stephen R.; Ewing, Timothy; Call, Douglas R.; Fredrickson, James K.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    Phototrophic microbial mats frequently exhibit sharp, light-dependent redox gradients that regulate microbial respiration on specific electron acceptors as a function of depth. In this work, a benthic phototrophic microbial mat from Hot Lake, a hypersaline, epsomitic lake located near Oroville in north-central Washington, was used to develop a microscale electrochemical method to study local electron transfer processes within the mat. To characterize the physicochemical variables influencing electron transfer, we initially quantified redox potential, pH, and dissolved oxygen gradients by depth in the mat under photic and aphotic conditions. We further demonstrated that power output of a mat fuel cell was light-dependent. To study local electron transfer processes, we deployed a microscale electrode (microelectrode) with tip size ~20 μm. To enrich a subset of microorganisms capable of interacting with the microelectrode, we anodically polarized the microelectrode at depth in the mat. Subsequently, to characterize the microelectrode-associated community and compare it to the neighboring mat community, we performed amplicon sequencing of the V1–V3 region of the 16S gene. Differences in Bray-Curtis beta diversity, illustrated by large changes in relative abundance at the phylum level, suggested successful enrichment of specific mat community members on the microelectrode surface. The microelectrode-associated community exhibited substantially reduced alpha diversity and elevated relative abundances of Prosthecochloris, Loktanella, Catellibacterium, other unclassified members of Rhodobacteraceae, Thiomicrospira, and Limnobacter, compared with the community at an equivalent depth in the mat. Our results suggest that local electron transfer to an anodically polarized microelectrode selected for a specific microbial population, with substantially more abundance and diversity of sulfur-oxidizing phylotypes compared with the neighboring mat community. PMID:24478768

  16. Iridium-192 Production for Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Rostelato, M.E.C.M.; Silva, C.P.G.; Rela, P.R.; Zeituni, C.A.; Lepki, V.; Feher, A.

    2004-10-05

    The purpose of this work is to settle a laboratory for Iridium -192 sources production, that is, to determine a wire activation method and to build a hot cell for the wires manipulation, quality control and packaging. The paper relates, mainly, the wire activation method and its quality control. The wire activation is carried out in our nuclear reactor, IEA- R1m.

  17. Iridium-Coated Rhenium Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

    1994-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium combustion chamber withstands operating temperatures up to 2,200 degrees C. Chamber designed to replace older silicide-coated combustion chamber in small rocket engine. Modified versions of newer chamber could be designed for use on Earth in gas turbines, ramjets, and scramjets.

  18. Osmium-191/iridium-191m radionuclide

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Jr., Furn F.; Butler, Thomas A.; Brihaye, Claude

    1987-01-01

    A generator system to provide iridium-191m for clinical imaging applications comprises an activated carbon adsorbent loaded with a compound containing the parent nuclide, osmium-191. The generator, which has a shelf-life in excess of two weeks and does not require a scavenger column, can be eluted with physiologically compatible saline.

  19. Osmium-191/iridium-191m radionuclide

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Butler, T.A.; Brihaye, C.

    1985-08-26

    A generator system to provide iridium-191m for clinical imaging applications comprises an activated carbon adsorbent loaded with a compound containing the parent nuclide, osmium-191. The generator, which has a shelf-life in excess of two weeks and does not require a scavenger column, can be eluted with physiologically compatible saline. 4 figs. 3 tabs.

  20. Iridium-Coated Rhenium Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

    1994-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium combustion chamber withstands operating temperatures up to 2,200 degrees C. Chamber designed to replace older silicide-coated combustion chamber in small rocket engine. Modified versions of newer chamber could be designed for use on Earth in gas turbines, ramjets, and scramjets.

  1. Note: Electrochemical etching of sharp iridium tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalanne, Jean-Benoît; Paul, William; Oliver, David; Grütter, Peter H.

    2011-11-01

    We describe an etching procedure for the production of sharp iridium tips with apex radii of 15-70 nm, as determined by scanning electron microscopy, field ion microscopy, and field emission measurements. A coarse electrochemical etch followed by zone electropolishing is performed in a relatively harmless calcium chloride solution with high success rate.

  2. Diastereo- and Enantioselective Iridium Catalyzed Carbonyl (α-Cyclopropyl)allylation via Transfer Hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Hong, Suckchang; Krische, Michael J

    2015-09-07

    The first examples of diastereo- and enantioselective carbonyl α-(cyclopropyl)allylation are reported. Under the conditions of iridium catalyzed transfer hydrogenation using the chiral precatalyst (R)-Ir-I modified by SEGPHOS, carbonyl α-(cyclopropyl)allylation may be achieved with equal facility from alcohol or aldehyde oxidation levels. This methodology provides a conduit to hitherto inaccessible inaccessible enantiomerically enriched cyclopropane-containing architectures. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Enhanced Catalytic Activity of Iridium(III) Complexes by Facile Modification of C,N-Bidentate Chelating Pyridylideneamide Ligands.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Miquel; Smith, Christene A; Albrecht, Martin

    2017-09-12

    A set of aryl-substituted pyridylideneamide (PYA) ligands with variable donor properties owing to a pronounced zwitterionic and a neutral diene-type resonance structure were used as electronically flexible ligands at a pentamethylcyclopentadienyl (Cp*) iridium center. The straightforward synthesis of this type of ligand allows for an easy incorporation of donor substituents such as methoxy groups in different positions of the phenyl ring of the C,N-bidentate chelating PYA. These modifications considerably enhance the catalytic activity of the coordinated iridium center toward the catalytic aerobic transfer hydrogenation of carbonyls and imines as well as the hydrosilylation of phenylacetylene. Moreover, these PYA iridium complexes catalyze the base-free transfer hydrogenation of aldehydes, and to a lesser extent also of ketones. Under standard transfer hydrogenation conditions including base, aldehydes are rapidly oxidized to carboxylic acids rather than reduced to the corresponding alcohol, as is observed under base-free conditions.

  4. Neuronal loss due to prolonged controlled-current stimulation with chronically implanted microelectrodes in the cat cerebral cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreery, Douglas; Pikov, Victor; Troyk, Philip R.

    2010-06-01

    Activated iridium microelectrodes were implanted for 450-1282 days in the sensorimotor cortex of seven adult domestic cats and then pulsed for 240 h (8 h per day for 30 days) at 50 Hz. Continuous stimulation at 2 nC/phase and with a geometric charge density of 100 µC cm-2 produced no detectable change in neuronal density in the tissue surrounding the microelectrode tips. However, pulsing with a continuous 100% duty cycle at 4 nC/phase and with a geometric charge density of 200 µC cm-2 induced loss of cortical neurons over a radius of at least 150 µm from the electrode tips. The same stimulus regimen but with a duty cycle of 50% (1 s of stimulation, and then 1 s without stimulation repeated for 8 h) produced neuronal loss within a smaller radius, approximately 60 µm from the center of the electrode tips. However, there also was significant loss of neurons surrounding the unpulsed electrodes, presumably as a result of mechanical injury due to their insertion into and long-term residence in the tissue, and this was responsible for most of the neuronal loss within 150 µm of the electrodes pulsed with the 50% duty cycle.

  5. A microchip-based endothelium mimic utilizing open reservoirs for cell immobilization and integrated carbon ink microelectrodes for detection.

    PubMed

    Hulvey, Matthew K; Martin, R Scott

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication and characterization of a microfluidic device that utilizes a reservoir-based approach for endothelial cell immobilization and integrated embedded carbon ink microelectrodes for the amperometric detection of extracellular nitric oxide (NO) release. The design utilizes a buffer channel to continuously introduce buffer or a plug of stimulant to the reservoir as well as a separate sampling channel that constantly withdraws buffer from the reservoir and over the microelectrode. A steel pin is used for both the fluidic connection to the sampling channel and to provide a quasi-reference electrode for the carbon ink microelectrode. Characterization of the device was performed using NO standards produced from a NONOate salt. Finally, NO release from a layer of immobilized endothelial cells was monitored and quantified using the system. This system holds promise as a means to electrochemically detect extracellular NO release from endothelial cells in either an array of reservoirs or concurrently with fluorescence-based intracellular NO measurements.

  6. Application of the Iridium Satellite System to Aeronautical Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Meza, Mike; Gupta, Om

    2008-01-01

    The next generation air transportation system will require greater air-ground communications capacity to accommodate more air traffic with increased safety and efficiency. Communications will remain primarily terrestrially based, but satellite communications will have an increased role. Inmarsat s aeronautical services have been approved and are in use for aeronautical safety communications provided by geostationary satellites. More recently the approval process for the Iridium low earth orbit constellation is nearing completion. The current Iridium system will be able to provide basic air traffic services communications suitable for oceanic, remote and polar regions. The planned second generation of the Iridium system, called Iridium NEXT, will provide enhanced capabilities and enable a greater role in the future of aeronautical communications. This paper will review the potential role of satellite communications in the future of air transportation, the Iridium approval process and relevant system testing, and the potential role of Iridium NEXT.

  7. Screening metal nanoparticles using boron-doped diamond microelectrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ivandini, Tribidasari A. Rangkuti, Prasmita K.; Einaga, Yasuaki

    2016-04-19

    Boron-doped diamond (BDD) microelectrodes were used to observe the correlation between electrocatalytic currents caused by individual Pt nanoparticle (Pt-np) collisions at the electrode. The BDD microelectrodes, ∼20 µm diameter and ∼2 µm particle size, were fabricated at the surface of tungsten wires. Pt-np with a size of 1 to 5 nm with agglomerations up to 20 nm was used for observation. The electrolytic currents were observed via catalytic reaction of 15 mM hydrazine in 50 mM phosphate buffer solution at Pt-np at 0.4 V when it collides with the surface of the microelectrodes. The low current noise and wider potential window in the measurements using BDD microelectrode produced a better results, which represents a better correlation to the TEM result of the Pt-np, compared to when gold microelectrodes was used.

  8. Iridium and Radio Astronomy in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. J.

    2004-06-01

    An account is given of the coordination of the Iridium mobile satellite system with the radio astronomy service in Europe, from the initial exploratory discussions at Jodrell Bank in 1991 to the signing of the so-called ``Interim Agreement'' in Paris in 1999. The technical issue of unwanted emissions from the Iridium downlink into the frequency band 1610.6-1613.8 MHz was not resolved, so the coordination agreement amounts to time sharing, albeit on more favourable terms for radio astronomy than agreements negotiated elsewhere. The European agreement fully recognizes the heavy use of the frequency band in European radio astronomy, and carries the promise that ``from 1 January 2006, European radioastronomers shall be able to collect measurement data consistent with the recommendation ITU-R RA.769-1.'' Some personal observations on the events are offered.

  9. Green Phosphorescence and Electroluminescence of Sulfur Pentafluoride-Functionalized Cationic Iridium(III) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Shavaleev, Nail M; Xie, Guohua; Varghese, Shinto; Cordes, David B; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Momblona, Cristina; Ortí, Enrique; Bolink, Henk J; Samuel, Ifor D W; Zysman-Colman, Eli

    2015-06-15

    We report on four cationic iridium(III) complexes [Ir(C^N)2(dtBubpy)](PF6) that have sulfur pentafluoride-modified 1-phenylpyrazole and 2-phenylpyridine cyclometalating (C^N) ligands (dtBubpy = 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridyl). Three of the complexes were characterized by single-crystal X-ray structure analysis. In cyclic voltammetry, the complexes undergo reversible oxidation of iridium(III) and irreversible reduction of the SF5 group. They emit bright green phosphorescence in acetonitrile solution and in thin films at room temperature, with emission maxima in the range of 482-519 nm and photoluminescence quantum yields of up to 79%. The electron-withdrawing sulfur pentafluoride group on the cyclometalating ligands increases the oxidation potential and the redox gap and blue-shifts the phosphorescence of the iridium complexes more so than the commonly employed fluoro and trifluoromethyl groups. The irreversible reduction of the SF5 group may be a problem in organic electronics; for example, the complexes do not exhibit electroluminescence in light-emitting electrochemical cells (LEECs). Nevertheless, the complexes exhibit green to yellow-green electroluminescence in doped multilayer organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with emission maxima ranging from 501 nm to 520 nm and with an external quantum efficiency (EQE) of up to 1.7% in solution-processed devices.

  10. The Chemical Vapor Deposition of Iridium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    accepted types are made of porous tungsten impregnated with barium calcium aluminates (Levi, 1955; Brodie and Jenkins, 1956). The emission capability of the...not only does the chemical composition of the pore ends and the bulk material undergo alteration, but the crystal structure of the tungsten (Maloney... hexafluoride to iridium metal or IrF 6 species. In our work, IrF 6 was prepared and stored in fluorine-passivated apparatus, and between runs maintained at

  11. Handling System for Iridium-192 Seeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, W.; Wodicka, D.

    1973-01-01

    A complete system is proposed for safe handling of iridium-192 seeds used to internally irradiate malignant growths. A vibratory hopper feeds the seeds onto a transport system for deposit in a magazine or storage area. A circular magazine consisting of segmented plastic tubing with holes in the walls to accommodate the seeds seems feasible. The magazine is indexed to stop and release a seed for calibration and deposition.

  12. Facile cyclometallation of a mesitylsilylene: synthesis and preliminary catalytic activity of iridium(iii) and iridium(v) iridasilacyclopentenes.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Javier A; García-Álvarez, Pablo; González-Álvarez, Laura

    2017-09-14

    Reactions of the mesityl-amidinato-silylene Si((t)Bu2bzam)Mes (1; (t)Bu2bzam = N,N'-bis(tert-butyl)benzamidinato; Mes = mesityl) with three different iridium precursors led, at room temperature, to two iridium(iii) and one iridium(v) complexes featuring one (Ir(III)) or two (Ir(V)) cyclometallated silylene ligands. The iridium(iii) complexes are active catalyst precursors for H/D exchange and dehydrogenative borylation of arene C-H bonds.

  13. Benzo annulated cycloheptatriene PCP pincer iridium complexes.

    PubMed

    Leis, Wolfgang; Wernitz, Sophie; Reichart, Benedikt; Ruckerbauer, David; Wielandt, Johannes Wolfram; Mayer, Hermann A

    2014-08-28

    The benzo annulated cycloheptatriene PCP pincer ligand was prepared in five steps. Treatment of with Ir(CO)3Cl gave the meridional cyclometalated chlorohydrido carbonyl iridium complexes which differ in their arrangement of the H, Cl, and CO ligands around iridium. Storing in THF led to isomerization processes. Hydrogen shifts from the sp(3)-CH carbon bound to iridium into the ligand backbone produced the three isomers . Reductive elimination of HCl from these complexes resulted in the square planar Ir(i) carbonyl complexes . Abstraction of the hydrogen from the sp(3)-CH-Ir fragment could be achieved either by treatment of with Ph3CBF4 or by the elimination of H2 which is initiated by CF3SO3H. The mass spectrometric characterisation of using fast atom bombardment reveals a complex fragmentation pattern. These different "fragment" ions were further investigated by electro-spray ionisation (tandem) mass spectrometry in high and low resolution. The identified compounds were attributed to structures by DFT calculations.

  14. Single neuronal recordings using surface micromachined polysilicon microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Muthuswamy, Jit; Okandan, Murat; Jackson, Nathan

    2005-03-15

    Bulk micromachining techniques of silicon have been used successfully in the past several years to microfabricate microelectrodes for monitoring single neurons in acute and chronic experiments. In this study we report for the first time a novel surface micromachining technique to microfabricate a very thin polysilicon microelectrode that can be used for monitoring single-unit activity in the central nervous system. The microelectrodes are 3 mm long and 50 microm x 3.75 microm in cross-section. Excellent signal to noise ratios in the order of 25-35 dB were obtained while recording neuronal action potentials. The microelectrodes successfully penetrated the brains after a microincision of the dura mater. Chronic implantation of the microprobe for up to 33 days produced only minor gliosis. Since the polysilicon shank acts as a conductor, additional processing steps involved in laying conductor lines on silicon substrates are avoided. Further, surface micromachining allows for fabricating extremely thin microelectrodes which could result in decreased inflammatory responses. We conclude that the polysilicon microelectrode reported here could be a complementary approach to bulk-micromachined silicon microelectrodes for chronic monitoring of single neurons in the central nervous system.

  15. A stepper motor-driven microelectrode positioner.

    PubMed

    Schmid, K; Böhmer, G

    1987-03-01

    The mechanical elements and the electronic control system from a stepper motor-driven microelectrode positioner is described. The unit embodies a high-precision small step angle hybrid motor. The compact, rugged and totally concentric design of the mechanic, by a spindle mechanism achieves the necessary precision by translating the stepwise rotations of the motor into steps of linear movement. The system takes advantage of commercially available low friction parts such as ball bearings, ball bushings and axles with hardened surfaces. The related electronic control unit is designed around the most recent integrated circuitry which is both sophisticated and economical. Though the described system is designed to be built in an average departmental workshop it compares favorably with more expensive commercial units and in some aspects outperforms them.

  16. Advances in Chemical Oceanography Made With Microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimers, C. E.

    2009-05-01

    Many of the remarkable biogeochemical processes that regulate the transfer of mass and energy between the atmosphere, ocean waters, the benthos and the Earth's crust take place at small spatial scales, e.g., within single cells, pores of sediments and rocks, aggregates, microbial mats, or biofilms. Over the past two decades, with advances in electroanalytical chemistry and microelectronics technology, it has become progressively possible to probe marine microenvironments and interfaces, and to discover how marine chemistry and life interact. Some of this exploration has been in the laboratory, but a significant portion has been possible because of in situ techniques designed for extreme or dynamic environments (e.g., euxinic seas, the seafloor, hydrothermal vents). This presentation will review past and present roles of microelectrodes in providing fundamental information about the chemical reactions which structure the marine environment.

  17. Boron-doped diamond nano/microelectrodes for bio-sensing and in vitro measurements

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hua; Wang, Shihua; Galligan, James J.; Swain, Greg M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the fabrication of the first diamond electrode in the mid 1980s, repid progress has been made on the development and application of this new type of electrode material. Boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes exhibit outstanding properties compared to oxygen-containing sp2 carbon electrodes. These properties make BDD electrodes an ideal choice for use in complex samples. In recent years, BDD microelectrodes have been applied to in vitro and in vivo measurements of biological molecules in animals, tissues and cells. This review will summarize recent progress in the development and applications of BDD electrodes in bio-sensing and in vitro measurements of biomolecules. In the first section, the methods for BDD nanocrystalline diamond film deposition and BDD microelectrodes preparation are described. This is followed by a description and discussion of several approaches for characterization of the BDD electrode surface structure, morphology, and electrochemical activity. Further, application of BDD microelectrodes for use in the in vitro analysis of norepinephrine (NE), serotonin (5-HT), nitric oxide (NO), histamine, and adenosine from tissues are summarized and finally some of the remaining challenges are discussed. PMID:21196394

  18. Robust Functionalization of Large Microelectrode Arrays by Using Pulsed Potentiostatic Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Rothe, Joerg; Frey, Olivier; Madangopal, Rajtarun; Rickus, Jenna; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Surface modification of microelectrodes is a central step in the development of microsensors and microsensor arrays. Here, we present an electrodeposition scheme based on voltage pulses. Key features of this method are uniformity in the deposited electrode coatings, flexibility in the overall deposition area, i.e., the sizes and number of the electrodes to be coated, and precise control of the surface texture. Deposition and characterization of four different materials are demonstrated, including layers of high-surface-area platinum, gold, conducting polymer poly(ethylenedioxythiophene), also known as PEDOT, and the non-conducting polymer poly(phenylenediamine), also known as PPD. The depositions were conducted using a fully integrated complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) chip with an array of 1024 microelectrodes. The pulsed potentiostatic deposition scheme is particularly suitable for functionalization of individual electrodes or electrode subsets of large integrated microelectrode arrays: the required deposition waveforms are readily available in an integrated system, the same deposition parameters can be used to functionalize the surface of either single electrodes or large arrays of thousands of electrodes, and the deposition method proved to be robust and reproducible for all materials tested. PMID:28025569

  19. Field-programmable lab-on-a-chip based on microelectrode dot array architecture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gary; Teng, Daniel; Lai, Yi-Tse; Lu, Yi-Wen; Ho, Yingchieh; Lee, Chen-Yi

    2014-09-01

    The fundamentals of electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) digital microfluidics are very strong: advantageous capability in the manipulation of fluids, small test volumes, precise dynamic control and detection, and microscale systems. These advantages are very important for future biochip developments, but the development of EWOD microfluidics has been hindered by the absence of: integrated detector technology, standard commercial components, on-chip sample preparation, standard manufacturing technology and end-to-end system integration. A field-programmable lab-on-a-chip (FPLOC) system based on microelectrode dot array (MEDA) architecture is presented in this research. The MEDA architecture proposes a standard EWOD microfluidic component called 'microelectrode cell', which can be dynamically configured into microfluidic components to perform microfluidic operations of the biochip. A proof-of-concept prototype FPLOC, containing a 30 × 30 MEDA, was developed by using generic integrated circuits computer aided design tools, and it was manufactured with standard low-voltage complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, which allows smooth on-chip integration of microfluidics and microelectronics. By integrating 900 droplet detection circuits into microelectrode cells, the FPLOC has achieved large-scale integration of microfluidics and microelectronics. Compared to the full-custom and bottom-up design methods, the FPLOC provides hierarchical top-down design approach, field-programmability and dynamic manipulations of droplets for advanced microfluidic operations.

  20. A single carbon fiber microelectrode with branching carbon nanotubes for bioelectrochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xueyan; Lu, Xin; Tze, William T Y; Wang, Ping

    2010-06-15

    Carbon fiber electrodes are greatly promising for microelectronic applications including high performance biosensors, miniaturized transmitters, and energy storage and generation devices. For biosensor applications, one drawback of using carbon fiber microelectrodes, especially single fiber electrodes, is the weak electronic signals, a consequence of low surface area of fibers, which ultimately limit the sensitivity of the sensors. In this paper, we report a novel single fiber microelectrode with branched carbon nanotubes for enhanced sensing performance. The fiber microelectrode was prepared from carbonization of cellulose fibers. Upon introduction of carbon nanotubes, the carbon fibers exhibited a significant increase in the specific surface area from <10 to 36.4 m(2)/g (determined by the BET method). A single fiber electrode with such a hierarchical structure was examined for redox reactions of coenzyme NAD(H) which is useful to mediate the assays and transformations of a broad range of biochemicals. Experimental results showed that carbon nanotubes enhanced the redox reactions on surfaces of the electrode by reducing the oxidation potential of NAD(H) from 0.8 to 0.55 V. The single carbon fiber with branched nanotubes was also examined for the detection of glycerol, and the results showed linear responding signals in a concentration range of 40-250 microM. These results are comparable to the properties of fossil-based carbon materials, and thus our cellulose-based carbon electrodes provide a potentially sustainable alternative in bioelectrochemical applications.

  1. Luminescent dendritic cyclometalated iridium(III) polypyridine complexes: synthesis, emission behavior, and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kenneth Yin; Liu, Hua-Wei; Fong, Tommy Tsz-Him; Chen, Xian-Guang; Lo, Kenneth Kam-Wing

    2010-06-21

    Luminescent dendritic cyclometalated iridium(III) polypyridine complexes [{Ir(N--C)(2)}(n)(bpy-n)](PF(6))(n) (HN--C = 2-phenylpyridine, Hppy, n = 8 (ppy-8), 4 (ppy-4), 3 (ppy-3); HN--C = 2-phenylquinoline, Hpq, n = 8 (pq-8), 4 (pq-4), 3 (pq-3)) have been designed and synthesized. The properties of these dendrimers have been compared to those of their monomeric counterparts [Ir(N--C)(2)(bpy-1)](PF(6)) (HN--C = Hppy (ppy-1), Hpq (pq-1)). Cyclic voltammetric studies revealed that the iridium(IV/III) oxidation and bpy-based reduction occurred at about +1.24 to +1.29 V and -1.21 to -1.27 V versus SCE, respectively, for all the complexes. The molar absorptivity of the dendritic iridium(III) complexes is approximately proportional to the number of [Ir(N--C)(2)(N--N)] moieties in one complex molecule. However, the emission lifetimes and quantum yields are relatively independent of the number of [Ir(N--C)(2)(N--N)] units, suggesting negligible electronic communications between these units. Upon photoexcitation, the complexes displayed triplet metal-to-ligand charge-transfer ((3)MLCT) (dpi(Ir) --> pi*(bpy-n)) emission. The interaction of these complexes with plasmid DNA has been investigated by agarose gel retardation assays. The results showed that the dendritic iridium(III) complexes, unlike their monomeric counterparts, bound to the plasmid, and the interaction was electrostatic in nature. The lipophilicity of all the complexes has been determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Additionally, the cellular uptake of the complexes by the human cervix epithelioid carcinoma (HeLa) cell line has been examined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), laser-scanning confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry. Upon internalization, all the complexes were localized in the perinuclear region, forming very sharp luminescent rings surrounding the nuclei. Interestingly, in addition to these rings, HeLa cells treated with the dendritic

  2. Apparatus and method of inserting a microelectrode in body tissue or the like using vibration means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldstein, C.; Crawford, D. W.; Kanabus, E. W. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    An arrangement for and method of inserting a glass microelectrode having a tip in the micron range into body tissue is presented. The arrangement includes a microelectrode. The top of the microelectrode is attached to the diaphragm center of a first speaker. The microelectrode tip is brought into contact with the tissue by controlling a micromanipulator. Thereafter, an audio signal is applied to the speaker to cause the microelectrode to vibrate and thereby pierce the tissue surface without breaking the microelectrode tip. Thereafter, the tip is inserted into the tissue to the desired depth by operating the micromanipulator with the microelectrode in a vibratory or non-vibratory state.

  3. Omnidirectional Printing of Flexible, Stretchable, and Spanning Silver Microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Bok Y.; Duoss, Eric B.; Motala, Michael J.; Guo, Xiaoying; Park, Sang-Il; Xiong, Yujie; Yoon, Jongseung; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Rogers, John A.; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2009-03-01

    Flexible, stretchable, and spanning microelectrodes that carry signals from one circuit element to another are needed for many emerging forms of electronic and optoelectronic devices. We have patterned silver microelectrodes by omnidirectional printing of concentrated nanoparticle inks in both uniform and high-aspect ratio motifs with minimum widths of approximately 2 micrometers onto semiconductor, plastic, and glass substrates. The patterned microelectrodes can withstand repeated bending and stretching to large levels of strain with minimal degradation of their electrical properties. With this approach, wire bonding to fragile three-dimensional devices and spanning interconnects for solar cell and light-emitting diode arrays are demonstrated.

  4. Potential for unreliable interpretation of EEG recorded with microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, William C.; Kellis, Spencer; Greger, Bradley; Butson, Christopher R.; Patel, Paras R.; Assaf, Trevor; Mihaylova, Temenuzhka; Glynn, Simon

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY PURPOSE Recent studies in epilepsy, cognition, and brain machine interfaces have shown the utility of recording intracranial EEG (iEEG) with greater spatial resolution. Many of these studies utilize microelectrodes connected to specialized amplifiers that are optimized for such recordings. We recently measured the impedances of several commercial microelectrodes and demonstrated that they will distort iEEG signals if connected to clinical EEG amplifiers commonly used in most centers. In this study we demonstrate the clinical implications of this effect and identify some of the potential difficulties in using microelectrodes. METHODS Human iEEG data were digitally filtered to simulate the signal recorded by a hybrid grid (2 macro- and 8 microelectrodes) connected to a standard EEG amplifier. The filtered EEG data were read by three trained epileptologists, and high frequency oscillations (HFOs) detected with a well-known algorithm. The filtering method was verified experimentally by recording an injected EEG signal in a saline bath with the same physical acquisition system used to generate the model. Several electrodes underwent scanning electron microscopy (SEM). KEY FINDINGS Macroelectrode recordings were unaltered compared to the source iEEG signal, but microelectrodes attenuated low frequencies. The attenuated signals were difficult to interpret: all three clinicians changed their clinical scoring of slowing and seizures when presented with the same data recorded on different electrodes. The HFO detection algorithm was oversensitive with microelectrodes, classifying many more HFOs than when the same data were recorded with macroelectrodes. In addition, during experimental recordings the microelectrodes produced much greater noise as well as large baseline fluctuations, creating sharply-contoured transients, and superimposed “false” HFOs. SEM of these microelectrodes demonstrated marked variability in exposed electrode surface area, lead fractures

  5. Synthesis of benzimidazoles via iridium-catalyzed acceptorless dehydrogenative coupling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang; Lv, Xiao-Hui; Ye, Lin-Miao; Hu, Yu; Chen, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Xue-Jing; Yan, Ming

    2015-07-21

    Iridium-catalyzed acceptorless dehydrogenative coupling of tertiary amines and arylamines has been developed. A number of benzimidazoles were prepared in good yields. An iridium-mediated C-H activation mechanism is suggested. This finding represents a novel strategy for the synthesis of benzimidazoles.

  6. Variation of iridium in a differentiated tholeiitic dolerite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L.P.

    1971-01-01

    Iridium has been determined in a drill core from the Great Lake (Tasmania) dolerite sheet. Iridium decreases systematically from the mafic dolerites (0.25 ppb) to the granophyres (0.006 ppb). The trend with differentiation closely parallels that of chromium. ?? 1971.

  7. Enzymatic Determination of Diglyceride Using an Iridium Nano-Particle Based Single Use, Disposable Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Shu-Yi; Bartling, Brandon; Wang, Christina; Shieu, Fuh-Sheng; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2010-01-01

    A single use, disposable iridium-nano particle contained biosensor had been developed for the determination of diglyceride (DG). In this study hydrogen peroxide, formed through the enzymatic breakdown of DG via lipase, glycerol kinase and glycerol 3-phosphate oxidase, was electrochemically oxidized at an applied potential of +0.5 V versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The oxidation current was then used to quantify the diglyceride concentration. Optimum enzyme concentrations and the surfactant loading used were established for successful sensor response. Good linear performance was observed over a DG concentration range of 0 to 25 μM in phosphate buffer and bovine serum media. PMID:22219685

  8. Iridium enrichment in airborne particles from kilauea volcano: january 1983.

    PubMed

    Zoller, W H; Parrington, J R; Kotra, J M

    1983-12-09

    Airborne particulate matter from the January 1983 eruption of Kilauea volcano was inadvertently collected on air filters at Mauna Loa Observatory at a sampling station used to observe particles in global circulation. Analyses of affected samples revealed unusually large concentrations of selenium, arsenic, indium, gold, and sulfur, as expected for volcanic emissions. Strikingly large concentrations of iridium were also observed, the ratio of iridium to aluminum being 17,000 times its value in Hawaiian basalt. Since iridium enrichments have not previously been observed in volcanic emissions, the results for Kilauea suggest that it is part of an unusual volcanic system which may be fed by magma from the mantle. The iridium enrichment appears to be linked with the high fluorine content of the volcanic gases, which suggests that the iridium is released as a volatile IrF(6).

  9. Synthesis and Electroluminescent Property of New Orange Iridium Compounds for Flexible White Organic Light Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Won; Jeong, Hyunjin; Kim, Young Kwan; Ha, Yunkyoung

    2015-10-01

    Recently, white organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) have aroused considerable attention because they have the potential of next-generation flexible displays and white illuminated applications. White OLED applications are particularly heading to the industry but they have still many problems both materials and manufacturing. Therefore, we proposed that the new iridium compounds of orange emitters could be demonstrated and also applied to flexible white OLEDs for verification of potential. First, we demonstrated the chemical properties of new orange iridium compounds. Secondly, conventional two kinds of white phosphorescent OLEDs were fabricated by following devices; indium-tin oxide coated glass substrate/4,4'-bis[N-(napthyl)-N-phenylamino]biphenyl/N,N'-dicarbazolyl-3,5-benzene doped with blue and new iridium compounds for orange emitting 8 wt%/1,3,5-tris[N-phenylbenzimidazole-2-yl]benzene/lithium quinolate/aluminum. In addition, we fabricated white OLEDs using these emitters to verify the potential on flexible substrate. Therefore, this work could be proposed that white light applications can be applied and could be extended to additional research on flexible applications.

  10. "Cosmetic electrochemistry": the facile production of graphite microelectrode ensembles.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Nadeem A; Kadara, Rashid O; Banks, Craig E

    2010-03-14

    The facile and rapid production of microelectrode ensembles is shown to be possible using off-the-shelf cosmetic products and is exemplified with the electrochemical sensing of a toxic metal offering a novel fabrication methodology.

  11. Sonochemically Fabricated Microelectrode Arrays for Use as Sensing Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Collyer, Stuart D.; Davis, Frank; Higson, Séamus P.J.

    2010-01-01

    The development, manufacture, modification and subsequent utilisation of sonochemically-formed microelectrode arrays is described for a range of applications. Initial fabrication of the sensing platform utilises ultrasonic ablation of electrochemically insulating polymers deposited upon conductive carbon substrates, forming an array of up to 70,000 microelectrode pores cm−2. Electrochemical and optical analyses using these arrays, their enhanced signal response and stir-independence area are all discussed. The growth of conducting polymeric “mushroom” protrusion arrays with entrapped biological entities, thereby forming biosensors is detailed. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this approach, lending itself ideally to mass fabrication coupled with unrivalled sensitivity and stir independence makes commercial viability of this process a reality. Application of microelectrode arrays as functional components within sensors include devices for detection of chlorine, glucose, ethanol and pesticides. Immunosensors based on microelectrode arrays are described within this monograph for antigens associated with prostate cancer and transient ischemic attacks (strokes). PMID:22399926

  12. Underpotential deposition and anodic stripping voltammetry at mesoporous microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Pablo Lozano; Elliott, Joanne M

    2005-05-01

    Using the technique of liquid crystal templating a series of high surface area mesoporous platinum microelectrodes was fabricated. The underpotential deposition of metal ions at such electrodes was found to be similar to that at conventional platinum electrodes. The phenomena of underpotential deposition, in combination with the intrinsic properties of mesoporous microelectrodes (i.e. a high surface area and efficient mass transport) was exploited for the purpose of anodic stripping voltammetry. In particular the underpotential deposition of Ag(+), Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) ions was investigated and it was found that mesoporous microelectrodes were able to quantify the concentration of ions in solution down to the ppb range. The overall behaviour of the mesoporous electrodes was found to be superior to that of conventional microelectrodes and the effects of interference by surfactants were minimal.

  13. Coordination chemistry and catalytic activity of N-heterocyclic carbene iridium(I) complexes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ching-Feng; Chang, Yung-Hung; Liu, Yi-Hong; Peng, Shei-Ming; Elsevier, Cornelis J; Chen, Jwu-Ting; Liu, Shiuh-Tzung

    2009-09-21

    Iridium complexes [(CO)2Ir(NHC-R)Cl] (R = Et-, 3a; PhCH2-, 3b; CH3OCH2CH2-, 3c; o-CH3OC6H4CH2-, 3d; NHC: N-heterocyclic carbene) are prepared via the carbene transfer from [(NHC-R)W(CO)5] to [Ir(COD)Cl]2. By using substitution with 13CO, we are able to estimate the activation energy (G) of the CO-exchange in 3a-d, which are in the range of 12-13 kcal mol-1, significantly higher than those for the phosphine analog [(CO)2Ir(PCy3)Cl]. Reactions of 3b and 3d with an equimolar amount of PPh3 result in the formation of the corresponding [(NHC-R)Ir(CO)(PPh3)Cl] with the phosphine and NHC in trans arrangement. In contrast, the analogous reaction of 3a or 3c with phosphine undergoes substitution followed by the anion metathesis to yield the corresponding di-substituted [(NHC-R)Ir(CO)(PPh3)2]BF4 (5) directly. Treatment of 3b or 3d with excess of PPh3 leads to the similar product of disubstitution 5b and 5d. The analysis for the IR data of carbonyliridium complexes provides the estimation of electron-donating power of NHCs versus phosphines. The NHC moiety on the iridium center cannot be replaced by phosphines, even 1,2-bis(diphenylphohino)ethane (dppe). All the carbene moieties on the iridium complexes are inert toward sulfur treatment, indicating a strong interaction between NHC and the iridium centers. Complexes 3a-c are active on the catalysis of the oxidative cyclization of 2-(o-aminophenyl)ethanol to yield the indole compound. The phosphine substituted complexes or analogs are less active.

  14. Microelectrode array fabrication by electrical discharge machining and chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Fofonoff, Timothy A; Martel, Sylvain M; Hatsopoulos, Nicholas G; Donoghue, John P; Hunter, Ian W

    2004-06-01

    Wire electrical discharge machining (EDM), with a complementary chemical etching process, is explored and assessed as a method for developing microelectrode array assemblies for intracortically recording brain activity. Assembly processes based on these methods are highlighted, and results showing neural activity successfully recorded from the brain of a mouse using an EDM-based device are presented. Several structures relevant to the fabrication of microelectrode arrays are also offered in order to demonstrate the capabilities of EDM.

  15. Toward high-throughput screening of NAD(P)-dependent oxidoreductases using boron-doped diamond microelectrodes and microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Oyobiki, Ryo; Kato, Taisuke; Katayama, Michinobu; Sugitani, Ai; Watanabe, Takeshi; Einaga, Yasuaki; Matsumoto, Yoshinori; Horisawa, Kenichi; Doi, Nobuhide

    2014-10-07

    Although oxidoreductases are widely used in many applications, such as biosensors and biofuel cells, improvements in the function of existing oxidoreductases or the discovery of novel oxidoreductases with greater activities is desired. To increase the activity of oxidoreductases by directed evolution, a powerful screening technique for oxidoreductases is required. In this study, we demonstrate the utility of boron-doped diamond (BDD) microelectrodes for quantitative and potentially high-throughput measurement of the activity of NAD(P)-dependent oxidoreductases. We first confirmed that BDD microelectrodes can quantify the activity of low concentrations (10-100 pM) of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase with a measuring time of 1 ms per sample. In addition, we found that poisoning of BDD microelectrodes can be repressed by optimizing the pH and by adding l-arginine to the enzyme solution as an antiaggregation agent. Finally, we fabricated a microfluidic device containing a BDD electrode for the first time and observed the elevation of the oxidation current of NADH with increasing flow rate. These results imply that the combination of a BDD microelectrode and microfluidics can be used for high-throughput screening of an oxidoreductase library containing a large number (>10(6)) of samples, each with a small (nanoliter) sample volume.

  16. Iridium Film For Charge-Coupled Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, Michael H.

    1990-01-01

    Usability extended to different environments. Application of thin film of iridium to back surface of back-surface-illuminated charge-coupled device expected to increase and stabilize quantum efficiency at wavelengths less than 4,500 Angstrom. Enhances quantum efficiency according to principle discussed in "Metal Film Increases CCD Output" (NPO-16815). Does not react with hydrogen, so device need not be kept in oxygen: Advantage where high absorption of ultraviolet light by oxygen undesirable; for example, when device used to make astronomical observations from high altitudes.

  17. Iridium Interfacial Stack - IrIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spry, David

    2012-01-01

    Iridium Interfacial Stack (IrIS) is the sputter deposition of high-purity tantalum silicide (TaSi2-400 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm)/iridium (Ir-200 nm)/platinum (Pt-200 nm) in an ultra-high vacuum system followed by a 600 C anneal in nitrogen for 30 minutes. IrIS simultaneously acts as both a bond metal and a diffusion barrier. This bondable metallization that also acts as a diffusion barrier can prevent oxygen from air and gold from the wire-bond from infiltrating silicon carbide (SiC) monolithically integrated circuits (ICs) operating above 500 C in air for over 1,000 hours. This TaSi2/Pt/Ir/Pt metallization is easily bonded for electrical connection to off-chip circuitry and does not require extra anneals or masking steps. There are two ways that IrIS can be used in SiC ICs for applications above 500 C: it can be put directly on a SiC ohmic contact metal, such as Ti, or be used as a bond metal residing on top of an interconnect metal. For simplicity, only the use as a bond metal is discussed. The layer thickness ratio of TaSi2 to the first Pt layer deposited thereon should be 2:1. This will allow Si from the TaSi2 to react with the Pt to form Pt2Si during the 600 C anneal carried out after all layers have been deposited. The Ir layer does not readily form a silicide at 600 C, and thereby prevents the Si from migrating into the top-most Pt layer during future anneals and high-temperature IC operation. The second (i.e., top-most) deposited Pt layer needs to be about 200 nm to enable easy wire bonding. The thickness of 200 nm for Ir was chosen for initial experiments; further optimization of the Ir layer thickness may be possible via further experimentation. Ir itself is not easily wire-bonded because of its hardness and much higher melting point than Pt. Below the iridium layer, the TaSi2 and Pt react and form desired Pt2Si during the post-deposition anneal while above the iridium layer remains pure Pt as desired to facilitate easy and strong wire-bonding to the Si

  18. Iridium Film For Charge-Coupled Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, Michael H.

    1990-01-01

    Usability extended to different environments. Application of thin film of iridium to back surface of back-surface-illuminated charge-coupled device expected to increase and stabilize quantum efficiency at wavelengths less than 4,500 Angstrom. Enhances quantum efficiency according to principle discussed in "Metal Film Increases CCD Output" (NPO-16815). Does not react with hydrogen, so device need not be kept in oxygen: Advantage where high absorption of ultraviolet light by oxygen undesirable; for example, when device used to make astronomical observations from high altitudes.

  19. Ultrasensitive electrochemical biomolecular detection using nanostructured microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Sage, Andrew T; Besant, Justin D; Lam, Brian; Sargent, Edward H; Kelley, Shana O

    2014-08-19

    Electrochemical sensors have the potential to achieve sensitive, specific, and low-cost detection of biomolecules--a capability that is ever more relevant to the diagnosis and monitored treatment of disease. The development of devices for clinical diagnostics based on electrochemical detection could provide a powerful solution for the routine use of biomarkers in patient treatment and monitoring and may overcome the many issues created by current methods, including the long sample-to-answer times, high cost, and limited prospects for lab-free use of traditional polymerase chain reaction, microarrays, and gene-sequencing technologies. In this Account, we summarize the advances in electrochemical biomolecular detection, focusing on a new and integrated platform that exploits the bottom-up fabrication of multiplexed electrochemical sensors composed of electrodeposited noble metals. We trace the evolution of these sensors from gold nanoelectrode ensembles to nanostructured microelectrodes (NMEs) and discuss the effects of surface morphology and size on assay performance. The development of a novel electrocatalytic assay based on Ru(3+) adsorption and Fe(3+) amplification at the electrode surface as a means to enable ultrasensitive analyte detection is discussed. Electrochemical measurements of changes in hybridization events at the electrode surface are performed using a simple potentiostat, which enables integration into a portable, cost-effective device. We summarize the strategies for proximal sample processing and detection in addition to those that enable high degrees of sensor multiplexing capable of measuring 100 different analytes on a single chip. By evaluating the cost and performance of various sensor substrates, we explore the development of practical lab-on-a-chip prototype devices. By functionalizing the NMEs with capture probes specific to nucleic acid, small molecule, and protein targets, we can successfully detect a wide variety of analytes at

  20. Electrical Characterization of 3D Au Microelectrodes for Use in Retinal Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangmin; Ahn, Jae Hyun; Seo, Jong-Mo; Chung, Hum; Cho, Dong-Il “Dan”

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide high-quality visual information to patients who have implanted retinal prosthetic devices, the number of microelectrodes should be large. As the number of microelectrodes is increased, the dimensions of each microelectrode must be decreased, which in turn results in an increased microelectrode interface impedance and decreased injection current dynamic range. In order to improve the trade-off envelope between the number of microelectrodes and the current injection characteristics, a 3D microelectrode structure can be used as an alternative. In this paper, the electrical characteristics of 2D and 3D Au microelectrodes were investigated. In order to examine the effects of the structural difference, 2D and 3D Au microelectrodes with different base areas but similar effective surface areas were fabricated and evaluated. Interface impedances were measured and similar dynamic ranges were obtained for both 2D and 3D Au microelectrodes. These results indicate that more electrodes can be implemented in the same area if 3D designs are used. Furthermore, the 3D Au microelectrodes showed substantially enhanced electrical durability characteristics against over-injected stimulation currents, withstanding electrical currents that are much larger than the limit measured for 2D microelectrodes of similar area. This enhanced electrical durability property of 3D Au microelectrodes is a new finding in microelectrode research, and makes 3D microelectrodes very desirable devices. PMID:26091397

  1. Graphene microelectrode arrays for neural activity detection.

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaowei; Wu, Lei; Cheng, Ji; Huang, Shanluo; Cai, Qi; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate a method to fabricate graphene microelectrode arrays (MEAs) using a simple and inexpensive method to solve the problem of opaque electrode positions in traditional MEAs, while keeping good biocompatibility. To study the interface differences between graphene-electrolyte and gold-electrolyte, graphene and gold electrodes with a large area were fabricated. According to the simulation results of electrochemical impedances, the gold-electrolyte interface can be described as a classical double-layer structure, while the graphene-electrolyte interface can be explained by a modified double-layer theory. Furthermore, using graphene MEAs, we detected the neural activities of neurons dissociated from Wistar rats (embryonic day 18). The signal-to-noise ratio of the detected signal was 10.31 ± 1.2, which is comparable to those of MEAs made with other materials. The long-term stability of the MEAs is demonstrated by comparing differences in Bode diagrams taken before and after cell culturing.

  2. Electric potential microelectrode for studies of electrobiogeophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damgaard, Lars Riis; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2014-09-01

    Spatially separated electron donors and acceptors in sediment can be exploited by the so-called "cable bacteria." Electric potential microelectrodes (EPMs) were constructed to measure the electric fields that should appear when cable bacteria conduct electrons over centimeter distances. The EPMs were needle-shaped, shielded Ag/AgCl half-cells that were rendered insensitive to redox-active species in the environment. Tip diameters of 40 to 100 µm and signal resolution of approximately 10 μV were achieved. A test in marine sediments with active cable bacteria showed an electric potential increase by approximately 2 mV from the sediment-water interface to a depth of approximately 20 mm, in accordance with the location and direction of the electric currents estimated from oxygen, pH, and H2S microprofiles. The EPM also captured emergence and decay of electric diffusion potentials in the upper millimeters of artificial sediment in response to changes in ion concentrations in the overlying water. The results suggest that the EPM can be used to track electric current sources and sinks with submillimeter resolution in microbial, biogeochemical, and geophysical studies.

  3. Diminiode thermionic conversion with 111-iridium electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koeger, E. W.; Bair, V. L.; Morris, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary data indicating thermionic-conversion potentialities for a 111-iridium emitter and collector spaced 0.2 mm apart are presented. These results comprise output densities of current and of power as functions of voltage for three sets of emitter, collector, and reservoir temperatures: 1553, 944, 561 K; 1605, 898, 533 K; and 1656, 1028, 586 K. For the 1605 K evaluation, estimates produced work-function values of 2.22 eV for the emitter and 1.63 eV for the collector with a 2.0-eV barrier index (collector work function plus interelectrode voltage drop) corresponding to the maximum output of 5.5 W/sq cm at 0.24 volt. The current, voltage curve for the 1656 K 111-iridium diminiode yields a 6.2 W/sq cm maximum at 0.25 volt and is comparable with the 1700 K envelope for a diode with an etched-rhenium emitter and a 0.025-mm electrode gap made by TECO and evaluated by NASA.

  4. Ab initio phase diagram of iridium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burakovsky, L.; Burakovsky, N.; Cawkwell, M. J.; Preston, D. L.; Errandonea, D.; Simak, S. I.

    2016-09-01

    The phase diagram of iridium is investigated using the Z methodology. The Z methodology is a technique for phase diagram studies that combines the direct Z method for the computation of melting curves and the inverse Z method for the calculation of solid-solid phase boundaries. In the direct Z method, the solid phases along the melting curve are determined by comparing the solid-liquid equilibrium boundaries of candidate crystal structures. The inverse Z method involves quenching the liquid into the most stable solid phase at various temperatures and pressures to locate a solid-solid boundary. Although excellent agreement with the available experimental data (to ≲65 GPa) is found for the equation of state (EOS) of Ir, it is the third-order Birch-Murnaghan EOS with B0'=5 rather than the more widely accepted B0'=4 that describes our ab initio data to higher pressure (P ) . Our results suggest the existence of a random-stacking hexagonal close-packed structure of iridium at high P . We offer an explanation for the 14-layer hexagonal structure observed in experiments by Cerenius and Dubrovinsky.

  5. Superconductivity in Ca10(Ir4As8)(Fe2As2)5 with Square-Planar Coordination of Iridium

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Kazutaka; Mitsuoka, Daisuke; Takasuga, Masaya; Sugiyama, Yuki; Sugawara, Kento; Katayama, Naoyuki; Sawa, Hiroshi; Kubo, Hiroaki S.; Takamori, Kenta; Ichioka, Masanori; Fujii, Tatsuo; Mizokawa, Takashi; Nohara, Minoru

    2013-01-01

    We report the unprecedented square-planar coordination of iridium in the iron iridium arsenide Ca10(Ir4As8)(Fe2As2)5. This material experiences superconductivity at 16 K. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles band calculation suggest Ir(II) oxidation state, which yields electrically conductive Ir4As8 layers. Such metallic spacer layers are thought to enhance the interlayer coupling of Fe2As2, in which superconductivity emerges, thus offering a way to control the superconducting transition temperature. PMID:24173038

  6. Flexible white organic light-emitting diodes with a multi-metal electrode and a new combination of heteroleptic iridium compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho Won; Yang, Hyung Jin; Yi, Jae Eun; Kim, Young Kwan; Ha, Yunkyoung

    2015-01-01

    Transparent electrodes and heteroleptic iridium complexes have attracted tremendous scientific interest to organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) because they have an advantage in that transparent electrodes can replace indium-tin-oxide (ITO) electrode that has structural defects or diffuse indium into the organic layer. Moreover, heteroleptic iridium complexes exhibit high luminescence and quantum yield, as well as superior device performance. Therefore, we propose the use of flexible white OLEDs with semitransparent Ni/Ag/Ni multi-metal layers and a new combination of iridium complex as an orange phosphorescent emitter. We demonstrate that flexible white OLEDs with ITO-free electrodes and new orange phosphorescent emitters have the potential of stable electrical and optical characteristics.

  7. High activity, high yield tin modified platinum-iridium catalysts, and reforming process utilizing such catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, W.C. Jr.; Swan, G.A. III; Boyle, J.P.

    1993-06-22

    A process is described for improving the octane quality of a naphtha which comprises reforming said naphtha at reforming conditions wherein said reforming conditions are defined as follows: over a catalyst which includes from about 0.1 percent to about 1.0 percent platinum, from about 0.1 percent to about 1.0 percent iridium, and from about 0.02 percent to about 0.4 percent tin, wherein each of said metals is composited with and uniformly dispersed throughout an inorganic oxide support.

  8. Preparation of boron doped diamond modified by iridium for electroreduction of carbon dioxide (CO2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichzan, A. M.; Gunlazuardi, J.; Ivandini, T. A.

    2017-04-01

    Electroreduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) at iridium oxide-modified boron-doped diamond (IrOx-BDD) electrodes in aqueous electrolytes was studied by voltammetric method. The aim of this study was to find out the catalytic effect of IrOx to produce fine chemicals contained of two or more carbon atoms (for example acetic acid) in high percentage. Characterization using FE-SEM and XPS indicated that IrO2 can be deposited at BDD electrode, whereas characterization using cyclic voltammetry indicated that the electrode was applicable to be used as working electrode for CO2 electroreduction.

  9. Surface properties of pulsed laser deposited Ir, Rh, and Ir 0.9Rh 0.1 thin films for use as microelectrode arrays in electroanalytical heavy metal trace sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Drogoff, B.; El Khakani, M. A.; Silva, P. R. M.; Chaker, M.; Ross, G. G.

    1999-11-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of iridium, rhodium, and Ir 0.9Rh 0.1 thin films onto a-SiC:H-coated silicon substrates for use in heavy metal sensors has been achieved by ablating iridium and/or rhodium targets with a KrF excimer laser. The deposited films are polycrystalline and exhibited very smooth surfaces with an average roughness value ( Ra) of ˜1 nm. The wettability by mercury of their surface was investigated by means of the contact angle measurement technique, and compared to that of Ag and Pt films. The PLD films (whether Ir, Rh, or Ir 0.9Rh 0.1) were found to present an almost identical Hg-wetting behavior, which is characterized by a high static contact angle of 132±2°. Moreover, in contrast to the cases of Pt or Ag films, where amalgamation with Hg rapidly occurs during the contact angle measurements, no evident interaction of Hg with the surface of the PLD films was observed. Microelectrode arrays of each of the three films (Ir, Rh and Ir 0.9Rh 0.1) were fabricated and used as a conducting base onto which Hg microdrops are electroplated. Reproducible and uniform Hg deposits on the microelectrode arrays were obtained. The electroanalytical performance of these Hg-electroplated microelectrode arrays based sensors was then evaluated by means of Square Wave Anodic Stripping Voltammetry (SWASV), in synthetic solutions containing Zn, Cd and Pb ion traces. Over a concentration range as wide as 0.2-20 ppb, the detected signals are found to exhibit a strong linear correlation with ion concentration. For a preconcentration time of only 5 min, detection limits as low as 0.2 ppb for both Cd and Pb, and 0.5 ppb for Zn were achieved.

  10. Water reduction systems associated with homoleptic cyclometalated iridium complexes of various 2-phenylpyridines.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yong-Jun; Yu, Zhen-Tao; Cai, Jian-Guang; Zheng, Chao; Huang, Wei; Zou, Zhi-Gang

    2013-08-01

    The photoreduction of water to hydrogen represents a promising method for generating sustainable clean fuel. The molecular processes of this photoreduction require an effective light absorber, such as the ruthenium polybipyridine complex, to collect and convert the solar energy into a usable chemical form. In the search for a highly active and stable photosensitizer (PS), iridium complexes are attractive because of their desirable photophysical characteristics. Herein, a series of homoleptic tris-cyclometalated iridium complexes, based on different 2-phenylpyridine ligands, were utilized as PSs in photocatalytic systems for hydrogen production with [Rh(dtb-bpy)3 ](PF6 )3 (dtb-bpy=4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-dipyridyl) serving as the water reduction catalyst (WRC) and triethanolamine (TEOA) as the electron donor. The photophysical and electrochemical properties of these complexes were systematically investigated. The excited state of neutral iridium complexes (PS*) could not be quenched by using TEOA as an electron donor, but they could be quenched by using [Rh(dtb-bpy)3 ](PF6 )3 as an electron acceptor, indicating that the PS* quenching pathway in catalytic reactions was most likely an oxidative quenching process. A set of long-lived and highly active systems for hydrogen evolution were obtained in Ir(III) -Rh(III) -TEOA systems. These systems maintained their activity for more than 72 h with visible-light irradiation, and the total turnover number was up to 3040. Comparative studies indicated that the photocatalytic performance of these homoleptic tris-cyclometalated iridium compounds was superior to that of the cationic iridium complex [Ir(ppy)2 (bpy)](PF6 ) (ppy=2-phenylpyridine, bpy=2,2'-dipyridyl) (4), which was used as a reference. The significant increase in the photocatalytic efficiencies was in part attributed to the higher photostability of the neutral Ir(III) complexes. This assumption was supported by their different coordination modes, photophysical, and

  11. High-rate in-plane micro-supercapacitors scribed onto photo paper using in situ femtolaser-reduced graphene oxide/Au nanoparticle microelectrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruozhou; Peng, Rui; Tumuluri, Uma; Wu, Zili; Hu, Anming; Kihm, K. D.; Bridges, D.; Zhang, T.; Compagnini, G.; Feng, Z.; Hu, A.

    2016-02-11

    Direct laser-reduction of graphene oxide (GO), as a lithography-free approach, has been proven effective in manufacturing in-plane micro-supercapacitors (MSCs) with fast ion diffusion. However, the power density and the charge/discharge rate are still limited by the relatively low conductivity of electrodes. Here, we report a facile approach by exploiting femtolaser in situ reduction of the hydrated GO and chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) nanocomposite simultaneously, which incorporates both the patterning of rGO electrodes and the fabrication of Au current collectors in a single step. These flexible MSCs boast achievements of one-hundred fold increase in electrode conductivities of up to 1.1 × 106 S m–1, which provide superior rate capability (50% for the charging rate increase from 0.1 V s–1 to 100 V s–1), sufficiently high frequency responses (362 Hz, 2.76 ms time constant), and large specific capacitances of 0.77 mF cm–2 (17.2 F cm–3 for volumetric capacitance) at 1 V s–1, and 0.46 mF cm–2 (10.2 F cm–3) at 100 V s–1. The use of photo paper substrates enables the flexibility of this fabrication protocol. Moreover, proof-of-concept 3D MSCs are demonstrated with enhanced areal capacitance (up to 3.84 mF cm–2 at 1 V s–1) while keeping high rate capabilities. As a result, this prototype of all solid-state MSCs demonstrates the broad range of potentials of thin-film based energy storage device applications for flexible, portable, and wearable electronic devices that require a fast charge/discharge rate and high power density.

  12. Monoalkylation of acetonitrile by primary alcohols catalyzed by iridium complexes.

    PubMed

    Anxionnat, Bruno; Pardo, Domingo Gomez; Ricci, Gino; Cossy, Janine

    2011-08-05

    The monoalkylation of acetonitrile by primary alcohols was achieved in a one-pot sequence in the presence of iridium catalysts. A diversity of nitriles has been obtained from aryl- and alkyl-methanols in excellent yield.

  13. Iridium abundances across the ordovician-silurian stratotype.

    PubMed

    Wilde, P; Berry, W B; Quinby-Hunt, M S; Orth, C J; Quintana, L R; Gilmore, J S

    1986-07-18

    Chemostratigraphic analyses in the Ordovician-Silurian boundary stratotype section, bracketing a major extinction event in the graptolitic shale section at Dob's Linn, Scotland, show persistently high iridium concentrations of 0.050 to 0.250 parts per billion. There is no iridiumn concentration spike in the boundary interval or elsewhere in the 13 graptolite zones examined encompassing about 20 million years. Iridium correlated with chromium, both elements showing a gradual decrease with time into the middle part of the Lower Silurian. The chromium-iridium ratio averages about 10(6). Paleogeographic and geologic reconstructions coupled with the occurrence of ophiolites and other deep crustal rocks in the source area suggest that the high iridium and chromium concentrations observed in the shales result from terrestrial erosion of exposed upper mantle ultramafic rocks rather than from a cataclysmic extraterrestrial event.

  14. Acute radiodermatitis from occupational exposure to iridium 192

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J.; Rosen, T. )

    1989-12-01

    Industrial radiography using the man-made radioisotope iridium 192 is commonplace in the southern states. Despite established procedures and safeguards, accidental exposure may result in typical acute radiodermatitis. We have presented a clinical example of this phenomenon.9 references.

  15. A new moving-coil microelectrode puller.

    PubMed

    Ensor, D R

    1979-03-01

    This paper describes an improved electrode puller for the manufacture of glass microelectrodes or micropipettes. The instrument resembles a conventional horizontal two-stage, solenoid-powered electrode puller but the pull is now developed by a light moving-coil and a fixed permanent magnet, using the principle of the moving-coil loudspeaker. In a conventional puller the force is generated by a solenoid with a massive moving-iron core. In this new puller the moving-coil solenoid responds much more rapidly to changing currents because of its greatly reduced inductance, and a substantial reduction in mass to 25 g, gives more acceleration from a comparable force. The sudden discharge of a capacitor bank through the coil accelerates the glass quickly during the last stage of the pull. This rapid acceleration is of importance in the formation of good electrodes with fine tips. For the prototype, an electronic control unit was constructed which allows the parameters necessary for the manufacture of electrodes to be set and regulated accurately and repeatedly, so that series of electrodes of constant shapes can be made. The length of the electrode shank may be predetermined over a wide range and tip diameters down to 0.08 micron have already been measured. The angle of the taper that supports the tip may be varied from less than 1 to over 6 degrees. The mechanical design of the instrument is comparatively simple, as it has only one moving part, while the relative complexity of the electronic control section should not present any manufacturing difficulties. Although this puller has been used mainly to make single-barrel fine electrodes from borosilicate glass, it is adaptable for other purposes. The extent of the control over the shape of the shank of the electrode renders it particularly suitable for the manufacture of composite, ion-sensitive electrodes.

  16. Dielectrophoresis of micro/nano particles using curved microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Tovar-Lopez, Francisco J.; Baratchi, Sara; Zhang, Chen; Kayani, Aminuddin A.; Chrimes, Adam F.; Nahavandi, Saeid; Wlodkowic, Donald; Mitchell, Arnan; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2011-12-01

    Dielectrophoresis, the induced motion of polarisable particles in non-homogenous electric field, has been proven as a versatile mechanism to transport, immobilise, sort and characterise micro/nano scale particle in microfluidic platforms. The performance of dielectrophoretic (DEP) systems depend on two parameters: the configuration of microelectrodes designed to produce the DEP force and the operating strategies devised to employ this force in such processes. This work summarises the unique features of curved microelectrodes for the DEP manipulation of target particles in microfluidic systems. The curved microelectrodes demonstrate exceptional capabilities including (i) creating strong electric fields over a large portion of their structure, (ii) minimising electro-thermal vortices and undesired disturbances at their tips, (iii) covering the entire width of the microchannel influencing all passing particles, and (iv) providing a large trapping area at their entrance region, as evidenced by extensive numerical and experimental analyses. These microelectrodes have been successfully applied for a variety of engineering and biomedical applications including (i) sorting and trapping model polystyrene particles based on their dimensions, (ii) patterning carbon nanotubes to trap low-conductive particles, (iii) sorting live and dead cells based on their dielectric properties, (iv) real-time analysis of drug-induced cell death, and (v) interfacing tumour cells with environmental scanning electron microscopy to study their morphological properties. The DEP systems based on curved microelectrodes have a great potential to be integrated with the future lab-on-achip systems.

  17. GPS/GNSS Interference from Iridium Data Transmitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, H. T.; Blume, F.; Estey, L.; White, S.

    2011-12-01

    The Iridium satellite communication system broadcasts in the 1610 to 1626.5 MHz band. The L1 frequencies broadcast by GPS, Galileo and GLONASS satellites are 1575.42 MHz, 1575.42 MHz and 1602 MHz + n × 0.5625 MHz, respectively (each GLONASS satellite uses a unique frequency). The proximity of the Iridium frequency band with the L1 frequencies of the GPS, Galileo and GLONASS systems leaves GNSS receivers susceptible to interference from Iridium data transmissions. Interference from Iridium transmissions can cause cycle slips and loss of lock on the carrier and code phases, thereby degrading the quality of GNSS observations and position estimates. In 2008, UNAVCO staff members observed that the percent of slips vs. the number of observations increased as the distance between a GPS choke ring antenna (TRM29659.00) and an Iridium antenna decreased. From those observations they suggested that Iridium antennas and GPS antennas should be separated by >30 m to minimize cycle slips caused by the interference from Iridium data transmissions. A second test conducted in 2009 using a newer Trimble GNSS choke ring antenna (TRM59800.00) showed similar results to the previous test despite the wider frequency range of the newer antenna. More recent testing conducted to investigate the response of new receiver models to iridium transmissions has shown that many GNSS enabled models, when combined with GNSS enabled antennas, have increased sensitivity to interference when compared to older GPS-only models. The broader frequency spectrum of the Low Noise Amplifiers (LNA) installed in many newer GNSS antennas can increase the impact of near-band RF interference on tracking performance. Our testing has shown that the quality of data collected at sites collocated with iridium communications is highly degraded for antenna separations exceeding 100m. Using older GPS antenna models (e.g. TRM29659.00) with newer GNSS enabled receivers can reduce this effect. To mitigate the effects that

  18. Iridium{reg_sign} worldwide personal communication system

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, J.

    1997-01-01

    The IRIDIUM system is a personal worldwide communication system designed to support portable, low power subscriber units through the use of a constellation of satellites in low earth polar orbit. The satellites are networked together to form a system which provides continuous line-of-sight communications between the IRIDIUM system and any point within 30 km of the earth{close_quote}s surface. The system architecture and operation are described. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Synthesis and characterization of nitrides of iridium and palladiums

    SciTech Connect

    Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; Sadigh, B.; Zaug, J.M.; Aberg, D.; Meng, Yue; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2008-08-14

    We describe the synthesis of nitrides of iridium and palladium using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. We have used the in situ techniques of x-ray powder diffraction and Raman scattering to characterize these compounds and have compared our experimental findings where possible to the results of first-principles theoretical calculations. We suggest that palladium nitride is isostructural with pyrite, while iridium nitride has a monoclinic symmetry and is isostructural with baddeleyite.

  20. Enabling long term monitoring of dopamine using dimensionally stable ultrananocrystalline diamond microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Gaurab; Tan, Chao; Siddiqui, Shabnam; Arumugam, Prabhu U.

    2016-09-01

    Chronic dopamine (DA) monitoring is a critical enabling technology to identify the neural basis of human behavior. Carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFM), the current gold standard electrode for in vivo fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), rapidly loses sensitivity due to surface fouling during chronic neural testing. Periodic voltage excursions at elevated anodic potentials regenerate fouled CFM surfaces but they also chemically degrade the CFM surfaces. Here, we compare the dimensional stability of 150 μm boron-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond (BDUNCD) microelectrodes in 1X PBS during ‘electrochemical cleaning’ with a similar-sized CFM. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy confirm the exceptional dimensional stability of BDUNCD after 40 h of FSCV cycling (∼8 million cycles). The fitting of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data to an appropriate circuit model shows a 2x increase in charge transfer resistance and an additional RC element, which suggests oxidation of BDUNCD electrode surface. This could have likely increased the DA oxidation potential by ∼34% to +308 mV. A 2x increase in BDUNCD grain capacitance and a negligible change in grain boundary impedance suggests regeneration of grains and the exposure of new grain boundaries, respectively. Overall, DA voltammogram signals were reduced by only ∼20%. In contrast, the CFM is completely etched with a ∼90% reduction in the DA signal using the same cleaning conditions. Thus, BDUNCD provides a robust electrode surface that is amenable to repeated and aggressive cleaning which could be used for chronic DA sensing.

  1. Solventless synthesis of iridium(0) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redón, R.; Ramírez-Crescencio, F.; Fernández-Osorio, A. L.

    2011-11-01

    In this article, we present the results of a solvent-free synthesis of iridium(0) nanoparticles, both water washed and unwashed. IrCl3 and NaBH4, as starting materials, are mixed using an agate mortar and milled for 15 min until a black powder is obtained, which is heated in a nitrogen-controlled atmosphere oven at 200 °C for 2 h. If the product of the reaction is not washed before heating, NaBH4 and IrO2 impurities are observed. On the other hand, if the reaction product is washed before the heating, the obtained powder is free of impurities. We study the effect of the variation in reducing agent concentration and the annealing temperature used after the reaction. In all cases, the calculated particle size is less than 10 nm.

  2. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectrum of Iridium Monophosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, H. F.; Liu, Anwen; Cheung, A. S.-C.

    2009-06-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectrum of IrP in the spectral region between 380-600 nm has been studied. Reacting laser ablated iridium atoms with 1% PH_3 seeded in argon produced the IrP molecule. A few vibronic transitions have been recorded. Preliminary analysis of the rotational structure indicated that these vibronic bands are with Ω^' = 0 and Ω^'' = 0 and is likely to be ^{1}Σ - X ^{1}Σ transition. Vibrational separation of the excited state is estimated to be about 442 cm^{-1}. The ground state bond length is determined to be 1.766 Å. This work represents the first experimental investigation of the spectra of IrP.

  3. Steric and Electronic Influence of Aryl Isocyanides on the Properties of Iridium(III) Cyclometalates.

    PubMed

    Maity, Ayan; Le, Linh Q; Zhu, Zhuan; Bao, Jiming; Teets, Thomas S

    2016-03-07

    Cyclometalated iridium complexes with efficient phosphorescence and good electrochemical stability are important candidates for optoelectronic devices. Isocyanide ligands are strong-field ligands: when attached to transition metals, they impart larger HOMO-LUMO energy gaps, engender higher oxidative stability at the metal center, and support rugged organometallic complexes. Aryl isocyanides offer more versatile steric and electronic control by selective substitution at the aryl ring periphery. Despite a few reports of alkyl isocyanide of cyclometalated iridium(III), detailed studies on analogous aryl isocyanide complexes are scant. We report the synthesis, photophysical properties, and electrochemical properties of 11 new luminescent cationic biscyclometalated bis(aryl isocyanide)iridium(III) complexes. Three different aryl isocyanides--2,6-dimethylphenyl isocyanide (CNAr(dmp)), 2,6-diisopropylphenyl isocyanide (CNAr(dipp)), and 2-naphthyl isocyanide (CNAr(nap))--were combined with four cyclometalating ligands with differential π-π* energies--2-phenylpyridine (ppy), 2,4-difluorophenylpyridine (F2ppy), 2-benzothienylpyridine (btp), and 2-phenylbenzothiazole (bt). Five of them were crystallographically characterized. All new complexes show wide redox windows, with reduction potentials falling in a narrow range of -2.02 to -2.37 V and oxidation potentials spanning a wider range of 0.97-1.48 V. Efficient structured emission spans from the blue region for [(F2ppy)2Ir(CNAr)2]PF6 to the orange region for [(btp)2Ir(CNAr)2]PF6, demonstrating that isocyanide ligands can support redox-stable luminescent complexes with a range of emission colors. Emission quantum yields were generally high, reaching a maximum of 0.37 for two complexes, whereas btp-ligated complexes had quantum yields below 1%. The structure of the CNAr ligand has a minimal effect on the photophysical properties, which are shown to arise from ligand-centered excited states with very little contribution from

  4. Monochloramine Microelectrode for In-Situ Application Within Chloraminated Distribution System Biofilm

    EPA Science Inventory

    A monochloramine microelectrode with a tip size between 5 and 15 μm and using platinum wire was successfully designed, fabricated and characterized for in-situ monochloramine measurement within chloraminated distribution system biofilm. The monochloramine microelectrode showed s...

  5. Characterization and Application of a Chlorine Microelectrode for Measuring Monochloramine within a Biofilm

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine microelectrodes with tip sizes of 5-15 μm were developed and used to measure biofilm monochloramine penetration profiles. The chlorine microelectrode showed response to total chlorine, including free chlorine, monochloramine, and dichloramine under various conditions. ...

  6. Monochloramine Microelectrode for In-Situ Application Within Chloraminated Distribution System Biofilm

    EPA Science Inventory

    A monochloramine microelectrode with a tip size between 5 and 15 μm and using platinum wire was successfully designed, fabricated and characterized for in-situ monochloramine measurement within chloraminated distribution system biofilm. The monochloramine microelectrode showed s...

  7. Characterization and Application of a Chlorine Microelectrode for Measuring Monochloramine within a Biofilm

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorine microelectrodes with tip sizes of 5-15 μm were developed and used to measure biofilm monochloramine penetration profiles. The chlorine microelectrode showed response to total chlorine, including free chlorine, monochloramine, and dichloramine under various conditions. ...

  8. PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith

    2008-01-01

    The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

  9. Modeling and Simulation of Microelectrode-Retina Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Beckerman, M

    2002-11-30

    The goal of the retinal prosthesis project is the development of an implantable microelectrode array that can be used to supply visually-driven electrical input to cells in the retina, bypassing nonfunctional rod and cone cells, thereby restoring vision to blind individuals. This goal will be achieved through the study of the fundamentals of electrical engineering, vision research, and biomedical engineering with the aim of acquiring the knowledge needed to engineer a high-density microelectrode-tissue hybrid sensor that will restore vision to millions of blind persons. The modeling and simulation task within this project is intended to address the question how best to stimulate, and communicate with, cells in the retina using implanted microelectrodes.

  10. Signal distortion from microelectrodes in clinical EEG acquisition systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stacey, William C.; Kellis, Spencer; Patel, Paras R.; Greger, Bradley; Butson, Christopher R.

    2012-10-01

    Many centers are now using high-density microelectrodes during traditional intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) both for research and clinical purposes. These microelectrodes are FDA-approved and integrate into clinical EEG acquisition systems. However, the electrical characteristics of these electrodes are poorly described and clinical systems were not designed to use them; thus, it is possible that this shift into clinical practice could have unintended consequences. In this study, we characterized the impedance of over 100 commercial macro- and microelectrodes using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to determine how electrode properties could affect signal acquisition and interpretation. The EIS data were combined with the published specifications of several commercial EEG systems to design digital filters that mimic the behavior of the electrodes and amplifiers. These filters were used to analyze simulated brain signals that contain a mixture of characteristic features commonly observed in iEEG. Each output was then processed with several common quantitative EEG measurements. Our results show that traditional macroelectrodes had low impedances and produced negligible distortion of the original signal. Brain tissue and electrical wiring also had negligible filtering effects. However, microelectrode impedances were much higher and more variable than the macroelectrodes. When connected to clinical amplifiers, higher impedance electrodes produced considerable distortion of the signal at low frequencies (<60 Hz), which caused significant changes in amplitude, phase, variance and spectral band power. In contrast, there were only minimal changes to the signal content for frequencies above 100 Hz. In order to minimize distortion with microelectrodes, we determined that an acquisition system should have an input impedance of at least 1 GΩ, which is much higher than most clinical systems. These results show that it is critical to account for variations

  11. Signal distortion from microelectrodes in clinical EEG acquisition systems

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, William C.; Kellis, Spencer; Patel, Paras R.; Greger, Bradley; Butson, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Many centers are now using high-density microelectrodes during traditional intracranial EEG (iEEG) both for research and clinical purposes. These microelectrodes are FDA-approved and integrate into clinical EEG acquisition systems. However, the electrical characteristics of these electrodes are poorly described and clinical systems were not designed to use them; thus it is possible that this shift into clinical practice could have unintended consequences. In this study, we characterized the impedance of over 100 commercial macro- and microelectrodes using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to determine how electrode properties could affect signal acquisition and interpretation. The EIS data were combined with the published specifications of several commercial EEG systems to design digital filters that mimic the behavior of the electrodes and amplifiers. These filters were used to analyze simulated brain signals that contain a mixture of characteristic features commonly observed in iEEG. Each output was then processed with several common quantitative EEG measurements. Our results show that traditional macroelectrodes had low impedances and produced negligible distortion of the original signal. Brain tissue and electrical wiring also had negligible filtering effects. However, microelectrode impedances were much higher and more variable than the macroelectrodes. When connected to clinical amplifiers, higher impedance electrodes produced considerable distortion of the signal at low frequencies (< 60 Hz), which caused significant changes in amplitude, phase, variance, and spectral band power. In contrast, there were only minimal changes to the signal content for frequencies above 100 Hz. In order to minimize distortion with microelectrodes, we determined that an acquisition system should have an input impedance of at least 1 GΩ, which is much higher than most clinical systems. These results show that it is critical to account for variations in impedance when

  12. In situ observation of reactive oxygen species forming on oxygen-evolving iridium surfaces† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc04622c Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Verena; Velasco Vélez, Juan J.; Piccinin, Simone; Hävecker, Michael; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Water splitting performed in acidic media relies on the exceptional performance of iridium-based materials to catalyze the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). In the present work, we use in situ X-ray photoemission and absorption spectroscopy to resolve the long-standing debate about surface species present in iridium-based catalysts during the OER. We find that the surface of an initially metallic iridium model electrode converts into a mixed-valent, conductive iridium oxide matrix during the OER, which contains OII– and electrophilic OI– species. We observe a positive correlation between the OI– concentration and the evolved oxygen, suggesting that these electrophilic oxygen sites may be involved in catalyzing the OER. We can understand this observation by analogy with photosystem II; their electrophilicity renders the OI– species active in O–O bond formation, i.e. the likely potential- and rate-determining step of the OER. The ability of amorphous iridium oxyhydroxides to easily host such reactive, electrophilic species can explain their superior performance when compared to plain iridium metal or crystalline rutile-type IrO2. PMID:28507666

  13. Mobility of iridium in terrestrial environments: Implications for the interpretation of impact-related mass-extinctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Peinado, F. J.; Rodríguez-Tovar, F. J.

    2010-08-01

    Traditionally, iridium has been considered an element of low mobility, but its behavior is still debated. Ir concentration in a soil affected by a catastrophic mining spill in 1998 that covered the soil with a layer of tailings offers the opportunity to analyse an exceptional Ir-bearing horizon 10 years after deposition. This has enabled comparisons with the values of past Ir-bearing horizons associated to impact-related mass-extinction events. Iridium concentration in the tailings (0.349 ppm) was 5-fold higher than the anomaly in the K-Pg at The Moody Creek Mine section (the highest values obtained from terrestrial sections). The oxidative weathering of the tailings caused the release of Ir and infiltration into the soil. Iridium distribution in depth indicates redistribution throughout the profile in relation to the change in the physico-chemical properties of the soil. With regard to the background concentration in the soil (0.056 ppm), anomalous values of Ir (0.129 ppm) can be detected to 11 cm below the layer of tailings. The correlation analysis between the Ir concentration and the main properties and constituents of the soils indicated a significant correlation with sulfur, iron, clay content, and pH. Selective extractions were made to study the forms in which Ir can be mobilized in the soil. The residual/insoluble fraction was >90% of the total Ir concentration in soil. Soluble-in-water concentration of Ir (1.5% of total) was detected in the uppermost 2-3 cm of the soil, which were directly affected by the leaching of acidic waters coming from the oxidation of the pyrite tailings. Iridium retention in the affected part of the soil reached 9% of the total Ir concentration; this retention could be related to the amorphous iron forms dissolved by the oxalic-oxalate extraction. However, according to our research, original Ir abundance could be secondarily modified, and then a direct analysis of the iridium values recorded in sediments could induce

  14. Microelectrode voltammetry of multi-electron transfers complicated by coupled chemical equilibria: a general theory for the extended square scheme.

    PubMed

    Laborda, Eduardo; Gómez-Gil, José María; Molina, Angela

    2017-06-28

    A very general and simple theoretical solution is presented for the current-potential-time response of reversible multi-electron transfer processes complicated by homogeneous chemical equilibria (the so-called extended square scheme). The expressions presented here are applicable regardless of the number of electrons transferred and coupled chemical processes, and they are particularized for a wide variety of microelectrode geometries. The voltammetric response of very different systems presenting multi-electron transfers is considered for the most widely-used techniques (namely, cyclic voltammetry, square wave voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry and steady state voltammetry), studying the influence of the microelectrode geometry and the number and thermodynamics of the (electro)chemical steps. Most appropriate techniques and procedures for the determination of the 'interaction' between successive transfers are discussed. Special attention is paid to those situations where homogeneous chemical processes, such as protonation, complexation or ion association, affect the electrochemical behaviour of the system by different stabilization of the oxidation states.

  15. High Temporal Resolution Measurements of Dopamine with Carbon Nanotube Yarn Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) can detect small changes in dopamine concentration; however, measurements are typically limited to scan repetition frequencies of 10 Hz. Dopamine oxidation at carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) is dependent on dopamine adsorption, and increasing the frequency of FSCV scan repetitions decreases the oxidation current, because the time for adsorption is decreased. Using a commercially available carbon nanotube yarn, we characterized carbon nanotube yarn microelectrodes (CNTYMEs) for high-speed measurements with FSCV. For dopamine, CNTYMEs have a significantly lower ΔEp than CFMEs, a limit of detection of 10 ± 0.8 nM, and a linear response to 25 μM. Unlike CFMEs, the oxidation current of dopamine at CNTYMEs is independent of scan repetition frequency. At a scan rate of 2000 V/s, dopamine can be detected, without any loss in sensitivity, with scan frequencies up to 500 Hz, resulting in a temporal response that is four times faster than CFMEs. While the oxidation current is adsorption-controlled at both CFMEs and CNTYMEs, the adsorption and desorption kinetics differ. The desorption coefficient of dopamine-o-quinone (DOQ), the oxidation product of dopamine, is an order of magnitude larger than that of dopamine at CFMEs; thus, DOQ desorbs from the electrode and can diffuse away. At CNTYMEs, the rates of desorption for dopamine and dopamine-o-quinone are about equal, resulting in current that is independent of scan repetition frequency. Thus, there is no compromise with CNTYMEs: high sensitivity, high sampling frequency, and high temporal resolution can be achieved simultaneously. Therefore, CNTYMEs are attractive for high-speed applications. PMID:24832571

  16. High temporal resolution measurements of dopamine with carbon nanotube yarn microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Christopher B; Ivanov, Ilia N; Nguyen, Michael D; Zestos, Alexander G; Venton, B Jill

    2014-06-17

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) can detect small changes in dopamine concentration; however, measurements are typically limited to scan repetition frequencies of 10 Hz. Dopamine oxidation at carbon-fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) is dependent on dopamine adsorption, and increasing the frequency of FSCV scan repetitions decreases the oxidation current, because the time for adsorption is decreased. Using a commercially available carbon nanotube yarn, we characterized carbon nanotube yarn microelectrodes (CNTYMEs) for high-speed measurements with FSCV. For dopamine, CNTYMEs have a significantly lower ΔEp than CFMEs, a limit of detection of 10 ± 0.8 nM, and a linear response to 25 μM. Unlike CFMEs, the oxidation current of dopamine at CNTYMEs is independent of scan repetition frequency. At a scan rate of 2000 V/s, dopamine can be detected, without any loss in sensitivity, with scan frequencies up to 500 Hz, resulting in a temporal response that is four times faster than CFMEs. While the oxidation current is adsorption-controlled at both CFMEs and CNTYMEs, the adsorption and desorption kinetics differ. The desorption coefficient of dopamine-o-quinone (DOQ), the oxidation product of dopamine, is an order of magnitude larger than that of dopamine at CFMEs; thus, DOQ desorbs from the electrode and can diffuse away. At CNTYMEs, the rates of desorption for dopamine and dopamine-o-quinone are about equal, resulting in current that is independent of scan repetition frequency. Thus, there is no compromise with CNTYMEs: high sensitivity, high sampling frequency, and high temporal resolution can be achieved simultaneously. Therefore, CNTYMEs are attractive for high-speed applications.

  17. IR-doped ruthenium oxide catalyst for oxygen evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for preparing a metal-doped ruthenium oxide material by heating a mixture of a doping metal and a source of ruthenium under an inert atmosphere. In some embodiments, the doping metal is in the form of iridium black or lead powder, and the source of ruthenium is a powdered ruthenium oxide. An iridium-doped or lead-doped ruthenium oxide material can perform as an oxygen evolution catalyst and can be fabricated into electrodes for electrolysis cells.

  18. Iridium NEXT: A Global access for your sensor needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, O. P.; Fish, C. S.

    2010-12-01

    The operational Iridium constellation is comprised of 66 satellites, used to primarily provide worldwide voice and data coverage to satellite phones, pagers and integrated transceivers. The satellites are in low Earth orbit at 781 km and inclination of 86.4 deg, resulting in unprecedented 24/7 coverage and real-time visibility of the entire globe. Recently, through funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), Iridium has been utilized by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), with help from The Boeing Company, as an infrastructure for a comprehensive network for space environment measurements. Known as the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE), the Iridium-based system provides real-time magnetic field measurements using the satellites as part of a new observation network to forecast weather in space. In February 2007, Iridium announced Iridium NEXT, a novel design for a second-generation satellite constellation. Anticipated to begin launching in 2015, Iridium NEXT will maintain the existing Iridium constellation architecture of 66 cross-linked satellite LEO covering 100 percent of the globe. In the spirit of AMPERE, for commercial, government, and scientific organizations Iridium NEXT also plans to offer new earth and space observation opportunities through hosted hosted payloads on the 66 Iridium NEXT satellite network. To provide seamless support and access to this latest innovation in payload transportation, Iridium NEXT has teamed with Space Dynamics Laboratory - Utah State University which has delivered thousands of successful sensors and subsystems for over 400 space borne and aircraf based payloads. One such innovation called SensorPOD will offer unique benefits such as unprecedented spatial and temporal coverage, real-time relay of data to and from up to 5 Kg payloads in space, and access to space at a fraction of the cost of a dedicated missions such as 3U or larger Cubesats. In this

  19. Activation of surface oxygen sites on an iridium-based model catalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaud, Alexis; Demortiere, Arnaud; Saubanere, Matthieu; Dachraoui, Walid; Duchamp, Martial; Doublet, Marie-Liesse; Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is of prime importance in multiple energy storage devices; however, deeper mechanistic understanding is required to design enhanced electrocatalysts for the reaction. Current understanding of the OER mechanism based on oxygen adsorption on a metallic surface site fails to fully explain the activity of iridium and ruthenium oxide surfaces, and the drastic surface reconstruction observed for the most active OER catalysts. Here we demonstrate, using La2LiIrO6 as a model catalyst, that the exceptionally high activity found for Ir-based catalysts arises from the formation of active surface oxygen atoms that act as electrophilic centres for water to react. Moreover, with the help of transmission electron microscopy, we observe drastic surface reconstruction and iridium migration from the bulk to the surface. Therefore, we establish a correlation between surface activity and surface stability for OER catalysts that is rooted in the formation of surface reactive oxygen.

  20. Iridium complexes demonstrating broadband emission through controlled geometric distortion and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Li, Jian; Turner, Eric

    2016-04-12

    Iridium compounds and their uses are disclosed herein. For example, carbazole containing iridium compounds are disclosed. The compounds are useful in many devices, including, but not limited to, electroluminescent devices.

  1. DETERMINATION OF HETEROGENEOUS ELECTRON TRANSFER RATE CONSTANTS AT MICROFABRICATED IRIDIUM ELECTRODES. (R825511C022)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been an increasing use of both solid metal and microfabricated iridium electrodes as substrates for various types of electroanalysis. However, investigations to determine heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants on iridium, especially at an electron beam evapor...

  2. DETERMINATION OF HETEROGENEOUS ELECTRON TRANSFER RATE CONSTANTS AT MICROFABRICATED IRIDIUM ELECTRODES. (R825511C022)

    EPA Science Inventory

    There has been an increasing use of both solid metal and microfabricated iridium electrodes as substrates for various types of electroanalysis. However, investigations to determine heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants on iridium, especially at an electron beam evapor...

  3. Iridium complexes containing mesoionic C donors: selective C(sp3)-H versus C(sp2)-H bond activation, reactivity towards acids and bases, and catalytic oxidation of silanes and water.

    PubMed

    Petronilho, Ana; Woods, James A; Mueller-Bunz, Helge; Bernhard, Stefan; Albrecht, Martin

    2014-11-24

    Metalation of a C2-methylated pyridylimidazolium salt with [IrCp*Cl2]2 affords either an ylidic complex, resulting from C(sp(3))-H bond activation of the C2-bound CH3 group if the metalation is performed in the presence of a base, such as AgO2 or Na2CO3, or a mesoionic complex via cyclometalation and thermally induced heterocyclic C(sp(2))-H bond activation, if the reaction is performed in the absence of a base. Similar cyclometalation and complex formation via C(sp(2))-H bond activation is observed when the heterocyclic ligand precursor consists of the analogous pyridyltriazolium salt, that is, when the metal bonding at the C2 position is blocked by a nitrogen rather than a methyl substituent. Despite the strongly mesoionic character of both the imidazolylidene and the triazolylidene, the former reacts rapidly with D(+) and undergoes isotope exchange at the heterocyclic C5 position, whereas the triazolylidene ligand is stable and only undergoes H/D exchange under basic conditions, where the imidazolylidene is essentially unreactive. The high stability of the Ir-C bond in aqueous solution over a broad pH range was exploited in catalytic water oxidation and silane oxidation. The catalytic hydrosilylation of ketones proceeds with turnover frequencies as high as 6,000 h(-1) with both the imidazolylidene and the triazolylidene system, whereas water oxidation is enhanced by the stronger donor properties of the imidazol-4-ylidene ligands and is more than three times faster than with the triazolylidene analogue. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Highly Sensitive and Long Term Stable Electrochemical Microelectrodes for Implantable Glucose Monitoring Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Liangliang

    A miniature wireless implantable electrochemical glucose system for continuous glucose monitoring with good selectivity, sensitivity, linearity and long term stability was developed. First, highly sensitive, long-term stable and reusable planar H2O2 microelectrodes have been fabricated by microlithography. These electrodes composed of a 300 nm Pt black layer situated on a 5 um thick Au layer, provide effective protection to the underlying chromium adhesion layer. Using repeated cyclic voltammetric sweeps in flowing buffer solution, highly sensitive Pt black working electrodes were realized with five-decade linear dynamic range and low detection limit (10 nM) for H2O2 at low oxidation potentials. Second, a highly sensitive, low cost and flexible microwire biosensor was described using 25-mum thick gold wire as working electrode together with 125-mum thick Pt/Ir and Ag wires as counter and reference electrode, embedded within a PDMS-filled polyethylene tube. Surface area and activity of sensor was enhanced by converting gold electrode to nanoporous configuration followed by electrodeposition of platinum black. Glucose oxidase based biosensors by electrodeposition of poly(o-phenylenediamine) and glucose oxidase on the working electrode, displayed a higher glucose sensitivity (1.2 mA mM-1 cm-2) than highest literature reported. In addition it exhibits wide detection range (up to 20 mM) and selectivity (>95%). Third, novel miniaturized and flexible microelectrode arrays with 8 of 25 mum electrodes displayed the much needed 3D diffusion profiles similar to a single 25 mum microelectrode, but with one order increase in current levels. These microelectrode arrays displayed a H2O2 sensitivity of 13 mA mM-1 cm-2, a wide dynamic range of 100 nM to 10 mM, limit of detection of 10 nM. These microwire based edge plane microsensors incorporated flexibility, miniaturization and low operation potential are an promising approach for continuous in vivo metabolic monitoring. Fourth

  5. Progress Towards Biocompatible Intracortical Microelectrodes for Neural Interfacing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jorfi, Mehdi; Skousen, John L.; Weder, Christoph; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    To ensure long-term consistent neural recordings, next-generation intracortical microelectrodes are being developed with an increased emphasis on reducing the neuro-inflammatory response. The increased emphasis stems from the improved understanding of the multifaceted role that inflammation may play in disrupting both biologic and abiologic components of the overall neural interface circuit. To combat neuro-inflammation and improve recording quality, the field is actively progressing from traditional inorganic materials towards approaches that either minimizes the microelectrode footprint or that incorporate compliant materials, bioactive molecules, conducting polymers or nanomaterials. However, the immune-privileged cortical tissue introduces an added complexity compared to other biomedical applications that remains to be fully understood. This review provides a comprehensive reflection on the current understanding of the key failure modes that may impact intracortical microelectrode performance. In addition, a detailed overview of the current status of various materials-based approaches that have gained interest for neural interfacing applications is presented, and key challenges that remain to be overcome are discussed. Finally, we present our vision on the future directions of materials-based treatments to improve intracortical microelectrodes for neural interfacing. PMID:25460808

  6. Progress towards biocompatible intracortical microelectrodes for neural interfacing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorfi, Mehdi; Skousen, John L.; Weder, Christoph; Capadona, Jeffrey R.

    2015-02-01

    To ensure long-term consistent neural recordings, next-generation intracortical microelectrodes are being developed with an increased emphasis on reducing the neuro-inflammatory response. The increased emphasis stems from the improved understanding of the multifaceted role that inflammation may play in disrupting both biologic and abiologic components of the overall neural interface circuit. To combat neuro-inflammation and improve recording quality, the field is actively progressing from traditional inorganic materials towards approaches that either minimizes the microelectrode footprint or that incorporate compliant materials, bioactive molecules, conducting polymers or nanomaterials. However, the immune-privileged cortical tissue introduces an added complexity compared to other biomedical applications that remains to be fully understood. This review provides a comprehensive reflection on the current understanding of the key failure modes that may impact intracortical microelectrode performance. In addition, a detailed overview of the current status of various materials-based approaches that have gained interest for neural interfacing applications is presented, and key challenges that remain to be overcome are discussed. Finally, we present our vision on the future directions of materials-based treatments to improve intracortical microelectrodes for neural interfacing.

  7. Neurotoxicity testing using Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs): a growing trend

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are groups of extracellular electrodes that are 10-30 microns in diameter and can be utilized in vivo or in vitro. For in vitro uses, an MEA typically contains up to 64 electrodes and can be utilized to measure the activity of cells and tissues that a...

  8. Neurotoxicity testing using Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs): a growing trend

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are groups of extracellular electrodes that are 10-30 microns in diameter and can be utilized in vivo or in vitro. For in vitro uses, an MEA typically contains up to 64 electrodes and can be utilized to measure the activity of cells and tissues that a...

  9. Characterization of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):tosylate conductive polymer microelectrodes for transmitter detection.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Simon T; Vreeland, Richard F; Heien, Michael L; Taboryski, Rafael

    2012-04-21

    In this paper we investigate the physical and electrochemical properties of micropatterned poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):tosylate (PEDOT:tosylate) microelectrodes for neurochemical detection. PEDOT:tosylate is a promising conductive polymer electrode material for chip-based bioanalytical applications such as capillary electrophoresis, high-performance liquid chromatography, and constant potential amperometry at living cells. Band electrodes with widths down to 3 μm were fabricated on polymer substrates using UV lithographic methods. The electrodes are electrochemically stable in a range between -200 mV and 700 mV vs. Ag/AgCl and show a relatively low resistance. A wide range of transmitters is shown to oxidize readily on the electrodes. Kinetic rate constants and half wave potentials are reported. The capacitance per area was found to be high (1670 ± 130 μF cm(-2)) compared to other thin film microelectrode materials. Finally, we use constant potential amperometry to measure the release of transmitters from a group of PC 12 cells. The results show how the current response decreases for a series of stimulations with high K(+) buffer.

  10. In vivo measurement of tubular fluid ferrocyanide with carbon-fiber microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Moore, L C; Clausen, C; Bowden, E F; Birzgalis, A

    1987-06-01

    Techniques to construct carbon-fiber microelectrodes and to measure ferrocyanide ion concentration in single nephrons are described. The measurement involves polarizing an inert carbon-fiber microelectrode 500 mV positive with respect to a Ag-AgCl reference, while measuring the faradic current produced by the oxidation of ferrocyanide. A carbon fiber (5-7 micron diam) is heat sealed into a glass micropipette that is then sharpened, silanized, and electrochemically pretreated to minimize electrode degradation by protein. Circuit diagrams for an inexpensive voltage clamp-current monitor and a data sampling device are presented. The electrodes show a linear response to changes in ferrocyanide concentration in large and very small (20 nl) volumes in vitro. The electrodes were used in an electrochemical microassay to determine tubular fluid-to-plasma ferrocyanide concentration ratios and nephron filtration rates with proximal micropuncture samples. The results show excellent agreement with paired determinations using [3H]inulin. In vivo proximal tubule perfusion experiments show a rapid linear response to changes in tubular fluid ferrocyanide concentration. These electrodes permit rapid quantitative measurements of ferrocyanide concentration and water transport in the proximal tubule and may be useful in other biological systems.

  11. Highly fluorescent and biocompatible iridium nanoclusters for cellular imaging.

    PubMed

    Vankayala, Raviraj; Gollavelli, Ganesh; Mandal, Badal Kumar

    2013-08-01

    Highly fluorescent iridium nanoclusters were synthesized and investigated its application as a potential intracellular marker. The iridium nanoclusters were prepared with an average size of ~2 nm. Further, these nanoclusters were refluxed with aromatic ligands, such as 2,2'-binaphthol (BINOL) in order to obtain fluorescence properties. The photophysical properties of these bluish-green emitting iridium nanoclusters were well characterized by using UV-Visible, fluorescence and lifetime decay measurements. The emission spectrum for these nanoclusters exhibit three characteristic peaks at 449, 480 and 515 nm. The fluorescence quantum yield of BINOL-Ir NCs were estimated to be 0.36 and the molar extinction co-efficients were in the order of 10(6) M(-1)cm(-1). In vitro cytotoxicity studies in HeLa cells reveal that iridium nanoclusters exhibited good biocompatibility with an IC50 value of ~100 μg/ml and also showed excellent co-localization and distribution throughout the cytoplasm region without entering into the nucleus. This research has opened a new window in developing the iridium nanoparticle based intracellular fluorescent markers and has wide scope to act as biomedical nanocarrier to carry many biological molecules and anticancer drugs.

  12. Testing of electroformed deposited iridium/powder metallurgy rhenium rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.; Dickerson, Robert

    1996-01-01

    High-temperature, oxidation-resistant chamber materials offer the thermal margin for high performance and extended lifetimes for radiation-cooled rockets. Rhenium (Re) coated with iridium (Ir) allow hours of operation at 2200 C on Earth-storable propellants. One process for manufacturing Ir/Re rocket chambers is the fabrication of Re substrates by powder metallurgy (PM) and the application of Ir coatings by using electroformed deposition (ED). ED Ir coatings, however, have been found to be porous and poorly adherent. The integrity of ED Ir coatings could be improved by densification after the electroforming process. This report summarizes the testing of two 22-N, ED Ir/PM Re rocket chambers that were subjected to post-deposition treatments in an effort to densify the Ir coating. One chamber was vacuum annealed, while the other chamber was subjected to hot isostatic pressure (HIP). The chambers were tested on gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen propellants, at mixture ratios that simulated the oxidizing environments of Earth-storable propellants. ne annealed ED Ir/PM Re chamber was tested for a total of 24 firings and 4.58 hr at a mixture ratio of 4.2. After only 9 firings, the annealed ED Ir coating began to blister and spall upstream of the throat. The blistering and spalling were similar to what had been experienced with unannealed, as-deposited ED Ir coatings. The HIP ED Ir/PM Re chamber was tested for a total of 91 firings and 11.45 hr at mixture ratios of 3.2 and 4.2. The HIP ED Ir coating remained adherent to the Re substrate throughout testing; there were no visible signs of coating degradation. Metallography revealed, however, thinning of the HIP Ir coating and occasional pores in the Re layer upstream of the throat. Pinholes in the Ir coating may have provided a path for oxidation of the Re substrate at these locations. The HIP ED Ir coating proved to be more effective than vacuum annealed and as-deposited ED Ir. Further densification is still required to

  13. A Microchip-based Endothelium Mimic Utilizing Open Reservoirs for Cell Immobilization and Integrated Carbon Ink Microelectrodes for Detection

    PubMed Central

    Hulvey, Matthew K; Martin, R. Scott

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication and characterization of a microfluidic device that utilizes a reservoir-based approach for endothelial cell immobilization and integrated embedded carbon ink microelectrodes for the amperometric detection of extracellular nitric oxide (NO) release. The design utilizes a buffer channel to continuously introduce buffer or a plug of stimulant to the reservoir as well as a separate sampling channel that constantly withdraws buffer from the reservoir and over the microelectrode. A steel pin is used for both the fluidic connection to the sampling channel and to provide a quasi-reference electrode for the carbon ink microelectrode. Characterization of the device was performed using NO standards produced from a NONOate salt. Finally, NO release from a layer of immobilized endothelial cells was monitored and quantified using the system. This system holds promise as a means to electrochemically detect extracellular NO release from endothelial cells in either an array of reservoirs or concurrently with fluorescence-based intracellular NO measurements. PMID:18989663

  14. Needle-type environmental microsensors: design, construction and uses of microelectrodes and multi-analyte MEMS sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woo Hyoung; Lee, Jin-Hwan; Choi, Woo-Hyuck; Hosni, Ahmed A.; Papautsky, Ian; Bishop, Paul L.

    2011-04-01

    The development of environmental microsensor techniques is a revolutionary advance in the measurement of both absolute levels and changes in chemical species in the field of environmental engineered and natural systems. The tiny tip (5-15 µm diameter) of microsensors makes them very attractive experimental tools for direct measurements of the chemical species of interest inside biological samples (e.g., biofilm, flocs). Microelectrodes fabricated from pulled micropipettes (e.g., dissolved oxygen, oxidation-reduction potential, ion-selective microelectrode) have contributed to greater understanding of biological mechanisms for decades using microscopic monitoring, and currently microelectromechanical system (MEMS) microfabrication technologies are being successfully applied to fabricate multi-analyte sensor systems for in situ monitoring. This review focuses on needle-type environmental microsensor technology, including microelectrodes and multi-analyte MEMS sensor arrays. Design, construction and applications to biofilm research of these sensors are described. Practical methods for biofilm microprofile measurements are presented and several in situ applications for a biofilm study are highlighted. Ultimately, the developed needle-type microsensors combined with molecular biotechnology (such as microscopic observation with fluorescent probes) show the tremendous promise of micro-environmental sensor technology.

  15. Tuning electrode impedance for the electrical recording of biopotentials.

    PubMed

    Fontes, M A; de Beeck, M; Van Hoof, C; Neves, H P

    2010-01-01

    Tuning the electrode impedance through the DC biasing of iridium oxide is presented. Impedance reduction of up to two orders of magnitude was reproducibly observed in 20 microm diameter microelectrodes at a biasing of 1V.

  16. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence from heteroleptic iridium(III) complexes with multicolor emission.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuyang; Gao, Hongfang; Wang, Xiaomei; Qi, Honglan

    2015-02-16

    Electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) with different emission colors is important in the development of multichannel analytical techniques. In this report, five new heteroleptic iridium(III) complexes were synthesized, and their photophysical, electrochemical, and ECL properties were studied. Here, 2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyridine (dfppy, complex 1), 2-phenylbenzo[d]thiazole (bt, complex 2), and 2-phenylpyridine (ppy, complex 3) were used as the main ligands to tune the emission color, while avobenzone (avo) was used as the ancillary ligand. For comparison, complexes 4 and 5 with 2-phenylpyridine and 2-phenylbenzo[d]thiazole as the main ligand, respectively, and acetyl acetone (acac) as the ancillary ligand were also synthesized. All five iridium(III) complexes had strong intraligand absorption bands (π–π*) in the UV region (below 350 nm) and a featureless MLCT (d−π*) transition in the visible 400–500 nm range. Multicolored emissions were observed for these five iridium(III) complexes, including green, orange, and red for complexes 4, 5, 2, 1, 3, respectively. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the electronic density of the highest occupied molecular orbital is entirely located on the C^N ligands and the iridium atom, while the formation of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) is complicated. The LUMO is mainly assigned to the ancillary ligand for complexes 1 and 3 but to the C^N ligand for complexes 2, 4, and 5. Cyclic voltammetry studies showed that all these complexes have a reversible oxidation wave, but no reduction waves were found in the electrochemical windows of CH2Cl2. The E1/2(ox) values of these complexes ranged from 0.642 to 0.978 V for complexes 3, 4, 2, 5, 1, (in increasing order) and are all lower than that of Ru(bpy)3(2+). Most importantly, when using tripropylamine as a coreactant, complexes 1–5 exhibited intense ECL signals with an emission wavelength centered at 616, 580, 663, 536, and 569 nm, respectively

  17. Experimental determination of the solubility of iridium in silicate melts: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisov, Alexander; Dingwell, Donald B.; Oneill, Hugh ST.C.; Palme, Herbert

    1992-01-01

    Little is known of the geochemical behavior of iridium. Normally this element is taken to be chalcophile and/or siderophile so that during planetary differentiation processes, e.g., core formation, iridium is extracted from silicate phases into metallic phases. Experimental determination of the metal/silicate partition coefficient of iridium is difficult simply because it is so large. Also there are no data on the solubility behavior of iridium in silicate melts. With information on the solubility of iridium in silicate melts it is possible, in combination with experimental data for Fe-Ir alloys, to calculate the partition coefficient between a metallic phase and a silicate melt.

  18. Experimental determination of the solubility of iridium in silicate melts: Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borisov, Alexander; Dingwell, Donald B.; Oneill, Hugh ST.C.; Palme, Herbert

    1992-01-01

    Little is known of the geochemical behavior of iridium. Normally this element is taken to be chalcophile and/or siderophile so that during planetary differentiation processes, e.g., core formation, iridium is extracted from silicate phases into metallic phases. Experimental determination of the metal/silicate partition coefficient of iridium is difficult simply because it is so large. Also there are no data on the solubility behavior of iridium in silicate melts. With information on the solubility of iridium in silicate melts it is possible, in combination with experimental data for Fe-Ir alloys, to calculate the partition coefficient between a metallic phase and a silicate melt.

  19. A VOLTAMMETRIC FLAVIN MICROELECTRODE FOR USE IN BIOFILMS

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hung Duc; Renslow, Ryan; Babauta, Jerome; Ahmed, Bulbul; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms used in bioelectrochemical systems are expected to transfer electrons using electron transfer mediators. One mediator type, flavins, which includes flavin mononucleotide, riboflavin, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, has been found to be endogenously produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. However, the presence and concentration of flavins inside a S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilm have never been reported. The goal of this study was to develop a flavin microelectrode capable of measuring flavins inside a living biofilm and apply it to a biofilm which produces flavins. Because flavins are electrochemically active molecules, the flavin microelectrode was based on detection via square-wave voltammetry. The microelectrode consisted of a carbon working electrode with a 10–30 μm tip diameter, a built-in platinum counter electrode, and a Ag/AgCl reference electrode, all enclosed in a glass outer case. The microelectrode was calibrated between 0.1 μM and 10 μM flavins and showed a linear correlation between flavin concentration and peak currents located at −424 mVAg/AgCl on a square-wave voltammogram. We also developed a model to explain the electrochemical mechanism of flavin detection, and to determine the effective surface area of the microelectrode, the standard reduction potential, and the transfer coefficient. We found that the effective surface area of the microelectrode was close to 100 times the projected surface area. The model predicted a standard reduction potential for RF/RFH2 of −419 mVAg/AgCl at 20 °C and a transfer coefficient of 0.45. Lastly, we measured flavin concentration inside a S. oneidensis MR-1 biofilm grown on a glass surface using oxygen as the electron acceptor. The flavin concentration reached 0.7 μM, increasing near the bottom of the biofilm, where no oxygen was present. This shows the possibility that flavins are produced in the anaerobic zone to act as intermediate electron acceptors in the deeper parts of the biofilm, where

  20. Enhanced Interfacial Charge Transfer on a Tungsten Trioxide Photoanode with Immobilized Molecular Iridium Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Tong, Haili; Jiang, Yi; Zhang, Qian; Li, Jialing; Jiang, Wenchao; Zhang, Donghui; Li, Na; Xia, Lixin

    2017-08-24

    The rational design of active photoanodes for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting is crucial for future applications in sustainable energy conversion. A combination of catalysts with photoelectrodes is generally required to improve surface kinetics and suppress surface recombination. In this study, we present WO3 photoanode modified with the iridium complex [(H4 dphbpy)Ir(III) (Cp*)Cl]Cl (Ir-PO3 H2 ; H4 dphbpy=2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-bisphosphonic acid, Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadiene (WO3 +Ir-PO3 H2 )- for PEC water oxidation. When Ir-PO3 H2 is anchored to a WO3 electrode, the photoanode shows a significant improvement in both photocurrent and faradaic efficiency compared to the bare WO3 photoanode. Under simulated sunlight illumination (AM 1.5G, 100 mW cm(-2) ) with an applied bias of 1.23 V (vs. reversible hydrogen electrode), the photoanode exhibits a photocurrent of 1.16 mA cm(-2) in acidic conditions, which is double that of the bare WO3 photoanode. The faradaic efficiency is promoted from 56 % to 95 %. Kinetic studies reveal that Ir-PO3 H2 exhibits a different interfacial charge-transfer mechanism on the WO3 photoanode for PEC water oxidation compared to iridium oxide. Ir-PO3 H2 , as a water-oxidation catalyst, can accelerate the surface charge transfer through rapid surface kinetics. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Field desorption of Na and Cs from graphene on iridium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatskii, D. P.; Pavlov, V. G.

    2015-08-01

    Field electron and desorption microscopy has been used to study specific features of the field desorption of sodium and cesium ions adsorbed on the surface of iridium with graphene. It was found that adsorbed sodium atoms most strongly reduce the work function on graphene islands situated over densely packed faces of iridium. A strong electric field qualitatively similarly affects the sodium and cesium desorption processes from a field emitter to give two desorption phases and has no noticeable effect on the disintegration of the graphene layer.

  2. Iridium Complexes as a Roadblock for DNA Polymerase during Amplification.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Falguni; Kumar, Prashant; Tripathi, Suman Kumar; Patra, Srikanta; Koner, Apurba L

    2016-07-05

    Iridium-based metal complexes containing polypyridyl-pyrazine ligands show properties of DNA intercalation. They serve as roadblocks to DNA polymerase activity, thereby inhibiting the polymerization process. Upon the addition of increasing concentrations of these iridium complexes, a rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay reveals the selective inhibition of the DNA polymerization process. This label-free approach to study the inhibition of fundamental cellular processes via physical roadblock can offer an alternative route toward cancer therapy. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Corrosion-resistant iridium-platinum anode material for high polarization application in corrosive acids

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.; Summers, L.; Lewis, P.

    1993-09-08

    The present invention relates to highly corrosion resistant components for use in an electrochemical cell. Specifically, these components are resistant to corrosion under very extreme conditions such as exposure to aqua regia in the presence of a constant current density of 100mA/m{sup 2}. The components are comprised of an iridium-platinum alloy that comprises less than 30% iridium. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the iridium-platinum alloy comprises 15-20% iridium. In another preferred embodiment of the present invention, the iridium-platinum alloy is deposited on the surface of an electrochemical cell component by magnetron sputtering. The present invention also relates to a method for conducting an electrochemical reaction in the presence of highly corrosive acids under a high degree of polarization wherein the electrochemical cell comprises a component, preferably the anode, containing an iridium-platinum alloy that comprises less than 30% iridium.

  4. Tracking axonal action potential propagation on a high-density microelectrode array across hundreds of sites.

    PubMed

    Bakkum, Douglas J; Frey, Urs; Radivojevic, Milos; Russell, Thomas L; Müller, Jan; Fiscella, Michele; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Axons are traditionally considered stable transmission cables, but evidence of the regulation of action potential propagation demonstrates that axons may have more important roles. However, their small diameters render intracellular recordings challenging, and low-magnitude extracellular signals are difficult to detect and assign. Better experimental access to axonal function would help to advance this field. Here we report methods to electrically visualize action potential propagation and network topology in cortical neurons grown over custom arrays, which contain 11,011 microelectrodes and are fabricated using complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. Any neuron lying on the array can be recorded at high spatio-temporal resolution, and simultaneously precisely stimulated with little artifact. We find substantial velocity differences occurring locally within single axons, suggesting that the temporal control of a neuron's output may contribute to neuronal information processing.

  5. Detection of Toxic Heavy Metal, Co(II) Trace via Voltammetry with Semiconductor Microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Suw Young; Lee, Chang Hyun; Koo, Jae Mo

    2017-01-01

    The cobalt (Co(II)) ion is a main component of alloys and considered to be carcinogenic, especially due to the carcinogenic and toxicological effects in the aquatic environment. The toxic trace of the Co(II) detection was conducted using the infrared photodiode electrode (IPDE) using a working electrode, via the cyclic and square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry. The results indicated a sensitive oxidation peak current of Co(II) on the IPDE. Under the optimal conditions, the common-type glassy carbon, the metal platinum, the carbon paste, and the carbon fiber microelectrode were compared with the IPDE in the electrolyte using the standard Co(II). The IPDE was found to be far superior to the others. PMID:28503262

  6. In vivo assessment of cancerous tumors using boron doped diamond microelectrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierro, Stéphane; Yoshikawa, Momoko; Nagano, Osamu; Yoshimi, Kenji; Saya, Hideyuki; Einaga, Yasuaki

    2012-11-01

    The in vitro and in vivo electrochemical detection of the reduced form of glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine, GSH) using boron doped diamond (BDD) microelectrode for potential application in the assessment of cancerous tumors is presented. Accurate calibration curve for the determination of GSH could be obtained by the in vitro electrochemical measurements. Additionally, it was shown that it was possible to separate the detection of GSH from the oxidized form of glutathione (GSSG) using chronoamperometry measurements. In vivo GSH detection measurements have been performed in human cancer cells inoculated in immunodeficient mice. These measurements have shown that the difference of GSH level between cancerous and normal tissues can be detected. Moreover, GSH detection measurements carried out before and after X-ray irradiation have proved that it is possible to assess in vivo the decrease in GSH concentration in the tumor after a specific treatment.

  7. In vivo assessment of cancerous tumors using boron doped diamond microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Fierro, Stéphane; Yoshikawa, Momoko; Nagano, Osamu; Yoshimi, Kenji; Saya, Hideyuki; Einaga, Yasuaki

    2012-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo electrochemical detection of the reduced form of glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine, GSH) using boron doped diamond (BDD) microelectrode for potential application in the assessment of cancerous tumors is presented. Accurate calibration curve for the determination of GSH could be obtained by the in vitro electrochemical measurements. Additionally, it was shown that it was possible to separate the detection of GSH from the oxidized form of glutathione (GSSG) using chronoamperometry measurements. In vivo GSH detection measurements have been performed in human cancer cells inoculated in immunodeficient mice. These measurements have shown that the difference of GSH level between cancerous and normal tissues can be detected. Moreover, GSH detection measurements carried out before and after X-ray irradiation have proved that it is possible to assess in vivo the decrease in GSH concentration in the tumor after a specific treatment.

  8. In vivo assessment of cancerous tumors using boron doped diamond microelectrode

    PubMed Central

    Fierro, Stéphane; Yoshikawa, Momoko; Nagano, Osamu; Yoshimi, Kenji; Saya, Hideyuki; Einaga, Yasuaki

    2012-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo electrochemical detection of the reduced form of glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine, GSH) using boron doped diamond (BDD) microelectrode for potential application in the assessment of cancerous tumors is presented. Accurate calibration curve for the determination of GSH could be obtained by the in vitro electrochemical measurements. Additionally, it was shown that it was possible to separate the detection of GSH from the oxidized form of glutathione (GSSG) using chronoamperometry measurements. In vivo GSH detection measurements have been performed in human cancer cells inoculated in immunodeficient mice. These measurements have shown that the difference of GSH level between cancerous and normal tissues can be detected. Moreover, GSH detection measurements carried out before and after X-ray irradiation have proved that it is possible to assess in vivo the decrease in GSH concentration in the tumor after a specific treatment. PMID:23198091

  9. The potential of microelectrode arrays and microelectronics for biomedical research and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ian L; Livi, Paolo; Lewandowska, Marta K; Fiscella, Michele; Roscic, Branka; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2011-03-01

    Planar microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are devices that can be used in biomedical and basic in vitro research to provide extracellular electrophysiological information about biological systems at high spatial and temporal resolution. Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) is a technology with which MEAs can be produced on a microscale featuring high spatial resolution and excellent signal-to-noise characteristics. CMOS MEAs are specialized for the analysis of complete electrogenic cellular networks at the cellular or subcellular level in dissociated cultures, organotypic cultures, and acute tissue slices; they can also function as biosensors to detect biochemical events. Models of disease or the response of cellular networks to pharmacological compounds can be studied in vitro, allowing one to investigate pathologies, such as cardiac arrhythmias, memory impairment due to Alzheimer's disease, or vision impairment caused by ganglion cell degeneration in the retina.

  10. Pulse voltammetry wine defects identification by means of miniaturized microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francioso, L.; Bjorklund, R.; Siciliano, P.; Rulcker, T. K.

    2007-05-01

    Pulse voltammetry was employed to discriminate among different concentrations of defects in wine. The microelectrodes were fabricated as patterned platinum thin films on silicon wafers by means of silicon fabrication technology. The film pattern was as interdigitated fingers having a 2 μm fingers gap and active area of 100x100 μm2 a silicon nitride passivation permits a selective exposure of microelectrodes to electrolyte. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the current responses indicated that concentrations of acetaldehyde and L-ascorbic acid could be discriminated in a white wine electrolyte. Finally the capability of defects concentrations detection in two-defects solutions (acetaldehyde + L-ascorbic acid) has been investigated.

  11. Electrochemical measurements on a droplet using gold microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenabi, Amin; Souri, Asma; Rastkhadiv, Ali

    2016-03-01

    Facile methods of ion recognition are important for the fabrication of electronic tongue systems. In this work, we demonstrate performing pulsed conductometry on microliter electrolyte droplets dropped on gold microelectrodes vapor deposited on soda lime glass slides. A droplet is dropped between two microelectrodes when a voltage waveform from a preprogramed power supply is applied on them. The temporal variation of the electric current passing through the droplet is recorded, digitized and stored. The obtained data are compared with the database formed out of the previous experiences for the classification of the sample electrolytes. It is shown that the shape of the voltage waveform is the important parameter of the process. We devised a method for the optimization of the voltage waveform profile for obtaining the maximum of discriminating information from the recorded current variations.

  12. Characterizing Enzymatic Deposition for Microelectrode Neurotransmitter Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hosein, W. K.; Yorita, A. M.; Tolosa, V. M.

    2016-08-12

    The enzyme immobilization process, one step in creating an enzymatic biosensor, was characterized and analyzed as a function of its physical properties. The neural glutamic biosensor is a flexible device, effectively minimizing trauma to the area of implantation. The Multielectrode Array (MEA) is composed primarily of a proprietary polymer which has been successfully implanted into human subjects in recent years. This polymer allows the device the pliability that other devices normally lack, though this poses some challenges to implantation. The electrodes are made of Platinum (Pt), and can range in number from eight to thirty two electrodes per device. These electrodes are electroplated with a semipermeable polymer layer to improve selectivity of the electrode to the neurotransmitter of interest, in this case glutamate. A signal is created from the interaction of glutamate in the brain with the glutamate oxidase (GluOx) which is immobilized on the surface of the electrode by using crosslinking chemistry in conjunction with glutaraldehyde and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). The glutamate is oxidized by glutamate oxidase, producing α-ketoglutarate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a by-product. The production of H2O2 is crucial for detection of the presence of the glutamate within the enzymatic coating, as it diffuses through the enzyme layer and oxidizes at the surface of the electrode. This oxidation is detectable by measurable change in the current using amperometry. Hence, the MEA allows for in vivo monitoring of neurotransmitter activity in real time. The sensitivity of the sensor to these neurotransmitters is dependent on the thickness of the layer, which is investigated in these experiments in order to optimize the efficacy of the device to detecting the substrate, once implanted.

  13. Chronic in vivo stability assessment of carbon fiber microelectrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Paras R.; Zhang, Huanan; Robbins, Matthew T.; Nofar, Justin B.; Marshall, Shaun P.; Kobylarek, Michael J.; Kozai, Takashi D. Y.; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Chestek, Cynthia A.

    2016-12-01

    Objective. Individual carbon fiber microelectrodes can record unit activity in both acute and semi-chronic (∼1 month) implants. Additionally, new methods have been developed to insert a 16 channel array of carbon fiber microelectrodes. Before assessing the in vivo long-term viability of these arrays, accelerated soak tests were carried out to determine the most stable site coating material. Next, a multi-animal, multi-month, chronic implantation study was carried out with carbon fiber microelectrode arrays and silicon electrodes. Approach. Carbon fibers were first functionalized with one of two different formulations of PEDOT and subjected to accelerated aging in a heated water bath. After determining the best PEDOT formula to use, carbon fiber arrays were chronically implanted in rat motor cortex. Some rodents were also implanted with a single silicon electrode, while others received both. At the end of the study a subset of animals were perfused and the brain tissue sliced. Tissue sections were stained for astrocytes, microglia, and neurons. The local reactive responses were assessed using qualitative and quantitative methods. Main results. Electrophysiology recordings showed the carbon fibers detecting unit activity for at least 3 months with average amplitudes of ∼200 μV. Histology analysis showed the carbon fiber arrays with a minimal to non-existent glial scarring response with no adverse effects on neuronal density. Silicon electrodes showed large glial scarring that impacted neuronal counts. Significance. This study has validated the use of carbon fiber microelectrode arrays as a chronic neural recording technology. These electrodes have demonstrated the ability to detect single units with high amplitude over 3 months, and show the potential to record for even longer periods. In addition, the minimal reactive response should hold stable indefinitely, as any response by the immune system may reach a steady state after 12 weeks.

  14. Chronic in vivo stability assessment of carbon fiber microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Patel, Paras R; Zhang, Huanan; Robbins, Matthew T; Nofar, Justin B; Marshall, Shaun P; Kobylarek, Michael J; Kozai, Takashi D Y; Kotov, Nicholas A; Chestek, Cynthia A

    2016-12-01

    Individual carbon fiber microelectrodes can record unit activity in both acute and semi-chronic (∼1 month) implants. Additionally, new methods have been developed to insert a 16 channel array of carbon fiber microelectrodes. Before assessing the in vivo long-term viability of these arrays, accelerated soak tests were carried out to determine the most stable site coating material. Next, a multi-animal, multi-month, chronic implantation study was carried out with carbon fiber microelectrode arrays and silicon electrodes. Carbon fibers were first functionalized with one of two different formulations of PEDOT and subjected to accelerated aging in a heated water bath. After determining the best PEDOT formula to use, carbon fiber arrays were chronically implanted in rat motor cortex. Some rodents were also implanted with a single silicon electrode, while others received both. At the end of the study a subset of animals were perfused and the brain tissue sliced. Tissue sections were stained for astrocytes, microglia, and neurons. The local reactive responses were assessed using qualitative and quantitative methods. Electrophysiology recordings showed the carbon fibers detecting unit activity for at least 3 months with average amplitudes of ∼200 μV. Histology analysis showed the carbon fiber arrays with a minimal to non-existent glial scarring response with no adverse effects on neuronal density. Silicon electrodes showed large glial scarring that impacted neuronal counts. This study has validated the use of carbon fiber microelectrode arrays as a chronic neural recording technology. These electrodes have demonstrated the ability to detect single units with high amplitude over 3 months, and show the potential to record for even longer periods. In addition, the minimal reactive response should hold stable indefinitely, as any response by the immune system may reach a steady state after 12 weeks.

  15. Microelectrodes integrated cell-chip for drug effects study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Cui, Hui-Fang; Ye, Jian-Shan; Chong, Ser-Choong; Lim, Tit-Meng; Sheu, Fwu-Shan; Cheong, Hui-Wing

    2006-01-01

    Silicon-based microelectrode chips are useful tools for temporal recording of neurotransmitter releasing from neural cells. Both invasive and non-invasive methods are targeted by different group researchers to perform electrical stimulating on neural cells. A microfabricated microelectrodes integrated biochip will be presented in this paper, which describes the dopaminergic cells growing on the chip directly. The dopamine exocytosis can be detected non-invasively from drug incubated dopaminergic cells growing on the chip. The abovementioned silicon-based electrochemical sensor chip has been designed with an electrode array located on the bottom of reaction chamber and each electrode is individually electrical controlled. MN9D, a mouse mesencephalic dopaminergic cell line, has been grown on the surface of the biochip chamber directly. Dopamine exocytosis from the chip-grown MN9D cells was detected using amperometry technology. The amperometric detection limit of dopamine of the biochip microelectrodes was found from 0.06μM to 0.21μM (S/N=3) statistically for the electrode diameters from 10 μm to 90 μm, the level of dopamine exocytosis from MN9D cells was undetectable whithout drug incubation. In contrast, after MN9D cells were incubated with L-dopa, a dopamine precursor, K+ induced dopamine extocytosis was temporally detected. The microelectrodes integrated biochip provides a non-invasive, temporal detection of dopamine exocytosis from dopaminergic cells, and holds the potential for applications in studying the mechanisms of dopamine exocytosis, and drug screening. It also provides a tool for pharmaceutical research and drug screening on dopaminergic cells, extendably to be used for other cell culture and drug effects study.

  16. Characterization of a light switchable microelectrode array for retinal prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyi; Xiong, Tao; Chiou, Pei-Yu; Li, Zhihong

    2011-12-01

    A light switchable microelectrode array for retinal prosthesis, which is performed with the photosensitive conductivity of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and of more advantages over the two major current retinal prosthetic categories, is characterized. Sensitivity to different visible wavelengths and light intensities are verified as well. Preliminary impedance test invitro shows appropriate impedance for neuron stimulation applications. It is indicated that such device provides a promising potential to restore a certain degree of visual function.

  17. Origins of Enantioselectivity during Allylic Substitution Reactions Catalyzed by Metallacyclic Iridium Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Madrahimov, Sherzod T.; Hartwig, John F.

    2012-01-01

    In depth mechanistic studies of iridium catalyzed regioselective and enantioselective allylic substitution reactions are presented. A series of cyclometallated allyliridium complexes that are kinetically and chemically competent to be intermediates in the allylic substitution reactions was prepared and characterized by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopies and solid state structural analysis. The rates of epimerization of the less thermodynamically stable diastereomeric allyliridium complexes to the thermodynamically more stable allyliridium stereoisomers were measured. The rates of nucleophilic attack by aniline and by N-methylaniline on the isolated allyliridium complexes were also measured. Attack on the thermodynamically less stable allyliridium complex was found to be orders of magnitude faster than attack on the thermodynamically more stable complex, yet the major enantiomer of the catalytic reaction is formed from the more stable diastereomer. Comparison of the rates of nucleophilic attack to the rates of epimerization of the diastereomeric allyliridium complexes containing a weakly-coordinating counterion showed that nucleophilic attack on the less stable allyliridium species is much faster than conversion of the less stable isomer to the more stable isomer. These observations imply that Curtin-Hammett conditions are not met during iridium catalyzed allylic substitution reactions by η3-η1-η3 interconversion. Rather, these data imply that when these conditions exist for this reaction, they are created by reversible oxidative addition and the high selectivity of this oxidative addition step to form the more stable diastereomeric allyl complex leads to the high enantioselectivity. The stereochemical outcome of the individual steps of allylic substitution was assessed by reaction of deuterium-labeled substrates. The reaction was shown to occur by oxidative addition with inversion of configuration, followed by an outer sphere nucleophilic attack that leads to a second

  18. Origins of enantioselectivity during allylic substitution reactions catalyzed by metallacyclic iridium complexes.

    PubMed

    Madrahimov, Sherzod T; Hartwig, John F

    2012-05-16

    In depth mechanistic studies of iridium catalyzed regioselective and enantioselective allylic substitution reactions are presented. A series of cyclometalated allyliridium complexes that are kinetically and chemically competent to be intermediates in the allylic substitution reactions was prepared and characterized by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopies and single-crystal X-ray difraction. The rates of epimerization of the less thermodynamically stable diastereomeric allyliridium complexes to the thermodynamically more stable allyliridium stereoisomers were measured. The rates of nucleophilic attack by aniline and by N-methylaniline on the isolated allyliridium complexes were also measured. Attack on the thermodynamically less stable allyliridium complex was found to be orders of magnitude faster than attack on the thermodynamically more stable complex, yet the major enantiomer of the catalytic reaction is formed from the more stable diastereomer. Comparison of the rates of nucleophilic attack to the rates of epimerization of the diastereomeric allyliridium complexes containing a weakly coordinating counterion showed that nucleophilic attack on the less stable allyliridium species is much faster than conversion of the less stable isomer to the more stable isomer. These observations imply that Curtin-Hammett conditions are not met during iridium catalyzed allylic substitution reactions by η(3)-η(1)-η(3) interconversion. Rather, these data imply that when these conditions exist for this reaction, they are created by reversible oxidative addition, and the high selectivity of this oxidative addition step to form the more stable diastereomeric allyl complex leads to the high enantioselectivity. The stereochemical outcome of the individual steps of allylic substitution was assessed by reactions of deuterium-labeled substrates. The allylic substitution was shown to occur by oxidative addition with inversion of configuration, followed by an outer sphere nucleophilic attack

  19. In vivo deployment of mechanically adaptive nanocomposites for intracortical microelectrodes

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J P; Hess, A E; Rowan, S J; Weder, C; Zorman, C A; Tyler, D J; Capadona, J R

    2012-01-01

    We recently introduced a series of stimuli-responsive, mechanically-adaptive polymer nanocomposites. Here, we report the first application of these bio-inspired materials as substrates for intracortical microelectrodes. Our hypothesis is that the ideal electrode should be initially stiff to facilitate minimal trauma during insertion into the cortex, yet becomes mechanically compliant to match the stiffness of the brain tissue and minimize forces exerted on the tissue, attenuating inflammation. Microprobes created from mechanically reinforced nanocomposites demonstrated a significant advantage compared to model microprobes composed of neat polymer only. The nanocomposite microprobes exhibit a higher storage modulus (E’ = ~5 GPa) than the neat polymer microprobes (E’ = ~2 GPa) and could sustain higher loads (~17 mN), facilitating penetration through the pia mater and insertion into the cerebral cortex of a rat. In contrast, the neat polymer microprobes mechanically failed under lower loads (~7 mN) before they were capable of inserting into cortical tissue. Further, we demonstrated the material’s ability to morph while in the rat cortex to more closely match the mechanical properties of the cortical tissue. Nanocomposite microprobes that were implanted into the rat cortex for up to 8 weeks demonstrated increased cell density at the microelectrode-tissue interface and a lack of tissue necrosis or excessive gliosis. This body of work introduces our nanocomposite-based microprobes as adaptive substrates for intracortical microelectrodes and potentially other biomedical applications. PMID:21654037

  20. Efficient voltammetric discrimination of free bilirubin from uric acid and ascorbic acid by a CVD nanographite-based microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Taurino, Irene; Van Hoof, Viviane; Magrez, Arnaud; Forró, László; De Micheli, Giovanni; Carrara, Sandro

    2014-12-01

    We report a novel electrochemical sensor based on nanographite grown on platinum microelectrodes for the determination of bilirubin in the presence of normal concentrations of albumin. The albumin is a protein with an intrinsic ability to bind the bilirubin therefore reducing the concentration of the free electroactive metabolite in human fluids. In addition, the proposed device permits the discrimination of free bilirubin from two interferents, uric acid and ascorbic acid, by the separation of their oxidation peaks in voltammetry. Preliminary measurements in human serum prove that the proposed nanostructured platform can be used to detect bilirubin.

  1. The Iridium (tm) system: Personal communications anytime, anyplace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatlelid, John E.; Casey, Larry

    1993-01-01

    The Iridium system is designed to provide handheld personal communications between diverse locations around the world at any time and without prior knowledge of the location of the personal units. This paper provides an overview of the system, the services it provides, its operation, and an overview of the commercial practices and relatively high volume satellite production techniques which will make the system cost effective. A constellation of 66 satellites will provide an orbiting, spherical-shell, infrastructure for this global calling capability. The satellites act as tall cellular towers and allow convenient operation for portable handheld telephones. The system will provide a full range of services including voice, paging, data, geolocation, and fax capabilities. Motorola is a world leader in the production of high volume, high quality, reliable telecommunications hardware. One of Iridium's goals is to apply these production techniques to high reliability space hardware. Concurrent engineering, high performance work teams, advanced manufacturing technologies, and improved assembly and test methods are some of the techniques that will keep the Iridium system cost effective. Mobile, global, flexible personal communications are coming that will allow anyone to call or receive a call from/to anyplace at anytime. The Iridium system will provide communications where none exist today. This connectivity will allow increased information transfer, open new markets for various business endeavors, and in general increase productivity and development.

  2. Achieving Zero Stress in Iridium, Chromium, and Nickle Thin Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadway, David M.; Weimer, Jeffrey; Gurgew, Danielle; Lis, Tomasz; Ramsey, Brian D.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Ames, A.; Bruni, R.

    2015-01-01

    We examine a method for achieving zero intrinsic stress in thin films of iridium, chromium, and nickel deposited by magnetron sputter deposition. The examination of the stress in these materials is motivated by efforts to advance the optical performance of light-weight x-ray space telescopes into the regime of sub-arc second resolution that rely on control of the film stress to values within 10-100 MPa. A characteristic feature of the intrinsic stress behavior in chromium and nickel is their sensitivity to the magnitude and sign of the intrinsic stress with argon gas pressure, including the existence of a critical pressure that results in zero film stress. This critical pressure scales linearly with the film's density. While the effect of stress reversal with argon pressure has been previously reported by Hoffman and others for nickel and chromium, we have discovered a similar behavior for iridium. Additionally, we have identified zero stress in iridium shortly after island coalescence. This feature of film growth is used for achieving a total internal stress of -2.89 MPa for a 15.8 nm thick iridium film. The surface roughness of this low-stress film was examined using scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and x-ray reflectivity (XRR) at CuKa and these results presented and discussed.

  3. Magnetostratigraphy, Late devonian iridium anomaly, and impact hypotheses

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, N.F.; Van der Voo, R. )

    1990-04-01

    Paleomagnetism, sedimentology, and fine-scale stratigraphy have been integrated to explain the origin of an iridium anomaly in the Late Devonian of Western Australia. Thermal demagnetization experiments were carried out on 93 specimens of marginal-slope limestone form the northern Canning Basin. Samples are from a condensed sequence of deep-water (> 100 m) Frutexites microstromatolites. Frutexites is a shrublike cyanobacterial organism that probably precipitated hematite, or a metastable precursor, from sea water. When plotted within the microstratigraphic framework for the study area, the observed characteristic directions from the sampled interval (14.5 cm thick) are in five discrete, layer-parallel, normal- and reversed-polarity zones. The measured northeast-southwest declinations and shallow inclinations probably record Late Devonian magnetostratigraphy on a centimetre scale. The Frutexites bed studied there occurs close to the Frasnian/Famennian (Late Devonian) boundary, a time of mass extinction of a wide variety of marine organisms throughout the world. Anomalously high iridium concentrations observed in the Frutexites bed have suggested to some authors that the mass extinction was caused by meteorite impact. This study concludes that iridium, which is present over the span of five layer-parallel magnetic reversals, was concentrated over a long period of time by biologic processes. Thus, the Canning Basin iridium anomaly may be unrelated to meteorite impact.

  4. The Iridium (tm) system: Personal communications anytime, anyplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatlelid, John E.; Casey, Larry

    The Iridium system is designed to provide handheld personal communications between diverse locations around the world at any time and without prior knowledge of the location of the personal units. This paper provides an overview of the system, the services it provides, its operation, and an overview of the commercial practices and relatively high volume satellite production techniques which will make the system cost effective. A constellation of 66 satellites will provide an orbiting, spherical-shell, infrastructure for this global calling capability. The satellites act as tall cellular towers and allow convenient operation for portable handheld telephones. The system will provide a full range of services including voice, paging, data, geolocation, and fax capabilities. Motorola is a world leader in the production of high volume, high quality, reliable telecommunications hardware. One of Iridium's goals is to apply these production techniques to high reliability space hardware. Concurrent engineering, high performance work teams, advanced manufacturing technologies, and improved assembly and test methods are some of the techniques that will keep the Iridium system cost effective. Mobile, global, flexible personal communications are coming that will allow anyone to call or receive a call from/to anyplace at anytime. The Iridium system will provide communications where none exist today. This connectivity will allow increased information transfer, open new markets for various business endeavors, and in general increase productivity and development.

  5. Iridium alloy Clad Vent Set manufacturing qualification studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, George B.

    Metallurgical qualification studies to demonstrate the manufacturing readiness of the iridium alloy Clad Vent Set (CVS) for the General Purpose Heat Source program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant are described. Microstructural data for various materials/test conditions are presented.

  6. Origins of Regioselectivity in Iridium Catalyzed Allylic Substitution.

    PubMed

    Madrahimov, Sherzod T; Li, Qian; Sharma, Ankit; Hartwig, John F

    2015-12-02

    Detailed studies on the origin of the regioselectivity for formation of branched products over linear products have been conducted with complexes containing the achiral triphenylphosphite ligand. The combination of iridium and P(OPh)3 was the first catalytic system shown to give high regioselectivity for the branched product with iridium and among the most selective for forming branched products among any combination of metal and ligand. We have shown the active catalyst to be generated from [Ir(COD)Cl]2 and P(OPh)3 by cyclometalation of the phenyl group on the ligand and have shown such species to be the resting state of the catalyst. A series of allyliridium complexes ligated by the resulting P,C ligand have been generated and shown to be competent intermediates in the catalytic system. We have assessed the potential impact of charge, metal-iridium bond length, and stability of terminal vs internal alkenes generated by attack at the branched and terminal positions of the allyl ligand, respectively. These factors do not distinguish the regioselectivity for attack on allyliridium complexes from that for attack on allylpalladium complexes. Instead, detailed computational studies suggest that a series of weak, attractive, noncovalent interactions, including interactions of H-bond acceptors with a vinyl C-H bond of the alkene ligand, favor formation of the branched product with the iridium catalyst. This conclusion underscores the importance of considering attractive interactions, as well as repulsive steric interactions, when seeking to rationalize selectivities.

  7. Iridium alloy clad vent set manufacturing qualification studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, G.B.

    1990-06-15

    In 1987 the Department of Energy-Office of Special Applications (DOE-OSA) decided to transfer the iridium alloy Clad Vent Set (CVS) manufacturing for the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) program from EG G Mound Applied Technologies, Inc. (EG G-MAT) to the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). The reason for this transfer was to consolidate the GPHS program iridium hardware manufacturing. The CVS starting stock of iridium powder, foil, and blanks were already being manufactured at another Energy Systems facility - the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Since 1987 CVS manufacturing technology transfer efforts have taken place between EG G-MAT and Energy Systems. EG G-MAT retained all of their tooling, but they supplied all the necessary product drawings, specifications, and procedures, as well as their tooling drawings. Most of the tooling designs and processing steps were duplicated at the Y-12 Plant. Minor changes were required in both tooling design and processing steps, to accommodate particular health, safety, environmental, and manufacturing requirements at the Y-12 Plant. In order to evaluate the effects of the key Y-12 Plant processing modifications, four joint Y-12 Plant/EG G-MAT iridium CVS manufacturing qualification studies were organized. The successful completion of these studies allowed the Y-12 Plant to commence pilot production of CVS components for the CRAF and CASSINI missions. The CVS cup metallurgical qualification work will be presented here.

  8. Remote Sensing Missions for Earth Observation on Iridium NEXT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, O. P.

    2009-12-01

    A unique opportunity exists to host up to 66 earth observation sensors on Iridium’s proposed NEXT LEO constellation in a manner that can revolutionize earth observation and weather predictions. A constellation approach to sensing, using the real-time communications backbone of Iridium, will enable unprecedented geospatial and temporal sampling for now-casting of weather on a global basis as well as global climate monitoring. The NEXT constellation, which, like Iridium’s current LEO constellation, is expected to consist of 66 interconnected satellites in 6 near polar orbiting planes, provides a unique platform for hosting a variety of earth observation missions. Several remote sensing missions were recommended by Group on Earth Observations (GEO), NASA, NOAA, and ESA for consideration by Iridium during 2008. These include GPS radio occultation sensors, earth radiation budget measurements, altimetry, ocean and land imaging, and troposphere and stratospheric winds measurements including polar winds measurements. These missions are also considered high priority climate missions by the Decadal Survey. Study teams consisting of Iridium, NASA/JPL and multiple industrial partners of Iridium have conducted detailed studies of these missions for compatibility with NEXT. These studies have established technical feasibility, unique benefits from a constellation approach, and cost effectiveness for these solutions on NEXT.

  9. Mononuclear iridium dinitrogen complexes bonded to zeolite HY

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dong; Chen, Mingyang; Martinez-Macias, Claudia; Dixon, David A.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2014-11-07

    In this study, the adsorption of N2 on structurally well-defined dealuminated HY zeolite-supported iridium diethylene complexes was investigated. Iridium dinitrogen complexes formed when the sample was exposed to N2 in H2 at 298 K, as shown by infrared spectra recorded with isotopically labeled N2. Four supported species formed in various flowing gases: Ir(N2), Ir(N2)(N2), Ir(C2H5)(N2), and Ir(H)(N2). Their interconversions are summarized in a reaction network, showing, for example, that, in the presence of N2, Ir(N2) was the predominant dinitrogen species at temperatures of 273-373 K. Ir(CO)(N2) formed transiently in flowing CO, and in the presence of H2, rather stable iridium hydride complexes formed. Here, four structural models of each iridium complex bonded at the acidic sites of the zeolite were employed in a computational investigation, showing that the calculated vibrational frequencies agree well with experiment when full calculations are done at the level of density functional theory, independent of the size of the model of the zeolite.

  10. Discovery of tantalum, rhenium, osmium, and iridium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, R.; Thoennessen, M.

    2012-09-15

    Currently, thirty-eight tantalum, thirty-eight rhenium, thirty-nine osmium, and thirty-eight iridium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  11. Acid induced acetylacetonato replacement in biscyclometalated iridium(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanfang; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Ming

    2012-04-07

    Biscyclometalated iridium(III) complexes with an ancillary acetylacetone ligand, Ir(L)(2)(acac), (L = 2-(benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl)pyridine (btp), 1-phenylisoquinoline (piq), 2-phenylbenzothiazole (bt), 2-phenylpyridine (ppy), acac = deprotonated acetylacetone), demonstrate spectroscopic changes in their UV-Vis absorption and luminescent emission under acidic conditions. Such changes were found to be the same as those observed when certain mercury salts exist in the systems. Because some iridium(III) complexes have sulfur-containing ligands (i.e., btp and bt), a question was then raised as for whether or not the spectroscopic changes are associated with the specific affinity of Hg(2+) to the sulfur atom. Extensive studies performed in this work unambiguously proved that the observed spectroscopic changes were solely the results of the acid induced departure of acac and the follow-up coordination of solvent acetonitrile to the iridium(III) center and that the generally anticipated Hg(2+)-S affinity and its effect on the photophysical properties of iridium(III) luminophores did not play a role.

  12. Utilization of Low Bandwidth Iridium Modems for Polar Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, T.

    2012-12-01

    Transmission of realtime seismic data is a desirable goal when a rapid response is needed. However, for many science applications sample waveform data, system state of health, and the ability to command and control the seismic station are operationally adequate. Determining the optimal telemetry requirements for a remote polar seismic experiment requires balancing science objective against the expensive, over-subscribed support available in the polar environments? For example there is a significant difference in the resources needed for a permanent "monitoring" effort versus a short-term experiment. We will describe IRIS/PASSCAL's successful approach to utilizing Iridium telemetry for short-term seismic experiments and suggest viable use of an Iridium RUDICs system for higher data-rate, permanent seismic stations such as a monitoring scenario. Most seismic stations are configured to record at a rate that exceeds twice the data rate of a single Iridium Internet modem. The power requirement to run continuous Iridium telemetry better than doubles that of a standalone seismic station. Doubling station power roughly doubles station logistics by requiring an increased number of support flights for installation and service. The tradeoffs between desirable and adequate telemetry requirements and the ramifications these requirements have on support services must be considered for a successful seismic station. We describe two Iridium telemetry systems, developed by the IRIS/PASSCAL Polar Program, for use with seismic stations in Antarctica and the Arctic. The first system uses an inexpensive Iridium 9602 modem based device and short burst data (SBD) transmission to monitor station performance, provide some command and control, and return a small amount of representative seismic data. Power requirements for this SBD system are approximately 10Ah per year for a daily message. The second system uses an Iridium 9522b modem based device the DOD RUDICs system for a 2400 Baud

  13. Consecutive iridium catalyzed C–C and C–H bond forming hydrogenations for the diastereo- and enantioselective synthesis of syn-3-fluoro-1-alcohols: C–H (2-fluoro)allylation of primary alcohols†

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Abbas; Montgomery, T. Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Commercially available (2-fluoro)allyl chloride serves as an efficient allyl donor in highly enantioselective iridium catalyzed carbonyl (2-fluoro)allylations from the alcohol or aldehyde oxidation level via transfer hydrogenation. Diastereoselective Crabtree hydrogenation of the resulting homoallylic alcohols provides syn-3-fluoro-1-alcohols. PMID:22473044

  14. An Array of Microactuated Microelectrodes for Monitoring Single-Neuronal Activity in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Okandan, Murat; Gilletti, Aaron; Baker, Michael S.; Jain, Tilak

    2006-01-01

    Arrays of microelectrodes used for monitoring single-and multi-neuronal action potentials often fail to record from the same population of neurons over a period of time for several technical and biological reasons. We report here a novel Neural Probe chip with a 3-channel microactuated microelectrode array that will enable precise repositioning of the individual microelectrodes within the brain tissue after implantation. Thermal microactuators and associated microelectrodes in the Neural Probe chip are microfabricated using the Sandia’s Ultraplanar Multi-level MEMS Technology (SUMMiTV) process, a 5-layer polysilicon microma-chining technology of the Sandia National labs, Albuquerque, NM. The Neural Probe chip enables precise bi-directional positioning of the microelectrodes in the brain with a step resolution in the order of 8.8μm. The thermal microactuators allow for a linear translation of the microelectrodes of up to 5 mm in either direction making it suitable for positioning microelectrodes in deep structures of a rodent brain. The overall translation in either direction was reduced to approximately 2 mm after insulation of the microelectrodes with epoxy for monitoring multi-unit activity. Single unit recordings were obtained from the somatosensory cortex of adult rats over a period of three days demonstrating the feasibility of this technology. Further optimization of the microelectrode insulation and chip packaging will be necessary before this technology can be validated in chronic experiments. PMID:16119243

  15. An array of microactuated microelectrodes for monitoring single-neuronal activity in rodents.

    PubMed

    Muthuswamy, Jit; Okandan, Murat; Gilletti, Aaron; Baker, Michael S; Jain, Tilak

    2005-08-01

    Arrays of microelectrodes used for monitoring single- and multi-neuronal action potentials often fail to record from the same population of neurons over a period of time for several technical and biological reasons. We report here a novel Neural Probe chip with a 3-channel microactuated microelectrode array that will enable precise repositioning of the individual microelectrodes within the brain tissue after implantation. Thermal microactuators and associated microelectrodes in the Neural Probe chip are microfabricated using the Sandia's Ultraplanar Multi-level MEMS Technology (SUMMiTV) process, a 5-layer polysilicon micromachining technology of the Sandia National labs, Albuquerque, NM. The Neural Probe chip enables precise bi-directional positioning of the microelectrodes in the brain with a step resolution in the order of 8.8 microm. The thermal microactuators allow for a linear translation of the microelectrodes of up to 5 mm in either direction making it suitable for positioning microelectrodes in deep structures of a rodent brain. The overall translation in either direction was reduced to approximately 2 mm after insulation of the microelectrodes with epoxy for monitoring multi-unit activity. Single unit recordings were obtained from the somatosensory cortex of adult rats over a period of three days demonstrating the feasibility of this technology. Further optimization of the microelectrode insulation and chip packaging will be necessary before this technology can be validated in chronic experiments.

  16. The measurement of compound neural action potential in sciatic nerve using microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chungkeun; Kim, Yongho; Shin, Hangsik; Kim, Yongjun; Lee, Myoungho

    2006-01-01

    As a method of observing regeneration of damaged nerves, research is being conducted on analyzing the electric signals of nerve fibers that are damaged and regenerating by implanting a microelectrode array between those nerves. Microelectrode arrays possess high impedance and a unique phase characteristic according to their structural features, thus it requires a phase linearity test and an impedance test to prevent neural signal distortion. Therefore, this paper analyzes the features of microelectrode array and designs a bioamplifier. We also measured signals from sciatic nerves in rats with microelectrode array.

  17. Iridium-Catalyzed, Hydrosilyl-Directed Borylation of Unactivated Alkyl C−H Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Matthew A.; Cho, Seung Hwan; Hartwig, John

    2016-01-01

    We report the iridium-catalyzed borylation of primary and secondary alkyl C−H bonds directed by a Si−H group to form alkylboronate esters site selectively. The reactions occur with high selectivity at primary C−H bonds γ to the hydrosilyl group to form primary alkyl bisboronate esters. In the absence of such primary C−H bonds, the borylation occurs selectively at a secondary C−H bond γ to the hydrosilyl group, and these reactions of secondary C−H bonds occur with high diastereoselectivity. The hydrosilyl-containing alkyl boronate esters formed by this method undergo transformations selectively at the carbon−boron or carbon−silicon bonds of these products under distinct conditions to give the products of amination, oxidation, and arylation. PMID:26745739

  18. Iridium-Catalyzed, Hydrosilyl-Directed Borylation of Unactivated Alkyl C-H Bonds.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Matthew A; Cho, Seung Hwan; Hartwig, John

    2016-01-27

    We report the iridium-catalyzed borylation of primary and secondary alkyl C-H bonds directed by a Si-H group to form alkylboronate esters site selectively. The reactions occur with high selectivity at primary C-H bonds γ to the hydrosilyl group to form primary alkyl bisboronate esters. In the absence of such primary C-H bonds, the borylation occurs selectively at a secondary C-H bond γ to the hydrosilyl group, and these reactions of secondary C-H bonds occur with high diastereoselectivity. The hydrosilyl-containing alkyl boronate esters formed by this method undergo transformations selectively at the carbon-boron or carbon-silicon bonds of these products under distinct conditions to give the products of amination, oxidation, and arylation.

  19. Formation of C–C Bonds via Iridium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation and Transfer Hydrogenation

    PubMed Central

    Bower, John F.; Krische, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of C–C bonds via catalytic hydrogenation and transfer hydrogenation enables carbonyl and imine addition in the absence of stoichiometric organometallic reagents. In this review, iridium-catalyzed C–C bond-forming hydrogenations and transfer hydrogenations are surveyed. These processes encompass selective, atom-economic methods for the vinylation and allylation of carbonyl compounds and imines. Notably, under transfer hydrogenation conditions, alcohol dehydrogenation drives reductive generation of organoiridium nucleophiles, enabling carbonyl addition from the aldehyde or alcohol oxidation level. In the latter case, hydrogen exchange between alcohols and π-unsaturated reactants generates electrophile–nucleophile pairs en route to products of hydro-hydroxyalkylation, representing a direct method for the functionalization of carbinol C–H bonds. PMID:21822399

  20. Oxide Protective Coats for Ir/Re Rocket Combustion Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortini, Arthur; Tuffias, Robert H.

    2003-01-01

    An improved material system has been developed for rocket engine combustion chambers for burning oxygen/ hydrogen mixtures or novel monopropellants, which are highly oxidizing at operating temperatures. The baseline for developing the improved material system is a prior iridium/rhenium system for chambers burning nitrogen tetroxide/monomethyl hydrazine mixtures, which are less oxidizing. The baseline combustion chamber comprises an outer layer of rhenium that provides structural support, plus an inner layer of iridium that acts as a barrier to oxidation of the rhenium. In the improved material system, the layer of iridium is thin and is coated with a thermal fatigue-resistant refractory oxide (specifically, hafnium oxide) that serves partly as a thermal barrier to decrease the temperature and thus the rate of oxidation of the rhenium. The oxide layer also acts as a barrier against the transport of oxidizing species to the surface of the iridium. Tests in which various oxygen/hydrogen mixtures were burned in iridium/rhenium combustion chambers lined with hafnium oxide showed that the operational lifetimes of combustion chambers of the improved material system are an order of magnitude greater than those of the baseline combustion chambers.

  1. Simulation of dose distribution for iridium-192 brachytherapy source type-H01 using MCNPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwaningsih, Anik

    2014-09-01

    Dosimetric data for a brachytherapy source should be known before it used for clinical treatment. Iridium-192 source type H01 was manufactured by PRR-BATAN aimed to brachytherapy is not yet known its dosimetric data. Radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution are some primary keys in brachytherapy source. Dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 was obtained from the dose calculation formalism recommended in the AAPM TG-43U1 report using MCNPX 2.6.0 Monte Carlo simulation code. To know the effect of cavity on Iridium-192 type H01 caused by manufacturing process, also calculated on Iridium-192 type H01 if without cavity. The result of calculation of radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 were compared with another model of Iridium-192 source.

  2. Simulation of dose distribution for iridium-192 brachytherapy source type-H01 using MCNPX

    SciTech Connect

    Purwaningsih, Anik

    2014-09-30

    Dosimetric data for a brachytherapy source should be known before it used for clinical treatment. Iridium-192 source type H01 was manufactured by PRR-BATAN aimed to brachytherapy is not yet known its dosimetric data. Radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution are some primary keys in brachytherapy source. Dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 was obtained from the dose calculation formalism recommended in the AAPM TG-43U1 report using MCNPX 2.6.0 Monte Carlo simulation code. To know the effect of cavity on Iridium-192 type H01 caused by manufacturing process, also calculated on Iridium-192 type H01 if without cavity. The result of calculation of radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 were compared with another model of Iridium-192 source.

  3. A comparison of electrochemically pre-treated and spark-platinized carbon fiber microelectrode. Measurement of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine in human urine and plasma.

    PubMed

    Bartosova, Z; Riman, D; Halouzka, V; Vostalova, J; Simanek, V; Hrbac, J; Jirovsky, D

    2016-09-07

    A novel method of carbon fiber microelectrode activation using spark discharge was demonstrated and compared to conventional electrochemical pretreatment by potential cycling. The spark discharge was performed at 800 V between the microelectrode connected to positive pole of the power supply and platinum counter electrode. Spark discharge led both to trimming of the fiber tip into conical shape and to the modification of carbon fiber microelectrode with platinum, as proven by scanning electron microscopy and electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. After the characterization of electrochemical properties using ferricyanide voltammetry, the activated electrodes were used for electrochemical analysis of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, an oxidative stress marker. Subnanomolar detection limits (0.55 nmol L(-1)) in high-performance liquid chromatography were achieved for spark platinized electrodes incorporated into the flow detection cell.

  4. Electrochemical synthesis of an iridium powder with a large specific surface area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaykov, Yu. P.; Isakov, A. V.; Apisarov, A. P.; Nikitina, A. O.

    2017-02-01

    The synthesis of iridium powder in a molten NaCl-KCl medium at 700°C is carried out for the first time. The influence of the ratio of the cathode to the anode current density ( i c/ i a) on the structure and the morphology of the iridium powder is investigated. Single-phase and polycrystalline iridium powders with a specific surface of 16.8 m2/g are produced. The phase composition and the surface texture of the deposits are studied. The specific surface and the particle size of iridium powders as functions of the ratio i c/ i a are analyzed.

  5. Boron doped diamond microelectrodes arrays for electrochemical detection in HPLC.

    PubMed

    Mahé, Eric; Devilliers, Didier; Dardoize, François

    2015-01-01

    Boron doped diamond microelectrodes arrays (MEA) have been prepared in order to be used as new amperometric sensors in electrochemical cells for HPLC detectors. The following parameters were studied: number and diameter (15-40 µm) of the electrodes, distance between them (50-240 µm), and effect of the flow rate (0.1-3 mL/min). It was thus possible to find the optimum value of the parameters which give a good signal/noise ratio in the chronoamperometric responses, with a size of the electrochemical sensors as small as possible.

  6. Spatial characterization of electric potentials generated by pulsed microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Kandagor, V; Cela, C J; Sanders, C A; Greenbaum, E; Lazzi, G; Humayun, M S; Zhou, D M; Castro, R; Gaikwad, S; Little, J

    2010-01-01

    This presentation is a report on the in situ characterization of stimulating microelectrodes in the context of multielectrode retinal prosthetic implants. The experimental system approximately replicates the geometric and electrical parameters of Second Sight Medical Products' Argus II Retinal Implant. Topographic maps of electric potentials have been prepared for a 60 electrode structure in which selected electrodes were stimulated with biphasic repetitively pulsed charge densities at 100 microC·cm(-2). Surface contour maps were prepared using a 10 microm diameter recording electrode.

  7. A MULTIPLEXED ASSAY FOR DETERMINATION OF NEUROTOXICANT EFFECTS ON SPONTANEOUS NETWORK ACTIVITY AND CELL VIABILITY FROM MICROELECTRODE ARRAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    AbstractTITLE: A MULTIPLEXED ASSAY FOR DETERMINATION OF NEUROTOXICANT EFFECTS ON SPONTANEOUS NETWORK ACTIVITY AND CELL VIABILITY FROM MICROELECTRODE ARRAYSABSTRACT BODY: Microelectrode array (MEA) recordings are increasingly being used as an in vitro method to detect and characte...

  8. A MULTIPLEXED ASSAY FOR DETERMINATION OF NEUROTOXICANT EFFECTS ON SPONTANEOUS NETWORK ACTIVITY AND CELL VIABILITY FROM MICROELECTRODE ARRAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    AbstractTITLE: A MULTIPLEXED ASSAY FOR DETERMINATION OF NEUROTOXICANT EFFECTS ON SPONTANEOUS NETWORK ACTIVITY AND CELL VIABILITY FROM MICROELECTRODE ARRAYSABSTRACT BODY: Microelectrode array (MEA) recordings are increasingly being used as an in vitro method to detect and characte...

  9. Highly doped polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes reduce noise in neuronal recordings in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saha, Rajarshi; Jackson, Nathan; Patel, Chetan; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2010-10-01

    The aims of this study are to 1) experimentally validate for the first time the nonlinear current-potential characteristics of bulk doped polycrystalline silicon in the small amplitude voltage regimes (0-200 μV) and 2) test if noise amplitudes ( 0-15 μV ) from single neuronal electrical recordings get selectively attenuated in doped polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes due to the above property. In highly doped polycrystalline silicon, bulk resistances of several hundred kilo-ohms were experimentally measured for voltages typical of noise amplitudes and 9-10 kΩ for voltages typical of neural signal amplitudes ( > 150-200 μV). Acute multiunit measurements and noise measurements were made in n=6 and n=8 anesthetized adult rats, respectively, using polycrystalline silicon and tungsten microelectrodes. There was no significant difference in the peak-to-peak amplitudes of action potentials recorded from either microelectrode (p > 0.10). However, noise power in the recordings from tungsten microelectrodes (26.36 ±10.13 pW) was significantly higher than the corresponding value in polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes (7.49 ±2.66 pW). We conclude that polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes result in selective attenuation of noise power in electrical recordings compared to tungsten microelectrodes. This reduction in noise compared to tungsten microelectrodes is likely due to the exponentially higher bulk resistances offered by highly doped bulk polycrystalline silicon in the range of voltages corresponding to noise in multiunit measurements.

  10. A Tapered Aluminium Microelectrode Array for Improvement of Dielectrophoresis-Based Particle Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Buyong, Muhamad Ramdzan; Larki, Farhad; Faiz, Mohd Syafiq; Hamzah, Azrul Azlan; Yunas, Jumrail; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the dielectrophoretic force (FDEP) response of Aluminium Microelectrode Arrays with tapered profile is investigated through experimental measurements and numerical simulations. A standard CMOS processing technique with a step for the formation of a tapered profile resist is implemented in the fabrication of Tapered Aluminium Microelectrode Arrays (TAMA). The FDEP is investigated through analysis of the Clausius-Mossotti factor (CMF) and cross-over frequency (fxo). The performance of TAMA with various side wall angles is compared to that of microelectrodes with a straight cut sidewall profile over a wide range of frequencies through FEM numerical simulations. Additionally, electric field measurement (EFM) is performed through scanning probe microscopy (SPM) in order to obtain the region of force focus in both platforms. Results showed that the tapered profile microelectrodes with angles between 60° and 70° produce the highest electric field gradient on the particles. Also, the region of the strongest electric field in TAMA is located at the bottom and top edge of microelectrode while the strongest electric field in microelectrodes with straight cut profile is found at the top corner of the microelectrode. The latter property of microelectrodes improves the probability of capturing/repelling the particles at the microelectrode’s side wall. PMID:25970255

  11. Fabrication and characterization of nonplanar microelectrode array circuits for use in arthroscopic diagnosis of cartilage diseases.

    PubMed

    Quenneville, Eric; Binette, Jean-Sébastien; Garon, Martin; Légaré, Anne; Meunier, Michel; Buschmann, Michael D

    2004-12-01

    A process to fabricate nonplanar microelectrode array circuits was developed and the microelectrodes were characterized. These platinum microelectrode arrays are for recording streaming potential signals generated during indentation of articular cartilage. The nonplanar substrate was produced by permanent deformation of a 7-in-diameter circular stainless-steel wafer to form 32 semi-spherical caps (radius of curvature = 4.65 mm and height = 250 microm) at the periphery. The wafer was covered with a 2.5-microm-thick layer of insulating polyimide. Standard microelectronic processes were applied to produce 32 circuits (60 mm long x 4 mm wide) with 37 exposed circular microelectrodes (diameter = 100 microm) centered over each semi-spherical cap. A 2.5-microm-thick photodefinable polyimide layer encapsulated the conducting lines. Capacitances between one microelectrode and either another microelectrode or the metallic substrate were 14.6 +/- 2.0 and 34.4 +/- 3.3 pF, respectively, at 100 Hz. The impedance of the microelectrodes in a 0.15 M saline bath (PBS) was 0.25 +/- 0.08 Mohms while the crosstalk (Vinduced/Vapplied) between two microelectrodes was 0.20 +/- 0.11%, at 100 Hz. Indentation measurements were performed on articular cartilage in vitro showing,streaming potentials that indicate electrode-tissue contact times and generation of streaming potentials.

  12. Iridium alloy clad vent set manufacturing qualification studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, George B.

    1991-01-01

    Qualification studies have been successfully conducted to demonstrate iridium alloy Clad Vent Set (CVS) manufacturing readiness for the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. These studies were joint comparison evaluations of both the Y-12 Plant and EG&G Mound G-MAT) products. Note: EG&G-MAT formerly manufactured the iridium alloy CVS. The comparison evaluations involved work in a number of areas; however, only the CVS cup metallurgical evalution will be presented here. The initial metallurgical comparisons in conjunction with follow-up metallurgical work showed the Y-12 Plant CVS product to be comparable to the fully qualified (for Galileo and Ulysses missions) EG&G-MAT product. This allowed the Y-12 Plant to commence pilot production of CVS components for potential use in the CRAF and CASSINI missions.

  13. Iridium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Unsaturated Carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shou-Fei; Zhou, Qi-Lin

    2017-04-04

    Chiral carboxylic acid moieties are widely found in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, flavors, fragrances, and health supplements. Although they can be synthesized straightforwardly by transition-metal-catalyzed enantioselective hydrogenation of unsaturated carboxylic acids, because the existing chiral catalysts have various disadvantages, the development of new chiral catalysts with high activity and enantioselectivity is an important, long-standing challenge. Ruthenium complexes with chiral diphosphine ligands and rhodium complexes with chiral monodentate or bidentate phosphorus ligands have been the predominant catalysts for asymmetric hydrogenation of unsaturated acids. However, the efficiency of these catalysts is highly substrate-dependent, and most of the reported catalysts require a high loading, high hydrogen pressure, or long reaction time for satisfactory results. Our recent studies have revealed that chiral iridium complexes with chiral spiro-phosphine-oxazoline ligands and chiral spiro-phosphine-benzylamine ligands exhibit excellent activity and enantioselectivity in the hydrogenation of α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acids, including α,β-disubstituted acrylic acids, trisubstituted acrylic acids, α-substituted acrylic acids, and heterocyclic α,β-unsaturated acids. On the basis of an understanding of the role of the carboxy group in iridium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation reactions, we developed a carboxy-group-directed strategy for asymmetric hydrogenation of olefins. Using this strategy, we hydrogenated several challenging olefin substrates, such as β,γ-unsaturated carboxylic acids, 1,1-diarylethenes, 1,1-dialkylethenes, and 1-alkyl styrenes in high yield and with excellent enantioselectivity. All these iridium-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation reactions feature high turnover numbers (up to 10000) and turnover frequencies (up to 6000 h(-1)), excellent enantioselectivities (greater than 95% ee with few exceptions), low hydrogen pressure (<12 atm

  14. Iridium-catalyzed C-H borylation of pyridines.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Scott A; Tajuddin, Hazmi; Mkhalid, Ibraheem A I; Batsanov, Andrei S; Albesa-Jove, David; Cheung, Man Sing; Maxwell, Aoife C; Shukla, Lena; Roberts, Bryan; Blakemore, David C; Lin, Zhenyang; Marder, Todd B; Steel, Patrick G

    2014-10-07

    The iridium-catalysed C-H borylation is a valuable and attractive method for the preparation of aryl and heteroaryl boronates. However, application of this methodology for the preparation of pyridyl and related azinyl boronates can be challenged by low reactivity and propensity for rapid protodeborylation, particularly for a boronate ester ortho to the azinyl nitrogen. Competition experiments have revealed that the low reactivity is due to inhibition of the active catalyst through coordination of the azinyl nitrogen lone pair at the vacant site on the iridium. This effect can be overcome through the incorporation of a substituent at C-2. Moreover, when this is sufficiently electron-withdrawing protodeborylation is sufficiently slowed to permit isolation and purification of the C-6 boronate ester. Following functionalization, reduction of the directing C-2 substituent provides the product arising from formal ortho borylation of an unhindered pyridine ring.

  15. Water-soluble iridium phosphorescent complexes for OLED applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eum, Min-Sik; Yoon, Heekoo; Kim, Tae Hyung

    2012-09-01

    Newly prepared water-soluble iridium phosphorescent complexes, trans-[Ir(ppy)(PAr3)2(H)L]0,+ (ppy = bidentate 2-phenylpyridinato anionic ligand; L= Cl (1), CO (2), CN- (3); H being trans to the nitrogen of ppy ligand; PAr3 (TPPTS) = P(m-C6H4SO3Na)3), have been synthesized and characterized. Those complexes containing water-soluble phosphine ligands can emit any color region as altering cyclometalated ligands in aqueous media with high quantum efficiencies. Even though these water-soluble phosphorescent iridium complexes can be the sensing probe for toxic CO gas and CN anion, they will be capable of promising materials in the solution processible OLED applications.

  16. Circularly polarised phosphorescent photoluminescence and electroluminescence of iridium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tian-Yi; Jing, Yi-Ming; Liu, Xuan; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Lin; Tang, Zhiyong; Zheng, You-Xuan; Zuo, Jing-Lin

    2015-10-01

    Nearly all the neutral iridium complexes widely used as dopants in PhOLEDs are racemic mixtures; however, this study observed that these complexes can be separated into stable optically active Λ and ∆ isomers and that their chirality is an intrinsic property. The circularly polarised phosphorescent photoluminescence (CPPPL) signals of Λ/Δ isomers are perfect mirror images with opposite polarisation and equal intensity exhibiting a “handedness” for the polarisation. For the first time, we applied the Λ/Δ iridium isomers as emitters in OLEDs, and the circularly polarised phosphorescent electroluminescence (CPPEL) spectra reveal completely positive or negative broad peaks consistent with the CPPPL spectra. The results demonstrate that the Λ/Δ isomers have potential application for 3D OLEDs because they can exhibit high efficiency and luminance, and 3D display technology based on circularly polarised light is the most comfortable for the eyes.

  17. Network flexibility of the IRIDIUM (R) Global Mobile Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Jonathan; Laurin, Mala

    1995-01-01

    The IRIDIUM system is a global personal communications system supported by a constellation of 66 low earth orbit (LEO) satellites and a collection of earth-based 'gateway' switching installations. Like traditional wireless cellular systems, coverage is achieved by a grid of cells in which bandwidth is reused for spectral efficiency. Unlike any cellular system ever built, the moving cells can be shared by multiple switching facilities. Noteworthy features of the IRIDIUM system include inter-satellite links, a GSM-based telephony architecture, and a geographically controlled system access process. These features, working in concert, permit flexible and reliable administration of the worldwide service area by gateway operators. This paper will explore this unique concept.

  18. Superconducting iridium thin films as transition edge sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogorin, Daniela F.

    Transition edge sensors are the detectors of choice for a wide range of applications; from dark matter search, neutrino search, to cosmic radiation detection from near infrared to millimeter wavelengths. We are developing transition edge sensors using superconducting iridium thin films and we are proposing their use for future dark matter and neutrino search experiments. Our Ir films are deposited using an radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering and photolithographic techniques and measured using an adiabatic refrigerator capable of reaching temperatures of a few tens of mK. This thesis presents a detailed description of superconducting iridium thin films from the fabrication process to the characterization of the film properties at room temperature and low temperature. Alternative options for the bias circuit used to read out the TES signals will be discussed, we are proposing the use of RLC resonant circuits and transformers instead of SQUIDS.

  19. Network flexibility of the IRIDIUM (R) Global Mobile Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Jonathan; Laurin, Mala

    1995-01-01

    The IRIDIUM system is a global personal communications system supported by a constellation of 66 low earth orbit (LEO) satellites and a collection of earth-based 'gateway' switching installations. Like traditional wireless cellular systems, coverage is achieved by a grid of cells in which bandwidth is reused for spectral efficiency. Unlike any cellular system ever built, the moving cells can be shared by multiple switching facilities. Noteworthy features of the IRIDIUM system include inter-satellite links, a GSM-based telephony architecture, and a geographically controlled system access process. These features, working in concert, permit flexible and reliable administration of the worldwide service area by gateway operators. This paper will explore this unique concept.

  20. Probing the Viability of Oxo-Coupling Pathways in Iridium-Catalyzed Oxygen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Graeupner, Jonathan; Hintermair, Ulrich; Huang, Daria L; Thomsen, Julianne M; Takase, Mike; Campos, Jesús; Hashmi, Sara M; Elimelech, Menachem; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H

    2013-10-14

    A series of Cp*Ir(III) dimers have been synthesized to elucidate the mechanistic viability of radical oxo-coupling pathways in iridium-catalyzed O2 evolution. The oxidative stability of the precursors toward nanoparticle formation and their oxygen evolution activity have been investigated and compared to suitable monomeric analogues. We found that precursors bearing monodentate NHC ligands degraded to form nanoparticles (NPs), and accordingly their O2 evolution rates were not significantly influenced by their nuclearity or distance between the two metals in the dimeric precursors. A doubly chelating bis-pyridine-pyrazolide ligand provided an oxidation-resistant ligand framework that allowed a more meaningful comparison of catalytic performance of dimers with their corresponding monomers. With sodium periodate (NaIO4) as the oxidant, the dimers provided significantly lower O2 evolution rates per [Ir] than the monomer, suggesting a negative interaction instead of cooperativity in the catalytic cycle. Electrochemical analysis of the dimers further substantiates the notion that no radical oxyl-coupling pathways are accessible. We thus conclude that the alternative path, nucleophilic attack of water on high-valent Ir-oxo species, may be the preferred mechanistic pathway of water oxidation with these catalysts, and bimolecular oxo-coupling is not a valid mechanistic alternative as in the related ruthenium chemistry, at least in the present system.

  1. Probing the Viability of Oxo-Coupling Pathways in Iridium-Catalyzed Oxygen Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Graeupner, Jonathan; Hintermair, Ulrich; Huang, Daria L.; Thomsen, Julianne M.; Takase, Mike; Campos, Jesús; Hashmi, Sara M.; Elimelech, Menachem; Brudvig, Gary W.; Crabtree, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    A series of Cp*IrIII dimers have been synthesized to elucidate the mechanistic viability of radical oxo-coupling pathways in iridium-catalyzed O2 evolution. The oxidative stability of the precursors toward nanoparticle formation and their oxygen evolution activity have been investigated and compared to suitable monomeric analogues. We found that precursors bearing monodentate NHC ligands degraded to form nanoparticles (NPs), and accordingly their O2 evolution rates were not significantly influenced by their nuclearity or distance between the two metals in the dimeric precursors. A doubly chelating bis-pyridine–pyrazolide ligand provided an oxidation-resistant ligand framework that allowed a more meaningful comparison of catalytic performance of dimers with their corresponding monomers. With sodium periodate (NaIO4) as the oxidant, the dimers provided significantly lower O2 evolution rates per [Ir] than the monomer, suggesting a negative interaction instead of cooperativity in the catalytic cycle. Electrochemical analysis of the dimers further substantiates the notion that no radical oxyl-coupling pathways are accessible. We thus conclude that the alternative path, nucleophilic attack of water on high-valent Ir-oxo species, may be the preferred mechanistic pathway of water oxidation with these catalysts, and bimolecular oxo-coupling is not a valid mechanistic alternative as in the related ruthenium chemistry, at least in the present system. PMID:24474842

  2. Aggregation-induced phosphorescence of iridium(III) complexes with 2,2'-bipyridine-acylhydrazone and their highly selective recognition to Cu2+.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Wu, Yu-Hui; Luo, Jian; Shi, Lin-Xi; Chen, Zhong-Ning

    2013-02-21

    Two cationic cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes with 2,2'-bipyridine-acylhydrazone were synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic and photophysical measurements. They exhibit remarkable aggregation-induced phosphorescent emission (AIPE) phenomenon which is caused by the restriction of rapid isomerization of the C=N bond in the acylhydrazone moiety and are supported by TD-DFT studies. They also act as a significant 'off-on' luminescent switch for Cu(2+) which works as both catalyzer and oxidant in the sensing process, resulting in hydrolysis and cyclization products which are highly emissive. The sensing properties of iridium(III) complexes are also investigated by ESI-MS spectrometry and (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

  3. Prototyping iridium coated mirrors for x-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döhring, Thorsten; Probst, Anne-Catherine; Stollenwerk, Manfred; Emmerich, Florian; Stehlíková, Veronika; Inneman, Adolf

    2017-05-01

    X-ray astronomy uses space-based telescopes to overcome the disturbing absorption of the Eart&hacute;s atmosphere. The telescope mirrors are operating at grazing incidence angles and are coated with thin metal films of high-Z materials to get sufficient reflectivity for the high-energy radiation to be observed. In addition the optical payload needs to be light-weighted for launcher mass constrains. Within the project JEUMICO, an acronym for "Joint European Mirror Competence", the Aschaffenburg University of Applied Sciences and the Czech Technical University in Prague started a collaboration to develop mirrors for X-ray telescopes. The X-ray telescopes currently developed within this Bavarian- Czech project are of Lobster eye type optical design. Corresponding mirror segments use substrates of flat silicon wafers which are coated with thin iridium films, as this material is promising high reflectivity in the X-ray range of interest. The deposition of the iridium films is based on a magnetron sputtering process. Sputtering with different parameters, especially by variation of the argon gas pressure, leads to iridium films with different properties. In addition to investigations of the uncoated mirror substrates the achieved surface roughness has been studied. Occasional delamination of the iridium films due to high stress levels is prevented by chromium sublayers. Thereby the sputtering parameters are optimized in the context of the expected reflectivity of the coated X-ray mirrors. In near future measurements of the assembled mirror modules optical performances are planned at an X-ray test facility.

  4. Olefin oxygenation by water on an iridium center.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Tapas; Sarkar, Mithun; Dinda, Shrabani; Dutta, Indranil; Rahaman, S M Wahidur; Bera, Jitendra K

    2015-05-20

    Oxygenation of 1,5-cyclooctadiene (COD) is achieved on an iridium center using water as a reagent. A hydrogen-bonding interaction with an unbound nitrogen atom of the naphthyridine-based ligand architecture promotes nucleophilic attack of water to the metal-bound COD. Irida-oxetane and oxo-irida-allyl compounds are isolated, products which are normally accessed from reactions with H2O2 or O2. DFT studies support a ligand-assisted water activation mechanism.

  5. Iridium-Catalyzed Regioselective and Enantioselective Allylation of Trimethylsiloxyfuran

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenyong; Hartwig, John F.

    2012-01-01

    We report the regioselective and enantioselective allylation of an ester enolate, trimethylsiloxyfuran. This enolate reacts in the 3-position with linear aromatic allylic carbonates or aliphatic allylic benzoates to form the branched substitution products in the presence of a metallacyclic iridium catalyst. This process provides access to synthetically important 3-substituted butenolides in enantioenriched form. Stoichiometric reactions of the allyliridium intermediate imply that the trimethylsiloxyfuran is activated by the carboxylate leaving group. PMID:22954355

  6. Electrocatalysis with vitamin B sub 12 in water-in-oil microemulsions at carbon-fiber microelectrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Owlia, A.

    1989-01-01

    Microemulsions are clear, thermodynamically stable dispersions containing oil, surfactant and water. They are crude models of biological membranes and can be used to investigate some of the organizational influence of membranes in lipid and protein synthesis, energy transduction, ion and group transport, etc. This thesis concerns the investigation of microemulsion properties as media in which catalytic reduction of vicinal dibromides can take place with the electrochemically generated Co(I) form of Vitamin B{sub 12}. Methods to study fundamental properties of resistive w/o AOT/H{sub 2}O/isoctane were developed. Microelectrodes of approximate radius of 6 {mu}m were prepared and characterized. Nonlinear regression was applied to the analysis of steady state voltammograms obtained at carbon-fiber microelectrodes. Reversible regression models were used to analyze data for oxidation of ferrocene in acetonitrile with and without added electrolyte. An estimate of cell resistance in highly resistive media was obtained by including ohmic drop in the model for reversible electron transfer. The electrocatalytic reduction of 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB), 1,2-dibromobutane (DBB), and trans-1,2-dibromocyclohexane (DBCH) with Vitamin B{sub 12} in pH {le} 3 water MeCN and w/o microemulsions of AOT/H{sub 2}O/isoctane at carbon fiber microelectrode was investigated. The microviscosity of w/o microemulsions were estimated from the Stokes-Einstein equation using ferrocene as a probe. Results show that the diffusion of molecules in the microemulsions are similar to their diffusion in organic phase (isoctane). Nonlinear regression analysis of the data for AOT w/o microemulsions describing the dependence of D{prime} on C{sub x} enables an estimate of micelle diffusion coefficients.

  7. Highly conductive and flexible silver nanowire-based microelectrodes on biocompatible hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yumi; Lee, Hyungjin; Lee, Donghwa; Lee, Youngu

    2014-01-01

    We successfully fabricated silver nanowire (AgNW)-based microelectrodes on various substrates such as a glass and polydimethylsiloxane by using a photolithographic process for the first time. The AgNW-based microelectrodes exhibited excellent electrical conductivity and mechanical flexibility. We also demonstrated the direct transfer process of AgNW-based microelectrodes from a glass to a biocompatible polyacrylamide-based hydrogel. The AgNW-based microelectrodes on the biocompatible hydrogel showed excellent electrical performance. Furthermore, they showed great mechanical flexibility as well as superior stability under wet conditions. We anticipate that the AgNW-based microelectrodes on biocompatible hydrogel substrates can be a promising platform for realization of practical bioelectronics devices.

  8. Chronic intracortical neural recordings using microelectrode arrays coated with PEDOT-TFB.

    PubMed

    Charkhkar, Hamid; Knaack, Gretchen L; McHail, Daniel G; Mandal, Himadri S; Peixoto, Nathalia; Rubinson, Judith F; Dumas, Theodore C; Pancrazio, Joseph J

    2016-03-01

    Microelectrode arrays have been extensively utilized to record extracellular neuronal activity for brain-machine interface applications. Modifying the microelectrodes with conductive polymers such as poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) has been reported to be advantageous because it increases the effective surface area of the microelectrodes, thereby decreasing impedance and enhancing charge transfer capacity. However, the long term stability and integrity of such coatings for chronic recordings remains unclear. Previously, our group has demonstrated that use of the smaller counter ion tetrafluoroborate (TFB) during electrodeposition increased the stability of the PEDOT coatings in vitro compared to the commonly used counter ion poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS). In the current work, we examined the long-term in vivo performance of PEDOT-TFB coated microelectrodes. To do so, we selectively modified half of the microelectrodes on NeuroNexus single shank probes with PEDOT-TFB while the other half of the microelectrodes were modified with gold as a control. The modified probes were then implanted into the primary motor cortex of rats. Single unit recordings were observed on both PEDOT-TFB and gold control microelectrodes for more than 12 weeks. Compared to the gold-coated microelectrodes, the PEDOT-TFB coated microelectrodes exhibited an overall significantly lower impedance and higher number of units per microelectrode specifically for the first four weeks. The majority of PEDOT-TFB microelectrodes with activity had an impedance magnitude lower than 400 kΩ at 1 kHz. Our equivalent circuit modeling of the impedance data suggests stability in the polymer-related parameters for the duration of the study. In addition, when comparing PEDOT-TFB microelectrodes with and without long-term activity, we observed a distinction in certain circuit parameters for these microelectrodes derived from equivalent circuit modeling prior to implantation. This observation may prove

  9. Mononuclear iridium dinitrogen complexes bonded to zeolite HY

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Dong; Chen, Mingyang; Martinez-Macias, Claudia; ...

    2014-11-07

    In this study, the adsorption of N2 on structurally well-defined dealuminated HY zeolite-supported iridium diethylene complexes was investigated. Iridium dinitrogen complexes formed when the sample was exposed to N2 in H2 at 298 K, as shown by infrared spectra recorded with isotopically labeled N2. Four supported species formed in various flowing gases: Ir(N2), Ir(N2)(N2), Ir(C2H5)(N2), and Ir(H)(N2). Their interconversions are summarized in a reaction network, showing, for example, that, in the presence of N2, Ir(N2) was the predominant dinitrogen species at temperatures of 273-373 K. Ir(CO)(N2) formed transiently in flowing CO, and in the presence of H2, rather stable iridiummore » hydride complexes formed. Here, four structural models of each iridium complex bonded at the acidic sites of the zeolite were employed in a computational investigation, showing that the calculated vibrational frequencies agree well with experiment when full calculations are done at the level of density functional theory, independent of the size of the model of the zeolite.« less

  10. Mono- and bis-tolylterpyridine iridium(III) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkle, Lindsay M.; Young, Jr., Victor G.; Mann, Kent R.

    2012-01-20

    The first structure report of trichlorido[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) dimethyl sulfoxide solvate, [IrCl{sub 3}(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})] {center_dot} C{sub 2}H{sub 6}OS, (I), is presented, along with a higher-symmetry setting of previously reported bis[4'-(p-tolyl)-2,2':6',2{double_prime}-terpyridine]iridium(III) tris(hexafluoridophosphate) acetonitrile disolvate, [Ir(C{sub 22}H{sub 17}N{sub 3})2](PF{sub 6}){sub 3} {center_dot} 2C{sub 2}H{sub 3}N, (II) [Yoshikawa, Yamabe, Kanehisa, Kai, Takashima & Tsukahara (2007). Eur. J. Inorg. Chem. pp. 1911-1919]. For (I), the data were collected with synchrotron radiation and the dimethyl sulfoxide solvent molecule is disordered over three positions, one of which is an inversion center. The previously reported structure of (II) is presented in the more appropriate C2/c space group. The iridium complex and one PF{sub 6}{sup -} anion lie on twofold axes in this structure, making half of the molecule unique.

  11. Digital microfluidic operations on micro-electrode dot array architecture.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Teng, D; Fan, S-K

    2011-12-01

    As digital microfluidics-based biochips find more applications, their complexity is expected to increase significantly owing to the trend of multiple and concurrent assays on the chip. There is a pressing need to deliver a top-down design methodology that the biochip designer can leverage the same level of computer-aided design support as the semi-conductor industry now does. Moreover, as microelectronics fabrication technology is scaling up and integrated device performance is improving, it is expected that these microfluidic biochips will be integrated with microelectronic components in next-generation system-on-chip designs. This study presents the analysis and experiments of digital microfluidic operations on a novel electrowetting-on-dielectric-based 'micro-electrode dot array architecture' that fosters a development path for hierarchical top-down design approach for digital microfluidics. The proposed architecture allows dynamic configurations and activations of identical basic microfluidic unit called 'micro-electrode cells' to design microfluidic components, layouts, routing, microfluidic operations and applications of the biochip hierarchically. Fundamental microfluidic operations have been successfully performed by the architecture. In addition, this novel architecture demonstrates a number of advantages and flexibilities over the conventional digital microfluidics in performing advanced microfluidic operations.

  12. Interdigitated array microelectrode capacitive sensor for detection of paraffinophilic mycobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, Andrew M.; Peterson, Erik T. K.; Papautsky, Ian

    2008-02-01

    Mycobacterium Avium Complex (MAC) is an opportunistic pathogen that threatens public health and has high clinical relevance. While culture-based and molecular biology techniques for identification are available, these methods are prone to error and require weeks to perform. There is a critical need for improved portable lab-on-a-chip sensor technology which will enable accurate and rapid point-of-care detection of these microorganisms. In this work, a new capacitive sensing strategy is explored utilizing interdigitated array (IDA) microelectrodes and exploiting the paraffinophilic nature of MAC. In this approach, paraffin wax is deposited over IDA microelectrodes to selectively extract these microorganisms from samples. As bacteria consume the dielectric paraffin layer, the charging current of the IDA capacitor changes to facilitate detection. Several IDA geometries were designed and simulated using CFD-ACE+ modeling software and compared with mathematical models. Capacitance of fabricated devices was determined using a charge-based capacitance measurement (CBCM) technique. Modeling and experimental results were in good agreement. Detection of femto-Farad changes in capacitance is possible, making this a feasible technique for sensing small changes in the paraffin for detection of paraffinophilic MAC.

  13. In-Vivo Characterization of Glassy Carbon Micro-Electrode Arrays for Neural Applications and Histological Analysis of the Brain Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vomero, Maria

    The aim of this work is to fabricate and characterize glassy carbon Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs) for sensing and stimulating neural activity, and conduct histological analysis of the brain tissue after the implant to determine long-term performance. Neural applications often require robust electrical and electrochemical response over a long period of time, and for those applications we propose to replace the commonly used noble metals like platinum, gold and iridium with glassy carbon. We submit that such material has the potential to improve the performances of traditional neural prostheses, thanks to better charge transfer capabilities and higher electrochemical stability. Great interest and attention is given in this work, in particular, to the investigation of tissue response after several weeks of implants in rodents' brain motor cortex and the associated materials degradation. As part of this work, a new set of devices for Electrocorticography (ECoG) has been designed and fabricated to improve durability and quality of the previous generation of devices, designed and manufactured by the same research group in 2014. In-vivo long-term impedance measurements and brain activity recordings were performed to test the functionality of the neural devices. In-vitro electrical characterization of the carbon electrodes, as well as the study of the adhesion mechanisms between glassy carbon and different substrates is also part of the research described in this book.

  14. Long-Term Neural Recordings Using MEMS Based Movable Microelectrodes in the Brain.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Nathan; Sridharan, Arati; Anand, Sindhu; Baker, Michael; Okandan, Murat; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2010-01-01

    One of the critical requirements of the emerging class of neural prosthetic devices is to maintain good quality neural recordings over long time periods. We report here a novel MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) based technology that can move microelectrodes in the event of deterioration in neural signal to sample a new set of neurons. Microscale electro-thermal actuators are used to controllably move microelectrodes post-implantation in steps of approximately 9 mum. In this study, a total of 12 movable microelectrode chips were individually implanted in adult rats. Two of the twelve movable microelectrode chips were not moved over a period of 3 weeks and were treated as control experiments. During the first 3 weeks of implantation, moving the microelectrodes led to an improvement in the average signal to noise ratio (SNR) from 14.61 +/- 5.21 dB before movement to 18.13 +/- 4.99 dB after movement across all microelectrodes and all days. However, the average root-mean-square values of noise amplitudes were similar at 2.98 +/- 1.22 muV and 3.01 +/- 1.16 muV before and after microelectrode movement. Beyond 3 weeks, the primary observed failure mode was biological rejection of the PMMA (dental cement) based skull mount resulting in the device loosening and eventually falling from the skull. Additionally, the average SNR for functioning devices beyond 3 weeks was 11.88 +/- 2.02 dB before microelectrode movement and was significantly different (p < 0.01) from the average SNR of 13.34 +/- 0.919 dB after movement. The results of this study demonstrate that MEMS based technologies can move microelectrodes in rodent brains in long-term experiments resulting in improvements in signal quality. Further improvements in packaging and surgical techniques will potentially enable movable microelectrodes to record cortical neuronal activity in chronic experiments.

  15. Evaluation of Molybdenum as a Surrogate for Iridium in the GPHS Weld Development

    SciTech Connect

    Stine, Andrew Martin; Pierce, Stanley W.; Moniz, Paul F.

    2015-10-17

    The welding equipment used for welding iridium containers (clads) at Los Alamos National Laboratory is twenty five years old and is undergoing an upgrade. With the upgrade, there is a requirement for requalification of the welding process, and the opportunity for process improvement. Testing of the new system and requalification will require several welds on iridium test parts and clads, and any efforts to improve the process will add to the need for iridium parts. The extreme high cost of iridium imposes a severe limitation on the extent of test welding that can be done. The 2 inch diameter, 0.027 inch thick, iridium blank disc that the clad cup is formed from, is useful for initial weld trials, but it costs $5000. The development clad sets needed for final tests and requalification cost $15,000 per set. A solution to iridium cost issue would be to do the majority of the weld development on a less expensive surrogate metal with similar weld characteristics. One such metal is molybdenum. Since its melting index (melting temperature x thermal conductivity) is closest to iridium, welds on molybdenum should be similar in size for a given weld power level. Molybdenum is inexpensive; a single 2 inch molybdenum disc costs only $9. In order to evaluate molybdenum as a surrogate for iridium, GTA welds were first developed to provide full penetration on 0.030 inch thick molybdenum discs at speeds of 20, 25, and 30 inches per minute (ipm). These weld parameters were then repeated on the standard 0.027 inch thick iridium blanks. The top surface and bottom surface (root) width and grain structure of the molybdenum and iridium welds were compared, and similarities were evident between the two metals. Due to material and thickness differences, the iridium welds were approximately 35% wider than the molybdenum welds. A reduction in iridium weld current of 35% produce welds slightly smaller than the molybdenum welds yet showed that current could be scaled according to molybdenum/iridium

  16. Rockot Launch Vehicle Commercial Operations for Grace and Iridium Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viertel, Y.; Kinnersley, M.; Schumacher, I.

    2002-01-01

    The GRACE mission and the IRIDIUM mission on ROCKOT launch vehicle are presented. Two identical GRACE satellites to measure in tandem the gravitational field of the earth with previously unattainable accuracy - it's called the Gravity Research and Climate Experiment, or and is a joint project of the U.S. space agency, NASA and the German Centre for Aeronautics and Space Flight, DLR. In order to send the GRACE twins into a 500x500 km , 89deg. orbit, the Rockot launch vehicle was selected. A dual launch of two Iridium satellites was scheduled for June 2002 using the ROCKOT launch vehicle from Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Northern Russia. This launch will inject two replacement satellites into a low earth orbit (LEO) to support the maintenance of the Iridium constellation. In September 2001, Eurockot successfully carried out a "Pathfinder Campaign" to simulate the entire Iridium mission cycle at Plesetsk. The campaign comprised the transport of simulators and related equipment to the Russian port-of-entry and launch site and also included the integration and encapsulation of the simulators with the actual Rockot launch vehicle at Eurockot's dedicated launch facilities at Plesetsk Cosmodrome. The pathfinder campaign lasted four weeks and was carried out by a joint team that also included Khrunichev, Russian Space Forces and Eurockot personnel on the contractors' side. The pathfinder mission confirmed the capability of Eurockot Launch Services to perform the Iridium launch on cost and on schedule at Plesetsk following Eurockot's major investment in international standard preparation, integration and launch facilities including customer facilities and a new hotel. In 2003, Eurockot will also launch the Japanese SERVI'S-1 satellite for USEF. The ROCKOT launch vehicle is a 3 stage liquid fuel rocket whose first 2 stages have been adapted from the Russian SS-19. A third stage, called "Breeze", can be repeatedly ignited and is extraordinarily capable of manoeuvre. Rockot can place

  17. Effects of hydroxylamine on microbial community structure and function of autotrophic nitrifying biofilms determined by in situ hybridization and the use of microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Kindaichi, T; Okabe, S; Satoh, H; Watanabe, Y

    2004-01-01

    Effects of hydroxylamine (NH2OH), an intermediate of NH4+ oxidation, on microbial community structure and function of two autotrophic nitrifying biofilms fed with and without NH2OH were analyzed by a 16S rRNA approach and the use of microelectrodes. In the NH2OH-added biofilm, partial oxidation of NH4+ to NO2- was observed, whereas complete oxidation of NH4+ to NO3- was achieved in the control biofilm. In situ hybridization results revealed that no nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) hybridized with any specific probes were detected in the NH2OH-added biofilm. Thus, the addition of low concentrations of NH2OH (250 microM) completely inhibited the growth of NOB. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA indicated that the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) detected in both biofilms were closely related to Nitrosomonas europaea, and that the clone sequences from both biofilm libraries have more than 99% similarity to each other. However, in situ hybridization results revealed that the addition of NH2OH changed the form of growth pattern of the dominant Nitrosomonas spp. from dense clusters mode to single scattered cells mode. Microelectrode measurements revealed that the average NH4+ consumption rate calculated in the NH2OH-added biofilm was two times higher than that in the control biofilm. This clearly demonstrated that the oxidation of NH4+ was stimulated by NH2OH addition.

  18. Semiconductor films on flexible iridium substrates

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit

    2005-03-29

    A laminate semiconductor article includes a flexible substrate, an optional biaxially textured oxide buffer system on the flexible substrate, a biaxially textured Ir-based buffer layer on the substrate or the buffer system, and an epitaxial layer of a semiconductor. Ir can serve as a substrate with an epitaxial layer of a semiconductor thereon.

  19. Characterization of Iridium Coated Rhenium Used in High-Temperature, Radiation-Cooled Rocket Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stulen, R. H.; Boehme, D. R.; Clift, W. M.; McCarty, K. F.

    1990-01-01

    Materials used for radiation-cooled rocket thrusters must be capable of surviving under extreme conditions of high-temperatures and oxidizing environments. While combustion efficiency is optimized at high temperatures, many refractory metals are unsuitable for thruster applications due to rapid material loss from the formation of volatile oxides. This process occurs during thruster operation by reaction of the combustion products with the material surface. Aerojet Technical Systems has developed a thruster cone chamber constructed of Re coated with Ir on the inside surface where exposure to the rocket exhaust occurs. Re maintains its structural integrity at high temperature and the Ir coating is applied as an oxidation barrier. Ir also forms volatile oxide species (IrO2 and IrO3) but at a considerably slower rate than Re. In order to understand the performance limits of Ir-coated Re thrusters, we are investigating the interdiffusion and oxidation kinetics of Ir/Re. The formation of iridium and rhenium oxides has been monitored in situ by Raman spectroscopy during high temperature exposure to oxygen. For pure Ir, the growth of oxide films as thin as approximately 200 A could be easily detected and the formation of IrO2 was observed at temperatures as low as 600 C. Ir/Re diffusion test specimens were prepared by magnetron sputtering of Ir on Re substrates. Concentration profiles were determined by sputter Auger depth profiles of the heat treated specimens. Significant interdiffusion was observed at temperatures as low as 1000 C. Measurements of the activation energy suggest that below 1350 C, the dominant diffusion path is along defects, most likely grain boundaries, rather than bulk diffusion through the grains. The phases that form during interdiffusion have been examined by x ray diffraction. Analysis of heated test specimens indicates that the Ir-Re reaction produces a solid solution phase of Ir dissolved in the HCP structure of Re.

  20. Structural, kinetic, and thermodynamic study of the reversible thermal C-H activation/reductive elimination of alkanes at iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, J.M.; Stryker, J.M.; Bergman, R.G.

    1986-04-02

    The hydrido alkyl iridium complex Cp*(PMe/sub 3/)Ir(Cy)(H) (1, Cp* = eta/sup 5/-C/sub 5/; Cy = cyclohexyl) has been isolated by air-free chromatography at -80/sup 0/C, and its molecular structure has been determined by X-ray diffraction. Thermolysis of 1 in benzene cleanly produces cyclohexane and Cp*(PMe/sub 3/)Ir(Ph)(H) (2). The rate of reaction is first-order in 1, zero-order in benzene, and inhibited by cyclohexane; its activation parameters are ..delta..H/sup + +/ = 35.6 +/- 0.5 kcal/mol and ..delta..S/sup + +/ = +10 +/- 2 eu. An inverse isotope effect, kappa/sub h/kappa/sub d/ = 0.7 +/- 0.1, is calculated from rates of cyclohexane and cyclohexane-d/sub 12/ reductive elimination at 130/sup 0/C, and deuterium scrambling between the hydride and ..cap alpha..-cyclohexyl positions is observed to occur competitively with reductive elimination. A mechanism is proposed in which cyclohexane loss from 1 is reversible and produces (Cp*(PMe/sub 3/)Ir), which oxidatively adds to a C-H bond in a benzene solvent molecule to form 2. Evidence is also presented for the possible intermediacy of a cyclohexane/(Cp*(PMe/sub 3/)Ir) sigma-complex, which is formed before free (Cp*(PMe/sub 3/)Ir) is released. Equilibrium constants for the equilibration of several pairs of alkanes and their corresponding iridium(III) hydrido alkyl complexes have been determined and imply the following trend in solution phase iridium-carbon bond dissociation enthalpies: phenyl >> n-pentyl > 2,3-dimethylbutyl > cyclopentyl approx. cyclohexyl > neopentyl.

  1. Phosphorescent Imaging of Living Cells Using a Cyclometalated Iridium(III) Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dik-Lung; Zhong, Hai-Jing; Fu, Wai-Chung; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Kwan, Hiu-Yee; Fong, Wang-Fun; Chung, Lai-Hon; Wong, Chun-Yuen; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2013-01-01

    A cell permeable cyclometalated iridium(III) complex has been developed as a phosphorescent probe for cell imaging. The iridium(III) solvato complex [Ir(phq)2(H2O]2)] preferentially stains the cytoplasm of both live and dead cells with a bright luminescence. PMID:23457478

  2. Real-Time Characterization of Formation and Breakup of Iridium Clusters in Highly Dealuminated Zeolite Y

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun, Alper; Gates, Bruce C.

    2009-01-15

    The chemistry of formation of iridium clusters from mononuclear iridium diethylene complexes anchored in dealuminated Y zeolite, and their subsequent breakup -- all including changes in the metal-metal, metal-support, and metal-ligand interactions -- is demonstrated by time-resolved EXAFS, XANES, and IR spectroscopy.

  3. Platinum nanowire microelectrode arrays for neurostimulation applications: Fabrication, characterization, and in-vitro retinal cell stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, John J., III

    Implantable electrical neurostimulating devices are being developed for a number of applications, including artificial vision through retinal stimulation. The epiretinal prosthesis will use a two-dimensional array microelectrodes to address individual cells of the retina. MEMS fabrication processes can produce arrays of microelectrodes with these dimensions, but there are two critical issues that they cannot satisfy. One, the stimulating electrodes are the only part of the implanted electrical device that penetrate through the water impermeable package, and must do so without sacrificing hermeticity. Two, As electrode size decreases, the current density (A cm-2 ) increases, due to increased electrochemical impedance. This reduces the amount of charge that can be safely injected into the tissue. To date, MEMS processing method, cannot produce electrode arrays with good, prolonged hermetic properties. Similarly, MEMS approaches do not account for the increased impedance caused by decreased surface area. For these reasons there is a strong motivation for the development of a water-impermeable, substrate-penetrating electrode array with low electrochemical impedance. This thesis presents a stimulating electrode array fabricated from platinum nanowires using a modified electrochemical template synthesis approach. Nanowires are electrochemically deposited from ammonium hexachloroplatinate solution into lithographically patterned nanoporous anodic alumina templates to produce microarrays of platinum nanowires. The platinum nanowires penetrating through the ceramic aluminum oxide template serve as parallel electrical conduits through the water impermeable, electrically insulating substrate. Electrode impedance can be adjusted by either controlling the nanowire hydrous platinum oxide content or by partially etching the alumina template to expose additional surface area. A stepwise approach to this project was taken. First, the electrochemistry of ammonium

  4. Sensitized near-infrared emission from ytterbium(III) via direct energy transfer from iridium(III) in a heterometallic neutral complex.

    PubMed

    Mehlstäubl, Marita; Kottas, Gregg S; Colella, Silvia; De Cola, Luisa

    2008-05-14

    A tetrametallic iridium-ytterbium complex has been synthesised that shows sensitized near-infrared emission (lambda(max) = 976 nm) upon excitation of the iridium unit in the visible region (400 nm) due to efficient energy transfer from the iridium units to the Yb(III) ion. The iridium phosphorescence is quenched nearly quantitatively while the ytterbium ion emits brightly in the NIR.

  5. HPLC-ED of low-molecular weight brominated phenols and tetrabromobisphenol A using pretreated carbon fiber microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Bartosova, Zdenka; Jirovsky, David; Riman, Daniel; Halouzka, Vladimir; Svidrnoch, Martin; Hrbac, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Electrochemically pretreated carbon fiber microelectrode was used to develop a simple, fast and sensitive HPLC-ECD method for the determination of brominated phenols. In addition to simple mono-, di- and tri-bromophenols (4-bromophenol, 2,4-dibromophenol, 2,6-dibromophenol, 2,4,6-tri-bromophenol) the possibility of electrochemical detection of 3,3',5,5'-tetrabromobisphenol A in oxidation mode is reported for the first time. The isocratic separation was achieved within 14 min using ternary mobile phase consisting of 50mM-phosphate buffer (pH 3.5), acetonitrile and methanol (35/15/50, v/v), and detection potential of E=+1450 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl). The carbon fiber microelectrode permitted to use high anodic potentials (up to +1800 mV vs. Ag/AgCl), the optimum analytical response was achieved at +1450 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. The limits of detection (LOD) for the studied analytes were within the range of 1.8-56.6 ng mL(-1). The developed method was applied to determination of brominated phenols in spiked water samples. Furthermore, after simple extraction with methyl tert-butyl ether, it was possible to quantify tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBA) in a piece of CRT monitor plastic casing. The found amount of TBBA was 10.22 mg kg(-1) (±0.43).

  6. Independent positioning of microelectrodes for multisite recordings in vitro.

    PubMed

    Albus, Klaus; Sinske, Kurt; Heinemann, Uwe

    2009-01-30

    A robust and easy to handle, inexpensive multisite recording system is described which allows independent positioning of several microelectrodes with high precision axial movement of each electrode. The basic units of the system are a manually operated manipulator for left-right and up-down movement and a micrometer for positioning in the direction of the micrometer axis. The micrometer is actuated with a DC-motor operated by a stand-alone controller module allowing for remote control of the motor in either step mode or continuous mode. The multisite recording system has been proven to allow stable simultaneous recordings of single unit and population activities, extracellular ion concentrations and intracellular potentials in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) of rat.

  7. Acetylcholinesterase biosensor for carbaryl detection based on interdigitated array microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhili; Guo, Yemin; Sun, Xia; Cao, Yaoyao; Wang, Xiangyou

    2014-10-01

    In this study, an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensor with superior accuracy and sensitivity was successfully developed based on interdigitated array microelectrodes (IAMs). IAMs have a series of parallel microband electrodes with alternating microbands connected together. Chitosan was used as the enzyme immobilization material, and AChE was used as the model enzyme for carbaryl detection to fabricate AChE biosensor. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used in conjunction with the fabricated biosensor to detect pesticide residues. Based on the inhibition of pesticides on the AChE activity, using carbaryl as model compounds, the biosensor exhibited a wide range, low detection limit, and high stability. Moreover, the biosensor can also be used as a new promising tool for pesticide residue analysis.

  8. Luminescent cyclometalated iridium(III) polypyridine di-2-picolylamine complexes: synthesis, photophysics, electrochemistry, cation binding, cellular internalization, and cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pui-Kei; Law, Wendell Ho-Tin; Liu, Hua-Wei; Lo, Kenneth Kam-Wing

    2011-09-05

    A series of luminescent cyclometalated iridium(III) polypyridine complexes containing a di-2-picolylamine (DPA) moiety [Ir(N^C)(2)(phen-DPA)](PF(6)) (phen-DPA = 5-(di-2-picolylamino)-1,10-phenanthroline) (HN^C = 2-phenylpyridine, Hppy (1a), 2-(4-methylphenyl)pyridine, Hmppy (2a), 2-phenylquinoline, Hpq (3a), 4-(2-pyridyl)benzaldehyde, Hpba (4a)) and their DPA-free counterparts [Ir(N^C)(2)(phen-DMA)](PF(6)) (phen-DMA = 5-(dimethylamino)-1,10-phenanthroline) (HN^C = Hppy (1b), Hmppy (2b), Hpq (3b), Hpba (4b)) have been synthesized and characterized, and their photophysical and electrochemical properties investigated. Photoexcitation of the complexes in fluid solutions at 298 K and in alcohol glass at 77 K resulted in intense and long-lived luminescence. The emission of the complexes has been assigned to a triplet metal-to-ligand charge-transfer ((3)MLCT) (dπ(Ir) → π*(N^N)) or triplet intraligand ((3)IL) (π → π*) (N^C) excited state and with substantial mixing of triplet amine-to-ligand charge-transfer ((3)NLCT) (n → π*) (N^N) character, depending on the identity of the cyclometalating and diimine ligands. Electrochemical measurements revealed an irreversible amine oxidation wave at ca. +1.1 to +1.2 V vs saturated calomel electrode, a quasi-reversible iridium(IV/III) couple at ca. +1.2 to +1.6 V, and a reversible diimine reduction couple at ca. -1.4 to -1.5 V. The cation-binding properties of these complexes have been studied by emission spectroscopy. Upon binding of zinc ion, the iridium(III) DPA complexes displayed 1.2- to 5.4-fold emission enhancement, and the K(d) values determined were on the order of 10(-5) M. Job's plot analysis confirmed that the binding stoichiometry was 1:1. Additionally, selectivity studies showed that the iridium(III) DPA complexes were more sensitive toward zinc ion among various transition metal ions examined. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of these complexes toward human cervix epithelioid carcinoma cells have been studied by

  9. The robo-pigeon based on the multiple brain regions synchronization implanted microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Huai, Rui-Tuo; Yang, Jun-Qing; Wang, Hui

    2016-07-03

    Almost all multichannel microelectrodes are only applied to the same nucleus. The multiple brain regions synchronization implanted microelectrodes can be implanted in the several brain regions at the same time, when used in the robo-animal, which can reduce the operation process, shorten animals operation time. Due to electrode position relatively fixed, errors caused by each separately implanted electrode were reduced and the animal control effect was greatly increased compared to the original electrodes. The electrode fixed time was also extended. This microelectrode provided beneficial reference function for the study of the free state of small animals in different brain regions.

  10. Mechanistically Driven Development of Iridium Catalysts for Asymmetric Allylic Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, John F.; Stanley, Levi M.

    2010-01-01

    Conspectus Enantioselective allylic substitution reactions comprise some of the most versatile methods for preparing enantiomerically enriched materials. These reactions form products that contain multiple functionalities by creating carbon–nitrogen, carbon–oxygen, carbon–carbon, and carbon–sulfur bonds. For many years, the development of catalysts for allylic substitution focused on palladium complexes. However, studies of complexes of other metals have revealed selectivities that often complement those of palladium systems. Most striking is the observation that reactions with unsymmetrical allylic electrophiles that typically occur with palladium catalysts at the less hindered site of an allylic electrophile occur at the more hindered site with catalysts based on other metals. In this Account, we describe an iridium precursor and a phosphoramidite ligand that catalyze reactions with a particularly broad scope of nucleophiles. The active form of this iridium catalyst is not generated by the simple binding of the phosphoramidite ligand to the metal precursor. Instead, the initial phosphoramidite and iridium precursor react in the presence of base to form a metallacyclic species that is the active catalyst. This species is generated either in situ or separately in isolated form by reactions with added base. The identification of the structure of the active catalyst led to the development of simplified catalysts as well as the most active form of the catalyst now available, which is stabilized by a loosely bound ethylene. Most recently, this structure was used to prepare intermediates containing allyl ligands, the structures of which provide a model for the enantioselectivities discussed here. Initial studies from our laboratory on the scope of iridium-catalyzed allylic substitution showed that reactions of primary and secondary amines, including alkylamines, benzylamines, and allylamines, and reactions of phenoxides and alkoxides occurred in high yields

  11. Triazolylidene-Iridium Complexes with a Pendant Pyridyl Group for Cooperative Metal-Ligand Induced Catalytic Dehydrogenation of Amines.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Marta; Pereira, Ana; Müller-Bunz, Helge; Belderraín, Tomás R; Pérez, Pedro J; Albrecht, Martin

    2017-07-03

    Two iridium(III) complexes containing a C,N-bidentate pyridyl-triazolylidene ligand were prepared that are structurally very similar but differ in their pendant substituent. Whereas complex 1 contains a non-coordinating pyridyl unit, complex 2 has a phenyl group on the triazolylidene substituent. The presence of the basic pyridyl unit has distinct effects on the catalytic activity of the complex in the oxidative dehydrogenation of benzylic amines, inducing generally higher rates, higher selectivity towards formation of imines versus secondary amines, and notable quantities of tertiary amines when compared to the phenyl-functionalized analogue. The role of the pyridyl functionality has been elucidated from a set of stoichiometric experiments, which demonstrate hydrogen bonding between the pendant pyridyl unit and the amine protons of the substrate. Such Npyr ⋅⋅⋅H-N interactions are demonstrated by X-ray diffraction analysis, (1) H NMR, and IR spectroscopy, and suggest a pathway of substrate bond-activation that involves concerted substrate binding through the Lewis acidic iridium center and the Lewis basic pyridyl site appended to the triazolylidene ligand, in agreement with ligand-metal cooperative substrate activation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Bias-enhanced nucleation of diamond on iridium: A comprehensive study of the first stages by sequential surface analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavanne, A.; Arnault, J.-C.; Barjon, J.; Arabski, J.

    2011-03-01

    The chemical evolution of the iridium surface along the successive steps of BEN was investigated using electron spectroscopy techniques (XPS, AES). To this end, a sequential study was carried out in an UHV analysis chamber connected to a MPCVD reactor. First, experimental results were obtained on iridium surfaces exposed to a methane plasma without bias. They show a sp 2 carbon layer formation on iridium, probably due to the segregation during cooling of carbon solubilized at high temperature in iridium. In this scenario, the iridium surface would be uncovered by carbon as BEN starts. Then, the consequences of BEN were observed: (i) formation of a thicker carbon layer at the iridium surface due to carbon segregation and sub-implantation (ii) chemical modification of iridium neighboring within the first nanometers; (iii) diamond nucleation.

  13. In vitro continuous amperometry with a diamond microelectrode coupled with video microscopy for simultaneously monitoring endogenous norepinephrine and its effect on the contractile response of a rat mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinwoo; Galligan, James J; Fink, Gregory D; Swain, Greg M

    2006-10-01

    Continuous amperometry with a diamond microelectrode and video microscopy were used to record (in vitro) endogenous norepinephrine release simultaneously with the evoked contractile response of a mesenteric artery from a healthy Sprague Dawley rat. Norepinephrine (NE) is a vasoconstricting neurotransmitter released from sympathetic nerves that innervate the smooth muscle cell layers surrounding arteries and veins. Using these two techniques along with several drugs, the NE released at sympathetic neuroeffector junctions nearby the microelectrode was measured as an oxidation current. Key to the amperometric measurement was the use of a diamond microelectrode because of the response sensitivity, reproducibility, and stability it provided. NE release was elicited by electrical stimulation at frequencies between 1 and 60 Hz, with a maximum response seen at 20 Hz. Confirmation that the oxidation current was, in fact, associated with endogenous NE came from the results of several drugs. Tetrodotoxin (TTX, 0.3 microM), a voltage-dependent sodium channel antagonist that blocks nerve conduction, abolished both the oxidation current and the arterial constriction. The alpha(2)-adrenergic autoreceptor antagonist, yohimbine (1.0 microM), caused an increase in the oxidation current and the corresponding constriction. The addition of cocaine (10 microM), an antagonist that inhibits neuronal NE reuptake, caused both the oxidation current and the contractile response to increase. These results, combined with the fact that the hydrodynamic voltammetric E(1/2) for endogenous NE was identical to that for a standard solution, confirmed that the oxidation current was due to NE and that this compound caused, at least in part, the contractile response. The results demonstrate that continuous amperometric monitoring of NE with a diamond microelectrode and video imaging of vascular tone allow real time local measurement of the temporal relationship between nerve-stimulated NE release and

  14. Methanol dehydrogenation by iridium N-heterocyclic carbene complexes.

    PubMed

    Campos, Jesús; Sharninghausen, Liam S; Manas, Michael G; Crabtree, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    A series of homogeneous iridium bis(N-heterocyclic carbene) catalysts are active for three transformations involving dehydrogenative methanol activation: acceptorless dehydrogenation, transfer hydrogenation, and amine monoalkylation. The acceptorless dehydrogenation reaction requires base, yielding formate and carbonate, as well as 2-3 equivalents of H2. Of the few homogeneous systems known for this reaction, our catalysts tolerate air and employ simple ligands. Transfer hydrogenation of ketones and imines from methanol is also possible. Finally, N-monomethylation of anilines occurs through a "borrowing hydrogen" reaction. Notably, this reaction is highly selective for the monomethylated product.

  15. The solubility of hydrogen in rhodium, ruthenium, iridium and nickel.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclellan, R. B.; Oates, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    The temperature variation of the solubility of hydrogen in rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and nickel in equilibrium with H2 gas at 1 atm pressure has been measured by a technique involving saturating the solvent metal with hydrogen, quenching, and analyzing in resultant solid solutions. The solubilities determined are small (atom fraction of H is in the range from 0.0005 to 0.00001, and the results are consistent with the simple quasi-regular model for dilute interstitial solid solutions. The relative partial enthalpy and excess entropy of the dissolved hydrogen atoms have been calculated from the solubility data and compared with well-known correlations between these quantities.

  16. Measurements of the hard-x-ray reflectivity of iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Romaine, S.; Bruni, R.; Gorenstein, P.; Zhong, Z

    2007-01-10

    In connection with the design of a hard-x-ray telescope for the Constellation X-Ray Observatory we measured the reflectivity of an iridium-coated zerodur substrate as a function of angle at 55, 60, 70, and 80 keV at the National Synchrotron Light Source of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The optical constants were derived from the reflectivity data. The real component of the index of refraction is in excellent agreement with theoretical values at all four energies. However, the imaginary component, which is related to the mass attenuation coefficient, is 50% to 70% larger at 55, 60, and 70 keV than theoretical values.

  17. Levitation of iridium and liquid mercury by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Xie, W J; Cao, C D; Lü, Y J; Wei, B

    2002-09-02

    Single-axis acoustic levitation of the heaviest solid (iridium, rho=22.6 g cm(-3)) and liquid (mercury, rho=13.6 g cm(-3) on the Earth is achieved by greatly enhancing both the levitation force and stability through optimizing the geometric parameters of the levitator. The acoustically levitated Pb-Sn eutectic alloy melt (rho=8.5 g cm(-3)) is highly undercooled by up to 38 K, which results in a microstructural transition of "lamellae-broken lamellae-dendrites." The drastic enhancement of levitation capability indicates a broader application range of single-axis acoustic levitation.

  18. Iridium-Catalyzed Kinetic Asymmetric Transformations of Racemic Allylic Benzoates

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Levi M.; Bai, Chen; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Hartwig, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Versatile methods for iridium-catalyzed, kinetic asymmetric substitution of racemic, branched allylic esters are reported. These reactions occur with a variety of aliphatic, aryl, and heteroaryl allylic benzoates to form the corresponding allylic substitution products in high yields (74–96%) with good to excellent enantioselectivity (84–98% ee) with a scope that encompasses a range of anionic carbon and heteroatom nucleophiles. These kinetic asymmetric processes occur with distinct stereochemical courses for racemic aliphatic and aromatic allylic benzoates, and the high reactivity of branched allylic benzoates enables enantioselective allylic substitutions that are slow or poorly selective with linear allylic electrophiles. PMID:20552969

  19. Luminescent cyclometallated iridium(III) complexes having acetylide ligands

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Mark E.; Bossi, Alberto; Djurovich, Peter Ivan

    2014-09-02

    The present invention relates to phosphorescent (triplet-emitting) organometallic materials. The phosphorescent materials of the present invention comprise Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes for use as triplet light-emitting materials. The Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complexes comprise at least one cyclometallating ligand and at least one alkynyl ligand bonded to the iridium. Also provided is an organic light emitting device comprising an anode, a cathode and an emissive layer between the anode and the cathode, wherein the emissive layer comprises a Ir(III)cyclometallated alkynyl complex as a triplet emitting material.

  20. Luminescent iridium(III) complexes as novel protein staining agents.

    PubMed

    Jia, Junli; Fei, Hao; Zhou, Ming

    2012-05-01

    This article reports a new class of luminescent metal complexes, biscyclometalated iridium(III) complexes with an ancillary bathophenanthroline disulfonate ligand, for staining protein bands that are separated by electrophoresis. The performances of these novel staining agents have been studied in comparison with tris(bathophenanthroline disulfonate) ruthenium(II) tetrasodium salt (i.e. RuBPS) using a commercially available imaging system. The staining agents showed different limits of detection, linear dynamic ranges, and protein-to-protein variations. The overall performances of all three stains were found to be better than or equivalent to RuBPS under the experimental conditions.

  1. Determination of iridium in mafic rocks by atomic absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimaldi, F.S.; Schnepfe, M.M.

    1970-01-01

    Iridium is determined in mineralized mafic rocks by atomic absorption after fire-assay concentration into a gold bead. Interelement interferences in the atomic-absorption determination are removed and Ir sensitivity is increased by buffering the solutions with a mixture of copper and sodium sulphates. Substantial amounts of Ag, Al, Au, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Fe, Ho, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Te, Ti, V, Y, Zn and platinum metals can be tolerated in the atomic-absorption determination. The sensitivity and detection limits are 3.2 and 0.25 ppm of Ir, respectively. ?? 1970.

  2. Local structure of Iridium organometallic catalysts covalently bonded to carbon nanotubes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasco, J.; Cuartero, V.; Subías, G.; Jiménez, M. V.; Pérez-Torrente, J. J.; Oro, L. A.; Blanco, M.; Álvarez, P.; Blanco, C.; Menéndez, R.

    2016-05-01

    Hybrid catalysts based on Iridium N-heterocyclic carbenes anchored to carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been studied by XAFS spectroscopy. Oxidation of CNT yields a large amount of functional groups, mainly hydroxyl groups at the walls and carboxylic groups at the tips, defects and edges. Different kinds of esterification reactions were performed to functionalize oxidized CNT with imidazolium salts. Then, the resulting products were reacted with an Ir organometallic compound to form hybrid catalysts efficient in hydrogen transfer processes. XANES spectroscopy agree with the presence of Ir(I) in these catalysts and the EXAFS spectra detected differences in the local structure of Ir atoms between the initial Ir organometallic compound and the Ir complexes anchored to the CNT. Our results confirm that the halide atom, present in the Ir precursor, was replaced by oxygen from -OH groups at the CNT wall in the first coordination shell of Ir. The lability of this group accounts for the good recyclability and the good efficiency shown by these hybrid catalysts.

  3. A Facile Approach for Constructing Conductive Polymer Patterns for Application in Electrochromic Devices and Flexible Microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dabum; Kim, Jeonghun; Ko, Youngsang; Shim, Kyubin; Kim, Jung Ho; You, Jungmok

    2016-12-07

    We developed a novel strategy for fabricating poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) patterns on various substrates, including hydrogels, via sequential solution procedure without multistep chemical etching or lift-off processes. First, PEDOT nanothin films were prepared on a glass substrate by solution phase monomer casting and oxidative polymerization. As a second step, after UV-induced poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) photolithography at the PEDOT/PEG interface through a photomask, the hydrogel was peeled away from the PEDOT-coated glass substrate to detach the UV-exposed PEDOT region, which left the UV nonexposed PEDOT region intact on the glass substrate, resulting in PEDOT patterns. In a final step, the PEDOT patterns were cleanly transferred from the glass to a flexible hydrogel substrate by a direct-transfer process based on a second round of gelation process. Using this strategy, PEDOT patterns on ITO glass or ITO film were used to successfully fabricate an electrochromic (EC) device that exhibited stable electrochromic switching as a function of applied potential. Furthermore, PEDOT patterns on hydrogel were used to fabricate all organic, flexible microelectrodes with good electrical properties and excellent mechanical flexibility. Importantly, the conductivity of PEDOT patterns on hydrogel (ca. 235 S cm(-1)) described here is significantly higher than that previously reported (ca. 20-70 S cm(-1)). This approach can be easily integrated into various technological fabrication steps for the development of next-generation bioelectronics systems.

  4. A digital microfluidic device with integrated nanostructured microelectrodes for electrochemical immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Rackus, Darius G; Dryden, Michael D M; Lamanna, Julian; Zaragoza, Alexandre; Lam, Brian; Kelley, Shana O; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured microelectrodes (NMEs) are three-dimensional electrodes that have superb sensitivity for electroanalysis. Here we report the integration of NMEs with the versatile fluid-handling system digital microfluidics (DMF), for eventual application to distributed diagnostics outside of the laboratory. In the new methods reported here, indium tin oxide DMF top plates were modified to include Au NMEs as well as counter and pseudoreference electrodes. The new system was observed to outperform planar sensing electrodes of the type that are typically integrated with DMF. A rubella virus (RV) IgG immunoassay was developed to evaluate the diagnostic potential for the new system, relying on magnetic microparticles coated with RV particles and analysis by differential pulse voltammetry. The limit of detection of the assay (0.07 IU mL(-1)) was >100× below the World Health Organization defined cut-off for rubella immunity. The sensitivity of the integrated device and its small size suggest future utility for distributed diagnostics.

  5. Leptin Counteracts the Hypoxia-Induced Inhibition of Spontaneously Firing Hippocampal Neurons: A Microelectrode Array Study

    PubMed Central

    Gavello, Daniela; Rojo-Ruiz, Jonathan; Marcantoni, Andrea; Franchino, Claudio; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Besides regulating energy balance and reducing body-weight, the adipokine leptin has been recently shown to be neuroprotective and antiapoptotic by promoting neuronal survival after excitotoxic and oxidative insults. Here, we investigated the firing properties of mouse hippocampal neurons and the effects of leptin pretreatment on hypoxic damage (2 hours, 3% O2). Experiments were carried out by means of the microelectrode array (MEA) technology, monitoring hippocampal neurons activity from 11 to 18 days in vitro (DIV). Under normoxic conditions, hippocampal neurons were spontaneously firing, either with prevailing isolated and randomly distributed spikes (11 DIV), or with patterns characterized by synchronized bursts (18 DIV). Exposure to hypoxia severely impaired the spontaneous activity of hippocampal neurons, reducing their firing frequency by 54% and 69%, at 11 and 18 DIV respectively, and synchronized their firing activity. Pretreatment with 50 nM leptin reduced the firing frequency of normoxic neurons and contrasted the hypoxia-induced depressive action, either by limiting the firing frequency reduction (at both ages) or by increasing it to 126% (in younger neurons). In order to find out whether leptin exerts its effect by activating large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK), as shown on rat hippocampal neurons, we applied the BK channel blocker paxilline (1 µM). Our data show that paxilline reversed the effects of leptin, both on normoxic and hypoxic neurons, suggesting that the adipokine counteracts hypoxia through BK channels activation in mouse hippocampal neurons. PMID:22848520

  6. Microelectrode miRNA sensors enabled by enzymeless electrochemical signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tanyu; Viennois, Emilie; Merlin, Didier; Wang, Gangli

    2015-08-18

    Better detections of circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) as disease biomarkers could advance diseases diagnosis and treatment. Current analysis methods or sensors for research and applications are challenged by the low concentrations and wide dynamic range (from aM to nM) of miRNAs in a physiological sample. Here, we report a one-step label-free electrochemical sensor comprising a triple-stem DNA-redox probe structure on a gold microelectrode. A new signal amplification mechanism without the need of a redox enzyme is introduced. The novel strategy overcomes the fundamental limitations of microelectrode DNA sensors that fail to generate detectable current, which is primarily due to the limited amount of redox probes in response to the target analyte binding. By employing a reductant, tris(2-carboxyethyl) phosphine hydrochloride (TCEP) in the detection buffer solution, each redox molecule on the detection probe is cyclically oxidized at the electrode and reduced by the reductant; thus, the signal is amplified in situ during the detection period. The combined merits in the diagnosis power of cyclic voltammetry and the high sensitivity of pulse voltammetry enable parallel analysis for method validation and optimization previously inaccessible. As such, the detection limit of miRNA-122 was 0.1 fM via direct readout, with a wide detection range from sub fM to nM. The detection time is within minutes, which is a significant improvement over other macroscopic sensors and other relevant techniques such as quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The high selectivity of the developed sensors is demonstrated by the discrimination against two most similar family sequences: miR-122-3p present in serum and 2-mismatch synthetic RNA sequence. Interference such as nonspecific adsorption, a common concern in sensor development, is reduced to a negligible amount by adopting a multistep surface modification strategy. Importantly, unlike qRT-PCR, the

  7. Evaluation of a Microelectrode Arrays for Neurotoxicity Testing Using a Chemical Training Set

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microelectrode array (MEA) approaches have been proposed as a tool for detecting functional changes in electrically active cells, including neurons, exposed to drugs, chemicals, or particles. However, conventional single well MEA systems lack the throughput necessary for screenin...

  8. Evaluation of Multi-Well Microelectrode Arrays for Neurotoxicity Screening Using a Chemical Training Set

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microelectrode array (MEA) approaches have been proposed as a tool for detecting functional changes in electrically-excitable cells, including neurons, exposed to drugs, chemical or particles. However, conventional single well-MEA systems lack the throughput necessary for screen...

  9. Microelectrode Arrays: A Physiologically-based Neurotoxicity Testing Platform for the 21st Century

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs) have been in use over the past decade and a half to study multiple aspects ofelectrically excitable cells. Inparticular, MEAs have been applied to explore the pharmacological and toxicological effects ofnumerous compounds on spontaneous activity ofneu...

  10. Evaluation of Multi-Well Microelectrode Arrays for Neurotoxicity Screening Using a Chemical Training Set

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microelectrode array (MEA) approaches have been proposed as a tool for detecting functional changes in electrically-excitable cells, including neurons, exposed to drugs, chemical or particles. However, conventional single well-MEA systems lack the throughput necessary for screen...

  11. Evaluation of a Microelectrode Arrays for Neurotoxicity Testing Using a Chemical Training Set

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microelectrode array (MEA) approaches have been proposed as a tool for detecting functional changes in electrically active cells, including neurons, exposed to drugs, chemicals, or particles. However, conventional single well MEA systems lack the throughput necessary for screenin...

  12. Low Frequency Activity of Cortical Networks on Microelectrode Arrays is Differentially Altered by Bicuculline and Carbaryl

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thousands of chemicals need to be characterized for their neurotoxicity potential. Neurons grown on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are an in vitro model used to screen chemicals for functional effects on neuronal networks. Typically, after removal of low frequency components, effec...

  13. Microelectrode Arrays: A Physiologically-based Neurotoxicity Testing Platform for the 21st Century

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs) have been in use over the past decade and a half to study multiple aspects ofelectrically excitable cells. Inparticular, MEAs have been applied to explore the pharmacological and toxicological effects ofnumerous compounds on spontaneous activity ofneu...

  14. Low Frequency Activity of Cortical Networks on Microelectrode Arrays is Differentially Altered by Bicuculline and Carbaryl

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thousands of chemicals need to be characterized for their neurotoxicity potential. Neurons grown on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are an in vitro model used to screen chemicals for functional effects on neuronal networks. Typically, after removal of low frequency components, effec...

  15. Neutral carrier Na+- and Ca2+-selective microelectrodes for intracellular application.

    PubMed Central

    Dagostino, M; Lee, C O

    1982-01-01

    Na+- and Ca2+-selective microelectrodes were made with Simon's neutral carrier ETH 227 and ETH 1001, respectively, and their properties were studied for intracellular application. The kNaK (selectivity coefficient for Na+ with respect to K+) values of the Na+-selective microelectrodes were in the range of 0.01-0.02, which is comparable to those of recessed-tip Na+-selective glass microelectrodes. The kNaMg values of the microelectrodes were approximately 0.005 so that the interference by intracellular Mg2+ levels could be negligible. The kNaCa values were approximately 2 and the Na+-selective microelectrodes were more selective to Ca2+ than Na+. This indicates that their intracellular application requires special care to handle Ca2+ interference under certain conditions. The kNaK, kNaMg, and kNaCa values did not depend significantly on the methods used for their determination or on the ion activity levels tested. The Nicolsky equation described well the microelectrode potentials in the mixed solutions of NaCl (1-100 mM) and KCl. Potential and resistance of the microelectrodes were stable for a long period and their response time was fast. The results indicate that the Na+-selective microlectrodes are suitable for measurements of intracellular Na ion activities. Ca2+-selective microelectrode potentials at Ca2+ concentrations lower than 10(-4) M changed significantly for the first 2-3 h and then became fairly stable. The rate of the potential change was dependent on the column length of the Ca2+-selective liquid filled. Potentials of the microelectrodes varied from 10-20 mV for Ca2+ between 10(-7) and 10(-6) M concentrations, which may be the cytosolic free-Ca2+ range. With the Ca2+ concentrations greater than 10(-6) M, the microelectrodes had potential changes of approximately 30 mV or greater for a tenfold change in Ca2+ concentration. The kCaK and kCaNa values were in the ranges of 10(-5)-10(-6) and 10(-4)-10(-5), respectively. The kCaMg values were approximately

  16. Dynamic high-temperature characterization of an iridium alloy in tension

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Jin, Helena; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Bignell, John; Ulrich, G. B.; George, E. P.

    2015-09-01

    Iridium alloys have been utilized as structural materials for certain high-temperature applications, due to their superior strength and ductility at elevated temperatures. The mechanical properties, including failure response at high strain rates and elevated temperatures of the iridium alloys need to be characterized to better understand high-speed impacts at elevated temperatures. A DOP-26 iridium alloy has been dynamically characterized in compression at elevated temperatures with high-temperature Kolsky compression bar techniques. However, the dynamic high-temperature compression tests were not able to provide sufficient dynamic high-temperature failure information of the iridium alloy. In this study, we modified current room-temperature Kolsky tension bar techniques for obtaining dynamic tensile stress-strain curves of the DOP-26 iridium alloy at two different strain rates (~1000 and ~3000 s-1) and temperatures (~750°C and ~1030°C). The effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile stress-strain response of the iridium alloy were determined. The DOP-26 iridium alloy exhibited high ductility in stress-strain response that strongly depended on both strain rate and temperature.

  17. Carbon nanotubes grown on metal microelectrodes for the detection of dopamine

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Cheng; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Nguyen, Michael; ...

    2015-12-07

    Microelectrodes modified with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are useful for the detection of neurotransmitters because the CNTs enhance sensitivity and have electrocatalytic effects. CNTs can be grown on carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) but the intrinsic electrochemical activity of carbon fibers makes evaluating the effect of CNT enhancement difficult. Metal wires are highly conductive and many metals have no intrinsic electrochemical activity for dopamine, so we investigated CNTs grown on metal wires as microelectrodes for neurotransmitter detection. In this work, we successfully grew CNTs on niobium substrates for the first time. Instead of planar metal surfaces, metal wires with a diameter ofmore » only 25 μm were used as CNT substrates; these have potential in tissue applications due to their minimal tissue damage and high spatial resolution. Scanning electron microscopy shows that aligned CNTs are grown on metal wires after chemical vapor deposition. By use of fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, CNT-coated niobium (CNT-Nb) microelectrodes exhibit higher sensitivity and lower ΔEp value compared to CNTs grown on carbon fibers or other metal wires. The limit of detection for dopamine at CNT-Nb microelectrodes is 11 ± 1 nM, which is approximately 2-fold lower than that of bare CFMEs. Adsorption processes were modeled with a Langmuir isotherm, and detection of other neurochemicals was also characterized, including ascorbic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, serotonin, adenosine, and histamine. CNT-Nb microelectrodes were used to monitor stimulated dopamine release in anesthetized rats with high sensitivity. This research demonstrates that CNT-grown metal microelectrodes, especially CNTs grown on Nb microelectrodes, are useful for monitoring neurotransmitters.« less

  18. Highly Doped Polycrystalline Silicon Microelectrodes Reduce Noise in Neuronal Recordings In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Rajarshi; Jackson, Nathan; Patel, Chetan; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study are to 1) experimentally validate for the first time the nonlinear current-potential characteristics of bulk doped polycrystalline silicon in the small amplitude voltage regimes (0–200 μV) and 2) test if noise amplitudes (0–15 μV) from single neuronal electrical recordings get selectively attenuated in doped polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes due to the above property. In highly doped polycrystalline silicon, bulk resistances of several hundred kilo-ohms were experimentally measured for voltages typical of noise amplitudes and 9–10 kΩ for voltages typical of neural signal amplitudes (>150–200 μV). Acute multiunit measurements and noise measurements were made in n = 6 and n = 8 anesthetized adult rats, respectively, using polycrystalline silicon and tungsten microelectrodes. There was no significant difference in the peak-to-peak amplitudes of action potentials recorded from either microelectrode (p > 0.10). However, noise power in the recordings from tungsten microelectrodes (26.36 ± 10.13 pW) was significantly higher (p < 0.001) than the corresponding value in polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes (7.49 ± 2.66 pW). We conclude that polycrystalline silicon microelectrodes result in selective attenuation of noise power in electrical recordings compared to tungsten microelectrodes. This reduction in noise compared to tungsten microelectrodes is likely due to the exponentially higher bulk resistances offered by highly doped bulk polycrystalline silicon in the range of voltages corresponding to noise in multiunit measurements. PMID:20667815

  19. Measurement of Extracellular Ion Fluxes Using the Ion-selective Self-referencing Microelectrode Technique

    PubMed Central

    Luxardi, Guillaume; Reid, Brian; Ferreira, Fernando; Maillard, Pauline; Zhao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Cells from animals, plants and single cells are enclosed by a barrier called the cell membrane that separates the cytoplasm from the outside. Cell layers such as epithelia also form a barrier that separates the inside from the outside or different compartments of multicellular organisms. A key feature of these barriers is the differential distribution of ions across cell membranes or cell layers. Two properties allow this distribution: 1) membranes and epithelia display selective permeability to specific ions; 2) ions are transported through pumps across cell membranes and cell layers. These properties play crucial roles in maintaining tissue physiology and act as signaling cues after damage, during repair, or under pathological condition. The ion-selective self-referencing microelectrode allows measurements of specific fluxes of ions such as calcium, potassium or sodium at single cell and tissue levels. The microelectrode contains an ionophore cocktail which is selectively permeable to a specific ion. The internal filling solution contains a set concentration of the ion of interest. The electric potential of the microelectrode is determined by the outside concentration of the ion. As the ion concentration varies, the potential of the microelectrode changes as a function of the log of the ion activity. When moved back and forth near a source or sink of the ion (i.e. in a concentration gradient due to ion flux) the microelectrode potential fluctuates at an amplitude proportional to the ion flux/gradient. The amplifier amplifies the microelectrode signal and the output is recorded on computer. The ion flux can then be calculated by Fick’s law of diffusion using the electrode potential fluctuation, the excursion of microelectrode, and other parameters such as the specific ion mobility. In this paper, we describe in detail the methodology to measure extracellular ion fluxes using the ion-selective self-referencing microelectrode and present some representative

  20. Carbon nanotubes grown on metal microelectrodes for the detection of dopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Cheng; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Nguyen, Michael; Ganesana, Mallikarjunarao; Zestos, Alexander; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Geohegan, David B.; Venton, B. Jill

    2015-12-07

    Microelectrodes modified with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are useful for the detection of neurotransmitters because the CNTs enhance sensitivity and have electrocatalytic effects. CNTs can be grown on carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) but the intrinsic electrochemical activity of carbon fibers makes evaluating the effect of CNT enhancement difficult. Metal wires are highly conductive and many metals have no intrinsic electrochemical activity for dopamine, so we investigated CNTs grown on metal wires as microelectrodes for neurotransmitter detection. In this work, we successfully grew CNTs on niobium substrates for the first time. Instead of planar metal surfaces, metal wires with a diameter of only 25 μm were used as CNT substrates; these have potential in tissue applications due to their minimal tissue damage and high spatial resolution. Scanning electron microscopy shows that aligned CNTs are grown on metal wires after chemical vapor deposition. By use of fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, CNT-coated niobium (CNT-Nb) microelectrodes exhibit higher sensitivity and lower ΔEp value compared to CNTs grown on carbon fibers or other metal wires. The limit of detection for dopamine at CNT-Nb microelectrodes is 11 ± 1 nM, which is approximately 2-fold lower than that of bare CFMEs. Adsorption processes were modeled with a Langmuir isotherm, and detection of other neurochemicals was also characterized, including ascorbic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, serotonin, adenosine, and histamine. CNT-Nb microelectrodes were used to monitor stimulated dopamine release in anesthetized rats with high sensitivity. This research demonstrates that CNT-grown metal microelectrodes, especially CNTs grown on Nb microelectrodes, are useful for monitoring neurotransmitters.

  1. Carbon Nanotubes Grown on Metal Microelectrodes for the Detection of Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Microelectrodes modified with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are useful for the detection of neurotransmitters because the CNTs enhance sensitivity and have electrocatalytic effects. CNTs can be grown on carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) but the intrinsic electrochemical activity of carbon fibers makes evaluating the effect of CNT enhancement difficult. Metal wires are highly conductive and many metals have no intrinsic electrochemical activity for dopamine, so we investigated CNTs grown on metal wires as microelectrodes for neurotransmitter detection. In this work, we successfully grew CNTs on niobium substrates for the first time. Instead of planar metal surfaces, metal wires with a diameter of only 25 μm were used as CNT substrates; these have potential in tissue applications due to their minimal tissue damage and high spatial resolution. Scanning electron microscopy shows that aligned CNTs are grown on metal wires after chemical vapor deposition. By use of fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, CNT-coated niobium (CNT-Nb) microelectrodes exhibit higher sensitivity and lower ΔEp value compared to CNTs grown on carbon fibers or other metal wires. The limit of detection for dopamine at CNT-Nb microelectrodes is 11 ± 1 nM, which is approximately 2-fold lower than that of bare CFMEs. Adsorption processes were modeled with a Langmuir isotherm, and detection of other neurochemicals was also characterized, including ascorbic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, serotonin, adenosine, and histamine. CNT-Nb microelectrodes were used to monitor stimulated dopamine release in anesthetized rats with high sensitivity. This study demonstrates that CNT-grown metal microelectrodes, especially CNTs grown on Nb microelectrodes, are useful for monitoring neurotransmitters. PMID:26639609

  2. Carbon Nanotubes Grown on Metal Microelectrodes for the Detection of Dopamine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Jacobs, Christopher B; Nguyen, Michael D; Ganesana, Mallikarjunarao; Zestos, Alexander G; Ivanov, Ilia N; Puretzky, Alexander A; Rouleau, Christopher M; Geohegan, David B; Venton, B Jill

    2016-01-05

    Microelectrodes modified with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are useful for the detection of neurotransmitters because the CNTs enhance sensitivity and have electrocatalytic effects. CNTs can be grown on carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) but the intrinsic electrochemical activity of carbon fibers makes evaluating the effect of CNT enhancement difficult. Metal wires are highly conductive and many metals have no intrinsic electrochemical activity for dopamine, so we investigated CNTs grown on metal wires as microelectrodes for neurotransmitter detection. In this work, we successfully grew CNTs on niobium substrates for the first time. Instead of planar metal surfaces, metal wires with a diameter of only 25 μm were used as CNT substrates; these have potential in tissue applications due to their minimal tissue damage and high spatial resolution. Scanning electron microscopy shows that aligned CNTs are grown on metal wires after chemical vapor deposition. By use of fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, CNT-coated niobium (CNT-Nb) microelectrodes exhibit higher sensitivity and lower ΔEp value compared to CNTs grown on carbon fibers or other metal wires. The limit of detection for dopamine at CNT-Nb microelectrodes is 11 ± 1 nM, which is approximately 2-fold lower than that of bare CFMEs. Adsorption processes were modeled with a Langmuir isotherm, and detection of other neurochemicals was also characterized, including ascorbic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, serotonin, adenosine, and histamine. CNT-Nb microelectrodes were used to monitor stimulated dopamine release in anesthetized rats with high sensitivity. This study demonstrates that CNT-grown metal microelectrodes, especially CNTs grown on Nb microelectrodes, are useful for monitoring neurotransmitters.

  3. A flexible and implantable microelectrode arrays using high-temperature grown vertical carbon nanotubes and a biocompatible polymer substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Wenwen; Chen, Chaoyang; Feng, Zhaoying; Xu, Yong; Zhou, Chengpeng; Masurkar, Nirul; Cavanaugh, John; Ming-Cheng Cheng, Mark

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a novel microelectrode arrays using high-temperature grown vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) integrated on a flexible and biocompatible parylene substrate. A simple microfabrication process is proposed to unite the high quality vertical CNTs grown at high temperature with the heat sensitive parylene substrate in a highly controllable manner. Briefly, the CNTs electrode is encapsulated by two layers of parylene and the device is released using xenon difluoride (XeF2). The process is compatible with wafer-scale post complementary metal oxide semiconductor integration. Lower impedance and larger interfacial capacitance have been demonstrated using CNTs compared to a Pt electrode. The flexible CNT electrodes have been utilized for extracellular neuronal recording and stimulation in rats. The signal-to-noise ratio of the device is about 12.5. The threshold voltage for initiating action potential is about 0.5 V.

  4. A flexible and implantable microelectrode arrays using high-temperature grown vertical carbon nanotubes and a biocompatible polymer substrate.

    PubMed

    Yi, Wenwen; Chen, Chaoyang; Feng, Zhaoying; Xu, Yong; Zhou, Chengpeng; Masurkar, Nirul; Cavanaugh, John; Cheng, Mark Ming-Cheng

    2015-03-27

    This paper presents a novel microelectrode arrays using high-temperature grown vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) integrated on a flexible and biocompatible parylene substrate. A simple microfabrication process is proposed to unite the high quality vertical CNTs grown at high temperature with the heat sensitive parylene substrate in a highly controllable manner. Briefly, the CNTs electrode is encapsulated by two layers of parylene and the device is released using xenon difluoride (XeF2). The process is compatible with wafer-scale post complementary metal oxide semiconductor integration. Lower impedance and larger interfacial capacitance have been demonstrated using CNTs compared to a Pt electrode. The flexible CNT electrodes have been utilized for extracellular neuronal recording and stimulation in rats. The signal-to-noise ratio of the device is about 12.5. The threshold voltage for initiating action potential is about 0.5 V.

  5. Deep brain stimulation macroelectrodes compared to multiple microelectrodes in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Arcot Desai, Sharanya; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Potter, Steve M.; Gross, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays (wire diameter <50 μm) were compared to traditional macroelectrodes for deep brain stimulation (DBS). Understanding the neuronal activation volume may help solve some of the mysteries associated with DBS, e.g., its mechanisms of action. We used c-fos immunohistochemistry to investigate neuronal activation in the rat hippocampus caused by multi-micro- and macroelectrode stimulation. At ± 1V stimulation at 25 Hz, microelectrodes (33 μm diameter) had a radius of activation of 100 μm, which is 50% of that seen with 150 μm diameter macroelectrode stimulation. Macroelectrodes activated about 5.8 times more neurons than a single microelectrode, but displaced ~20 times more neural tissue. The sphere of influence of stimulating electrodes can be significantly increased by reducing their impedance. By ultrasonic electroplating (sonicoplating) the microelectrodes with platinum to increase their surface area and reduce their impedance by an order of magnitude, the radius of activation increased by 50 μm and more than twice the number of neurons were activated within this increased radius compared to unplated microelectrodes. We suggest that a new approach to DBS, one that uses multiple high-surface area microelectrodes, may be more therapeutically effective due to increased neuronal activation. PMID:24971060

  6. Enhanced Flexible Tubular Microelectrode with Conducting Polymer for Multi-Functional Implantable Tissue-Machine Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hong-Chang; Liu, Jing-Quan; Kang, Xiao-Yang; Tang, Long-Jun; Wang, Ming-Hao; Ji, Bo-Wen; Yang, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Chen, Xiang; Yang, Chun-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Implantable biomedical microdevices enable the restoration of body function and improvement of health condition. As the interface between artificial machines and natural tissue, various kinds of microelectrodes with high density and tiny size were developed to undertake precise and complex medical tasks through electrical stimulation and electrophysiological recording. However, if only the electrical interaction existed between electrodes and muscle or nerve tissue without nutrition factor delivery, it would eventually lead to a significant symptom of denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy. In this paper, we developed a novel flexible tubular microelectrode integrated with fluidic drug delivery channel for dynamic tissue implant. First, the whole microelectrode was made of biocompatible polymers, which could avoid the drawbacks of the stiff microelectrodes that are easy to be broken and damage tissue. Moreover, the microelectrode sites were circumferentially distributed on the surface of polymer microtube in three dimensions, which would be beneficial to the spatial selectivity. Finally, the in vivo results confirmed that our implantable tubular microelectrodes were suitable for dynamic electrophysiological recording and simultaneous fluidic drug delivery, and the electrode performance was further enhanced by the conducting polymer modification.

  7. Enhanced Flexible Tubular Microelectrode with Conducting Polymer for Multi-Functional Implantable Tissue-Machine Interface

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Hong-Chang; Liu, Jing-Quan; Kang, Xiao-Yang; Tang, Long-Jun; Wang, Ming-Hao; Ji, Bo-Wen; Yang, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Lin; Chen, Xiang; Yang, Chun-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Implantable biomedical microdevices enable the restoration of body function and improvement of health condition. As the interface between artificial machines and natural tissue, various kinds of microelectrodes with high density and tiny size were developed to undertake precise and complex medical tasks through electrical stimulation and electrophysiological recording. However, if only the electrical interaction existed between electrodes and muscle or nerve tissue without nutrition factor delivery, it would eventually lead to a significant symptom of denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy. In this paper, we developed a novel flexible tubular microelectrode integrated with fluidic drug delivery channel for dynamic tissue implant. First, the whole microelectrode was made of biocompatible polymers, which could avoid the drawbacks of the stiff microelectrodes that are easy to be broken and damage tissue. Moreover, the microelectrode sites were circumferentially distributed on the surface of polymer microtube in three dimensions, which would be beneficial to the spatial selectivity. Finally, the in vivo results confirmed that our implantable tubular microelectrodes were suitable for dynamic electrophysiological recording and simultaneous fluidic drug delivery, and the electrode performance was further enhanced by the conducting polymer modification. PMID:27229174

  8. Fabrication and testing of polyimide-based microelectrode arrays for cortical mapping of evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Myllymaa, Sami; Myllymaa, Katja; Korhonen, Hannu; Töyräs, Juha; Jääskeläinen, Juha E; Djupsund, Kaj; Tanila, Heikki; Lappalainen, Reijo

    2009-06-15

    Modern microfabrication techniques make it possible to develop microelectrode arrays that may be utilized not only in neurophysiological research but also in the clinic, e.g. in neurosurgery and as elements of neural prostheses. The aim of this study was to test whether a flexible microelectrode array is suitable for recording cortical surface field potentials in rats. Polyimide-based microelectrode arrays were fabricated by utilizing microfabrication techniques e.g. photolithography and magnetron sputter deposition. The present microelectrode array consists of eight platinum microelectrodes (round-shaped, Ø: 200 microm), transmission lines and connector pads sandwiched between two thin layers of biocompatible polyimide. The microelectrode arrays were electrochemically characterized by impedance spectroscopy in physiological saline solution and successfully tested in vivo by conducting acute and chronic measurements of evoked potentials on the surface of rat cortex. The arrays proved excellent flexibility and mechanical strength during handling and implantation onto the surface of cortex. The excellent electrochemical characteristics and stable in vivo recordings with high spatiotemporal resolution highlight the potential of these arrays. The fabrication protocol described here allows implementation of several other neural interfaces with different layouts, material selections or target areas either for recording or stimulation purposes.

  9. Microindentation hardness evaluation of iridium alloy clad vent set cups

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, G.B.; DeRoos, L.F.; Stinnette, S.E. )

    1993-01-15

    An iridium alloy, DOP-26, is used as cladding for [sup 238]PuO[sub 2] fuel in radioisotope heat sources for space power systems. Presently, DOP-26 iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVS) are being manufactured at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for potential use in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cassini mission to Saturn. Wrought/ground/stress relieved blanks are warm formed into CVS cups. These cups are then annealed to recrystallize the material for subsequent fabrication/assembly operations as well as for final use. One of the cup manufacturing certification requirements is to test for Vickers microindentation hardness. New microindentation hardness specification limits, 210 to 310 HV, have been established for a test load of 1000 grams-force (gf). The original specification limits, 250 to 350 HV, were for 200 gf testing. The primary reason for switching to a higher test load was to reduce variability in the test data. The DOP-26 alloy exhibits microindentation hardness load dependence, therefore, new limits were needed for 1000 gf testing. The new limits were established by testing material from 15 CVS cups using 200 gf and 1000 gf loads and then statistically analyzing the data. Additional work using a Knoop indenter and a 10 gf load indicated that the DOP-26 alloy grain boundaries have higher hardnesses than the grain interiors.

  10. Microindentation hardness evaluation of iridium alloy clad vent set cups

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, G.B.; DeRoos, L.F.; Stinnette, S.E.

    1992-05-15

    An iridium alloy, DOP-26, is used as cladding for {sup 238}PuO{sup 2} fuel in radioisotope heat sources for space power systems. Presently, DOP-26 iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVS) are being manufactured at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for potential use in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration`s Cassini mission to Saturn. Wrought/ground/stress relieved blanks are warm formed into CVS cups. These cups are then annealed to recrystallize the material for subsequent fabrication/assembly operations as well as for final use. One of the cup manufacturing certification requirements is to test for Vickers microindentation hardness. New microindentation hardness specification limits, 210 to 310 HV, have been established for a test load of 1000 grams-force (gf). The original specification limits, 250 to 350 HV, were for 200 gf testing. The primary reason for switching to a higher test load was to reduce variability in the test data. The DOP-26 alloy exhibits microindentation hardness load dependence, therefore, new limits were needed for 1000 gf testing. The new limits were established by testing material from 15 CVS cups using 200 gf and 1000 gf loads and then statistically analyzing the data. Additional work using a Knoop indenter and a 10 gf load indicated that the DOP-26 alloy grain boundaries have higher hardnesses than the grain interiors.

  11. Microindentation hardness evaluation of iridium alloy clad vent set cups

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, G.B.; DeRoos, L.F.; Stinnette, S.E.

    1992-05-15

    An iridium alloy, DOP-26, is used as cladding for {sup 238}PuO{sup 2} fuel in radioisotope heat sources for space power systems. Presently, DOP-26 iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVS) are being manufactured at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for potential use in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cassini mission to Saturn. Wrought/ground/stress relieved blanks are warm formed into CVS cups. These cups are then annealed to recrystallize the material for subsequent fabrication/assembly operations as well as for final use. One of the cup manufacturing certification requirements is to test for Vickers microindentation hardness. New microindentation hardness specification limits, 210 to 310 HV, have been established for a test load of 1000 grams-force (gf). The original specification limits, 250 to 350 HV, were for 200 gf testing. The primary reason for switching to a higher test load was to reduce variability in the test data. The DOP-26 alloy exhibits microindentation hardness load dependence, therefore, new limits were needed for 1000 gf testing. The new limits were established by testing material from 15 CVS cups using 200 gf and 1000 gf loads and then statistically analyzing the data. Additional work using a Knoop indenter and a 10 gf load indicated that the DOP-26 alloy grain boundaries have higher hardnesses than the grain interiors.

  12. Microindentation hardness evaluation of iridium alloy clad vent set cups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, George B.; DeRoos, Larry F.; Stinnette, Samuel E.

    1993-01-01

    An iridium alloy, DOP-26, is used as cladding for 238PuO2 fuel in radioisotope heat sources for space power systems. Presently, DOP-26 iridium alloy clad vent sets (CVS) are being manufactured at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for potential use in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Cassini mission to Saturn. Wrought/ground/stress relieved blanks are warm formed into CVS cups. These cups are then annealed to recrystallize the material for subsequent fabrication/assembly operations as well as for final use. One of the cup manufacturing certification requirements is to test for Vickers microindentation hardness. New microindentation hardness specification limits, 210 to 310 HV, have been established for a test load of 1000 grams-force (gf). The original specification limits, 250 to 350 HV, were for 200 gf testing. The primary reason for switching to a higher test load was to reduce variability in the test data. The DOP-26 alloy exhibits microindentation hardness load dependence, therefore, new limits were needed for 1000 gf testing. The new limits were established by testing material from 15 CVS cups using 200 gf and 1000 gf loads and then statistically analyzing the data. Additional work using a Knoop indenter and a 10 gf load indicated that the DOP-26 alloy grain boundaries have higher hardnesses than the grain interiors.

  13. Iridium and tantalum foils for spaceflight neutron dosimetry.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, R. A.; Liles, E. D.

    1972-01-01

    Description of a two-foil system of iridium and tantalum which can measure thermal and intermediate energy neutrons at flux densities of 1 neutron/sq cm-sec over a ten-day lunar mission (1,000,000 neutrons/sq cm). The foils are chemically inert and nontoxic, weigh less than 1 g each, and require only routine gamma pulse height analysis for activation measurement. Detection of fluences below 1,000,000 neutrons/sq cm are achieved for counts of foil activity made as late as two months following neutron exposure. Tantalum foils flown in Apollo 11 indicated a mean dose equivalent to the astronauts of less than 16 mrem from thermal plus intermediate energy neutrons, while nuclear emulsion track analysis indicated approximately 17 mrem from neutrons of energy greater than 0.6 MeV. Iridium foils flown on Apollo 12 indicated dose equivalents of 1.8 to 2.8 mrem from thermal neutrons, excluding tissue thermalized SNAP-27 neutrons.

  14. Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Isoxazolium Triflates with a Chiral Iridium Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ryuhei; Kuwano, Ryoichi

    2016-06-13

    The iridium catalyst [IrCl(cod)]2 -phosphine-I2 (cod=1,5-cyclooctadiene) selectively reduced isoxazolium triflates to isoxazolines or isoxazolidines in the presence of H2 . The iridium-catalyzed hydrogenation proceeded in high-to-good enantioselectivity when an optically active phosphine-oxazoline ligand was used. The 3-substituted 5-arylisoxazolium salts were transformed into 4-isoxazolines with up to 95:5 enantiomeric ratio (e.r.). Chiral cis-isoxazolidines were obtained in up to 89:11 e.r., with no formation of their trans isomers, when the substrates had a primary alkyl substituent at the 5-position. The mechanistic studies indicate that the hydridoiridium(III) species prefers to deliver its hydride to the C5 atom of the isoxazole ring. The hydride attack leads to the formation of the chiral isoxazolidine via a 3-isoxazoline intermediate. Meanwhile, in the selective formation of 4-isoxazolines, hydride attack at the C5 atom may be obstructed by steric hindrance from the 5-aryl substituent. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Analysis and Consequences of the Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 Collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anz-Meador, P. D.; Liou, Jer-Chi

    2010-01-01

    The collision of Iridium 33 and Cosmos 2251, on 10 February 2009, was the first known unintentional hypervelocity collision in space of intact satellites. Iridium 33 was an active commercial telecommunications satellite, while Cosmos 2251 was a derelict communication satellite of the Strela-2M class. The collision occurred at a relative velocity of 11.6 km/s at an altitude of approximately 790 km over the Great Siberian Plain and near the northern apex of Cosmos 2251 s orbit. This paper describes the physical and orbital characteristics of the relevant spacecraft classes and reports upon our analysis of the resulting debris clouds size, mass, area-to-mass ratio, and relative velocity/directionality distributions. We compare these distributions to those predicted by the NASA breakup model and notable recent fragmentation events; in particular, we compare the area-to-mass ratio distribution for each spacecraft to that exhibited by the FY-1C debris cloud for the purpose of assessing the relative contribution of modern aerospace materials to debris clouds resulting from energetic collisions. In addition, we examine the long-term consequences of this event for the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment. Finally, we discuss "lessons learned", which may be incorporated into NASA s environmental models.

  16. Testing of Wrought Iridium/Chemical Vapor Deposition Rhenium Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.; Schneider, Steven J.

    1996-01-01

    A 22-N class, iridium/rhenium (Ir/Re) rocket chamber, composed of a thick (418 miocrometer) wrought iridium (Ir) liner and a rhenium substrate deposited via chemical vapor deposition, was tested over an extended period on gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen (GO2/GH2) propellants. The test conditions were designed to produce species concentrations similar to those expected in an Earth-storable propellant combustion environment. Temperatures attained in testing were significantly higher than those expected with Earth-storable propellants, both because of the inherently higher combustion temperature of GO2/GH2 propellants and because the exterior surface of the rocket was not treated with a high-emissivity coating that would be applied to flight class rockets. Thus the test conditions were thought to represent a more severe case than for typical operational applications. The chamber successfully completed testing (over 11 hr accumulated in 44 firings), and post-test inspections showed little degradation of the Ir liner. The results indicate that use of a thick, wrought Ir liner is a viable alternative to the Ir coatings currently used for Ir/Re rockets.

  17. Analysis of Abrasive Blasting of DOP-26 Iridium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ohriner, Evan Keith; Zhang, Wei; Ulrich, George B

    2012-01-01

    The effects of abrasive blasting on the surface geometry and microstructure of DOP-26 iridium alloy (Ir-0.3% W-0.006% Th 0.005% Al) have been investigated. Abrasive blasting has been used to control emissivity of components operating at elevated temperature. The effects of abrasive blasting conditions on surface morphology were investigated both experimentally and by numerical modeling. The simplified model, based on finite element analysis of a single angular particle impacting on Ir alloy disk, calculates the surface deformation and residual strain distribution. The experimental results and modeling results both indicate that the surface geometry is not sensitive to the abrasive blast process conditions of nozzle pressure and standoff distance considered in this study. On the other hand, the modeling results suggest that the angularity of the abrasive particle has an important role in determining surface geometry, which in turn, affects the emissivity. Abrasive blasting causes localized surface strains and localized recrystallization, but it does not affect grain size following extended exposure at elevated temperature. The dependence of emissivity of the DOP-26 alloy on mean surface slope follows a similar trend to that reported for pure iridium.

  18. Iridium thin films deposited via pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chenglin

    High purity Ir thin films for future applications as transition-edge sensors were deposited on Si (100) via pulsed laser deposition. The iridium deposition rate was investigated and found to have a high value with the pulsed laser power higher than 4.2×10 9 W/cm 2 . At this laser intensity range, the PLD Ir films were deposited at substrate temperature ranging from 100 to 700°C. Ir thin films' characteristics were investigated at both room temperature and low temperature with the emphasis on study of the effect of the substrate temperature during deposition on the structure and morphology of the films. The PLD films exhibited a (110) preferentially oriented polycrystalline structure. Their average grain size increased from about 30 to 110 nm as the deposition temperature was raised from 100 to 600°C. With a 700°C substrate temperature the grain size jumped to 500 nm. Iridium silicide was found in the film deposited at 700°C substrate temperature. This indicated a critical deposition temperature between 600 and 700°C. A 50 mK platform was built for low temperature measurements. At low temperature, the Residual Resistance Ratio (RRR) of the Ir thin films had a typical value of 1.50. A typical transition curve of the film showed a transition temperature higher and wider than expected.

  19. Phosphorescent Neutral Iridium (III) Complexes for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    PubMed

    Bin Mohd Yusoff, Abd Rashid; Huckaba, Aron J; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja

    2017-04-01

    The development of transition metal complexes for application in light-emitting devices is currently attracting significant research interest. Among phosphorescent emitters, those involving iridium (III) complexes have proven to be exceedingly useful due to their relatively short triplet lifetime and high phosphorescence quantum yields. The emission wavelength of iridium (III) complexes significantly depends on the ligands, and changing the electronic nature and the position of the ligand substituents can control the properties of the ligands. In this chapter, we discuss recent developments of phosphorescent transition metal complexes for organic light-emitting diode applications focusing solely on the development of iridium metal complexes.

  20. Formylated chloro-bridged iridium(III) dimers as OLED materials: opening up new possibilities.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael Y; Xie, Guohua; Tourbillon, Clarisse; Sandroni, Martina; Cordes, David B; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Samuel, Ifor D W; Zysman-Colman, Eli

    2015-05-14

    In this study, a series of four formyl-substituted chloro-bridged iridium(iii) dimers were prepared. Their absorption, photophysical and electrochemical properties were studied in dichloromethane solution. It was found that as the formyl content increased on the cyclometalating ligands, emission unexpectedly became brighter. Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) were fabricated using each of these iridium dimers as the emitter. The OLED fabricated using the brightest of the series, 2b, as the dopant afforded a decent external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 2.6%. This suggests that chloro-bridged iridium dimers are potential candidates as solid-state emitters.

  1. Identification of an Iridium(III)-Based Inhibitor of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tian-Shu; Mao, Zhifeng; Ng, Chan-Tat; Wang, Modi; Wang, Wanhe; Wang, Chunming; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen; Wang, Yitao; Leung, Chung-Hang; Ma, Dik-Lung

    2016-04-28

    The novel iridium(III) complex 1 was verified as a potent inhibitor of the TNF-α-TNFR protein-protein interaction in vitro and in cellulo. The iridium(III) center plays a critical role in organizing the structure of the bioactive metal complex, as the isolated ligands were found to be completely inactive. Both iridium enantiomers inhibited TNF-α-induced NF-κB activity and TNF-α-TNFR binding. 1 represents a promising scaffold for the further development of more potent organometallic TNF-α inhibitors.

  2. Iridium anomaly in the Cretaceous section of the Eastern Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelyev, Dmitry; Savelyeva, Olga

    2010-05-01

    The origin of iridium anomalies is widely discussed with regard to massive fauna and flora extinction at several geologic boundaries. Two hypotheses are most popular, cosmogenic and volcanogenic. Anomalies of iridium are known at many stratigraphic levels, both at the geologic series borders and within geologic series. Our studies revealed increased content of iridium in a section of Cretaceous oceanic deposits on the Kamchatsky Mys Peninsula (Eastern Kamchatka, Russia). The investigated section (56°03.353´N, 163°00.376´E) includes interbedded jaspers and siliceous limestones overlaying pillow-basalts. These deposits belong to the Smagin Formation of the Albian-Cenomanian age. In the middle and upper parts of the section two beds of black carbonaceous rocks with sapropelic organic matter were observed. Their formation marked likely episodes of oxygen depletion of oceanic intermediate water (oceanic anoxic events). Our geochemical studies revealed an enrichment of the carbonaceous beds in a number of major and trace elements (Al2O3, TiO2, FeO, MgO, K2O, P2O5, Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr, V, Mo, Ba, Y, Zr, Nb, REE, U, Au, Pt etc.) in comparison with associating jaspers and limestones. There are likely different sources which contributed to the enrichment. It is possible however to correlate the excess of Al, Ti, Zr, Nb with volcanogenic admixture, which is absent in limestones and jaspers. A possible source of the volcanogenic material was local volcanism as suggested by the close association of the investigated section with volcanic rocks (basaltic lavas and hyaloclastites). The basalts of the Smagin Formation were previously proposed to originate during Cretaceous activity of the Hawaiian mantle plume (Portnyagin et al., Geology, 2008). Neutron activation analysis indicated increased up to 9 ppb concentration of Ir at the bottom of the lower carbonaceous bed (inorganic part of the sample was analyzed comprising 46% of the bulk rock). In other samples Ir content was below

  3. A preliminary study of factors affecting the calibration stability of the iridium versus iridium-40 percent rhodium thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Shaffiq; Germain, Edward F.; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Alderfer, David W.; Wright, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    An iridium versus iridium-40% rhodium thermocouple was studied. Problems associated with the use of this thermocouple for high temperature applications (up to 2000 C) were investigated. The metallurgical studies included X-ray, macroscopic, resistance, and metallographic studies. The thermocouples in the as-received condition from the manufacturer revealed large amounts of internal stress caused by cold working during manufacturing. The thermocouples also contained a large amount of inhomogeneities and segregations. No phase transformations were observed in the alloy up to 1100 C. It was found that annealing the thermocouple at 1800 C for two hours, and then at 1400 C for 2 to 3 hours yielded a fine grain structure, relieving some of the strains, and making the wire more ductile. It was also found that the above annealing procedure stabilized the thermal emf behavior of the thermocouple for application below 1800 C (an improvement from + or - 1% to + or - 0.02% within the range of the test parameters used).

  4. Long-Term Neural Recordings Using MEMS Based Movable Microelectrodes in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Nathan; Sridharan, Arati; Anand, Sindhu; Baker, Michael; Okandan, Murat; Muthuswamy, Jit

    2010-01-01

    One of the critical requirements of the emerging class of neural prosthetic devices is to maintain good quality neural recordings over long time periods. We report here a novel MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) based technology that can move microelectrodes in the event of deterioration in neural signal to sample a new set of neurons. Microscale electro-thermal actuators are used to controllably move microelectrodes post-implantation in steps of approximately 9 μm. In this study, a total of 12 movable microelectrode chips were individually implanted in adult rats. Two of the twelve movable microelectrode chips were not moved over a period of 3 weeks and were treated as control experiments. During the first 3 weeks of implantation, moving the microelectrodes led to an improvement in the average signal to noise ratio (SNR) from 14.61 ± 5.21 dB before movement to 18.13 ± 4.99 dB after movement across all microelectrodes and all days. However, the average root-mean-square values of noise amplitudes were similar at 2.98 ± 1.22 μV and 3.01 ± 1.16 μV before and after microelectrode movement. Beyond 3 weeks, the primary observed failure mode was biological rejection of the PMMA (dental cement) based skull mount resulting in the device loosening and eventually falling from the skull. Additionally, the average SNR for functioning devices beyond 3 weeks was 11.88 ± 2.02 dB before microelectrode movement and was significantly different (p < 0.01) from the average SNR of 13.34 ± 0.919 dB after movement. The results of this study demonstrate that MEMS based technologies can move microelectrodes in rodent brains in long-term experiments resulting in improvements in signal quality. Further improvements in packaging and surgical techniques will potentially enable movable microelectrodes to record cortical neuronal activity in chronic experiments. PMID:20617188

  5. Modelling small-patterned neuronal networks coupled to microelectrode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massobrio, Paolo; Martinoia, Sergio

    2008-09-01

    Cultured neurons coupled to planar substrates which exhibit 'well-defined' two-dimensional network architectures can provide valuable insights into cell-to-cell communication, network dynamics versus topology, and basic mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and learning. In the literature several approaches were presented to drive neuronal growth, such as surface modification by silane chemistry, photolithographic techniques, microcontact printing, microfluidic channel flow patterning, microdrop patterning, etc. This work presents a computational model fit for reproducing and explaining the dynamics exhibited by small-patterned neuronal networks coupled to microelectrode arrays (MEAs). The model is based on the concept of meta-neuron, i.e., a small spatially confined number of actual neurons which perform single macroscopic functions. Each meta-neuron is characterized by a detailed morphology, and the membrane channels are modelled by simple Hodgkin-Huxley and passive kinetics. The two main findings that emerge from the simulations can be summarized as follows: (i) the increasing complexity of meta-neuron morphology reflects the variations of the network dynamics as a function of network development; (ii) the dynamics displayed by the patterned neuronal networks considered can be explained by hypothesizing the presence of several short- and a few long-term distance interactions among small assemblies of neurons (i.e., meta-neurons).

  6. Editor's highlight: Evaluation of a Microelectrode Array-based ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Thousands of compounds in the environment have not been characterized for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) hazard. To address this issue, methods to screen compounds rapidly for DNT hazard evaluation are necessary and are being developed for key neurodevelopmental processes. In order to develop an assay for network formation, the current study evaluated effects of a training set of chemicals on network ontogeny by measuring spontaneous electrical activity in neural networks grown on microelectrode arrays (MEA). Rat (0-24 h old) primary cortical cells were plated in 48 well MEA plates and exposed to six compounds: acetaminophen, bisindolylmaleimide-1 (Bis-1), domoic acid, mevastatin, sodium orthovanadate, and loperamide for a period of 12 days. Spontaneous network activity was recorded on days 2, 5, 7, 9, and 12 and viability was assessed using the Cell Titer Blue® assay on day 12. Network activity (e.g. mean firing rate (MFR), burst rate (BR), etc), increased between days 5 and 12. Random Forest analysis indicated that across all compounds and times, temporal correlation of firing patterns (r), MFR, BR, #of active electrodes and % of spikes in a burst were the most influential parameters in separating control from treated wells. All compounds except acetaminophen (≤ 30 µM) caused concentration-related effects on one or more of these parameters. Domoic acid and sodium orthovanadate altered several of these parameters in the absence of cytotoxicity. Although

  7. Microelectrode arrays: a new tool to measure embryonic heart activity.

    PubMed

    Reppel, Michael; Pillekamp, Frank; Lu, Zhong Ju; Halbach, Marcel; Brockmeier, Konrad; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Hescheler, Juergen

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of the sequential excitation of cardiac tissue is of high relevance, both for clinical pathophysiological purposes, eg, detection of sustained ventricular arrhythmias, as well as for experimental electrophysiology. Clinically, different technical approaches such as single electrode measurements and bipolar mapping electrode catheters have been used. In experimental setups several techniques to record cardiac activity have been proposed. Beside the well-established intracellular current-clamp recordings of action potentials, recent studies have performed extracellularly activation sequence mapping or simultaneous multichannel action potential electrode array measurements. Measurement of extracellularly recorded field potentials (FPs) hereby especially provides detailed information about the origin and spread of excitation in the heart. A similar analytical approach for cardiac FPs advanced the analysis of excitation spread and arrhythmic activity in multicellular preparations like developmental differentiation tissue of mouse embryonic stem cells, multicellular preparations of isolated native embryonic cardiomyocytes or the embryonic heart in toto. The use of substrate-integrated Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs, Multi Channel Systems, Reutlingen, Germany) with 60 electrodes of 10-30 microm diameters on a 100-200 microm grid, coated with porous titanium nitride to minimize the impedance allows recording of FPs at a high signal to noise ratio. The possibility to electrically stimulate the tissue further expands the range of applications and bioassays. It may thus facilitate the evaluation of drug research providing detailed information about the interplay of the complex cardiac network, and might improve the predictability of physiological and pathophysiological conditions or drug effects in embryonic heart tissue.

  8. Microelectrode-based dielectric spectroscopy of glucose effect on erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Colella, L; Beyer, C; Fröhlich, J; Talary, M; Renaud, P

    2012-06-01

    The dielectric response of biconcave erythrocytes exposed to D-glucose and L-glucose has been investigated using a double array of planar interdigitated microelectrodes on a glass microchip. Erythrocytes are analyzed under physiological conditions suspended in hypo-osmolar balanced solutions containing different glucose concentrations (0-20 mM). The glucose effect on the cellular dielectric properties is evaluated by analyzing the spectra using two different approaches, the equivalent circuit model and a modified model for ellipsoidal particles. The results show that at elevated glucose concentration (15 mM) the membrane capacitance increases by 36%, whereas the cytosol conductivity slightly decreases with a variation of about 15%. On the contrary, no variation has been registered with L-glucose, a biologically inactive enantiomer of D-glucose. The paper discusses the possible mechanism controlling the membrane dielectric response. As the external D-glucose increases, the number of activated glucose transporter in the erythrocyte membrane raises and the transition from sugar-free state to sugar-bounded state induces a change in the dipole moments and in the membrane capacitance.

  9. Investigating brain functional evolution and plasticity using microelectrode array technology.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Alessandro; Obeid, Iyad

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate long and short-term plasticity responsible for memory formation in dissociated neuronal networks. In order to address this issue, a set of experiments was designed and implemented in which the microelectrode array electrode grid was divided into four quadrants, two of which were chronically stimulated, every two days for one hour with a stimulation paradigm that varied over time. Overall network and quadrant responses were then analyzed to quantify what level of plasticity took place in the network and how this was due to the stimulation interruption. The results demonstrate that there were no spatial differences in the stimulus-evoked activity within quadrants. Furthermore, the implemented stimulation protocol induced depression effects in the neuronal networks as demonstrated by the consistently lower network activity following stimulation sessions. Finally, the analysis demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of the stimulation decreased over time, thus suggesting a habituation phenomenon. These findings are sufficient to conclude that electrical stimulation is an important tool to interact with dissociated neuronal cultures, but localized stimuli are not enough to drive spatial synaptic potentiation or depression. On the contrary, the ability to modulate synaptic temporal plasticity was a feasible task to achieve by chronic network stimulation.

  10. Polycrystalline-Diamond MEMS Biosensors Including Neural Microelectrode-Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Varney, Michael W.; Aslam, Dean M.; Janoudi, Abed; Chan, Ho-Yin; Wang, Donna H.

    2011-01-01

    Diamond is a material of interest due to its unique combination of properties, including its chemical inertness and biocompatibility. Polycrystalline diamond (poly-C) has been used in experimental biosensors that utilize electrochemical methods and antigen-antibody binding for the detection of biological molecules. Boron-doped poly-C electrodes have been found to be very advantageous for electrochemical applications due to their large potential window, low background current and noise, and low detection limits (as low as 500 fM). The biocompatibility of poly-C is found to be comparable, or superior to, other materials commonly used for implants, such as titanium and 316 stainless steel. We have developed a diamond-based, neural microelectrode-array (MEA), due to the desirability of poly-C as a biosensor. These diamond probes have been used for in vivo electrical recording and in vitro electrochemical detection. Poly-C electrodes have been used for electrical recording of neural activity. In vitro studies indicate that the diamond probe can detect norepinephrine at a 5 nM level. We propose a combination of diamond micro-machining and surface functionalization for manufacturing diamond pathogen-microsensors. PMID:25586924

  11. Modelling small-patterned neuronal networks coupled to microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Massobrio, Paolo; Martinoia, Sergio

    2008-09-01

    Cultured neurons coupled to planar substrates which exhibit 'well-defined' two-dimensional network architectures can provide valuable insights into cell-to-cell communication, network dynamics versus topology, and basic mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and learning. In the literature several approaches were presented to drive neuronal growth, such as surface modification by silane chemistry, photolithographic techniques, microcontact printing, microfluidic channel flow patterning, microdrop patterning, etc. This work presents a computational model fit for reproducing and explaining the dynamics exhibited by small-patterned neuronal networks coupled to microelectrode arrays (MEAs). The model is based on the concept of meta-neuron, i.e., a small spatially confined number of actual neurons which perform single macroscopic functions. Each meta-neuron is characterized by a detailed morphology, and the membrane channels are modelled by simple Hodgkin-Huxley and passive kinetics. The two main findings that emerge from the simulations can be summarized as follows: (i) the increasing complexity of meta-neuron morphology reflects the variations of the network dynamics as a function of network development; (ii) the dynamics displayed by the patterned neuronal networks considered can be explained by hypothesizing the presence of several short- and a few long-term distance interactions among small assemblies of neurons (i.e., meta-neurons).

  12. Solvent drag across gramicidin channels demonstrated by microelectrodes.

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, P; Saparov, S M

    2000-01-01

    The competition of ion and water fluxes across gramicidin channels was assessed from the concentration distributions of both pore-impermeable and -permeable cations that were simultaneously measured by double-barreled microelectrodes in the immediate vicinity of a planar bilayer. Because water movement across the membrane led to accumulation of solutes on one side of the membrane and depletion on the other, the permeable cation was not only pushed by water across the channel (true solvent drag); it also flowed along its concentration gradient (pseudo-solvent drag). For the demonstration of true solvent drag, a difference between the bulk concentrations on the hypertonic and the hypotonic sides of the membrane was established. It was adjusted to get equal cation concentrations at both membrane/water interfaces. From the sodium and potassium fluxes measured along with membrane conductivity under these conditions, approximately five water molecules were found to be transported simultaneously with one ion through the channel. In diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine membranes, a single-channel hydraulic permeability coefficient of 1.6 x 10(-14) cm(3) s(-1) was obtained. PMID:10777738

  13. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection using microelectrode biochip array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong-Sung; Lee, Kyung-Sup; Park, Dae-Hee

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, a microelectrode array DNA chip was fabricated on a glass slide using photolithography technology. Several probe DNAs with mercaptohexyl moiety at their 5' end were immobilized on the gold electrodes by a DNA arrayer utilizing the affinity between gold and sulfur. Then target DNAs were hybridized and reacted with Hoechst 33258, which is a DNA minor groove binder and electrochemically active dye. Cyclic voltammetry in a 5 mM ferricyanide/ferrocyanide solution at 100 mV s-1 confirmed the immobilization of probe DNA on the gold electrodes. Linear sweep voltammetry or cyclic voltammetry showed a difference between target DNA and control DNA in the anodic peak current values. This was derived from Hoechst 33258 concentrated at the electrode surface through association with formed hybrids. It is suggested that this DNA chip could recognize sequence specific genes. It is also suggested that a multichannel electrochemical DNA microarray is useful to develop a portable device for a clinical gene diagnostic system.

  14. Human Islets Exhibit Electrical Activity on Microelectrode Arrays (MEA).

    PubMed

    Schönecker, S; Kraushaar, U; Guenther, E; Gerst, F; Ullrich, S; Häring, H-U; Königsrainer, A; Barthlen, W; Drews, G; Krippeit-Drews, P

    2015-05-01

    This study demonstrates for the first time that the microelectrode array (MEA) technique allows analysis of electrical activity of islets isolated from human biopsies. We have shown before that this method, i.e., measuring beta cell electrical activity with extracellular electrodes, is a powerful tool to assess glucose responsiveness of isolated murine islets. In the present study, human islets were shown to exhibit glucose-dependent oscillatory electrical activity. The glucose responsiveness could be furthermore demonstrated by an increase of insulin secretion in response to glucose. Electrical activity was increased by tolbutamide and inhibited by diazoxide. In human islets bursts of electrical activity were markedly blunted by the Na(+) channel inhibitor tetrodotoxin which does not affect electrical activity in mouse islets. Thus, the MEA technique emerges as a powerful tool to decipher online the unique features of human islets.Additionally, this technique will enable research with human islets even if only a few islets are available and it will allow a fast and easy test of metabolic integrity of islets destined for transplantation.

  15. Electrophysiological characterization of Nsc-34 cell line using Microelectrode Array.

    PubMed

    Sabitha, K R; Sanjay, D; Savita, B; Raju, T R; Laxmi, T R

    2016-11-15

    Neurons communicate with each other through intricate network to evolve higher brain functions. The electrical activity of the neurons plays a crucial role in shaping the connectivity. With motor neurons being vulnerable to neurodegenerative diseases, understanding the electrophysiological properties of motor neurons is the need of the hour, in order to comprehend the impairment of connectivity in these diseases. NSC-34 cell line serves as an excellent model to study the properties of motor neurons as they express Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). Although NSC-34 cell lines have been used to study the effect of various toxicological, neurotrophic and neuroprotective agents, the electrical activity of these cells has not been elucidated. In the current study, we have characterized the electrophysiological properties of NSC-34 cell lines using Micro-Electrode Array (MEA) as a tool. Based on the spike waveform, firing frequency, auto- and cross-correlogram analysis, we demonstrate that NSC-34 cell culture has >2 distinct types of neuronal population: principal excitatory neurons, putative interneurons and unclassified neurons. The presence of interneurons in the NSC-34 culture was characterized by increased expression of GAD-67 markers. Thus, finding an understanding of the electrophysiological properties of different population of neurons in NSC-34 cell line, will have multiple applications in the treatment of neurological disorders.

  16. Estimating electrical conductivity tensors of biological tissues using microelectrode arrays.

    PubMed

    Gilboa, Elad; La Rosa, Patricio S; Nehorai, Arye

    2012-10-01

    Finding the electrical conductivity of tissue is highly important for understanding the tissue's structure and functioning. However, the inverse problem of inferring spatial conductivity from data is highly ill-posed and computationally intensive. In this paper, we propose a novel method to solve the inverse problem of inferring tissue conductivity from a set of transmembrane potential and stimuli measurements made by microelectrode arrays (MEA). We first formalize the discrete forward model of transmembrane potential propagation, based on a reaction-diffusion model with an anisotropic inhomogeneous electrical conductivity-tensor field. Then, we propose a novel parallel optimization algorithm for solving the complex inverse problem of estimating the electrical conductivity-tensor field. Specifically, we propose a single-step approximation with a parallel block-relaxation optimization routine that simplifies the joint tensor field estimation problem into a set of computationally tractable subproblems, allowing the use of efficient standard optimization tools. Finally, using numerical examples of several electrical conductivity field topologies and noise levels, we analyze the performance of our algorithm, and discuss its application to real measurements obtained from smooth-muscle cardiac tissue, using data collected with a high-resolution MEA system.

  17. Polycrystalline-Diamond MEMS Biosensors Including Neural Microelectrode-Arrays.

    PubMed

    Varney, Michael W; Aslam, Dean M; Janoudi, Abed; Chan, Ho-Yin; Wang, Donna H

    2011-08-15

    Diamond is a material of interest due to its unique combination of properties, including its chemical inertness and biocompatibility. Polycrystalline diamond (poly-C) has been used in experimental biosensors that utilize electrochemical methods and antigen-antibody binding for the detection of biological molecules. Boron-doped poly-C electrodes have been found to be very advantageous for electrochemical applications due to their large potential window, low background current and noise, and low detection limits (as low as 500 fM). The biocompatibility of poly-C is found to be comparable, or superior to, other materials commonly used for implants, such as titanium and 316 stainless steel. We have developed a diamond-based, neural microelectrode-array (MEA), due to the desirability of poly-C as a biosensor. These diamond probes have been used for in vivo electrical recording and in vitro electrochemical detection. Poly-C electrodes have been used for electrical recording of neural activity. In vitro studies indicate that the diamond probe can detect norepinephrine at a 5 nM level. We propose a combination of diamond micro-machining and surface functionalization for manufacturing diamond pathogen-microsensors.

  18. Piezo-Driven Vibrating Insertion Device for Microelectrode Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Takahiro; Kanzaki, Ryohei; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    Microelectrode arrays are commonly used to measure neural activities in the brain, and arrays with some 100 electrodes are commercially available to date. However, insertion of a dense grid array deforms the brain, resulting in deterioration of the measurements. In order to overcome this problem, we propose a piezo-driven vibrating insertion device to reduce the insertion-induced deformation of the brain. We attempted under various conditions to insert the array into an agarose substrate, whose hardness was adjusted to that of the cerebral cortex of rats. Our experiments demonstrated that inverse-sawtooth vibration reduced the insertion-induced deformation of the substrate in proportion to the logarithm of an upstroke velocity when the velocity was higher than 10 mm/s, and vibrating insertion of the maximum velocity at 36.7 mm/s reduced the deformation by up to 40% as compared to insertion without vibration. In addition, we tested the vibrating insertion device in an electrophysiological experiment in the rat auditory cortex in vivo, and successfully measured tone-evoked neuronal activities.

  19. Microelectrode measurements of local mass transport rates in heterogeneous biofilms.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, K; Lewandowski, Z

    1998-08-05

    Microelectrodes were used to measure oxygen profiles and local mass transfer coefficient profiles in biofilm clusters and interstitial voids. Both profiles were measured at the same location in the biofilm. From the oxygen profile, the effective diffusive boundary layer thickness (DBL) was determined. The local mass transfer coefficient profiles provided information about the nature of mass transport near and within the biofilm. All profiles were measured at three different average flow velocities, 0.62, 1.53, and 2.60 cm sec-1, to determine the influence of flow velocity on mass transport. Convective mass transport was active near the biofilm/liquid interface and in the upper layers of the biofilm, independent of biofilm thickness and flow velocity. The DBL varied strongly between locations for the same flow velocities. Oxygen and local mass transfer coefficient profiles collected through a 70 micrometer thick cluster revealed that a cluster of that thickness did not present any significant mass transport resistance. In a 350 micrometer thick biofilm cluster, however, the local mass transfer coefficient decreased gradually to very low values near the substratum. This was hypothetically attributed to the decreasing effective diffusivity in deeper layers of biofilms. Interstitial voids between clusters did not seem to influence the local mass transfer coefficients significantly for flow velocities of 1.53 and 2.60 cm sec-1. At a flow velocity of 0.62 cm sec-1, interstitial voids visibly decreased the local mass transfer coefficient near the bottom. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. An active, flexible carbon nanotube microelectrode array for recording electrocorticograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yung-Chan; Hsu, Hui-Lin; Lee, Yu-Tao; Su, Huan-Chieh; Yen, Shiang-Jie; Chen, Chang-Hsiao; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Yew, Tri-Rung; Yeh, Shih-Rung; Yao, Da-Jeng; Chang, Yen-Chung; Chen, Hsin

    2011-06-01

    A variety of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) has been developed for monitoring intra-cortical neural activity at a high spatio-temporal resolution, opening a promising future for brain research and neural prostheses. However, most MEAs are based on metal electrodes on rigid substrates, and the intra-cortical implantation normally causes neural damage and immune responses that impede long-term recordings. This communication presents a flexible, carbon-nanotube MEA (CMEA) with integrated circuitry. The flexibility allows the electrodes to fit on the irregular surface of the brain to record electrocorticograms in a less invasive way. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) further improve both the electrode impedance and the charge-transfer capacity by more than six times. Moreover, the CNTs are grown on the polyimide substrate directly to improve the adhesion to the substrate. With the integrated recording circuitry, the flexible CMEA is proved capable of recording the neural activity of crayfish in vitro, as well as the electrocorticogram of a rat cortex in vivo, with an improved signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, the proposed CMEA can be employed as a less-invasive, biocompatible and reliable neuro-electronic interface for long-term usage.