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Sample records for iron absorption conditioning

  1. Determining the Effect of Environmental Conditions on Iron Corrosion by Atomic Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malel, Esteban; Shalev, Deborah E.

    2013-01-01

    Iron corrosion is a complex process that occurs when iron is exposed to oxygen and humidity and is exacerbated by the presence of chloride ions. The deterioration of iron structures or other components can be costly to society and is usually evaluated by following the properties of the corroding material. Here, the iron ions released into solution…

  2. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  3. Iron absorption and transport-an update.

    PubMed

    Conrad, M E; Umbreit, J N

    2000-08-01

    Iron is vital for all living organisms. However, excess iron is hazardous because it produces free radical formation. Therefore, iron absorption is carefully regulated to maintain an equilibrium between absorption and body loss of iron. In countries where heme is a significant part of the diet, most body iron is derived from dietary heme iron because heme binds few of the luminal intestinal iron chelators that inhibit absorption of non-heme iron. Uptake of luminal heme into enterocytes occurs as a metalloporphyrin. Intracellularly, iron is released from heme by heme oxygenase so that iron leaves the enterocyte to enter the plasma as non-heme iron. Ferric iron is absorbed via a beta(3) integrin and mobilferrin (IMP) pathway that is not shared with other nutritional metals. Ferrous iron uptake is facilitated by DMT-1 (Nramp-2, DCT-1) in a pathway shared with manganese. Other proteins were recently described which are believed to play a role in iron absorption. SFT (Stimulator of Iron Transport) is postulated to facilitate both ferric and ferrous iron uptake, and Hephaestin is thought to be important in transfer of iron from enterocytes into the plasma. The iron concentration within enterocytes reflects the total body iron and either upregulates or satiates iron-binding sites on regulatory proteins. Enterocytes of hemochromatotics are iron-depleted similarly to the absorptive cells of iron-deficient subjects. Iron depletion, hemolysis, and hypoxia each can stimulate iron absorption. In non-intestinal cells most iron uptake occurs via either the classical clathrin-coated pathway utilizing transferrin receptors or the poorly defined transferrin receptor independent pathway. Non-intestinal cells possess the IMP and DMT-1 pathways though their role in the absence of iron overload is unclear. This suggests that these pathways have intracellular functions in addition to facilitating iron uptake.

  4. Iron absorption from typical Latin American diets.

    PubMed

    Acosta, A; Amar, M; Cornbluth-Szarfarc, S C; Dillman, E; Fosil, M; Biachi, R G; Grebe, G; Hertrampf, E; Kremenchuzky, S; Layrisse, M

    1984-06-01

    The availability and daily absorption of iron was determined by the extrinsic label method in typical lower middle to lower class diets consumed in regions of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Peru, and Venezuela. Differences in iron absorption from meals up to 7-fold, could be attributed to the varying contents of absorption enhancers, eg, in meat, and of inhibitors in tea, vegetables, and wheat or maize bread. The total iron available in the diets from four countries did not meet the physiological requirements for normal subjects but deficient subjects fulfilled their requirements absorbing from 1.0 to 2.1 mg/day. In five diets heme iron (6 to 24% of the total) provided 34 to 73% of the iron absorbed. These data suggest that such absorption and utilization studies may be used to correlate the prevalence of iron deficiency in a population with certain diets and to guide fortification programs.

  5. [Effect of polyphenols of coffee pulp on iron absorption].

    PubMed

    de Rozo, M P; Vélez, J; García, L A

    1985-06-01

    The effect of the polyphenols of coffee pulp on iron absorption was studied using the method of ligated segments in rats. Optimal conditions to measure iron absorption, were determined using as criteria the concentration of Fe59 and the time that produced the highest value of blood radioactivity. A concentration of 0.4 uCi/dose of Fe59 and a 3-hr period were chosen to measure iron absorption. Experimental groups were formed assigning six rats randomly to each group. Each group was injected with a solution of 59Fe and either with the standard polyphenol solution or with the coffee pulp extract, except the control group which was injected with the Fe59 solution only. The effect of two polyphenol concentrations was also studied. Iron uptake from the duodenum was found to be the best indicator of iron absorption when compared to the sum of iron uptake by the tissues (blood, liver, spleen, kidneys, heart and carcass). Therefore, this indicator was used to interpret the results obtained. Catechin, tannic acid and the coffee pulp extract decreased significantly iron absorption when compared with the control group. The level of polyphenols used in these experiments is similar to the amounts consumed by animals fed coffee pulp at a 10% level. Therefore, we can conclude that the antinutritional effect of coffee pulp polyphenols may be partially due to their capacity to bind iron.

  6. Iron absorption from intrinsically-labeled lentils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low iron (Fe) absorption from important staple foods may contribute to Fe deficiency in developing countries. To date, there are few studies examining the Fe bioavailability of pulse crops as commonly prepared and consumed by humans. The objectives of this study were to characterize the Fe absorpt...

  7. Inhibitory effect of nuts on iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Macfarlane, B J; Bezwoda, W R; Bothwell, T H; Baynes, R D; Bothwell, J E; MacPhail, A P; Lamparelli, R D; Mayet, F

    1988-02-01

    The effects on iron absorption of nuts, an important source of dietary protein in many developing countries, were measured in 137 Indian women. When the absorption from bread and nut meals (walnuts, almonds, peanuts, and hazelnuts) was compared with that from bread meals, the overall geometric mean absorption from the nut meals (1.8%) was significantly less than from the bread meals alone (6.6%, t = 9.8, p less than 0.0005). In contrast, coconut did not reduce absorption significantly. All the nuts tested contained significant amounts of two known inhibitors of Fe absorption (phytates and polyphenols) but the amounts in coconut were significantly less than in the other nuts. Fifty milligrams ascorbic acid overcame the inhibitory effects of two nuts that were tested (Brazil nuts and peanuts). This is different from that found previously for soy protein, another potent inhibitor of Fe absorption.

  8. Non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate does not interact with heme iron absorption in humans.

    PubMed

    Gaitán, Diego; Olivares, Manuel; Lönnerdal, Bo; Brito, Alex; Pizarro, Fernando

    2012-12-01

    The absorption of heme iron has been described as distinctly different from that of non-heme iron. Moreover, whether heme and non-heme iron compete for absorption has not been well established. Our objective was to investigate the potential competition between heme and non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate for absorption, when both iron forms are ingested on an empty stomach. Twenty-six healthy nonpregnant women were selected to participate in two iron absorption studies using iron radioactive tracers. We obtained the dose-response curve for absorption of 0.5, 10, 20, and 50 mg heme iron doses, as concentrated red blood cells. Then, we evaluated the absorption of the same doses, but additionally we added non-heme iron, as ferrous sulfate, at constant heme/non-heme iron molar ratio (1:1). Finally, we compare the two curves by a two-way ANOVA. Iron sources were administered on an empty stomach. One factor analysis showed that heme iron absorption was diminished just by increasing total heme iron (P < 0.0001). The addition of non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate did not have any effect on heme iron absorption (P = NS). We reported evidence that heme and non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate does not compete for absorption. The mechanism behind the absorption of these iron sources is not clear. PMID:22935997

  9. Hydrogen absorption in iron exposed to simulated concrete pore solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Scully, J.R.

    1996-02-01

    Safe cathodic protection (CP) limits are required for prestressed steel in concrete to avoid the risk of hydrogen embrittlement (HE). This preliminary study addressed some effects of concrete pore solution chemistry and metal surface condition on hydrogen absorption in iron. To accomplish this, the Devanathan-Stachurski permeation technique was used to investigate hydrogen absorption in 99.5% iron foils exposed to NaOH, saturated Ca(OH){sub 2}, and saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} + 0.6 M NaCl, all at pH 12.5. The foils used in this investigation were tested after various surface preparations: (a) polished, (b) with a thermal oxide formed by a heat treatment designed to simulate the stress relief oxide, and (c) with corrosion films to simulate an inservice tendon that was exposed to a marine environment for some time prior to CP. Hydrogen uptake in iron was most efficient for foils covered with Portland cement-based mortar, at least 2.5 times greater than that in NaOH of the same pH and hydrogen production rate. Absorption in saturated Ca(OH){sub 2} was somewhat less than that from the mortar cover. While chloride had no direct effect on the hydrogen absorption rate, the corrosion product and the thermal oxide were found to decrease hydrogen absorption compared to polished iron. The thermal oxide acted as a complete barrier at all charging current densities investigated. The effectiveness of this thermal oxide barrier to hydrogen, however, was compromised by corrosion resulting from alternate immersion exposure to a chloride environment.

  10. Iron absorption and phenolic compounds: importance of different phenolic structures.

    PubMed

    Brune, M; Rossander, L; Hallberg, L

    1989-08-01

    The phenolic compounds (phenolic monomers, polyphenols, tannins) are considered to interfere with iron absorption by complex formation with iron in the gastro-intestinal lumen, making the iron less available for absorption. Very little is known about the extent to which different types of phenolic compounds of different size and chemical structure inhibit iron absorption. The relationship between iron absorption and the amount and type of phenolic compounds was studied by the extrinsic tag method. The aims of the studies were as follows: (i) To study the effect of small phenolic compounds with different hydroxylation patterns (gallic acid, catechin, chlorogenic acid) on iron absorption, (ii) To study the effect of different amounts of a hydrolysable tannin containing ten gallic acid residues (tannic acid) on iron absorption. (iii) To study the degree of inhibition of iron absorption by some foods and beverages (oregano, spinach, coffee and tea) in relation to their respective content of iron-binding phenolic groups, measured by a newly developed method. The inhibition of iron absorption by tannic acid was strongly dose-related. The smallest amount (5 mg) inhibited absorption by 20 per cent, 25 mg by 67 per cent and 100 mg by 88 per cent. Gallic acid inhibited iron absorption to the same extent as tannic acid, per mol galloyl groups, whereas no inhibition was observed when catechin was added to the test meal. Chlorogenic acid inhibited iron absorption to a lesser extent. Oregano and tea inhibited iron absorption in proportion to their respective content of galloyl groups, whereas the inhibitory effect of spinach was less marked. The inhibiting effect of coffee was explained mainly by its content of galloyl groups, but also by some other factor, probably chlorogenic acid. It is concluded that the content of iron-binding galloyl groups might be a major determinant of the inhibitory effect of phenolic compounds on iron absorption from the diet, whereas the phenolic

  11. Influence of Inflammatory Disorders and Infection on Iron Absorption and Efficacy of Iron- Fortified Foods

    PubMed Central

    Hurrell, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    The provision of iron- fortified foods is a common strategy to prevent iron deficiency; however, ensuring adequate iron absorption is a challenge. Iron bioavailability depends on the choice of iron compound, the presence enhancers and inhibitors of absorption in the food matrix, and the physiological state of the consumer, including iron status, other nutritional deficiencies and inflammatory disorders. Inflammation associated with infections and inflammatory disorders would be expected to decrease iron absorption and reduce the efficacy of iron- fortified foods. The decreased absorption is due to an increase in circulating hepcidin in response to inflammatory cytokines. Hepcidin degrades ferroportin and blocks the passage of iron from the intestinal cell to the plasma. This is the innate immune response to infections and aims to restrict pathogen growth by restricting iron supply. Stable isotope studies have reported women and children with chronic malaria parasitemia or febrile malaria to have increased inflammatory cytokines, increased hepcidin and much decreased iron absorption. No studies have specifically investigated the efficacy of iron- fortified foods in the absence and presence of infections. In contrast, inflammation and increased hepcidin associated with adiposity in overweight have been linked to both lower iron absorption and the decreased efficacy of iron- fortified foods. PMID:25762975

  12. Dependence of intestinal iron absorption on the valency state of iron.

    PubMed

    Wollenberg, P; Rummel, W

    1987-11-01

    1. In rats iron was absorbed after administration into the gut lumen as ferric iron bound to serum albumin, to nitrilotriacetic acid, and to 8-OH-quinoline sulfonic acid, or as isolated diferri-transferrin. 2. Iron absorption from 59Fe-labelled transferrin was inhibited by the addition of rat plasma. 3. The inhibitory component in the rat plasma turned out to be ceruloplasmin (ferrous iron oxidase, EC 1.16.2.1). 4. The absorption of iron from these ferric iron complexes was also inhibited by addition to the incubation medium of ferrozine, a strong anionic Fe(II)-ligand. 5. Uptake and absorptive utilization of transferrin-bound ferric iron was decreased after a prewash of the gut lumen and could be restored by the addition of ascorbate to the incubation medium. 6. The conclusion was drawn from these results that luminal reduction precedes ferric iron absorption and that this is a prerequisite for the uptake into the mucosa.

  13. The inhibitory effect of bran on iron absorption in man.

    PubMed

    Simpson, K M; Morris, E R; Cook, J D

    1981-08-01

    The effects of whole wheat bran and its components on the absorption of nonheme dietary iron were measured using a double isotope technique in human volunteers. When 12 g bran was added to a light meal, absorption decreased by 51 to 74%; this inhibitory effect of bran was shown for meals of both high and low iron availability. Inhibition was not explained by monoferric phytate, the major form of iron in bran, because labeled iron from monoferric phytate was absorbed at least as well as the common pool of nonheme dietary iron. Furthermore, removal of phytate from bran by endogenous phytase did not in itself alter the inhibitory effect of the bran on iron absorption. Studies in which dephytinized bran was separated into a soluble, phosphate-rich fraction and an insoluble, high-fiber fraction indicated that the soluble fraction was more inhibitory than the insoluble fraction. PMID:6267927

  14. Calcium and iron absorption: mechanism of action and nutritional importance.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, L; Rossander-Hultén, L; Brune, M; Gleerup, A

    1992-05-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effect of calcium on iron absorption in 57 human subjects. Three studies suggested that the effect is not located in the gastrointestinal tract. The presence of phytate in a meal and formation of calcium-iron-phytate complexes is not a prerequisite for the inhibition. The relative increase in iron absorption by ascorbic acid was the same in meals with and without calcium, suggesting that calcium did not influence the balance between enhancing and inhibiting ligands in the gastrointestinal lumen. No inhibiting effect on iron absorption was seen when adding 3 mg calcium to 0.01 mg iron (molar ratio Ca/Fe = 420). Previous studies showing a marked inhibition by calcium had a lower molar ratio, but greater amounts of calcium were given. This suggests that a minimal concentration of calcium is needed to achieve an effect. The present results indirectly support our original hypothesis that the inhibitory effect of calcium on iron absorption is situated within the intestinal mucosal cells. The practical nutritional implications of the inhibitory effect of calcium are considerable since addition of milk, milkshake or cheese to common meals such as pizza or hamburger meals reduced iron absorption by 50-60%. It is recommended to reduce the intake of dairy products with the main meals providing most of the dietary iron, especially for those having the highest iron requirements i.e. children, teenagers and women at childbearing age.

  15. Adaptation of iron requirement to hypoxic conditions at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Max; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2015-12-15

    Adequate acclimatization time to enable adjustment to hypoxic conditions is one of the most important aspects for mountaineers ascending to high altitude. Accordingly, most reviews emphasize mechanisms that cope with reduced oxygen supply. However, during sojourns to high altitude adjustment to elevated iron demand is equally critical. Thus in this review we focus on the interaction between oxygen and iron homeostasis. We review the role of iron 1) in the oxygen sensing process and erythropoietin (Epo) synthesis, 2) in gene expression control mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor-2 (HIF-2), and 3) as an oxygen carrier in hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochromes. The blood hormone Epo that is abundantly expressed by the kidney under hypoxic conditions stimulates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow, a process requiring high iron levels. To ensure that sufficient iron is provided, Epo-controlled erythroferrone that is expressed in erythroid precursor cells acts in the liver to reduce expression of the iron hormone hepcidin. Consequently, suppression of hepcidin allows for elevated iron release from storage organs and enhanced absorption of dietary iron by enterocytes. As recently observed in sojourners at high altitude, however, iron uptake may be hampered by reduced appetite and gastrointestinal bleeding. Reduced iron availability, as observed in a hypoxic mountaineer, enhances hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and may contribute to other hypoxia-related diseases. Overall, adequate systemic iron availability is an important prerequisite to adjust to high-altitude hypoxia and may have additional implications for disease-related hypoxic conditions.

  16. Solar powered absorption air conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardon, J. M.

    1980-04-01

    Artificial means of providing or removing heat from the building are discussed along with the problem of the appropriate building design and construction for a suitable heat climate inside the building. The use of a lithium bromide-water absorption chiller, powered by a hot water store heated by an array of stationary flat collectors, is analyzed. An iterative method of predicting the cooling output from a LiBr-water absorption refrigeration plant having variable heat input is described and a model allowing investigation of the performance of a solar collector and thermal storage system is developed.

  17. Oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles affects iron absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, Gretchen J.; Esch, Mandy B.; Tako, Elad; Southard, Teresa L.; Archer, Shivaun D.; Glahn, Raymond P.; Shuler, Michael L.

    2012-04-01

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in food and pharmaceuticals is expected to increase, but the impact of chronic oral exposure to nanoparticles on human health remains unknown. Here, we show that chronic and acute oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles can influence iron uptake and iron transport in an in vitro model of the intestinal epithelium and an in vivo chicken intestinal loop model. Intestinal cells that are exposed to high doses of nanoparticles showed increased iron transport due to nanoparticle disruption of the cell membrane. Chickens acutely exposed to carboxylated particles (50 nm in diameter) had a lower iron absorption than unexposed or chronically exposed birds. Chronic exposure caused remodelling of the intestinal villi, which increased the surface area available for iron absorption. The agreement between the in vitro and in vivo results suggests that our in vitro intestinal epithelium model is potentially useful for toxicology studies.

  18. Infant iron status affects iron absorption in Peruvian breastfed infants at 2 and 5 mo of age

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of prenatal iron supplementation on maternal postpartum iron status and early infant iron homeostasis remain largely unknown. We examined iron absorption and growth in exclusively breastfed infants in relation to fetal iron exposure and iron status during early infancy. Longitudinal, paired ...

  19. Iron Absorption from Two Milk Formulas Fortified with Iron Sulfate Stabilized with Maltodextrin and Citric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Maciero, Eugenia; Krasnoff, Gustavo; Cócaro, Nicolas; Gaitan, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fortification of milk formulas with iron is a strategy widely used, but the absorption of non-heme iron is low. The purpose of this study was to measure the bioavailability of two iron fortified milk formulas designed to cover toddlers’ nutritional needs. These milks were fortified with iron sulfate stabilized with maltodextrin and citric acid. Methods: 15 women (33–47 years old) participated in study. They received on different days, after an overnight fast, 200 mL of Formula A; 200 mL of Formula B; 30 mL of a solution of iron and ascorbic acid as reference dose and 200 mL of full fat cow’s milk fortified with iron as ferrous sulfate. Milk formulas and reference dose were labeled with radioisotopes 59Fe or 55Fe, and the absorption of iron measured by erythrocyte incorporation of radioactive Fe. Results: The geometric mean iron absorption corrected to 40% of the reference dose was 20.6% for Formula A and 20.7% for Formula B, versus 7.5% of iron fortified cow’s milk (p < 0.001). The post hoc Sheffé indeed differences between the milk formulas and the cow’s milk (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Formulas A and B contain highly bioavailable iron, which contributes to covering toddlers’ requirements of this micronutrient. PMID:26529007

  20. Duodenal Absorption and Tissue Utilization of Dietary Heme and Nonheme Iron Differ in Rats123

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chang; Thomas, Carrie E.; Insogna, Karl L.; O'Brien, Kimberly O.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dietary heme contributes to iron intake, yet regulation of heme absorption and tissue utilization of absorbed heme remains undefined. Objectives: In a rat model of iron overload, we used stable iron isotopes to examine heme- and nonheme-iron absorption in relation to liver hepcidin and to compare relative utilization of absorbed heme and nonheme iron by erythroid (RBC) and iron storage tissues (liver and spleen). Methods: Twelve male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to groups for injections of either saline or iron dextran (16 or 48 mg Fe over 2 wk). After iron loading, rats were administered oral stable iron in the forms of 57Fe-ferrous sulfate and 58Fe-labeled hemoglobin. Expression of liver hepcidin and duodenal iron transporters and tissue stable iron enrichment was determined 10 d postdosing. Results: High iron loading increased hepatic hepcidin by 3-fold and reduced duodenal expression of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) by 76%. Nonheme-iron absorption was 2.5 times higher than heme-iron absorption (P = 0.0008). Absorption of both forms of iron was inversely correlated with hepatic hepcidin expression (heme-iron absorption: r = −0.77, P = 0.003; nonheme-iron absorption: r = −0.80, P = 0.002), but hepcidin had a stronger impact on nonheme-iron absorption (P = 0.04). Significantly more 57Fe was recovered in RBCs (P = 0.02), and more 58Fe was recovered in the spleen (P = 0.01). Conclusions: Elevated hepcidin significantly decreased heme- and nonheme-iron absorption but had a greater impact on nonheme-iron absorption. Differential tissue utilization of heme vs. nonheme iron was evident between erythroid and iron storage tissues, suggesting that some heme may be exported into the circulation in a form different from that of nonheme iron. PMID:25332470

  1. Melting of iron determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to 100 GPa

    PubMed Central

    Aquilanti, Giuliana; Trapananti, Angela; Karandikar, Amol; Kantor, Innokenty; Marini, Carlo; Mathon, Olivier; Pascarelli, Sakura; Boehler, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Temperature, thermal history, and dynamics of Earth rely critically on the knowledge of the melting temperature of iron at the pressure conditions of the inner core boundary (ICB) where the geotherm crosses the melting curve. The literature on this subject is overwhelming, and no consensus has been reached, with a very large disagreement of the order of 2,000 K for the ICB temperature. Here we report new data on the melting temperature of iron in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell to 103 GPa obtained by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, a technique rarely used at such conditions. The modifications of the onset of the absorption spectra are used as a reliable melting criterion regardless of the solid phase from which the solid to liquid transition takes place. Our results show a melting temperature of iron in agreement with most previous studies up to 100 GPa, namely of 3,090 K at 103 GPa. PMID:26371317

  2. Melting of iron determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy to 100 GPa.

    PubMed

    Aquilanti, Giuliana; Trapananti, Angela; Karandikar, Amol; Kantor, Innokenty; Marini, Carlo; Mathon, Olivier; Pascarelli, Sakura; Boehler, Reinhard

    2015-09-29

    Temperature, thermal history, and dynamics of Earth rely critically on the knowledge of the melting temperature of iron at the pressure conditions of the inner core boundary (ICB) where the geotherm crosses the melting curve. The literature on this subject is overwhelming, and no consensus has been reached, with a very large disagreement of the order of 2,000 K for the ICB temperature. Here we report new data on the melting temperature of iron in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell to 103 GPa obtained by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, a technique rarely used at such conditions. The modifications of the onset of the absorption spectra are used as a reliable melting criterion regardless of the solid phase from which the solid to liquid transition takes place. Our results show a melting temperature of iron in agreement with most previous studies up to 100 GPa, namely of 3,090 K at 103 GPa.

  3. Iron absorption in raw and cooked bananas: A field study using stable isotopes in women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Banana is a staple food in many regions with high iron deficiency and may be a potential vehicle for iron fortification. However, iron absorption from bananas is not known. The objective of this study was to evaluate total iron absorption from raw and cooked bananas. Thirty women (34.9 +/- 6.6 years...

  4. The relevance of the intestinal crypt and enterocyte in regulating iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Oates, Phillip S

    2007-11-01

    Rigorous regulation of iron absorption is required to meet the requirements of the body and to limit excess iron accumulation that can produce oxidative stress. Regulation of iron absorption is controlled by hepcidin and probably by the crypt program. Hepcidin is a humoral mediator of iron absorption that interacts with the basolateral transporter, ferroportin. High levels of hepcidin reduce iron absorption by targeting ferroportin to lysosomes for destruction. It is also proposed that ferroportin is expressed on the apical membrane and coordinates with ferroportin-hepcidin derived from the basal surface to modulate the uptake phase of iron absorption. The crypt program suggests that as crypt cells differentiate and migrate into the absorptive zone they absorb iron from the diet at levels inverse to the amount of iron taken up from transferrin. Under most circumstances, intestinal iron absorption is controlled at multiple levels that lead to hepcidin/ferroportin modulation of the enterocyte labile iron pool (LIP). It is likely that transcription of iron transport proteins involved in the apical and basolateral transport of iron are differentially regulated by separate LIPs. Iron-responsive protein (IRP) 1 and IRP2 do not appear to play a significant role in the expression of iron transport proteins, although IRP2 regulates L- and H-ferritin expression. Despite the importance of hepcidin, there is evidence of hepcidin-independent regulation of iron absorption possibly involving haemojuvelin (HJV) and neogenin, which may be up-regulated during ineffective erythropoiesis.

  5. Food Iron Absorption in Man APPLICATIONS OF THE TWO-POOL EXTRINSIC TAG METHOD TO MEASURE HEME AND NONHEME IRON ABSORPTION FROM THE WHOLE DIET

    PubMed Central

    Björn-Rasmussen, Erik; Hallberg, Leif; Isaksson, Björn; Arvidsson, Bertil

    1974-01-01

    A new radioisotope method to measure iron absorption from the whole diet was used in this study. The method is based on the concept that food iron is absorbed from two pools, the heme iron pool and the nonheme iron pool, which can be especially labeled with two radioiron isotopes given as hemoglobin and as an iron salt. The purpose of this study was to test the accuracy of this two-pool extrinsic tag method. The meals served were composed as an average of 6 wk consumption in the present material of 32 young enlisted men. The mean and total heme and nonheme iron absorption in all the 32 young men was 1.01±0.11. This figure agrees well with the mean daily losses expected for this group of subjects (1.0 mg). The conclusion can therefore be made that there are no major systematic errors of the present method to measure the total iron absorption from a mixed diet. In one series a comparison was made of the absorption of heme and nonheme iron from the meals. A significant correlation between the absorption of the two kinds of iron was found. However, a much greater fraction of the heme iron was absorbed (37%) than of the nonheme iron (5%). The absorption both from breakfast and lunch was in two series found to give a good prediction of the total daily nonheme iron absorption. One series was designed to compare the effect of two levels of iron fortification. There was a significant increase in iron absorption when the level of iron fortification of the meals was increased. PMID:4808639

  6. Effect of animal proteins on the absorption of food iron in man.

    PubMed

    Björn-Rasmussen, E; Hallberg, L

    1979-01-01

    The way in which meat and fish act to promote the absorption of nonheme iron in food is not known. The present paper is a report of the results of a series of studies aimed at obtaining some insight into the mechanism of action of meat and other animal proteins on the absorption of food iron. Beef, fish, chicken and calf thymus all increased the iron absorption to about the same extent. Neither egg albumin, cysteine or a water extract of beef did, however, affect the absorption of food iron. Beef increased the absorption of a solution of inorganic iron given without food only when the iron salt was trivalent or when sodium phytate was added to the solution. It was concluded that meat acts by counteracting luminal factors that inhibit iron absorption. The most probable mechanism for this action is formation of a luminal carrier which transports the iron to the mucosal cell membrane.

  7. Probing iron spin state by optical absorption in laser-heated diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, S.; Goncharov, A. F.; Holtgrewe, N.; Lin, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Pressure-induced spin-pairing transitions in iron-bearing minerals have been in the focus of geophysical studies1. Modern consensus is that iron spin state in the lower mantle is a complex function of crystal structure, composition, pressure, and temperature. Discontinuities in physical properties of lower mantle minerals have been revealed over the spin transition pressure range, but at room temperature. In this work, we have used a supercontinuum laser source and an intensified CCD camera to probe optical properties of siderite, FeCO3, and post-perovskite, Mg0.9Fe0.1SiO3, across the spin transition in laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Synchronously gating the CCD with the supercontinuum pulses (Fig. 1A) allowed diminishing thermal background to ~8.3*10-4. Utilizing the experimental setup we infer the spin state of ferrous iron in siderite at high pressure and temperature conditions (Fig. 1B). Similar behavior is observed for low spin ferric iron in post-perovskite at 130 GPa indicating that all iron in post-perovskite is high spin at lower mantle conditions. Also, our experimental setup holds promise for measuring radiative thermal conductivity of mantle minerals at relevant mantle conditions. Figure 1. (A) Timing of the optical absorption measurements at high temperature. (B) High temperature siderite absorption spectra at 45 GPa. Before heating and quenched after 1300 K spectra are shown in light and dark blue, respectively. Green and red curves are absorption spectra at 1200 K and 1300 K, respectively. Spectra shown in black represent room temperature absorption data on HS (43 GPa) and LS (45.5 GPa) siderite after Lobanov et al., 2015, shown for comparison.

  8. Properties of iron under core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Underlying an understanding of the geodynamo and evolution of the core is knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of iron and iron mixtures under high pressure and temperature conditions. Key properties include the viscosity of the fluid outer core, thermal diffusivity, equations-of-state, elastic properties of solid phases, and phase equilibria for iron and iron-dominated mixtures. As is expected for work that continues to tax technological and intellectual limits, controversy has followed both experimental and theoretical progress in this field. However, estimates for the melting temperature of the inner core show convergence and the equation-of-state for iron as determined in independent experiments and theories are in remarkable accord. Furthermore, although the structure and elastic properties of the solid inner-core phase remains uncertain, theoretical and experimental underpinnings are better understood and substantial progress is likely in the near future. This talk will focus on an identification of properties that are reasonably well known and those that merit further detailed study. In particular, both theoretical and experimental (static and shock wave) determinations of the density of iron under extreme conditions are in agreement at the 1% or better level. The behavior of the Gruneisen parameter (which determines the geothermal gradient and controls much of the outer core heat flux) is constrained by experiment and theory under core conditions for both solid and liquid phases. Recent experiments and theory are suggestive of structure or structures other than the high-pressure hexagonal close-packed (HCP) phase. Various theories and experiments for the elasticity of HCP iron remain in poor accord. Uncontroversial constraints on core chemistry will likely never be possible. However, reasonable bounds are possible on the basis of seismic profiles, geochemical arguments, and determinations of sound velocities and densities at high pressure and

  9. Iron absorption after introducing and discontinuation of iron and zinc supplementation in rats.

    PubMed

    Januszko, Olga; Madej, Dawid; Brzozowska, Anna; Kaluza, Joanna

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in iron apparent absorption (IAA%) during and after iron and zinc supplementation in rats. The study was conducted on 6-week old male Wistar rats in 3 stages: 4-week period of adaptation to the control (C) and iron deficient (D) diets (stage I); 4-week period of supplementation with 10-time more iron (CSFe, DSFe), zinc (CSZn, DSZn) or both iron and zinc (CSFeZn, DSFeZn) compared to C diet (stage II); 2-week of post-supplementation period (rats were fed the same diets as in the adaptation period, stage III). IAA% was measured in five consecutive days directly after introducing and discontinuation of iron and zinc supplementation as well as in the end of stage II (days: 22-24th) and stage III (days: 8-10th). Overall in the second day after introducing and in the fifth day after discontinuation of iron or iron and zinc supplementation, the IAA% had undergone to the level compatible with the values in the end of each stage. At the end of stage II, IAA% in CSFeZn (54.1 ± 2.7%) rats was not different from the IAA% in CSFe rats (53.9 ± 1.9%), but in DSFeZn group IAA% (49.4 ± 2.1%) was significantly lower than in DSFe (57.4 ± 2.3%) group. Moreover, IAA% after stage II and stage III in DSZn group was significantly lower (39.2 ± 2.8% and 38.6 ± 2.6%, respectively) than in group D (60.7 ± 1.9% and 54.3 ± 3.0%, respectively). In conclusion, zinc administered simultaneously with iron (Zn:Fe weight ratio=1:1) decreased IAA% in adult rats fed on iron deficient diet, but not in rats fed on control diet. IAA% reduction by zinc supplementation has been extended to 10 days after discontinuation of the treatment. Adaptation of the rats to high doses of iron or iron and zinc and also to the cessation of these treatments was relatively fast. However, IAA% was stabilized faster after introducing the supplementation than it's discontinuation.

  10. Ab initio calculation of x-ray absorption of iron up to 3 Mbar and 8000 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazevet, S.; Recoules, V.; Bouchet, J.; Guyot, F.; Harmand, M.; Ravasio, A.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.

    2014-03-01

    Using ab initio simulations within the generalized gradient approximation, we calculate x-ray absorption near edge spectra (XANES) at the iron K edge throughout the high-pressure phase diagram and up to extreme density and temperature conditions that are representative of the Earth's inner core (up to 3 Mbar and 8000 K). We show that XANES spectra near the Fe K edge exhibit clear signatures for the different high-temperature, high-pressure phases of iron. This suggests that XANES spectroscopy might be used to resolve ongoing controversies regarding both the high-pressure melting curve of iron and the nature of the solid phases undergoing melting up to several Mbar. In contrast to diffraction measurements, it also offers a severe constraint for density functional theory predictions of the transport properties of iron by providing direct information on the electronic structure of iron at these extreme conditions.

  11. Iron absorption in raw and cooked bananas: a field study using stable isotopes in women

    PubMed Central

    García, Olga P.; Martínez, Mara; Romano, Diana; Camacho, Mariela; de Moura, Fabiana F.; Abrams, Steve A.; Khanna, Harjeet K.; Dale, James L.; Rosado, Jorge L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Banana is a staple food in many regions with high iron deficiency and may be a potential vehicle for iron fortification. However, iron absorption from bananas is not known. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate total iron absorption from raw and cooked bananas. Design Thirty women (34.9±6.6 years) from rural Mexico were randomly assigned to one of two groups each consuming: 1) 480 g/day of raw banana for 6 days, or 2) 500 g/day of cooked banana for 4 days. Iron absorption was measured after extrinsically labeling with 2 mg of 58Fe and a reference dose of 6 mg 57Fe; analysis was done using ICP-MS. Results Iron content in cooked bananas was significantly higher than raw bananas (0.53 mg/100 g bananas vs. 0.33 mg/100 mg bananas, respectively) (p<0.001). Percent iron absorption was significantly higher in raw bananas (49.3±21.3%) compared with cooked banana (33.9±16.2%) (p=0.035). Total amount of iron absorbed from raw and cooked bananas was similar (0.77±0.33 mg vs. 0.86±0.41 mg, respectively). Conclusion Total amount of absorbed iron is similar between cooked and raw bananas. The banana matrix does not affect iron absorption and is therefore a potential effective target for genetic modification for iron biofortification. PMID:25660254

  12. Extracting phosphoric iron under laboratorial conditions smelting bog iron ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Török, B.; Thiele, A.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years it has been indicated by archaeometric investigations that phosphoric-iron (P-iron, low carbon steel with 0,5-1,5wt% P), which is an unknown and unused kind of steel in the modern industry, was widely used in different parts of the world in medieval times. In this study we try to explore the role of phosphorus in the arhaeometallurgy of iron and answer some questions regarding the smelting bog iron ores with high P-content. XRF analyses were performed on bog iron ores collected in Somogy county. Smelting experiments were carried out on bog iron ores using a laboratory model built on the basis of previously conducted reconstructed smelting experiments in copies of excavated furnaces. The effect of technological parameters on P-content of the resulted iron bloom was studied. OM and SEM-EDS analyses were carried out on the extracted iron and slag samples. On the basis of the material analyses it can be stated that P-iron is usually extracted but the P-content is highly affected by technological parameters. Typical microstructures of P-iron and of slag could also be identified. It could also be established that arsenic usually solved in high content in iron as well.

  13. Dietary inulin supplementation does not promote colonic iron absorption in a porcine model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prebiotics may enhance iron bioavailability by increasing iron absorption in the colon. Anemic pigs fitted with cecal cannulas were fed a low-iron diet with or without 4% inulin. Over 7 days, pigs were administered 1 mg 54 Fe in the morning feed followed by cannula infusion of 0.5 mg 58 Fe to measu...

  14. Oral iron supplements increase hepcidin and decrease iron absorption from daily or twice-daily doses in iron-depleted young women.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Diego; Goede, Jeroen S; Zeder, Christophe; Jiskra, Markus; Chatzinakou, Vaiya; Tjalsma, Harold; Melse-Boonstra, Alida; Brittenham, Gary; Swinkels, Dorine W; Zimmermann, Michael B

    2015-10-22

    Iron supplements acutely increase hepcidin, but the duration and magnitude of the increase, its dose dependence, and its effects on subsequent iron absorption have not been characterized in humans. Better understanding of these phenomena might improve oral iron dosing schedules. We investigated whether the acute iron-induced increase in hepcidin influences iron absorption of successive daily iron doses and twice-daily iron doses. We recruited 54 nonanemic young women with plasma ferritin ≤20 µg/L and conducted: (1) a dose-finding investigation with 40-, 60-, 80-, 160-, and 240-mg labeled Fe as [(57)Fe]-, [(58)Fe]-, or [(54)Fe]-FeSO4 given at 8:00 am fasting on 1 or on 2 consecutive days (study 1, n = 25; study 2, n = 16); and (2) a study giving three 60-mg Fe doses (twice-daily dosing) within 24 hours (study 3, n = 13). In studies 1 and 2, 24 hours after doses ≥60 mg, serum hepcidin was increased (P < .01) and fractional iron absorption was decreased by 35% to 45% (P < .01). With increasing dose, fractional absorption decreased (P < .001), whereas absolute absorption increased (P < .001). A sixfold increase in iron dose (40-240 mg) resulted in only a threefold increase in iron absorbed (6.7-18.1 mg). In study 3, total iron absorbed from 3 doses (2 mornings and an afternoon) was not significantly greater than that from 2 morning doses. Providing lower dosages (40-80 mg Fe) and avoiding twice-daily dosing maximize fractional absorption. The duration of the hepcidin response supports alternate day supplementation, but longer-term effects of these schedules require further investigation. These clinical trials were registered at www.ClinicalTrials.gov as #NCT01785407 and #NCT02050932.

  15. A complete diet-based algorithm for predicting nonheme iron absorption in adults.

    PubMed

    Armah, Seth M; Carriquiry, Alicia; Sullivan, Debra; Cook, James D; Reddy, Manju B

    2013-07-01

    Many algorithms have been developed in the past few decades to estimate nonheme iron absorption from the diet based on single meal absorption studies. Yet single meal studies exaggerate the effect of diet and other factors on absorption. Here, we propose a new algorithm based on complete diets for estimating nonheme iron absorption. We used data from 4 complete diet studies each with 12-14 participants for a total of 53 individuals (19 men and 34 women) aged 19-38 y. In each study, each participant was observed during three 1-wk periods during which they consumed different diets. The diets were typical, high, or low in meat, tea, calcium, or vitamin C. The total sample size was 159 (53 × 3) observations. We used multiple linear regression to quantify the effect of different factors on iron absorption. Serum ferritin was the most important factor in explaining differences in nonheme iron absorption, whereas the effect of dietary factors was small. When our algorithm was validated with single meal and complete diet data, the respective R(2) values were 0.57 (P < 0.001) and 0.84 (P < 0.0001). The results also suggest that between-person variations explain a large proportion of the differences in nonheme iron absorption. The algorithm based on complete diets we propose is useful for predicting nonheme iron absorption from the diets of different populations.

  16. Quercetin inhibits intestinal iron absorption and ferroportin transporter expression in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lesjak, Marija; Hoque, Rukshana; Balesaria, Sara; Skinner, Vernon; Debnam, Edward S; Srai, Surjit K S; Sharp, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Balancing systemic iron levels within narrow limits is critical for maintaining human health. There are no known pathways to eliminate excess iron from the body and therefore iron homeostasis is maintained by modifying dietary absorption so that it matches daily obligatory losses. Several dietary factors can modify iron absorption. Polyphenols are plentiful in human diet and many compounds, including quercetin--the most abundant dietary polyphenol--are potent iron chelators. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute and longer-term effects of quercetin on intestinal iron metabolism. Acute exposure of rat duodenal mucosa to quercetin increased apical iron uptake but decreased subsequent basolateral iron efflux into the circulation. Quercetin binds iron between its 3-hydroxyl and 4-carbonyl groups and methylation of the 3-hydroxyl group negated both the increase in apical uptake and the inhibition of basolateral iron release, suggesting that the acute effects of quercetin on iron transport were due to iron chelation. In longer-term studies, rats were administered quercetin by a single gavage and iron transporter expression measured 18 h later. Duodenal FPN expression was decreased in quercetin-treated rats. This effect was recapitulated in Caco-2 cells exposed to quercetin for 18 h. Reporter assays in Caco-2 cells indicated that repression of FPN by quercetin was not a transcriptional event but might be mediated by miRNA interaction with the FPN 3'UTR. Our study highlights a novel mechanism for the regulation of iron bioavailability by dietary polyphenols. Potentially, diets rich in polyphenols might be beneficial for patients groups at risk of iron loading by limiting the rate of intestinal iron absorption. PMID:25058155

  17. Quercetin Inhibits Intestinal Iron Absorption and Ferroportin Transporter Expression In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Balesaria, Sara; Skinner, Vernon; Debnam, Edward S.; Srai, Surjit K. S.; Sharp, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Balancing systemic iron levels within narrow limits is critical for maintaining human health. There are no known pathways to eliminate excess iron from the body and therefore iron homeostasis is maintained by modifying dietary absorption so that it matches daily obligatory losses. Several dietary factors can modify iron absorption. Polyphenols are plentiful in human diet and many compounds, including quercetin – the most abundant dietary polyphenol – are potent iron chelators. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute and longer-term effects of quercetin on intestinal iron metabolism. Acute exposure of rat duodenal mucosa to quercetin increased apical iron uptake but decreased subsequent basolateral iron efflux into the circulation. Quercetin binds iron between its 3-hydroxyl and 4-carbonyl groups and methylation of the 3-hydroxyl group negated both the increase in apical uptake and the inhibition of basolateral iron release, suggesting that the acute effects of quercetin on iron transport were due to iron chelation. In longer-term studies, rats were administered quercetin by a single gavage and iron transporter expression measured 18 h later. Duodenal FPN expression was decreased in quercetin-treated rats. This effect was recapitulated in Caco-2 cells exposed to quercetin for 18 h. Reporter assays in Caco-2 cells indicated that repression of FPN by quercetin was not a transcriptional event but might be mediated by miRNA interaction with the FPN 3′UTR. Our study highlights a novel mechanism for the regulation of iron bioavailability by dietary polyphenols. Potentially, diets rich in polyphenols might be beneficial for patients groups at risk of iron loading by limiting the rate of intestinal iron absorption. PMID:25058155

  18. Duration of the inhibitory effect of calcium on non-haem iron absorption in man.

    PubMed

    Gleerup, A; Rossander-Hultén, L; Hallberg, L

    1993-12-01

    We investigated the duration of the inhibitory effect of calcium from milk and cheese (340 mg) in a breakfast meal on non-haem iron absorption from a hamburger meal eaten 2 or 4 h after the breakfast. The effect of calcium on iron absorption was studied in 21 human subjects by using paired observations and a dual-radioisotope method (55Fe and 59Fe). No duration effect of calcium on iron absorption was observed in this study. The present findings offer an opportunity for theoretical improvement of iron nutrition by a redistribution of the daily intake of calcium to the meals with a minor iron content, i.e. breakfast and the evening meal.

  19. Clinical implications of changes in the modern diet: iron intake, absorption and status.

    PubMed

    Heath, Anne-Louise M; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2002-06-01

    The modern British diet contains less red meat and is lower in iron than that consumed 30 years ago. This is in spite of the fact that fortification of foods, particularly breakfast cereals, with iron has become more widespread. Although there is no clear relationship between dietary iron intake and iron status, isotope studies have identified multiple dietary factors that influence iron absorption, such as ascorbic acid, animal tissue, phytates and polyphenols. There is no evidence to suggest that current dietary changes will have a major impact on iron status in the general population; however, effects on the incidence of iron overload in individuals with HFE mutations and iron deficiency in children and premenopausal women remain to be determined.

  20. Attractive microwave absorption and the impedance match effect in zinc oxide and carbonyl iron composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhi; Zhang, Yi; Cao, ChenTao; Yuan, Jing; Liu, QingFang; Wang, JianBo

    2011-12-01

    The flower-like ZnO and ZnO/carbonyl-iron composite have been prepared by a sonochemical route and ball-milling process, respectively. For ZnO/carbonyl-iron composite, a reflection loss ( RL) exceeding -20 dB was obtained in a broad frequency range of 8.4-17.9 GHz with a thin thickness of 1.2-2.3 mm. An optimal RL of -61 dB was found at 11.7 GHz for an absorber thickness of 1.91 mm. It is demonstrated that the attractive microwave-absorption properties are a consequence of a proper electro-magnetic impedance match and geometrical cancellation at the air-material interface. In addition, an impedance mismatch function was proposed, which provides an effective method to determine the microwave absorbing properties from the intrinsic materials constants. The calculated value of matching frequency and thickness is well consistent with the experimental data. The method also provides a simple theoretical graphic aid for determining the absorption characteristics and the location of the matching conditions in the frequency domain.

  1. Oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles effects iron absorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in food and pharmaceuticals is expected to increase, but the impact of chronic oral exposure to nanoparticles on human health remains unknown. Here, we show that chronic and acute oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles can influence iron uptake and iron trans...

  2. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of iron at multimegabar pressures in laser shock experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmand, M.; Ravasio, A.; Mazevet, S.; Bouchet, J.; Denoeud, A.; Dorchies, F.; Feng, Y.; Fourment, C.; Galtier, E.; Gaudin, J.; Guyot, F.; Kodama, R.; Koenig, M.; Lee, H. J.; Miyanishi, K.; Morard, G.; Musella, R.; Nagler, B.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Ozaki, N.; Recoules, V.; Toleikis, S.; Vinci, T.; Zastrau, U.; Zhu, D.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.

    2015-07-01

    Taking advantage of the new opportunities provided by x-ray free electron laser (FEL) sources when coupled to a long laser pulse as available at the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), we have performed x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) of laser shock compressed iron up to 420 GPa (±50 ) and 10 800 K (±1390 ). Visible diagnostics coupled with hydrodynamic simulations were used to infer the thermodynamical conditions along the Hugoniot and the release adiabat. A modification of the pre-edge feature at 7.12 keV in the XANES spectra is observed above pressures of 260 GPa along the Hugoniot. Comparing with ab initio calculations and with previous laser-heated diamond cell data, we propose that such changes in the XANES pre-edge could be a signature of molten iron. This interpretation then suggests that iron is molten at pressures and temperatures higher than 260 GPa (±29 ) and 5680 K (±700 ) along the principal Fe Hugoniot.

  3. Serum hepcidin is significantly associated with iron absorption from food and supplemental sources in healthy young woman

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hepcidin is a key regulator of iron homeostasis, but to date no studies have examined the effect of hepcidin on iron absorption in humans. Our objective was to assess relations between both serum hepcidin and serum prohepcidin with nonheme-iron absorption in the presence and absence of food with the...

  4. A carbonyl iron/carbon fiber material for electromagnetic wave absorption.

    PubMed

    Youh, Meng-Jey; Wu, Hung-Chih; Lin, Wang-Hua; Chiu, Sheng-Cheng; Huang, Chien-Fa; Yu, Hsin-Chih; Hsu, Jen-Sung; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2011-03-01

    A carbonyl iron/carbon fiber material consisting of carbon fibers grown on micrometer-sized carbonyl iron sphere, was synthesized by chemical vapor deposition using a mixture of C2H2 and H2. The hollow-core carbon fibers (outer diameter: 140 nm and inner diameter: 40 nm) were composed of well-ordered graphene layers which were almost parallel to the long axis of the fibers. A composite (2 mm thick) consisting of the carbonyl iron/carbon fibers and epoxy resin demonstrated excellent electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption. Minimum reflection losses of -36 dB (99.95% of EM wave absorption) at 7.6 GHz and -32 dB (99.92% of EM wave absorption) at 34.1 GHz were achieved. The well-dispersed and network-like carbon fibers in the resin matrix affected the dielectric loss of the EM wave while the carbonyl iron affected the magnetic loss.

  5. Total iron absorption by young women from iron-biofortified pearl millet composite meals is double that from regular millet meals but less than that from post-harvest iron-fortified millet meals.

    PubMed

    Cercamondi, Colin I; Egli, Ines M; Mitchikpe, Evariste; Tossou, Felicien; Zeder, Christophe; Hounhouigan, Joseph D; Hurrell, Richard F

    2013-09-01

    Iron biofortification of pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum) is a promising approach to combat iron deficiency (ID) in the millet-consuming communities of developing countries. To evaluate the potential of iron-biofortified millet to provide additional bioavailable iron compared with regular millet and post-harvest iron-fortified millet, an iron absorption study was conducted in 20 Beninese women with marginal iron status. Composite test meals consisting of millet paste based on regular-iron, iron-biofortified, or post-harvest iron-fortified pearl millet flour accompanied by a leafy vegetable sauce or an okra sauce were fed as multiple meals for 5 d. Iron absorption was measured as erythrocyte incorporation of stable iron isotopes. Fractional iron absorption from test meals based on regular-iron millet (7.5%) did not differ from iron-biofortified millet meals (7.5%; P = 1.0), resulting in a higher quantity of total iron absorbed from the meals based on iron-biofortified millet (1125 vs. 527 μg; P < 0.0001). Fractional iron absorption from post-harvest iron-fortified millet meals (10.4%) was higher than from regular-iron and iron-biofortified millet meals (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively), resulting in a higher quantity of total iron absorbed from the post-harvest iron-fortified millet meals (1500 μg; P < 0.0001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Results indicate that consumption of iron-biofortified millet would double the amount of iron absorbed and, although fractional absorption of iron from biofortification is less than that from fortification, iron-biofortified millet should be highly effective in combatting ID in millet-consuming populations.

  6. Total Iron Absorption by Young Women from Iron-Biofortified Pearl Millet Composite Meals Is Double That from Regular Millet Meals but Less Than That from Post-Harvest Iron-Fortified Millet Meals123

    PubMed Central

    Cercamondi, Colin I.; Egli, Ines M.; Mitchikpe, Evariste; Tossou, Felicien; Zeder, Christophe; Hounhouigan, Joseph D.; Hurrell, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Iron biofortification of pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum) is a promising approach to combat iron deficiency (ID) in the millet-consuming communities of developing countries. To evaluate the potential of iron-biofortified millet to provide additional bioavailable iron compared with regular millet and post-harvest iron-fortified millet, an iron absorption study was conducted in 20 Beninese women with marginal iron status. Composite test meals consisting of millet paste based on regular-iron, iron-biofortified, or post-harvest iron-fortified pearl millet flour accompanied by a leafy vegetable sauce or an okra sauce were fed as multiple meals for 5 d. Iron absorption was measured as erythrocyte incorporation of stable iron isotopes. Fractional iron absorption from test meals based on regular-iron millet (7.5%) did not differ from iron-biofortified millet meals (7.5%; P = 1.0), resulting in a higher quantity of total iron absorbed from the meals based on iron-biofortified millet (1125 vs. 527 μg; P < 0.0001). Fractional iron absorption from post-harvest iron-fortified millet meals (10.4%) was higher than from regular-iron and iron-biofortified millet meals (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively), resulting in a higher quantity of total iron absorbed from the post-harvest iron-fortified millet meals (1500 μg; P < 0.0001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Results indicate that consumption of iron-biofortified millet would double the amount of iron absorbed and, although fractional absorption of iron from biofortification is less than that from fortification, iron-biofortified millet should be highly effective in combatting ID in millet-consuming populations. PMID:23884388

  7. The influence of high iron diet on rat lung manganese absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Khristy; Molina, Ramon; Donaghey, Thomas; Brain, Joseph D.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne . E-mail: wessling@hsph.harvard.edu

    2006-01-15

    Individuals chronically exposed to manganese are at high risk for neurotoxic effects of this metal. A primary route of exposure is through respiration, although little is known about pulmonary uptake of metals or factors that modify this process. High dietary iron levels inversely affect intestinal uptake of manganese, and a major goal of this study was to determine if dietary iron loading could increase lung non-heme iron levels and alter manganese absorption. Rats were fed a high iron (1% carbonyl iron) or control diet for 4 weeks. Lung non-heme iron levels increased {approx}2-fold in rats fed the high iron diet. To determine if iron-loading affected manganese uptake, {sup 54}Mn was administered by intratracheal (it) instillation or intravenous (iv) injection for pharmacokinetic studies. {sup 54}Mn absorption from the lungs to the blood was lower in it-instilled rats fed the 1% carbonyl iron diet. Pharmacokinetics of iv-injected {sup 54}Mn revealed that the isotope was cleared more rapidly from the blood of iron-loaded rats. In situ analysis of divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) expression in lung detected mRNA in airway epithelium and bronchus-associated lymphatic tissue (BALT). Staining of the latter was significantly reduced in rats fed the high iron diet. In situ analysis of transferrin receptor (TfR) mRNA showed staining in BALT alone. These data demonstrate that manganese absorption from the lungs to the blood can be modified by iron status and the route of administration.

  8. Equilibrium iron isotope fractionation at core-mantle boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Veniamin B

    2009-02-13

    The equilibrium iron isotope fractionation between lower mantle minerals and metallic iron at core-mantle boundary conditions can be evaluated from the high-pressure 57Fe partial vibrational density of states determined by synchrotron inelastic nuclear resonant x-ray scattering spectroscopy using a diamond anvil. Ferropericlase [(Mg,Fe)O] and (Fe,Mg)SiO3- post-perovskite are enriched in heavy iron isotopes relative to metallic iron at ultrahigh pressures, as opposed to the equilibrium iron isotope fractionation between these compounds at low pressure. The enrichment of Earth and Moon basalts in heavy iron isotopes relative to those from Mars and asteroid Vesta can be explained by the equilibrium iron isotope fractionation during the segregation of Earth's core and the assumption that Earth was already differentiated before the Moon-forming "giant impact." PMID:19213913

  9. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Westre, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    Fe-K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to investigate the electronic and geometric structure of the iron active site in non-heme iron enzymes. A new theoretical extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis approach, called GNXAS, has been tested on data for iron model complexes to evaluate the utility and reliability of this new technique, especially with respect to the effects of multiple-scattering. In addition, a detailed analysis of the 1s{yields}3d pre-edge feature has been developed as a tool for investigating the oxidation state, spin state, and geometry of iron sites. Edge and EXAFS analyses have then been applied to the study of non-heme iron enzyme active sites.

  10. Absorption of inorganic halides produced from Freon 12 by calcium carbonate containing iron(III) oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, Seiichiro; Matsuba, Yoichi; Yamada, Etsu; Takai, Kenji; Utani, Kazunori

    1997-09-01

    Inorganic halides produced by the catalytic decomposition of Freon 12 were fixed by calcium carbonate, which is the main component of limestone. Iron(III) oxide, which is present as a contaminant in limestone, promoted the absorption of the halides by calcium carbonate at low temperatures. The supposed action of iron(III) oxide was to first react with inorganic halides, forming iron halides, and, then, transfer them to calcium carbonate to replace carbonate ion in a catalytic way. Thus, calcium carbonate containing iron oxides (limestone) can be used as an effective absorbent for the inorganic halogens produced during the decomposition of Freons.

  11. Alpha-lactalbumin and casein-glycomacropeptide do not affect iron absorption from formula in healthy term infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron absorption from infant formula is relatively low. Alpha-lactalbumin and casein-glycomacropeptide have been suggested to enhance mineral absorption. We therefore assessed the effect of alpha-lactalbumin and casein-glycomacropeptide on iron absorption from infant formula in healthy term infants. ...

  12. Microbial iron reduction under deep subsurface pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Testemale, D.; Hazemann, J.; Oger, P.

    2009-12-01

    The deep subsurface is characterized by hostile conditions in terms of temperature, pressure and nutrient availability. Our current view of the biosphere extension is restricted to depths shallower than the isotherm associated to the highest observed temperature for life, i.e. 122°C. At this temperature, depending on the geological setting, pressure varies between ambient pressure at geothermal springs and 350 MPa in cold subduction zones. In this high-pressure biosphere, biological iron reduction is an important process linked to carbon oxidation. Among the factors governing reaction rates and yields in the deep subsurface, pressure could be of importance due its effects on kinetic and equilibrium reactions. The understanding and modelling of Fe reduction in natural environments, especially in the subsurface, can be first comprehended thanks to studies of Fe reduction in pure cultures; indeed the study of the effects of high pressure on Fe-reducing bacteria in pure cultures can serve as a basic model for the effects of pressure on Fe reduction in the subsurface. We investigated the effects of pressure on the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) by the bacterial model Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. This strain is a mesophilic and piezosensitive counterpart of the psychrophilic and piezophilic Shewanella representatives that have been frequently isolated from deep-sea environments. Kinetics of Fe(III) reduction to Fe(II) were monitored in situ by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) in an appropriate pressure vessel dedicated to in situ XAS measurements (Testemale et al. 2005). Measurements were performed at the BM30B beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facilty (Grenoble, France). Experiments were conducted from 0.1 MPa to 100 MPa at MR-1 optimal temperature (30°C). Iron reduction was monitored until 100 MPa in cultures of MR-1 at a concentration of 10e8 cells/ml. This shows that the metabolic activity of a piezosensitive microbe extends far beyond its pressure

  13. Iron absorption in humans: bovine serum albumin compared with beef muscle and egg white

    SciTech Connect

    Hurrell, R.F.; Lynch, S.R.; Trinidad, T.P.; Dassenko, S.A.; Cook, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    We studied the influence of bovine serum albumin and beef meat on nonheme iron absorption in humans and on dialyzable iron in vitro. The addition of serum albumin to a maize gruel had no significant effect on nonheme Fe absorption whereas the addition of beef meat caused a threefold increase. When added to a bread meal, serum albumin caused a modest 60% increase in nonheme Fe absorption and beef meat had no effect. When added to a protein-free meal, serum albumin reduced Fe absorption by 47% compared with a 72% reduction on addition of egg white. The bioavailability of nonheme Fe from meals containing serum albumin was consistently overestimated by the in vitro technique. We conclude that the facilitation of nonheme Fe absorption by meat is not a general property of all animal protein but is better explained by the action of one or more specific animal tissues.

  14. Zinc Absorption from Micronutrient Powder Is Low but Is not Affected by Iron in Kenyan Infants

    PubMed Central

    Esamai, Fabian; Liechty, Edward; Ikemeri, Justus; Westcott, Jamie; Kemp, Jennifer; Culbertson, Diana; Miller, Leland V.; Hambidge, K. Michael; Krebs, Nancy F.

    2014-01-01

    Interference with zinc absorption is a proposed explanation for adverse effects of supplemental iron in iron-replete children in malaria endemic settings. We examined the effects of iron in micronutrient powder (MNP) on zinc absorption after three months of home fortification with MNP in maize-based diets in rural Kenyan infants. In a double blind design, six-month-old, non-anemic infants were randomized to MNP containing 5 mg zinc, with or without 12.5 mg of iron (MNP + Fe and MNP − Fe, respectively); a control (C) group received placebo powder. After three months, duplicate diet collections and zinc stable isotopes were used to measure intake from MNP + non-breast milk foods and fractional absorption of zinc (FAZ) by dual isotope ratio method; total absorbed zinc (TAZ, mg/day) was calculated from intake × FAZ. Mean (SEM) TAZ was not different between MNP + Fe (n = 10) and MNP − Fe (n = 9) groups: 0.85 (0.22) and 0.72 (0.19), respectively, but both were higher than C (n = 9): 0.24 (0.03) (p = 0.04). Iron in MNP did not significantly alter zinc absorption, but despite intakes over double estimated dietary requirement, both MNP groups’ mean TAZ barely approximated the physiologic requirement for age. Impaired zinc absorption may dictate need for higher zinc doses in vulnerable populations. PMID:25493942

  15. Inhibition of haem-iron absorption in man by calcium.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, L; Rossander-Hulthén, L; Brune, M; Gleerup, A

    1993-03-01

    The inhibiting effect of Ca on non-haem-Fe absorption is well established. Present studies showed that Ca inhibited haem-Fe absorption to the same extent when the same amount of Ca (165 mg Ca as CaCl2) was added to a meal. Attempts were made to examine the mechanism for this inhibition in the present studies. Meat is the only known dietary factor influencing haem-Fe absorption. The present studies were designed to examine whether Ca interfered with the enhancing effect of meat on haem-Fe absorption. We found that the inhibition was the same whether biosynthetically radio-Fe-labelled haemoglobin was given in meals with or without meat. The haem-Fe absorption ratio with:without added Ca was 0.59 (SE 0.07) when Ca was added to a hamburger meal, and 0.52 (SE 0.03) when added to a wheat roll. These values were not significantly different (t 0.95; P = 0.35). The inhibition of haem-Fe absorption by Ca is, thus, a direct effect on the absorption of haem-Fe and not an indirect counteracting effect of the well-known enhancing effect of meat on haem-Fe absorption. Control studies were conducted to ensure that haem-Fe had not been degraded to non-haem-Fe during preparation of the foods. Since Ca inhibits the absorption of haem- and non-haem-Fe to the same extent, the present results strongly suggest that Ca interferes with the transport of Fe through the mucosal cell, and at a late stage, is common for haem- and non-haem-Fe transport.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Removal of iron interferences by solvent extraction for geochemical analysis by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, L.; Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Iron is a common interferent in the determination of many elements in geochemical samples. Two approaches for its removal have been taken. The first involves removal of iron by extraction with methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) from hydrochloric acid medium, leaving the analytes in the aqueous phase. The second consists of reduction of iron(III) to iron(II) by ascorbic acid to minimize its extraction into MIBK, so that the analytes may be isolated by extraction. Elements of interest can then be determined using the aqueous solution or the organic extract, as appropriate. Operating factors such as the concentration of hydrochloric acid, amounts of iron present, number of extractions, the presence or absence of a salting-out agent, and the optimum ratio of ascorbic acid to iron have been determined. These factors have general applications in geochemical analysis by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry. ?? 1985.

  17. Alginate Inhibits Iron Absorption from Ferrous Gluconate in a Randomized Controlled Trial and Reduces Iron Uptake into Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wawer, Anna A.; Harvey, Linda J.; Dainty, Jack R.; Perez-Moral, Natalia; Sharp, Paul; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous in vitro results indicated that alginate beads might be a useful vehicle for food iron fortification. A human study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that alginate enhances iron absorption. A randomised, single blinded, cross-over trial was carried out in which iron absorption was measured from serum iron appearance after a test meal. Overnight-fasted volunteers (n = 15) were given a test meal of 200 g cola-flavoured jelly plus 21 mg iron as ferrous gluconate, either in alginate beads mixed into the jelly or in a capsule. Iron absorption was lower from the alginate beads than from ferrous gluconate (8.5% and 12.6% respectively, p = 0.003). Sub-group B (n = 9) consumed the test meals together with 600 mg calcium to determine whether alginate modified the inhibitory effect of calcium. Calcium reduced iron absorption from ferrous gluconate by 51%, from 11.5% to 5.6% (p = 0.014), and from alginate beads by 37%, from 8.3% to 5.2% (p = 0.009). In vitro studies using Caco-2 cells were designed to explore the reasons for the difference between the previous in vitro findings and the human study; confirmed the inhibitory effect of alginate. Beads similar to those used in the human study were subjected to simulated gastrointestinal digestion, with and without cola jelly, and the digestate applied to Caco-2 cells. Both alginate and cola jelly significantly reduced iron uptake into the cells, by 34% (p = 0.009) and 35% (p = 0.003) respectively. The combination of cola jelly and calcium produced a very low ferritin response, 16.5% (p<0.001) of that observed with ferrous gluconate alone. The results of these studies demonstrate that alginate beads are not a useful delivery system for soluble salts of iron for the purpose of food fortification. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01528644 PMID:25391138

  18. Selective microwave absorption of iron-rich carbon nanotube composites.

    PubMed

    Gui, Xuchun; Wang, Kunlin; Cao, Anyuan; Wei, Jinquan; Lv, Ruitao; Kang, Feiyu; Shu, Qinke; Jia, Yi; Wu, Dehai

    2010-03-01

    We report on high selectivity of microwave absorption by controlling the concentration of carbon nanotubes in polymer composites and matching the dielectric loss and magnetic loss through encapsulation of crystalline Fe nanorods inside nanotubes. The reflection loss reached more than 10 dB (> 90% absorption) by loading nanotubes at concentrations of 1 wt% to 10 wt% into the composites, and the frequencies corresponding to the maximum loss can be tailored throughout the range of 2 to 18 GHz by changing the concentration. A maximum absorption capability (75 dB x GHz) was observed at a CNT loading of about 4.5 wt%. The crystalline structure of encapsulated Fe nanorods can be modified to enhance the reflection loss. Control of absorption selectivity by modifying the structure and concentration of nanoscale fillers could facilitate potential higher-frequency applications (e.g., radar absorbing) of nanocomposites. PMID:20355578

  19. Selective microwave absorption of iron-rich carbon nanotube composites.

    PubMed

    Gui, Xuchun; Wang, Kunlin; Cao, Anyuan; Wei, Jinquan; Lv, Ruitao; Kang, Feiyu; Shu, Qinke; Jia, Yi; Wu, Dehai

    2010-03-01

    We report on high selectivity of microwave absorption by controlling the concentration of carbon nanotubes in polymer composites and matching the dielectric loss and magnetic loss through encapsulation of crystalline Fe nanorods inside nanotubes. The reflection loss reached more than 10 dB (> 90% absorption) by loading nanotubes at concentrations of 1 wt% to 10 wt% into the composites, and the frequencies corresponding to the maximum loss can be tailored throughout the range of 2 to 18 GHz by changing the concentration. A maximum absorption capability (75 dB x GHz) was observed at a CNT loading of about 4.5 wt%. The crystalline structure of encapsulated Fe nanorods can be modified to enhance the reflection loss. Control of absorption selectivity by modifying the structure and concentration of nanoscale fillers could facilitate potential higher-frequency applications (e.g., radar absorbing) of nanocomposites.

  20. Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Microorganisms Under Hot Deep Subsurface Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruper, S.; Sharma, A.; Scott, J. H.

    2010-04-01

    In subsurface environments the availability of terminal electron acceptors will be the major biogeochemical constraint, before temperature or pressure begin plays a role. Data is presented to show the impact of deep hot subsurface conditions on dissimilatory iron reduction.

  1. Inhibitory effect of oat products on non-haem iron absorption in man.

    PubMed

    Rossander-Hulthén, L; Gleerup, A; Hallberg, L

    1990-11-01

    Oat products are increasingly used in human nutrition due to the rather high content of soluble fibre. Oat products, however, have a high content of phytate which may interfere with the absorption of non-haem iron. The iron balance situation is critical in several groups, especially in children, teenagers and women in their fertile years. It is therefore important to examine the effect of oat products on non-haem iron absorption in man. The present studies showed that oat bran and oat porridge markedly inhibited the absorption of non-haem iron. The inhibition can be explained by the high phytate content of oat products. This is partly due to a high resistance of oat phytate against exogenous phytase and partly to an inactivation of the endogenous phytase in oats caused by the usual heat treatment of oats which is made to prevent rancidity of oat lipids during storage. The inhibitory effect of oat products on iron absorption is sufficiently marked to be a serious consideration if such products are more regularly consumed.

  2. Bioavailability of bi- and trivalent oral iron preparations. Investigations of iron absorption by postabsorption serum iron concentrations curves.

    PubMed

    Dietzfelbinger, H

    1987-01-01

    Since 1977 the bioavailability of 14 bi- and trivalent oral iron preparations has been investigated in five separate orientated clinical studies by using postabsorption serum iron concentration curves. The range of relative bioavailability was 46 to 100% in the first group of preparations, 31 to 47% in the second group and 6 to 29% in the third group. The first group contained mainly bivalent quick release preparations, the second group slow or sustained release preparations and the third mainly trivalent iron preparations. The postabsorption serum iron concentration curves which show a good congruence with exact 59Fe whole body retention tests again confirmed the nearly 50-year-old rule that bivalent iron is up to 16 times better absorbed than trivalent iron. There is no doubt that the oral iron preparations of good bioavailability are able to cure an iron deficiency more rapidly than iron preparations with a low bioavailability. This therefore has a clear influence on the overall expense of iron therapy. Only those preparations from the first group can be recommended for oral iron therapy. The preparations in the second group are less suitable and those in the third group should be excluded from iron therapy in all countries. PMID:3566864

  3. Synergistic intracellular iron chelation combinations: mechanisms and conditions for optimizing iron mobilization.

    PubMed

    Vlachodimitropoulou Koumoutsea, Evangelia; Garbowski, Maciej; Porter, John

    2015-09-01

    Iron chelators are increasingly combined clinically but the optimal conditions for cellular iron mobilization and mechanisms of interaction are unclear. Speciation plots for iron(III) binding of paired combinations of the licensed iron chelators desferrioxamine (DFO), deferiprone (DFP) and deferasirox (DFX) suggest conditions under which chelators can combine as 'shuttle' and 'sink' molecules but this approach does not consider their relative access and interaction with cellular iron pools. To address this issue, a sensitive ferrozine-based detection system for intracellular iron removal from the human hepatocyte cell line (HuH-7) was developed. Antagonism, synergism or additivity with paired chelator combinations was distinguished using mathematical isobologram analysis over clinically relevant chelator concentrations. All combinations showed synergistic iron mobilization at 8 h with clinically achievable concentrations of sink and shuttle chelators. Greatest synergism was achieved by combining DFP with DFX, where about 60% of mobilized iron was attributable to synergistic interaction. These findings predict that the DFX dose required for a half-maximum effect can be reduced by 3·8-fold when only 1 μmol/l DFP is added. Mechanisms for the synergy are suggested by consideration of the iron-chelate speciation plots together with the size, charge and lipid solubilities for each chelator. Hydroxypyridinones with low lipid solubilities but otherwise similar properties to DFP were used to interrogate the mechanistic interactions of chelator pairs. These studies confirm that synergistic cellular iron mobilization requires one chelator to have the physicochemical properties to enter cells, chelate intracellular iron and subsequently donate iron to a second 'sink' chelator.

  4. Synergistic intracellular iron chelation combinations: mechanisms and conditions for optimizing iron mobilization.

    PubMed

    Vlachodimitropoulou Koumoutsea, Evangelia; Garbowski, Maciej; Porter, John

    2015-09-01

    Iron chelators are increasingly combined clinically but the optimal conditions for cellular iron mobilization and mechanisms of interaction are unclear. Speciation plots for iron(III) binding of paired combinations of the licensed iron chelators desferrioxamine (DFO), deferiprone (DFP) and deferasirox (DFX) suggest conditions under which chelators can combine as 'shuttle' and 'sink' molecules but this approach does not consider their relative access and interaction with cellular iron pools. To address this issue, a sensitive ferrozine-based detection system for intracellular iron removal from the human hepatocyte cell line (HuH-7) was developed. Antagonism, synergism or additivity with paired chelator combinations was distinguished using mathematical isobologram analysis over clinically relevant chelator concentrations. All combinations showed synergistic iron mobilization at 8 h with clinically achievable concentrations of sink and shuttle chelators. Greatest synergism was achieved by combining DFP with DFX, where about 60% of mobilized iron was attributable to synergistic interaction. These findings predict that the DFX dose required for a half-maximum effect can be reduced by 3·8-fold when only 1 μmol/l DFP is added. Mechanisms for the synergy are suggested by consideration of the iron-chelate speciation plots together with the size, charge and lipid solubilities for each chelator. Hydroxypyridinones with low lipid solubilities but otherwise similar properties to DFP were used to interrogate the mechanistic interactions of chelator pairs. These studies confirm that synergistic cellular iron mobilization requires one chelator to have the physicochemical properties to enter cells, chelate intracellular iron and subsequently donate iron to a second 'sink' chelator. PMID:26033030

  5. Influence of dietary protein type and iron source on the absorption of amino acids and minerals.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Llamas, F; Garaulet, M; Martínez, J A; Marín, J F; Larqué, E; Zamora, S

    2001-12-01

    The apparent digestibility coefficient (ADC) of amino acids and the balance of minerals (calcium, phosphorus, magnesium and iron) has been determined in rats fed four diets differing in the protein type (casein or soy protein) and iron source (ferrous sulphate or lactate) in order to study the possible interactions of these nutrients. The availability of amino acids, especially essential amino acids, was greater in the diet made with animal protein (casein). The iron source also affected the absorption of most amino acids in all the diets assayed with ferrous sulphate being greater. The balance of iron, magnesium and phosphorus was higher in the diets containing animal protein. The retention of calcium and magnesium was significantly greater when ferrous sulphate was used as iron source. These results demonstrate the important interaction between amino acids and minerals and between the minerals themselves, which must be carefully studied when selecting different types of protein or mineral sources in human or animal nutrition.

  6. Detection, identification and mapping of iron anomalies in brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M.; Toastmann, H.; Channell, J.E.T.; Guyodo, Y.; Batich, C.; Dobson, J.

    2008-06-16

    This work describes a novel method for the detection, identification and mapping of anomalous iron compounds in mammalian brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We have located and identified individual iron anomalies in an avian tissue model associated with ferritin, biogenic magnetite and haemoglobin with a pixel resolution of less than 5 {micro}m. This technique represents a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds in brain tissue. The potential for high-resolution iron mapping using microfocused X-ray beams has direct application to investigations of the location and structural form of iron compounds associated with human neurodegenerative disorders - a problem which has vexed researchers for 50 years.

  7. Studies on different iron source absorption by in situ ligated intestinal loops of broilers.

    PubMed

    Jia, Y F; Jiang, M M; Sun, J; Shi, R B; Liu, D S

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the iron source absorption in the small intestine of broiler. In situ ligated intestinal loops of 70 birds were poured into one of seven solutions, including inorganic iron (FeSO4, Fe2(SO4)3), organic Fe glycine chelate (Fe-Gly(II), Fe-Gly(III)), the mixtures (FeSO4 with glycine (Fe+Gly(II)), Fe2(SO4)3 with glycine (Fe+Gly(III)), and no Fe source (control). The total volume of 3-mL solution (containing 1 mg of elemental Fe) was injected into intestinal loops, and then 120-min incubation was performed. Compared with inorganic iron groups, in which higher FeSO4 absorption than Fe2(SO4)3 was observed, supplementation with organic Fe glycine chelate significantly increased the Fe concentration in the duodenum and jejunum (P < 0.05), however, decreased DMT1 and DcytB messenger RNA (mRNA) levels (P < 0.05). Organic Fe glycine chelate (Fe-Gly(II), Fe-Gly(III)) increased serum iron concentration (SI), compared with inorganic 3 valence iron groups (Fe2(SO4)3 and Fe+Gly(III)) (P < 0.05); moreover, lower TIBC value was observed for the chelate (P < 0.05); however, mixture of inorganic iron and glycine did not have a positive role at DMT1 and DcytB mRNA levels, SI and Fe concentrations in the small intestine. Those results indicated that the absorption of organic Fe glycine chelate was more effective than that of inorganic Fe, and the orders of iron absorption in the small intestine were: Fe-Gly(II), Fe-Gly(III) > FeSO4, Fe+Gly(II) > Fe2(SO4)3, Fe+Gly(III). Additionally, the simple mixture of inorganic iron and glycine could not increase Fe absorption, and the duodenum was the main site of Fe absorption in the intestines of broilers and the ileum absorbed iron rarely.

  8. Mathematical model of zinc absorption: effects of dietary calcium, protein and iron on zinc absorption.

    PubMed

    Miller, Leland V; Krebs, Nancy F; Hambidge, K Michael

    2013-02-28

    A previously described mathematical model of Zn absorption as a function of total daily dietary Zn and phytate was fitted to data from studies in which dietary Ca, Fe and protein were also measured. An analysis of regression residuals indicated statistically significant positive relationships between the residuals and Ca, Fe and protein, suggesting that the presence of any of these dietary components enhances Zn absorption. Based on the hypotheses that (1) Ca and Fe both promote Zn absorption by binding with phytate and thereby making it unavailable for binding Zn and (2) protein enhances the availability of Zn for transporter binding, the model was modified to incorporate these effects. The new model of Zn absorption as a function of dietary Zn, phytate, Ca, Fe and protein was then fitted to the data. The proportion of variation in absorbed Zn explained by the new model was 0·88, an increase from 0·82 with the original model. A reduced version of the model without Fe produced an equally good fit to the data and an improved value for the model selection criterion, demonstrating that when dietary Ca and protein are controlled for, there is no evidence that dietary Fe influences Zn absorption. Regression residuals and testing with additional data supported the validity of the new model. It was concluded that dietary Ca and protein modestly enhanced Zn absorption and Fe had no statistically discernable effect. Furthermore, the model provides a meaningful foundation for efforts to model nutrient interactions in mineral absorption.

  9. Anemia and iron deficiency in gastrointestinal and liver conditions

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jürgen; Connor, Susan; Virgin, Garth; Ong, David Eng Hui; Pereyra, Lisandro

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is associated with a number of pathological gastrointestinal conditions other than inflammatory bowel disease, and also with liver disorders. Different factors such as chronic bleeding, malabsorption and inflammation may contribute to IDA. Although patients with symptoms of anemia are frequently referred to gastroenterologists, the approach to diagnosis and selection of treatment as well as follow-up measures is not standardized and suboptimal. Iron deficiency, even without anemia, can substantially impact physical and cognitive function and reduce quality of life. Therefore, regular iron status assessment and awareness of the clinical consequences of impaired iron status are critical. While the range of options for treatment of IDA is increasing due to the availability of effective and well-tolerated parenteral iron preparations, a comprehensive overview of IDA and its therapy in patients with gastrointestinal conditions is currently lacking. Furthermore, definitions and assessment of iron status lack harmonization and there is a paucity of expert guidelines on this topic. This review summarizes current thinking concerning IDA as a common co-morbidity in specific gastrointestinal and liver disorders, and thus encourages a more unified treatment approach to anemia and iron deficiency, while offering gastroenterologists guidance on treatment options for IDA in everyday clinical practice.

  10. Anemia and iron deficiency in gastrointestinal and liver conditions.

    PubMed

    Stein, Jürgen; Connor, Susan; Virgin, Garth; Ong, David Eng Hui; Pereyra, Lisandro

    2016-09-21

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is associated with a number of pathological gastrointestinal conditions other than inflammatory bowel disease, and also with liver disorders. Different factors such as chronic bleeding, malabsorption and inflammation may contribute to IDA. Although patients with symptoms of anemia are frequently referred to gastroenterologists, the approach to diagnosis and selection of treatment as well as follow-up measures is not standardized and suboptimal. Iron deficiency, even without anemia, can substantially impact physical and cognitive function and reduce quality of life. Therefore, regular iron status assessment and awareness of the clinical consequences of impaired iron status are critical. While the range of options for treatment of IDA is increasing due to the availability of effective and well-tolerated parenteral iron preparations, a comprehensive overview of IDA and its therapy in patients with gastrointestinal conditions is currently lacking. Furthermore, definitions and assessment of iron status lack harmonization and there is a paucity of expert guidelines on this topic. This review summarizes current thinking concerning IDA as a common co-morbidity in specific gastrointestinal and liver disorders, and thus encourages a more unified treatment approach to anemia and iron deficiency, while offering gastroenterologists guidance on treatment options for IDA in everyday clinical practice. PMID:27672287

  11. Anemia and iron deficiency in gastrointestinal and liver conditions

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jürgen; Connor, Susan; Virgin, Garth; Ong, David Eng Hui; Pereyra, Lisandro

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is associated with a number of pathological gastrointestinal conditions other than inflammatory bowel disease, and also with liver disorders. Different factors such as chronic bleeding, malabsorption and inflammation may contribute to IDA. Although patients with symptoms of anemia are frequently referred to gastroenterologists, the approach to diagnosis and selection of treatment as well as follow-up measures is not standardized and suboptimal. Iron deficiency, even without anemia, can substantially impact physical and cognitive function and reduce quality of life. Therefore, regular iron status assessment and awareness of the clinical consequences of impaired iron status are critical. While the range of options for treatment of IDA is increasing due to the availability of effective and well-tolerated parenteral iron preparations, a comprehensive overview of IDA and its therapy in patients with gastrointestinal conditions is currently lacking. Furthermore, definitions and assessment of iron status lack harmonization and there is a paucity of expert guidelines on this topic. This review summarizes current thinking concerning IDA as a common co-morbidity in specific gastrointestinal and liver disorders, and thus encourages a more unified treatment approach to anemia and iron deficiency, while offering gastroenterologists guidance on treatment options for IDA in everyday clinical practice. PMID:27672287

  12. Multiband microwave absorption films based on defective multiwalled carbon nanotubes added carbonyl iron/acrylic resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Chen, Changxin; Pan, Xiaoyan; Ni, Yuwei; Zhang, Song; Huang, Jie; Chen, Da; Zhang, Yafei

    2009-05-01

    Defective multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were introduced to the carbonyl iron (CI) based composites to improve its microwave absorption by a simple ultrasonic mixing process. The electromagnetic parameters were measured in the 2-18 GHz range. Microwave absorption of CI based composites with 2 mm in thickness was evidently enhanced by adding as little as 1.0 wt% defective MWCNTs with two well separated absorption peaks exceeding -20 dB, as compared with that of pure CI based and defective MWCNTs composites. The enhancement mechanism is thought due to the interaction and better electromagnetic match between defective MWCNTs and ferromagnetic CI particles.

  13. Modeling of the Temperature Effect on Oxygen Absorption by Iron-Based Oxygen Scavengers.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Vladimir A; Miltz, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    A new engineering-oriented model for prediction of the effect of temperature on the kinetics of oxygen absorption by iron-based oxygen scavengers (IOSs) was developed. The model is based on the physicochemical mechanism of the O2 scavenging process by the active component of the IOS (iron powder). The conclusions of this study are: (1) the iron deposits formed on the iron particles are composed of 2 different layers: an inner layer of Fe3 O4 and an outer layer of FeOOH that vanishes with the depletion of oxygen. (2) The model considers the chemical processes in the heterogeneous closed system "Fe-H2 O-NaCl-O2 " and describes the kinetics of oxygen absorption by the powder, depending on the characteristics of the system. (3) The nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) of the O2 absorption kinetics was derived and a simple approximate solution to this ODE was obtained theoretically that is similar to the empirical exponential formula published in the relevant literature. (4) The temperature dependence of the oxygen absorption rate is more complicated than that described by the Arrhenius equation. PMID:26650762

  14. Absorption of zinc and iron by rats fed meals containing sorghum food products

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, S.M.A.; Johnson, P.E.; Hamaker, B.; Kirleis, A.

    1986-03-05

    Zinc and iron absorption from freeze-dried traditionally-prepared sorghum food products was studied in rats. After a period of marginal zinc or iron depletion, rats were fed test meals containing 1 of 4 sorghum foods cooked maize gruel or an inorganic mineral each of which was extrinsically labeled with either /sup 65/Zn or /sup 59/Fe before being added to the diets. Absorption was determined by whole body percent retention of the initial radioisotope dose over a period of 19 days. Iron was highly available from all products tested (75-83%) with no significant differences in absorption among groups (p>0.05). Zinc from fermented Aceta (97%) was more available than that from the other sorghum products (69-78%) or maize gruel (76%). Zinc from acid To (78%) and Aceta (97%) was as available as that from zinc oxide in the control diet (93%) (p>0.05). There were no significant differences in zinc absorption among groups fed Acid To (78%), neutral To (76), alkali To (69%) or maize gruel (76%) (p<0.05). Phytate in the fermented Aceta was 33% lower than in the other sorghum foods. Iron and zinc were highly available from all sorghum foods. Reduction phytate by fermentation increased Zn availability.

  15. Modeling of the Temperature Effect on Oxygen Absorption by Iron-Based Oxygen Scavengers.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Vladimir A; Miltz, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    A new engineering-oriented model for prediction of the effect of temperature on the kinetics of oxygen absorption by iron-based oxygen scavengers (IOSs) was developed. The model is based on the physicochemical mechanism of the O2 scavenging process by the active component of the IOS (iron powder). The conclusions of this study are: (1) the iron deposits formed on the iron particles are composed of 2 different layers: an inner layer of Fe3 O4 and an outer layer of FeOOH that vanishes with the depletion of oxygen. (2) The model considers the chemical processes in the heterogeneous closed system "Fe-H2 O-NaCl-O2 " and describes the kinetics of oxygen absorption by the powder, depending on the characteristics of the system. (3) The nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) of the O2 absorption kinetics was derived and a simple approximate solution to this ODE was obtained theoretically that is similar to the empirical exponential formula published in the relevant literature. (4) The temperature dependence of the oxygen absorption rate is more complicated than that described by the Arrhenius equation.

  16. Probing iron at Super-Earth core conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Amadou, N.; Brambrink, E.; Vinci, T.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Huser, G.; Brygoo, S.; Morard, G.; Guyot, F.; Resseguier, T. de; Mazevet, S.; Miyanishi, K.; Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.; Boehly, T.; and others

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we report on the quasi-isentropic compression of an iron sample using ramp shaped laser irradiation. This technique allows us to quasi-isentropically compress iron up to 700 GPa and 8500 K. To our knowledge, these data are the highest pressures reached on iron in off-Hugoniot conditions and the closest to the thermodynamic states thought to exist in Earth-like planetary cores. The experiment was performed on the Ligne d'Intégration laser facility at CESTA, Bordeaux, France.

  17. The Effect of Plant Proteins Derived from Cereals and Legumes on Heme Iron Absorption.

    PubMed

    Weinborn, Valerie; Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Brito, Alex; Arredondo, Miguel; Flores, Sebastián; Valenzuela, Carolina

    2015-10-30

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of proteins from cereals and legumes on heme iron (Fe) absorption. The absorption of heme Fe without its native globin was measured. Thirty adult females participated in two experimental studies (15 per study). Study I focused on the effects of cereal proteins (zein, gliadin and glutelin) and study II on the effects of legume proteins (soy, pea and lentil) on heme Fe absorption. When heme was given alone (as a control), study I and II yielded 6.2% and 11.0% heme absorption (p > 0.05). In study I, heme Fe absorption was 7.2%, 7.5% and 5.9% when zein, gliadin and glutelin were added, respectively. From this, it was concluded that cereal proteins did not affect heme Fe absorption. In study II, heme Fe absorption was 7.3%, 8.1% and 9.1% with the addition of soy, pea and lentil proteins, respectively. Only soy proteins decreased heme Fe absorption (p < 0.05). These results suggest that with the exception of soy proteins, which decreased absorption, proteins derived from cereals and legumes do not affect heme Fe absorption.

  18. The Effect of Plant Proteins Derived from Cereals and Legumes on Heme Iron Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Weinborn, Valerie; Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Brito, Alex; Arredondo, Miguel; Flores, Sebastián; Valenzuela, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of proteins from cereals and legumes on heme iron (Fe) absorption. The absorption of heme Fe without its native globin was measured. Thirty adult females participated in two experimental studies (15 per study). Study I focused on the effects of cereal proteins (zein, gliadin and glutelin) and study II on the effects of legume proteins (soy, pea and lentil) on heme Fe absorption. When heme was given alone (as a control), study I and II yielded 6.2% and 11.0% heme absorption (p > 0.05). In study I, heme Fe absorption was 7.2%, 7.5% and 5.9% when zein, gliadin and glutelin were added, respectively. From this, it was concluded that cereal proteins did not affect heme Fe absorption. In study II, heme Fe absorption was 7.3%, 8.1% and 9.1% with the addition of soy, pea and lentil proteins, respectively. Only soy proteins decreased heme Fe absorption (p < 0.05). These results suggest that with the exception of soy proteins, which decreased absorption, proteins derived from cereals and legumes do not affect heme Fe absorption. PMID:26529009

  19. The Effect of Plant Proteins Derived from Cereals and Legumes on Heme Iron Absorption.

    PubMed

    Weinborn, Valerie; Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Brito, Alex; Arredondo, Miguel; Flores, Sebastián; Valenzuela, Carolina

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of proteins from cereals and legumes on heme iron (Fe) absorption. The absorption of heme Fe without its native globin was measured. Thirty adult females participated in two experimental studies (15 per study). Study I focused on the effects of cereal proteins (zein, gliadin and glutelin) and study II on the effects of legume proteins (soy, pea and lentil) on heme Fe absorption. When heme was given alone (as a control), study I and II yielded 6.2% and 11.0% heme absorption (p > 0.05). In study I, heme Fe absorption was 7.2%, 7.5% and 5.9% when zein, gliadin and glutelin were added, respectively. From this, it was concluded that cereal proteins did not affect heme Fe absorption. In study II, heme Fe absorption was 7.3%, 8.1% and 9.1% with the addition of soy, pea and lentil proteins, respectively. Only soy proteins decreased heme Fe absorption (p < 0.05). These results suggest that with the exception of soy proteins, which decreased absorption, proteins derived from cereals and legumes do not affect heme Fe absorption. PMID:26529009

  20. Paenibacillus polymyxa BFKC01 enhances plant iron absorption via improved root systems and activated iron acquisition mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cheng; Guo, Jiansheng; Zhu, Lin; Xiao, Xin; Xie, Yue; Zhu, Jian; Ma, Zhongyou; Wang, Jianfei

    2016-08-01

    Despite the high abundance of iron (Fe) in most earth's soils, Fe is the major limiting factor for plant growth and development due to its low bioavailability. With an increasing recognition that soil microbes play important roles in plant growth, several strains of beneficial rhizobactria have been applied to improve plant nutrient absorption, biomass, and abiotic or biotic stress tolerance. In this study, we report the mechanisms of microbe-induced plant Fe assimilation, in which the plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) Paenibacillus polymyxa BFKC01 stimulates plant's Fe acquisition machinery to enhance Fe uptake in Arabidopsis plants. Mechanistic studies show that BFKC01 transcriptionally activates the Fe-deficiency-induced transcription factor 1 (FIT1), thereby up-regulating the expression of IRT1 and FRO2. Furthermore, BFKC01 has been found to induce plant systemic responses with the increased transcription of MYB72, and the biosynthetic pathways of phenolic compounds are also activated. Our data reveal that abundant phenolic compounds are detected in root exudation of the BFKC01-inoculated plants, which efficiently facilitate Fe mobility under alkaline conditions. In addition, BFKC01 can secret auxin and further improved root systems, which enhances the ability of plants to acquire Fe from soils. As a result, BFKC01-inoculated plants have more endogenous Fe and increased photosynthetic capacity under alkaline conditions as compared to control plants. Our results demonstrate the potential roles of BFKC01 in promoting Fe acquisition in plants and underline the intricate integration of microbial signaling in controlling plant Fe acquisition. PMID:27105423

  1. Gastrointestinal bleeding and iron absorption in the experimental blind loop syndrome.

    PubMed

    Giannella, R A; Toskes, P P

    1976-07-01

    Rats with surgically created self-filling jejunal blind loops and the blind loop syndrome manifested gastrointestinal bleeding and hyperabsorption of iron. Although the mean hematocrit and serum iron levels of rats with self-filling blind loops became overtly anemic and manifested low-serum iron levels. It is suggested that the documented gastrointestinal bleeding in these rats with the experimental blind loop syndrome is another manifestation of damage to the intestinal epithelium in conditions of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

  2. Iron absorption and red blood cell incorporation in premature infants fed an iron-fortified infant formula.

    PubMed

    McDonald, M C; Abrams, S A; Schanler, R J

    1998-10-01

    This study was designed to identify differences in red blood cell (RBC) incorporation and iron absorption in premature infants between iron provided in a premature infant formula compared with iron provided as a supplement between feedings. We used a triple stable isotope technique in which 13 infants received 57Fe mixed with Enfamil Premature Formula on d 1 of the study, and 54Fe with a multivitamin supplement between meals on d 2. Two weeks later, blood was drawn for isotope analysis and 58Fe was given i.v. The percentage RBC incorporation of the 54Fe and 57Fe was calculated, and the percent absorption of these tracers was estimated by dividing by the percentage of 58Fe identified in RBCs 14 d after its infusion. We found a small, but significantly greater, percentage of RBC incorporation of the 54Fe given as a supplement compared with the 57Fe given in the formula (9.7 +/- 3.8% versus 7.8 +/- 3.1%, p = 0.02). The RBC 57Fe incorporation was closely correlated with the reticulocyte count (r = 0.80, p = 0.001), but not the serum ferritin or the Hb concentration. Approximately 68% of an i.v. dose of 58Fe was incorporated into RBCs. These findings indicate 1) iron is incorporated well into RBCs from preterm infant formula, with only a small increase in incorporation when given as a supplement, and 2) the reticulocyte count, but not the Hb concentration, is a good measure of RBC iron-incorporating capacity.

  3. Intestinal DMT1 is critical for iron absorption in the mouse but is not required for the absorption of copper or manganese.

    PubMed

    Shawki, Ali; Anthony, Sarah R; Nose, Yasuhiro; Engevik, Melinda A; Niespodzany, Eric J; Barrientos, Tomasa; Öhrvik, Helena; Worrell, Roger T; Thiele, Dennis J; Mackenzie, Bryan

    2015-10-15

    Divalent metal-ion transporter-1 (DMT1) is a widely expressed iron-preferring membrane-transport protein that serves a critical role in erythroid iron utilization. We have investigated its role in intestinal metal absorption by studying a mouse model lacking intestinal DMT1 (i.e., DMT1(int/int)). DMT1(int/int) mice exhibited a profound hypochromic-microcytic anemia, splenomegaly, and cardiomegaly. That the anemia was due to iron deficiency was demonstrated by the following observations in DMT1(int/int) mice: 1) blood iron and tissue nonheme-iron stores were depleted; 2) mRNA expression of liver hepcidin (Hamp1) was depressed; and 3) intraperitoneal iron injection corrected the anemia, and reversed the changes in blood iron, nonheme-iron stores, and hepcidin expression levels. We observed decreased total iron content in multiple tissues from DMT1(int/int) mice compared with DMT1(+/+) mice but no meaningful change in copper, manganese, or zinc. DMT1(int/int) mice absorbed (64)Cu and (54)Mn from an intragastric dose to the same extent as did DMT1(+/+) mice but the absorption of (59)Fe was virtually abolished in DMT1(int/int) mice. This study reveals a critical function for DMT1 in intestinal nonheme-iron absorption for normal growth and development. Further, this work demonstrates that intestinal DMT1 is not required for the intestinal transport of copper, manganese, or zinc.

  4. Intestinal DMT1 is critical for iron absorption in the mouse but is not required for the absorption of copper or manganese

    PubMed Central

    Shawki, Ali; Anthony, Sarah R.; Nose, Yasuhiro; Engevik, Melinda A.; Niespodzany, Eric J.; Barrientos, Tomasa; Öhrvik, Helena; Worrell, Roger T.; Thiele, Dennis J.

    2015-01-01

    Divalent metal-ion transporter-1 (DMT1) is a widely expressed iron-preferring membrane-transport protein that serves a critical role in erythroid iron utilization. We have investigated its role in intestinal metal absorption by studying a mouse model lacking intestinal DMT1 (i.e., DMT1int/int). DMT1int/int mice exhibited a profound hypochromic-microcytic anemia, splenomegaly, and cardiomegaly. That the anemia was due to iron deficiency was demonstrated by the following observations in DMT1int/int mice: 1) blood iron and tissue nonheme-iron stores were depleted; 2) mRNA expression of liver hepcidin (Hamp1) was depressed; and 3) intraperitoneal iron injection corrected the anemia, and reversed the changes in blood iron, nonheme-iron stores, and hepcidin expression levels. We observed decreased total iron content in multiple tissues from DMT1int/int mice compared with DMT1+/+ mice but no meaningful change in copper, manganese, or zinc. DMT1int/int mice absorbed 64Cu and 54Mn from an intragastric dose to the same extent as did DMT1+/+ mice but the absorption of 59Fe was virtually abolished in DMT1int/int mice. This study reveals a critical function for DMT1 in intestinal nonheme-iron absorption for normal growth and development. Further, this work demonstrates that intestinal DMT1 is not required for the intestinal transport of copper, manganese, or zinc. PMID:26294671

  5. Iron and phosphorus speciation in Fe-conditioned membrane bioreactor activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Ikeda-Ohno, Atsushi; Wang, Yuan; Waite, T David

    2015-06-01

    Iron dosing of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) is widely used as a means of meeting effluent phosphorus targets but there is limited understanding of the nature of iron and phosphorus-containing solids that are formed within the bioreactor (an important issue in view of the increasing interest in recovering phosphorus from wastewaters). Of particular challenge is the complexity of the MBR system and the variety of reactions that can occur on addition of iron salts to a membrane bioreactor. In this study, the performances of bench scale MBRs with dosing of either ferrous or ferric salts were monitored for a period of four months. The distributions of Fe and P-species in the Fe-conditioned sludges were determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Fe K-edge and the P K-edge. Regardless of whether iron was dosed to the anoxic or aerobic chambers and regardless of whether ferrous (Fe(II)) or ferric (Fe(III)) iron was dosed, iron present in the minerals in the conditioned sludges was consistently in the +III oxidation state. Fitting of the Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra revealed that an Fe(III)-phosphate species was the main Fe species present in all cases with the remaining fraction dominated by lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) in the Fe(II)-dosed case and ferrihydrite (am-FeOOH) in the Fe(III)-dosed case. Approximately half the phosphorus in the activated sludge samples was present as a distinct Fe-PO4 mineral (such as strengite or an amorphous ferric hydroxyl phosphate analogue of strengite) and half as phosphorus adsorbed to an iron oxyhydroxide mineral phase indicating that both co-precipitation and adsorption of phosphorus by iron contribute to removal of phosphorus from the MBR supernatant.

  6. Bioactive Dietary Polyphenols Inhibit Heme Iron Absorption in A Dose-Dependent Manner in Human Intestinal Caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qianyi; Kim, Eun-Young; Lindsay, Elizabeth Ann; Han, Okhee

    2011-01-01

    Although heme iron is an important form of dietary iron, its intestinal absorption mechanism remains elusive. Our previous work revealed that (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and grape seed extract (GSE) markedly inhibited intestinal heme iron absorption by reducing the basolateral iron export in Caco-2 cells. The aims of this study were to examine whether small amounts of EGCG, GSE and green tea extract (GT) could inhibit heme iron absorption, and to test whether the inhibitory action of polyphenols could be offset by ascorbic acid. A heme-55Fe absorption study was conducted by adding various concentrations of EGCG, GSE and GT to Caco-2 cells in the absence and presence of ascorbic acid. Polyphenolic compounds significantly inhibited heme-55Fe absorption in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of ascorbic acid did not modulate the inhibitory effect of dietary polyphenols on heme iron absorption when the cells were treated with polyphenols at a concentration of 46 mg/L. However, ascorbic acid was able to offset or reverse the inhibitory effects of polyphenolic compounds when lower concentrations of polyphenols were added (≤ 4.6 mg/L). Ascorbic acid modulated the heme iron absorption without changing the apical heme uptake, the expression of the proteins involved in heme metabolism and basolateral iron transport, and heme oxygenase activity, indicating that ascorbic acid may enhance heme iron absorption by modulating the intracellular distribution of 55Fe. These results imply that the regular consumption of dietary ascorbic acid can easily counteract the inhibitory effects of low concentrations of dietary polyphenols on heme iron absorption but cannot counteract the inhibitory actions of high concentrations of polyphenols. PMID:22417433

  7. Ferroportin mediates the intestinal absorption of iron from a nanoparticulate ferritin core mimetic in mice.

    PubMed

    Aslam, Mohamad F; Frazer, David M; Faria, Nuno; Bruggraber, Sylvaine F A; Wilkins, Sarah J; Mirciov, Cornel; Powell, Jonathan J; Anderson, Greg J; Pereira, Dora I A

    2014-08-01

    The ferritin core is composed of fine nanoparticulate Fe(3+) oxohydroxide, and we have developed a synthetic mimetic, nanoparticulate Fe(3+) polyoxohydroxide (nanoFe(3+)). The aim of this study was to determine how dietary iron derived in this fashion is absorbed in the duodenum. Following a 4 wk run-in on an Fe-deficient diet, mice with intestinal-specific disruption of the Fpn-1 gene (Fpn-KO), or littermate wild-type (WT) controls, were supplemented with Fe(2+) sulfate (FeSO4), nanoFe(3+), or no added Fe for a further 4 wk. A control group was Fe sufficient throughout. Direct intestinal absorption of nanoFe(3+) was investigated using isolated duodenal loops. Our data show that FeSO4 and nanoFe(3+) are equally bioavailable in WT mice, and at wk 8 the mean ± SEM hemoglobin increase was 18 ± 7 g/L in the FeSO4 group and 30 ± 5 g/L in the nanoFe(3+) group. Oral iron failed to be utilized by Fpn-KO mice and was retained in enterocytes, irrespective of the iron source. In summary, although nanoFe(3+) is taken up directly by the duodenum its homeostasis is under the normal regulatory control of dietary iron absorption, namely via ferroportin-dependent efflux from enterocytes, and thus offers potential as a novel oral iron supplement.

  8. Iron absorption from the whole diet: comparison of the effect of two different distributions of daily calcium intake.

    PubMed

    Gleerup, A; Rossander-Hulthén, L; Gramatkovski, E; Hallberg, L

    1995-01-01

    The possibility of reducing calcium inhibition of iron absorption by decreasing calcium intake in lunch and dinner meals, which provided the most dietary iron, was examined in 21 healthy female volunteers. During a 10-d period, nonheme iron in all meals was extrinsically labeled with radioisotopic iron to a uniform specific activity. Iron absorption from two identical 10-d periods was compared when meals were labeled with two different iron radioisotopes and when the same amount of calcium (937 mg) was distributed in two ways, in either mainly breakfast and late evening meals or more evenly in all meals. About 30-50% more iron was absorbed when no milk or cheese was served with lunch or dinner. The difference was statistically significant. Median iron requirements (1.61 mg/d) calculated from body weight and menstrual iron losses agreed with the mean value of median iron absorption in the two 10-d periods (1.54 mg/d), which supports the validity of the present method. A reasonable separation of calcium and iron intakes would improve iron nutrition.

  9. The determination of aluminum, copper, iron, and lead in glycol formulations by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Initial screening tests and the results obtained in developing procedures to determine Al, Cu, Fe, and Pb in glycol formulations are described. Atomic absorption completion was selected for Cu, Fe and Pb, and after comparison with emission spectroscopy, was selected for Al also. Before completion, carbon, iron, and lead are extracted with diethyl dithio carbamate (DDC) into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Aluminum was also extracted into MIBK using 8-hydroxyquinoline as a chelating agent. As little as 0.02 mg/l carbon and 0.06 mg/l lead or iron may be determined in glycol formulations. As little as 0.3 mg/l aluminum may be determined.

  10. Biogeochemical Conditions Favoring Magnetite Formation during Anaerobic Iron Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Bell, P. E.; Mills, A. L.; Herman, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    Several anaerobic bacteria isolated from the sediments of Contrary Creek, an iron-rich environment, produced magnetite when cultured in combinations but not when cultured alone in synthetic iron oxyhydroxide medium. When glucose was added as a carbon source, the pH of the medium decreased (to 5.5) and no magnetite was formed. When the same growth medium without glucose was used, the pH increased (to 8.5) and magnetite was formed. In both cases, Fe2+ was released into the growth medium. Geochemical equilibrium equations with Eh and pH as master variables were solved for the concentrations of iron and inorganic carbon that were observed in the system. Magnetite was predicted to be the dominant iron oxide formed at high pHs, while free Fe2+ or siderite were the dominant forms of iron expected at low pHs. Thus, magnetite formation occurs because of microbial alteration of the local Eh and pH conditions, along with concurrent reduction of ferric iron (direct biological reduction or abiological oxidation-reduction reactions). PMID:16347480

  11. Absorption and adsorption chillers applied to air conditioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuczyńska, Agnieszka; Szaflik, Władysław

    2010-07-01

    This work presents an application possibility of sorption refrigerators driven by low temperature fluid for air conditioning of buildings. Thermodynamic models were formulated and absorption LiBr-water chiller with 10 kW cooling power as well as adsorption chiller with silica gel bed were investigated. Both of them are using water for desorption process with temperature Tdes = 80 °C. Coefficient of performance (COP) for both cooling cycles was analyzed in the same conditions of the driving heat source, cooling water Tc = 25 °C and temperature in evaporator Tevap = 5 °C. In this study, the computer software EES was used to investigate the performance of absorption heat pump system and its behaviour in configuration with geothermal heat source.

  12. Dephytinisation with intrinsic wheat phytase and iron fortification significantly increase iron absorption from fonio (Digitaria exilis) meals in West African women.

    PubMed

    Koréissi-Dembélé, Yara; Fanou-Fogny, Nadia; Moretti, Diego; Schuth, Stephan; Dossa, Romain A M; Egli, Ines; Zimmermann, Michael B; Brouwer, Inge D

    2013-01-01

    Low iron and high phytic acid content make fonio based meals a poor source of bioavailable iron. Phytic acid degradation in fonio porridge using whole grain cereals as phytase source and effect on iron bioavailability when added to iron fortified fonio meals were investigated. Grains, nuts and seeds collected in Mali markets were screened for phytic acid and phytase activity. We performed an iron absorption study in Beninese women (n = 16), using non-dephytinised fonio porridge (FFP) and dephytinised fonio porridge (FWFP; 75% fonio-25% wheat), each fortified with (57)Fe or (58)Fe labeled FeSO4. Iron absorption was quantified by measuring the erythrocyte incorporation of stable iron isotopes. Phytic acid varied from 0.39 (bambara nut) to 4.26 g/100 g DM (pumpkin seed), with oilseeds values higher than grains and nuts. Phytase activity ranged from 0.17±1.61 (fonio) to 2.9±1.3 phytase unit (PU) per g (whole wheat). Phytic acid was almost completely degraded in FWFP after 60 min of incubation (pH≈5.0, 50°C). Phytate∶iron molar ratios decreased from 23.7∶1 in FFP to 2.7∶1 in FWFP. Iron fortification further reduced phytate∶iron molar ratio to 1.9∶1 in FFP and 0.3∶1 in FWFP, respectively. Geometric mean (95% CI) iron absorption significantly increased from 2.6% (0.8-7.8) in FFP to 8.3% (3.8-17.9) in FWFP (P<0.0001). Dephytinisation of fonio porridge with intrinsic wheat phytase increased fractional iron absorption 3.2 times, suggesting it could be a possible strategy to decrease PA in cereal-based porridges.

  13. Dephytinisation with Intrinsic Wheat Phytase and Iron Fortification Significantly Increase Iron Absorption from Fonio (Digitaria exilis) Meals in West African Women

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Diego; Schuth, Stephan; Egli, Ines; Zimmermann, Michael B.; Brouwer, Inge D.

    2013-01-01

    Low iron and high phytic acid content make fonio based meals a poor source of bioavailable iron. Phytic acid degradation in fonio porridge using whole grain cereals as phytase source and effect on iron bioavailability when added to iron fortified fonio meals were investigated. Grains, nuts and seeds collected in Mali markets were screened for phytic acid and phytase activity. We performed an iron absorption study in Beninese women (n = 16), using non-dephytinised fonio porridge (FFP) and dephytinised fonio porridge (FWFP; 75% fonio-25% wheat), each fortified with 57Fe or 58Fe labeled FeSO4. Iron absorption was quantified by measuring the erythrocyte incorporation of stable iron isotopes. Phytic acid varied from 0.39 (bambara nut) to 4.26 g/100 g DM (pumpkin seed), with oilseeds values higher than grains and nuts. Phytase activity ranged from 0.17±1.61 (fonio) to 2.9±1.3 phytase unit (PU) per g (whole wheat). Phytic acid was almost completely degraded in FWFP after 60 min of incubation (pH≈5.0, 50°C). Phytate∶iron molar ratios decreased from 23.7∶1 in FFP to 2.7∶1 in FWFP. Iron fortification further reduced phytate∶iron molar ratio to 1.9∶1 in FFP and 0.3∶1 in FWFP, respectively. Geometric mean (95% CI) iron absorption significantly increased from 2.6% (0.8–7.8) in FFP to 8.3% (3.8–17.9) in FWFP (P<0.0001). Dephytinisation of fonio porridge with intrinsic wheat phytase increased fractional iron absorption 3.2 times, suggesting it could be a possible strategy to decrease PA in cereal-based porridges. PMID:24124445

  14. White tea consumption slightly reduces iron absorption but not growth, food efficiency, protein utilization, or calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and zinc absorption in rats.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Llamas, Francisca; González, Daniel; Cabrera, Lorena; Espinosa, Cristobal; López, Jose A; Larqué, Elvira; Almajano, M Pilar; Zamora, Salvador

    2011-09-01

    We investigated the antinutritional effect of white tea extract (0, 15, and 45 mg of the tea solid extract per kilogram body weight) incorporated in the drinking water of rats for 3 and 30 days. Gender-based differences were found for all these variables, except apparent protein digestibility and the apparent absorption of calcium, phosphorus, and iron. White tea extract consumption did not significantly change body weight gain, food intake, food efficiency, protein efficiency ratio, apparent protein digestibility, nitrogen balance, or the apparent absorption of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and zinc. Nevertheless, the apparent absorption of iron was slightly (15-18%) but significantly (P<0.05) lower in rats that consumed white tea at the highest dose compared with the control groups at both 3 and 30 days. Our results suggest that the usual consumption of white tea is safe, although its effect on long-term iron absorption at high doses warrants more detailed investigation.

  15. Acute Copper and Ascorbic Acid Supplementation Inhibits Non-heme Iron Absorption in Humans.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Manuel; Figueroa, Constanza; Pizarro, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the study is to determine the effect of copper (Cu) plus the reducing agent ascorbic acid (AA) on the absorption of non-heme iron (Fe). Experimental study with block design in which each subject was his own control. After signing an informed consent, 14 adult women using an effective method of contraception and negative pregnancy test received 0.5 mg Fe, as ferrous sulfate, alone or with Cu, as copper sulfate, plus ascorbic acid (AA/Cu 2/1 molar ratio) at 4/1; 6/1 and 8/1 Cu/Fe molar ratios as an aqueous solution on days 1, 2, 14, and 15 of the study. Fe absorption was assessed by erythrocyte incorporation of iron radioisotopes (55)Fe and (59)Fe. Geometric mean (range ± SD) absorption of Fe at 4/1 and 6/1 Cu/Fe molar ratios (and AA/Cu 2/1 molar ratio) and Fe alone was 57.4 % (35.7-92.1 %), 64.2 % (45.8-89.9 %), and 38.8 % (20.4-73.8 %), respectively (ANOVA for repeated measures p < 0.001; post hoc test Scheffé, p < 0.05). This is attributable to the enhancing effect of AA on non-heme Fe absorption; however, Fe absorption at Cu/Fe 8/1 molar ratio was 47.3 % (27.7-80.8) (p = NS compared with Fe alone). It was expected that Fe absorption would have been equal or greater than at 4/1 and 6/1 molar ratios. Copper in the presence of ascorbic acid inhibits non-heme Fe absorption at Cu/Fe 8/1 molar ratio.

  16. Cucumis sativus secretes 4'-ketoriboflavin under iron-deficient conditions.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Junichi; Koshino, Hiroyuki; Sekino, Kouta; Ito, Shinsaku; Katsuta, Ryo; Takeda, Kouji; Yoshimura, Etsuro; Shinmachi, Fumie; Kawasaki, Shinji; Niimura, Youichi; Nukada, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    A new compound in cucumber, Cucumis sativus, nutrient solution that appears under iron-deficient conditions, but not under ordinary culture conditions, has been revealed by HPLC analysis. The chemical structure of this compound was identified using LC-MS and NMR techniques as that of 4'-ketoriboflavin. This is the first report to show that 4'-ketoriboflavin can be found in metabolites from organisms.

  17. An evaluation of in vitro intestinal absorption of iron, calcium and potassium in chickens receiving gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sembratowicz, I; Ognik, K; Stępniowska, A

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect of oral administration of colloidal gold nanoparticles on accumulation of gold in the small intestine and intestinal absorption of iron, calcium and potassium under in vitro conditions. The gold nanoparticles are non-ionic, nanocrystalline, chemically pure particles 5 nm in size, produced in a physical process. In total, 126 one day-old Ross 308 chicks were assigned to 7 experimental groups of 18 birds each (3 replications of 6 individuals each). The control group (G-C) did not receive gold nanoparticles. Groups: Au-5(7), Au-10(7) and Au-15(7) received gold nanoparticles in their drinking water in the amounts of 5 mg l(-1) for group Au-5(7), 10 mg l(-1) for group Au-10(7) and 15 mg l(-1) for group Au-15(7) in 8-14, 22-28 and 36-42 d of life. The birds in groups Au-5(3), Au-10(3) and Au-15(3) received gold nanoparticles in the same amounts, but only in 8-10, 22-24 and 36-38 d of life. The study revealed that nanogold supplied via ingestion leads to dose- and time-dependent accumulation of gold in the intestinal walls. Nanogold present in the jejunum has a negative impact on the absorption of calcium, iron and potassium under in vitro conditions.

  18. Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric determination of mucolytic drug ambroxol through ion-pair formation with iron and thiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Levent, Abdulkadir; Sentürk, Zühre

    2010-09-01

    Colorimetric and atomic absorption spectrometric methods have been developed for the determination of mucolytic drug Ambroxol. These procedures depend upon the reaction of iron(III) metal ion with the drug in the presence of thiocyanate ion to form stable ion-pair complex which extractable chloroform. The red-coloured complex was determined either colorimetrically at 510 nm or by indirect atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) via the determination of the iron content in the formed complex. The optimum experimental conditions for pH, concentrations of Fe(3+) and SCN(-), shaking time, phase ratio, and the number of extractions were determined. Under the proposed conditions, linearity was obeyed in the concentration ranges 4.1x10(-6) - 5.7x10(-5) M (1.7-23.6 µg mL(-1)) using both methods, with detection limits of 4.6x10(-7) M (0.19 µg mL(-1)) for colorimetry and 1.1x10(-6) M (0.46 µg mL(-1)) for AAS. The proposed methods were applied for the determination of Ambroxol in tablet dosage forms. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the high-performance liquid chromatographic method with diode-array detection.

  19. Modelling iron clay interactions in deep geological disposal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bildstein, O.; Trotignon, L.; Perronnet, M.; Jullien, M.

    In the context of deep geological disposal of high level radioactive wastes, the interactions between iron and clay-rich materials may lead to adverse transformations of clay minerals with a potential loss of confining properties such as swelling and capacity to exchange cations. Such transformations have been experimentally observed at temperatures starting at ca. 80 °C, where smectites contained in a mixture of bentonite and iron powder are transformed into iron-rich serpentine-type minerals. The reaction-transport code CRUNCH is used to investigate the iron-clay interactions at 50 °C over a period of 10,000 years, which are the conditions considered here to represent the mean temperature value and the expected timescale for the corrosion stage. The aim is to predict the nature and quantity of corrosion product, calculate the chemistry of water (essentially the pH) and the mineralogical transformation in the system containing the canister, an optional engineered barrier (bentonite) and the host-rock (argillite). The results of the calculations show that at the interface with the canister, where steel corrosion occurs, the iron is partly immobilized by the precipitation of iron oxides (essentially magnetite) and small amounts of siderite. The pH stabilizes at high values, between 10 and 11, at this location. In the bentonite or the argillite in contact with the container, the primary clay minerals are destabilized and iron-rich serpentine-like minerals precipitate as observed in the experiments (cronstedtite and berthierine). These minerals show low cation exchange and swelling capacities. The results also show that the interactions between iron and clay may lead to significant porosity changes in the system. A reduction of the porosity is predicted at the surface of the steel canister, due to the precipitation of iron oxides. Porosity increase is predicted in the clay material due to the dissolution of the primary clay minerals. The effect of these porosity

  20. Immobilization of selenate by iron in aqueous solution under anoxic conditions and the influence of uranyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puranen, Anders; Jonsson, Mats; Dähn, Rainer; Cui, Daqing

    2009-08-01

    In proposed high level radioactive waste repositories a large part of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) canisters are commonly composed of iron. Selenium is present in spent nuclear fuel as a long lived fission product. This study investigates the influence of iron on the uptake of dissolved selenium in the form of selenate and the effect of the presence of dissolved uranyl on the above interaction of selenate. The iron oxide, and selenium speciation on the surfaces was investigated by Raman spectroscopy. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy was used to determine the oxidation state of the selenium and uranium on the surfaces. Under the simulated groundwater conditions (10 mM NaCl, 2 mM NaHCO 3, <0.1 ppm O 2) the immobilized selenate was found to be reduced to oxidation states close to zero or lower and uranyl was found to be largely reduced to U(IV). The near simultaneous reduction of uranyl was found to greatly enhance the rate of selenate reduction. These findings suggest that the presence of uranyl being reduced by an iron surface could substantially enhance the rate of reduction of selenate under anoxic conditions relevant for a repository.

  1. Electroweak absorptive parts in the matching conditions of nonrelativistic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, Andre H.; Reisser, Christoph J.

    2005-04-01

    Electroweak corrections associated with the instability of the top quark to the next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) total top pair threshold cross section in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation are determined. Our method is based on absorptive parts in electroweak matching conditions of the operators of nonrelativistic QCD and the optical theorem. The corrections lead to ultraviolet phase space divergences that have to be renormalized and lead to NLL mixing effects. Numerically, the corrections can amount to several percent and are comparable to the known NNLL QCD corrections.

  2. Distinguishing iron-reducing from sulfate-reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, F.H.; Bradley, P.M.; Thomas, M.A.; McMahon, P.B.

    2009-01-01

    Ground water systems dominated by iron- or sulfate-reducing conditions may be distinguished by observing concentrations of dissolved iron (Fe2+) and sulfide (sum of H2S, HS-, and S= species and denoted here as "H2S"). This approach is based on the observation that concentrations of Fe2+ and H2S in ground water systems tend to be inversely related according to a hyperbolic function. That is, when Fe2+ concentrations are high, H2S concentrations tend to be low and vice versa. This relation partly reflects the rapid reaction kinetics of Fe2+ with H2S to produce relatively insoluble ferrous sulfides (FeS). This relation also reflects competition for organic substrates between the iron- and the sulfate-reducing microorganisms that catalyze the production of Fe2+ and H 2S. These solubility and microbial constraints operate in tandem, resulting in the observed hyperbolic relation between Fe2+ and H 2S concentrations. Concentrations of redox indicators, including dissolved hydrogen (H2) measured in a shallow aquifer in Hanahan, South Carolina, suggest that if the Fe2+/H2S mass ratio (units of mg/L) exceeded 10, the screened interval being tapped was consistently iron reducing (H2 ???0.2 to 0.8 nM). Conversely, if the Fe 2+/H2S ratio was less than 0.30, consistent sulfate-reducing (H2 ???1 to 5 nM) conditions were observed over time. Concomitantly high Fe2+ and H2S concentrations were associated with H2 concentrations that varied between 0.2 and 5.0 nM over time, suggesting mixing of water from adjacent iron- and sulfate-reducing zones or concomitant iron and sulfate reduction under nonelectron donor-limited conditions. These observations suggest that Fe2+/H2S mass ratios may provide useful information concerning the occurrence and distribution of iron and sulfate reduction in ground water systems. ?? 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  3. The effects of fruit juices and fruits on the absorption of iron from a rice meal.

    PubMed

    Ballot, D; Baynes, R D; Bothwell, T H; Gillooly, M; MacFarlane, B J; MacPhail, A P; Lyons, G; Derman, D P; Bezwoda, W R; Torrance, J D

    1987-05-01

    The effects of the chemical composition of fruit juices and fruit on the absorption of iron from a rice (Oryza sativa) meal were measured in 234 parous Indian women, using the erythrocyte utilization of radioactive Fe method. The corrected geometric mean Fe absorptions with different juices varied between 0.040 and 0.129, with the variation correlating closely with the ascorbic acid contents of the juices (rs 0.838, P less than 0.01). Ascorbic acid was not the only organic acid responsible for the promoting effects of citrus fruit juices on Fe absorption. Fe absorption from laboratory 'orange juice' (100 ml water, 33 mg ascorbic acid and 750 mg citric acid) was significantly better than that from 100 ml water and 33 mg ascorbic acid alone (0.097 and 0.059 respectively), while Fe absorption from 100 ml orange juice (28 mg ascorbic acid) was better than that from 100 ml water containing the same amount of ascorbic acid (0.139 and 0.098 respectively). Finally, Fe absorption from laboratory 'lemon juice' (100 ml orange juice and 4 g citric acid) was significantly better than that from 100 ml orange juice (0.226 and 0.166 respectively). The corrected geometric mean Fe absorption from the rice meal was 0.025. Several fruits had little or no effect on Fe absorption from the meal (0.013-0.024). These included grape (Vitis vinifera), peach (Prunus persica), apple (Malus sylvestris) and avocado pear (Persea americana). Fruit with a mild to moderate enhancing effect on Fe absorption (0.031-0.088) included strawberry (Fragaria sp.) (uncorrected values), plum (Prunus domestica), rhubarb (Rheum rhaponticum), banana (Musa cavendishii), mango (Mangifera indica), pear (Pyrus communis), cantaloup (Cucumis melo) and pineapple (Ananas comosus) (uncorrected values). Guava (Psidium guajava) and pawpaw (Carica papaya) markedly increased Fe absorption (0.126-0.293). There was a close correlation between Fe absorption and the ascorbic acid content of the fruits tested (rs 0.738, P less

  4. Silica-coated iron nanocubes: preparation, characterization and application in microwave absorption.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiaomin; Zheng, Zhong; Hu, Xiang; Xiao, Xiukun

    2010-01-01

    Novel cubic nanocapsules consisting of metallic iron core and amorphous silica shell were fabricated through a simple chemical reduction route followed by a Stöber process. Thus-prepared Fe@SiO(2) nanocubes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and scalar network analysis (SNA). Comparing with that of pure iron counterparts, silica-coated iron nanocubes exhibited improved magnetic properties, oxidation resistance and microwave absorption performance. A reflection loss (RL) exceeding -12 dB was obtained in the frequency range of 8-14 GHz for an absorber thickness of 2 mm, with an optimal RL of -18.2 dB at 9 GHz. Mechanism of the improved microwave absorption properties of the Fe@SiO(2) composite was discussed based on their magnetic properties and electromagnetic theory.

  5. Energy absorption characteristics of lightweight structural member by stacking conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Juho; Yang, Yongjun; Hwang, Woochae; Pyeon, Seokbeom; Min, Hanki; Yeo, Ingoo; Yang, Inyoung

    2012-04-01

    The recent trend in vehicle design is aimed at improving crash safety and environmental-friendliness. To solve these issues, the needs for lighter vehicle to limit exhaust gas and improve fuel economy has been requested for environmental-friendliness. Automobile design should be made for reduced weight once the safety of vehicle is maintained. In this study, composite structural members were manufactured using carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) which are representative lightweight structural materials. Carbon fiber has been researched as alternative to metals for lightweight vehicle and better fuel economy. CFRP is an anisotropic material which is the most widely adapted lightweight structural member because of their inherent design flexibility and high specific strength and stiffness. Also, variation of CFRP interface number is important to increase the energy absorption capacity. In this study, one type of circular shaped composite tube was used, combined with reinforcing foam. The stacking condition was selected to investigate the effect of the fiber orientation angle and interface number. The crashworthy behavior of circular composite material tubes subjected to static axial compression under same conditions is reported. The axial static collapse tests were carried out for each section member. The collapse modes and the energy absorption capability of the members were analyzed.

  6. Energy absorption characteristics of lightweight structural member by stacking conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Juho; Yang, Yongjun; Hwang, Woochae; Pyeon, Seokbeom; Min, Hanki; Yeo, Ingoo; Yang, Inyoung

    2011-11-01

    The recent trend in vehicle design is aimed at improving crash safety and environmental-friendliness. To solve these issues, the needs for lighter vehicle to limit exhaust gas and improve fuel economy has been requested for environmental-friendliness. Automobile design should be made for reduced weight once the safety of vehicle is maintained. In this study, composite structural members were manufactured using carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) which are representative lightweight structural materials. Carbon fiber has been researched as alternative to metals for lightweight vehicle and better fuel economy. CFRP is an anisotropic material which is the most widely adapted lightweight structural member because of their inherent design flexibility and high specific strength and stiffness. Also, variation of CFRP interface number is important to increase the energy absorption capacity. In this study, one type of circular shaped composite tube was used, combined with reinforcing foam. The stacking condition was selected to investigate the effect of the fiber orientation angle and interface number. The crashworthy behavior of circular composite material tubes subjected to static axial compression under same conditions is reported. The axial static collapse tests were carried out for each section member. The collapse modes and the energy absorption capability of the members were analyzed.

  7. Transcriptome variations in human CaCo-2 cells: a model for enterocyte differentiation and its link to iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Bédrine-Ferran, Hélène; Le Meur, Nolwenn; Gicquel, Isabelle; Le Cunff, Martine; Soriano, Nicolas; Guisle, Isabelle; Mottier, Stéphanie; Monnier, Annabelle; Teusan, Raluca; Fergelot, Patricia; Le Gall, Jean-Yves; Léger, Jean; Mosser, Jean

    2004-05-01

    Complete clinical expression of the HFE1 hemochromatosis is very likely modulated by genes linked to duodenal iron absorption, whose level is conditioned by unknown processes taking place during enterocyte differentiation. We carried out a transcriptomic study on CaCo-2 cells used as a model of enterocyte differentiation in vitro. Of the 720 genes on the microarrays, 80, 50, and 56 were significantly down-regulated up-regulated, and invariant during differentiation. With regard to iron metabolism, we showed that HEPH, SLC11A2, SLC11A3, and TF are significantly up-regulated, while ATP7B and SLC39A1 (and SFT) are down-regulated and ACO1, dCYTb, FECH, and FTH1 show constant expression. Ontological annotations highlight the decrease in the expression of cell cycle and DNA metabolism associated genes as well as transcription, protein metabolism, signal transduction, and nucleocytoplasmic transport associated genes, whereas there are increases in the expression of genes linked to cell adhesion, lipid and xenobiotic metabolism, iron transport and homeostasis, and immune response.

  8. Microwave absorption properties of amorphous iron nanostructures fabricated by a high-yield method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Zuo, Yalu; Yao, Yuelin; Xi, Li; Du, Jihong; Wang, Jianbo; Xue, Desheng

    2013-04-01

    Amorphous Fe nanoparticles and a nanonecklace were synthesized at room temperature by an aqueous reduction procedure, which provided a simple and potential method for volume production of ferromagnetic materials. The morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The amorphism of Fe nanoparticles and the nanonecklace was confirmed by x-ray diffraction and electron diffraction patterns in transmission electron microscopy. The complex permittivity and permeability behaviour of amorphous iron nanoparticles/paraffin wax (NPPW) and nanonecklace/paraffin wax (NCPW) composites was investigated in 0.1-18 GHz by a coaxial method. The strongest reflection loss values of NPPW and NCPW calculated from permittivity and permeability reached -53.2 dB and -47.8 dB at 6.4 GHz and 4.6 GHz with matching thicknesses of 2.4 mm and 2.3 mm, respectively. Moreover, the frequency ranges of microwave absorption exceeding 90% were around 4.9-8.8 GHz and 3.7-6.1 GHz for NPPW and NCPW, respectively. Comparing the microwave absorption property with crystallized Fe nanostructures, we may conclude that the relatively high resistivity and low permittivity of amorphous Fe nanostructures are favourable for impedance matching, and consequently result in the attracting microwave absorption property of amorphous Fe nanostructures. Thus, amorphous iron nanoparticles and the nanonecklace prepared by a high-yield method have great potential to be a highly efficient microwave absorber.

  9. Iron near absorption edge X-ray spectroscopy at aqueous-membrane interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenjie; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Vaknin, David

    2014-01-01

    Employing synchrotron X-ray scattering, we systematically determine the absorption near-edge spectra (XANES) of iron in its ferrous (Fe2+) and ferric (Fe3+) states both as ions in aqueous solutions and as they bind to form a single layer to anionic templates that consist of carboxyl or phosphate groups at aqueous/vapor interfaces. While the XANES of bulk iron ions show that the electronic state and coordination of iron complexes in the bulk are isotropic, the interfacial bound ions show a signature of a broken inversion-symmetry environment. The XANES of Fe2+ and Fe3+ in the bulk possess distinct profiles however, upon binding they practically exhibit similar patterns. This indicates that both bound ions settle into a stable electronic and coordination configuration with an effective fractional valence (for example, Fe[2+nu]+, 0 < nu < 1) at charged organic templates. Such two dimensional properties may render interfacial iron, abundant in living organisms, a more efficient and versatile catalytic behavior.

  10. [Application of solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry to mensuration of brain iron content in rats].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Sheng, Qing-hai; Shi, Zhen-hua; Zhang, Zhi-guo; Duan, Xiang-lin; Chang, Yan-zhong

    2009-04-01

    In the present study, the authors performed the solid sampling and detected the iron levels in cortex, hippocampus and striatum of rat brain by GFAAS. The authors' results showed that there are no remarkable difference between the data obtained by solid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption and liquid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption. Compared to liquid sampling graphite furnace atomic absorption, the sample pre-treatment stage was obviously simplified, the cost was reduced significantly, and the time was shortened significantly in the solid sampling GFAAS. This study will be beneficial to the mensuration of iron content in micro-tissue of animal by solid sampling GFASS.

  11. Iron location in O-carboxymethyl chitosans determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klepka, Marcin T.; Lawniczak-Jablonska, Krystyna; Wolska, Anna; Slawska-Waniewska, Anna; Rodrigues, Clóvis A.; Lorini, Josiane; Cruz, Karianne Araujo da

    2011-01-01

    Chitosans represent a class of functional natural polymers. Their unique attribute is the capability to bind metal ions into their structure. This property can be exploited in many biomedical applications, but before that, some questions about metal binding mechanism must be answered. O-carboxymethyl chitosans with accumulated Fe atoms were studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. It was shown that iron bonding depends on the technological processes used in chitosan production. The applied technology allows for the selective introduction of either oxygen alone or of nitrogen and oxygen into the nearest neighbourhood of Fe. Therefore, it is possible to control the surroundings of a metal atom depending on requirements.

  12. Mechanistic analysis of the hydrogen evolution and absorption reactions on iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Elhamid, Mahmoud Hassan

    2000-10-01

    The work in this thesis investigates the effect of additives on the kinetics of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and hydrogen absorption reaction (HAR) on iron. The electrochemical hydrogen permeation cell has been used to collect data on both reactions in the absence and presence of the additives. The effect of two additives on the kinetics of both the HER and HAR on iron in acidic solutions was quantified. These two compounds have different behaviors towards both reactions. While benzotriazole (BTA) inhibits both reactions, iodide enhances hydrogen absorption while inhibiting the HER. Analysis of the results using the IPZ (Iyer, Pickering, Zamanzadeh) model shows that both compounds inhibit the HER by decreasing its discharge rate constant and hence the exchange current density. On the other hand, while BTA decreases the rate of hydrogen absorption by decreasing both the hydrogen surface coverage and the kinetic-diffusion constant, k (see chapter 5), iodide ions decrease the rate of hydrogen absorption by increasing the kinetic-diffusion constant, k, while decreasing the hydrogen surface coverage (see chapter 6). A separate study was devoted to investigate the effect of thiosulfate on the kinetics of the HER and HAR on iron (chapter 7). It was shown that thiosulfate enhances both reactions in acidic solutions. The promoting effect was mainly due to its decomposition product H2SO3 with a small contribution from the colloidal sulfur and/or the undecomposed thiosulfate. In chapter 8 it was shown that the polarization data of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) can be analyzed to calculate the hydrogen surface coverage and the rate constants of the hydrogen discharge and recombination reactions for metals which have very low permeabilities of hydrogen, and on which the HER proceeds through a coupled Volmer discharge-Tafel recombination mechanism. The analysis is applied to the results of the HER on copper and iron and the rate constants obtained using the

  13. Reassignment of the Iron (3) Absorption Bands in the Spectra of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    Absorption features in the near-infrared and visible region reflectance spectra of Mars have been assigned to specific Fe (3+) crystal-field and o(2-) yields Fe(3+) charge transfer transitions. Recently, near-ultraviolet absorption spectra of iron oxides were obtained and the energies of o(2-) yields Fe(3+) charge-transfer (LMCT) transitions were determined from accurate SCF-X # alpha-SW molecular orbital calculations on (FeO6)(9-) and (FeO4)(5-) clusters. Both the theoretical and experimental results, together with existing data in the literature, show that some of the previous Fe(3+) band assignments in the spectra of Mars need to be revised. The theory of Fe(3+) spectra in minerals is discussed and applied to the spectrum of Mars.

  14. Thermal and electrical conductivity of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, Monica; Davies, Chris; Gubbins, David; Alfè, Dario

    2012-05-17

    The Earth acts as a gigantic heat engine driven by the decay of radiogenic isotopes and slow cooling, which gives rise to plate tectonics, volcanoes and mountain building. Another key product is the geomagnetic field, generated in the liquid iron core by a dynamo running on heat released by cooling and freezing (as the solid inner core grows), and on chemical convection (due to light elements expelled from the liquid on freezing). The power supplied to the geodynamo, measured by the heat flux across the core-mantle boundary (CMB), places constraints on Earth's evolution. Estimates of CMB heat flux depend on properties of iron mixtures under the extreme pressure and temperature conditions in the core, most critically on the thermal and electrical conductivities. These quantities remain poorly known because of inherent experimental and theoretical difficulties. Here we use density functional theory to compute these conductivities in liquid iron mixtures at core conditions from first principles--unlike previous estimates, which relied on extrapolations. The mixtures of iron, oxygen, sulphur and silicon are taken from earlier work and fit the seismologically determined core density and inner-core boundary density jump. We find both conductivities to be two to three times higher than estimates in current use. The changes are so large that core thermal histories and power requirements need to be reassessed. New estimates indicate that the adiabatic heat flux is 15 to 16 terawatts at the CMB, higher than present estimates of CMB heat flux based on mantle convection; the top of the core must be thermally stratified and any convection in the upper core must be driven by chemical convection against the adverse thermal buoyancy or lateral variations in CMB heat flow. Power for the geodynamo is greatly restricted, and future models of mantle evolution will need to incorporate a high CMB heat flux and explain the recent formation of the inner core. PMID:22495307

  15. Thermal and electrical conductivity of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, Monica; Davies, Chris; Gubbins, David; Alfè, Dario

    2012-04-11

    The Earth acts as a gigantic heat engine driven by the decay of radiogenic isotopes and slow cooling, which gives rise to plate tectonics, volcanoes and mountain building. Another key product is the geomagnetic field, generated in the liquid iron core by a dynamo running on heat released by cooling and freezing (as the solid inner core grows), and on chemical convection (due to light elements expelled from the liquid on freezing). The power supplied to the geodynamo, measured by the heat flux across the core-mantle boundary (CMB), places constraints on Earth's evolution. Estimates of CMB heat flux depend on properties of iron mixtures under the extreme pressure and temperature conditions in the core, most critically on the thermal and electrical conductivities. These quantities remain poorly known because of inherent experimental and theoretical difficulties. Here we use density functional theory to compute these conductivities in liquid iron mixtures at core conditions from first principles--unlike previous estimates, which relied on extrapolations. The mixtures of iron, oxygen, sulphur and silicon are taken from earlier work and fit the seismologically determined core density and inner-core boundary density jump. We find both conductivities to be two to three times higher than estimates in current use. The changes are so large that core thermal histories and power requirements need to be reassessed. New estimates indicate that the adiabatic heat flux is 15 to 16 terawatts at the CMB, higher than present estimates of CMB heat flux based on mantle convection; the top of the core must be thermally stratified and any convection in the upper core must be driven by chemical convection against the adverse thermal buoyancy or lateral variations in CMB heat flow. Power for the geodynamo is greatly restricted, and future models of mantle evolution will need to incorporate a high CMB heat flux and explain the recent formation of the inner core.

  16. Mode of oral iron administration and the amount of iron habitually consumed do not affect iron absorption, systemic iron utilisation or zinc absorption in iron-sufficient infants: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A; Domellöf, Magnus; Hernell, Olle; Hurrell, Richard F; Lind, Torbjörn; Lönnerdal, Bo; Zeder, Christophe; Egli, Ines M

    2016-09-01

    Different metabolic pathways of supplemental and fortification Fe, or inhibition of Zn absorption by Fe, may explain adverse effects of supplemental Fe in Fe-sufficient infants. We determined whether the mode of oral Fe administration or the amount habitually consumed affects Fe absorption and systemic Fe utilisation in infants, and assessed the effects of these interventions on Zn absorption, Fe and Zn status, and growth. Fe-sufficient 6-month-old infants (n 72) were randomly assigned to receive 6·6 mg Fe/d from a high-Fe formula, 1·3 mg Fe/d from a low-Fe formula or 6·6 mg Fe/d from Fe drops and a formula with no added Fe for 45 d. Fractional Fe absorption, Fe utilisation and fractional Zn absorption were measured with oral (57Fe and 67Zn) and intravenous (58Fe and 70Zn) isotopes. Fe and Zn status, infection and growth were measured. At 45 d, Hb was 6·3 g/l higher in the high-Fe formula group compared with the Fe drops group, whereas serum ferritin was 34 and 35 % higher, respectively, and serum transferrin 0·1 g/l lower in the high-Fe formula and Fe drops groups compared with the low-Fe formula group (all P<0·05). No intervention effects were observed on Fe absorption, Fe utilisation, Zn absorption, other Fe status indices, plasma Zn or growth. We concluded that neither supplemental or fortification Fe nor the amount of Fe habitually consumed altered Fe absorption, Fe utilisation, Zn absorption, Zn status or growth in Fe-sufficient infants. Consumption of low-Fe formula as the only source of Fe was insufficient to maintain Fe stores.

  17. Mode of oral iron administration and the amount of iron habitually consumed do not affect iron absorption, systemic iron utilisation or zinc absorption in iron-sufficient infants: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A; Domellöf, Magnus; Hernell, Olle; Hurrell, Richard F; Lind, Torbjörn; Lönnerdal, Bo; Zeder, Christophe; Egli, Ines M

    2016-09-01

    Different metabolic pathways of supplemental and fortification Fe, or inhibition of Zn absorption by Fe, may explain adverse effects of supplemental Fe in Fe-sufficient infants. We determined whether the mode of oral Fe administration or the amount habitually consumed affects Fe absorption and systemic Fe utilisation in infants, and assessed the effects of these interventions on Zn absorption, Fe and Zn status, and growth. Fe-sufficient 6-month-old infants (n 72) were randomly assigned to receive 6·6 mg Fe/d from a high-Fe formula, 1·3 mg Fe/d from a low-Fe formula or 6·6 mg Fe/d from Fe drops and a formula with no added Fe for 45 d. Fractional Fe absorption, Fe utilisation and fractional Zn absorption were measured with oral (57Fe and 67Zn) and intravenous (58Fe and 70Zn) isotopes. Fe and Zn status, infection and growth were measured. At 45 d, Hb was 6·3 g/l higher in the high-Fe formula group compared with the Fe drops group, whereas serum ferritin was 34 and 35 % higher, respectively, and serum transferrin 0·1 g/l lower in the high-Fe formula and Fe drops groups compared with the low-Fe formula group (all P<0·05). No intervention effects were observed on Fe absorption, Fe utilisation, Zn absorption, other Fe status indices, plasma Zn or growth. We concluded that neither supplemental or fortification Fe nor the amount of Fe habitually consumed altered Fe absorption, Fe utilisation, Zn absorption, Zn status or growth in Fe-sufficient infants. Consumption of low-Fe formula as the only source of Fe was insufficient to maintain Fe stores. PMID:27546308

  18. Evaluation of iron-containing carbon nanotubes by near edge X-ray absorption technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, A. G.; Bergmann, C. P.

    2015-10-01

    The synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via Chemical Vapor Deposition method with ferrocene results in CNTs filled with Fe-containing nanoparticles. The present work proposes a novel route to characterize the Fe phases in CNTs inherent to the synthesis process. CNTs were synthesized and, afterwards, the CNTs were heat treated at 1000 °C for 20 min in an inert atmosphere during a thermogravimetric experiment. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) experiments were performed on the CNTs before and after the heat treatment and, also, during the heat treatment, e.g., in situ tests were performed while several Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption (XANES) spectra were collected during the heating of the samples. The XAS technique was successfully applied to evaluate the phases encapsulated by CNTs. Phase transformations of the Fe-based nanoparticles were also observed from iron carbide to metallic iron when the in situ experiments were performed. Results also indicated that the applied synthesis method guarantees that Fe phases are not oxidize. In addition, the results show that heat treatment under inert atmosphere can control which phase remains encapsulated by the CNTs.

  19. Phytoestrogens modulate hepcidin expression by Nrf2: Implications for dietary control of iron absorption

    PubMed Central

    Bayele, Henry K.; Balesaria, Sara; Srai, Surjit K.S.

    2015-01-01

    Hepcidin is a liver-derived antimicrobial peptide that regulates iron absorption and is also an integral part of the acute phase response. In a previous report, we found evidence that this peptide could also be induced by toxic heavy metals and xenobiotics, thus broadening its teleological role as a defensin. However it remained unclear how its sensing of disparate biotic and abiotic stressors might be integrated at the transcriptional level. We hypothesized that its function in cytoprotection may be regulated by NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the master transcriptional controller of cellular stress defenses. In this report, we show that hepcidin regulation is inextricably linked to the acute stress response through Nrf2 signaling. Nrf2 regulates hepcidin expression from a prototypical antioxidant response element in its promoter, and by synergizing with other basic leucine-zipper transcription factors. We also show that polyphenolic small molecules or phytoestrogens commonly found in fruits and vegetables including the red wine constituent resveratrol can induce hepcidin expression in vitro and post-prandially, with concomitant reductions in circulating iron levels and transferrin saturation by one such polyphenol quercetin. Furthermore, these molecules derepress hepcidin promoter activity when its transcription by Nrf2 is repressed by Keap1. Taken together, the data show that hepcidin is a prototypical antioxidant response or cytoprotective gene within the Nrf2 transcriptional circuitry. The ability of phytoestrogens to modulate hepcidin expression in vivo suggests a novel mechanism by which diet may impact iron homeostasis. PMID:26546695

  20. Phytoestrogens modulate hepcidin expression by Nrf2: Implications for dietary control of iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Bayele, Henry K; Balesaria, Sara; Srai, Surjit K S

    2015-12-01

    Hepcidin is a liver-derived antimicrobial peptide that regulates iron absorption and is also an integral part of the acute phase response. In a previous report, we found evidence that this peptide could also be induced by toxic heavy metals and xenobiotics, thus broadening its teleological role as a defensin. However it remained unclear how its sensing of disparate biotic and abiotic stressors might be integrated at the transcriptional level. We hypothesized that its function in cytoprotection may be regulated by NFE2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), the master transcriptional controller of cellular stress defenses. In this report, we show that hepcidin regulation is inextricably linked to the acute stress response through Nrf2 signaling. Nrf2 regulates hepcidin expression from a prototypical antioxidant response element in its promoter, and by synergizing with other basic leucine-zipper transcription factors. We also show that polyphenolic small molecules or phytoestrogens commonly found in fruits and vegetables including the red wine constituent resveratrol can induce hepcidin expression in vitro and post-prandially, with concomitant reductions in circulating iron levels and transferrin saturation by one such polyphenol quercetin. Furthermore, these molecules derepress hepcidin promoter activity when its transcription by Nrf2 is repressed by Keap1. Taken together, the data show that hepcidin is a prototypical antioxidant response or cytoprotective gene within the Nrf2 transcriptional circuitry. The ability of phytoestrogens to modulate hepcidin expression in vivo suggests a novel mechanism by which diet may impact iron homeostasis.

  1. Bioavailability of iron in geophagic earths and clay minerals, and their effect on dietary iron absorption using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Geophagy, the deliberate consumption of earth, is strongly associated with iron (Fe) deficiency. It has been proposed that geophagy may be practiced as a means to improve Fe status by increasing Fe intakes and, conversely, that geophagy may cause Fe deficiency by inhibiting Fe absorption. We tested ...

  2. Optimization of absorption air-conditioning for solar energy applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, E. H.

    1976-01-01

    Improved performance of solar cooling systems using the lithium bromide water absorption cycle is investigated. Included are computer simulations of a solar-cooled house, analyses and measurements of heat transfer rates in absorption system components, and design and fabrication of various system components. A survey of solar collector convection suppression methods is presented.

  3. Effect of increasing levels of zinc fortificant on the iron absorption of bread co-fortified with iron and zinc consumed with a black tea.

    PubMed

    Olivares, Manuel; Castro, Carla; Pizarro, Fernando; de Romaña, Daniel López

    2013-09-01

    Iron (Fe) and zinc's (Zn) interaction at the absorptive level can have an effect on the success of co-fortification of wheat flour with both minerals on iron deficiency prevention. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of increasing levels of zinc fortificant on the iron absorption of bread co-fortified with iron and zinc consumed with a black tea. Twelve women aged 33-42 years participated in the study. They received on four different days 200 mL of black tea and 100 g of bread made with wheat flour (70% extraction) fortified with either 30 mg Fe/kg alone, as ferrous sulfate (A), or with the same Fe-fortified flour, but with graded levels of Zn, as zinc sulfate: 30 mg/kg (B), 60 mg/kg (C), or 90 mg/kg (D). Fe radioisotopes ((59)Fe and (55)Fe) of high specific activity were used as tracers, and Fe absorption iron was measured by the incorporation of radioactive Fe into erythrocytes. The geometric mean and range of ±1 SD of Fe absorption were as follows: A = 6.5% (2.2-19.3%), B = 4.6% (1.0-21.0%), C = 2.1% (0.9-4.9%), and D = 2.2% (0.7-6.6%), respectively; ANOVA for repeated measures F = 10.9, p < 0.001 (Scheffè's post hoc test: A vs. C, A vs. D, B vs. C, and B vs. D; p < 0.05). We can conclude that Fe absorption of bread made from low-extraction flour fortified with 30 mg/kg of Fe, as ferrous sulfate, and co-fortified with zinc, as zinc sulfate consumed with black tea is significantly decreased at a zinc fortification level of ≥60 mg/kg flour.

  4. Low temperature charge transport and microwave absorption of carbon coated iron nanoparticles–polymer composite films

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, V.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► Carbon coated Fe nanoparticle–PVC composite films were prepared by solution casting method. ► A low electrical percolation threshold of 2.2 was achieved. ► The low temperature electrical conductivity follows variable range hopping type conduction. ► An EMI shielding of 18 dB was achieved in 200 micron thick film. -- Abstract: In this paper, the low temperature electrical conductivity and microwave absorption properties of carbon coated iron nanoparticles–polyvinyl chloride composite films are investigated for different filler fractions. The filler particles are prepared by the pyrolysis of ferrocene at 980 °C and embedded in polyvinyl chloride matrix. The high resolution transmission electron micrographs of the filler material have shown a 5 nm thin layer graphitic carbon covering over iron particles. The room temperature electrical conductivity of the composite film changes by 10 orders of magnitude with the increase of filler concentration. A percolation threshold of 2.2 and an electromagnetic interference shielding efficiency (EMI SE) of ∼18.6 dB in 26.5–40 GHz range are observed for 50 wt% loading. The charge transport follows three dimensional variable range hopping conduction.

  5. Effects of proteins on absorption by the rat of iron from polymeric and low-molecular-weight iron species

    SciTech Connect

    Berner, L.; Miller, D.

    1986-03-05

    To examine effects of proteins on Fe absorption from polymeric ferric hydroxides (polys) or low-molecular-weight complexes (LMW Fe), 2 studies were conducted. First, anemic rats were given /sup 59/Fe-labeled polys or LMW Fe in the presence and absence of pepsin-digested soy protein isolate, casein, and BSA. The doses were introduced into ligated duodenal segments for 1 hr. Uptake into the carcass of /sup 59/Fe from polys was doubled in the presence of BSA (7.8 vs 16.1%, p < .05) while casein and soy had no effect (5.5 and 6.5%). Absorption of /sup 59/Fe from LMW Fe was 7X greater than from polys; BSA and casein had no effect but soy depressed Fe uptake by almost 50% (57.4 vs 35.5%, p < .05). The second experiment repeated the first except that the proteins were not pepsin-digested and the doses were given by gastric intubation. All Fe, whether from polys or LMW Fe, was highly available (although in vitro digestions reveal that polys are not depolymerized to a large degree under simulated stomach conditions). Soy depressed Fe uptake from both sources (92.9 vs. 81.6%, LMW Fe and 85.4 vs 73.7%, polys) while casein and BSA had no effect. These results show: (1) BSA can depolymerize polys in the rat duodenum, thus enhancing absorption; (2) soy isolate generally depressed Fe uptake; and (3) the rat stomach appears to have an exceptional capacity for equalizing Fe sources.

  6. Planktonic marine iron oxidizers drive iron mineralization under low-oxygen conditions.

    PubMed

    Field, E K; Kato, S; Findlay, A J; MacDonald, D J; Chiu, B K; Luther, G W; Chan, C S

    2016-09-01

    Observations of modern microbes have led to several hypotheses on how microbes precipitated the extensive iron formations in the geologic record, but we have yet to resolve the exact microbial contributions. An initial hypothesis was that cyanobacteria produced oxygen which oxidized iron abiotically; however, in modern environments such as microbial mats, where Fe(II) and O2 coexist, we commonly find microaerophilic chemolithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria producing Fe(III) oxyhydroxides. This suggests that such iron oxidizers could have inhabited niches in ancient coastal oceans where Fe(II) and O2 coexisted, and therefore contributed to banded iron formations (BIFs) and other ferruginous deposits. However, there is currently little evidence for planktonic marine iron oxidizers in modern analogs. Here, we demonstrate successful cultivation of planktonic microaerophilic iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria from the Chesapeake Bay during seasonal stratification. Iron oxidizers were associated with low oxygen concentrations and active iron redox cycling in the oxic-anoxic transition zone (<3 μm O2 , <0.2 μm H2 S). While cyanobacteria were also detected in this transition zone, oxygen concentrations were too low to support significant rates of abiotic iron oxidation. Cyanobacteria may be providing oxygen for microaerophilic iron oxidation through a symbiotic relationship; at high Fe(II) levels, cyanobacteria would gain protection against Fe(II) toxicity. A Zetaproteobacteria isolate from this site oxidized iron at rates sufficient to account for deposition of geologic iron formations. In sum, our results suggest that once oxygenic photosynthesis evolved, microaerophilic chemolithotrophic iron oxidizers were likely important drivers of iron mineralization in ancient oceans. PMID:27384464

  7. Probiotic strain Lactobacillus plantarum 299v increases iron absorption from an iron-supplemented fruit drink: a double-isotope cross-over single-blind study in women of reproductive age.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Michael; Önning, Gunilla; Berggren, Anna; Hulthén, Lena

    2015-10-28

    Iron deficiency is common, especially among young women. Adding probiotics to foods could be one way to increase iron absorption. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that non-haem iron absorption from a fruit drink is improved by adding Lactobacillus plantarum 299v (Lp299v). Iron absorption was studied in healthy women of reproductive age using a single-blind cross-over design in two trials applying the double-isotope (55Fe and 59Fe) technique. In Trial 1, iron absorption from a fruit drink containing 109 colony-forming units (CFU) Lp299v was compared with that from a control drink without Lp299v. Trial 2 had the same design but 1010 CFU were used. The test and control drinks contained approximately 5 mg of iron as ferrous lactate and were labelled with 59Fe (B) and 55Fe (A), respectively, and consumed on 4 consecutive days in the order AABB. Retention of the isotopes was measured with whole-body counting and in blood. Mean iron absorption from the drink containing 109 CFU Lp299v (28·6(sd 12·5) %) was significantly higher than from the control drink (18·5(sd 5·8) %), n 10, P<0·028). The fruit drink with 1010 CFU Lp299v gave a mean iron absorption of 29·1(sd 17·0) %, whereas the control drink gave an absorption of (20·1(sd 6·4) %) (n 11, P<0·080). The difference in iron absorption between the 109 CFU Lp299v and the 1010 CFU Lp299v drinks was not significant (P=0·941). In conclusion, intake of probiotics can increase iron absorption by approximately 50 % from a fruit drink having an already relatively high iron bioavailability.

  8. Hydrogenosomal activity of Trichomonas vaginalis cultivated under different iron conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Seok; Song, Hyun-Ouk; Choi, Ik-Hwa; Park, Soon-Jung; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2006-12-01

    To evaluate whether iron concentration in TYM medium influence on hydrogenosomal enzyme gene expression and hydrogenosomal membrane potential of Trichomonas vaginalis, trophozoites were cultivated in irondepleted, normal and iron-supplemented TYM media. The mRNA of hydrogenosomal enzymes, such as pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), hydrogenase, ferredoxin and malic enzyme, was increased with iron concentrations in T. vaginalis culture media, measured by RT-PCR. Hydrogenosomal membrane potentials measured with DiOC6 also showed similar tendency, e.g. T. vaginalis cultivated in iron-depleted and iron-supplemented media for 3 days showed a significantly reduced and enhanced hydrogenosomal membrane potential compared with that of normal TYM media, respectively. Therefore, it is suggested that iron may regulate hydrogenosomal activity through hydrogenosomal enzyme expression and hydrogenosomal membrane potential. PMID:17170580

  9. Preconcentration and determination of iron and copper in spice samples by cloud point extraction and flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ciğdem Arpa; Tokgöz, Ilknur; Bektaş, Sema

    2010-09-15

    A flow injection (FI) cloud point extraction (CPE) method for the determination of iron and copper by flame atomic absorption spectrometer (FAAS) has been improved. The analytes were complexed with 3-amino-7-dimethylamino-2-methylphenazine (Neutral Red, NR) and octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-114)wasadded as a surfactant. The micellar solutionwasheated above 50 degrees C and loaded through a column packed with cotton for phase separation. Then the surfactant-rich phase was eluted using 0.05 mol L(-1) H2SO4 and the analytes were determined by FAAS. Chemical and flow variables influencing the instrumental and extraction conditions were optimized. Under optimized conditions for 25 mL of preconcentrated solution, the enrichment factors were 98 and 69, the limits of detection (3s) were 0.7 and 0.3 ng mL(-1), the limits of quantification (10s) were 2.2 and 1.0 ng mL(-1) for iron and copper, respectively. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for ten replicate measurements of 10 ng mL(-1) iron and copper were 2.1% and 1.8%, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to determination of iron and copper in spice samples.

  10. Hyperinsulinemia may boost both hematocrit and iron absorption by up-regulating activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    2003-01-01

    There is growing evidence that increases in both hematocrit and body iron stores are components of the insulin resistance syndrome. The ability of insulin and of IGF-I - whose effective activity is increased in the context of insulin resistance - to boost activity of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), may be at least partially responsible for this association. HIF-1alpha, which functions physiologically as a detector of both hypoxia and iron-deficiency, promotes synthesis of erythropoietin, and may also mediate the up-regulatory impact of hypoxia on intestinal iron absorption. Insulin/IGF-I may also influence erythropoiesis more directly, as they are growth factors for developing reticulocytes. Conversely, the activation of HIF-1alpha associated with iron deficiency may be responsible for the increased glucose tolerance noted in iron-deficient animals; HIF-1alpha promotes efficient glucose uptake and glycolysis - a sensible adaptation to hypoxia - by inducing increased synthesis of glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes. Recent reports that phlebotomy can increase the efficiency of muscle glucose uptake in lean healthy omnivores are intriguing and require further confirmation. Whether increased iron stores contribute to the elevated vascular risk associated with insulin resistance is doubtful, inasmuch as most prospective studies fail to correlate serum ferritin or transferrin saturation with subsequent vascular events. However, current data are reasonably consistent with the possibility that moderately elevated iron stores are associated with increased overall risk for cancer - and for colorectal cancer in particular; free iron may play a catalytic role in 'spontaneous' mutagenesis. Thus, iron excess may mediate at least some of the increased cancer risk associated with insulin resistance and heme-rich diets. People who are insulin resistant can minimize any health risk associated with iron overload by avoiding heme

  11. Optimized determination of iron in grape juice, wines, and other alcoholic beverages by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Olalla, M; Cruz González, M; Cabrera, C; López, M C

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a study of the different methods of sample preparation for the determination of iron in grape juice, wines, and other alcoholic beverages by atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization; results are also reported for the practical application of these methods to the analysis of commercial samples produced in Spain. The methods examined include dealcoholization and dry and wet mineralization treatment using different acids and/or mixtures of them, both with and without heating. The sensitivity, detection limit, accuracy, precision, and selectivity of each method were established. The best results were obtained for wet mineralization with heated acid (HNO3-H2SO4); the results for table wines had an accuracy of 97.5-101.6%, a relative standard deviation of 3.51%, a detection limit of 19.2 micrograms/L, and a determination limit of 32.0 micrograms/L. The method was also sufficiently sensitive and selective. It was applied to the determination of iron in grape juice, different types of wines, and beverages with high alcoholic content, all of which are produced and widely consumed in Spain. The values obtained ranged from 3.394 +/- 2.15 mg/L for the juice, 2.938 +/- 1.47 mg/L for the white wines, 19.470 +/- 5.43 mg/L for the sweet wines, 0.311 +/- 0.07 mg/L for the brandies, and 0.564 +/- 0.12 mg/L for the anisettes. Thus, the method is useful for routine analysis in the quality control of these beverages. PMID:10693020

  12. Morphology evolution, magnetic and microwave absorption properties of nano/submicrometre iron particles obtained at different reduced temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xi'an; Guan, Jianguo; Wang, Wei; Tong, Guoxiu

    2009-04-01

    Nano/submicrometre iron particles were prepared by a hydrogen reduction method in a fluidized bed furnace using α-FeOOH nanorods as precursors. The effect of the reducing temperature (T) on the microstructure, static magnetic properties, microwave electromagnetic parameters and microwave absorption properties of the resultant iron particles was investigated. When T increases from 450 to 650 °C, the as-obtained iron particles show an obvious morphology evolution from anisotropic nanorods to isotropic submicrometre polyhedra. As a result, the saturation magnetization, the complex permittivity and the real permeability all increase, while the coercivity and the imaginary permeability decrease due to the reducing surface effect and shape anisotropy. Nanocomposites containing 30 wt% iron nanorods obtained at 450 °C show a minimal reflection loss (RL) as low as -36.8 dB at 14.1 GHz and an absorption band with RL under -10 dB from 11.6 to 17.0 GHz when the thickness is 1.5 mm, suggesting that they are promising as a strong absorption, thin and lightweight microwave absorber.

  13. Lactic acid fermentation stimulated iron absorption by Caco-2 cells is associated with increased soluble iron content in carrot juice.

    PubMed

    Bergqvist, Sharon W; Andlid, Thomas; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie

    2006-10-01

    An in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model was applied to explore the impact of lactic acid (LA) fermentation by Lactobacillus pentosus FSC1 and Leuconostoc mesenteroides FSC2 on the Fe bioavailability of carrot juice. The redox state of Fe in fermented carrot juice was also assessed as a crucial factor for absorption. LA fermentation was shown to improve mineral solubility to different extents at simulated physiological conditions: Mn (2-fold); Fe (1.5-1.7-fold); Zn (1.2-fold); Cu (1-fold). Soluble Fe2+ was increased about 16-fold by LA fermentation, and about one third of the Fe2+ remained soluble after in vitro digestion (about 4-5-fold higher than in fresh juice). Data on cell-line studies showed a 4-fold increase in the efficiency of Fe uptake, but not in transepithelial transfer by Caco2 cells, as a result of fermentation. The increases in Fe2+ level and the efficiency of cellular Fe uptake were strain-dependent. To sum up the effect on both Fe solubility and cellular uptake efficiency, the amount of cellularly absorbed Fe from Ln. mesenteroides FSC2-fermented juice was about 20 % higher than that from L. pentosus FSC1-fermented juice (22.7 v. 19.2 microg/l juice per mg protein). To conclude, LA fermentation enhanced Fe absorption by Caco-2 cells from carrot juice because of increases in not only Fe solubility after digestion, but also the efficiency of cellular Fe uptake. The fermentation-improved efficiency of Fe uptake was possibly due to the increased level of soluble Fe2+ rather than a being a strain-specific event.

  14. Effect of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the transformation and immobilization of arsenic in soils: New insights from X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jian-Xin; Wang, Yu-Jun; Liu, Cun; Wang, Li-Hua; Yang, Ke; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L

    2014-08-30

    The geochemical behavior and speciation of arsenic (As) in paddy soils is strongly controlled by soil redox conditions and the sequestration by soil iron oxyhydroxides. Hence, the effects of iron oxide reductive dissolution on the adsorption, transformation and precipitation of As(III) and As(V) in soils were investigated using batch experiments and synchrotron based techniques to gain a deeper understanding at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. The results of batch sorption experiments revealed that the sorption capacity of As(V) on anoxic soil was much higher than that on control soil. Synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) mapping studies indicated that As was heterogeneously distributed and was mainly associated with iron in the soil. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses revealed that the primary speciation of As in the soil is As(V). These results further suggested that, when As(V) was introduced into the anoxic soil, the rapid coprecipitation of As(V) with ferric/ferrous ion prevented its reduction to As(III), and was the main mechanism controlling the immobilization of As. This research could improve the current understanding of soil As chemistry in paddy and wetland soils. PMID:25064258

  15. Simultaneous and direct determination of iron and nickel in biological solid samples by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Nieto, Beatriz; Gismera, Ma Jesús; Sevilla, Ma Teresa; Procopio, Jesús R

    2013-11-15

    The simultaneous and direct determination of nickel and iron in plants and lichens has been investigated using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The primary resonance line for nickel at 232.003 nm and the adjacent secondary line for iron at 232.036 nm have been used for this purpose. The optimization of the experimental conditions was performed using a pine needles certified reference material (SRM 1575a). The influence of pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, the amount of solid sample introduced into the graphite furnace and the use of aqueous or solid standard for calibration were studied. The spectral interferences caused by absorption of the concomitants of the solid sample were detected and corrected using a least square algorithm. Aliquots of 0.1-1mg of the solid samples were weighed onto the solid sampling platforms and analyzed directly, without addition of any reagents. The limits of detection were 25 µg kg(-1) for nickel and 0.40 mg kg(-1) for iron and the precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation, ranged from 7% to 12%. The proposed method was used to determine both metals in different bioindicator samples with successful results.

  16. Alternating magnetic field energy absorption in the dispersion of iron oxide nanoparticles in a viscous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolkova, Ilona S.; Kazantseva, Natalia E.; Babayan, Vladimir; Smolka, Petr; Parmar, Harshida; Vilcakova, Jarmila; Schneeweiss, Oldrich; Pizurova, Nadezda

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by a coprecipitation method in a controlled growth process leading to the formation of uniform highly crystalline nanoparticles with average size of 13 nm, which corresponds to the superparamagnetic state. Nanoparticles obtained are a mixture of single-phase nanoparticles of magnetite and maghemite as well as nanoparticles of non-stoichiometric magnetite. The subsequent annealing of nanoparticles at 300 °C in air during 6 h leads to the full transformation to maghemite. It results in reduced value of the saturation magnetization (from 56 emu g-1 to 48 emu g-1) but does not affect the heating ability of nanoparticles. A 2-7 wt% dispersion of as-prepared and annealed nanoparticles in glycerol provides high heating rate in alternating magnetic fields allowed for application in magnetic hyperthermia; however the value of specific loss power does not exceed 30 W g-1. This feature of heat output is explained by the combined effect of magnetic interparticle interactions and the properties of the carrier medium. Nanoparticles coalesce during the synthesis and form aggregates showing ferromagnetic-like behavior with magnetization hysteresis, distinct sextets on Mössbauer spectrum, blocking temperature well about room temperature, which accounts for the higher energy barrier for magnetization reversal. At the same time, low specific heat capacity of glycerol intensifies heat transfer in the magnetic dispersion. However, high viscosity of glycerol limits the specific loss power value, since predominantly the Neel relaxation accounts for the absorption of AC magnetic field energy.

  17. Pork meat increases iron absorption from a 5-day fully controlled diet when compared to a vegetarian diet with similar vitamin C and phytic acid content.

    PubMed

    Bach Kristensen, Mette; Hels, Ole; Morberg, Catrine; Marving, Jens; Bügel, Susanne; Tetens, Inge

    2005-07-01

    Meat increases absorption of non-haem iron in single-meal studies. The aim of the present study was to investigate, over a 5 d period, the potential increasing effect of consumption of pork meat in a whole diet on the fractional absorption of non-haem iron and the total absorption of iron, when compared to a vegetarian diet. A randomised cross-over design with 3 x 5 d whole-diet periods with diets containing Danish-produced meat, Polish-produced meat or a vegetarian diet was conducted. Nineteen healthy female subjects completed the study. All main meals in the meat diets contained 60 g of pork meat and all diets had high phytic acid content (1250 mumol/d). All main meals were extrinsically labelled with the radioactive isotope (59)Fe and absorption of iron was measured in a whole body counter. The non-haem iron absorption from the Danish meat diet was significantly higher compared to the vegetarian diet (P=0.031). The mean fractional absorption of non-haem iron was 7.9 (se1.1), 6.8 (se 1.0) and 5.3 (se 0.6) % for the Danish and Polish meat diets and vegetarian diet, respectively. Total absorption of iron was higher for both meat diets compared to the vegetarian diet (Danish meat diet: P=0.006, Polish meat diet: P=0.003). The absorption ratios of the present study were well in accordance with absorption ratios estimated using algorithms on iron bioavailability. Neither the meat diets nor the vegetarian diets fulfilled the estimated daily requirements of absorbed iron in spite of a meat intake of 180 g/d in the meat diets.

  18. The influences of iron characteristics, operating conditions and solution chemistry on contaminants removal by zero-valent iron: A review.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuankui; Li, Jinxiang; Huang, Tinglin; Guan, Xiaohong

    2016-09-01

    For successful application of a zero-valent iron (ZVI) system, of particular interest is the performance of ZVI under various conditions. The current review comprehensively summarizes the potential effects of the major influencing factors, such as iron intrinsic characteristics (e.g., surface area, iron impurities and oxide films), operating conditions (e.g., pH, dissolved oxygen, iron dosage, iron pretreatment, mixing conditions and temperature) and solution chemistry (e.g., anions, cations and natural organic matter) on the performance of ZVI reported in literature. It was demonstrated that all of the factors could exert significant effects on the ZVI performance toward contaminants removal, negatively or positively. Depending on the removal mechanisms of the respective contaminants and other environmental conditions, an individual variable may exhibit different effects. On the other hand, many of these influences have not been well understood or cannot be individually isolated in experimental or natural systems. Thus, more research is required in order to elucidate the exact roles and mechanisms of each factor in affecting the performance of ZVI. Furthermore, based on these understandings, future research may attempt to establish some feasible strategies to minimize the deteriorating effects and utilize the positive effects so as to improve the performance of ZVI. PMID:27206056

  19. Morphology of biogenic iron oxides records microbial physiology and environmental conditions: toward interpreting iron microfossils.

    PubMed

    Krepski, S T; Emerson, D; Hredzak-Showalter, P L; Luther, G W; Chan, C S

    2013-09-01

    Despite the abundance of Fe and its significance in Earth history, there are no established robust biosignatures for Fe(II)-oxidizing micro-organisms. This limits our ability to piece together the history of Fe biogeochemical cycling and, in particular, to determine whether Fe(II)-oxidizers played a role in depositing ancient iron formations. A promising candidate for Fe(II)-oxidizer biosignatures is the distinctive morphology and texture of extracellular Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide stalks produced by mat-forming microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing micro-organisms. To establish the stalk morphology as a biosignature, morphologic parameters must be quantified and linked to the microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing metabolism and environmental conditions. Toward this end, we studied an extant model organism, the marine stalk-forming Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1. We grew cultures in flat glass microslide chambers, with FeS substrate, creating opposing oxygen/Fe(II) concentration gradients. We used solid-state voltammetric microelectrodes to measure chemical gradients in situ while using light microscopy to image microbial growth, motility, and mineral formation. In low-oxygen (2.7-28 μm) zones of redox gradients, the bacteria converge into a narrow (100 μm-1 mm) growth band. As cells oxidize Fe(II), they deposit Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide stalks in this band; the stalks orient directionally, elongating toward higher oxygen concentrations. M. ferrooxydans stalks display a narrow range of widths and uniquely biogenic branching patterns, which result from cell division. Together with filament composition, these features (width, branching, and directional orientation) form a physical record unique to microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizer physiology; therefore, stalk morphology is a biosignature, as well as an indicator of local oxygen concentration at the time of formation. Observations of filamentous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide microfossils from a ~170 Ma marine Fe

  20. Morphology of biogenic iron oxides records microbial physiology and environmental conditions: toward interpreting iron microfossils.

    PubMed

    Krepski, S T; Emerson, D; Hredzak-Showalter, P L; Luther, G W; Chan, C S

    2013-09-01

    Despite the abundance of Fe and its significance in Earth history, there are no established robust biosignatures for Fe(II)-oxidizing micro-organisms. This limits our ability to piece together the history of Fe biogeochemical cycling and, in particular, to determine whether Fe(II)-oxidizers played a role in depositing ancient iron formations. A promising candidate for Fe(II)-oxidizer biosignatures is the distinctive morphology and texture of extracellular Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide stalks produced by mat-forming microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing micro-organisms. To establish the stalk morphology as a biosignature, morphologic parameters must be quantified and linked to the microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing metabolism and environmental conditions. Toward this end, we studied an extant model organism, the marine stalk-forming Fe(II)-oxidizing bacterium, Mariprofundus ferrooxydans PV-1. We grew cultures in flat glass microslide chambers, with FeS substrate, creating opposing oxygen/Fe(II) concentration gradients. We used solid-state voltammetric microelectrodes to measure chemical gradients in situ while using light microscopy to image microbial growth, motility, and mineral formation. In low-oxygen (2.7-28 μm) zones of redox gradients, the bacteria converge into a narrow (100 μm-1 mm) growth band. As cells oxidize Fe(II), they deposit Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide stalks in this band; the stalks orient directionally, elongating toward higher oxygen concentrations. M. ferrooxydans stalks display a narrow range of widths and uniquely biogenic branching patterns, which result from cell division. Together with filament composition, these features (width, branching, and directional orientation) form a physical record unique to microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizer physiology; therefore, stalk morphology is a biosignature, as well as an indicator of local oxygen concentration at the time of formation. Observations of filamentous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide microfossils from a ~170 Ma marine Fe

  1. Measurements of Electrical and Thermal Conductivity of Iron Under Earth's Core Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, K.; Kuwayama, Y.; Shimizu, K.; Yagi, T.; Hirose, K.; Ohishi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Secular cooling of the Earth's core induces the convection of the conductive liquid outer core, which generates the geomagnetic field, and the growth of the solid inner core. Since iron is the primary component of the Earth's core, the electrical and thermal conductivity of iron in both solid and liquid states are key pieces of information for estimating the transport properties of the core. We performed electrical and thermal conductivity measurements on iron under core conditions in a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Our electrical conductivity measurements on iron clearly show resistivity saturation phenomena in iron under high pressure and high temperature conditions as predicted in a recent laboratory-based model for the core conductivity (Gomi et al., 2013). Direct measurements of thermal diffusivity of iron have been also preformed at high pressures by using the pulsed light heating thermoreflectance technique, which enable us to confirm the validity of the Wiedemann-Franz law toward transition metal under high pressure.

  2. Simultaneous determination of cadmium, iron and tin in canned foods using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leao, Danilo J; Junior, Mario M S; Brandao, Geovani C; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2016-06-01

    A method was established to simultaneously determine cadmium, iron and tin in canned-food samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS). The quantification step has been performed using the primary line (228.802nm) for cadmium and the adjacent secondary lines (228.725nm and 228.668nm) for iron and tin, respectively. The selected chemical modifier was an acid solution that contained a mixture of 0.1% (w/v) Pd and 0.05% (w/v) Mg. The absorbance signals were measured based on the peak area using 3 pixels for cadmium and 5 pixels for iron and tin. Under these conditions, cadmium, iron and tin have been determined in canned-food samples using the external calibration technique based on aqueous standards, where the limits of quantification were 2.10ngg(-1) for cadmium, 1.95mgkg(-1) for iron and 3.00mgkg(-1) for tin, and the characteristic masses were 1.0pg for cadmium, 0.9ng for iron and 1.1ng for tin. The precision was evaluated using two solutions of each metal ion, and the results, which were expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD%), were 3.4-6.8%. The method accuracy for cadmium and iron was confirmed by analyzing a certified reference material of apple leaves (NIST 1515), which was supplied by NIST. However, for tin, the accuracy was confirmed by comparing the results of the proposed method and another analytical technique (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry). The proposed procedure was applied to determine cadmium, iron and tin in canned samples of peeled tomato and sardine. Eleven samples were analyzed, and the analyte concentrations were 3.57-62.9ngg(-1), 2.68-31.48mgkg(-1) and 4.06-122.0mgkg(-1) for cadmium, iron and tin, respectively. In all analyzed samples, the cadmium and tin contents were lower than the permissible maximum levels for these metals in canned foods in the Brazilian legislation.

  3. Simultaneous determination of cadmium, iron and tin in canned foods using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Leao, Danilo J; Junior, Mario M S; Brandao, Geovani C; Ferreira, Sergio L C

    2016-06-01

    A method was established to simultaneously determine cadmium, iron and tin in canned-food samples using high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS). The quantification step has been performed using the primary line (228.802nm) for cadmium and the adjacent secondary lines (228.725nm and 228.668nm) for iron and tin, respectively. The selected chemical modifier was an acid solution that contained a mixture of 0.1% (w/v) Pd and 0.05% (w/v) Mg. The absorbance signals were measured based on the peak area using 3 pixels for cadmium and 5 pixels for iron and tin. Under these conditions, cadmium, iron and tin have been determined in canned-food samples using the external calibration technique based on aqueous standards, where the limits of quantification were 2.10ngg(-1) for cadmium, 1.95mgkg(-1) for iron and 3.00mgkg(-1) for tin, and the characteristic masses were 1.0pg for cadmium, 0.9ng for iron and 1.1ng for tin. The precision was evaluated using two solutions of each metal ion, and the results, which were expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD%), were 3.4-6.8%. The method accuracy for cadmium and iron was confirmed by analyzing a certified reference material of apple leaves (NIST 1515), which was supplied by NIST. However, for tin, the accuracy was confirmed by comparing the results of the proposed method and another analytical technique (inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry). The proposed procedure was applied to determine cadmium, iron and tin in canned samples of peeled tomato and sardine. Eleven samples were analyzed, and the analyte concentrations were 3.57-62.9ngg(-1), 2.68-31.48mgkg(-1) and 4.06-122.0mgkg(-1) for cadmium, iron and tin, respectively. In all analyzed samples, the cadmium and tin contents were lower than the permissible maximum levels for these metals in canned foods in the Brazilian legislation. PMID:27130088

  4. The IRP1-HIF-2α axis coordinates iron and oxygen sensing with erythropoiesis and iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sheila A; Nizzi, Christopher P; Chang, Yuan-I; Deck, Kathryn M; Schmidt, Paul J; Galy, Bruno; Damnernsawad, Alisa; Broman, Aimee T; Kendziorski, Christina; Hentze, Matthias W; Fleming, Mark D; Zhang, Jing; Eisenstein, Richard S

    2013-02-01

    Red blood cell production is a finely tuned process that requires coordinated oxygen- and iron-dependent regulation of cell differentiation and iron metabolism. Here, we show that translational regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α) synthesis by iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) is critical for controlling erythrocyte number. IRP1-null (Irp1(-/-)) mice display a marked transient polycythemia. HIF-2α messenger RNA (mRNA) is derepressed in kidneys of Irp1(-/-) mice but not in kidneys of Irp2(-/-) mice, leading to increased renal erythropoietin (Epo) mRNA and inappropriately elevated serum Epo levels. Expression of the iron transport genes DCytb, Dmt1, and ferroportin, as well as other HIF-2α targets, is enhanced in Irp1(-/-) duodenum. Analysis of mRNA translation state in the liver revealed IRP1-dependent dysregulation of HIF-2α mRNA translation, whereas IRP2 deficiency derepressed translation of all other known 5' iron response element (IRE)-containing mRNAs expressed in the liver. These results uncover separable physiological roles of each IRP and identify IRP1 as a therapeutic target for manipulating HIF-2α action in hematologic, oncologic, and other disorders. PMID:23395174

  5. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    ... cereals and breads. White beans, lentils, spinach, kidney beans, and peas. Nuts and some dried fruits, such as raisins. Iron in food comes in two forms: heme iron and nonheme iron. Nonheme iron is found in plant foods and iron-fortified food products. Meat, seafood, ...

  6. Biological iron oxidation by Gallionella spp. in drinking water production under fully aerated conditions.

    PubMed

    de Vet, W W J M; Dinkla, I J T; Rietveld, L C; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2011-11-01

    Iron oxidation under neutral conditions (pH 6.5-8) may be a homo- or heterogeneous chemically- or a biologically-mediated process. The chemical oxidation is supposed to outpace the biological process under slightly alkaline conditions (pH 7-8). The iron oxidation kinetics and growth of Gallionella spp. - obligatory chemolithotrophic iron oxidizers - were assessed in natural, organic carbon-containing water, in continuous lab-scale reactors and full-scale groundwater trickling filters in the Netherlands. From Gallionella cell numbers determined by qPCR, balances were made for all systems. The homogeneous chemical iron oxidation occurred in accordance with the literature, but was retarded by a low water temperature (13 °C). The contribution of the heterogeneous chemical oxidation was, despite the presence of freshly formed iron oxyhydroxides, much lower than in previous studies in ultrapure water. This could be caused by the adsorption of natural organic matter (NOM) on the iron oxide surfaces. In the oxygen-saturated natural water with a pH ranging from 6.5 to 7.7, Gallionella spp. grew uninhibited and biological iron oxidation was an important, and probably the dominant, process. Gallionella growth was not even inhibited in a full-scale filter after plate aeration. From this we conclude that Gallionella spp. can grow under neutral pH and fully aerated conditions when the chemical iron oxidation is retarded by low water temperature and inhibition of the autocatalytic iron oxidation.

  7. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in women.

    PubMed

    Coad, Jane; Pedley, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional problems in the world and disproportionately affects women and children. Stages of iron deficiency can be characterized as mild deficiency where iron stores become depleted, marginal deficiency where the production of many iron-dependent proteins is compromised but hemoglobin levels are normal and iron deficiency anemia where synthesis of hemoglobin is decreased and oxygen transport to the tissues is reduced. Iron deficiency anemia is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin levels but this approach lacks both specificity and sensitivity. Failure to identify and treat earlier stages of iron deficiency is concerning given the neurocognitive implications of iron deficiency without anemia. Most of the daily iron requirement is derived from recycling of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages; only 5-10 % comes from the diet. Iron absorption is affected by inhibitors and enhancers of iron absorption and by the physiological state. Inflammatory conditions, including obesity, can result in iron being retained in the enterocytes and macrophages causing hypoferremia as a strategic defense mechanism to restrict iron availability to pathogens. Premenopausal women usually have low iron status because of iron loss in menstrual blood. Conditions which further increase iron loss, compromise absorption or increase demand, such as frequent blood donation, gastrointestinal lesions, athletic activity and pregnancy, can exceed the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to upregulate iron absorption. Women of reproductive age are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency and its consequences however there is a controversial argument that evolutionary pressures have resulted in an iron deficient phenotype which protects against infection.

  8. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  9. Intestinal absorption of dietary cadmium in women depends on body iron stores and fiber intake.

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, M; Akesson, A; Nermell, B; Vahter, M

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of intake and uptake of cadmium in relation to diet composition were carried out in 57 nonsmoking women, 20-50 years of age. A vegetarian/high-fiber diet and a mixed-diet group were constructed based on results from a food frequency questionnaire. Duplicate diets and the corresponding feces were collected during 4 consecutive days in parallel with dietary recording of type and amount of food ingested for determination of the dietary intake of cadmium and various nutrients. Blood and 24-hr urine samples were collected for determination of cadmium, hemoglobin, ferritin, and zinc. There were no differences in the intake of nutrients between the mixed-diet and the high-fiber diet groups, except for a significantly higher intake of fiber (p < 0.001) and cadmium (p < 0.002) in the high-fiber group. Fecal cadmium corresponded to 98% in the mixed-diet group and 100% in the high-fiber diet group. No differences in blood cadmium (BCd) or urinary cadmium (UCd) between groups could be detected. There was a tendency toward higher BCd and UCd concentrations with increasing fiber intake; however, the concentrations were not statistically significant at the 5% level, indicating an inhibitory effect of fiber on the gastrointestinal absorption of cadmium. Sixty-seven percent of the women had serum ferritin < 30 micrograms/l, indicating reduced body iron stores, which were highly associated with higher BCd (irrespective of fiber intake). BCd was mainly correlated with UCd, serum ferritin, age, anf fibre intake. UCd and serum ferritin explained almost 60% of the variation in BCd.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:7713018

  10. Quantifying intra- and extracellular aggregation of iron oxide nanoparticles and its influence on specific absorption rate.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seongho; Hurley, Katie R; Bischof, John C; Haynes, Christy L; Hogan, Christopher J

    2016-09-21

    A promising route to cancer treatment is hyperthermia, facilitated by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). After exposure to an alternating external magnetic field, SPIONs generate heat, quantified by their specific absorption rate (SAR, in W g(-1) Fe). However, without surface functionalization, commercially available, high SAR SPIONs (EMG 308, Ferrotec, USA) aggregate in aqueous suspensions; this has been shown to reduce SAR. Further reduction in SAR has been observed for SPIONs in suspensions containing cells, but the origin of this further reduction has not been made clear. Here, we use image analysis methods to quantify the structures of SPION aggregates in the extra- and intracellular milieu of LNCaP cell suspensions. We couple image characterization with nanoparticle tracking analysis and SAR measurements of SPION aggregates in cell-free suspensions, to better quantify the influence of cellular uptake on SPION aggregates and ultimately its influence on SAR. We find that in both the intra- and extracellular milieu, SPION aggregates are well-described by a quasifractal model, with most aggregates having fractal dimensions in the 1.6-2.2 range. Intracellular aggregates are found to be significantly larger than extracellular aggregates and are commonly composed of more than 10(3) primary SPION particles (hence they are "superaggregates"). By using high salt concentrations to generate such superaggregates and measuring the SAR of suspensions, we confirm that it is the formation of superaggregates in the intracellular milieu that negatively impacts SAR, reducing it from above 200 W g(-1) Fe for aggregates composed of fewer than 50 primary particles to below 50 W g(-1) for superaggregates. While the underlying physical mechanism by which aggregation leads to reduction in SAR remains to be determined, the methods developed in this study provide insight into how cellular uptake influences the extent of SPION aggregation, and enable estimation of the

  11. Absorption and impedance boundary conditions for phased geometrical-acoustics methods.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2012-10-01

    Defining accurate acoustical boundary conditions is of crucial importance for room acoustic simulations. In predicting sound fields using phased geometrical acoustics methods, both absorption coefficients and surface impedances of the boundary surfaces can be used, but no guideline has been developed on which boundary condition produces accurate results. In this study, various boundary conditions in terms of normal, random, and field incidence absorption coefficients and normal incidence surface impedance are used in a phased beam tracing model, and the simulated results are validated with boundary element solutions. Two rectangular rooms with uniform and non-uniform absorption distributions are tested. Effects of the neglect of reflection phase shift are also investigated. It is concluded that the impedance, random incidence, and field incidence absorption boundary conditions produce reasonable results with some exceptions at low frequencies for acoustically soft materials.

  12. [THE DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTIC POSSIBILITIES IN EVALUATION OF IRON-DEFICIENT CONDITION UNDER ANEMIAS].

    PubMed

    Zubrikhina, G N; Blindar, V N; Matveeva, I I

    2016-03-01

    The article presents data concerning differential diagnostic possibilities of evaluation of genuine iron-deficient anemia and anemia of chronic diseases. The variety of mechanisms of development of anemia of chronic diseases is demonstrated, including effect of humoral inhibitors of erythropoiesis, disorder of iron metabolism at the expense of its redistribution into cells of macrophage system, suppression of erythropoiesis resulted in redistributed or functional iron deficiency. The data is presented concerning significance in diagnostic of anemia of chronic diseases of such factors as content of ferritin, dissolving receptors of transferrin and role of hepcidin protein in pathogenesis of anemia of chronic diseases. The analysis of scientific publications demonstrated that hepcidin is a negative regulator of iron metabolism. Under iron-deficient anemia its level in blood decreases that contribute to extensive absorption of iron in gastrointestinal tract. On the contrary, under anemia of chronic diseases its content drastically increases and results in blocking of iron transport everywhere, including internal epithelium, macrophages, placenta and other types of cells. The hyper-production of hepcidin during infection and inflammation is responsible for anemia of chronic diseases. The perspectives of development of pharmaceuticals decreasing level of hepcidin for treatment of anemia of chronic diseases is demonstrated.

  13. Iron-binding compounds impair Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, especially under anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    O'May, Che Y; Sanderson, Kevin; Roddam, Louise F; Kirov, Sylvia M; Reid, David W

    2009-06-01

    The success of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis (CF) and other chronic infections is largely attributed to its ability to grow in antibiotic-resistant biofilm communities. This study investigated the effects of limiting iron levels as a strategy for preventing/disrupting P. aeruginosa biofilms. A range of synthetic and naturally occurring iron-chelating agents were examined. Biofilm development by P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 and CF sputum isolates from chronically infected individuals was significantly decreased by iron removal under aerobic atmospheres. CF strains formed poor biofilms under anaerobic conditions. Strain PAO1 was also tested under anaerobic conditions. Biofilm formation by this model strain was almost totally prevented by several of the chelators tested. The ability of synthetic chelators to impair biofilm formation could be reversed by iron addition to cultures, providing evidence that these effective chelating compounds functioned by directly reducing availability of iron to P. aeruginosa. In contrast, the biological chelator lactoferrin demonstrated enhanced anti-biofilm effects as iron supplementation increased. Hence biofilm inhibition by lactoferrin appeared to occur through more complex mechanisms to those of the synthetic chelators. Overall, our results demonstrate the importance of iron availability to biofilms and that iron chelators have potential as adjunct therapies for preventing biofilm development, especially under low oxygen conditions such as encountered in the chronically infected CF lung. PMID:19429753

  14. Structural differences of oxidized iron-sulfur and nickel-iron cofactors in O2-tolerant and O2-sensitive hydrogenases studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sigfridsson, Kajsa G V; Leidel, Nils; Sanganas, Oliver; Chernev, Petko; Lenz, Oliver; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Nishihara, Hirofumi; Parkin, Alison; Armstrong, Fraser A; Dementin, Sébastien; Rousset, Marc; De Lacey, Antonio L; Haumann, Michael

    2015-02-01

    The class of [NiFe]-hydrogenases comprises oxygen-sensitive periplasmic (PH) and oxygen-tolerant membrane-bound (MBH) enzymes. For three PHs and four MBHs from six bacterial species, structural features of the nickel-iron active site of hydrogen turnover and of the iron-sulfur clusters functioning in electron transfer were determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Fe-XAS indicated surplus oxidized iron and a lower number of ~2.7 Å Fe-Fe distances plus additional shorter and longer distances in the oxidized MBHs compared to the oxidized PHs. This supported a double-oxidized and modified proximal FeS cluster in all MBHs with an apparent trimer-plus-monomer arrangement of its four iron atoms, in agreement with crystal data showing a [4Fe3S] cluster instead of a [4Fe4S] cubane as in the PHs. Ni-XAS indicated coordination of the nickel by the thiol group sulfurs of four conserved cysteines and at least one iron-oxygen bond in both MBH and PH proteins. Structural differences of the oxidized inactive [NiFe] cofactor of MBHs in the Ni-B state compared to PHs in the Ni-A state included a ~0.05 Å longer Ni-O bond, a two times larger spread of the Ni-S bond lengths, and a ~0.1 Å shorter Ni-Fe distance. The modified proximal [4Fe3S] cluster, weaker binding of the Ni-Fe bridging oxygen species, and an altered localization of reduced oxygen species at the active site may each contribute to O2 tolerance.

  15. MYB10 and MYB72 are required for growth under iron-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christine M; Hindt, Maria N; Schmidt, Holger; Clemens, Stephan; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2013-11-01

    Iron is essential for photosynthesis and is often a limiting nutrient for plant productivity. Plants respond to conditions of iron deficiency by increasing transcript abundance of key genes involved in iron homeostasis, but only a few regulators of these genes have been identified. Using genome-wide expression analysis, we searched for transcription factors that are induced within 24 hours after transferring plants to iron-deficient growth conditions. Out of nearly 100 transcription factors shown to be up-regulated, we identified MYB10 and MYB72 as the most highly induced transcription factors. Here, we show that MYB10 and MYB72 are functionally redundant and are required for plant survival in alkaline soil where iron availability is greatly restricted. myb10myb72 double mutants fail to induce transcript accumulation of the nicotianamine synthase gene NAS4. Both myb10myb72 mutants and nas4-1 mutants have reduced iron concentrations, chlorophyll levels, and shoot mass under iron-limiting conditions, indicating that these genes are essential for proper plant growth. The double myb10myb72 mutant also showed nickel and zinc sensitivity, similar to the nas4 mutant. Ectopic expression of NAS4 rescues myb10myb72 plants, suggesting that loss of NAS4 is the primary defect in these plants and emphasizes the importance of nicotianamine, an iron chelator, in iron homeostasis. Overall, our results provide evidence that MYB10 and MYB72 act early in the iron-deficiency regulatory cascade to drive gene expression of NAS4 and are essential for plant survival under iron deficiency. PMID:24278034

  16. Improvement of iron nutrition in developing countries: comparison of adding meat, soy protein, ascorbic acid, citric acid, and ferrous sulphate on iron absorption from a simple Latin American-type of meal.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, L; Rossander, L

    1984-04-01

    A study in 49 subjects compared different methods for increasing the absorption of iron from a simple Latin American-type meal composed of maize, rice, and black beans. The addition of meat (75 g) increased the nonheme iron absorption from 0.17 to 0.45 mg; soy protein in an amount corresponding to the protein content of the meat increased the absorption to 0.51 mg (due to the high iron content of soy flour); cauliflower as a source of ascorbic acid (65 mg) increased the absorption to 0.58 mg, pure ascorbic acid (50 mg) to 0.41 mg, and ferrous sulphate mixed into the meal in an amount (6 mg) corresponding to the iron content of the soy flour increased the absorption to 0.64 mg. The addition of citric acid (1 g) reduced the absorption to 0.06 mg (to about one-third). We conclude that several methods are available for increasing iron absorption from a Latin American meal and that the choice of method depends on several factors, particularly cost.

  17. Absorption band III kinetics probe the picosecond heme iron motion triggered by nitric oxide binding to hemoglobin and myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Kruglik, Sergei G; Lamarre, Isabelle; Martin, Jean-Louis; Negrerie, Michel

    2012-04-01

    To study the ultrafast movement of the heme iron induced by nitric oxide (NO) binding to hemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin (Mb), we probed the picosecond spectral evolution of absorption band III (∼760 nm) and vibrational modes (iron-histidine stretching, ν(4) and ν(7) in-plane modes) in time-resolved resonance Raman spectra. The time constants of band III intensity kinetics induced by NO rebinding (25 ps for hemoglobin and 40 ps for myoglobin) are larger than in Soret bands and Q-bands. Band III intensity kinetics is retarded with respect to NO rebinding to Hb and to Mb. Similarly, the ν((Fe-His)) stretching intensity kinetics are retarded with respect to the ν(4) and ν(7) heme modes and to Soret absorption. In contrast, band III spectral shift kinetics do not coincide with band III intensity kinetics but follows Soret kinetics. We concluded that, namely, the band III intensity depends on the heme iron out-of-plane position, as theoretically predicted ( Stavrov , S. S. Biopolymers 2004 , 74 , 37 - 40 ).

  18. Preparation and characterization of novel glass-ceramic tile with microwave absorption properties from iron ore tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Rui; Liao, SongYi; Dai, ChangLu; Liu, YuChen; Chen, XiaoYu; Zheng, Feng

    2015-03-01

    A novel glass-ceramic tile consisting of one glass-ceramic layer (GC) attaining microwave absorption properties atop ceramic substrate was prepared through quench-heat treatment route derived from iron ore tailings (IOTs) and commercial raw materials (purity range 73-99%). X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM, Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Physical property measurement system (PPMS) and Vector network analyzer (VNA) measurements were carried out to investigate phase, microstructure, magnetic and microwave absorption aspects of the glass-ceramic layer. Roughly 80.6±1.7 wt% borosilicate glass and 19.4±1.7 wt% spinel ferrite with chemical formula of (Zn2+0.17Fe3+0.83)[Fe3+1.17Fe2+0.06Ni2+0.77]O4 were found among the tested samples. Absorption of Electromagnetic wave by 3 mm thick glass-ceramic layer at frequency of 2-18 GHz reached peak reflection loss (RL) of -17.61 dB (98.27% microwave absorption) at 10.31 GHz. Altering the thickness of the glass-ceramic layer can meet the requirements of different level of microwave absorption.

  19. Decoupling of arsenic and iron release from ferrihydrite suspension under reducing conditions: a biogeochemical model

    PubMed Central

    Burnol, André; Garrido, Francis; Baranger, Philippe; Joulian, Catherine; Dictor, Marie-Christine; Bodénan, Françoise; Morin, Guillaume; Charlet, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    High levels of arsenic in groundwater and drinking water are a major health problem. Although the processes controlling the release of As are still not well known, the reductive dissolution of As-rich Fe oxyhydroxides has so far been a favorite hypothesis. Decoupling between arsenic and iron redox transformations has been experimentally demonstrated, but not quantitatively interpreted. Here, we report on incubation batch experiments run with As(V) sorbed on, or co-precipitated with, 2-line ferrihydrite. The biotic and abiotic processes of As release were investigated by using wet chemistry, X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption and genomic techniques. The incubation experiments were carried out with a phosphate-rich growth medium and a community of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria under strict anoxic conditions for two months. During the first month, the release of Fe(II) in the aqueous phase amounted to only 3% to 10% of the total initial solid Fe concentration, whilst the total aqueous As remained almost constant after an initial exchange with phosphate ions. During the second month, the aqueous Fe(II) concentration remained constant, or even decreased, whereas the total quantity of As released to the solution accounted for 14% to 45% of the total initial solid As concentration. At the end of the incubation, the aqueous-phase arsenic was present predominately as As(III) whilst X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicated that more than 70% of the solid-phase arsenic was present as As(V). X-ray diffraction revealed vivianite Fe(II)3(PO4)2.8H2O in some of the experiments. A biogeochemical model was then developed to simulate these aqueous- and solid-phase results. The two main conclusions drawn from the model are that (1) As(V) is not reduced during the first incubation month with high Eh values, but rather re-adsorbed onto the ferrihydrite surface, and this state remains until arsenic reduction is energetically more favorable than iron reduction, and (2) the release of As

  20. The chemical environment of iron in mineral fibres. A combined X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Pollastri, Simone; D'Acapito, Francesco; Trapananti, Angela; Colantoni, Ivan; Andreozzi, Giovanni B; Gualtieri, Alessandro F

    2015-11-15

    Although asbestos represents today one of the most harmful contaminant on Earth, in 72% of the countries worldwide only amphiboles are banned while controlled use of chrysotile is allowed. Uncertainty on the potential toxicity of chrysotile is due to the fact that the mechanisms by which mineral fibres induces cyto- and geno-toxic damage are still unclear. We have recently started a long term project aimed at the systematic investigation of the crystal-chemistry, bio-interaction and toxicity of the mineral fibres. This work presents a systematic structural investigation of iron in asbestos and erionite (considered the most relevant mineral fibres of social and/or economic-industrial importance) using synchrotron X-ray absorption and Mössbauer spectroscopy. In all investigated mineral fibres, iron in the bulk structure is found in octahedral sites and can be made available at the surface via fibre dissolution. We postulate that the amount of hydroxyl radicals released by the fibers depends, among other factors, upon their dissolution rate; in relation to this, a ranking of ability of asbestos fibres to generate hydroxyl radicals, resulting from available surface iron, is advanced: amosite > crocidolite ≈ chrysotile > anthophyllite > tremolite. Erionite, with a fairly high toxicity potential, contains only octahedrally coordinated Fe(3+). Although it needs further experimental evidence, such available surface iron may be present as oxide nanoparticles coating and can be a direct cause of generation of hydroxyl radicals when such coating dissolves.

  1. Investigation of the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii under iron limiting conditions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Iron acquisition systems are important virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. To identify these systems in Acinetobacter baumannii, the transcriptomic response of the completely sequenced strain ATCC 17978 under iron limiting conditions was investigated using a genomic microarray that contained probes for all annotated open reading frames. Results Under low iron conditions, transcription levels were more than 2-fold up-regulated for 463 genes, including 95 genes that were up-regulated more than 4-fold. Of particular significance, three siderophore biosynthesis gene clusters, including one novel cluster, were highly up-regulated. Binding sites for the ferric uptake regulator were identified in the promoter regions of many up-regulated genes, suggesting a prominent role for this regulator in the Acinetobacter iron acquisition response. Down-regulation under iron limitation was less dramatic as the transcription of only 202 genes varied more than 2-fold. Various genes involved in motility featured prominently amongst the genes down-regulated when iron was less readily available. Motility assays confirmed that these transcriptional changes are manifested at the phenotypic level. The siderophore biosynthesis gene clusters were further investigated by means of comparative genomic analysis of 10 sequenced Acinetobacter isolates. These analyses revealed important roles for mobile genetic elements in shaping the siderophore meditated iron acquisition mechanisms between different Acinetobacter strains. Conclusions A. baumannii grown under iron limited conditions resulted in major transcriptional changes of not only many iron acquisition related genes, but also genes involved in other processes such as motility. Overall, this study showed that A. baumannii is well adaptable to growth in an environment which has limiting iron availability. PMID:21342532

  2. Iron absorption from bread in humans: inhibiting effects of cereal fiber, phytate and inositol phosphates with different numbers of phosphate groups.

    PubMed

    Brune, M; Rossander-Hultén, L; Hallberg, L; Gleerup, A; Sandberg, A S

    1992-03-01

    Iron absorption was measured from five kinds of bread made from various types of flour and fermented in different ways in order to obtain a wide variation in the content of fiber, phytate (inositol hexaphosphate) and its degradation products, inorganic phosphate and inositol phosphates with fewer numbers of phosphate groups (inositol pentaphosphate through monophosphate). Each experiment had 9-10 subjects and, in each subject, iron absorption was measured from control rolls made from low extraction wheat flour and one kind of test roll using two different radioiron tracers: 55Fe and 59Fe. The inhibition of iron absorption was closely related to the content of phytate-phosphorous as determined using the AOAC method, and to the sum of the tri- through hexaphosphate groups as determined using the HPLC method. As an example, prolonged fermentation of whole-rye bread reduced total inositol phosphates to the same amount as in the control rolls and increased fractional iron absorption to the same high level, in spite of a fiber content five times as great. The results strongly suggest that the inhibitory effect of bran on iron absorption is due to its content of phytate and other inositol phosphates present after fermentation, rather than to its content of fiber or other constituents. Thus, effective fermentation will increase the bioavailability of iron in whole-meal bread.

  3. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory measurements were conducted to evaluate properties of atmospheric gases under simulated conditions for the outer planets. A significant addition to this effort was the capability to make such measurements at millimeter wavelengths. Measurements should soon be completed on the millimeter wave absorption from ammonia under Jovian conditions. Also studied will be the feasibility of measuring the microwave and millimeter wave properties of phosphine (PH3) under simulated Jovian conditions. Further analysis and application of the laboratory results to microwave and millimeter wave absorption data for the outer planet, such as Voyager Radio Occultation experiments, will be pursued.

  4. Candida albicans Hap43 Is a Repressor Induced under Low-Iron Conditions and Is Essential for Iron-Responsive Transcriptional Regulation and Virulence ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Po-Chen; Yang, Cheng-Yao; Lan, Chung-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that exists as normal flora in healthy human bodies but causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. In addition to innate and adaptive immunities, hosts also resist microbial infections by developing a mechanism of “natural resistance” that maintains a low level of free iron to restrict the growth of invading pathogens. C. albicans must overcome this iron-deprived environment to cause infections. There are three types of iron-responsive transcriptional regulators in fungi; Aft1/Aft2 activators in yeast, GATA-type repressors in many fungi, and HapX/Php4 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Aspergillus species. In this study, we characterized the iron-responsive regulator Hap43, which is the C. albicans homolog of HapX/Php4 and is repressed by the GATA-type repressor Sfu1 under iron-sufficient conditions. We provide evidence that Hap43 is essential for the growth of C. albicans under low-iron conditions and for C. albicans virulence in a mouse model of infection. Hap43 was not required for iron acquisition under low-iron conditions. Instead, it was responsible for repression of genes that encode iron-dependent proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration and iron-sulfur cluster assembly. We also demonstrated that Hap43 executes its function by becoming a transcriptional repressor and accumulating in the nucleus in response to iron deprivation. Finally, we found a connection between Hap43 and the global corepressor Tup1 in low-iron-induced flavinogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest a complex interplay among Hap43, Sfu1, and Tup1 to coordinately regulate iron acquisition, iron utilization, and other iron-responsive metabolic activities. PMID:21131439

  5. Association of Long-term Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy with Bone Fractures and effects on Absorption of Calcium, Vitamin B12, Iron, and Magnesium

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Jensen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are now one of the most widely used classes of drugs. PPIs have proven to have a very favorable safety profile and it is unusual for a patient to stop these drugs because of side effects. However, increasing numbers of patients are chronically taking PPIs for gastroesophageal reflux disease and a number of other common persistent conditions, therefore the long-term potential adverse effects are receiving increasing attention. One area that is receiving much attention and generally has been poorly studied, is the long-term effects of chronic acid suppression on the absorption of vitamins and nutrients. This area has received increased attention because of the reported potential adverse effect of chronic PPI treatment leading to an increased occurrence of bone fractures. This has led to an increased examination of the effects of PPIs on calcium absorption/metabolism as well as numerous cohort, case control and prospective studies of their ability to affect bone density and cause bone fractures. In this article these studies are systematically examined, as well as the studies of the effects of chronic PPI usage on VB12, iron and magnesium absorption. In general the studies in each of thee areas have led to differing conclusions, but when examined systematically, a number of the studies are showing consistent results that support the conclusion that long-term adverse effects on these processes can have important clinical implications. PMID:20882439

  6. Low-potential iron-sulfur centers in photosystem I: an X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    McDermott, A E; Yachandra, V K; Guiles, R D; Britt, R D; Dexheimer, S L; Sauer, K; Klein, M P

    1988-05-31

    We have measured the X-ray absorption spectra of Fe in photosystem I (PS I) preparations from spinach and a thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp., to characterize structures of the Fe complexes that function as electron acceptors in PS I. These acceptors include centers A and B, which are probably typical [4Fe-4S] ferredoxins, and X. The structure of X is not known, but its electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum has generated the suggestions that it is either a [2Fe-2S] or [4Fe-4S] ferredoxin or an Fe-quinone species. The iron X-ray absorption K-edge and iron extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra reveal that essentially all of the 11-14 Fe atoms present in the reaction center are present in the form of Fe-S centers and that not more than 1 atom out of 12 could be octahedral or oxygen-coordinated Fe. This suggests that, besides A and B, additional Fe-S clusters are present which are likely to be X. Our EXAFS spectra cannot be simulated adequately by a mixture of [4Fe-4S] ferredoxins with typical bond lengths and disorder parameters because the amplitude of Fe backscattering is small; however, excellent simulations of the data are consistent with a mixture of [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins and [4Fe-4S] ferredoxins, or with unusually distorted [4Fe-4S] clusters. We presume that the [2Fe-2S] or distorted [4Fe-4S] centers are X. The X-ray absorption spectra of PS I preparations from Synechococcus and spinach are essentially indistinguishable.

  7. Absorption spectroscopy of mid and neighboring Z plasmas: Iron, nickel,copper and germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loisel, G.; Arnault, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Blenski, T.; Caillaud, T.; Fariaut, J.; Fölsner, W.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J.-C.; Poirier, M.; Reverdin, C.; Silvert, V.; Thais, F.; Turck-Chièze, S.; Villette, B.

    2009-09-01

    Opacities of four medium Z element plasmas (iron, nickel, copper and germanium) have been measured at the LULI-2000 facility in similar conditions: temperatures between 15 and 25 eV and densities between 2 and 10 mg/cm 3, in a wavelength range (8-18 Å) including the strong 2p-3d structures. Two laser beams from the LULI facility were used in the nanosecond-picosecond configuration. The NANO-2000 beam (at λ = 0.53 μm) heated a gold hohlraum with an energy between 30 and 150 J with a duration of 0.6 ns. Samples covering half a hohlraum hole were thus radiatively heated. The picosecond pulse PICO-2000 beam (at λ = 1.053 μm) has been used to produce a short (about 10 ps) X-ray backlighter in order to reduce time variations of temperatures and densities during the measurement. A crystal high-resolution spectrometer was used as the main diagnostic to record at the same time the non-absorbed and the absorbed backlighter spectra. Radiation temperatures were measured using a broadband spectrometer. 1D and 2D simulations have been performed in order to estimate hydrodynamic plasmas parameters. The measured spectra have been compared with theoretical ones obtained using either the superconfiguration code SCO or the detailed term accounting code HULLAC. These comparisons allow us to check the modeling of the statistical broadening and of the spin-orbit splitting of the 2p-3d transitions and related effects such as the interaction between relativistic subconfigurations belonging to the same non-relativistic configuration.

  8. Helicobacter pylori and CagA under conditions of iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Noto, Jennifer M; Peek, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and compelling evidence has demonstrated that this condition heightens the risk of gastric cancer. Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the strongest known risk factor for the development of gastric adenocarcinoma. Recent work has demonstrated that, under conditions of iron deficiency, H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis is augmented through increased formation of the strain-specific cag type IV secretion system and enhanced delivery of the bacterial oncoprotein CagA into host cells. Although CagA is a potent virulence factor that promotes oncogenic responses, additional studies have now demonstrated that CagA modulates host cell iron homeostasis in vitro and fundamental metabolic functions of the bacterial cell in vivo. Here we discuss these findings and describe working models by which CagA exerts its effects on gastric epithelial cells, with particular emphasis on its potential role in modulation of host iron homeostasis.

  9. Surface oxidation of pyrite under ambient atmospheric and aqueous (pH = 2 to 10) conditions: electronic structure and mineralogy from X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, E. C.; Sherman, D. M.; Purton, J. A.

    2003-03-01

    The nature of the surface oxidation phase on pyrite, FeS 2, reacted in aqueous electrolytes at pH = 2 to 10 and with air under ambient atmospheric conditions was studied using synchrotron-based oxygen K edge, sulfur L III edge, and iron L II,III edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We demonstrate that O K edge X-ray absorption spectra provide a sensitive probe of sulfide surface oxidation that is complementary to X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Using total electron yield detection, the top 20 to 50 Å of the pyrite surface is characterized. In air, pyrite oxidizes to form predominantly ferric sulfate. In aqueous air-saturated solutions, the surface oxidation products of pyrite vary with pH, with a marked transition occurring around pH 4. Below pH = 4, a ferric (hydroxy)sulfate is the main oxidation product on the pyrite surface. At higher pH, we find iron(III) oxyhydroxide in addition to ferric (hydroxy)sulfate on the surface. Under the most alkaline conditions, the O K edge spectrum closely resembles that of goethite, FeOOH, and the surface is oxidized to the extent that no FeS 2 can be detected in the X-ray absorption spectra. In a 1.667 × 10 -3 mol/L Fe 3+ solution with ferric iron present as FeCl 3 in NaCl, the oxidation of pyrite is autocatalyzed, and formation of the surface iron(III) oxyhydroxide phase is promoted at low pH.

  10. Microwave Absorption Properties of Iron Nanoparticles Prepared by Ball-Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xuan T. A.; Ta, Bach N.; Ngo, Le T. H.; Do, Manh H.; Nguyen, Phuc X.; Nam, Dao N. H.

    2016-05-01

    A nanopowder of iron was prepared using a high-energy ball milling method, which is capable of producing nanoparticles at a reasonably larger scale compared to conventional chemical methods. Analyses using x-ray diffraction and magnetic measurements indicate that the iron nanoparticles are a single phase of a body-centered cubic structure and have quite stable magnetic characteristics in the air. The iron nanoparticles were then mixed with paraffin and pressed into flat square plates for free-space microwave transmission and reflection measurements in the 4-8 GHz range. Without an Al backing plate, the Fe nanoparticles seem to only weakly absorb microwave radiation. The reflected signal S 11 drops to zero and a very large negative value of reflection loss ( RL) are observed for Al-backed samples, suggesting the existence of a phase matching resonance near frequency f ˜ 6 GHz.

  11. Water oxidation catalysis with nonheme iron complexes under acidic and basic conditions: homogeneous or heterogeneous?

    PubMed

    Hong, Dachao; Mandal, Sukanta; Yamada, Yusuke; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Llobet, Antoni; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-08-19

    Thermal water oxidation by cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN) was catalyzed by nonheme iron complexes, such as Fe(BQEN)(OTf)2 (1) and Fe(BQCN)(OTf)2 (2) (BQEN = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(8-quinolyl)ethane-1,2-diamine, BQCN = N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-bis(8-quinolyl)cyclohexanediamine, OTf = CF3SO3(-)) in a nonbuffered aqueous solution; turnover numbers of 80 ± 10 and 20 ± 5 were obtained in the O2 evolution reaction by 1 and 2, respectively. The ligand dissociation of the iron complexes was observed under acidic conditions, and the dissociated ligands were oxidized by CAN to yield CO2. We also observed that 1 was converted to an iron(IV)-oxo complex during the water oxidation in competition with the ligand oxidation. In addition, oxygen exchange between the iron(IV)-oxo complex and H2(18)O was found to occur at a much faster rate than the oxygen evolution. These results indicate that the iron complexes act as the true homogeneous catalyst for water oxidation by CAN at low pHs. In contrast, light-driven water oxidation using [Ru(bpy)3](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) as a photosensitizer and S2O8(2-) as a sacrificial electron acceptor was catalyzed by iron hydroxide nanoparticles derived from the iron complexes under basic conditions as the result of the ligand dissociation. In a buffer solution (initial pH 9.0) formation of the iron hydroxide nanoparticles with a size of around 100 nm at the end of the reaction was monitored by dynamic light scattering (DLS) in situ and characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) measurements. We thus conclude that the water oxidation by CAN was catalyzed by short-lived homogeneous iron complexes under acidic conditions, whereas iron hydroxide nanoparticles derived from iron complexes act as a heterogeneous catalyst in the light-driven water oxidation reaction under basic conditions.

  12. Experimental determination of the electrical resistivity of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Kenji; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Hirose, Kei; Shimizu, Katsuya; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    Earth continuously generates a dipole magnetic field in its convecting liquid outer core by a self-sustained dynamo action. Metallic iron is a dominant component of the outer core, so its electrical and thermal conductivity controls the dynamics and thermal evolution of Earth's core. However, in spite of extensive research, the transport properties of iron under core conditions are still controversial. Since free electrons are a primary carrier of both electric current and heat, the electron scattering mechanism in iron under high pressure and temperature holds the key to understanding the transport properties of planetary cores. Here we measure the electrical resistivity (the reciprocal of electrical conductivity) of iron at the high temperatures (up to 4,500 kelvin) and pressures (megabars) of Earth's core in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The value measured for the resistivity of iron is even lower than the value extrapolated from high-pressure, low-temperature data using the Bloch-Grüneisen law, which considers only the electron-phonon scattering. This shows that the iron resistivity is strongly suppressed by the resistivity saturation effect at high temperatures. The low electrical resistivity of iron indicates the high thermal conductivity of Earth's core, suggesting rapid core cooling and a young inner core less than 0.7 billion years old. Therefore, an abrupt increase in palaeomagnetic field intensity around 1.3 billion years ago may not be related to the birth of the inner core. PMID:27251282

  13. Experimental determination of the electrical resistivity of iron at Earth’s core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Kenji; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Hirose, Kei; Shimizu, Katsuya; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    Earth continuously generates a dipole magnetic field in its convecting liquid outer core by a self-sustained dynamo action. Metallic iron is a dominant component of the outer core, so its electrical and thermal conductivity controls the dynamics and thermal evolution of Earth’s core. However, in spite of extensive research, the transport properties of iron under core conditions are still controversial. Since free electrons are a primary carrier of both electric current and heat, the electron scattering mechanism in iron under high pressure and temperature holds the key to understanding the transport properties of planetary cores. Here we measure the electrical resistivity (the reciprocal of electrical conductivity) of iron at the high temperatures (up to 4,500 kelvin) and pressures (megabars) of Earth’s core in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The value measured for the resistivity of iron is even lower than the value extrapolated from high-pressure, low-temperature data using the Bloch-Grüneisen law, which considers only the electron-phonon scattering. This shows that the iron resistivity is strongly suppressed by the resistivity saturation effect at high temperatures. The low electrical resistivity of iron indicates the high thermal conductivity of Earth’s core, suggesting rapid core cooling and a young inner core less than 0.7 billion years old. Therefore, an abrupt increase in palaeomagnetic field intensity around 1.3 billion years ago may not be related to the birth of the inner core.

  14. Moisture Absorption of Plant Fiber under Annealed, Bleached and Mercerized Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Dip

    2010-06-01

    The water absorptions behaviors of the okra fibers, which are available in north east India, were studied under ambient, annealed, bleached and mercerized conditions by using ordinary gravimetric absorption method. The gains in moisture content in the fibers due to water absorption as well as their capillarity at constant relative humidity were measured as a function of exposure time. In order to ascertain the environment factor of utility of the fibers, the moisture regain of the fibers were determined at different relative air humidity. The water yielding capacity of okra fibers was also determined in order to understand their drying properties. The diffusion coefficients of the sorption process of the fibers under ambient, annealed, bleached and mercerized conditions were estimated.

  15. Moisture Absorption of Plant Fiber under Annealed, Bleached and Mercerized Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Saikia, Dip

    2010-06-29

    The water absorptions behaviors of the okra fibers, which are available in north east India, were studied under ambient, annealed, bleached and mercerized conditions by using ordinary gravimetric absorption method. The gains in moisture content in the fibers due to water absorption as well as their capillarity at constant relative humidity were measured as a function of exposure time. In order to ascertain the environment factor of utility of the fibers, the moisture regain of the fibers were determined at different relative air humidity. The water yielding capacity of okra fibers was also determined in order to understand their drying properties. The diffusion coefficients of the sorption process of the fibers under ambient, annealed, bleached and mercerized conditions were estimated.

  16. Saturation of electrical resistivity of solid iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, Monica; Alfè, Dario

    2016-01-01

    We report on the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of solid iron at high pressure, up to and including conditions likely to be found at the centre of the Earth. We have extended some of the calculations of the resistivities of pure solid iron we recently performed at Earth's core conditions (Pozzo et al. in Earth Planet Sci Lett 393:159-164, 2014) to lower temperature. We show that at low temperature the resistivity increases linearly with temperature, and saturates at high temperature. This saturation effect is well known as the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit in metals, but has been largely ignored to estimate the resistivity of iron at Earth's core conditions. Recent experiments (Gomi et al. in Phys Earth Planet Int 224:88-103, 2013) coupled new high pressure data and saturation to predict the resitivity of iron and iron alloys at Earth's core conditions, and reported values up to three times lower than previous estimates, confirming recent first principles calculations (de Koker et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci 109:4070-4073, 2012; Pozzo et al. in Nature 485:355-358, 2012, Phys Rev B 87:014110-10, 2013, Earth Planet Sci Lett 393:159-164, 2014; Davies et al. in Nat Geosci 8:678-685, 2015). The present results support the saturation effect idea. PMID:27026948

  17. Saturation of electrical resistivity of solid iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Pozzo, Monica; Alfè, Dario

    2016-01-01

    We report on the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity of solid iron at high pressure, up to and including conditions likely to be found at the centre of the Earth. We have extended some of the calculations of the resistivities of pure solid iron we recently performed at Earth's core conditions (Pozzo et al. in Earth Planet Sci Lett 393:159-164, 2014) to lower temperature. We show that at low temperature the resistivity increases linearly with temperature, and saturates at high temperature. This saturation effect is well known as the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit in metals, but has been largely ignored to estimate the resistivity of iron at Earth's core conditions. Recent experiments (Gomi et al. in Phys Earth Planet Int 224:88-103, 2013) coupled new high pressure data and saturation to predict the resitivity of iron and iron alloys at Earth's core conditions, and reported values up to three times lower than previous estimates, confirming recent first principles calculations (de Koker et al. in Proc Natl Acad Sci 109:4070-4073, 2012; Pozzo et al. in Nature 485:355-358, 2012, Phys Rev B 87:014110-10, 2013, Earth Planet Sci Lett 393:159-164, 2014; Davies et al. in Nat Geosci 8:678-685, 2015). The present results support the saturation effect idea.

  18. Facile synthesis of iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites: application for electromagnetic wave absorption at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Yu, Xinxin; Hu, Hongrui; Li, Yang; Wu, Mingzai; Wang, Zhongzhu; Li, Guang; Sun, Zhaoqi; Chen, Changle

    2015-03-19

    Iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites were synthesized by facile thermochemical reactions of graphite oxide and FeSO4 · 7H2O. By adjusting reaction temperature, α-Fe2O3/reduced graphene oxide and Fe3O4/reduced graphene oxide composites can be obtained conveniently. Graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide sheets were demonstrated to regulate the phase transition from α-Fe2O3 to Fe3O4 via γ-Fe2O3, which was reported for the first time. The hydroxyl groups attached on the graphene oxide sheets and H2 gas generated during the annealing of graphene oxide are believed to play an important role during these phase transformations. These samples showed good electromagnetic wave absorption performance due to their electromagnetic complementary effect. These samples possess much better electromagnetic wave absorption properties than the mixture of separately prepared Fe3O4 with rGO, suggesting the crucial role of synthetic method in determining the product properties. Also, these samples perform much better than commercial absorbers. Most importantly, the great stability of these composites is highly advantageous for applications as electromagnetic wave absorption materials at high temperatures.

  19. High-velocity ultraviolet iron, silicon, oxygen, and sulfur absorption features associated with the remnant of SN 1006

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesen, Robert A.; Wu, Chi-Chao; Leventhal, Marvin; Hamilton, Andrew J. S.

    1988-01-01

    New low-dispersion IUE spectra of a faint sdOb star located in a direction near the center of the SN 1006 remnant are presented. The UV spectrum of the star exhibits several strong absorption features which are uncharacteristic of its optical sdOB star classification. The identification by Wu et al. (1983) of very broad absorption features at 1610, 2370, 2600 A as Fe II gas associated with the SN 1006 remnant is supported. The observed Fe II line profiles indicate a concentration of Fe(+) toward the remnant's center with a radial velocity range on the order of + or - 5000 km/s. Strong absorption lines at 1281, 1331, and 1420 A are interpreted as originating from clumps of O-, Si- and S-rich ejecta with central radial velocities in the range 5000-6500 km/s. The presence in the SN 1006 remnant of an expanding sphere of iron-rich ejecta interior to O-, Si-, and S-rich clumps of ejecta having velocities over the maximum seen for the Fe II absorbing gas is consistent with type Ia Sn observations and carbon deflagration models.

  20. Facile synthesis of iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites: application for electromagnetic wave absorption at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lili; Yu, Xinxin; Hu, Hongrui; Li, Yang; Wu, Mingzai; Wang, Zhongzhu; Li, Guang; Sun, Zhaoqi; Chen, Changle

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites were synthesized by facile thermochemical reactions of graphite oxide and FeSO4·7H2O. By adjusting reaction temperature, α-Fe2O3/reduced graphene oxide and Fe3O4/reduced graphene oxide composites can be obtained conveniently. Graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide sheets were demonstrated to regulate the phase transition from α-Fe2O3 to Fe3O4 via γ-Fe2O3, which was reported for the first time. The hydroxyl groups attached on the graphene oxide sheets and H2 gas generated during the annealing of graphene oxide are believed to play an important role during these phase transformations. These samples showed good electromagnetic wave absorption performance due to their electromagnetic complementary effect. These samples possess much better electromagnetic wave absorption properties than the mixture of separately prepared Fe3O4 with rGO, suggesting the crucial role of synthetic method in determining the product properties. Also, these samples perform much better than commercial absorbers. Most importantly, the great stability of these composites is highly advantageous for applications as electromagnetic wave absorption materials at high temperatures. PMID:25788158

  1. Facile synthesis of iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites: application for electromagnetic wave absorption at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lili; Yu, Xinxin; Hu, Hongrui; Li, Yang; Wu, Mingzai; Wang, Zhongzhu; Li, Guang; Sun, Zhaoqi; Chen, Changle

    2015-03-01

    Iron oxides/reduced graphene oxide composites were synthesized by facile thermochemical reactions of graphite oxide and FeSO4.7H2O. By adjusting reaction temperature, α-Fe2O3/reduced graphene oxide and Fe3O4/reduced graphene oxide composites can be obtained conveniently. Graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide sheets were demonstrated to regulate the phase transition from α-Fe2O3 to Fe3O4 via γ-Fe2O3, which was reported for the first time. The hydroxyl groups attached on the graphene oxide sheets and H2 gas generated during the annealing of graphene oxide are believed to play an important role during these phase transformations. These samples showed good electromagnetic wave absorption performance due to their electromagnetic complementary effect. These samples possess much better electromagnetic wave absorption properties than the mixture of separately prepared Fe3O4 with rGO, suggesting the crucial role of synthetic method in determining the product properties. Also, these samples perform much better than commercial absorbers. Most importantly, the great stability of these composites is highly advantageous for applications as electromagnetic wave absorption materials at high temperatures.

  2. Environmental Factors Affecting Ammonium Oxidation Under Iron Reducing Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, P. R.; Huang, S.; Ruiz-Urigüen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) oxidation coupled to iron (Fe) reduction in the absence of oxygen and nitrate/nitrite (NO3-/NO2-) has been reported by several investigators and referred to as Feammox. Feammox is a biological reaction, where Fe(III) is the electron acceptor, which is reduced to Fe(II), and NH4+ is the electron donor, which is oxidized to NO2-. Through a 180-day anaerobic incubation experiment, and using PCR-DGGE, 454-pyosequecing and qPCR analysis, we have shown that an Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6, a previously unreported species in the Acidimicrobiaceae family, might be either responsible or plays a key role in the Feammox process, We have enriched these Feammox bacteria (65.8% in terms of cell numbers) in a membrane reactor, and isolated the pure Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 strain in an autotrophic medium. In samples collected and then incubated from a series of local wetland-, upland-, as well as storm-water detention pond-sediments, Feammox activity was only detected in acidic soil environments that contain Fe oxides. Using primers we developed for this purpose, Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 was detected in all incubations where Feammox was observed. Anaerobic incubations of Feammox enrichment cultures adjusted to different pH, revealed that the optimal pH for Feammox is 4 ~ 5, and the reaction does not proceed when pH > 7. Feammox was still proceeding at pH as low as 2. In Feammox culture amended with different Fe(III) sources, Feammox reaction proceeded only when Fe oxides (ferrihydrite or goethite ) were supplied, whereas samples incubated with ferric chloride or ferric citrate showed no measurable NH4+ oxidation. Furthermore, we have also determined from incubation experiments conducted with a temperature gradient (10 ~ 35℃), that the Feammox process was active when the temperature is above 15℃, and the optimal temperature is 20℃. Incubations of enrichment culture with 79% Feammox bacteria appeared to remove circa 8% more NH4+ at 20ºC than at

  3. Dual Mechanism Conceptual Model for Cr Isotope Fractionation during Reduction by Zerovalent Iron under Saturated Flow Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jamieson-Hanes, Julia H; Amos, Richard T; Blowes, David W; Ptacek, Carol J

    2015-05-01

    Chromium isotope analysis is rapidly becoming a valuable complementary tool for tracking Cr(VI) treatment in groundwater. Evaluation of various treatment materials has demonstrated that the degree of isotope fractionation is a function of the reaction mechanism, where reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) induces the largest fractionation. However, it has also been observed that uniform flow conditions can contribute complexity to isotope measurements. Here, laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to assess Cr isotope fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by zerovalent iron under both static and saturated flow conditions. Isotope measurements were accompanied by traditional aqueous geochemical measurements (pH, Eh, concentrations) and solid-phase analysis by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Increasing δ(53)Cr values were associated with decreasing Cr(VI) concentrations, which indicates reduction; solid-phase analysis showed an accumulation of Cr(III) on the iron. Reactive transport modeling implemented a dual mechanism approach to simulate the fractionation observed in the experiments. The faster heterogeneous reaction pathway was associated with minimal fractionation (ε=-0.2‰), while the slower homogeneous pathway exhibited a greater degree of fractionation (ε=-0.9‰ for the batch experiment, and ε=-1.5‰ for the column experiment). PMID:25839086

  4. Iron K Features in the Quasar E 1821+643: Evidence for Gravitationally Redshifted Absorption?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaqoob, Tahir; Serlemitsos, Peter

    2005-01-01

    We report a Chandra high-energy grating detection of a narrow, redshifted absorption line superimposed on the red wing of a broad Fe K line in the z = 0.297 quasar E 1821+643. The absorption line is detected at a confidence level, estimated by two different methods, in the range approx. 2 - 3 sigma. Although the detection significance is not high enough to exclude a non-astrophysical origin, accounting for the absorption feature when modeling the X-ray spectrum implies that the Fe-K emission line is broad, and consistent with an origin in a relativistic accretion disk. Ignoring the apparent absorption feature leads to the conclusion that the Fe-K emission line is narrower, and also affects the inferred peak energy of the line (and hence the inferred ionization state of Fe). If the absorption line (at approx. 6.2 keV in the quasar frame) is real, we argue that it could be due to gravitationally redshifted Fe XXV or Fe XXVI resonance absorption within approx. 10 - 20 gravitational radii of the putative central black hole. The absorption line is not detected in earlier ASCA and Chandra low-energy grating observations, but the absorption line is not unequivocally ruled out by these data. The Chandra high-energy grating Fe-K emission line is consistent with an origin predominantly in Fe I-XVII or so. In an ASCA observation eight years earlier, the Fe-K line peaked at approx. 6.6 keV, closer to the energies of He-like Fe triplet lines. Further, in a Chandra low-energy grating observation the Fe-K line profile was double-peaked, one peak corresponding to Fe I-XVII or so, the other peak to Fe XXVI Ly alpha. Such a wide range in ionization state of Fe is not ruled out by the HEG and ASCA data either, and is suggestive of a complex structure for the line-emitter.

  5. Formation of an interconnected network of iron melt at Earth’s lower mantle conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Crystal Y.; Zhang, Li; Yang, Wenge; Liu, Yijin; Wang, Junyue; Meng, Yue; Andrews, Joy C.; Mao, Wendy L.

    2013-10-06

    Core formation represents the most significant differentiation event in Earth’s history. Our planet’s present layered structure with a metallic core and an overlying mantle implies that there must be a mechanism to separate iron alloy from silicates in the initially accreted material. At upper mantle conditions, percolation has been ruled out as an efficient mechanism because of the tendency of molten iron to form isolated pockets at these pressures and temperatures. Here we present experimental evidence of a liquid iron alloy forming an interconnected melt network within a silicate perovskite matrix under pressure and temperature conditions of the Earth’s lower mantle. Using nanoscale synchrotron X-ray computed tomography, we image a marked transition in the shape of the iron-rich melt in three-dimensional reconstructions of samples prepared at varying pressures and temperatures using a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. We find that, as the pressure increases from 25 to 64GPa, the iron distribution changes from isolated pockets to an interconnected network. Our results indicate that percolation could be a viable mechanism of core formation at Earth’s lower mantle conditions.

  6. Environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides under cyclic loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Castagna, A.; Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1995-08-01

    The tensile and fatigue crack growth behavior in air in hydrogen and in oxygen of an Fe-Al-Cr-Zr alloy is described. The results are compared to data for FA-129. A detailed analysis of frequency effects on fatigue crack growth rates of FA-129, tested in the B2 condition, shows that dislocation transport of hydrogen from the surface is the rate limiting step in fatigue crack growth.

  7. Impacts of Combustion Conditions and Photochemical Processing on the Light Absorption of Biomass Combustion Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Martinsson, J; Eriksson, A C; Nielsen, I Elbæk; Malmborg, V Berg; Ahlberg, E; Andersen, C; Lindgren, R; Nyström, R; Nordin, E Z; Brune, W H; Svenningsson, B; Swietlicki, E; Boman, C; Pagels, J H

    2015-12-15

    The aim was to identify relationships between combustion conditions, particle characteristics, and optical properties of fresh and photochemically processed emissions from biomass combustion. The combustion conditions included nominal and high burn rate operation and individual combustion phases from a conventional wood stove. Low temperature pyrolysis upon fuel addition resulted in "tar-ball" type particles dominated by organic aerosol with an absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) of 2.5-2.7 and estimated Brown Carbon contributions of 50-70% to absorption at the climate relevant aethalometer-wavelength (520 nm). High temperature combustion during the intermediate (flaming) phase was dominated by soot agglomerates with AAE 1.0-1.2 and 85-100% of absorption at 520 nm attributed to Black Carbon. Intense photochemical processing of high burn rate flaming combustion emissions in an oxidation flow reactor led to strong formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol, with no or weak absorption. PM1 mass emission factors (mg/kg) of fresh emissions were about an order of magnitude higher for low temperature pyrolysis compared to high temperature combustion. However, emission factors describing the absorption cross section emitted per kg of fuel consumed (m(2)/kg) were of similar magnitude at 520 nm for the diverse combustion conditions investigated in this study. These results provide a link between biomass combustion conditions, emitted particle types, and their optical properties in fresh and processed plumes which can be of value for source apportionment and balanced mitigation of biomass combustion emissions from a climate and health perspective. PMID:26561964

  8. Impacts of Combustion Conditions and Photochemical Processing on the Light Absorption of Biomass Combustion Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Martinsson, J; Eriksson, A C; Nielsen, I Elbæk; Malmborg, V Berg; Ahlberg, E; Andersen, C; Lindgren, R; Nyström, R; Nordin, E Z; Brune, W H; Svenningsson, B; Swietlicki, E; Boman, C; Pagels, J H

    2015-12-15

    The aim was to identify relationships between combustion conditions, particle characteristics, and optical properties of fresh and photochemically processed emissions from biomass combustion. The combustion conditions included nominal and high burn rate operation and individual combustion phases from a conventional wood stove. Low temperature pyrolysis upon fuel addition resulted in "tar-ball" type particles dominated by organic aerosol with an absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) of 2.5-2.7 and estimated Brown Carbon contributions of 50-70% to absorption at the climate relevant aethalometer-wavelength (520 nm). High temperature combustion during the intermediate (flaming) phase was dominated by soot agglomerates with AAE 1.0-1.2 and 85-100% of absorption at 520 nm attributed to Black Carbon. Intense photochemical processing of high burn rate flaming combustion emissions in an oxidation flow reactor led to strong formation of Secondary Organic Aerosol, with no or weak absorption. PM1 mass emission factors (mg/kg) of fresh emissions were about an order of magnitude higher for low temperature pyrolysis compared to high temperature combustion. However, emission factors describing the absorption cross section emitted per kg of fuel consumed (m(2)/kg) were of similar magnitude at 520 nm for the diverse combustion conditions investigated in this study. These results provide a link between biomass combustion conditions, emitted particle types, and their optical properties in fresh and processed plumes which can be of value for source apportionment and balanced mitigation of biomass combustion emissions from a climate and health perspective.

  9. LiCl Dehumidifier LiBr absorption chiller hybrid air conditioning system with energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Ko, Suk M.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a hybrid air conditioning system that combines a solar powered LiCl dehumidifier with a LiBr absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier removes the latent load by absorbing moisture from the air, and the sensible load is removed by the absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier is coupled to a regenerator and the desiccant in the regenerator is heated by solar heated hot water to drive the moisture therefrom before being fed back to the dehumidifier. The heat of vaporization expended in the desiccant regenerator is recovered and used to partially preheat the driving fluid of the absorption chiller, thus substantially improving the overall COP of the hybrid system.

  10. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    After long arduous work with the simulator, measurements of the refractivity and absorptivity of nitrogen under conditions similar to those for Titan were completed. The most significant measurements, however, were those of the microwave absorption from gaseous ammonia under simulated conditions for the Jovian atmospheres over wavelengths from 1.3 to 22 cm. The results of these measurements are critical in that they confirm the theoretical calculation of the ammonia opacity using the Ben-Reuven lineshape. The application of both these results, and results obtained previously, to planetary observations at microwave frequencies were especially rewarding. Applications of the results for ammonia to radio astronomical observations of Jupiter in the 1.3 to 20 cm wavelength range and the application of results for gaseous H2SO4 under simulated Venus conditions are discussed.

  11. Preparation of Ni-B Coating on Carbonyl Iron and Its Microwave Absorption Properties in the X Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rong; Zhou, Wan-Cheng; Qing, Yu-Chang

    2014-09-01

    Ni-B coated carbonyl iron particles (CI@Ni-B) are prepared by the electroless plating technique. The structure, morphology, and antioxidant properties of the CI@Ni-B particles are analyzed. The results demonstrate that the CI particles have been coated with intact spherical-shell Ni-B coating, indicating the core-shell structure of CI@Ni-B particles, and the Ni-B coating can prevent the further oxidation of the CI particles. Compared with the raw CI particles/paraffin coatings with the same coating thickness of 2.0 mm and particles content of 70%, the CI@Ni-B particles/paraffin coatings possess higher microwave absorption (the RL exceeding -10 dB is obtained in the whole X band (8.2-12.4 GHz) with minimal RL of -35.0 dB at 9.2 GHz).

  12. Temperature dependence of the electromagnetic properties and microwave absorption of carbonyl iron particles/silicone resin composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yingying; Zhou, Wancheng; Qing, Yuchang; Luo, Fa; Zhu, Dongmei

    2015-01-01

    Microwave absorbing composites with thin thickness and wideband absorption were successfully prepared by a spraying method using carbonyl iron particles (CIPs) as absorbers and silicone resin as the matrix. The value of reflection loss (RL) below -5 dB can be obtained in the frequency range of 5.76-18 GHz for the composite with 0.8 mm thickness. The temperature dependence of electromagnetic properties and RL of the composites were investigated. The RL of the composite showed a slight variation when the temperature reached up to 200 °C while decreased at 300 °C. The room temperature RL of the composite did not display significant difference before and after the heat treatment at 300 °C for 10 h; the mechanism was also discussed.

  13. Iron (III)-silica interactions in aqueous solution: insights from X.-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovski, Gleb S.; Schott, Jacques; Farges, François; Hazemann, Jean-Louis

    2003-10-01

    The influence of aqueous silica on the hydrolysis of iron(III) nitrate and chloride salts in dilute aqueous solutions ( mFe ˜ 0.01 mol/kg) was studied at ambient temperature using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy at the Fe K-edge. Results show that in Si-free iron nitrate and chloride solutions at acid pH (pH < 2.5), Fe is hexa-coordinated with 6 oxygens of H 2O- and/or OH-groups in the first coordination sphere of the metal, at an Fe-O distance of 2.00 ± 0.01 Å. With increasing pH (2.7 < pH < 13), these groups are rapidly replaced by bridging hydroxyls (-OH-) or oxygens (-O-), and polymerized Fe hydroxide complexes form via Fe-(O/OH)-Fe bonds. In these polymers, the first atomic shell of iron represents a distorted octahedron with six O/OH groups and Fe-O distances ranging from 1.92 to 2.07 Å. The Fe octahedra are linked together by their edges (Fe-Fe distance 2.92-3.12 Å) and corners (Fe-Fe distance ˜3.47 ± 0.03 Å). The Fe-Fe coordination numbers ( Nedge = 1-2; Ncorner = 0.5-0.7) are consistent with the dominant presence of iron dimers, trimers and tetramers at pH 2.5 to 2.9, and of higher-polymerized species at pH > 3. At pH > 2.5 in the presence of aqueous silica, important changes in Fe(III) hydrolysis are detected. In 0.05- m Si solutions (pH ˜ 2.7-3.0), the corner linkages between Fe octahedra in the polymeric complexes disappear, and the Fe-Fe distances corresponding to the edge linkages slightly increase (Fe-Fe edge ˜ 3.12-3.14 Å). The presence of 1 to 2 silicons at 3.18 ± 0.03 Å is detected in the second atomic shell around iron. At basic pH (˜12.7), similar structural changes are observed for the iron second shell. The Fe-Si and Fe-Fe distances and coordination numbers derived in this study are consistent with (1) Fe-Si complex stoichiometries Fe 2Si 1-2 and Fe 3Si 2-3 at pH < 3; (2) structures composed of Fe-Fe dimers and trimers sharing one or two edges of FeO 6-octahedra; and (3) silicon tetrahedra linked to two

  14. Relativistic Iron K Emission and Absorption in the Seyfert 1.9 Galaxy MCG-05-23-16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braito, V.; Reeves, J. N.; Dewangan, G. C.; George, I.; Griffiths, R.; Markowitz, A.; Nandra, K.; Porquet, D.; Ptak, A.; Turner, T. J.; Yaqoob, T.; Weaver, K.

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of the simultaneous deep XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the bright Seyfert 1.9 galaxy MCG-5-23-16, which is thought to have one of the best known examples of a relativistically broadened iron Kalpha line. We detected a narrow sporadic absorption line at 7.7 keV which appears to be variable on a time-scale of 20 ksec. If associated with FeXXVI this absorption is indicative of a possible variable high ionization, high velocity outflow. The time averaged spectral analysis shows that the iron K-shell complex is best modeled with an unresolved narrow emission component (FWHM less than 5000 kilometers per second, EW approx. 60 eV) plus a broad component. This latter component has FWHM approx. 44000 kilometers per second, an EW approx. 50 eV and its profile is well described with an emission line originating from the accretion disk viewed with an inclination angle approx. 40 deg. and with the emission arising from within a few tens of gravitational radii of the central black hole. The time-resolved spectral analysis of the XMM-Newton EPIC-pn spectrum shows that both the narrow and broad components of the Fe K emission line appear to be constant within the errors. The analysis of the XMM-Newton/RGS spectrum reveals that the soft X-ray emission of MCG-5-23-16 is likely dominated by several emission lines superimposed on an unabsorbed scattered power-law continuum. The lack of strong Fe L shell emission together with the detection of a strong forbidden line in the O VII triplet supports a scenario where the soft X ray emission lines are produced in a plasma photoionized by the nuclear emission.

  15. Iron plaque formed under aerobic conditions efficiently immobilizes arsenic in Lupinus albus L roots.

    PubMed

    Fresno, Teresa; Peñalosa, Jesús M; Santner, Jakob; Puschenreiter, Markus; Prohaska, Thomas; Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic is a non-threshold carcinogenic metalloid. Thus, human exposure should be minimised, e.g. by chemically stabilizing As in soil. Since iron is a potential As immobiliser, it was investigated whether root iron plaque, formed under aerobic conditions, affects As uptake, metabolism and distribution in Lupinus albus plants. White lupin plants were cultivated in a continuously aerated hydroponic culture containing Fe/EDDHA or FeSO4 and exposed to arsenate (5 or 20 μM). Only FeSO4 induced surficial iron plaque in roots. LA-ICP-MS analysis accomplished on root sections corroborated the association of As to this surficial Fe. Additionally, As(V) was the predominant species in FeSO4-treated roots, suggesting less efficient As uptake in the presence of iron plaque. Fe/EDDHA-exposed roots neither showed such surficial FeAs co-localisation nor As(V) accumulation; in contrast As(III) was the predominant species in root tissue. Furthermore, FeSO4-treated plants showed reduced shoot-to-root As ratios, which were >10-fold lower compared to Fe/EDDHA treatment. Our results highlight the role of an iron plaque formed in roots of white lupin under aerobic conditions on As immobilisation. These findings, to our knowledge, have not been addressed before for this plant and have potential implications on soil remediation (phytostabilisation) and food security (minimising As in crops). PMID:27263113

  16. Iron plaque formed under aerobic conditions efficiently immobilizes arsenic in Lupinus albus L roots.

    PubMed

    Fresno, Teresa; Peñalosa, Jesús M; Santner, Jakob; Puschenreiter, Markus; Prohaska, Thomas; Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic is a non-threshold carcinogenic metalloid. Thus, human exposure should be minimised, e.g. by chemically stabilizing As in soil. Since iron is a potential As immobiliser, it was investigated whether root iron plaque, formed under aerobic conditions, affects As uptake, metabolism and distribution in Lupinus albus plants. White lupin plants were cultivated in a continuously aerated hydroponic culture containing Fe/EDDHA or FeSO4 and exposed to arsenate (5 or 20 μM). Only FeSO4 induced surficial iron plaque in roots. LA-ICP-MS analysis accomplished on root sections corroborated the association of As to this surficial Fe. Additionally, As(V) was the predominant species in FeSO4-treated roots, suggesting less efficient As uptake in the presence of iron plaque. Fe/EDDHA-exposed roots neither showed such surficial FeAs co-localisation nor As(V) accumulation; in contrast As(III) was the predominant species in root tissue. Furthermore, FeSO4-treated plants showed reduced shoot-to-root As ratios, which were >10-fold lower compared to Fe/EDDHA treatment. Our results highlight the role of an iron plaque formed in roots of white lupin under aerobic conditions on As immobilisation. These findings, to our knowledge, have not been addressed before for this plant and have potential implications on soil remediation (phytostabilisation) and food security (minimising As in crops).

  17. Laboratory measurements of microwave absorption from gaseous atmospheric constituents under conditions for the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1986-01-01

    Quite often the interpretive work on the microwave and millimeter-wave absorption profiles, which are inferred from radio occultation measurements or radio astronomical observations of the outer planets, employs theoretically-derived absorption coefficients to account for contributions to the observed opacity from gaseous constituents. Variations of the actual absorption coefficients from those which are theoretically derived, especially under the environmental conditions characteristic of the outer planets, can result in significant errors in the inferred abundances of the absorbing constituents. The recognition of the need to make laboratory measurements of the absorptivity of gases such as NH3, CH4, and H2O in a predominantly H2 atmosphere, under temperature and pressure conditions simulating the outer planets' atmospheres, and at wavelengths corresponding to both radio occultation and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility capable of making such measurements at Georgia Tech. The laboratory measurement system, the measurement techniques, and the proposed experimental regimen for Winter 1985 are described.

  18. Oxygen, neon, and iron X-ray absorption in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatuzz, Efraín; García, Javier A.; Kallman, Timothy R.; Mendoza, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We present a detailed study of X-ray absorption in the local interstellar medium by analyzing the X-ray spectra of 24 galactic sources obtained with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer and the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer. Methods: By modeling the continuum with a simple broken power-law and by implementing the new ISMabs X-ray absorption model, we have estimated the total H, O, Ne, and Fe column densities towards the observed sources. Results: We have determined the absorbing material distribution as a function of source distance and galactic latitude-longitude. Conclusions: Direct estimates of the fractions of neutrally, singly, and doubly ionized species of O, Ne, and Fe reveal the dominance of the cold component, thus indicating an overall low degree of ionization. Our results are expected to be sensitive to the model used to describe the continuum in all sources.

  19. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1987-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and Earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorping properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. Laboratory measurement of the microwave properties of atmospheric gases under simulated conditions for the outer planets were conducted. Results of these measurements are discussed.

  20. Use of absorption refrigerating machines in mine air-conditioning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Duganov, G.V.; Rozhko, V.F.; Shtompel, A.I.; Timofeevskii, L.S.

    1984-07-01

    This article describes lithium bromide absorption refrigerating machines (LBARMs) designed for use in mine air-conditioning systems (MACS). The application of LBARMs in MACS is difficult due to the elevation of temperature of the cold carrier when supplied to the mine air refrigerants. A thermodynamic and thermoeconomic analysis was conducted to determine the principal lines of LBARM design for creating a suitable microclimate in underground mines. The MACS will maintain the temperature in the mines at a horizon of 913 m at 24-26/sup 0/C. A scheme is proposed for stage-by-stage cooling by connecting two machines in succession. It is concluded that the use of absorption refrigerating machines in coal mine air-conditioning systems facilitates the integrated and economic use of heat energy as well as of secondary heat resources for cold generation.

  1. Growth of the acidophilic iron-sulfur bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans under Mars-like geochemical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauermeister, Anja; Rettberg, Petra; Flemming, Hans-Curt

    2014-08-01

    The question of life on Mars has been in focus of astrobiological research for several decades, and recent missions in orbit or on the surface of the planet are constantly expanding our knowledge on Martian geochemistry. For example, massive stratified deposits have been identified on Mars containing sulfate minerals and iron oxides, which suggest the existence of acidic aqueous conditions in the past, similar to acidic iron- and sulfur-rich environments on Earth. Acidophilic organisms thriving in such habitats could have been an integral part of a possibly widely extinct Martian ecosystem, but remains might possibly even exist today in protected subsurface niches. The chemolithoautotrophic strain Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was selected as a model organism to study the metabolic capacities of acidophilic iron-sulfur bacteria, especially regarding their ability to grow with in situ resources that could be expected on Mars. The experiments were not designed to accurately simulate Martian physical conditions (except when certain single parameters such as oxygen partial pressure were considered), but rather the geochemical environment that can be found on Mars. A. ferrooxidans could grow solely on the minerals contained in synthetic Mars regolith mixtures with no added nutrients, using either O2 as an external electron acceptor for iron oxidation, or H2 as an external electron donor for iron reduction, and thus might play important roles in the redox cycling of iron on Mars. Though the oxygen partial pressure of the Martian atmosphere at the surface was not sufficient for detectable iron oxidation and growth of A. ferrooxidans during short-term incubation (7 days), alternative chemical O2-generating processes in the subsurface might yield microhabitats enriched in oxygen, which principally are possible under such conditions. The bacteria might also contribute to the reductive dissolution of Fe3+-containing minerals like goethite and hematite, which are

  2. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for the Venus middle atmosphere (1 to 6 atm, temperatures from 500 to 575K) obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments (at 3.6 to 13.4 cm wavelengths) and earth-based radio astronomical observations (1 to 3 cm wavelength range) are compared to laboratory observations at the latter wavelength range under simulated Venus conditions to infer abundances of microwave-absorbing atmospheric constituents, i.e. H2SO4 in a CO2 atmosphere.

  3. Non-Heme Iron Absorption and Utilization from Typical Whole Chinese Diets in Young Chinese Urban Men Measured by a Double-Labeled Stable Isotope Technique

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lichen; Zhang, Yuhui; Wang, Jun; Huang, Zhengwu; Gou, Lingyan; Wang, Zhilin; Ren, Tongxiang; Piao, Jianhua; Yang, Xiaoguang

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was to observe the non-heme iron absorption and biological utilization from typical whole Chinese diets in young Chinese healthy urban men, and to observe if the iron absorption and utilization could be affected by the staple food patterns of Southern and Northern China. Materials and Methods Twenty-two young urban men aged 18–24 years were recruited and randomly assigned to two groups in which the staple food was rice and steamed buns, respectively. Each subject received 3 meals containing approximately 3.25 mg stable 57FeSO4 (the ratio of 57Fe content in breakfast, lunch and dinner was 1:2:2) daily for 2 consecutive days. In addition, approximately 2.4 mg 58FeSO4 was administered intravenously to each subject at 30–60 min after dinner each day. Blood samples were collected from each subject to measure the enrichment of the 57Fe and 58Fe. Fourteen days after the experimental diet, non-heme iron absorption was assessed by measuring 57Fe incorporation into red blood cells, and absorbed iron utilization was determined according to the red blood cell incorporation of intravenously infused 58Fe SO4. Results Non-heme iron intake values overall, and in the rice and steamed buns groups were 12.8 ±2.1, 11.3±1.3 and 14.3±1.5 mg, respectively; the mean 57Fe absorption rates were 11±7%, 13±7%, and 8±4%, respectively; and the mean infused 58Fe utilization rates were 85±8%, 84±6%, and 85±10%, respectively. There was no significantly difference in the iron intakes, and 57Fe absorption and infused 58Fe utilization rates between rice and steamed buns groups (all P>0.05). Conclusion We present the non-heme iron absorption and utilization rates from typical whole Chinese diets among young Chinese healthy urban men, which was not affected by the representative staple food patterns of Southern and Northern China. This study will provide a basis for the setting of Chinese iron DRIs. PMID:27099954

  4. The effect of different levels of wheat bran on iron absorption in rats from bread containing similar amounts of phytate.

    PubMed

    Fairweather-Tait, S J

    1982-03-01

    1. Iron absorption was studied in weanling rats using balance techniques from semi-synthetic diets containing dried white bread (60.5 g dietary fibre/kg. White & Southgate, unpublished results), brown bread (130.2 g dietary fibre/kg) or wholemeal bread (221.2 g dietary fibre/kg) at a level of 300 g/kg and compared with a control group given a diet containing added FeSO4 at a similar Fe level to that for the bread groups. The dried bread contained 6.2-6.4 g phytate/kg. 2. Absorption of Fe was significantly higher (P less than 0.001) in the control group (0.45) than in the White (0.28), brown (0.31) or wholemeal (0.24) groups. 3. A second experiment was carried out on 6-week-old rats in which the dried bread was extrinsically labelled with 59Fe and absorption from a single meal measured by both faecal excretion and incorporation of 59Fe into the blood. Control animals were given 59FeSO4 for comparison. 4. The excretion of 59Fe (% of administered dose) was significantly lower (P less than 0.001) in the control group (31) than in the white (48), brown (45) or wholemeal (47) groups. After 10 d the control group had significantly more 59Fe in the blood than the bread groups, but there were no differences between the bread groups. 5. It appears that wheat bran fibre itself has no effect on the retention of Fe from the diet in the rat, when supplied in amounts similar to those found in commercially-available bread.

  5. Solar Absorption Refrigeration System for Air-Conditioning of a Classroom Building in Northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Tanmay; Varun; Kumar, Anoop

    2015-10-01

    Air-conditioning is a basic tool to provide human thermal comfort in a building space. The primary aim of the present work is to design an air-conditioning system based on vapour absorption cycle that utilizes a renewable energy source for its operation. The building under consideration is a classroom of dimensions 18.5 m × 13 m × 4.5 m located in Hamirpur district of Himachal Pradesh in India. For this purpose, cooling load of the building was calculated first by using cooling load temperature difference method to estimate cooling capacity of the air-conditioning system. Coefficient of performance of the refrigeration system was computed for various values of strong and weak solution concentration. In this work, a solar collector is also designed to provide required amount of heat energy by the absorption system. This heat energy is taken from solar energy which makes this system eco-friendly and sustainable. A computer program was written in MATLAB to calculate the design parameters. Results were obtained for various values of solution concentrations throughout the year. Cost analysis has also been carried out to compare absorption refrigeration system with conventional vapour compression cycle based air-conditioners.

  6. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and Earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often lead to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. Steffes and Eshleman showed that under environmental conditions corresponding to the middle atmosphere of Venus, the microwave absorption due to atmospheric SO2 was 50 percent greater than that calculated from Van Vleck-Weiskopff theory. Similarly, the opacity from gaseous H2SO4 was found to be a factor of 7 greater than theoretically predicted for conditions of the Venus middle atmosphere. The recognition of the need to make such measurements over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the periapsis altitudes of radio occultation experiments, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements.

  7. Effects of prebiotic supplementation on the expression of proteins regulating iron absorption in anaemic growing rats.

    PubMed

    Marciano, Renata; Santamarina, Aline Boveto; de Santana, Aline Alves; Silva, Maísa de Lima Correia; Amancio, Olga Maria Silvério; do Nascimento, Claudia Maria da Penha Oller; Oyama, Lila Missae; de Morais, Mauro Batista

    2015-03-28

    Prebiotics may increase intestinal Fe absorption in anaemic growing rats. The present study evaluated the effects of high-performance (HP) inulin and oligofructose on factors that regulate Fe absorption in anaemic rats during the growth phase. Male Wistar rats aged 21 d of age were fed AIN-93G ration without Fe for 2 weeks to induce Fe-deficiency anaemia. The rats were fed on day 35 a control diet, or a diet with 10 % HP inulin, or a diet with 10 % oligofructose, without Fe supplementation. The animals were euthanised after 2 weeks, and segments of the duodenum, caecum, colon and liver were removed. The expression levels of proteins in the intestinal segments were assessed using Western blotting. The levels of serum, urine and liver hepcidin and the concentrations of IL-10, IL-6 and TNF-α in the caecum, colon and liver were measured using the ELISA test. HP inulin increased the expression of the divalent metal transporter 1 protein in the caecum by 162 % (P= 0·04), and the expression of duodenal cytochrome b reductase in the colon by 136 % (P= 0·02). Oligofructose decreased the expression of the protein ferroportin in the duodenum (P= 0·02), the concentrations of IL-10 (P= 0·044), IL-6 (P= 0·036) and TNF-α (P= 0·004) in the caecum, as well as the level of urinary hepcidin (P< 0·001). These results indicate that prebiotics may interfere with the expression of various intestinal proteins and systemic factors involved in the regulation of intestinal Fe absorption in anaemic rats during the growth phase.

  8. Liquid iron-sulfur alloys at outer core conditions by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, Koichiro; Hirose, Kei; Imada, Saori; Nakajima, Yoichi; Komabayashi, Tetsuya; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Baron, Alfred Q. R.

    2014-10-01

    We perform first-principles calculations to investigate liquid iron-sulfur alloys (Fe, Fe56S8, Fe52S12, and Fe48S16) under high-pressure and high-temperature (150-300 GPa and 4000-6000 K) conditions corresponding to the Earth's outer core. Considering only the density profile, the best match with the preliminary reference Earth model is by liquid Fe-14 wt % S (Fe50S14), assuming sulfur is the only light element. However, its bulk sound velocity is too high, in particular in the deep outer core, suggesting that another light component such as oxygen is required. An experimental check using inelastic X-ray scattering shows good agreement with the calculations. In addition, a present study demonstrates that the Birch's law does not hold for liquid iron-sulfur alloy, consistent with a previous report on pure liquid iron.

  9. Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy of the ν7 band of jet-cooled iron pentacarbonyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loroño, M.; Cruse, H. A.; Davies, P. B.

    2000-02-01

    The ν7 parallel band of Fe(CO) 5 has been measured in the 620 cm -1 region using high-resolution diode laser absorption spectroscopy in a free jet expansion. A comparison with simulated band profiles indicated a rotational temperature of between 2 and 3 K in the jet. At these temperatures the K-structure of the Q-branch is partly resolved. The following molecular parameters were obtained: ν0=619.95747(12) cm -1, B7=0.026743(2) cm -1, A7=0.030721(1) cm -1. Approximate values of the quartic centrifugal distortion constants were also obtained from fitting the spectra.

  10. Iron, copper, and zinc absorption and turnover; the use of stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Aggett, P J

    1997-08-01

    This overview demonstrates the increasing use of low natural abundance stable isotopes in the investigation of mineral metabolism. There are many practical problems associated with their use and analysis and their expense has limited their application in some areas such as studies in adults. Undoubtedly we will have to assess our ideas and protocols as the practical problems and their metabolic implications become better appreciated but none the less, the use of such isotopes will certainly refine our understanding of the way the body uses elements such as zinc, copper, iron and selenium and other essential elements and will enable us to determine our dietary requirements for these nutrients and to find ways of detecting more efficiently early deficiency and toxicity states.

  11. Bioavailability of iron in geophagic earths and clay minerals, and their effect on dietary iron absorption using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model.

    PubMed

    Seim, Gretchen L; Ahn, Cedric I; Bodis, Mary S; Luwedde, Flavia; Miller, Dennis D; Hillier, Stephen; Tako, Elad; Glahn, Raymond P; Young, Sera L

    2013-08-01

    Geophagy, the deliberate consumption of earth, is strongly associated with iron (Fe) deficiency. It has been proposed that geophagy may be practiced as a means to improve Fe status by increasing Fe intakes and, conversely, that geophagy may cause Fe deficiency by inhibiting Fe absorption. We tested these hypotheses by measuring Fe concentration and relative bioavailable Fe content of 12 samples of geophagic earth and 4 samples of pure clay minerals. Further, we assessed the impact of these samples on the bioavailability of Fe from an Fe-rich test meal (cooked white beans, WB). Fe concentrations were measured with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Fe bioavailability was determined using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model in which ferritin formation was used as an index of Fe bioavailability. Geophagic earth and clay mineral samples were evaluated with this model, both alone and in combination with WB (1 : 16 ratio, sample : WB). Median Fe concentration of the geophagic earth was 3485 (IQR 2462, 14 ,571) μg g⁻¹ and mean Fe concentration in the clay minerals was 2791 (±1782) μg g⁻¹. All specimens had Fe concentrations significantly higher (p ≤ 0.005) than the Fe concentration of WB (77 μg g⁻¹). Ferritin formation (i.e. Fe uptake) in cells exposed to geophagic earths and clay minerals was significantly lower than in cells exposed to WB (p ≤ 0.05) and Fe uptake responses of 11 of the 16 samples were not significantly different from the blank, indicating no bioavailable Fe. When samples were combined with WB, 5 of 16 had mean ferritin levels that were significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05, one tail) than the WB alone, indicating that the samples inhibited Fe uptake from the WB. None of the ferritin responses of cells exposed to both WB and earth/clay were significantly higher than WB alone. Thus, although geophagic earths and mineral clays are high in total Fe, very little of this Fe is bioavailable. Further, some

  12. The Pseudomonas fluorescens Siderophore Pyoverdine Weakens Arabidopsis thaliana Defense in Favor of Growth in Iron-Deficient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Trapet, Pauline; Avoscan, Laure; Klinguer, Agnès; Pateyron, Stéphanie; Citerne, Sylvie; Chervin, Christian; Mazurier, Sylvie; Lemanceau, Philippe; Wendehenne, David; Besson-Bard, Angélique

    2016-05-01

    Pyoverdines are siderophores synthesized by fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. Under iron-limiting conditions, these high-affinity ferric iron chelators are excreted by bacteria in the soil to acquire iron. Pyoverdines produced by beneficial Pseudomonas spp. ameliorate plant growth. Here, we investigate the physiological incidence and mode of action of pyoverdine from Pseudomonas fluorescens C7R12 on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants grown under iron-sufficient or iron-deficient conditions. Pyoverdine was provided to the medium in its iron-free structure (apo-pyoverdine), thus mimicking a situation in which it is produced by bacteria. Remarkably, apo-pyoverdine abolished the iron-deficiency phenotype and restored the growth of plants maintained in the iron-deprived medium. In contrast to a P. fluorescens C7R12 strain impaired in apo-pyoverdine production, the wild-type C7R12 reduced the accumulation of anthocyanins in plants grown in iron-deficient conditions. Under this condition, apo-pyoverdine modulated the expression of around 2,000 genes. Notably, apo-pyoverdine positively regulated the expression of genes related to development and iron acquisition/redistribution while it repressed the expression of defense-related genes. Accordingly, the growth-promoting effect of apo-pyoverdine in plants grown under iron-deficient conditions was impaired in iron-regulated transporter1 and ferric chelate reductase2 knockout mutants and was prioritized over immunity, as highlighted by an increased susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea This process was accompanied by an overexpression of the transcription factor HBI1, a key node for the cross talk between growth and immunity. This study reveals an unprecedented mode of action of pyoverdine in Arabidopsis and demonstrates that its incidence on physiological traits depends on the plant iron status. PMID:26956666

  13. Specific absorption rate determination of magnetic nanoparticles through hyperthermia measurements in non-adiabatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coïsson, M.; Barrera, G.; Celegato, F.; Martino, L.; Vinai, F.; Martino, P.; Ferraro, G.; Tiberto, P.

    2016-10-01

    An experimental setup for magnetic hyperthermia operating in non-adiabatic conditions is described. A thermodynamic model that takes into account the heat exchanged by the sample with the surrounding environment is developed. A suitable calibration procedure is proposed that allows the experimental validation of the model. Specific absorption rate can then be accurately determined just from the measurement of the sample temperature at the equilibrium steady state. The setup and the measurement procedure represent a simplification with respect to other systems requiring calorimeters or crucial corrections for heat flow. Two families of magnetic nanoparticles, one superparamagnetic and one characterised by larger sizes and static hysteresis, have been characterised as a function of field intensity, and specific absorption rate and intrinsic loss power have been obtained.

  14. Cascade Reverse Osmosis Air Conditioning System: Cascade Reverse Osmosis and the Absorption Osmosis Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    BEETIT Project: Battelle is developing a new air conditioning system that uses a cascade reverse osmosis (RO)-based absorption cycle. Analyses show that this new cycle can be as much as 60% more efficient than vapor compression, which is used in 90% of air conditioners. Traditional vapor-compression systems use polluting liquids for a cooling effect. Absorption cycles use benign refrigerants such as water, which is absorbed in a salt solution and pumped as liquid—replacing compression of vapor. The refrigerant is subsequently separated from absorbing salt using heat for re-use in the cooling cycle. Battelle is replacing thermal separation of refrigerant with a more efficient reverse osmosis process. Research has shown that the cycle is possible, but further investment will be needed to reduce the number of cascade reverse osmosis stages and therefore cost.

  15. Observation of auto-oscillations and chaos in subsidiary absorption in yttrium iron garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, G.; Chen, M.; Patton, C.E.

    1988-11-15

    Auto-oscillations of the dynamic magnetization and routes to chaos for the first-order transverse pump spin-wave instability have been studied in single-crystal yttrium-iron-garnet (YIG) films. The measurements reported here were made on a 20.8-..mu..m-thick YIG film at 9.4 GHz with the static and microwave fields in the plane of the film. Auto-oscillations at 100--400 kHz were observed in the power absorbed by the film over a relatively narrow static field range of 1100--1460 Oe, compared to the first-order instability (FOI) range of 0--1630 Oe. The auto-oscillation frequency and threshold microwave field amplitude were both strongly field dependent. The threshold amplitudes were about a factor of 2 larger than the FOI threshold amplitudes. At even higher power levels and for an even narrower field range of 1300--1380 Oe, the auto-oscillations showed frequency changes indicative of chaotic behavior. Several different subharmonic bifurcation routes to chaos were observed for different fields within the chaotic region.

  16. Inhibitory effect of calcium on non-heme iron absorption may be related to translocation of DMT-1 at the apical membrane of enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ben A V; Sharp, Paul A; Elliott, Ruan; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2010-07-28

    Many studies show that calcium reduces iron absorption from single meals, but the underlying mechanism is not known. We tested the hypothesis that calcium alters the expression and/or functionality of iron transport proteins. Differentiated Caco-2 cells were treated with ferric ammonium citrate and calcium chloride, and ferritin, DMT-1, and ferroportin were quantified in whole-cell lysate and cell-membrane fractions. Calcium attenuated the iron-induced increase in cell ferritin levels in a dose-dependent manner; a significant decrease was seen at calcium concentrations of 1.25 and 2.5 mM but was only evident after a 16-24 h incubation period. Calcium and iron treatments decreased DMT-1 protein in Caco-2 cell membranes, although total DMT-1 in whole cell lysates was unchanged by either iron or calcium. No change was seen in ferroportin expression. Our data suggest that calcium reduces iron bioavailability by decreasing DMT-1 expression at the apical cell membrane, thereby downregulating iron transport into the cell.

  17. Application of internal standardization to rapid coprecipitation technique using lanthanum phosphate for flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of iron and lead.

    PubMed

    Kagaya, Shigehiro; Malek, Zanariah Abdul; Araki, Yasuko; Hasegawa, Kiyoshi

    2002-08-01

    By applying an internal standardization, we could use a rapid coprecipitation technique using lanthanum phosphate as a coprecipitant for preconcentration of iron(III) and lead in their flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination. Indium as an internal standard was added to the initial sample solution together with lanthanum and phosphoric acid; the coprecipitation of iron(III) and lead was then carried out at pH about 3. After measuring the atomic absorbances of iron, lead, and indium in the final sample solution, we determined the contents of iron(III) and lead in the original sample solution by using the internal standardization with indium. In this method, complete collection of the precipitate was not required after the coprecipitation of iron(III), lead, and indium, because the ratio of the recovery of iron(III) or lead to that of indium was almost constant regardless of the recovery of the precipitate. This method was simple and rapid, and was available for the determination of 2-300 micrograms L-1 of iron(III) and 5-400 micrograms L-1 of lead in some water samples.

  18. Selenate removal by zero-valent iron in oxic condition: the role of Fe(II) and selenate removal mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yoon, In-Ho; Bang, Sunbaek; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Kim, Min Gyu; Park, Sang Yoon; Choi, Wang-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of the concentration of ferrous [Fe(II)] ions on selenate [Se(VI)] removal using zero-valent iron (ZVI). The mechanism of removal was investigated using spectroscopic and image analyses of the ZVI-Fe(II)-Se(VI) system. The test to remove 50 mg/L of Se(VI) by 1 g/L of ZVI resulted in about 60% removal of Se(VI) in the case with absence of Fe(II), but other tests with the addition of 50 and 100 mg/L of the Fe(II) had increased the removal efficiencies about 93 and 100% of the Se(VI), respectively. In other batch tests with the absence of ZVI, there were little changes on the Se(VI) removal by the varied concentration of the Fe(II). From these results, we found that Fe(II) ion plays an accelerator for the reduction of Se(VI) by ZVI with the stoichiometric balance of 1.4 (=nFe(2+)/nSe(6+)). Under anoxic conditions, the batch test revealed about 10% removal of the Se(VI), indicating that the presence of dissolved oxygen increased the kinetics of Se(VI) removal due to the Fe(II)-containing oxides on the ZVI, as analyzed by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra also showed that the reductive process of Se(VI) to Se(0)/Se(-II) occurred in the presence of the both ZVI and Fe(II). The final product of iron corrosion was lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH), which acts as an electron transfer barrier from Fe(0) core to Se(VI). Therefore, the addition of Fe(II) enhanced the reactivity of ZVI through the formation of iron oxides (magnetite) favoring electron transfer during the removal of Se(VI), which was through the exhaustion of the Fe(0) core reacted with Se(VI). PMID:25943509

  19. Arsenic distribution and speciation near rice roots influenced by iron plaques and redox conditions of the soil matrix.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Noriko; Ohkura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Yoshio; Maejima, Yuji; Arao, Tomohito

    2014-01-01

    Elevated arsenic (As) concentrations in rice and the soil solution result from changes in soil redox conditions, influenced by the water management practices during rice cultivation. Microscale changes in redox conditions from rhizosphere to soil matrix affect the As speciation and Fe plaque deposition. In order to focus on the rhizosphere environment, we observed microscale distribution and speciation of As around the rhizosphere of paddy rice with X-ray fluorescence mapping and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. When the soil matrix was anaerobic during rice growth, Fe-plaque did not cover the entire root, and As(III) was the dominant arsenic species in the soil matrix and rhizosphere. Draining before harvest led the conditions to shift to aerobic. Oxidation of As(III) to As(V) occurred faster in the Fe-plaque than the soil matrix. Arsenic was scavenged by iron mottles originating from Fe-plaque around the roots. The ratio of As(V) to As(III) decreased toward the outer-rim of the subsurface Fe mottles where the soil matrix was not completely aerated. These results provide direct evidence that speciation of As near rice roots depends on spatial and temporal redox variations in the soil matrix. PMID:24384039

  20. Redox State of Iron in Lunar Glasses using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Multivariate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyar, M. D.; McCanta, M. C.; Lanzirotti, A.; Sutton, S. R.; Carey, C. J.; Mahadevan, S.; Rutherford, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The oxidation state of igneous materials on a planet is a critically-important variable in understanding magma evolution on bodies in our solar system. However, direct and indirect methods for quantifying redox states are challenging, especially across the broad spectrum of silicate glass compositions found on airless bodies. On the Moon, early Mössbauer studies of bulk samples suggested the presence of significant Fe3+ (>10%) in lunar glasses (green, orange, brown); lunar analog glasses synthesized at fO2 <10-11 have similar Fe3+. All these Mössbauer spectra are challenging to interpret due to the presence of multiple coordination environments in the glasses. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) allows pico- and nano-scale interrogation of primitive planetary materials using the pre-edge, main edge, and EXAFS regions of absorption edge spectra. Current uses of XAS require availability of standards with compositions similar to those of unknowns and complex procedures for curve-fitting of pre-edge features that produce results with poorly constrained accuracy. A new approach to accurate and quantitative redox measurements with XAS is to couple use of spectra from synthetic glass standards covering a broad compositional range with multivariate analysis (MVA) techniques. Mössbauer and XAS spectra from a suite of 33 synthetic glass standards covering a wide range of compositions and fO2(Dyar et al., this meeting) were used to develop a MVA model that utilizes valuable predictive information not only in the major spectral peaks/features, but in all channels of the XAS region. Algorithms for multivariate analysis t were used to "learn" the characteristics of a data set as a function of varying spectral characteristics. These models were applied to the study of lunar glasses, which provide a challenging test case for these newly-developed techniques due to their very low fO2. Application of the new XAS calibration model to Apollo 15 green (15426, 15427 and 15425

  1. Alginate-Iron Speciation and Its Effect on In Vitro Cellular Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Horniblow, Richard D.; Dowle, Miriam; Iqbal, Tariq H.; Latunde-Dada, Gladys O.; Palmer, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Alginates are a class of biopolymers with known iron binding properties which are routinely used in the fabrication of iron-oxide nanoparticles. In addition, alginates have been implicated in influencing human iron absorption. However, the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles employs non-physiological pH conditions and whether nanoparticle formation in vivo is responsible for influencing cellular iron metabolism is unclear. Thus the aims of this study were to determine how alginate and iron interact at gastric-comparable pH conditions and how this influences iron metabolism. Employing a range of spectroscopic techniques under physiological conditions alginate-iron complexation was confirmed and, in conjunction with aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticles were observed. The results infer a nucleation-type model of iron binding whereby alginate is templating the condensation of iron-hydroxide complexes to form iron oxide centred nanoparticles. The interaction of alginate and iron at a cellular level was found to decrease cellular iron acquisition by 37% (p < 0.05) and in combination with confocal microscopy the alginate inhibits cellular iron transport through extracellular iron chelation with the resulting complexes not internalised. These results infer alginate as being useful in the chelation of excess iron, especially in the context of inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer where excess unabsorbed luminal iron is thought to be a driver of disease. PMID:26378798

  2. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yuxin; Versteeg, R.; Slater, L.; LaBrecque, D.

    2009-06-01

    Calcium carbonate is a secondary mineral precipitate influencing zero valent iron (ZVI) barrier reactivity and hydraulic performance. We conducted column experiments to investigate electrical signatures resulting from concurrent CaCO{sub 3} and iron oxides precipitation under simulated field geochemical conditions. We identified CaCO{sub 3} as a major mineral phase throughout the columns, with magnetite present primarily close to the influent based on XRD analysis. Electrical measurements revealed decreases in conductivity and polarization of both columns, suggesting that electrically insulating CaCO{sub 3} dominates the electrical response despite the presence of electrically conductive iron oxides. SEM/EDX imaging suggests that the electrical signal reflects the geometrical arrangement of the mineral phases. CaCO{sub 3} forms insulating films on ZVI/magnetite surfaces, restricting charge transfer between the pore electrolyte and ZVI particles, as well as across interconnected ZVI particles. As surface reactivity also depends on the ability of the surface to engage in redox reactions via charge transfer, electrical measurements may provide a minimally invasive technology for monitoring reactivity loss due to CaCO{sub 3} precipitation. Comparison between laboratory and field data shows consistent changes in electrical signatures due to iron corrosion and secondary mineral precipitation.

  3. The interactive biotic and abiotic processes of DDT transformation under dissimilatory iron-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Wang, Fang; Gu, Chenggang; Yang, Xinglun; Kengara, Fredrick O; Bian, Yongrong; Song, Yang; Jiang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the study was to elucidate the biotic and abiotic processes under dissimilatory iron reducing conditions involved in reductive dechlorination and iron reduction. DDT transformation was investigated in cultures of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 with/without α-FeOOH. A modified first-order kinetics model was developed and described DDT transformation well. Both the α-FeOOH reduction rate and the dechlorination rate of DDT were positively correlated to the biomass. Addition of α-FeOOH enhanced reductive dechlorination of DDT by favoring the cell survival and generating Fe(II) which was absorbed on the surface of bacteria and iron oxide. 92% of the absorbed Fe(II) was Na-acetate (1M) extractable. However, α-FeOOH also played a negative role of competing for electrons as reflected by the dechlorination rate of DDT was inhibited when increasing the α-FeOOH from 1 g L(-1) to 5 g L(-1). DDT was measured to be toxic to S. putrefaciens 200. The metabolites DDD, DDE and DDMU were recalcitrant to S. putrefaciens 200. The results suggested that iron oxide was not the key factor to promote the dissipation of DDX (DDT and the metabolites), whereas the one-electron reduction potential (E1) of certain organochlorines is the main factor and that the E1 higher than the threshold of the reductive driving forces of DIRB probably ensures the occur of reductive dechlorination.

  4. Particle extinction measured at ambient conditions with differential optical absorption spectroscopy. 2. Closure study.

    PubMed

    Müller, Thomas; Müller, Detlef; Dubois, René

    2006-04-01

    Spectral particle extinction coefficients of atmospheric aerosols were measured with, to the best of our knowledge, a newly designed differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument. A closure study was carried out on the basis of optical and microphysical aerosol properties obtained from nephelometer, particle soot/absorption photometer, hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer, twin differential mobility particle sizer, aerodynamic particle sizer, and Berner impactors. The data were collected at the urban site of Leipzig during a period of 10 days in March 2000. The performance test also includes a comparison of the optical properties measured with DOAS to particle optical properties calculated with a Mie-scattering code. The computations take into account dry and ambient particle conditions. Under dry particle conditions the linear regression and the correlation coefficient for particle extinction are 0.95 and 0.90, respectively. At ambient conditions these parameters are 0.89 and 0.97, respectively. An inversion algorithm was used to retrieve microphysical particle properties from the extinction coefficients measured with DOAS. We found excellent agreement within the retrieval uncertainties.

  5. Particle extinction measured at ambient conditions with differential optical absorption spectroscopy. 2. Closure study.

    PubMed

    Müller, Thomas; Müller, Detlef; Dubois, René

    2006-04-01

    Spectral particle extinction coefficients of atmospheric aerosols were measured with, to the best of our knowledge, a newly designed differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument. A closure study was carried out on the basis of optical and microphysical aerosol properties obtained from nephelometer, particle soot/absorption photometer, hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyzer, twin differential mobility particle sizer, aerodynamic particle sizer, and Berner impactors. The data were collected at the urban site of Leipzig during a period of 10 days in March 2000. The performance test also includes a comparison of the optical properties measured with DOAS to particle optical properties calculated with a Mie-scattering code. The computations take into account dry and ambient particle conditions. Under dry particle conditions the linear regression and the correlation coefficient for particle extinction are 0.95 and 0.90, respectively. At ambient conditions these parameters are 0.89 and 0.97, respectively. An inversion algorithm was used to retrieve microphysical particle properties from the extinction coefficients measured with DOAS. We found excellent agreement within the retrieval uncertainties. PMID:16607998

  6. Inclusion of Guava Enhances Non-Heme Iron Bioavailability but Not Fractional Zinc Absorption from a Rice-Based Meal in Adolescents12

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Krishnapillai Madhavan; Brahmam, Ginnela N.V.; Radhika, Madhari S.; Dripta, Roy Choudhury; Ravinder, Punjal; Balakrishna, Nagalla; Chen, Zhensheng; Hawthorne, Keli M.; Abrams, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Assessing the bioavailability of non-heme iron and zinc is essential for recommending diets that meet the increased growth-related demand for these nutrients. We studied the bioavailability of iron and zinc from a rice-based meal in 16 adolescent boys and girls, 13–15 y of age, from 2 government-run residential schools. Participants were given a standardized rice meal (regular) and the same meal with 100 g of guava fruit (modified) with 57Fe on 2 consecutive days. A single oral dose of 58Fe in orange juice was given at a separate time as a reference dose. Zinc absorption was assessed by using 70Zn, administered intravenously, and 67Zn given orally with meals. The mean hemoglobin concentration was similar in girls (129 ± 7.8 g/L) and boys (126 ± 7.1 g/L). There were no sex differences in the indicators of iron and zinc status except for a higher hepcidin concentration in boys (P < 0.05). The regular and modified meals were similar in total iron (10–13 mg/meal) and zinc (2.7 mg/meal) content. The molar ratio of iron to phytic acid was >1:1, but the modified diet had 20 times greater ascorbic acid content. The absorption of 57Fe from the modified meal, compared with regular meal, was significantly (P < 0.05) greater in both girls (23.9 ± 11.2 vs. 9.7 ± 6.5%) and boys (19.2 ± 8.4 vs. 8.6 ± 4.1%). Fractional zinc absorption was similar between the regular and modified meals in both sexes. Hepcidin was found to be a significant predictor of iron absorption (standardized β = −0.63, P = 0.001, R2 = 0.40) from the reference dose. There was no significant effect of sex on iron and zinc bioavailability from meals. We conclude that simultaneous ingestion of guava fruit with a habitual rice-based meal enhances iron bioavailability in adolescents. PMID:23596161

  7. Absorption of Sunlight by Water Vapor in Cloudy Conditions: A Partial Explaination for the Cloud Absorption Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, D.

    1996-01-01

    The atmospheric radiative transfer algorithms used in most global general circulation models underestimate the globally-averaged solar energy absorbed by cloudy atmospheres by up to 25 Wm(sup -2)...Here, a sophisticated atmospheric radiative transfer model was used to provide a more comprehensive description of the physical processes that contribute to the absorption of solar radiation by the Earth's atmosphere.

  8. Inclusion of ancient Latin-American crops in bread formulation improves intestinal iron absorption and modulates inflammatory markers.

    PubMed

    Laparra, José Moisés; Haros, Monika

    2016-02-01

    This study compares iron (Fe) absorption in Fe-deficient animals from bread formulations prepared by substitution of white wheat flour (WB) by whole wheat flour (WWB), amaranth flour (Amaranthus hypochondriacus, 25%) (AB) and quinoa flour (Chenopodium quinoa, 25%) (QB), or chia flour (Salvia hispanica L, 5%) (ChB). Hematological parameters of Fe homeostasis, plasmatic active hepcidin peptide production (LC coupled to Ms/Ms), and liver TfR-2 and IL-6 expression (RT-qPCR) were determined. The different bread formulations increased Fe content between 14% and 83% relative to white bread. Only animals fed with WWB, AB and ChB increased haemoglobin concentrations significantly. Feeding the different bread formulations did not increase hepcidin levels, but down-regulated transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2) (apart from WWB) and IL-6 (apart from QB) expression levels. Only AB and ChB had a significant influence on Fe bioavailability at the investigated level of substitution. The potential contribution of these flours would not differ considerably from that of WWB. PMID:26787109

  9. Excellent improvement in the static and dynamic magnetic properties of carbon coated iron nanoparticles for microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khani, Omid; Shoushtari, Morteza Zargar; Farbod, Mansoor

    2015-11-01

    Carbon coated iron nanoparticles were synthesized, using a simple arc-discharge method. The morphology and the internal structure of the core/shell nanoparticles were studied, using field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that both magnetic α-Fe and nonmagnetic γ-Fe phases existed in the as-prepared particles. In order to improve the static and dynamic magnetic properties of the core/shell nanoparticles, the produced nanocapsules were annealed in argon atmosphere at two different temperatures. Hysteresis loops revealed that the value of the saturation magnetization (MS) increased more than 4.1 times of its original value by annealing and this led to 70% increase in the imaginary part of the permeability. Phase analysis showed that heat treatment eliminated the nonmagnetic γ-Fe phase completely. The reflection loss plots were studied for composite layers containing 20 vol% of the annealed and not annealed nanocapsules. One of the absorber layers which contained annealed nanocapsules showed at least -10 dB loss in the whole G, C, X and Ku frequency bands and the optimal absorption exceeded -37 dB at 5.8 GHz for the as-prepared sample with a thickness of 3.2 mm. The results revealed that the magnetic properties of the arc-made Fe/C core/shell nanoparticle can be improved significantly by annealing in argon.

  10. Inclusion of ancient Latin-American crops in bread formulation improves intestinal iron absorption and modulates inflammatory markers.

    PubMed

    Laparra, José Moisés; Haros, Monika

    2016-02-01

    This study compares iron (Fe) absorption in Fe-deficient animals from bread formulations prepared by substitution of white wheat flour (WB) by whole wheat flour (WWB), amaranth flour (Amaranthus hypochondriacus, 25%) (AB) and quinoa flour (Chenopodium quinoa, 25%) (QB), or chia flour (Salvia hispanica L, 5%) (ChB). Hematological parameters of Fe homeostasis, plasmatic active hepcidin peptide production (LC coupled to Ms/Ms), and liver TfR-2 and IL-6 expression (RT-qPCR) were determined. The different bread formulations increased Fe content between 14% and 83% relative to white bread. Only animals fed with WWB, AB and ChB increased haemoglobin concentrations significantly. Feeding the different bread formulations did not increase hepcidin levels, but down-regulated transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2) (apart from WWB) and IL-6 (apart from QB) expression levels. Only AB and ChB had a significant influence on Fe bioavailability at the investigated level of substitution. The potential contribution of these flours would not differ considerably from that of WWB.

  11. Opacity of iron, nickel, and copper plasmas in the x-ray wavelength range: Theoretical interpretation of 2p-3d absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Blenski, T.; Loisel, G.; Poirier, M.; Thais, F.; Arnault, P.; Caillaud, T.; Fariaut, J.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J.-C.; Porcherot, Q.; Reverdin, C.; Silvert, V.; Villette, B.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Foelsner, W.; Gaufridy de Dortan, F. de

    2011-09-15

    This paper deals with theoretical studies on the 2p-3d absorption in iron, nickel, and copper plasmas related to LULI2000 (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, 2000J facility) measurements in which target temperatures were of the order of 20 eV and plasma densities were in the range 0.004-0.01 g/cm{sup 3}. The radiatively heated targets were close to local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The structure of 2p-3d transitions has been studied with the help of the statistical superconfiguration opacity code sco and with the fine-structure atomic physics codes hullac and fac. A new mixed version of the sco code allowing one to treat part of the configurations by detailed calculation based on the Cowan's code rcg has been also used in these comparisons. Special attention was paid to comparisons between theory and experiment concerning the term features which cannot be reproduced by sco. The differences in the spin-orbit splitting and the statistical (thermal) broadening of the 2p-3d transitions have been investigated as a function of the atomic number Z. It appears that at the conditions of the experiment the role of the term and configuration broadening was different in the three analyzed elements, this broadening being sensitive to the atomic number. Some effects of the temperature gradients and possible non-LTE effects have been studied with the help of the radiative-collisional code scric. The sensitivity of the 2p-3d structures with respect to temperature and density in medium-Z plasmas may be helpful for diagnostics of LTE plasmas especially in future experiments on the {Delta}n=0 absorption in medium-Z plasmas for astrophysical applications.

  12. Effect of alloying impurities and conditions of heat treatment of iron-based powder materials and their magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Yago, G.I.; Vasil`ev, V.M.; Panasyuk, O.A.

    1994-07-01

    The structure of the initial iron powders, the type of alloying impurities, and the conditions of compaction and heat treatment of materials have been studied from the standpoint of their effect on the magnetic properties. Ways of enhancing the properties of magnetically-soft iron-based powder materials are recommended and methods of studying them are suggested.

  13. Anaerobic Biodegradation Of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Under Iron-Reducing Conditions In Batch And Continuous-Flow Cultures

    EPA Science Inventory

    The feasibility of biodegradation of the fuel oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) under iron-reducing conditions was explored in batch and continuous-flow systems. A porous pot completely-mixed reactor was seeded with diverse cultures and operated under iron-reducing...

  14. Ligandless dispersive liquid--liquid microextraction of iron in biological and foodstuff samples and its determination by Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Madadizadeh, Mohadeseh; Taher, Mohammad Ali; Ashkenani, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    A new, simple, and efficient method comprising ligandless dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry is reported for the preconcentration and determination of ultratrace amounts of Fe(III). Carbon tetrachloride and acetone were used as the extraction and disperser solvents, respectively. Some effective parameters of the microextraction such as choice of extraction and disperser solvents, their volume, extraction time and temperature, salt and surfactant effect, and pH were optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 0.02 to 0.46 microg/L of Fe(III), with LOD and LOQ of 5.2 and 17.4 ng/L, respectively. The RSD for seven replicated determinations of Fe(IIl) ion at 0.1 microg/L concentration level was 5.2%. Operational simplicity, rapidity, low cost, good repeatability, and low consumption of extraction solvent are the main advantages of the proposed method. The method was successfully applied to the determination of iron in biological, food, and certified reference samples.

  15. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    2005-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments, entry probe radio signal absorption measurements, and earth- based or spacecraft-based radio astronomical (emission) observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or the use of laboratory measurements of such properties taken under environmental conditions that are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. For example, new laboratory measurements completed recently by Mohammed and Steffes (2003 and 2004) under this grant (NAG5-12122,5/1/02-4/30/05), have shown that the millimeter-wavelength opacities from both gaseous phosphine (PH3) and gaseous ammonia ("3) under simulated conditions for the outer planets vary significantly from that predicted by theory over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. These results have directly impacted planning and scientific goals for study of Saturn's atmosphere with the Cassini Radio Science Experiment, as discussed below. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both spacecraft entry probe and orbiter (or flyby) radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the

  16. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties Under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1998-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments, entry probe radio signal absorption measurements, and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties taken under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. For example, laboratory measurements completed recently by Kolodner and Steffes (ICARUS 132, pp. 151-169, March 1998, attached as Appendix A) under this grant (NAGS-4190), have shown that the opacity from gaseous H2SO4 under simulated Venus conditions is best described by a different formalism than was previously used. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both spacecraft entry probe and orbiter radio occultation experiments and by radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in such experiments, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  17. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    2002-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments, entry probe radio signal absorption measurements, and earth-based or spacecraft-based radio astronomical (emission) observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or the use of laboratory measurements of such properties taken under environmental conditions that are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. Laboratory measurements have shown that the centimeter-wavelength opacity from gaseous phosphine (PH3) under simulated conditions for the outer planets far exceeds that predicted from theory over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. This fundamentally changed the resulting interpretation of Voyager radio occultation data at Saturn and Neptune. It also directly impacts planning and scientific goals for study of Saturn's atmosphere with the Cassini Radio Science Experiment and the Rossini RADAR instrument. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both spacecraft entry probe and orbiter (or flyby) radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations

  18. Effect of phytate reduction of sorghum, through genetic modification, on iron and zinc availability as assessed by an in vitro dialysability bioaccessibility assay, Caco-2 cell uptake assay, and suckling rat pup absorption model.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Johanita; Taylor, John R N; Du, Xiaogu; De Moura, Fabiana F; Lönnerdal, Bo; Oelofse, André

    2013-11-15

    Improved iron and zinc availability from sorghum, a commonly consumed staple, will benefit many malnourished communities in rural Africa burdened with high prevalence of iron and zinc deficiency. This research compared the effect of genetic phytate reduction in sorghum on iron and zinc bioaccessibility and uptake measured by in vitro dialysability and Caco-2 cell uptake assays to that of iron and zinc absorption measured by a suckling rat pup model. The phytate reduction (80-86%) in these sorghums significantly increased zinc availability. The Caco-2 cell method, but not the dialysability assay, proved useful in estimating zinc absorption. The measured increase in iron availability differed between the methods, possibly due to the effect of varying mineral (Ca, Fe, Zn, P) contents of the sorghums. This effect was most prominent in the iron uptake results. More research is needed to determine the effect of naturally occurring variations in mineral contents of sorghum on the iron uptake by Caco-2 cells.

  19. A photo-oxidation procedure using UV radiation/H 2O 2 for decomposition of wine samples — Determination of iron and manganese content by flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Walter N. L.; Brandão, Geovani C.; Portugal, Lindomar A.; David, Jorge M.; Ferreira, Sérgio L. C.

    2009-06-01

    This paper proposes the use of photo-oxidation with UV radiation/H 2O 2 as sample pretreatment for the determination of iron and manganese in wines by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The optimization involved the study of the following variables: pH and concentration of buffer solution, concentrated hydrogen peroxide volume and irradiation time. The evaluation of sample degradation was monitored by measuring the absorbance at the maximum wavelength of red wine (530 nm). Using the experimental conditions established during the optimization (irradiation time of 30 min, oxidant volume of 2.5 mL, pH 10, and a buffer concentration of 0.15 mol L - 1 ), this procedure allows the determination of iron and manganese with limits of detection of 30 and 22 μg L - 1 , respectively, for a 5 mL volume of digested sample. The precision levels, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), were 2.8% and 0.65% for iron and 2.7% and 0.54% for manganese for concentrations of 0.5 and 2.0 mg L - 1 , respectively. Addition/recovery tests for evaluation of the accuracy were in the ranges of 90%-111% and 95%-107% for iron and manganese, respectively. This digestion procedure has been applied for the determination of iron and manganese in six wine samples. The concentrations varied from 1.58 to 2.77 mg L - 1 for iron and from 1.30 to 1.91 mg L - 1 for manganese. The results were compared with those obtained by an acid digestion procedure and determination of the elements by FAAS. There was no significant difference between the results obtained by the two methods based on a paired t-test (at 95% confidence level).

  20. Laboratory Evaluation and Application of Microwave Absorption Properties Under Simulated Conditions for Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1997-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. Laboratory measurements completed under this grant (NAGW-533), have shown that the opacity from, SO2 under simulated Venus conditions is best described by a different lineshape than was previously used in theoretical predictions. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  1. THE PHYSICAL CONDITIONS OF THE INTRINSIC N V NARROW ABSORPTION LINE SYSTEMS OF THREE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jian; Charlton, Jane C.; Misawa, Toru; Eracleous, Michael; Ganguly, Rajib E-mail: misawatr@shinshu-u.ac.j

    2010-10-20

    We employ detailed photoionization models to infer the physical conditions of intrinsic narrow absorption line systems found in high-resolution spectra of three quasars at z = 2.6-3.0. We focus on a family of intrinsic absorbers characterized by N V lines that are strong relative to the Ly{alpha} lines. The inferred physical conditions are similar for the three intrinsic N V absorbers, with metallicities greater than 10 times the solar value (assuming a solar abundance pattern), and with high ionization parameters (log U {approx} 0). Thus, we conclude that the unusual strength of the N V lines results from a combination of partial coverage, a high ionization state, and high metallicity. We consider whether dilution of the absorption lines by flux from the broad emission line region can lead us to overestimate the metallicities and we find that this is an unlikely possibility. The high abundances that we infer are not surprising in the context of scenarios in which metal enrichment takes place very early on in massive galaxies. We estimate that the mass outflow rate in the absorbing gas (which is likely to have a filamentary structure) is less than a few M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} under the most optimistic assumptions, although it may be embedded in a much hotter, more massive outflow.

  2. Absorption of Sunlight by Water Vapor in Cloudy Conditions: A Partial Explanation for the Cloud Absorption Anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, D.

    1997-01-01

    The atmospheric radiative transfer algorithms used in most global general circulation models underestimate the globally-averaged solar energy absorbed by cloudy atmospheres by up to 25 W/sq m. The origin of this anomalous absorption is not yet known, but it has been attributed to a variety of sources including oversimplified or missing physical processes in these models, uncertainties in the input data, and even measurement errors. Here, a sophisticated atmospheric radiative transfer model was used to provide a more comprehensive description of the physical processes that contribute to the absorption of solar radiation by the Earth's atmosphere. We found that the amount of sunlight absorbed by a cloudy atmosphere is inversely proportional to the solar zenith angle and the cloud top height, and directly proportional to the cloud optical depth and the water vapor concentration within the clouds. Atmospheres with saturated, optically-thick, low clouds absorbed about 12 W/sq m more than clear atmospheres. This accounts for about 1/2 to 1/3 of the anomalous ab- sorption. Atmospheres with optically thick middle and high clouds usually absorb less than clear atmospheres. Because water vapor is concentrated within and below the cloud tops, this absorber is most effective at small solar zenith angles. An additional absorber that is distributed at or above the cloud tops is needed to produce the amplitude and zenith angle dependence of the observed anomalous absorption.

  3. Fretting wear of iron, nickel, and titanium under varied environmental conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    Fretting wear experiments were conducted on high purity iron, nickel and titanium in air under conditions of varied humidity and temperature, and in nitrogen. For iron and titanium, maximum fretting occurred at 10 and 30 percent relative humidity respectively. Nickel showed a minimum in fretting wear at about 10 percent relative humidity. With increasing temperature, all three metals initially showed reduced fretting wear, with increasing wear observed as temperatures increased beyond 200-300 C. For titanium, dramatically reduced fretting wear was observed at temperatures above 500 C, relatable to a change in oxidation kinetics. All three metals showed much less fretting wear in N2 with the presence of moisture in N2 having a proportionally stronger effect than in air.

  4. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 {Angstrom}. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 {Angstrom}. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  5. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 [Angstrom]. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 [Angstrom]. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  6. Thermal and magnetic anomalies of α-iron: an exploration by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccato, Silvia; Sanson, Andrea; Kantor, Innokenty; Mathon, Olivier; Dyadkin, Vadim; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Carnera, Alberto; Pascarelli, Sakura

    2016-09-01

    The local structure and dynamics of α-iron have been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to shed light on some thermal and magnetic anomalies observed in the last decades. The quantitative EXAFS analysis of the first two coordination shells reveals a peculiar local vibrational dynamics of α-iron: the second neighbor distance exhibits anharmonicity and vibrational anisotropy larger than the first neighbor distance. We search for possible distortions of the bcc structure to justify the unexplained magnetostriction anomalies of α-iron and provide a value for the maximum dislocation of the central Fe atom. No thermal anomalies have been detected from the current XRD data. On the contrary, an intriguing thermal anomaly at about 150 K, ascribed to a stiffening of the Fe–Fe bonds, was found by EXAFS.

  7. Thermal and magnetic anomalies of α-iron: an exploration by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccato, Silvia; Sanson, Andrea; Kantor, Innokenty; Mathon, Olivier; Dyadkin, Vadim; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Carnera, Alberto; Pascarelli, Sakura

    2016-09-01

    The local structure and dynamics of α-iron have been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to shed light on some thermal and magnetic anomalies observed in the last decades. The quantitative EXAFS analysis of the first two coordination shells reveals a peculiar local vibrational dynamics of α-iron: the second neighbor distance exhibits anharmonicity and vibrational anisotropy larger than the first neighbor distance. We search for possible distortions of the bcc structure to justify the unexplained magnetostriction anomalies of α-iron and provide a value for the maximum dislocation of the central Fe atom. No thermal anomalies have been detected from the current XRD data. On the contrary, an intriguing thermal anomaly at about 150 K, ascribed to a stiffening of the Fe-Fe bonds, was found by EXAFS.

  8. Thermal and magnetic anomalies of α-iron: an exploration by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Boccato, Silvia; Sanson, Andrea; Kantor, Innokenty; Mathon, Olivier; Dyadkin, Vadim; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Carnera, Alberto; Pascarelli, Sakura

    2016-09-01

    The local structure and dynamics of α-iron have been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to shed light on some thermal and magnetic anomalies observed in the last decades. The quantitative EXAFS analysis of the first two coordination shells reveals a peculiar local vibrational dynamics of α-iron: the second neighbor distance exhibits anharmonicity and vibrational anisotropy larger than the first neighbor distance. We search for possible distortions of the bcc structure to justify the unexplained magnetostriction anomalies of α-iron and provide a value for the maximum dislocation of the central Fe atom. No thermal anomalies have been detected from the current XRD data. On the contrary, an intriguing thermal anomaly at about 150 K, ascribed to a stiffening of the Fe-Fe bonds, was found by EXAFS.

  9. Speciation of water soluble iron in size segregated airborne particulate matter using LED based liquid waveguide with a novel dispersive absorption spectroscopic measurement technique.

    PubMed

    Chan, K L; Jiang, S Y N; Ning, Z

    2016-03-31

    In this study, we present the development and evaluation of a dispersive absorption spectroscopic technique for trace level soluble ferrous detection. The technique makes use of the broadband absorption spectra of the ferrous-ferrozine complex with a novel spectral fitting algorithm to determine soluble ferrous concentrations in samples and achieves much improved measurement precision compared to conventional methods. The developed method was evaluated by both model simulations and experimental investigations. The results demonstrated the robustness of the method against the spectral fluctuation, wavelength drift and electronic noise, while achieving excellent linearity (R(2) > 0.999) and low detection limit (0.06 μg L(-1)) for soluble ferrous detection. The developed method was also used for the speciation of soluble iron in size segregated atmospheric aerosols. The measurement was carried out during Spring and Summer in typical urban environment in Hong Kong. The measured total iron concentrations are in good agreement compared to conventional Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES) measurements. Investigation on ambient particulate matter samples shows the size dependent characteristic of iron speciation in the atmosphere with a more active role of fine particles in transforming between ferrous and ferric. The method demonstrated in this study provides a cost and time effective approach for the speciation of iron in ambient aerosols. PMID:26965332

  10. Climatic thresholds for pedogenic iron oxides under aerobic conditions: Processes and their significance in paleoclimate reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Xiaoyong; Ji, Junfeng; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José

    2016-10-01

    Iron oxides are widely distributed across the surface of the Earth as a result of the aerobic weathering of primary Fe-bearing minerals. Pedogenic iron oxides which consist mainly of hematite (Hm), goethite (Gt), maghemite (Mgh), are often concentrated synchronously in aerobic soils under low to moderate rainfall regimes. Magnetic susceptibility (χ) and redness, which respectively reflect the content of Mgh and Hm in soils, are considered reasonable pedogenic and climatic indicators in soil taxonomy and paleorainfall reconstruction. However, under high rainfall regimes, the grain growth of Mgh and transformation to Hm, combined with the prior formation of Gt under conditions of high relative humidity (RH), can result in magnetic reduction and dramatic yellowing of soils and sediments, which explains the existence of rainfall thresholds for Mgh and Hm at a large scale even before the pedogenic environment turns anaerobic. In order to capture the rainfall thresholds for Mgh and Hm occurring under aerobic conditions, we explored a tropical transect across a granitic region where the soil color turned from red to yellow under a wide rainfall range of 900-2200 mm/yr and a corresponding mean annual RH range of 77%-85%. We observed a lower rainfall threshold of ∼1500 mm/yr and a corresponding RH ∼80% for Mgh and Hm along this transect, as well as a higher rainfall threshold of ∼1700 mm/yr and a corresponding RH of ∼81% for Gt and total pedogenic iron oxides (citrate/bicarbonate/dithionite-extractable Fe, Fed). Cross-referencing with comparable studies in temperate and subtropical regions, we noted that the rainfall or RH thresholds for Fed and Hm or Mgh likewise increase with temperature. Moreover, the different thresholds for total and individual iron oxide phase indicates that a negative correlation between chemical weathering intensity and redness or χ in sediment sequences can occur under the prevalent climate regime just between their thresholds. Finally

  11. Iron-silica interaction at extreme conditions and the electrically conducting layer at the base of Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Dubrovinsky, L; Dubrovinskaia, N; Langenhorst, F; Dobson, D; Rubie, D; Gessmann, C; Abrikosov, I A; Johansson, B; Baykov, V I; Vitos, L; Le Bihan, T; Crichton, W A; Dmitriev, V; Weber, H-P

    2003-03-01

    The boundary between the Earth's metallic core and its silicate mantle is characterized by strong lateral heterogeneity and sharp changes in density, seismic wave velocities, electrical conductivity and chemical composition. To investigate the composition and properties of the lowermost mantle, an understanding of the chemical reactions that take place between liquid iron and the complex Mg-Fe-Si-Al-oxides of the Earth's lower mantle is first required. Here we present a study of the interaction between iron and silica (SiO2) in electrically and laser-heated diamond anvil cells. In a multianvil apparatus at pressures up to 140 GPa and temperatures over 3,800 K we simulate conditions down to the core-mantle boundary. At high temperature and pressures below 40 GPa, iron and silica react to form iron oxide and an iron-silicon alloy, with up to 5 wt% silicon. At pressures of 85-140 GPa, however, iron and SiO2 do not react and iron-silicon alloys dissociate into almost pure iron and a CsCl-structured (B2) FeSi compound. Our experiments suggest that a metallic silicon-rich B2 phase, produced at the core-mantle boundary (owing to reactions between iron and silicate), could accumulate at the boundary between the mantle and core and explain the anomalously high electrical conductivity of this region.

  12. Understanding Sulfur Poisoning and Regeneration of Nickel Biomass Conditioning Catalysts using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, M. M.; Cheah, S.; Kuhn, J. N.

    2013-01-01

    The production of biofuels can proceed via a biomass gasification to produce syngas, which can then undergo catalytic conditioning and reforming reactions prior to being sent to a fuel synthesis reactor. Catalysts used for biomass conditioning are plagued by short lifetimes which are a result of, among other things, poisoning. Syngas produced from biomass gasification may contain between 30-300 ppm H2S, depending on the feedstock and gasification conditions, and H2S is a key catalyst poison. In order to overcome catalyst poisoning, either an H2S-tolerant catalyst or an efficient regeneration protocol should be employed. In this study, sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) was used to monitor sulfur species on spent catalyst samples and the transformation of these species from sulfides to sulfates during steam and air regeneration on a Ni/Mg/K/Al2O3 catalyst used to condition biomass-derived syngas. Additionally, nickel K-edge EXAFS and XANES are used to examine the state of nickel species on the catalysts. Post-reaction samples showed the presence of sulfides on the H2S-poisoned nickel catalyst and although some gaseous sulfur species were observed to leave the catalyst bed during regeneration, sulfur remained on the catalyst and a transformation from sulfides to sulfates was observed. The subsequent H2 reduction led to a partial reduction of sulfates back to sulfides. A proposed reaction sequence is presented and recommended regeneration strategies are discussed.

  13. Condition for unity absorption in an ultrathin and highly lossy film in a Gires-Tournois interferometer configuration.

    PubMed

    Park, Junghyun; Kim, Soo Jin; Brongersma, Mark L

    2015-05-01

    We present a condition for unity absorption for a Gires-Tournois interferometer configuration constructed from an ultrathin and highly lossy film on top of metallic mirror. From the impedance matching condition in the transmission line theory, we identify a solution space for the required complex refractive index of the lossy film in various film thickness and dielectric constants of the metallic mirror. It is shown that strong absorption requires the imaginary part of the refractive index of the ultrathin lossy film be larger than 0.64, and the physical origin of this condition is elucidated. The proposed method is useful in identifying candidate semiconductor materials that can be used as the lossy film in a unity-absorption Gires-Tournois interferometer configuration and designing the thickness of this film to maximize absorption.

  14. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. The goal of this investigation was to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  15. Particle extinction measured at ambient conditions with differential optical absorption spectroscopy. 1. system setup and characterization.

    PubMed

    Müller, Thomas; Müller, Detlef; Dubois, René

    2005-03-20

    We describe an instrument for measuring the particle extinction coefficient at ambient conditions in the spectral range from 270 to 1000 nm. It is based on a differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) system, which was originally used for measuring trace-gas concentrations of atmospheric absorbers in the ultraviolet-visible wavelength range. One obtains the particle extinction spectrum by measuring the total atmospheric extinction and subtracting trace-gas absorption and Rayleigh scattering. The instrument consists of two nested Newton-type telescopes, which are simultaneously used for emitting and detecting light, and two arrays of retroreflectors at the ends of the two light paths. The design of this new instrument solves crucial problems usually encountered in the design of such instruments. The telescope is actively repositioned during the measurement cycle. Particle extinction is simultaneously measured at several wavelengths by the use of two grating spectrometers. Optical turbulence causes lateral movement of the spot of light in the receiver telescope. Monitoring of the return signals with a diode permits correction for this effect. Phase-sensitive detection efficiently suppresses background signals from the atmosphere as well as from the instrument itself. The performance of the instrument was tested during a measurement period of 3 months from January to March 2000. The instrument ran without significant interruption during that period. A mean accuracy of 0.032 km(-1) was found for the extinction coefficient for an 11-day period in March. PMID:15813269

  16. Liquid Iron Alloys with Hydrogen at Outer Core Conditions by First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, K.; Hirose, K.

    2015-12-01

    Since the density of the outer core deduced from seismic data is about 10% lower than that of pure iron at core pressures and temperatures (P-T), it is widely believed that the outer core includes one or more light elements. Although intensive experimental and theoretical studies have been performed so far, the light element in the core has not yet been identified. Comparison of the density and sound velocity of liquid iron alloys with observations, such as the PREM, is a promising way to determine the species and quantity of light alloying component(s) in the outer core. Here we report the results of a first-principles molecular dynamics study on liquid iron alloyed with hydrogen, one of candidates of the light elements. Hydrogen had been much less studied than other candidates. However, hydrogen has been known to reduce the melting temperature of Fe-H solid [1]. Furthermore, very recently, Nomura et al. argued that the outer core may include 24 at.% H in order to be molten under relatively low temperature (< 3600 K) [2]. Since then hydrogen has attracted strong interests. We clarify the effects of hydrogen on density and sound velocity of liquid iron alloys under outer core P-T conditions. It is shown that ~1 wt% hydrogen can reproduce PREM density and sound velocity simultaneously very well. In addition, we show the presence of hydrogen rather reduces Gruneisen parameters. It indicates that, if hydrogen exists in the outer core, temperature profile of the outer core could be changed considerably from one estimated so far. [1] Sakamaki, K., E. Takahashi, Y. Nakajima, Y. Nishihara, K. Funakoshi, T. Suzuki, and Y. Fukai, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 174, 192-201 (2009). [2] Nomura, R., K. Hirose, K. Uesugi, Y. Ohishi, A. Tsuchiyama, A. Miyake, and Y. Ueno, Science 31, 522-525 (2014).

  17. Ionic liquid-based extraction followed by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of trace heavy metals in high-purity iron metal.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Hiroaki; Kato, Tatsuya; Hiraide, Masataka

    2014-02-01

    The analysis of high-purity materials for trace impurities is an important and challenging task. The present paper describes a facile and sensitive method for the determination of trace heavy metals in high-purity iron metal. Trace heavy metals in an iron sample solution were rapidly and selectively preconcentrated by the extraction into a tiny volume of an ionic liquid [1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide] for the determination by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). A nitrogen-donating neutral ligand, 2,4,6-tris(2-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine (TPTZ), was found to be effective in the ionic liquid-based selective extraction, allowing the nearly complete (~99.8%) elimination of the iron matrix. The combination with the optimized GFAAS was successful. The detectability reached sub-μg g(-1) levels in iron metal. The novel use of TPTZ in ionic liquid-based extraction followed by GFAAS was successfully applied to the determination of traces of Co, Ni, Cu, Cd, and Pb in certified reference materials for high-purity iron metal.

  18. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    The recognition of the need to make laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressure which correspond to the altitudes probed by radio occultation experiments, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. Construction was completed of the outer planets simulator and measurements were conducted of the microwave absorption and refraction from nitrogen under simulated Titan conditions. The results of these and previous laboratory measurements were applied to a wide range of microwave opacity measurements, in order to derive constituent densities and distributions in planetary atmospheres such as Venus.

  19. Erosive Wear Behavior of High-Alloy Cast Iron and Duplex Stainless Steel under Mining Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoganandh, J.; Natarajan, S.; Kumaresh Babu, S. P.

    2015-09-01

    Centrifugal pumps used in the lignite mines encounter erosive wear problems, leading to a disastrous failure of the pump casings. This paper attempts to evaluate the erosive wear resistance of Ni-Hard 4, high-chromium iron, and Cast CD4MCu duplex stainless steel (DSS), for mining conditions. The prepared test coupons were subjected to an erosion test by varying the impingement velocity and the angle of impingement, under two different pH conditions of 3 and 7, which pertained to the mining conditions. XRD analysis was carried out to confirm the phases present in the alloy. The eroded surface was subjected to SEM analysis to identify the erosion mechanisms. The surface degradation of Ni-Hard 4 and high-chromium iron came from a low-angle abrasion with a grooving and plowing mechanism at a low angle of impingement. At normal impingement, deep indentations resulted in lips and crater formations, leading to degradation of the surface in a brittle manner. A combined extrusion-forging mechanism is observed in the CD4MCu DSS surface at all the impingement angles.

  20. Iron deficiency: new insights into diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Camaschella, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are common conditions worldwide affecting especially children and young women. In developing countries, iron deficiency is caused by poor iron intake and/or parasitic infection, whereas vegetarian dietary choices, poor iron absorption, and chronic blood loss are common causes in high-income countries. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents can result in functional iron deficiency for erythropoiesis even when stores are iron-replete. Diagnosis of iron deficiency is straightforward, except when it occurs in the context of inflammatory disorders. Oral iron salts correct absolute iron deficiency in most patients, because low hepcidin levels facilitate iron absorption. Unfortunately frequent side effects limit oral iron efficacy. Intravenous iron is increasingly utilized, because currently available preparations allow rapid normalization of total body iron even with a single infusion and are effective also in functional iron deficiency and in iron deficiency associated with inflammatory disorders. The evidence is accumulating that these preparations are safe and effective. However, long-term safety issues of high doses of iron need to be further explored.

  1. Iron deficiency: new insights into diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Camaschella, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are common conditions worldwide affecting especially children and young women. In developing countries, iron deficiency is caused by poor iron intake and/or parasitic infection, whereas vegetarian dietary choices, poor iron absorption, and chronic blood loss are common causes in high-income countries. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents can result in functional iron deficiency for erythropoiesis even when stores are iron-replete. Diagnosis of iron deficiency is straightforward, except when it occurs in the context of inflammatory disorders. Oral iron salts correct absolute iron deficiency in most patients, because low hepcidin levels facilitate iron absorption. Unfortunately frequent side effects limit oral iron efficacy. Intravenous iron is increasingly utilized, because currently available preparations allow rapid normalization of total body iron even with a single infusion and are effective also in functional iron deficiency and in iron deficiency associated with inflammatory disorders. The evidence is accumulating that these preparations are safe and effective. However, long-term safety issues of high doses of iron need to be further explored. PMID:26637694

  2. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1992-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The use of theoretically-derived microwave absorption properties for such atmospheric constituents, or using laboratory measurements of such properties under environmental conditions which are significantly different than those of the planetary atmosphere being studied, often leads to significant misinterpretation of available opacity data. For example, laboratory measurements performed by Fahd and Steffes have shown that the opacity from gaseous SO2 under simulated Venus conditions can be well described by the Van Vleck-Weisskopf lineshape at wavelengths shortward of 2 cm, but that the opacity of wavelengths greater than 2 cm is best described by a different lineshape that was previously used in theoretical predictions. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  3. Dominance of goethite over hematite in iron oxides of mineral dust from Western Africa: Quantitative partitioning by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formenti, P.; Caquineau, S.; Chevaillier, S.; Klaver, A.; Desboeufs, K.; Rajot, J. L.; Belin, S.; Briois, V.

    2014-11-01

    This paper reports on the X-ray absorption analysis of samples of mineral dust emitted from or transported to Western Africa. We found that iron oxides account, by mass, for 38% to 72% of the total elemental iron. They are composed of minerals in the Fe(III) oxidation state: goethite (FeO·OH) and hematite (Fe2O3). The apparent fraction of iron oxide attributed to goethite is higher than hematite regardless of the source region from which the dust originated. The goethite percent content of iron oxides is in the range 52-78% (by mass), the highest values being measured for dust originating in the Sahel. The limited number of samples analyzed and the sample-to-sample variability prevent us from concluding firmly on the regional variability of the goethite-to-hematite ratio. Based on the experimental data on mineralogical composition and on concurrent measurements of the number size distribution, the optical properties of mineral dust have been calculated in a Mie approximation for homogeneous spherical particles. At 550 nm, the single-scattering albedo ω0 ranges between 0.89 and 0.93, the asymmetry factor g ranges between 0.76 and 0.8 and the mass extinction efficiency kext varies between 0.5 and 1.1 m2 g-1; these values are all in the range of those from independent direct measurements. Neglecting the partitioning between hematite and goethite and the assimilation of iron oxides by hematite, as it is often done with models, lowers the single-scattering albedo and increases the asymmetry factor in the UV-visible spectral region below 550 nm. The mass extinction efficiency is insensitive to the nature of the iron oxides but rather responds to variations in the number size distribution. The mineralogy of iron oxides should therefore be taken into account when assessing the effect of mineral dust on climate and atmospheric chemistry, in particular via interactions involving photolysis.

  4. Effect of bionic coupling units' forms on wear resistance of gray cast iron under dry linear reciprocating sliding condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Xie, Guofeng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Ren, Luquan

    2015-07-01

    In order to get close to the wear form of guide rails, the homemade linear reciprocating wear testing machine was used for the wear test. In order to improve the wear-resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, bionic coupling units of different forms were manufactured by a laser. Wear behavior of gray-cast-iron with bionic-coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using the wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that bionic coupling unit could improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron. The wear resistance of gray cast iron with reticulation bionic coupling unit is the best. When the load and speed changed, reticulation bionic coupling unit still has excellent performance in improving the wear resistance of gray cast iron.

  5. Density of alkaline magmas at crustal and upper mantle conditions by X-ray absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, R.; Malfait, W.; Petitgirard, S.; Sanchez-Valle, C.

    2011-12-01

    Silicate melts are essential components of igneous processes and are directly involved in differentiation processes and heat transfer within the Earth. Studies of the physical properties of magmas (e.g., density, viscosity, conductivity, etc) are however challenging and experimental data at geologically relevant pressure and temperature conditions remain scarce. For example, there is virtually no data on the density at high pressure of alkaline magmas (e.g., phonolites) typically found in continental rift zone settings. We present in situ density measurements of alkaline magmas at crustal and upper mantle conditions using synchrotron X-ray absorption. Measurements were conducted on ID27 beamline at ESRF using a panoramic Paris-Edinburgh Press (PE Press). The starting material is a synthetic haplo-phonolite glass similar in composition to the Plateau flood phonolites from the Kenya rift [1]. The glass was synthesized at 1673 K and 2.0 GPa in a piston-cylinder apparatus at ETH Zurich and characterized using EPMA, FTIR and density measurements. The sample contains less than 200 ppm water and is free of CO2. Single-crystal diamond cylinders (Øin = 0.5 mm, height = 1 mm) were used as sample containers and placed in an assembly formed by hBN spacers, a graphite heater and a boron epoxy gasket [2]. The density was determined as a function of pressure (1.0 to 3.1 GPa) and temperature (1630-1860 K) from the X-ray absorption contrast at 20 keV between the sample and the diamond capsule. The molten state of the sample during the data collection was confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements. Pressure and temperature were determined simultaneously from the equation of state of hBN and platinum using the the double isochor method [3].The results are combined with available density data at room conditions to derive the first experimental equation of state (EOS) of phonolitic liquids at crustal and upper mantle conditions. We will compare our results with recent reports of the

  6. Simultaneous measurement of 59Fe and 51Cr in iron absorption studies using a whole-body scanner with mobile shielding.

    PubMed

    Marx, J J; van den Beld, B; van Dongen, R; Strackee, L H

    1980-07-01

    A whole-body scanner is described with a mobile shadow shield which affords a considerable reduction in space. The scanner has two NaI(T1) scintillation crystals of 4 x 6", placed at opposite sites of the subject. Background radiation, efficiency and geometric qualities made the scanner very useful for clinical whole-body counting. The equipment was used in iron absorption studies using a double isotope technique with 59Fe and 51Cr. After ingestion of an oral test dose total body kinetics of 59Fe and 51Cr was followed up to 60 days in 4 volunteers. Between days 3 and 10 the 51Cr, which was used as an non-absorbable indicator, had left the body completely. The 59Fe reached a constant value not before day 10, indicating that iron retention cannot be measured before that time. From repeated measurement of 59Fe and 51Cr directly after ingestion until the first defaecation it could be deduced that the coefficient of variation for 59Fe was less than 1.5% with a scanning time of 600 sec, and for 51Cr less than 5%. Extreme variations in geometry, such as measurement of the activity in a beaker and of the same amount after ingestion in the body, yielded practically the same value for 59Fe. The double isotope technique made it possible to measure not only iron retention but also mucosal uptake and mucosal transfer of iron. It is pointed out that measurement of the last two parameters of iron absorption is not possible in patients with serious obstipation or with very low mucosal uptake values. PMID:6780983

  7. Effects of surface condition on aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, R.L.; Buchanan, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    Effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides (FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo), a FeAl-based iron aluminide (FA-385), and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy (FAPY) were evaluated. All tests were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution. In cyclic-anodic-polarization testing for aqueous-corrosion behavior, the surface conditions examined were: as-received (i.e., with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned and chemically cleaned. For all materials, the polarization tests showed the critical pitting potentials to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. These results indicate detrimental effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased susceptibilities to localized corrosion. In 200-hour U-bend stress-corrosion-cracking tests for environmental-embrittlement behavior, conducted at open-circuit corrosion potentials and at a hydrogen-charging potential of {minus}1500 mV (SHE), the above materials (except FA-385) were examined with retained oxides and with mechanically cleaned surfaces. At the open-circuit corrosion potentials, none of the materials in either surface condition underwent cracking. At the hydrogen-charging potential, none of the materials with retained oxides underwent cracking, but FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo in the mechanically cleaned condition did undergo cracking. These results suggest beneficial effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased resistance to environmental hydrogen embrittlement.

  8. A Nanoparticulate Ferritin-Core Mimetic Is Well Taken Up by HuTu 80 Duodenal Cells and Its Absorption in Mice Is Regulated by Body Iron12

    PubMed Central

    Latunde-Dada, Gladys O; Pereira, Dora IA; Tempest, Bethan; Ilyas, Hibah; Flynn, Angela C; Aslam, Mohamad F; Simpson, Robert J; Powell, Jonathan J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Iron (Fe) deficiency anemia remains the largest nutritional deficiency disorder worldwide. How the gut acquires iron from nano Fe(III), especially at the apical surface, is incompletely understood. Objective: We developed a novel Fe supplement consisting of nanoparticulate tartrate-modified Fe(III) poly oxo-hydroxide [here termed nano Fe(III)], which mimics the Fe oxide core of ferritin and effectively treats iron deficiency anemia in rats. Methods: We determined transfer to the systemic circulation of nano Fe(III) in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient outbread Swiss mouse strain (CD1) mice with use of 59Fe-labeled material. Iron deficiency was induced before starting the Fe-supplementation period through reduction of Fe concentrations in the rodent diet. A control group of iron-sufficient mice were fed a diet with adequate Fe concentrations throughout the study. Furthermore, we conducted a hemoglobin repletion study in which iron-deficient CD1 mice were fed for 7 d a diet supplemented with ferrous sulfate (FeSO4) or nano Fe(III). Finally, we further probed the mechanism of cellular acquisition of nano Fe(III) by assessing ferritin formation, as a measure of Fe uptake and utilization, in HuTu 80 duodenal cancer cells with targeted inhibition of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) and duodenal cytochrome b (DCYTB) before exposure to the supplemented iron sources. Differences in gene expression were assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results: Absorption (means ± SEMs) of nano Fe(III) was significantly increased in iron-deficient mice (58 ± 19%) compared to iron-sufficient mice (18 ± 17%) (P = 0.0001). Supplementation of the diet with nano Fe(III) or FeSO4 significantly increased hemoglobin concentrations in iron-deficient mice (170 ± 20 g/L, P = 0.01 and 180 ± 20 g/L, P = 0.002, respectively). Hepatic hepcidin mRNA expression reflected the nonheme-iron concentrations of the liver and was also comparable for both nano Fe(III)– and

  9. Structural characterization of poorly-crystalline scorodite, iron(III)-arsenate co-precipitates and uranium mill neutralized raffinate solids using X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N; Jiang, D T; Cutler, J; Kotzer, T; Jia, Y F; Demopoulos, G P; Rowson, J W

    2009-12-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) is used to characterize the mineralogy of the iron(III)-arsenate(V) precipitates produced during the raffinate (aqueous effluent) neutralization process at the McClean Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. To facilitate the structural characterization of the precipitated solids derived from the neutralized raffinate, a set of reference compounds were synthesized and analyzed. The reference compounds include crystalline scorodite, poorly-crystalline scorodite, iron(III)-arsenate co-precipitates obtained under different pH conditions, and arsenate-adsorbed on goethite. The poorly-crystalline scorodite (prepared at pH 4 with Fe/As = 1) has similar As local structure as that of crystalline scorodite. Both As and Fe K-edge XAFS of poorly-crystalline scorodite yield consistent results on As-Fe (or Fe-As) shell. From As K-edge analysis the As-Fe shell has an inter-atomic distance of 3.33 ± 0.02 Å and coordination number of 3.2; while from Fe K-edge analysis the Fe-As distance and coordination number are 3.31 ± 0.02 Å and 3.8, respectively. These are in contrast with the typical arsenate adsorption on bidentate binuclear sites on goethite surfaces, where the As-Fe distance is 3.26 ± 0.03 Å and coordination number is close to 2. A similar local structure identified in the poorly-crystalline scorodite is also found in co-precipitation solids (Fe(III)/As(V) = 3) when precipitated at the same pH (pH = 4): As-Fe distance 3.30 ± 0.03 Å and coordination number 3.9; while at pH = 8 the co-precipitate has As-Fe distance of 3.27 ± 0.03 Å and coordination number about 2, resembling more closely the adsorption case. The As local structure in the two neutralized raffinate solid series (precipitated at pH values up to 7) closely resembles that in the poorly-crystalline scorodite. All of the raffinate solids have the same As-Fe inter-atomic distance as that in the poorly-crystalline scorodite, and a systematic decrease in the

  10. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of microwave and millimeter wave properties of the simulated atmosphere of the outer planets and their satellites has continued. One of the focuses is on the development of a radiative transfer model of the Jovian atmosphere at wavelengths from 1 mm to 10 cm. This modeling effort led to laboratory measurements of the millimeter wave opacity of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) under simulated Jovian conditions. Descriptions of the modeling effort, the Laboratory experiment, and the observations are presented. Correlative studies of measurements with Pioneer-Venus radio occultation measurements with longer wavelength emission measurements have provided new ways for characterizing temporal and spatial variations in the abundance of both gases H2SO4 and SO2, and for modeling their roles in the subcloud atmosphere. Laboratory measurements were conducted on 1.35 cm (and 13 cm) opacity of gaseous SO2 and absorptivity of gaseous SO2 at the 3.2 mm wavelength under simulated Venus conditions. Laboratory measurements were completed on millimeter wave dielectric properties of liquid H2SO4, in order to model the effects of the opacity of the clouds of Venus onto millimeter wave emission spectrum.

  11. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1988-01-01

    In the first half of this grant year, laboratory measurements were conducted on the millimeter-wave properties of atmospheric gases under simulated conditions for the outer planet. Significant improvements in the current system have made it possible to accurately characterize the opacity from gaseous NH3 at longer millimeter wavelengths (7 to 10 mm) under simulated Jovian conditions. In the second half of the grant year, it is hoped to extend such measurements to even shorter millimeter-wavelengths. Further analysis and application of the laboratory results to microwave and millimeter-wave absorption data for the outer planets, such as results from Voyager Radio Occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations will be continued. The analysis of available multispectral microwave opacity data from Venus, including data from the most recent radio astronomical ovservations in the 1.3 to 3.6 cm wavelength range and newly obtained Pioneer-Venus Radio Occulatation measurements at 13 cm, using the laboratory measurements as an interpretative tool will be pursued.

  12. Corrosion of iron, aluminum and copper-base alloys in glycols under simulated solar collector conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Diegle, R.B.

    1981-10-01

    The corrosion behavior of iron, aluminum and copperbase alloys was studied in uninhibited glycol solutions under conditions that simulate those found in non-concentrating solar collectors. It was found that only Type 444 stainless steel exhibited adequate corrosion resistance; there was no evidence of pitting, crevice corrosion, or galvanic attack, and general corrosion rates were low. The general corrosion rate of CDA 122 copper was high (greater than 200 ..mu..m/y) under some test conditions, but copper was resistant to pitting and crevice attack. General corrosion rates of the aluminum alloys (1100, 3003 and 6061) were low, but these alloys were susceptible to pitting and crevice attack. The propensity for pitting was greatest in the presence of chlorides but it also was severe in the absence of chlorides following long exposures. The onset of pitting of the aluminum alloys in chloride-free solutions was attributed to degradation of the glycols.

  13. Microbial Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Under Iron Reducing Conditions, Alternative Electron Acceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Urigüen, M.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Autotrophic Acidimicrobiaceae-bacterium named A6 (A6), part of the Actinobacteria phylum have been linked to anaerobic ammonium (NH4+) oxidation under iron reducing conditions. These organisms obtain their energy by oxidizing NH4+ and transferring the electrons to a terminal electron acceptor (TEA). Under environmental conditions, the TEAs are iron oxides [Fe(III)], which are reduced to Fe(II), this process is known as Feammox. Our studies indicate that alternative forms of TEAs can be used by A6, e.g. iron rich clays (i.e. nontronite) and electrodes in bioelectrochemical systems such as Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs), which can sustain NH4+removal and A6 biomass production. Our results show that nontronite can support Feammox and promote bacterial cell production. A6 biomass increased from 4.7 x 104 to 3.9 x 105 cells/ml in 10 days. Incubations of A6 in nontronite resulted in up to 10 times more NH4+ removal and 3 times more biomass production than when ferrihydrite is used as the Fe(III) source. Additionally, Fe in nontronite can be reoxidized by aeration and A6 can reutilize it; however, Fe is still finite in the clay. In contrast, in MECs, A6 harvest electrons from NH4+ and use an anode as an unlimited TEA, as a result current is produced. We operated multiple MECs in parallel using a single external power source, as described by Call & Logan (2011). MECs were run with an applied voltage of 0.7V and different growing mediums always containing initial 5mM NH4+. Results show that current production is favored when anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an electron shuttled, is present in the medium as it facilitates the transfer of electrons from the bacterial cell to the anode. Additionally, A6 biomass increased from 1 x 104 to 9.77 x 105cells/ml in 14 days of operation. Due to Acidimicrobiaceae-bacterium A6's ability to use various TEAs, MECs represent an alternative, iron-free form, for optimized biomass production of A6 and its application in NH4

  14. The structure of genetically modified iron-sulfur cluster F(x) in photosystem I as determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiao-Min; Hochman, Yehoshua; Lev, Tal; Bunker, Grant; Carmeli, Chanoch

    2009-02-01

    Photosystem I (PS I) mediates light-induced electron transfer from P700 through a chlorophyll a, a quinone and a [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster F(X), located on the core subunits PsaA/B to iron-sulfur clusters F(A/B) on subunit PsaC. Structure function relations in the native and in the mutant (psaB-C565S/D566E) of the cysteine ligand of F(X) cluster were studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS) and transient spectroscopy. The structure of F(X) was determined in PS I lacking clusters F(A/B) by interruption of the psaC2 gene of PS I in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp PCC 6803. PsaC-deficient mutant cells assembled the core subunits of PS I which mediated electron transfer mostly to the phylloquinone. EXAFS analysis of the iron resolved a [4Fe-4S] cluster in the native PsaC-deficient PS I. Each iron had 4 sulfur and 3 iron atoms in the first and second shells with average Fe-S and Fe-Fe distances of 2.27 A and 2.69 A, respectively. In the C565S/D566E serine mutant, one of the irons of the cluster was ligated to three oxygen atoms with Fe-O distance of 1.81 A. The possibility that the structural changes induced an increase in the reorganization energy that consequently decreased the rate of electron transfer from the phylloquinone to F(X) is discussed.

  15. Ingestion of insoluble dietary fibre increased zinc and iron absorption and restored growth rate and zinc absorption suppressed by dietary phytate in rats.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Hara, H; Asvarujanon, P; Aoyama, Y; Luangpituksa, P

    2001-10-01

    We examined the effects of ingestion of five types of insoluble fibre on growth and Zn absorption in rats fed a marginally Zn-deficient diet (6.75 mg (0.103 mmol) Zn/kg diet) with or without added sodium phytate (12.6 mmol/kg diet). The types of insoluble fibre tested were corn husks, watermelon skin, yam-bean root (Pachyrhizus erosus) and pineapple core, and cellulose was used as a control (100 g/kg diet). Body-weight gain in the cellulose groups was suppressed by 57 % by feeding phytate. Body-weight gain in phytate-fed rats was 80 % greater in the watermelon skin fibre and yam-bean root fibre group than that in the cellulose group. Zn absorption ratio in the cellulose groups was lowered by 46 and 70 % in the first (days 7-10) and second (days 16-19) measurement periods with feeding phytate. In the rats fed the phytate-containing diets, Zn absorption ratio in the watermelon skin, yam-bean root and pineapple core fibre groups was 140, 80 and 54 % higher respectively than that in the cellulose group, in the second period. Fe absorption was not suppressed by phytate, however, feeding of these three types of fibre promoted Fe absorption in rats fed phytate-free diets. The concentration of soluble Zn in the caecal contents in the watermelon skin fibre or yam-bean root fibre groups was identical to that in the control group in spite of a higher short-chain fatty acid concentration and lower pH in the caecum. These findings indicate that ingestion of these types of insoluble fibre recovered the growth and Zn absorption suppressed by feeding a high level of phytate, and factors other than caecal fermentation may also be involved in this effect of insoluble fibre. PMID:11591231

  16. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since the pioneering research by Shoden in 1953. However, we recently developed a new method for determining ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron by computer-assisted serum ferritin kinetics. Serum ferritin increase or decrease curves were measured in patients with normal storage iron levels (chronic hepatitis C and iron deficiency anemia treated by intravenous iron injection), and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis and transfusion dependent anemia). We thereby confirmed the existence of two iron pathways where iron flows followed the numbered order (1) labile iron, (2) ferritin and (3) hemosiderin in iron deposition and mobilization among many previously proposed but mostly unproven routes. We also demonstrated the increasing and decreasing phases of ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron in iron deposition and mobilization. The author first demonstrated here the change in proportion between pre-existing ferritin iron and new ferritin iron synthesized by removing iron from hemosiderin in the course of iron removal. In addition, the author disclosed the cause of underestimation of storage iron turnover rate which had been reported by previous investigators in estimating storage iron turnover rate of normal subjects. PMID:25741033

  17. A Green Analytical Method Using Ultrasound in Sample Preparation for the Flow Injection Determination of Iron, Manganese, and Zinc in Soluble Solid Samples by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yebra, M. Carmen

    2012-01-01

    A simple and rapid analytical method was developed for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid samples. The method is based on continuous ultrasonic water dissolution of the sample (5–30 mg) at room temperature followed by flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination. A good precision of the whole procedure (1.2–4.6%) and a sample throughput of ca. 25 samples h–1 were obtained. The proposed green analytical method has been successfully applied for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid food samples (soluble cocoa and soluble coffee) and pharmaceutical preparations (multivitamin tablets). The ranges of concentrations found were 21.4–25.61 μg g−1 for iron, 5.74–18.30 μg g−1 for manganese, and 33.27–57.90 μg g−1 for zinc in soluble solid food samples and 3.75–9.90 μg g−1 for iron, 0.47–5.05 μg g−1 for manganese, and 1.55–15.12 μg g−1 for zinc in multivitamin tablets. The accuracy of the proposed method was established by a comparison with the conventional wet acid digestion method using a paired t-test, indicating the absence of systematic errors. PMID:22567553

  18. A green analytical method using ultrasound in sample preparation for the flow injection determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid samples by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yebra, M Carmen

    2012-01-01

    A simple and rapid analytical method was developed for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid samples. The method is based on continuous ultrasonic water dissolution of the sample (5-30 mg) at room temperature followed by flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination. A good precision of the whole procedure (1.2-4.6%) and a sample throughput of ca. 25 samples h(-1) were obtained. The proposed green analytical method has been successfully applied for the determination of iron, manganese, and zinc in soluble solid food samples (soluble cocoa and soluble coffee) and pharmaceutical preparations (multivitamin tablets). The ranges of concentrations found were 21.4-25.61 μg g(-1) for iron, 5.74-18.30 μg g(-1) for manganese, and 33.27-57.90 μg g(-1) for zinc in soluble solid food samples and 3.75-9.90 μg g(-1) for iron, 0.47-5.05 μg g(-1) for manganese, and 1.55-15.12 μg g(-1) for zinc in multivitamin tablets. The accuracy of the proposed method was established by a comparison with the conventional wet acid digestion method using a paired t-test, indicating the absence of systematic errors. PMID:22567553

  19. Effect of surface condition on the aqueous corrosion behavior of iron aluminies

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    The effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion characteristics of Fe-Al-based alloys were evaluated by electrochemical methods. Cyclic anodic polarization evaluations were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution (pH = 4,200 ppm Cl{sup {minus}}) on the Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides, FA-84 (Fe-28Al-2Cr-0.05B, at %), FA-129 (Fe-28Al-5Cr-0.5Nb-0.2C, at %), and FAL-Mo (Fe-28Al-5Cr-1Mo-0.04B-0.08Zr, at %), on the FeAl-based iron aluminide, FA-385 (Fe-35.65Al-0.20Mo-0.05Zr-0.11C, at %). The surface conditions evaluated were: As received (i.e. with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned (ground through 600-grit SiC paper), and chemically cleaned (10% HNO{sub 3}, 2%HF, at 43 {degree}C). The principal electrochemical parameter of interest was the critical putting potential with lower values indicating less resistance to chloride-induced localized corrosion. For all materials evaluated, the critical pitting potential was found to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. Mechanisms responsible for the detrimental high-temperature-oxide effect are under study.

  20. Complete reduction of TNT and other (poly)nitroaromatic compounds under iron-reducing subsurface conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, T.B.; Haderlein, S.B.; Schwarzenbach, R.P.; Heijman, C.G.; Holliger, C.

    1999-05-01

    Contamination of soils and aquifers with (poly)nitroaromatic compounds ((P)NACs) is a widespread problem. This work demonstrates that (P)NACs such as the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) can be completely reduced to the corresponding aromatic polyamines by Fe(II) present at the surface of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides or, less efficiently, by hydroquinone moieties of (natural) organic matter in the presence of H{sub 2}S. The reduction kinetics of (P)NACs were investigated in sterile batch systems as well as in columns containing either FeOOH-coated sand and a pure culture of the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacter metallireducens or ferrogenic consortia in aquifer sediments. The relative reactivities as well as the competition behavior of (P)NACs in batch and column systems, respectively, correlated well with their one-electron reduction potentials, E{sub h}{sup 1}{prime}, which the authors determined for TNT and its aminonitrotoluene transformation products. A similar reactivity pattern of (P)NACs was found irrespective of the processes that (re)generated the surface-bound Fe(II), i.e., adsorption of Fe(II) from aqueous solution or microbial reduction of Fe(III)(hydr)oxides. The apparent stability of the toxic arylamine products under ferrogenic conditions may compromise intrinsic attenuation as an acceptable remediation option for (P)NAC contaminated anoxic aquifers. Iron-reducing conditions would, however, be favorable as a first step in a two-stage anaerobic/aerobic treatment of PNAC contaminated sediments since aromatic polyamines are biodegradable and/or bind irreversibly to the solid matrix under oxic conditions.

  1. Reduction of the Temperature Sensitivity of Halomonas hydrothermalis by Iron Starvation Combined with Microaerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hallsworth, John E.; Cockell, Charles S.

    2015-01-01

    The limits to biological processes on Earth are determined by physicochemical parameters, such as extremes of temperature and low water availability. Research into microbial extremophiles has enhanced our understanding of the biophysical boundaries which define the biosphere. However, there remains a paucity of information on the degree to which rates of microbial multiplication within extreme environments are determined by the availability of specific chemical elements. Here, we show that iron availability and the composition of the gaseous phase (aerobic versus microaerobic) determine the susceptibility of a marine bacterium, Halomonas hydrothermalis, to suboptimal and elevated temperature and salinity by impacting rates of cell division (but not viability). In particular, iron starvation combined with microaerobic conditions (5% [vol/vol] O2, 10% [vol/vol] CO2, reduced pH) reduced sensitivity to temperature across the 13°C range tested. These data demonstrate that nutrient limitation interacts with physicochemical parameters to determine biological permissiveness for extreme environments. The interplay between resource availability and stress tolerance, therefore, may shape the distribution and ecology of microorganisms within Earth's biosphere. PMID:25595757

  2. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions.

    PubMed

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2016-06-01

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth's core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth's magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth's core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth's core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18-44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth's geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth's history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo. PMID:27251283

  3. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R. Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-06-01

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth’s core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth’s magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth’s core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth’s core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18-44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth’s geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth’s history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo.

  4. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R. Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2016-06-01

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth’s core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth’s magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth’s core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth’s core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18–44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth’s geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth’s history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo.

  5. Direct measurement of thermal conductivity in solid iron at planetary core conditions.

    PubMed

    Konôpková, Zuzana; McWilliams, R Stewart; Gómez-Pérez, Natalia; Goncharov, Alexander F

    2016-06-01

    The conduction of heat through minerals and melts at extreme pressures and temperatures is of central importance to the evolution and dynamics of planets. In the cooling Earth's core, the thermal conductivity of iron alloys defines the adiabatic heat flux and therefore the thermal and compositional energy available to support the production of Earth's magnetic field via dynamo action. Attempts to describe thermal transport in Earth's core have been problematic, with predictions of high thermal conductivity at odds with traditional geophysical models and direct evidence for a primordial magnetic field in the rock record. Measurements of core heat transport are needed to resolve this difference. Here we present direct measurements of the thermal conductivity of solid iron at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the cores of Mercury-sized to Earth-sized planets, using a dynamically laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. Our measurements place the thermal conductivity of Earth's core near the low end of previous estimates, at 18-44 watts per metre per kelvin. The result is in agreement with palaeomagnetic measurements indicating that Earth's geodynamo has persisted since the beginning of Earth's history, and allows for a solid inner core as old as the dynamo.

  6. Widespread iron-rich conditions in the mid-Proterozoic ocean.

    PubMed

    Planavsky, Noah J; McGoldrick, Peter; Scott, Clinton T; Li, Chao; Reinhard, Christopher T; Kelly, Amy E; Chu, Xuelei; Bekker, Andrey; Love, Gordon D; Lyons, Timothy W

    2011-09-07

    The chemical composition of the ocean changed markedly with the oxidation of the Earth's surface, and this process has profoundly influenced the evolutionary and ecological history of life. The early Earth was characterized by a reducing ocean-atmosphere system, whereas the Phanerozoic eon (less than 542 million years ago) is known for a stable and oxygenated biosphere conducive to the radiation of animals. The redox characteristics of surface environments during Earth's middle age (1.8-1 billion years ago) are less well known, but it is generally assumed that the mid-Proterozoic was home to a globally sulphidic (euxinic) deep ocean. Here we present iron data from a suite of mid-Proterozoic marine mudstones. Contrary to the popular model, our results indicate that ferruginous (anoxic and Fe(2+)-rich) conditions were both spatially and temporally extensive across diverse palaeogeographic settings in the mid-Proterozoic ocean, inviting new models for the temporal distribution of iron formations and the availability of bioessential trace elements during a critical window for eukaryotic evolution.

  7. Liquid iron-hydrogen alloys at outer core conditions by first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemoto, Koichiro; Hirose, Kei

    2015-09-01

    We examined the density, bulk sound (compressional) velocity, and Grüneisen parameter of liquid pure Fe, Fe100H28 (0.50 wt % H), Fe88H40 (0.81 wt % H), and Fe76H52 (1.22 wt % H) at Earth's outer core pressure and temperature (P-T) conditions (~100 to 350 GPa, 4000 to 7000 K) based on first-principles molecular dynamics calculations. The results demonstrate that the thermodynamic Grüneisen parameter of liquid iron alloy decreases with increasing pressure, temperature, and hydrogen concentration, indicating a relatively small temperature gradient in the outer core when hydrogen is present. Along such temperature profile, both the density and compressional velocity of liquid iron containing ~1 wt % hydrogen match seismological observations. It suggests that hydrogen could be a primary light element in the core, although the shear velocity of the inner core is not reconciled with solid Fe-H alloy and thus requires another impurity element.

  8. Microwave Assisted Synthesis of Iron(III) Oxyhydroxides/Oxides Characterized Using Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray Diffraction, and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, J.G.; Luna, C.; Botez, C.E.; Elizalde, J.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    Microwave assisted synthesis of iron oxide/oxyhydroxide nanophases was conducted using iron(III) chloride titrated with sodium hydroxide at seven different temperatures from 100°C to 250°C with pulsed microwaves. From the XRD results, it was determined that there were two different phases synthesized during the reactions which were temperature dependent. At the lower temperatures, 100°C and 125°C, it was determined that an iron oxyhydroxide chloride was synthesized. Whereas, at higher temperatures, at 150°C and above, iron(III) oxide was synthesized. From the XRD, we also determined the FWHM and the average size of the nanoparticles using the Scherrer equation. The average size of the nanoparticles synthesized using the experimental conditions were 17, 21, 12, 22, 26, 33, 28 nm, respectively for the reactions from 100°C to 250°C. The particles also had low anisotropy indicating spherical nanoparticles, which was later confirmed using TEM. Finally, XAS studies show that the iron present in the nanophase was present as iron(III) coordinated to six oxygen atoms in the first coordination shell. The higher coordination shells also conform very closely to the ideal or bulk crystal structures. PMID:20161181

  9. Do thickening properties of locust bean gum affect the amount of calcium, iron and zinc available for absorption from infant formula? In vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Bosscher, D; Van Caillie-Bertrand, M; Deelstra, H

    2003-07-01

    Locust bean gum acts as a milk thickener in infant formula because of its high apparent viscosity. The effects of such thickening agents on metabolic and physiologic responses during infancy have not been clarified sufficiently. Due to the increased volume of the digest and the bulking and trapping effects, digestion and absorption of nutrients may be influenced in presence of locust bean gum. The central question addressed in this paper is whether the thickening properties of locust bean gum affect the availability of calcium, iron, and zinc. Increasing amounts of powdered locust bean gum were homogenised with infant formula and samples were diluted to 0.14, 0.27, 0.42 and 0.71 g/100 ml. Viscosity of the samples was measured by a Carrie-Med CSL100 rheometer. Available amounts of calcium, iron, and zinc were evaluated using a continuous-flow dialysis model with preliminary digestion. Elemental contents of samples and dialysates were analysed with atomic absorption spectrometry. The first set of experiments showed that addition of locust bean gum to infant formulas increased the viscosity of the luminal contents. Correlations between the locust bean gum concentration and the viscosity of the samples before and after gastric or intestinal digestion were highly significant (0.97). In the second set of experiments, the correlations between the locust bean gum concentration and the amounts of calcium trapped by the locust bean gum fraction also showed high significance (0.93). In the third experimental design, again strong correlations were found between the viscosity of the intestinal digest and the amounts of calcium trapped by the fibre fraction (0.90). For iron and zinc, no such relationships were found. From this experimental set-up it appears that locust bean gum influences calcium availability in infant formulas by means of its physical properties to act as thickening agent, rather than its chemical ability to form complexes as demonstrated earlier with respect

  10. [Effect of dinitrosyl iron complexes on erythrocyte energy metabolism under thermal trauma conditions].

    PubMed

    Martusevich, A K; Solov'eva, A G; Peretiagin, S P; Vanin, A F

    2014-01-01

    The effect of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC) on the energy metabolism of erythrocytes under combined thermal trauma conditions has been studied on a group of 30 Wistar rats, which was divided into 3 groups: intact (n = 10), control (n = 10), and main (n = 10). Combined thermal trauma (skin burn + thermoinhalation damage) was modeled in animals of the control and main groups. Rats of control group received infusions of sodium chloride solution (n = 10) every day. Rats of the main group obtained infusions of DNIC solution in sodium chloride. Rat blood samples were characterized by the activity of lactate dehydrogenase in direct and reverse reaction, lactate level, and coefficients of the substrate provision and energy reactions balance. It was stated, that DNIC clearly normalized the energy metabolism of erythrocytes beginning with the third day after thermal trauma onset. PMID:24791335

  11. Simultaneous determination of iron and nickel in fluoropolymers by solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soares, Bruno M; Santos, Rafael F; Bolzan, Rodrigo C; Muller, Edson I; Primel, Ednei G; Duarte, Fabio A

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the development of a method of simultaneous determination of iron and nickel in fluoropolymers by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS) with direct solid sampling. In order to carry out simultaneous measurements, both the main resonance line of nickel (232.003nm) and the adjacent secondary line of iron (232.036nm) were monitored in the same spectral window. The proposed method was optimized with a perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) sample and was applied to the determination of iron and nickel in fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) and modified polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE-TFM) samples. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, as well as the use of Pd and H2 (during pyrolysis) as chemical modifiers, were carefully investigated. Compromise temperatures for pyrolysis and atomization of both analytes were achieved at 800 and 2300°C, respectively, using only 0.5Lmin(-1) H2 as chemical modifier during pyrolysis. Calibration curves were performed with aqueous standards by using a single solution which contained both analytes. Limits of detection were 221 and 9.6ngg(-1) for iron and nickel, respectively. Analyte concentrations in all samples ranged from 3.53 to 12.4µgg(-1) for iron and from 37 to 78ngg(-1) for nickel, with relative standard deviation less than 19%. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing these results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after sample digestion by microwave-induced combustion and no significant statistical difference was observed. PMID:27591638

  12. Simultaneous determination of iron and nickel in fluoropolymers by solid sampling high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soares, Bruno M; Santos, Rafael F; Bolzan, Rodrigo C; Muller, Edson I; Primel, Ednei G; Duarte, Fabio A

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the development of a method of simultaneous determination of iron and nickel in fluoropolymers by high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS GF AAS) with direct solid sampling. In order to carry out simultaneous measurements, both the main resonance line of nickel (232.003nm) and the adjacent secondary line of iron (232.036nm) were monitored in the same spectral window. The proposed method was optimized with a perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) sample and was applied to the determination of iron and nickel in fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) and modified polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE-TFM) samples. Pyrolysis and atomization temperatures, as well as the use of Pd and H2 (during pyrolysis) as chemical modifiers, were carefully investigated. Compromise temperatures for pyrolysis and atomization of both analytes were achieved at 800 and 2300°C, respectively, using only 0.5Lmin(-1) H2 as chemical modifier during pyrolysis. Calibration curves were performed with aqueous standards by using a single solution which contained both analytes. Limits of detection were 221 and 9.6ngg(-1) for iron and nickel, respectively. Analyte concentrations in all samples ranged from 3.53 to 12.4µgg(-1) for iron and from 37 to 78ngg(-1) for nickel, with relative standard deviation less than 19%. Accuracy was evaluated by comparing these results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after sample digestion by microwave-induced combustion and no significant statistical difference was observed.

  13. Hydroquinone-Mediated Redox Cycling of Iron and Concomitant Oxidation of Hydroquinone in Oxic Waters under Acidic Conditions: Comparison with Iron-Natural Organic Matter Interactions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chao; Garg, Shikha; Waite, T David

    2015-12-15

    Interactions of 1,4-hydroquinone with soluble iron species over a pH range of 3-5 in the air-saturated and partially deoxygenated solution are examined here. Our results show that 1,4-hydroquinone reduces Fe(III) in acidic conditions, generating semiquinone radicals (Q(•-)) that can oxidize Fe(II) back to Fe(III). The oxidation rate of Fe(II) by Q(•-)increases with increase in pH due to the speciation change of Q(•-) with its deprotonated form (Q(•-)) oxidizing Fe(II) more rapidly than the protonated form (HQ(•)). Although the oxygenation of Fe(II) is negligible at pH < 5, O2 still plays an important role in iron redox transformation by rapidly oxidizing Q(•-) to form benzoquinone (Q). A kinetic model is developed to describe the transformation of quinone and iron under all experimental conditions. The results obtained here are compared with those obtained in our previous studies of iron-Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) interactions in acidic solutions and support the hypothesis that hydroquinone moieties can reduce Fe(III) in natural waters. However, the semiquinone radicals generated in pure hydroquinone solution are rapidly oxidized by dioxygen, while the semiquinone radicals generated in SRFA solution are resistant to oxidation by dioxygen, with the result that steady-state semiquinone concentrations in SRFA solutions are 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than in solutions of 1,4-hydroquinone. As a result, semiquinone moieties in SRFA play a much more important role in iron redox transformations than is the case in solutions of simple quinones such as 1,4-hydroquinone. This difference in the steady-state concentration of semiquinone species has a dramatic effect on the cycling of iron between the +II and +III oxidation states, with iron turnover frequencies in solutions containing SRFA being 10-20 times higher than those observed in solutions of 1,4-hydroquinone.

  14. Molecular evidence and physiological characterization of iron absorption in isolated enterocytes of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): implications for dietary cadmium and lead absorption.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Raymond W M; Andrés, Jose A; Niyogi, Som

    2010-09-01

    Recent studies suggested the probable involvement of an apical iron (Fe(2+)) transporter, the divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1), in the uptake of several divalent metals in fish. The present study examined the gastrointestinal expression of the DMT1 gene, and investigated the kinetics of Fe(2+) uptake and its interactions with cadmium and lead in isolated enterocytes of freshwater rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The expressions of two DMT1 isoforms (Nramp-beta and -gamma) were recorded along the entire gastrointestinal tract of fish as well as in the enterocytes. Fe(2+) uptake in isolated enterocytes was saturable and sensitive to the proton gradient and membrane potential, suggesting DMT1-mediated transport. Both cadmium and lead inhibited Fe(2+) uptake in isolated enterocytes in a concentration-dependent manner, and lead appeared to be a stronger inhibitor than cadmium. The kinetic characterization of Fe(2+) uptake revealed that the apparent affinity of uptake was significantly decreased (increased K(m)) in the presence of either cadmium or lead, whereas the maximum uptake rate (J(max)) remained unchanged-indicating that the interaction between Fe(2+) and cadmium or lead is competitive in nature. Overall, our study suggests that the uptake of dietary cadmium and lead may occur via the iron-transporting pathway in fish.

  15. Secoisolariciresinol diglucoside abrogates oxidative stress-induced damage in cardiac iron overload condition.

    PubMed

    Puukila, Stephanie; Bryan, Sean; Laakso, Anna; Abdel-Malak, Jessica; Gurney, Carli; Agostino, Adrian; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Prasad, Kailash; Khaper, Neelam

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac iron overload is directly associated with cardiac dysfunction and can ultimately lead to heart failure. This study examined the effect of secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG), a component of flaxseed, on iron overload induced cardiac damage by evaluating oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. Cells were incubated with 50 μ5M iron for 24 hours and/or a 24 hour pre-treatment of 500 μ M SDG. Cardiac iron overload resulted in increased oxidative stress and gene expression of the inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-10 and interferon γ, as well as matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9. Increased apoptosis was evident by increased active caspase 3/7 activity and increased protein expression of Forkhead box O3a, caspase 3 and Bax. Cardiac iron overload also resulted in increased protein expression of p70S6 Kinase 1 and decreased expression of AMP-activated protein kinase. Pre-treatment with SDG abrogated the iron-induced increases in oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis, as well as the increased p70S6 Kinase 1 and decreased AMP-activated protein kinase expression. The decrease in superoxide dismutase activity by iron treatment was prevented by pre-treatment with SDG in the presence of iron. Based on these findings we conclude that SDG was cytoprotective in an in vitro model of iron overload induced redox-inflammatory damage, suggesting a novel potential role for SDG in cardiac iron overload.

  16. The effect of administration of copper nanoparticles to chickens in drinking water on estimated intestinal absorption of iron, zinc, and calcium.

    PubMed

    Ognik, Katarzyna; Stępniowska, Anna; Cholewińska, Ewelina; Kozłowski, Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    Copper nanoparticles used as a dietary supplement for poultry could affect the absorption of mineral elements. Hence the aim of the study was to determine the effect of administration of copper nanoparticles to chickens in drinking water on intestinal absorption of iron, zinc, and calcium. The experiment was carried out on 126 chicks assigned to seven experimental groups of 18 birds each (3 replications of 6 individuals each). The control group (G-C) did not receive copper nanoparticles. Groups: Cu-5(7), Cu-10(7), and Cu-15(7) received gold nanoparticles in their drinking water in the amounts of 5 mg/L for group Cu-5(7), 10 mg/L for group Cu-10(7), and 15 mg/L for group Cu-15(7) during 8 to 14, 22 to 28, and 36 of 42 days of the life of the chicks. The birds in groups Cu-5(3), Cu-10(3), and Cu-15(3) received copper nanoparticles in the same amounts, but only during 8 to 10, 22 to 24, and 36 to 38 days of life. Blood for analysis was collected from the wing vein of all chicks at the age of 42 days. After the rearing period (day 42), six birds from each experimental group with body weight similar to the group average were slaughtered. The carcasses were dissected and samples of the jejunum were collected for analysis of absorption of selected minerals. Mineral absorption was tested using the in vitro gastrointestinal sac technique. Oral administration of copper nanoparticles to chickens in the amount of 5, 10, and 15 mg/L led to accumulation of this element in the intestinal walls. The highest level of copper nanoparticles applied increased Cu content in the blood plasma of the birds. The in vitro study suggests that copper accumulated in the intestines reduces absorption of calcium and zinc, but does not affect iron absorption. PMID:27307476

  17. Disorders associated with systemic or local iron overload: from pathophysiology to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Sebastiani, Giada; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2011-10-01

    In healthy subjects, the rate of dietary iron absorption, as well as the amount and distribution of body iron are tightly controlled by hepcidin, the iron regulatory hormone. Disruption of systemic iron homeostasis leads to pathological conditions, ranging from anemias caused by iron deficiency or defective iron traffic, to iron overload (hemochromatosis). Other iron-related disorders are caused by misregulation of cellular iron metabolism, which results in local accumulation of the metal in mitochondria. Brain iron overload is observed in neurodegenerative disorders. Secondary hemochromatosis develops as a complication of another disease. For example, repeated blood transfusions, a standard treatment of various anemias characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis, promote transfusional siderosis, while chronic liver diseases are often associated with mild to moderate secondary iron overload. In this critical review, we discuss pathophysiological and clinical aspects of all types of iron metabolism disorders (265 references).

  18. Determination of tellurium in ores, concentrates and related materials by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry after separations by iron collection and xanthate extraction.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, E M; Leaver, M E

    1990-02-01

    A method for determining approximately 0.01 mug/g or more of tellurium in ores, concentrates, rocks, soils and sediments is described. After sample decomposition and evaporation of the solution to incipient dryness, tellurium is separated from > 300 mug of copper by co-precipitation with hydrous ferric oxide from an ammoniacal medium and the precipitate is dissolved in 10M hydrochloric acid. Alternatively, for samples containing 300 mug of copper, the salts are dissolved in 10M hydrochloric acid. Tellurium in the resultant solutions is reduced to the quadrivalent state by heating and separated from iron, lead and various other elements by a single cyclohexane extraction of its xanthate complex from approximately 9.5M hydrochloric acid in the presence of thiosemicarbazide as a complexing agent for copper. After washing with 10M hydrochloric acid followed by water to remove residual iron, chloride and soluble salts, tellurium is stripped from the extract with 16M nitric acid and finally determined, in a 2% v/v nitric acid medium, by graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry at 214.3 nm in the presence of nickel as matrix modifier. Small amounts of gold and palladium, which are partly co-extracted as xanthates if the iron-collection step is omitted, do not interfere. Co-extraction of arsenic is avoided by volatilizing it as the bromide during the decomposition step. The method is directly applicable, without the co-precipitation step, to most rocks, soils and sediments.

  19. Arsenic adsorption by iron-aluminium hydroxide coated onto macroporous supports: Insights from X-ray absorption spectroscopy and comparison with granular ferric hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Suresh Kumar, Prashanth; Flores, Roxana Quiroga; Sjöstedt, Carin; Önnby, Linda

    2016-01-25

    This paper evaluates the arsenic adsorption characteristics of a macroporous polymer coated with coprecipitated iron-aluminium hydroxides (MHCMP). The MHCMP adsorbent-composite fits best with a pseudo-second order model for As(III) and a pseudo-first order kinetic model for As(V). The MHCMP shows a maximum adsorption capacity of 82.3 and 49.6 mg As/g adsorbent for As(III) and As(V) ions respectively, and adsorption followed the Langmuir model. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure showed that binding of As(III) ions were confirmed to take place on the iron hydroxides coated on the MHCMP, whereas for As(V) ions the binding specificity could not be attributed to one particular metal hydroxide. As(III) formed a bidentate mononuclear complex with Fe sites, whereas As(V) indicated on a bidentate binuclear complex with Al sites or monodentate with Fe sites on the adsorbent. The column experiments were run in a well water spiked with a low concentration of As(III) (100 μg/L) and a commercially available adsorbent (GEH(®)102) based on granular iron-hydroxide was used for comparison. It was found that the MHCMP was able to treat 7 times more volume of well water as compared to GEH(®)102, maintaining the threshold concentration of less than 10 μg As/L, indicating that the MHCMP is a superior adsorbent.

  20. Direct laser-driven ramp compression studies of iron: A first step toward the reproduction of planetary core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadou, N.; Brambrink, E.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Huser, G.; Guyot, F.; Mazevet, S.; Morard, G.; de Resseguier, T.; Vinci, T.; Myanishi, K.; Ozaki, N.; Kodama, R.; Boehly, T.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.; Koenig, M.

    2013-06-01

    The study of iron under quasi-isentropic compression using high energy lasers, might allow to understand its thermodynamical properties, in particular its melting line in conditions of pressure and temperature relevant to Earth-like planetary cores (330-1500 GPa, 5000-8000 K). However, the iron alpha-epsilon solid-solid phase transition at 13 GPa favors shock formation during the quasi-isentropic compression process which can depart from the appropriate thermodynamical path. Understanding this shock formation mechanism is a key issue for being able to reproduce Earth-like planetary core conditions in the laboratory by ramp compression. In this article, we will present recent results of direct laser-driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments on iron samples obtained on the LULI 2000 and LIL laser facilities.

  1. The plasma membrane proteome of maize roots grown under low and high iron conditions.

    PubMed

    Hopff, David; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Lüthje, Sabine

    2013-10-01

    Iron (Fe) homeostasis is essential for life and has been intensively investigated for dicots, while our knowledge for species in the Poaceae is fragmentary. This study presents the first proteome analysis (LC-MS/MS) of plasma membranes isolated from roots of 18-day old maize (Zea mays L.). Plants were grown under low and high Fe conditions in hydroponic culture. In total, 227 proteins were identified in control plants, whereas 204 proteins were identified in Fe deficient plants and 251 proteins in plants grown under high Fe conditions. Proteins were sorted by functional classes, and most of the identified proteins were classified as signaling proteins. A significant number of PM-bound redox proteins could be identified including quinone reductases, heme and copper-containing proteins. Most of these components were constitutive, and others could hint at an involvement of redox signaling and redox homeostasis by change in abundance. Energy metabolism and translation seem to be crucial in Fe homeostasis. The response to Fe deficiency includes proteins involved in development, whereas membrane remodeling and assembly and/or repair of Fe-S clusters is discussed for Fe toxicity. The general stress response appears to involve proteins related to oxidative stress, growth regulation, an increased rigidity and synthesis of cell walls and adaption of nutrient uptake and/or translocation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics in Europe. PMID:23353019

  2. Different storage conditions influence biocompatibility and physicochemical properties of iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Jan; Janko, Christina; Agarwal, Rohit; Nowak, Johannes; Müller, Robert; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Lee, Geoffrey; Odenbach, Stefan; Lyer, Stefan; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have attracted increasing attention in many biomedical fields. In magnetic drug targeting SPIONs are injected into a tumour supplying artery and accumulated inside the tumour with a magnet. The effectiveness of this therapy is thus dependent on magnetic properties, stability and biocompatibility of the particles. A good knowledge of the effect of storage conditions on those parameters is of utmost importance for the translation of the therapy concept into the clinic and for reproducibility in preclinical studies. Here, core shell SPIONs with a hybrid coating consisting of lauric acid and albumin were stored at different temperatures from 4 to 45 °C over twelve weeks and periodically tested for their physicochemical properties over time. Surprisingly, even at the highest storage temperature we did not observe denaturation of the protein or colloidal instability. However, the saturation magnetisation decreased by maximally 28.8% with clear correlation to time and storage temperature. Furthermore, the biocompatibility was clearly affected, as cellular uptake of the SPIONs into human T-lymphoma cells was crucially dependent on the storage conditions. Taken together, the results show that the particle properties undergo significant changes over time depending on the way they are stored.

  3. Different Storage Conditions Influence Biocompatibility and Physicochemical Properties of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zaloga, Jan; Janko, Christina; Agarwal, Rohit; Nowak, Johannes; Müller, Robert; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Lee, Geoffrey; Odenbach, Stefan; Lyer, Stefan; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have attracted increasing attention in many biomedical fields. In magnetic drug targeting SPIONs are injected into a tumour supplying artery and accumulated inside the tumour with a magnet. The effectiveness of this therapy is thus dependent on magnetic properties, stability and biocompatibility of the particles. A good knowledge of the effect of storage conditions on those parameters is of utmost importance for the translation of the therapy concept into the clinic and for reproducibility in preclinical studies. Here, core shell SPIONs with a hybrid coating consisting of lauric acid and albumin were stored at different temperatures from 4 to 45 °C over twelve weeks and periodically tested for their physicochemical properties over time. Surprisingly, even at the highest storage temperature we did not observe denaturation of the protein or colloidal instability. However, the saturation magnetisation decreased by maximally 28.8% with clear correlation to time and storage temperature. Furthermore, the biocompatibility was clearly affected, as cellular uptake of the SPIONs into human T-lymphoma cells was crucially dependent on the storage conditions. Taken together, the results show that the particle properties undergo significant changes over time depending on the way they are stored. PMID:25918940

  4. The impact of changing surface ocean conditions on the dissolution of aerosol iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishwick, Matthew P.; Sedwick, Peter N.; Lohan, Maeve C.; Worsfold, Paul J.; Buck, Kristen N.; Church, Thomas M.; Ussher, Simon J.

    2014-11-01

    The proportion of aerosol iron (Fe) that dissolves in seawater varies greatly and is dependent on aerosol composition and the physicochemical conditions of seawater, which may change depending on location or be altered by global environmental change. Aerosol and surface seawater samples were collected in the Sargasso Sea and used to investigate the impact of these changing conditions on aerosol Fe dissolution in seawater. Our data show that seawater temperature, pH, and oxygen concentration, within the range of current and projected future values, had no significant effect on the dissolution of aerosol Fe. However, the source and composition of aerosols had the most significant effect on the aerosol Fe solubility, with the most anthropogenically influenced samples having the highest fractional solubility (up to 3.2%). The impact of ocean warming and acidification on aerosol Fe dissolution is therefore unlikely to be as important as changes in land usage and fossil fuel combustion. Our experimental results also reveal important changes in the size distribution of soluble aerosol Fe in solution, depending on the chemical conditions of seawater. Under typical conditions, the majority (77-100%) of Fe released from aerosols into ambient seawater existed in the colloidal (0.02-0.4 µm) size fraction. However, in the presence of a sufficient concentration of strong Fe-binding organic ligands (10 nM) most of the aerosol-derived colloidal Fe was converted to soluble Fe (<0.02 µm). This finding highlights the potential importance of organic ligands in retaining aerosol Fe in a biologically available form in the surface ocean.

  5. Alcanivorax borkumensis produces an extracellular siderophore in iron-limitation condition maintaining the hydrocarbon-degradation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Denaro, R; Crisafi, F; Russo, D; Genovese, M; Messina, E; Genovese, L; Carbone, M; Ciavatta, M L; Ferrer, M; Golyshin, P; Yakimov, M M

    2014-10-01

    Obligate marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria possess genetic and physiological features to use hydrocarbons as sole source of carbon and to compete for the uptake of nutrients in usually nutrient-depleted marine habitats. In the present work we have studied the siderophore-based iron uptake systems in Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 and their functioning during biodegradation of an aliphatic hydrocarbon, tetradecane, under iron limitation conditions. The antiSMASH analysis of SK2 genome revealed the presence of two different putative operons of siderophore synthetases. Search for the predicted core structures indicated that one siderophore is clearly affiliated to the family of complex oligopeptidic siderophores possessing an Orn-Ser-Orn carboxyl motif whereas the second one is likely to belong to the family of SA (salicylic acid)-based siderophores. Analyzing the supernatant of SK2 culture, an extracellular siderophore was identified and its structure was resolved. Thus, along with the recently described membrane-associated amphiphilic tetrapeptidic siderophore amphibactin, strain SK2 additionally produces an extracellular type of iron-chelating molecule with structural similarity to pseudomonins. Comparative Q-PCR analysis of siderophore synthetases demonstrated their significant up-regulation in iron-depleted medium. Different expression patterns were recorded for two operons during the early and late exponential phases of growth, suggesting a different function of these two siderophores under iron-depleted conditions.

  6. Alcanivorax borkumensis produces an extracellular siderophore in iron-limitation condition maintaining the hydrocarbon-degradation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Denaro, R; Crisafi, F; Russo, D; Genovese, M; Messina, E; Genovese, L; Carbone, M; Ciavatta, M L; Ferrer, M; Golyshin, P; Yakimov, M M

    2014-10-01

    Obligate marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria possess genetic and physiological features to use hydrocarbons as sole source of carbon and to compete for the uptake of nutrients in usually nutrient-depleted marine habitats. In the present work we have studied the siderophore-based iron uptake systems in Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 and their functioning during biodegradation of an aliphatic hydrocarbon, tetradecane, under iron limitation conditions. The antiSMASH analysis of SK2 genome revealed the presence of two different putative operons of siderophore synthetases. Search for the predicted core structures indicated that one siderophore is clearly affiliated to the family of complex oligopeptidic siderophores possessing an Orn-Ser-Orn carboxyl motif whereas the second one is likely to belong to the family of SA (salicylic acid)-based siderophores. Analyzing the supernatant of SK2 culture, an extracellular siderophore was identified and its structure was resolved. Thus, along with the recently described membrane-associated amphiphilic tetrapeptidic siderophore amphibactin, strain SK2 additionally produces an extracellular type of iron-chelating molecule with structural similarity to pseudomonins. Comparative Q-PCR analysis of siderophore synthetases demonstrated their significant up-regulation in iron-depleted medium. Different expression patterns were recorded for two operons during the early and late exponential phases of growth, suggesting a different function of these two siderophores under iron-depleted conditions. PMID:25088485

  7. Iron status of vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Craig, W J

    1994-05-01

    An appropriately planned well-balanced vegetarian diet is compatible with an adequate iron status. Although the iron stores of vegetarians may be reduced, the incidence of iron-deficiency anemia in vegetarians is not significantly different from that in omnivores. Restrictive vegetarian diets (eg, macrobiotic) are associated with more widespread iron-deficiency anemia. Western vegetarians who consume a variety of foods have a better iron status than do those in developing countries who consume a limited diet based on unleavened, unrefined cereals. Whereas phytates, polyphenolics, and other plant constituents found in vegetarian diets inhibit nonheme-iron absorption, vitamin C, citric acid, and other organic acids facilitate nonheme-iron absorption.

  8. Studies on a Novel Actinobacteria Species Capable of Oxidizing Ammonium under Iron Reduction Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huanh, Shan; Ruiz-Urigüen, Melany; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) oxidation coupled to iron reduction in the absence of oxygen and nitrate/nitrite (NO3-/NO2-) was noted in a forested riparian wetland in New Jersey (1,2), and in tropical rainforest soils (3), and was coined Feammox (4). Through a 180-days anaerobic incubation of soil samples collected at the New Jersey site, and using 16S rDNA PCR-DGGE, 454-pyosequecing, and qPCR analysis, we have shown that an Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6, belonging to the phylum Actinobacteria, is responsible for this Feammox process, described previously (1,2). We have enriched these Feammox bacteria in a high efficiency Feammox membrane reactor (with 85% NH4+removal per 48h), and isolated the pure Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 strain 5, in an autotrophic medium. To determine if the Feammox bacteria found in this study are common, at least at the regional scale, we analyzed a series of local wetland-, upland-, as well as storm-water detention pond-sediments. Through anaerobic incubations and molecular biology analysis, the Feammox reaction and Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 were found in three of twenty soil samples collected, indicating that the Feammox pathway might be widespread in selected soil environments. Results show that soil pH and Fe(III) content are key environmental factors controlling the distributions of Feammox bacteria, which require acidic conditions and the presence of iron oxides. Results from incubation experiments conducted at different temperatures have shown that, in contrast to another anaerobic ammonium oxidation pathways (e.g., anammox), the optimal temperature of the Feammox process is ~ 20° and that the organisms are still active when the temperature is around 10°. An incubation experiment amended with acetylene gas (C2H2) as a selected inhibitor showed that in the Feammox reaction, Fe(III) is the electron acceptor, which is reduced to Fe(II), and NH4+is the electron donor, which is oxidized to NO2-. After this process, NO2- is converted to

  9. Gold and iron oxide associations under supergene conditions: An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greffié, Catherine; Benedetti, Marc F.; Parron, Claude; Amouric, Marc

    1996-05-01

    Abstract-The interaction of gold hydroxo-chloro complexes with iron oxides (ferrihydrites, goethites) during coprecipitation experiments is investigated. Chemical analyses of solids and solutions are coupled with a detailed characterization of the iron oxides with various methods, including X-ray diffraction, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM), and Mössbauer spectroscopy. HCl solutions containing varying amounts of AuCl 4- and ferric nitrate were titrated to neutral or alkaline pH, resulting in the coprecipitation of gold and iron oxide phases (ferrihydrite or goethite). Reference titrations were performed in the absence of iron. Most of the gold was removed from solution in the presence of iron oxides whereas gold remained dissolved in the reference samples. In association with iron oxides two forms of gold have been identified by HRTEM and 197Au Mössbauer spectroscopy: metallic gold as well as chloro and/or hydroxo combined gold. This combined gold is in a trivalent state as the primary product which means that a reduction process is not a necessary step for the adsorption of gold species on iron oxides. Metallic gold characterized in these products by means of HRTEM consists mainly of colloids ranging from 3-60 nm in diameter embedded in the ferrihydrite matrix, as isolated particles or as particles associated with goethite laths. The smallest metallic gold particles detected would be almost invisible to classical observation techniques used for solid phases. In our experiments, oxidation-reduction reactions between Fe 2+ and Au 3+ are responsible for the presence of metallic gold observed on the iron phases. Photochemical reactions may also take part in the reduction process. Colloidal gold and gold complexes could be associated to the iron oxides by strong electrostatic interactions. Our results suggest that poorly ordered iron oxides are highly efficient in trapping gold from solutions thanks to their high surface area, and favor gold

  10. Bile salts affect expression of Escherichia coli O157:H7 genes for virulence and iron acquisition, and promote growth under iron limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Hamner, Steve; McInnerney, Kate; Williamson, Kerry; Franklin, Michael J; Ford, Timothy E

    2013-01-01

    Bile salts exhibit potent antibacterial properties, acting as detergents to disrupt cell membranes and as DNA-damaging agents. Although bacteria inhabiting the intestinal tract are able to resist bile's antimicrobial effects, relatively little is known about how bile influences virulence of enteric pathogens. Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an important pathogen of humans, capable of causing severe diarrhea and more serious sequelae. In this study, the transcriptome response of E. coli O157:H7 to bile was determined. Bile exposure induced significant changes in mRNA levels of genes related to virulence potential, including a reduction of mRNA for the 41 genes making up the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island. Bile treatment had an unusual effect on mRNA levels for the entire flagella-chemotaxis regulon, resulting in two- to four-fold increases in mRNA levels for genes associated with the flagella hook-basal body structure, but a two-fold decrease for "late" flagella genes associated with the flagella filament, stator motor, and chemotaxis. Bile salts also caused increased mRNA levels for seventeen genes associated with iron scavenging and metabolism, and counteracted the inhibitory effect of the iron chelating agent 2,2'-dipyridyl on growth of E. coli O157:H7. These findings suggest that E. coli O157:H7 may use bile as an environmental signal to adapt to changing conditions associated with the small intestine, including adaptation to an iron-scarce environment.

  11. Iron nitrosyl hemoglobin formation from the reaction of hydroxylamine and hemoglobin under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Lockamy, Virginia L; Shields, Howard; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; King, S Bruce

    2004-11-01

    Sickle cell disease patients receiving hydroxyurea (HU) therapy have shown increases in the production of nitric oxide (NO) metabolites, which include iron nitrosyl hemoglobin (HbNO), nitrite, and nitrate. However, the exact mechanism by which HU forms HbNO in vivo is not understood. Previous studies indicate that the reaction of oxyhemoglobin (oxyHb) or deoxyhemoglobin (deoxyHb) with HU are too slow to account for in vivo HbNO production. In this study, we show that the reaction of methemoglobin (metHb) with HU to form HbNO could potentially be fast enough to account for in vivo HbNO formation but competing reactions of either excess oxyHb or deoxyHb during the reaction reduces the likelihood that HbNO will be produced from the metHb-HU reaction. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy we have detected measurable amounts of HbNO and metHb during the reactions of oxyHb, deoxyHb, and metHb with excess hydroxylamine (HA). We also demonstrate HbNO and metHb formation from the reactions of excess oxyHb, deoxyHb, or metHb and HA, conditions that are more likely to mimic those in vivo. These results indicate that the reaction of hydroxylamine with hemoglobin produces HbNO and lend chemical support for a potential role for hydroxylamine in the in vivo metabolism of hydroxyurea.

  12. [Simultaneous Biotransformation of Ammonium and Nitrate via Zero-Valent Iron on Anaerobic Conditions].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Huang, Yong; Yuan, Yi; Liu, Xin; Li, Xiang; Shen, Jie; Yang, Peng-bing

    2015-12-01

    Zero-valent iron (ZVI) was used to improve the biological autotrophic denitrification process between nitrate and ammonia by anaerobic ammonia oxidation ( ANAMMOX) bacteria. With the addition of ZVI, the biological autotrophic denitrification process could be reacted in the influent condition of pH was 7-8, at 35°C ±0.5°C, the concentration of ammonia was 50-100 mg · L⁻¹ and the concentration of nitrate was 50-100 mg · L⁻¹. The highest conversion rate could be reached to 17.2 mg · (L·h) ⁻¹. With the change of reaction time and the molar ratio of nitrate and ammonia in influent, the final molar conversion ratio of nitrate and ammonia in effluent fluctuated between 1.2-3. 5. The result showed that this autotrophic denitrification process was not belonged to elementary reaction. The mechanism of this autotrophic denitrification process could be summarized that with the reduction of ZVI, the nitrate could be reduced to nitrite. Hereafter, the ANAMMOX process reacted between the nitrite and ammonia. PMID:27011992

  13. [Light Absorption Characteristics of FeS2-Fe1-xS Heterostructures Synthesized under Hydrothermal Conditions].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Huang, Fei; Meng, Lin; Yu, Hao-ran; Chen, Ying-hua

    2015-05-01

    Fe-S series, especially FeS2 and Fe1-x S is the main component of crustal rocks as important metal sulphides. Pyrite (FeS2) shows a promising vision in solar cell materials for its high absorption coefficient and suitable band gap. Predecessors have done some researches on the photovoltaic properties of Fe-S series under different conditions. However, little researches have been done on the coexisted sulphide of FeS2 and Fe1-xS. FeS2 and Fe1-xS often appear as symbiotically due to their similar formation conditions. So the study on the optical absorption characteristics of FeS2 and Fe1-xS are of important significance. In order to study the optical absorption characteristics of FeS2-Fe1-xS heterostructures, using the SEM and XRD to characterize the morphology, composition and structure, respectively. The results show that the samples were cubic pyrite with a certain amount of pyrhotite (Fe1-xS). The crystal partical size was between 5 and 10 nm. Measurement of the absorption spectrum was performed using Cary 500 UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotoineter, acquiring the results of 1 860-1 889 nm, and the absorption peak in 1879nm. According to the band gap (eV) formula, the band gap value is calculated to be 0. 657 8 eV. The extreme electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency achieved was about 15%. By the first principles, we analysed the reason of the changing of the band gap value, and then compared the result with previous one. The internal structure of mineral is the important factor affecting the photoelectric conversion. The light absorption characteristics of FeS2-Fel-xS heterostructures synthesized under hydrothermal conditions is better than the characteristics from natural pyrite with defects of Co and Ni. The heterostructures can improve the electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency and provide scientific basis for the absorption characteristics research of Fe-S series materials. PMID:26415446

  14. [Light Absorption Characteristics of FeS2-Fe1-xS Heterostructures Synthesized under Hydrothermal Conditions].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Huang, Fei; Meng, Lin; Yu, Hao-ran; Chen, Ying-hua

    2015-05-01

    Fe-S series, especially FeS2 and Fe1-x S is the main component of crustal rocks as important metal sulphides. Pyrite (FeS2) shows a promising vision in solar cell materials for its high absorption coefficient and suitable band gap. Predecessors have done some researches on the photovoltaic properties of Fe-S series under different conditions. However, little researches have been done on the coexisted sulphide of FeS2 and Fe1-xS. FeS2 and Fe1-xS often appear as symbiotically due to their similar formation conditions. So the study on the optical absorption characteristics of FeS2 and Fe1-xS are of important significance. In order to study the optical absorption characteristics of FeS2-Fe1-xS heterostructures, using the SEM and XRD to characterize the morphology, composition and structure, respectively. The results show that the samples were cubic pyrite with a certain amount of pyrhotite (Fe1-xS). The crystal partical size was between 5 and 10 nm. Measurement of the absorption spectrum was performed using Cary 500 UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotoineter, acquiring the results of 1 860-1 889 nm, and the absorption peak in 1879nm. According to the band gap (eV) formula, the band gap value is calculated to be 0. 657 8 eV. The extreme electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency achieved was about 15%. By the first principles, we analysed the reason of the changing of the band gap value, and then compared the result with previous one. The internal structure of mineral is the important factor affecting the photoelectric conversion. The light absorption characteristics of FeS2-Fel-xS heterostructures synthesized under hydrothermal conditions is better than the characteristics from natural pyrite with defects of Co and Ni. The heterostructures can improve the electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency and provide scientific basis for the absorption characteristics research of Fe-S series materials.

  15. Iron and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... 24 months old. Serve iron-rich foods alongside foods containing vitamin C — such as tomatoes, broccoli, oranges, and strawberries — which improves the body's absorption of iron. Avoid serving coffee ...

  16. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1988-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. The key activity for this grant year has continued to be laboratory measurements of the microwave and millimeter-wave properties of the simulated atmospheres of the outer planets and their satellites. A Fabry-Perot spectrometer system capable of operation from 32 to 41 GHz was developed. Initially this spectrometer was used to complete laboratory measurements of the 7.5 to 9.3 mm absorption spectrum of ammonia. Laboratory measurements were begun at wavelengths near 3.2 mm, where a large number of observations of the emission from the outer planets were made. A description of this system is presented.

  17. Optimization of a solar powered absorption cycle under Abu Dhabi's weather conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Alili, A.; Hwang, Y.; Radermacher, R.; Kubo, I.

    2010-12-15

    In order for the solar absorption air conditioners to become a real alternative to the conventional vapour compression systems, their performance has to be improved and their total cost has to be reduced. A solar powered absorption cycle is modeled using the Transient System Simulation (TRNSYS) program and Typical Meteorological Year 2 data of Abu Dhabi. It uses evacuated tube collectors to drive a 10 kW ammonia-water absorption chiller. Firstly, the system performance and its total cost are optimized separately using single objective optimization algorithms. The design variables considered are: the collector slope, the collector mass flow rate, the collector area and the storage tank volume. The single objective optimization results show that MATLAB global optimization methods agree with the TRNSYS optimizer. Secondly, MATLAB is used to solve a multi-objective optimization problem to improve the system's performance and cost, simultaneously. The optimum designs are presented using Pareto curve and show the potential improvements of the baseline system. (author)

  18. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: X-ray absorption near the edge structure and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on pyrite prepared by thermally sulfurizing iron films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Ying-Shu; Wang, Bao-Yi; Wei, Long; Kui, Re-Xi; Qian, Hai-Jie

    2009-07-01

    This paper reports how pyrite films were prepared by thermal sulfurization of magnetron sputtered iron films and characterized by x-ray absorption near edge structure spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on a 4B9B beam line at the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The band gap of the pyrite agrees well with the optical band gap obtained by a spectrophotometer. The octahedral symmetry of pyrite leads to the splitting of the d orbit into t2g and eg levels. The high spin and low spin states were analysed through the difference of electron exchange interaction and the orbital crystal field. Only when the crystal field splitting is higher than 1.5 eV, the two weak peaks above the white lines can appear, and this was approved by experiments in the present work.

  19. Enhancement of iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide by thiocyanate and accumulation of iron(II)/thiocyanate/nitric oxide complex under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Takahama, Umeo; Hirota, Sachiko

    2012-01-13

    Iron(III) ingested as a food component or supplement for iron deficiencies can react with salivary SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+) and can be reduced to iron(II) by ascorbic acid in the stomach. Iron(II) generated in the stomach can react with salivary nitrite and SCN(-) to produce nitric oxide (NO) and FeSCN(+), respectively. The purpose of this investigation is to make clear the reactions among nitrite, SCN(-), iron ions, and ascorbic acid under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice. Iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to NO was enhanced by SCN(-) in acidic buffer solutions, and the oxidation product of iron(II) reacted with SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+). Almost all of the NO produced was autoxidized to N(2)O(3) under aerobic conditions. Iron(II)-dependent production of NO was also observed in acidified saliva. Under anaerobic conditions, NO transformed Fe(SCN)(2+) and FeSCN(+) to Fe(SCN)NO(+) in acidic buffer solutions. Fe(SCN)NO(+) was also formed under aerobic conditions when excess ascorbic acid was added to iron(II)/nitrite/SCN(-) systems in acidic buffer solutions and acidified saliva. The Fe(SCN)NO(+) formed was transformed to Fe(SCN)(2+) and iron(III) at pH 2.0 and pH 7.4, respectively, by O(2). Salivary glycoproteins could complex with iron(III) in the stomach preventing the formation of Fe(SCN)(2+). Ascorbic acid reduced iron(III) to iron(II) to react with nitrite and SCN(-) as described above. The above results suggest (i) that iron(II) can have toxic effects on the stomach through the formation of reactive nitrogen oxide species from NO when supplemented without ascorbic acid and through the formation of both reactive nitrogen oxide species and Fe(SCN)NO(+) when supplemented with ascorbic acid, and (ii) that the toxic effects of iron(III) seemed to be smaller than and similar to those of iron(II) when supplemented without and with ascorbic acid, respectively. Possible mechanisms that cause oxidative stress on the stomach

  20. Enhancement of iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide by thiocyanate and accumulation of iron(II)/thiocyanate/nitric oxide complex under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Takahama, Umeo; Hirota, Sachiko

    2012-01-13

    Iron(III) ingested as a food component or supplement for iron deficiencies can react with salivary SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+) and can be reduced to iron(II) by ascorbic acid in the stomach. Iron(II) generated in the stomach can react with salivary nitrite and SCN(-) to produce nitric oxide (NO) and FeSCN(+), respectively. The purpose of this investigation is to make clear the reactions among nitrite, SCN(-), iron ions, and ascorbic acid under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice. Iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to NO was enhanced by SCN(-) in acidic buffer solutions, and the oxidation product of iron(II) reacted with SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+). Almost all of the NO produced was autoxidized to N(2)O(3) under aerobic conditions. Iron(II)-dependent production of NO was also observed in acidified saliva. Under anaerobic conditions, NO transformed Fe(SCN)(2+) and FeSCN(+) to Fe(SCN)NO(+) in acidic buffer solutions. Fe(SCN)NO(+) was also formed under aerobic conditions when excess ascorbic acid was added to iron(II)/nitrite/SCN(-) systems in acidic buffer solutions and acidified saliva. The Fe(SCN)NO(+) formed was transformed to Fe(SCN)(2+) and iron(III) at pH 2.0 and pH 7.4, respectively, by O(2). Salivary glycoproteins could complex with iron(III) in the stomach preventing the formation of Fe(SCN)(2+). Ascorbic acid reduced iron(III) to iron(II) to react with nitrite and SCN(-) as described above. The above results suggest (i) that iron(II) can have toxic effects on the stomach through the formation of reactive nitrogen oxide species from NO when supplemented without ascorbic acid and through the formation of both reactive nitrogen oxide species and Fe(SCN)NO(+) when supplemented with ascorbic acid, and (ii) that the toxic effects of iron(III) seemed to be smaller than and similar to those of iron(II) when supplemented without and with ascorbic acid, respectively. Possible mechanisms that cause oxidative stress on the stomach

  1. [Ecological stability on biological removal of iron and manganese filter under poor nutritional conditions].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Xiong, Xiao-Li; Duan, Xiao-Dong; Song, Li-Xin; Yu, Ping-Bo; Li, Wei; Zhang, Jie

    2010-01-01

    To supply necessary bacteria and available nutrients, a method of returning backwashing wastewater to the bio-filter for removal of iron and manganese was used. The ecological stability of bio-filter was investigated from 3 aspects: iron and manganese removal efficiency, micro-ecological characteristics and the quantity distribution of dominant bacteria. The results indicated that, the bio-filter held strong antishock loading capability, when the system was operated at high filtration rate (10-13.9 m/h) and high manganese concentration (3.5-4.5 mg/L), a removal rate more than 98.9% of iron and manganese was achieved. Iron and manganese oxidizing bacteria are the dominant microflora in biological filtering layer, they not only adhere on filter sand materials (4.3 x 10(6) MPN/mL) to form compact biofilm, but also exist among filter materials void (6.5 x 10(6) MPN/mL) to form suspended flocs, which is very important to complete removal of iron and manganese. In the past 5 years, the bio-filter realized a continuous and stable operation and kept a high removal efficiency of iron and manganese without adding any nutrients.

  2. Estimation of perimortal percent carboxy-heme in nonstandard postmortem specimens using analysis of carbon monoxide by GC/MS and iron by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Middleberg, R A; Easterling, D E; Zelonis, S F; Rieders, F; Rieders, M F

    1993-01-01

    In decomposed, formalin-fixed, embalmed, exhumed, and some fire-dried cases in which normal blood is unavailable, the usual methods for determination of carboxyhemoglobin saturation frequently fail. To address these specimens, a method utilizing both gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) determination of carbon monoxide (CO) and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS) determination of iron (Fe), in the same specimen, was developed. The method is reported here, along with its application to seven pertinent forsensic death investigations. The CO analytical methodology involves acid liberation of the gas from the specimen aliquot in a headspace vial. After heating and equilibrating, a sample of the headspace vapor is injected into the GC/MS system with a gastight syringe. Quantitation is achieved by standard addition comparison utilizing the ideal gas law equation. Iron is quantified by FAAS analysis of the same aliquot used for the CO determination, following nitric acid digestion. The concentration is determined by comparison to a standard curve. A formula for determining the minimum percent carboxy-heme saturation was derived by using the ratio of the amount of CO to the amount of Fe in the aliquot analyzed. Tissue types analyzed include spleen, liver, muscle, dried blood, and unspecified decomposed tissue.

  3. Estimation of perimortal percent carboxy-heme in nonstandard postmortem specimens using analysis of carbon monoxide by GC/MS and iron by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Middleberg, R A; Easterling, D E; Zelonis, S F; Rieders, F; Rieders, M F

    1993-01-01

    In decomposed, formalin-fixed, embalmed, exhumed, and some fire-dried cases in which normal blood is unavailable, the usual methods for determination of carboxyhemoglobin saturation frequently fail. To address these specimens, a method utilizing both gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) determination of carbon monoxide (CO) and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS) determination of iron (Fe), in the same specimen, was developed. The method is reported here, along with its application to seven pertinent forsensic death investigations. The CO analytical methodology involves acid liberation of the gas from the specimen aliquot in a headspace vial. After heating and equilibrating, a sample of the headspace vapor is injected into the GC/MS system with a gastight syringe. Quantitation is achieved by standard addition comparison utilizing the ideal gas law equation. Iron is quantified by FAAS analysis of the same aliquot used for the CO determination, following nitric acid digestion. The concentration is determined by comparison to a standard curve. A formula for determining the minimum percent carboxy-heme saturation was derived by using the ratio of the amount of CO to the amount of Fe in the aliquot analyzed. Tissue types analyzed include spleen, liver, muscle, dried blood, and unspecified decomposed tissue. PMID:8429619

  4. An Extreme, Blueshifted Iron-Line Profile in the Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 PG 1402+261: An Edge-on Accretion Disk or Highly Ionized Absorption?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J. N.; Porquet, D.; Turner, T. J.

    2004-11-01

    We report on a short XMM-Newton observation of the radio-quiet narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy PG 1402+261. The EPIC X-ray spectrum of PG 1402+261 shows a strong excess of counts between 6 and 9 keV in the rest frame. This feature can be modeled by an unusually strong (equivalent width 2 keV) and very broad (FWHM velocity of 110,000 km s-1) iron K-shell emission line. The line centroid energy at 7.3 keV appears blueshifted with respect to the iron Kα emission band between 6.4 and 6.97 keV, while the blue wing of the line extends to 9 keV in the quasar rest frame. The line profile can be fitted by reflection from the inner accretion disk, but an inclination angle of >60° is required to model the extreme blue wing of the line. Furthermore, the extreme strength of the line requires a geometry whereby the hard X-ray emission from PG 1402+261 above 2 keV is dominated by the pure-reflection component from the disk, while little or none of the direct hard power law is observed. Alternatively, the spectrum above 2 keV may be explained by an ionized absorber, if the column density is sufficiently high (NH>3×1023 cm-2) and if the matter is ionized enough to produce a deep (τ~1) iron K-shell absorption edge at 9 keV. This absorber could originate in a large column density, high-velocity outflow, perhaps similar to those that appear to be observed in several other high accretion rate active galactic nuclei. Further observations, especially at higher spectral resolution, are required to distinguish between the accretion disk reflection and outflow scenarios.

  5. Redox speciation analysis of dissolved iron in estuarine and coastal waters with on-line solid phase extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaojin; Feng, Sichao; Huang, Yongming; Yuan, Dongxing

    2015-05-01

    An automatic on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) system employing the flow injection (FI) technique directly coupled to a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer (GFAAS) was established for speciation and determination of dissolved iron in estuarine and coastal waters. Fe(II) was mixed with ferrozine solution in a sample stream to form the Fe(II)-ferrozine complex which was extracted onto a C18 SPE cartridge, eluted with eluent and detected with GFAAS. In a parallel flow channel, Fe(III) was reduced to Fe(II) with ascorbic acid and then detected in the same way as Fe(II). The home-made interface between FI-SPE and GFAAS efficiently realized the sample introduction to the furnace in a semi-automated way. Parameters of the FI-SPE system and graphite furnace program were optimized based on a univariate experimental design and an orthogonal array design. The salinity effect on the method sensitivity was investigated. The proposed method provided a detection limit of 1.38 nmol L(-1) for Fe(II) and 1.87 nmol L(-1) for Fe(II+III). With variation of the sample loading volume, a broadened determination range of 2.5-200 nmol L(-1) iron could be obtained. The proposed method was successfully applied to analyze iron species in samples collected from the Jiulongjiang Estuary, Fujian, China. With the 2-cartridge FI-SPE system developed, on-line simultaneous determination of Fe species with GFAAS was achieved for the first time.

  6. Kinetic study for phenol degradation by ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and related iron corrosion investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, In-Ho; Yoo, Gursong; Hong, Hye-Jin; Kim, Jungmin; Kim, Min Gyu; Choi, Wang-Kyu; Yang, Ji-Won

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigated phenol degradation via zero-valent iron (ZVI)-assisted Fenton reaction through kinetic and spectroscopic analysis. In batch experiments, 100 mg/L of phenol was completely degraded, and 75% of TOC was removed within 3 min under an optimal hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration (50 mM) via the Fenton reaction. In the absence of H2O2, oxygen (O2) was dissolved into the solution and produced H2O2, which resulted in phenol degradation. However, phenol removal efficiency was not very high compared to external H2O2 input. The Fenton reaction rapidly occurred at the surface of ZVI, and then phenol mobility from the solution to the ZVI surface was the rate determining step of the whole reaction. The pseudo-second order adsorption kinetic model well describes phenol removal, and its rate increased according to the H2O2 concentration. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis revealed that iron oxide (Fe-O bonding) was formed on ZVI with [H2O2] > 50 mM. A high concentration of H2O2 led to rapid degradation of phenol and caused corrosion on the ZVI surface, indicating that Fe(2+) ions were rapidly oxidized to Fe(3+) ions due to the Fenton reaction and that Fe(3+) was precipitated as iron oxide on the ZVI surface. However, ZVI did not show corroded characteristics in the absence of H2O2 due to the insufficient ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and oxidation of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+).

  7. Iron L-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Oxy-Picket Fence Porphyrin: Experimental Insight into Fe-O2 Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Samuel A.; Kroll, Thomas; Decreau, Richard A.; Hocking, Rosalie K.; Lundberg, Marcus; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2013-01-01

    The electronic structure of the Fe–O2 center in oxy-hemoglobin and oxy-myoglobin is a long-standing issue in the field of bioinorganic chemistry. Spectroscopic studies have been complicated by the highly delocalized nature of the porphyrin and calculations require interpretation of multi-determinant wavefunctions for a highly covalent metal site. Here, iron L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), interpreted using a valence bond configuration interaction (VBCI) multiplet model, is applied to directly probe the electronic structure of the iron in the biomimetic Fe–O2 heme complex [Fe(pfp)(1-MeIm)O2] (pfp = meso-tetra(α,α,α,α-o-pivalamidophenyl) porphyrin or TpivPP). This method allows separate estimates of σ-donor, π-donor, and π-acceptor interactions through ligand to metal charge transfer (LMCT) and metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) mixing pathways. The L-edge spectrum of [Fe(pfp)(1-MeIm)O2] is further compared to those of [FeII(pfp)(1-MeIm)2], [FeII(pfp)], and [FeIII(tpp)(ImH)2]Cl (tpp = meso-tetraphenylporphyrin) which have FeII S = 0, FeII S = 1 and FeIII S = 1/2 ground states, respectively. These serve as references for the three possible contributions to the ground state of oxy-pfp. The Fe–O2 pfp site is experimentally determined to have both significant σ-donation and a strong π-interaction of the O2 with the iron, with the latter having implications with respect to the spin polarization of the ground state. PMID:23259487

  8. Redox speciation analysis of dissolved iron in estuarine and coastal waters with on-line solid phase extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaojin; Feng, Sichao; Huang, Yongming; Yuan, Dongxing

    2015-05-01

    An automatic on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) system employing the flow injection (FI) technique directly coupled to a graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer (GFAAS) was established for speciation and determination of dissolved iron in estuarine and coastal waters. Fe(II) was mixed with ferrozine solution in a sample stream to form the Fe(II)-ferrozine complex which was extracted onto a C18 SPE cartridge, eluted with eluent and detected with GFAAS. In a parallel flow channel, Fe(III) was reduced to Fe(II) with ascorbic acid and then detected in the same way as Fe(II). The home-made interface between FI-SPE and GFAAS efficiently realized the sample introduction to the furnace in a semi-automated way. Parameters of the FI-SPE system and graphite furnace program were optimized based on a univariate experimental design and an orthogonal array design. The salinity effect on the method sensitivity was investigated. The proposed method provided a detection limit of 1.38 nmol L(-1) for Fe(II) and 1.87 nmol L(-1) for Fe(II+III). With variation of the sample loading volume, a broadened determination range of 2.5-200 nmol L(-1) iron could be obtained. The proposed method was successfully applied to analyze iron species in samples collected from the Jiulongjiang Estuary, Fujian, China. With the 2-cartridge FI-SPE system developed, on-line simultaneous determination of Fe species with GFAAS was achieved for the first time. PMID:25770602

  9. Kinetic study for phenol degradation by ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and related iron corrosion investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, In-Ho; Yoo, Gursong; Hong, Hye-Jin; Kim, Jungmin; Kim, Min Gyu; Choi, Wang-Kyu; Yang, Ji-Won

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigated phenol degradation via zero-valent iron (ZVI)-assisted Fenton reaction through kinetic and spectroscopic analysis. In batch experiments, 100 mg/L of phenol was completely degraded, and 75% of TOC was removed within 3 min under an optimal hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration (50 mM) via the Fenton reaction. In the absence of H2O2, oxygen (O2) was dissolved into the solution and produced H2O2, which resulted in phenol degradation. However, phenol removal efficiency was not very high compared to external H2O2 input. The Fenton reaction rapidly occurred at the surface of ZVI, and then phenol mobility from the solution to the ZVI surface was the rate determining step of the whole reaction. The pseudo-second order adsorption kinetic model well describes phenol removal, and its rate increased according to the H2O2 concentration. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis revealed that iron oxide (Fe-O bonding) was formed on ZVI with [H2O2] > 50 mM. A high concentration of H2O2 led to rapid degradation of phenol and caused corrosion on the ZVI surface, indicating that Fe(2+) ions were rapidly oxidized to Fe(3+) ions due to the Fenton reaction and that Fe(3+) was precipitated as iron oxide on the ZVI surface. However, ZVI did not show corroded characteristics in the absence of H2O2 due to the insufficient ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and oxidation of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+). PMID:26692518

  10. Al-hijamah and oral honey for treating thalassemia, conditions of iron overload, and hyperferremia: toward improving the therapeutic outcomes

    PubMed Central

    El Sayed, Salah Mohamed; Baghdadi, Hussam; Abou-Taleb, Ashraf; Mahmoud, Hany Salah; Maria, Reham A; Ahmed, Nagwa S; Helmy Nabo, Manal Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Iron overload causes iron deposition and accumulation in the liver, heart, skin, and other tissues resulting in serious tissue damages. Significant blood clearance from iron and ferritin using wet cupping therapy (WCT) has been reported. WCT is an excretory form of treatment that needs more research efforts. WCT is an available, safe, simple, economic, and time-saving outpatient modality of treatment that has no serious side effects. There are no serious limitations or precautions to discontinue WCT. Interestingly, WCT has solid scientific and medical bases (Taibah mechanism) that explain its effectiveness in treating many disease conditions differing in etiology and pathogenesis. WCT utilizes an excretory physiological principle (pressure-dependent excretion) that resembles excretion through renal glomerular filtration and abscess evacuation. WCT exhibits a percutaneous excretory function that clears blood (through fenestrated skin capillaries) and interstitial fluids from pathological substances without adding a metabolic or detoxification burden on the liver and the kidneys. Interestingly, WCT was reported to decrease serum ferritin (circulating iron stores) significantly by about 22.25% in healthy subjects (in one session) and to decrease serum iron significantly to the level of causing iron deficiency (in multiple sessions). WCT was reported to clear blood significantly of triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, total cholesterol, uric acid, inflammatory mediators, and immunoglobulin antibodies (rheumatoid factor). Moreover, WCT was reported to enhance the natural immunity, potentiate pharmacological treatments, and to treat many different disease conditions. There are two distinct methods of WCT: traditional WCT and Al-hijamah (WCT of prophetic medicine). Both start and end with skin sterilization. In traditional WCT, there are two steps, skin scarification followed by suction using plastic cups (double S technique); Al-hijamah is a three

  11. [Morphology of soil iron oxides and its correlation with soil-forming process and forming conditions in a karst mountain].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Zhu, Zhang-Xiong; Fu, Wa-Li; Wen, Zhi-Lin

    2012-06-01

    The quantity and morphology of iron oxides are indicators of soil forming-process and forming conditions. In order to analyze the connection between soil iron oxides and soil forming conditions and degenerative process of karst ecosystem, we have chosen 14 soil profiles on the top and middle section of Jinfo Mountain, a typical karst slope in Chongqing, China. Morphology and contents of soil iron oxides were studied by using chemical selective extraction techniques. We draw conclusions: 1) total iron (Fe(t)) is mainly controlled by parent material and lithology. Significant difference of Fe(t) content exists between soils in Top Mountain (51.49 g x kg(-1), mean value from 5 profiles) and soils at the middle sector of North Slope (86.29 g x kg(-1), mean value of 9 profiles); 2) the results show low concentration of F(d) (29.16 g x kg(-1)) and low ratio of Fe(d) to Fe(t)(35.40%) in soil clay under conditions of high elevation and low temperature on Top Mountain. In contrast, the results indicate advanced weathering and soil-forming process at middle slope sites due to high temperature; this is supported by high mean values of Fe(d) (43.92 g x kg(-1)) and ratio of Fe(d)/Fe(t) in clay (60.41%); 3) long humid climatic setting and large numbers of soil organic matter on top of the mountain result in high activation degrees (F(o)/Fe(d)) and high complexation degrees (Fe(p)/Fe(d)); mean values of them are 73.51%, 17.21% respectively, which are higher than that of soils at middle slope sites (13.06%, 0.41%); 4) after degradation or deforestation of secondary forestland (pines massoniana among bushes) at middle section of the hillslope, soil free iron oxides (Fe(d)) and total iron oxides (Fe(t)) decrease as well as soil organic carbon and clay, because of progressively increasing of soil erosion. Average contents of Fe(t) and Fe(d) in clay from 2 shrub profiles are 98.25 g x kg(-1), 50.81 g x kg(-1) respectively. However, the four tillage soils we have studied reveal lower

  12. Structural stability of coprecipitated natural organic matter and ferric iron under reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henneberry, Yumiko K.; Kraus, Tamara E.C.; Nico, Peter S.; Horwath, William R.

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to assess the interaction of Fe coprecipitated with dissolved organic matter (DOM) and its effect on Fe (hydr)oxide crystallinity and DOM retention under abiotic reducing conditions. A Fe-based coagulant was reacted with DOM from an agricultural drain and the resulting precipitate (floc) was exposed to S(-II) and Fe(II). Solution concentrations of Fe(II/III) and DOM were monitored, floc crystallinity was determined using X-ray diffraction, and the composition and distribution of functional groups were assessed using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Results indicate coprecipitation of Fe(III) with DOM forms a non-crystalline floc that withstands crystallization regardless of change in pH, Fe:DOM ratio and type of reductant added. There was no evidence that exposure to reducing conditions led to release of DOM from the floc, indicating that coprecipitation with complex natural DOM in aquatic environments may stabilize Fe (hydr)oxides against crystallization upon reaction with reduced species and lead to long term sequestration of the DOM. STXM analysis identified spatially distinct regions with remarkable functional group purity, contrary to the model of DOM as a relatively uniform complex polymer lacking identifiable organic compounds. Polysaccharide-like OM was strongly and directly correlated with the presence of Fe but showed different Fe binding strength depending on the presence of carboxylic acid functional groups, whereas amide and aromatic functional groups were inversely correlated with Fe content.

  13. Absorption spectra of HCFC-22 around 829/cm at atmospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varanasi, Prasad

    1992-01-01

    Spectral absorption coefficients of HCFC-22 have been measured around 829/cm in the laboratory at various temperature-pressure combinations chosen to represent tangent heights (as in solar-occultation experiments) or layers in the atmosphere. The data measured employing the Doppler-limited spectra resolution (about 10 exp -4/cm) of a tunable diode laser spectrometer are free of instrumental distortion and are more practical in this case than the spectral line parameters adapted in conventional line-by-line procedures for analyzing atmospheric spectra. The present data obtained with N2 as the broadening gas are shown to be directly applicable to the real atmosphere.

  14. Electromagnetic absorption in a multilayered slab model of tissue under near-field exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, I; Hagmann, M J; Gandhi, O P

    1980-01-01

    The electromagnetic energy deposited in a semi-infinite slab model consisting of skin, fat, and muscle layers is calculated for both plane-wave and near-field exposures. The plane-wave spectrum (PWS) approach is used to calculate the energy deposited in the model by fields present due to leakage from equipment using electromagnetic energy. This analysis applies to near-field exposures where coupling of the target to the leakage source can be neglected. Calculations were made for 2,450 MHz, at which frequency the layered slab adequately models flat regions of the human body. Resonant absorption due to layering is examined as a function of the skin and fat thicknesses for plane-wave exposure and as a function of the physical extent of the near-field distribution. Calculations show that for fields that are nearly constant over at least a free-space wavelength, the energy deposition (for skin, fat, and muscle combination that gives resonant absorption) is equal to or less than that resulting from plane-wave exposure, but is appreciably greater than that obtained for a homogeneous muscle slab model.

  15. Electromagnetic absorption in a multilayered slab model of tissue under near-field exposure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, I.; Hagmann, M.J.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1980-01-01

    The electromagnetic energy deposited in a semi-infinite slab model consisting of skin, fat, and muscle layers is calculated for both plane-wave and near-field exposures. The plane-wave spectrum (PWS) approach is used to calculate the energy deposited in the model by fields present due to leakage from equipment using electromagnetic energy. This analysis applies to near-field exposures where coupling of the target to the leakage source can be neglected. Calculations were made for 2,450 MHz, at which frequency the layered slab adequately models flat regions of the human body. Resonant absorption due to layering is examined as a function of the skin and fat thicknesses for plane-wave exposure and as a function of the physical extent of the near-field distribution. Calculations show that for fields that are nearly constant over at least a free-space wavelength, the energy deposition (for skin, fat, and muscle combination that gives resonant absorption) is equal to or less than that resulting from plane-wave exposure, but is appreciably greater than that obtained for a homogeneous muscle slab model.

  16. Wavelength dependence of aerosol light absorption in urban and biomass burning impacted conditions: An integrative perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Gyawali, M.; Lewis, K.; Moosmuller, H.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol light absorption depends on aerosol size, morphology, mixing state, and composition. The wavelength dependence is often characterized with use of the Angstrom coefficient for absorption (AAE) determined from measurements at two or more wavelengths. Low fractal dimension black carbon (BC) particles are often expected to have an AAE near unity. Values of AAE significantly larger than unity are often attributed to the presence of an organic coating that absorbs strongly at lower wavelengths, though we have found that even non absorbing coatings on small, biomass burning related BC cores can have large AAE. Values of AAE significantly less than unity are often ascribed to experimental errors or large particle sizes, however, we find that they are most commonly associated with modest absorbing or non absorbing organic coatings that collapse the fractal soot BC core in urban aerosol to a dimension near that of a sphere. Photoacoustic measurements at 405 nm, 532 nm, 870 nm, and 1047 nm in urban Reno and Las Vegas NV, and for biomass burning experiments are used presented to illustrate the range of AAE possible, and coated sphere modeling results are presented to interpret the measurements.

  17. A greenhouse trial to investigate the ameliorative properties of biosolids and plants on physicochemical conditions of iron ore tailings: Implications for an iron ore mine site remediation.

    PubMed

    Cele, Emmanuel Nkosinathi; Maboeta, Mark

    2016-01-01

    An iron ore mine site in Swaziland is currently (2015) in a derelict state as a consequence of past (1964-1988) and present (2011 - current) iron ore mining operations. In order to control problems associated with mine wastes, the Swaziland Water Services Corporation (SWSC) recently (2013) proposed the application of biosolids in sites degraded by mining operations. It is thought that this practice could generally improve soil conditions and enhance plant reestablishment. More importantly, the SWSC foresees this as a potential solution to the biosolids disposal problems. In order to investigate the effects of biosolids and plants in soil physicochemical conditions of iron mine soils, we conducted two plant growth trials. Trial 1 consisted of tailings that received biosolids and topsoil (TUSB mix) while in trial 2, tailings received biosolids only (TB mix). In the two trials, the application rates of 0 (control), 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100 t ha(-1) were used. After 30 days of equilibration, 25 seeds of Cynodon dactylon were sown in each pot and thinned to 10 plants after 4 weeks. Plants were watered twice weekly and remained under greenhouse conditions for 12 weeks, subsequent to which soils were subjected to chemical analysis. According to the results obtained, there were significant improvements in soil parameters related to fertility such as organic matter (OM), water holding capacity (WHC), cation exchange capacity (CEC), ammonium [Formula: see text] , magnesium (Mg(2+)), calcium (Ca(2+)) and phosphorus ( [Formula: see text] ). With regard to heavy metals, biosolids led to significant increases in soil total concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg and Pb. The higher concentrations of Zn and Cu in treated tailings compared to undisturbed adjacent soils are a cause for concern because in the field, this might work against the broader objectives of mine soil remediation, which include the recolonization of reclaimed sites by soil-dwelling organisms. Therefore, while

  18. A greenhouse trial to investigate the ameliorative properties of biosolids and plants on physicochemical conditions of iron ore tailings: Implications for an iron ore mine site remediation.

    PubMed

    Cele, Emmanuel Nkosinathi; Maboeta, Mark

    2016-01-01

    An iron ore mine site in Swaziland is currently (2015) in a derelict state as a consequence of past (1964-1988) and present (2011 - current) iron ore mining operations. In order to control problems associated with mine wastes, the Swaziland Water Services Corporation (SWSC) recently (2013) proposed the application of biosolids in sites degraded by mining operations. It is thought that this practice could generally improve soil conditions and enhance plant reestablishment. More importantly, the SWSC foresees this as a potential solution to the biosolids disposal problems. In order to investigate the effects of biosolids and plants in soil physicochemical conditions of iron mine soils, we conducted two plant growth trials. Trial 1 consisted of tailings that received biosolids and topsoil (TUSB mix) while in trial 2, tailings received biosolids only (TB mix). In the two trials, the application rates of 0 (control), 10, 25, 50, 75 and 100 t ha(-1) were used. After 30 days of equilibration, 25 seeds of Cynodon dactylon were sown in each pot and thinned to 10 plants after 4 weeks. Plants were watered twice weekly and remained under greenhouse conditions for 12 weeks, subsequent to which soils were subjected to chemical analysis. According to the results obtained, there were significant improvements in soil parameters related to fertility such as organic matter (OM), water holding capacity (WHC), cation exchange capacity (CEC), ammonium [Formula: see text] , magnesium (Mg(2+)), calcium (Ca(2+)) and phosphorus ( [Formula: see text] ). With regard to heavy metals, biosolids led to significant increases in soil total concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg and Pb. The higher concentrations of Zn and Cu in treated tailings compared to undisturbed adjacent soils are a cause for concern because in the field, this might work against the broader objectives of mine soil remediation, which include the recolonization of reclaimed sites by soil-dwelling organisms. Therefore, while

  19. Changes of the corrosion potential of iron in stagnation and flow conditions and their relationship with metal release.

    PubMed

    Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Korshin, Gregory V

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the behavior of corrosion potential (Ecorr) of iron exposed to drinking water during episodes of stagnation and flow. These measurements showed that during stagnation episodes, Ecorr values decrease prominently and consistently. This decrease is initially rapid but it becomes slower as the stagnation time increases. During flow episodes, the Ecorr values increase and reach a quasi-steady state. Experiments with varying concentrations of dissolved oxygen showed that the decrease of Ecorr values characteristic for stagnation is likely to be associated with the consumption of dissolved oxygen by the exposed metal. The corrosion potential of iron and its changes during stagnation were sensitive to the concentrations of sulfate and chloride ions. Measurements of iron release showed that both the absolute values of Ecorr measured prior to or after stagnation episodes were well correlated with the logarithms of concentrations of total iron. The slope of this dependence showed that the observed correlations between Ecorr values and Fe concentrations corresponded to the coupling between the oxidant consumption and changes of Fe redox status. These results demonstrate that in situ Ecorr measurements can be a sensitive method with which to ascertain effects of hydrodynamic conditions and short-term variations of water chemistry on metal release and corrosion in drinking water. This approach is valuable practically because Ecorr measurements are precise, can be carried out in situ with any desired time resolution, do not affect the state of exposed surface in any extent and can be carried out with readily available equipment.

  20. Degradation of 1-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-3-(4-chlorophenyl) urea by nanoscale zerovalent iron under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haiying; Hou, Shaogang; Xie, Guohong; Yao, Ziwei; Zhou, Qingxiang

    2012-01-01

    The goal of present study was to investigate the applicability of nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) on the degradation of 1-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-3-(4-chlorophenyl) urea (CCU) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The experimental results showed that NZVI could effectively degrade CCU, but the removal efficiencies were different under these two different conditions. The best removal efficiencies for CCU were 90.2 and 75.8% under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The highly oxidative hydroxyl radicals and reductively hydrogen would account for the rapid degradation of CCU under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. The experimental results also showed that surfactant Tween 20 significantly inhibited the degradation of CCU under aerobic conditions. However it markedly enhanced the degradation of CCU under anaerobic condition.

  1. Low Temperature Electronic Absorption Spectra of Oxidized and Reduced Spinach Ferredoxins. Evidence for Nonequivalent Iron(III) Sites.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, J; Siiman, O; Gray, H B

    1974-01-01

    The electronic absorption spectra of oxidized and reduced spinach ferredoxins have been measured between 1200 and 600 nm at low temperature in D(2)O/ethylene glycol glasses. Relatively weak absorption bands are observed at 720, 820, and 920 nm in oxidized ferredoxin, and at 652, 820, and 920 nm in reduced ferredoxin. The spectral results show that the two Fe(III) centers in oxidized ferredoxin are not equivalent, and that the 820- and 920-nm bands are associated with the nonreducible site. Assignment of the reducible site as tetrahedral Fe(III) is indicated. The 720-nm (13.9 kcm(-1)) band in oxidized ferredoxin is attributed to an intensity-enhanced (6)A(1) --> (4)T(1)d-d transition, whereas the 652-nm (15.3 kcm(-1)) feature of reduced ferredoxin could be due either to (5)E --> (3)T(1) in tetrahedral Fe(II)S(4) or an Fe(II) --> Fe(III) intervalence excitation.

  2. Highly Ionized Iron Absorption Lines from Outflowing Gases in the X-ray Spectrum of NGC 1365

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risaliti, G.; Bianchi, S.; Matt, G.; Baldi, A.; Elvis, M.; Fabbiano, G.; Zezas, A.

    2006-01-01

    We present the discovery of four absorption lines in the X-ray spectrum of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1365, at energies between 6.7 and 8.3 keV. The lines are detected with high statistical confidence (from >20 sigma for the strongest to -4 sigma for the weakest) in two XMM-Newton observations 60 ks long. We also detect the same lines, with a lower signal-to-noise ratio (but still >2 sigma for each line), in two previous shorter (-10 ks) XMM-Newton observations. The spectral analysis identifies these features as Fe XXV and Fe XXVI Kalpha and Kbeta lines, outflowing with velocities varying between -1000 and -5000 km/s among the observations. These are the highest quality detections of such lines so far. The high equivalent widths [EW (Kalpha) approximately 100 eV] and the Kalpha/Kbeta ratios imply that the lines are due to absorption of the AGN continuum by a highly ionized gas with column density NH-5?1023 cm(exp -2) at a distance of -(50-100)RS from the continuum source.

  3. Comparison Study of Oral Iron Preparations Using a Human Intestinal Model

    PubMed Central

    Zariwala, Mohammed Gulrez; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Farnaud, Sebastien; Renshaw, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency and related iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) are the most prevalent nutritional disorders worldwide. The standard treatment involves supplementation with solid or liquid iron supplement preparations, usually based on a ferrous salt such as ferrous sulphate, ferrous fumarate, or ferrous gluconate. In the present study, we compared iron uptake and absorption from various solid and liquid iron supplement preparations currently available in the United Kingdom using the well-characterised human epithelial adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2. Intracellular ferritin protein formation by the Caco-2 cell was considered an indicator of cellular iron uptake and absorption. We investigated the effects of formulation ingredients at a defined pH on iron uptake and absorption, and designed a novel two-stage dissolution-absorption protocol that mimicked physiological conditions. Our experiments revealed wide variations in the rate of dissolution between the various solid iron preparations. Conventional-release ferrous iron tablets dissolved rapidly (48 ± 4 mins to 64 ± 4 mins), whereas modified-released tablets and capsules took significantly longer to undergo complete dissolution (274 ± 8 to 256 ± 8 mins). Among the solid iron preparations, ferrous sulphate conventional-release tablets demonstrated the highest iron absorption, whereas modified-release ferrous preparations demonstrated uniformly low iron absorption, as compared to the control (P < 0.05). Taken together, our results demonstrate that there are wide-ranging variations in dissolution times and iron uptake from oral iron preparations, with the physical characteristics of the preparation as well as the form of iron playing a key role. PMID:24482777

  4. A comparison of simultaneous plasma, atomic absorption, and iron colorimetric determinations of major and trace constituents in acid mine waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, J.W.; Nordstrom, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-three water samples collected during June to October 1982 from the Leviathan/Bryant Creek drainage basin were originally analyzed by simultaneous multielement direct-current plasma (DCP) atomic-emission spectrometry, flame atomic-absorption spectrometry, graphite-furnace atomic-absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) (thallium only), ultraviolet-visible spectrometry, and hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry.Determinations were made for the following metallic and semi-metallic constituents: AI, As, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Cd, Ca, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe(11), Fe(total), Li, Pb, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, K, Sb, Se, Si, Na, Sr, TI, V, and Zn. These samples were re-analyzed later by simultaneous multielement inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic-emission spectrometry and Zeeman-corrected GFAAS to determine the concentrations of many of the same constituents with improved accuracy, precision, and sensitivity. The result of this analysis has been the generation of comparative concentration values for a significant subset of the solute constituents. Many of the more recently determined values replace less-than-detection values for the trace metals; others constitute duplicate analyses for the major constituents. The multiple determinations have yielded a more complete, accurate, and precise set of analytical data. They also have resulted in an opportunity to compare the performance of the plasma-emission instruments operated in their respective simultaneous multielement modes. Flame atomic-absorption spectrometry was judged best for Na and K and hydride-generation atomic-absorption spectrometry was judged best for As because of their lower detection limit and relative freedom from interelement spectral effects. Colorimetric determination using ferrozine as the color agent was judged most accurate, precise, and sensitive for Fe. Cadmium, lead, and vanadium concentrations were too low in this set of samples to enable a determination of whether ICP or DCP is a more suitable technique. Of

  5. Uranium Immobilization in an Iron-Rich Rhizosphere of a Native Wetland Plant from the Savannah River Site under Reducing Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hypothesis of this study was that iron plaque formed on the roots of wetland plants and their rhizospheres create environmental conditions favorable for iron reducing bacteria that promote the in situ immobilization of uranium. Greenhouse microcosm studies were conducted usin...

  6. Does complex absorption behavior leading to conditioning and damage in KDP/DKDP reflect the electronic structure of initiators?

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; DeMange, P P; Negres, R A; Rubenchik, A M; Demos, S G

    2007-10-24

    Currently, most of our thinking about the defects responsible for initiating laser damage considers them as featureless absorbers. However, an increasing body of evidence, particularly involving multi-wavelength irradiation, suggests electronic structure of damage initiators is important in determining both initiation and conditioning behaviors in KDP. The effective absorption coefficient of energy under multi-wavelength irradiation cannot be accounted for by a structureless absorber, but is consistent with an initiator with a multi-level structure. We outline the evidence and assess the ability of such a simple multi-level model to explain these and other experimentally observed behaviors.

  7. Creep of highly-porous iron compacts under conditions of cyclic {alpha}{leftrightarrow}{gamma}-transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Kibets, V.I.; Matsokin, V.P.; Gedes, N.

    1994-09-01

    Features of the creep of highly-porous iron compacts with cyclic {alpha}{leftrightarrow}{gamma}-transformation are studied. Possible reasons are explored for acceleration of deformation during {alpha}{yields}{gamma}-transformation and sintering of compacts with {gamma}{yields}{alpha}-transformation.

  8. In situ synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanocomposites using iron oxide nanofluids at ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Lubna; Mahto, Neha; Nayar, Suprabha

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a simple method for the room temperature synthesis of magnetite/hydroxyapatite composite nanocomposites using ferrofluids. The in situ synthesis of magnetic-hydroxyapatite results in a homogenous distribution of the two phases as seen both in transmission electron micrographs and assembled to a micron range in the confocal micrographs. The selected area diffraction pattern analysis shows the presence of both phases of iron oxide and hydroxyapatite. To the dialyzed ferrofluid, the constituents of hydroxyapatite synthesis was added, the presence of the superparamagnetic iron oxide particles imparts directionality to the hydroxyapatite crystal growth. Electron probe microanalysis confirms the co-existence of both iron and calcium atoms. Vibrating Sample magnetometer data shows magnetization three times more than the parent ferrofluid, the local concentration of iron oxide nanoparticles affects the strength of dipolar interparticle interactions changing the energy barrier for determining the collective magnetic behavior of the sample. The limitations inherent to the use of external magnetic fields which can be circumvented by the introduction of internal magnets located in the proximity of the target by a minimal surgery or by using a superparamagnetic scaffold under the influence of externally applied magnetic field inspires us to increase the magnetization of our samples. The composite in addition shows anti-bacterial properties against the two gram (-ve) bacteria tested. This work is significant as magnetite-hydroxyapatite composites are attracting a lot of attention as adsorbents, catalysts, hyperthermia agents and even as regenerative medicine. PMID:25589209

  9. In situ synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanocomposites using iron oxide nanofluids at ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Lubna; Mahto, Neha; Nayar, Suprabha

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a simple method for the room temperature synthesis of magnetite/hydroxyapatite composite nanocomposites using ferrofluids. The in situ synthesis of magnetic-hydroxyapatite results in a homogenous distribution of the two phases as seen both in transmission electron micrographs and assembled to a micron range in the confocal micrographs. The selected area diffraction pattern analysis shows the presence of both phases of iron oxide and hydroxyapatite. To the dialyzed ferrofluid, the constituents of hydroxyapatite synthesis was added, the presence of the superparamagnetic iron oxide particles imparts directionality to the hydroxyapatite crystal growth. Electron probe microanalysis confirms the co-existence of both iron and calcium atoms. Vibrating Sample magnetometer data shows magnetization three times more than the parent ferrofluid, the local concentration of iron oxide nanoparticles affects the strength of dipolar interparticle interactions changing the energy barrier for determining the collective magnetic behavior of the sample. The limitations inherent to the use of external magnetic fields which can be circumvented by the introduction of internal magnets located in the proximity of the target by a minimal surgery or by using a superparamagnetic scaffold under the influence of externally applied magnetic field inspires us to increase the magnetization of our samples. The composite in addition shows anti-bacterial properties against the two gram (-ve) bacteria tested. This work is significant as magnetite-hydroxyapatite composites are attracting a lot of attention as adsorbents, catalysts, hyperthermia agents and even as regenerative medicine.

  10. Observation of x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in well-characterized iron-cobalt-platinum multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A.F.; Waddill, G.D.; Tobin, J.G.

    1993-04-01

    Magnetic circular dichroism in the Fe 2p x-ray absorption is observed in multilayers of(Fe9.5{Angstrom}/Pt9.5{Angstrom}){sub 92}. The magnetization and helicity are both in the plane of this multilayer which is prepared by magnetron sputter deposition. This sample is part of a study to examine magnetization in the ternary multilayer system of FeCo/Pt. Lattice and layer pair spacings are measured using x-ray scattering. The atomic concentration profiles of the multilayer films are characterized using Auger electron spectroscopy coupled with depth profiling. Conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy are used to examine the thin film, growth morphology and atomic structure.

  11. Hard X-ray photoelectron and X-ray absorption spectroscopy characterization of oxidized surfaces of iron sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhlin, Yuri; Tomashevich, Yevgeny; Vorobyev, Sergey; Saikova, Svetlana; Romanchenko, Alexander; Félix, Roberto

    2016-11-01

    Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) using an excitation energy range of 2 keV to 6 keV in combination with Fe K- and S K-edge XANES, measured simultaneously in total electron (TEY) and partial fluorescence yield (PFY) modes, have been applied to study near-surface regions of natural polycrystalline pyrite FeS2 and pyrrhotite Fe1-xS before and after etching treatments in an acidic ferric chloride solution. It was found that the following near-surface regions are formed owing to the preferential release of iron from oxidized metal sulfide lattices: (i) a thin, no more than 1-4 nm in depth, outer layer containing polysulfide species, (ii) a layer exhibiting less pronounced stoichiometry deviations and low, if any, concentrations of polysulfide, the composition and dimensions of which vary for pyrite and pyrrhotite and depend on the chemical treatment, and (iii) an extended almost stoichiometric underlayer yielding modified TEY XANES spectra, probably, due to a higher content of defects. We suggest that the extended layered structure should heavily affect the near-surface electronic properties, and processes involving the surface and interfacial charge transfer.

  12. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1989-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for planetary atmospheres obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments and earth-based radio astronomical observations can be used to infer abundances of microwave absorbing atmospheric constituents in those atmospheres, as long as reliable information regarding the microwave absorbing properties of potential constituents is available. Work performed has shown that laboratory measurements of the millimeter-wave opacity of ammonia between 7.5 mm and 9.3 mm and also at the 3.2 mm wavelength require a different lineshape to be used in the theoretical prediction for millimeter-wave ammonia opacity than was previously used. The recognition of the need to make such laboratory measurements of simulated planetary atmospheres over a range of temperatures and pressures which correspond to the altitudes probed by both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, and over a range of frequencies which correspond to those used in both radio occultation experiments and radio astronomical observations, has led to the development of a facility at Georgia Tech which is capable of making such measurements. It has been the goal of this investigation to conduct such measurements and to apply the results to a wide range of planetary observations, both spacecraft and earth-based, in order to determine the identity and abundance profiles of constituents in those planetary atmospheres.

  13. Effects of Surfactants and Synthetic Conditions on the Sizes and Self-Assembly of Monodisperse Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, X.; Yang, H.

    2004-02-17

    (B204)Monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles made from the thermal decomposition of iron carbonyl in octyl ether in the presence of oleic and stearic acids have been examined under various reaction conditions. Monodisperse particles with diameters of 3, 5, 10, 16 and 25 nm have been made. Ostwald ripening could be the key reason for making monodisperse nanoparticles with diameters of up to 25 nm, above the largest sizes that have been reported so far for this class of materials. When stearic acid was used as surfactant, the reaction mixtures can reflux at a lower temperature than the reaction using oleic acid, and monodisperse 3 nm Fe2O3 particles can be made. By controlling the temperatures during the drop casting, different superstructures and superlattices can be created. The nanoparticles and their assembly have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy.

  14. Oxidation of dissolved iron under warmer, wetter conditions on Mars: Transitions to present-day arid environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, R. G.

    The copious deposits of ferric-iron assemblages littering the surface of bright regions of Mars indicate that efficient oxidative weathering reactions have taken place during the evolution of the planet. Because the kinetics of atmosphere-surface (gas-solid) reactions are considerably slower than chemical weathering reactions involving an aqueous medium, most of the oxidation products now present in the martian regolith probably formed when groundwater flowed near the surface. This paper examines how chemical weathering reactions were effected by climatic variations when warm, wet environments became arid on Mars. Analogies are drawn with hydrogeochemical and weathering environments on the Australian continent where present-day oxidation of iron is occurring in acidic ground water under arid conditions.

  15. Oxidation of dissolved iron under warmer, wetter conditions on Mars: Transitions to present-day arid environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    The copious deposits of ferric-iron assemblages littering the surface of bright regions of Mars indicate that efficient oxidative weathering reactions have taken place during the evolution of the planet. Because the kinetics of atmosphere-surface (gas-solid) reactions are considerably slower than chemical weathering reactions involving an aqueous medium, most of the oxidation products now present in the martian regolith probably formed when groundwater flowed near the surface. This paper examines how chemical weathering reactions were effected by climatic variations when warm, wet environments became arid on Mars. Analogies are drawn with hydrogeochemical and weathering environments on the Australian continent where present-day oxidation of iron is occurring in acidic ground water under arid conditions.

  16. Doppler-broadened NICE-OHMS beyond the cavity-limited weak absorption condition - II: Experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmaninger, Thomas; Silander, Isak; Ma, Weiguang; Axner, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Doppler-broadened (Db) noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectrometry (NICE-OHMS) is normally described by an expression, here termed the conventional (CONV) description, that is restricted to the conventional cavity-limited weak absorption condition (CCLWA), i.e. when the single pass absorbance is significantly smaller than the empty cavity losses, i.e. when α0 L < < π / F. To describe NICE-OHMS signals beyond this limit two simplified extended descriptions (termed the extended locking and extended transmission description, ELET, and the extended locking and full transmission description, ELFT), which are assumed to be valid under the relaxed cavity-limited weak absorption condition (RCLWA), i.e. when α0 L < π / F, and a full description (denoted FULL), presumed to be valid also when the α0 L < π / F condition does not hold, have recently been derived in an accompanying work (Ma W, et al. Doppler-broadened NICE-OHMS beyond the cavity-limited weak absorption condition - I. Theoretical Description. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jqsrt.2015.09.007). The present work constitutes an experimental verification and assessment of the validity of these, performed in the Doppler limit for a set of Fα0 L / π values (up to 3.5); it is shown under which conditions the various descriptions are valid. It is concluded that for samples with Fα0 L / π up to 0.01, all descriptions replicate the data well. It is shown that the CONV description is adequate and provides accurate assessments of the signal strength (and thereby the analyte concentration) up to Fα0 L / π of around 0.1, while the ELET is accurate for Fα0 L / π up to around 0.3. The ELFT description mimics the Db NICE-OHMS signal well for Fα0 L / π up to around unity, while the FULL description is adequate for all Fα0 L / π values investigated. Access to these descriptions both increases considerably the dynamic range of the technique and

  17. Fabrication of Thin Films of α-Fe2O3 via Atomic Layer Deposition Using Iron Bisamidinate and Water under Mild Growth Conditions.

    PubMed

    Avila, Jason R; Kim, Dong Wook; Rimoldi, Martino; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2015-08-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been shown to be an excellent method for depositing thin films of iron oxide. With limited iron precursors available, the methods widely used require harsh conditions such as high temperatures and/or the use of oxidants such as ozone or peroxide. This letter aims to show that bis(N,N'-di-t-butylacetamidinato) iron(II) (iron bisamidinate or FeAMD) is an ideal ALD precursor because of its reactivity with water and relative volatility. Using in situ QCM analysis, we show outstanding conformal self-limiting growth of FeOx using FeAMD and water at temperatures lower than 200 °C. By annealing thin films of FeOx at 500 °C, we observe the formation of α-Fe2O3, confirming that we can use FeAMD to fabricate thin films of catalytically promising iron oxide materials using moderate growth conditions. PMID:26192606

  18. Fabrication of Thin Films of α-Fe2O3 via Atomic Layer Deposition Using Iron Bisamidinate and Water under Mild Growth Conditions.

    PubMed

    Avila, Jason R; Kim, Dong Wook; Rimoldi, Martino; Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

    2015-08-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been shown to be an excellent method for depositing thin films of iron oxide. With limited iron precursors available, the methods widely used require harsh conditions such as high temperatures and/or the use of oxidants such as ozone or peroxide. This letter aims to show that bis(N,N'-di-t-butylacetamidinato) iron(II) (iron bisamidinate or FeAMD) is an ideal ALD precursor because of its reactivity with water and relative volatility. Using in situ QCM analysis, we show outstanding conformal self-limiting growth of FeOx using FeAMD and water at temperatures lower than 200 °C. By annealing thin films of FeOx at 500 °C, we observe the formation of α-Fe2O3, confirming that we can use FeAMD to fabricate thin films of catalytically promising iron oxide materials using moderate growth conditions.

  19. Simulations of iron K pre-edge X-ray absorption spectra using the restricted active space method.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meiyuan; Sørensen, Lasse Kragh; Delcey, Mickaël G; Pinjari, Rahul V; Lundberg, Marcus

    2016-01-28

    The intensities and relative energies of metal K pre-edge features are sensitive to both geometric and electronic structures. With the possibility to collect high-resolution spectral data it is important to find theoretical methods that include all important spectral effects: ligand-field splitting, multiplet structures, 3d-4p orbital hybridization, and charge-transfer excitations. Here the restricted active space (RAS) method is used for the first time to calculate metal K pre-edge spectra of open-shell systems, and its performance is tested against on six iron complexes: [FeCl6](n-), [FeCl4](n-), and [Fe(CN)6](n-) in ferrous and ferric oxidation states. The method gives good descriptions of the spectral shapes for all six systems. The mean absolute deviation for the relative energies of different peaks is only 0.1 eV. For the two systems that lack centrosymmetry [FeCl4](2-/1-), the ratios between dipole and quadrupole intensity contributions are reproduced with an error of 10%, which leads to good descriptions of the integrated pre-edge intensities. To gain further chemical insight, the origins of the pre-edge features have been analyzed with a chemically intuitive molecular orbital picture that serves as a bridge between the spectra and the electronic structures. The pre-edges contain information about both ligand-field strengths and orbital covalencies, which can be understood by analyzing the RAS wavefunction. The RAS method can thus be used to predict and rationalize the effects of changes in both the oxidation state and ligand environment in a number of hard X-ray studies of small and medium-sized molecular systems.

  20. Efficacy and safety of iron-chelation therapy with deferoxamine, deferiprone, and deferasirox for the treatment of iron-loaded patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence rate of thalassemia, which is endemic in Southeast Asia, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean, exceeds 100,000 live births per year. There are many genetic variants in thalassemia with different pathological severity, ranging from a mild and asymptomatic anemia to life-threatening clinical effects, requiring lifelong treatment, such as regular transfusions in thalassemia major (TM). Some of the thalassemias are non-transfusion-dependent, including many thalassemia intermedia (TI) variants, where iron overload is caused by chronic increase in iron absorption due to ineffective erythropoiesis. Many TI patients receive occasional transfusions. The rate of iron overloading in TI is much slower in comparison to TM patients. Iron toxicity in TI is usually manifested by the age of 30-40 years, and in TM by the age of 10 years. Subcutaneous deferoxamine (DFO), oral deferiprone (L1), and DFO-L1 combinations have been effectively used for more than 20 years for the treatment of iron overload in TM and TI patients, causing a significant reduction in morbidity and mortality. Selected protocols using DFO, L1, and their combination can be designed for personalized chelation therapy in TI, which can effectively and safely remove all the excess toxic iron and prevent cardiac, liver, and other organ damage. Both L1 and DF could also prevent iron absorption. The new oral chelator deferasirox (DFX) increases iron excretion and decreases liver iron in TM and TI. There are drawbacks in the use of DFX in TI, such as limitations related to dose, toxicity, and cost, iron load of the patients, and ineffective removal of excess iron from the heart. Furthermore, DFX appears to increase iron and other toxic metal absorption. Future treatments of TI and related iron-loading conditions could involve the use of the iron-chelating drugs and other drug combinations not only for increasing iron excretion but also for preventing iron absorption.

  1. Efficacy and safety of iron-chelation therapy with deferoxamine, deferiprone, and deferasirox for the treatment of iron-loaded patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence rate of thalassemia, which is endemic in Southeast Asia, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean, exceeds 100,000 live births per year. There are many genetic variants in thalassemia with different pathological severity, ranging from a mild and asymptomatic anemia to life-threatening clinical effects, requiring lifelong treatment, such as regular transfusions in thalassemia major (TM). Some of the thalassemias are non-transfusion-dependent, including many thalassemia intermedia (TI) variants, where iron overload is caused by chronic increase in iron absorption due to ineffective erythropoiesis. Many TI patients receive occasional transfusions. The rate of iron overloading in TI is much slower in comparison to TM patients. Iron toxicity in TI is usually manifested by the age of 30–40 years, and in TM by the age of 10 years. Subcutaneous deferoxamine (DFO), oral deferiprone (L1), and DFO–L1 combinations have been effectively used for more than 20 years for the treatment of iron overload in TM and TI patients, causing a significant reduction in morbidity and mortality. Selected protocols using DFO, L1, and their combination can be designed for personalized chelation therapy in TI, which can effectively and safely remove all the excess toxic iron and prevent cardiac, liver, and other organ damage. Both L1 and DF could also prevent iron absorption. The new oral chelator deferasirox (DFX) increases iron excretion and decreases liver iron in TM and TI. There are drawbacks in the use of DFX in TI, such as limitations related to dose, toxicity, and cost, iron load of the patients, and ineffective removal of excess iron from the heart. Furthermore, DFX appears to increase iron and other toxic metal absorption. Future treatments of TI and related iron-loading conditions could involve the use of the iron-chelating drugs and other drug combinations not only for increasing iron excretion but also for preventing iron absorption. PMID:26893541

  2. Real-time x-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium, iron, and manganese in contaminated sediments during bioreduction

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu; Tokunaga, T.K.; Wan, J.; Kim, Y.; Sutton, S.R.; Newville, M.; Lanzirotti, A.; Rao, W.

    2008-01-15

    The oxidation status of uranium in sediments is important because the solubility of this toxic and radioactive element is much greater for U(VI) than for U(IV) species. Thus, redox manipulation to promote precipitation of UO{sub 2} is receiving interest as a method to remediate U-contaminated sediments. Presence of Fe and Mn oxides in sediments at much higher concentrations than U requires understanding of their redox status as well. This study was conducted to determine changes in oxidation states of U, Fe, and Mn in U-contaminated sediments from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Oxidation states of these elements were measured in real-time and nondestructively using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, on sediment columns supplied with synthetic groundwater containing organic carbon (OC, 0, 3, 10, 30 and 100 mM OC as lactate) for over 400 days. In sediments supplied with OC {ge} 30 mM, 80% of the U was reduced to U(IV), with transient reoxidation at about 150 days. Mn(III,IV) oxides were completely reduced to Mn(II) in sediments infused with OC {ge} 3 mM. However, Fe remained largely unreduced in all sediment columns, showing that Fe(III) can persist as an electron acceptor in reducing sediments over long times. This result in combination with the complete reduction of all other potential electron acceptors supports the hypothesis that the reactive Fe(III) fraction was responsible for reoxidizing U(IV).

  3. Vibrational, X-ray absorption, and Mössbauer spectra of sulfate minerals from the weathered massive sulfide deposit at Iron Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majzlan, Juraj; Alpers, Charles N.; Bender Koch, Christian; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Myneni, Satish B.C.; Neil, John M.

    2011-01-01

    The Iron Mountain Mine Superfund site in California is a prime example of an acid mine drainage (AMD) system with well developed assemblages of sulfate minerals typical for such settings. Here we present and discuss the vibrational (infrared), X-ray absorption, and M??ssbauer spectra of a number of these phases, augmented by spectra of a few synthetic sulfates related to the AMD phases. The minerals and related phases studied in this work are (in order of increasing Fe2O3/FeO): szomolnokite, rozenite, siderotil, halotrichite, r??merite, voltaite, copiapite, monoclinic Fe2(SO4)3, Fe2(SO4)3??5H2O, kornelite, coquimbite, Fe(SO4)(OH), jarosite and rhomboclase. Fourier transform infrared spectra in the region 750-4000cm-1 are presented for all studied phases. Position of the FTIR bands is discussed in terms of the vibrations of sulfate ions, hydroxyl groups, and water molecules. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra were collected for selected samples. The feature of greatest interest is a series of weak pre-edge peaks whose position is determined by the number of bridging oxygen atoms between Fe3+ octahedra and sulfate tetrahedra. M??ssbauer spectra of selected samples were obtained at room temperature and 80K for ferric minerals jarosite and rhomboclase and mixed ferric-ferrous minerals r??merite, voltaite, and copiapite. Values of Fe2+/[Fe2++Fe3+] determined by M??ssbauer spectroscopy agree well with those determined by wet chemical analysis. The data presented here can be used as standards in spectroscopic work where spectra of well-characterized compounds are required to identify complex mixtures of minerals and related phases. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  4. Vibrational, X-ray absorption, and Mössbauer spectra of sulfate minerals from the weathered massive sulfide deposit at Iron Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majzlan, Juraj; Alpers, Charles N.; Bender Koch, Christian; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Myneni, Satish B.C.; Neil, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The Iron Mountain Mine Superfund site in California is a prime example of an acid mine drainage (AMD) system with well developed assemblages of sulfate minerals typical for such settings. Here we present and discuss the vibrational (infrared), X-ray absorption, and Mössbauer spectra of a number of these phases, augmented by spectra of a few synthetic sulfates related to the AMD phases. The minerals and related phases studied in this work are (in order of increasing Fe2O3/FeO): szomolnokite, rozenite, siderotil, halotrichite, römerite, voltaite, copiapite, monoclinic Fe2(SO4)3, Fe2(SO4)3·5H2O, kornelite, coquimbite, Fe(SO4)(OH), jarosite and rhomboclase. Fourier transform infrared spectra in the region 750–4000 cm−1 are presented for all studied phases. Position of the FTIR bands is discussed in terms of the vibrations of sulfate ions, hydroxyl groups, and water molecules. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra were collected for selected samples. The feature of greatest interest is a series of weak pre-edge peaks whose position is determined by the number of bridging oxygen atoms between Fe3+ octahedra and sulfate tetrahedra. Mössbauer spectra of selected samples were obtained at room temperature and 80 K for ferric minerals jarosite and rhomboclase and mixed ferric–ferrous minerals römerite, voltaite, and copiapite. Values of Fe2+/[Fe2+ + Fe3+] determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy agree well with those determined by wet chemical analysis. The data presented here can be used as standards in spectroscopic work where spectra of well-characterized compounds are required to identify complex mixtures of minerals and related phases.

  5. Melting curves and entropy of melting of iron under Earth's core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Jin; Liu, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Zhong-Li; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2015-07-01

    The melting curves of iron are determined up to 365 GPa via molecular dynamic (MD) simulations combining with the embedded atom model (EAM) potential developed by Ackland et al. We simulated the melting with three approaches, the hysteresis, two-phase and recently modified Z methods. All three techniques can produce satisfying results, consistent well with most of static compression measurements and shock experiments. Hence, we recommend that these three techniques and this EAM potential are reliable techniques and potential for simulating melting properties of iron. Fitting the well-known Simon equation to our two-phase data we yield the analytical melting curve for iron: 1825(1 + P/57.723)0.654, which gives a melting point at the inner core boundary of 6345 K, very close to the recent diamond anvil cell (DAC) extrapolated value and other ab initio calculations. Furthermore, the analyses of our entropy of melting and solid-liquid interfacial energy γsl indicate that at high pressure, the entropy of fusion shows weak pressure effect. The γsl increases monotonically with pressure, and can be described as a second-order polynomial relation.

  6. Status of neurocognitive and oxidative stress conditions in iron-steel workers.

    PubMed

    Malekirad, Ali Akbar; Mirabdollahi, Mansuoreh; Pilehvarian, Ali Asghar; Nassajpour, Ali Reza; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine oxidative stress status as well as ferrous (Fe) and Copper (Cu) levels in blood, neurocognitive impairment, and clinical markers in iron-steel workers. A comparative cross-sectional analysis was performed in 50 iron-steel workers who have been in contact with Fe and Cu in comparison with a control group containing 50 healthy subjects in the same age group and sex. Blood levels of lipid peroxidation, total antioxidant capacity, Fe, and Cu along with neurocognitive impairment were measured in workers and controls. Clinical examination was accomplished to record any abnormal sign or symptoms. Comparing with controls, the workers showed higher blood levels of lipid peroxidation and Cu and also a lower total antioxidant capacity. There was a positive correlation between work history and interstitial lung disease that strengths the presumption to progress to chronic obstructive lung disease in future. The results indicate that exposure to a combination of Fe and Cu in iron-steel workers induces oxidative stress. Especially, in the present case, toxic effect of Cu has been more than positive effects of Fe, but the combined exposure resulted in no such critical toxicity.

  7. Effect of Experimental Conditions on Cementite Formation During Reduction of Iron Ore Pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Mania; Sichen, Du

    2016-08-01

    Experiments have been carried out to study the effect of temperature, gas composition, residence time, and type of iron ore pellets on formation of cementite during gaseous reduction of hematite. Industrial iron ore pellets have been reduced isothermally in a gas mixture with H2 and CO as main components. The presence of Fe3C in the partially reduced pellets shows that reduction and cementite formation take place at the same time. The maximum content of cementite is identified in the samples reduced by H2-CO at 1123 K (850 °C). The decrease in the carbide content due to addition of 1 pct CO2 to the initial gas mixture reveals the major influence of carbon potential in the gas atmosphere. Further increase of CO2 content increases the Fe3C. The variations of the amount of cementite with the CO2 content suggest that both the thermodynamics and kinetics of cementite formation are affected by the gas composition. Cementite decomposes to graphite and iron particles in reducing and inert atmospheres as the residence time of pellets at high temperature is increased above 60 minutes.

  8. Effects of electron correlations on transport properties of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Cohen, R E; Haule, K

    2015-01-29

    Earth's magnetic field has been thought to arise from thermal convection of molten iron alloy in the outer core, but recent density functional theory calculations have suggested that the conductivity of iron is too high to support thermal convection, resulting in the investigation of chemically driven convection. These calculations for resistivity were based on electron-phonon scattering. Here we apply self-consistent density functional theory plus dynamical mean-field theory (DFT + DMFT) to iron and find that at high temperatures electron-electron scattering is comparable to the electron-phonon scattering, bringing theory into agreement with experiments and solving the transport problem in Earth's core. The conventional thermal dynamo picture is safe. We find that electron-electron scattering of d electrons is important at high temperatures in transition metals, in contrast to textbook analyses since Mott, and that 4s electron contributions to transport are negligible, in contrast to numerous models used for over fifty years. The DFT+DMFT method should be applicable to other high-temperature systems where electron correlations are important.

  9. Applicability of DLVO Approach to Predict Trends in Iron Oxide Colloid Mobility Under Various Physical And Chemical Soil Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florian Carstens, Jannis; Bachmann, Jörg; Neuweiler, Insa

    2014-05-01

    In soil and groundwater, highly mobile iron oxide colloids can act as "shuttles" for transport of adsorbed contaminants such as heavy metals and radionuclides. Artificial iron oxide colloids are injected into polluted porous media to accelerate bacterial degradation of pollutants in the context of bioremediation purposes. The mobility of iron oxide colloids is strongly affected by the hydraulic, physical and chemical conditions of the pore space, the solid particle surface properties, the fluid phase, and the colloids themselves. Most pioneering studies focused on iron oxide colloid transport and retention in simplified model systems. The aim of this study is to investigate iron oxide colloid mobility under more complex, soil-typical conditions that have as yet only been applied for model microspheres, i.e. functionalized latex colloids. Among these conditions is the pivotal impact of organic matter, either dissolved or adsorbed onto solid particles, modifying wettability properties. Of particular importance was to determine if effective chemical surface parameters derived from contact angle and zeta potential measurements can be used as a tool to predict general tendencies for iron oxide colloid mobility in porous media. In column breakthrough experiments, goethite colloids (particle size: 200-900 nm) were percolated through quartz sand (grain size: 100-300 µm) at pH 5. The impact of a multitude of conditions on colloid mobility was determined: dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentration, ionic strength, flow velocity, flow interruption, partial saturation, and drying with subsequent re-wetting. The solid matrix consisted of either clean sand, organic matter-coated sand, goethite-coated sand, or sand hydrophobized with dichlorodimethylsilane. Additionally, contact angles and zeta potentials of the materials applied in the column experiments were measured. By means of these surface parameters, traditional DLVO interaction energies based on zeta potential as well

  10. Monosaccharide absorption activity of Arabidopsis roots depends on expression profiles of transporter genes under high salinity conditions.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kohji; Kanai, Motoki; Osakabe, Yuriko; Ohiraki, Haruka; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2011-12-16

    Plant roots are able to absorb sugars from the rhizosphere but also release sugars and other metabolites that are critical for growth and environmental signaling. Reabsorption of released sugar molecules could help reduce the loss of photosynthetically fixed carbon through the roots. Although biochemical analyses have revealed monosaccharide uptake mechanisms in roots, the transporters that are involved in this process have not yet been fully characterized. In the present study we demonstrate that Arabidopsis STP1 and STP13 play important roles in roots during the absorption of monosaccharides from the rhizosphere. Among 14 STP transporter genes, we found that STP1 had the highest transcript level and that STP1 was a major contributor for monosaccharide uptake under normal conditions. In contrast, STP13 was found to be induced by abiotic stress, with low expression under normal conditions. We analyzed the role of STP13 in roots under high salinity conditions where membranes of the epidermal cells were damaged, and we detected an increase in the amount of STP13-dependent glucose uptake. Furthermore, the amount of glucose efflux from stp13 mutants was higher than that from wild type plants under high salinity conditions. These results indicate that STP13 can reabsorb the monosaccharides that are released by damaged cells under high salinity conditions. Overall, our data indicate that sugar uptake capacity in Arabidopsis roots changes in response to environmental stresses and that this activity is dependent on the expression pattern of sugar transporters. PMID:22041897

  11. Laboratory evaluation of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1984-01-01

    The microwave absorbing properties of gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) under Venus atmospheric conditions are investigated. The results are applied to measurements from Mariner 5, Mariner 10, and Pioneer/Venus Radio Occultation experiments, to determine abundancies of gaseous sulfuric acid in the Venus atmosphere. The microwave properties of the vapors accompanying liquid H2SO4 are studied to estimate the vapor pressure in an atmospheric model.

  12. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-04-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management and Task 2--were completed in prior quarters while Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4--8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) continued with additional in-pipe testing required to

  13. Role of secondary metabolites in the interaction between Pseudomonas fluorescens and soil microorganisms under iron-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Deveau, Aurélie; Gross, Harald; Palin, Béatrice; Mehnaz, Samina; Schnepf, Max; Leblond, Pierre; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Aigle, Bertrand

    2016-08-01

    Microorganisms can be versatile in their interactions with each other, being variously beneficial, neutral or antagonistic in their effect. Although this versatility has been observed among many microorganisms and in many environments, little is known regarding the mechanisms leading to these changes in behavior. In the present work, we analyzed the mechanism by which the soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8 shifts from stimulating the growth of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor S238N to killing the fungus. We show that among the three secondary metabolites produced by the bacterial strain-the siderophores enantio-pyochelin and pyoverdine, and the biosurfactant viscosin-the siderophores are mainly responsible for the antagonistic activity of the bacterium under iron-limited conditions. While the bacterial strain continues to produce beneficial factors, their effects are overridden by the action of their siderophores. This antagonistic activity of the strain P. fluorescens BBC6R8 in iron-depleted environments is not restricted to its influence on L. bicolor, since it was also seen to inhibit the growth of the actinomycete Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877. We show that the strain P. fluorescens BBc6R8 uses different strategies to acquire iron, depending on certain biotic and abiotic factors. PMID:27199346

  14. HEPCIDIN AND IRON HOMEOSTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2014-01-01

    Despite fluctuations in dietary iron intake and intermittent losses through bleeding, the plasma iron concentrations in humans remain stable at 10–30 μM. While most of the iron entering blood plasma comes from recycling, appropriate amount of iron is absorbed from the diet to compensate for losses and maintain nontoxic amounts in stores. Plasma iron concentration and iron distribution are similarly regulated in laboratory rodents. The hepatic peptide hepcidin was identified as the systemic iron-regulatory hormone. In the efferent arc, hepcidin regulates intestinal iron absorption, plasma iron concentrations, and tissue iron distribution by inducing degradation of its receptor, the cellular iron exporter ferroportin. Ferroportin exports iron into plasma from absorptive enterocytes, from macrophages that recycle the iron of senescent erythrocytes, and from hepatocytes that store iron. In the more complex and less well understood afferent arc, hepatic hepcidin synthesis is transcriptionally regulated by extracellular and intracellular iron concentrations through a molecular complex of bone morphogenetic protein receptors and their iron-specific ligands, modulators and iron sensors. Through as yet undefined pathways, hepcidin is also homeostatically regulated by the iron requirements of erythroid precursors for hemoglobin synthesis. In accordance with the role of hepcidin-mediated iron redistribution in host defense, hepcidin production is regulated by inflammation as well. Increased hepcidin concentrations in plasma are pathogenic in iron-restrictive anemias including anemias associated with inflammation, chronic kidney disease and some cancers. Hepcidin deficiency causes iron overload in hereditary hemochromatosis and ineffective erythropoiesis. Hepcidin, ferroportin and their regulators represent potential targets for the diagnosis and treatment of iron disorders and anemias. PMID:22306005

  15. Simultaneous coprecipitation of lead, cobalt, copper, cadmium, iron and nickel in food samples with zirconium(IV) hydroxide prior to their flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination.

    PubMed

    Citak, Demirhan; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-09-01

    A simple and new coprecipitation procedure is developed for the determination of trace quantities of heavy metals (lead, cobalt, copper, cadmium, iron and nickel) in natural water and food samples. Analyte ions were coprecipitated by using zirconium(IV) hydroxide. The determination of metal levels was performed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The influences of analytical parameters including pH, amount of zirconium(IV), sample volume, etc. were investigated on the recoveries of analyte ions. The effects of possible matrix ions were also examined. The recoveries of the analyte ions were in the range of 95-100%. Preconcentration factor was calculated as 25. The detection limits for the analyte ions based on 3 sigma (n=21) were in the range of 0.27-2.50 microgL(-1). Relative standard deviation was found to be lower than 8%. The validation of the presented coprecipitation procedure was performed by the analysis certified reference materials (GBW 07605 Tea and LGC 6010 Hard drinking water). The procedure was successfully applied to natural waters and food samples like coffee, fish, tobacco, black and green tea. PMID:19539005

  16. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the corrinoid/iron-sulfur potein involved in acetyl coenzyme A synthesis by Clostridium thermoaceticum

    SciTech Connect

    Wirt, M.D.; Chance, M.R. ); Kumar, M.; Ragsdale, S.W. )

    1993-03-24

    The corrinoid/iron-sulfur protein (C/Fe-SP) from Clostridium thermoaceticum is an 88 kDa [alpha][beta]-dimer that cycles between a Co(I) and methyl-Co(III) form as it transfers a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate (methyl-H[sub 4]folate) to carbon monoxide dehydrogenase. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray edge spectroscopy of the as-isolated C/Fe-SP indicates that the inactive Co(II) state of the corrinoid has a four-coordinate distorted square-planar structure. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first observation of a four-coordinate Co(II) corrinoid. This unusual coordination state would be expected to poise the Co(II) state of the C/Fe-SP for facile reduction to four-coordinate Co(I), which is the active nucleophile that acts as the acceptor of the methyl group of methyl-H[sub 4]folate. Additionally, the first-derivative X-ray edge spectra for both the methyl-Co(III) and Co(II) forms of the C/Fe-SP show an unexpected shift to lower energy when compared to analogous free cobalamins indicating a potential role for the protein in mediating electronic as well as structural properties of the enzyme bound methylcobamide. 42 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Current approach to iron chelation in children.

    PubMed

    Aydinok, Yesim; Kattamis, Antonis; Viprakasit, Vip

    2014-06-01

    Transfusion-dependent children, mostly with thalassaemia major, but also and occasionally to a more significant degree, with inherited bone marrow failures, can develop severe iron overload in early life. Moreover, chronic conditions associated with ineffective erythropoiesis, such as non-transfusion-dependent thalassaemia (NTDT), may lead to iron overload through increased gut absorption of iron starting in childhood. Currently, the goal of iron chelation has shifted from treating iron overload to preventing iron accumulation and iron-induced end-organ complications, in order to achieve a normal pattern of complication-free survival and of quality of life. New chelation options increase the likelihood of achieving these goals. Timely initiation, close monitoring and continuous adjustment are the cornerstones of optimal chelation therapy in children, who have a higher transfusional requirements compared to adults in order to reach haemoglobin levels adequate for normal growth and development. Despite increased knowledge, there are still uncertainties about the level of body iron at which iron chelation therapy should be started and about the appropriate degree of iron stores' depletion.

  18. Oxidation of H2S by iron oxides in unsaturated conditions.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Kirk J; Yabusaki, Steven B; Engelhard, Mark H; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V; Thornton, Edward C

    2003-05-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that gas-phase H2S can immobilize certain redox-sensitive contaminants (e.g., Cr, U, Tc) in vadose zone environments. A key issue for effective and efficient delivery of H2S in these environments is the reactivity of the gas with indigenous iron oxides. To elucidate the factors that control the transport of H2S in the vadose zone, laboratory column experiments were conducted to identify reaction mechanisms and measure rates of H2S oxidation by iron oxide-coated sands using several carrier gas compositions (N2, air, and O2) and flow rates. Most experiments were conducted using ferrihydrite-coated sand. Additional studies were conducted with goethite- and hematite-coated sand and a natural sediment. Selective extractions were conducted at the end of each column experiment to determine the mass balance of the reaction products. XPS was used to confirm the presence of the reaction products. For column experiments in which ferrihydrite-coated sand was the substrate and N2 was the carrier gas, the major H2S oxidation products were FeS and elemental sulfur (mostly S8(0), represented as S(0) for simplicity) at ratios that were consistent with the stoichiometry of the postulated reactions. When air or O2 were used as the carrier gas, S(0) became the dominant reaction product along with FeS2 and smaller amounts of FeS, sulfate, and thiosulfate. A mathematical model of reactive transport was used to test the hypothesis that S(0) forming on the iron oxide surfaces reduces access of H2S to the reactive surface. Several conceptual models were assessed in the context of the postulated reactions with the final model based on a linear surface poisoning model and fitted reaction rates. These results indicate that carrier gas selection is a critical consideration with significant tradeoffs for remediation objectives.

  19. Lack of Plasma Protein Hemopexin Results in Increased Duodenal Iron Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Fiorito, Veronica; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Silengo, Lorenzo; Aime, Silvio; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The body concentration of iron is regulated by a fine equilibrium between absorption and losses of iron. Iron can be absorbed from diet as inorganic iron or as heme. Hemopexin is an acute phase protein that limits iron access to microorganisms. Moreover, it is the plasma protein with the highest binding affinity for heme and thus it mediates heme-iron recycling. Considering its involvement in iron homeostasis, it was postulated that hemopexin may play a role in the physiological absorption of inorganic iron. Methods and Results Hemopexin-null mice showed elevated iron deposits in enterocytes, associated with higher duodenal H-Ferritin levels and a significant increase in duodenal expression and activity of heme oxygenase. The expression of heme-iron and inorganic iron transporters was normal. The rate of iron absorption was assessed by measuring the amount of 57Fe retained in tissues from hemopexin-null and wild-type animals after administration of an oral dose of 57FeSO4 or of 57Fe-labelled heme. Higher iron retention in the duodenum of hemopexin-null mice was observed as compared with normal mice. Conversely, iron transfer from enterocytes to liver and bone marrow was unaffected in hemopexin-null mice. Conclusions The increased iron level in hemopexin-null duodenum can be accounted for by an increased iron uptake by enterocytes and storage in ferritins. These data indicate that the lack of hemopexin under physiological conditions leads to an enhanced duodenal iron uptake thus providing new insights to our understanding of body iron homeostasis. PMID:23826373

  20. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-07-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera

  1. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari, Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-01-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management and Task 2--were completed in prior quarters while Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4--8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) continued with additional in-pipe testing required to

  2. Occupancy of the iron binding sites of human transferrin.

    PubMed Central

    Huebers, H A; Josephson, B; Huebers, E; Csiba, E; Finch, C A

    1984-01-01

    The in vivo distribution of iron between the binding sites of transferrin was examined. Plasma was obtained from normal subjects under basal conditions and after in vitro and in vivo iron loading. Independent methods, including measurement of the transferrin profile after isoelectric focusing and cross immunoelectrophoresis, and determination of the iron content in the separated fractions were in agreement that there was a random distribution of iron on binding sites. This held true with in vitro loading, when iron was increased by intestinal absorption and with loading from the reticuloendothelial system. The data indicate that the distribution of apo-, monoferric, and diferric transferrins is predictable on the basis of the plasma transferrin saturation and negate the concept that iron loading of transferrin in vitro is a selective process with possible functional consequences in tissue iron delivery. PMID:6589596

  3. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    PubMed

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption.

  4. Insights on fission products behaviour in nuclear severe accident conditions by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, E.; Bès, R.; Martin, Ph; Pontillon, Y.; Ducros, G.; Solari, P. L.

    2016-04-01

    Many research programs have been carried out aiming to understand the fission products behaviour during a Nuclear Severe Accident. Most of these programs used highly radioactive irradiated nuclear fuel, which requires complex instrumentation. Moreover, the radioactive character of samples hinders an accurate chemical characterisation. In order to overcome these difficulties, SIMFUEL stand out as an alternative to perform complementary tests. A sample made of UO2 doped with 11 fission products was submitted to an annealing test up to 1973 K in reducing atmosphere. The sample was characterized before and after the annealing test using SEM-EDS and XAS at the MARS beam-line, SOLEIL Synchrotron. It was found that the overall behaviour of several fission products (such as Mo, Ba, Pd and Ru) was similar to that observed experimentally in irradiated fuels and consistent with thermodynamic estimations. The experimental approach presented in this work has allowed obtaining information on chemical phases evolution under nuclear severe accident conditions, that are yet difficult to obtain using irradiated nuclear fuel samples.

  5. Conditional knockout of the Slc5a6 gene in mouse intestine impairs biotin absorption.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Abhisek; Lambrecht, Nils; Subramanya, Sandeep B; Kapadia, Rubina; Said, Hamid M

    2013-01-01

    The Slc5a6 gene expresses a plasma membrane protein involved in the transport of the water-soluble vitamin biotin; the transporter is commonly referred to as the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT) because it also transports pantothenic acid and lipoic acid. The relative contribution of the SMVT system toward carrier-mediated biotin uptake in the native intestine in vivo has not been established. We used a Cre/lox technology to generate an intestine-specific (conditional) SMVT knockout (KO) mouse model to address this issue. The KO mice exhibited absence of expression of SMVT in the intestine compared with sex-matched littermates as well as the expected normal SMVT expression in other tissues. About two-thirds of the KO mice died prematurely between the age of 6 and 10 wk. Growth retardation, decreased bone density, decreased bone length, and decreased biotin status were observed in the KO mice. Microscopic analysis showed histological abnormalities in the small bowel (shortened villi, dysplasia) and cecum (chronic active inflammation, dysplasia) of the KO mice. In vivo (and in vitro) transport studies showed complete inhibition in carrier-mediated biotin uptake in the intestine of the KO mice compared with their control littermates. These studies provide the first in vivo confirmation in native intestine that SMVT is solely responsible for intestinal biotin uptake. These studies also provide evidence for a casual association between SMVT function and normal intestinal health.

  6. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2005-01-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast-iron test pipe segments. Efforts in the current quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8. Highly valuable lessons were learned from field tests of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast-iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. (These field tests were conducted and reported last quarter.) These tests identified several design issues which need to be implemented in both the small- and large

  7. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2005-07-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. Bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs with the pipe in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, minimize excavation, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of old cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct safe repair operations on live mains.

  8. Application of zero-valent iron nanoparticles for the removal of aqueous zinc ions under various experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wen; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhou, Xuefei; Zhang, Yalei

    2014-01-01

    Application of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) for Zn²⁺ removal and its mechanism were discussed. It demonstrated that the uptake of Zn²⁺ by nZVI was efficient. With the solids concentration of 1 g/L nZVI, more than 85% of Zn²⁺ could be removed within 2 h. The pH value and dissolved oxygen (DO) were the important factors of Zn²⁺ removal by nZVI. The DO enhanced the removal efficiency of Zn²⁺. Under the oxygen-contained condition, oxygen corrosion gave the nZVI surface a shell of iron (oxy)hydroxide, which could show high adsorption affinity. The removal efficiency of Zn²⁺ increased with the increasing of the pH. Acidic condition reduced the removal efficiency of Zn²⁺ by nZVI because the existing H⁺ inhibited the formation of iron (oxy)hydroxide. Adsorption and co-precipitation were the most likely mechanism of Zn²⁺ removal by nZVI. The FeOOH-shell could enhance the adsorption efficiency of nZVI. The removal efficiency and selectivity of nZVI particles for Zn²⁺ were higher than Cd²⁺. Furthermore, a continuous flow reactor for engineering application of nZVI was designed and exhibited high removal efficiency for Zn²⁺. PMID:24416439

  9. Conditional (intestinal-specific) knockout of the riboflavin transporter-3 (RFVT-3) impairs riboflavin absorption.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Veedamali S; Lambrecht, Nils; Lytle, Christian; Said, Hamid M

    2016-02-15

    Riboflavin (RF) is indispensable for normal cell metabolism, proliferation, and growth. The RFVT-3 protein (product of the Slc52a3 gene) is expressed in the gut with the expression being restricted to the apical membrane domain of the polarized intestinal epithelial cells. The relative contribution of RFVT-3 to total carrier-mediated RF uptake in the native intestine, however, is not clear. We addressed this issue in the current investigation using a conditional (intestinal-specific) RFVT-3 knockout (cKO) mouse model developed by the Cre/Lox approach. All RFVT-3 cKO mice were found to be RF deficient and showed a significant growth and development retardation; also, nearly two-thirds of them died prematurely between the age of 6 and 12 wk. In vivo (intestinal and colonic loops) and in vitro (native isolated intestinal epithelial cells) uptake studies showed a severe inhibition in carrier-mediated RF uptake in the cKO mice compared with control littermates. We also observed a significant increase in the level of expression of oxidative stress-responsive genes in the intestine of the cKO mice compared with control littermates. Supplementation of the RFVT-3 cKO mice with pharmacological doses of RF led to a complete correction of the growth retardation and to normalization in the level of expression of the oxidative stress-responsive genes in the gut. These results show, for the first time, that the RFVT-3 system is the main transporter involved in carrier-mediated RF uptake in the native mouse small and large intestine, and that its dysfunction impairs normal RF body homeostasis.

  10. Increased iron supplied through Fet3p results in replicative life span extension of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under conditions requiring respiratory metabolism.

    PubMed

    Botta, Gabriela; Turn, Christina S; Quintyne, Nicholas J; Kirchman, Paul A

    2011-10-01

    We have previously shown that copper supplementation extends the replicative life span of Saccharomyces cerevisiae when grown under conditions forcing cells to respire. We now show that copper's effect on life span is through Fet3p, a copper containing enzyme responsible for high affinity transport of iron into yeast cells. Life span extensions can also be obtained by supplementing the growth medium with 1mM ferric chloride. Extension by high iron levels is still dependent on the presence of Fet3p. Life span extension by iron or copper requires growth on media containing glycerol as the sole carbon source, which forces yeast to respire. Yeast grown on glucose containing media supplemented with iron show no extension of life span. The iron associated with cells grown in media supplemented with copper or iron is 1.4-1.8 times that of cells grown without copper or iron supplementation. As with copper supplementation, iron supplementation partially rescues the life span of superoxide dismutase mutants. Cells grown with copper supplementation display decreased production of superoxide as measured by dihydroethidium staining.

  11. Uranium immobilization in an iron-rich rhizosphere of a native wetland plant from the Savannah River Site under reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyun-shik; Buettner, Shea W; Seaman, John C; Jaffé, Peter R; van Groos, Paul G Koster; Li, Dien; Peacock, Aaron D; Scheckel, Kirk G; Kaplan, Daniel I

    2014-08-19

    The hypothesis of this study was that iron plaques formed on the roots of wetland plants and their rhizospheres create environmental conditions favorable for iron reducing bacteria that promote the in situ immobilization of uranium. Greenhouse microcosm studies were conducted using native plants (Sparganium americanum) from a wetland located on the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC. After iron plaques were established during a 73-day period by using an anoxic Fe(II)-rich nutrient solution, a U(VI) amended nutrient solution was added to the system for an additional two months. Compared to plant-free control microcosms, microcosms containing iron plaques successfully stimulated the growth of targeted iron reducing bacteria, Geobacter spp. Their population continuously increased after the introduction of the U(VI) nutrient solution. The reduction of some of the U(VI) to U(IV) by iron reducing bacteria was deduced based on the observations that the aqueous Fe(II) concentrations increased while the U(VI) concentrations decreased. The Fe(II) produced by the iron reducing bacteria was assumed to be reoxidized by the oxygen released from the roots. Advanced spectroscopic analyses revealed that a significant fraction of the U(VI) had been reduced to U(IV) and they were commonly deposited in association with phosphorus on the iron plaque.

  12. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2004-11-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8, with significant progress made in each as well as field testing of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. The field tests were conducted August 23-26, 2004 in Oradell, New Jersey. The field tests identified several design issues which need to be implemented in both the small

  13. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2005-04-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of old cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed previously. Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in test cast-iron pipe segments. Efforts in the current quarter continued to be focused on Tasks 4-8. Highly valuable lessons were learned from field tests of the 4-inch gas pipe repair robot in cast-iron pipe at Public Service Electric & Gas. (These field tests were conducted and reported previously.) Several design issues were identified which need to be implemented in both the small- and large-diameter repair

  14. Micro-Structure of Iron in Petroselinum crispum and its dependence with the chemical nature of the soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehipawala, Sunil; Samarasekara, Pubudu; Dahanayake, Rasika; Edmund, Leung

    The micro structure of the iron Iron in Petroselinum crispum is investigated using synchrotron X-ray Absorption and Mossbauer spectroscopy. Plants were grown under controlled soil conditions with different pH, and iron concentrations. The correlation between the micro structure of the iron in Petroselinum crispum plants and the soil conditions were studied. Most of the iron present in the plants has the form Fe3+ or electron density at the site of the iron nucleus similar to that of Fe3+. But the amount of iron absorbed by the plants depends on the soil conditions. These findings will help establish soil conditions necessary to increase Fe2+ intake by plants similar to the form of iron present in most supplements. Support for this project was provided by a PSC-CUNY Award, jointly funded by The Professional Staff Congress and The City University of New York.

  15. New developments and controversies in iron metabolism and iron chelation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2016-03-26

    Iron is essential for all organisms including microbial, cancer and human cells. More than a quarter of the human population is affected by abnormalities of iron metabolism, mainly from iron deficiency and iron overload. Iron also plays an important role in free radical pathology and oxidative damage which is observed in almost all major diseases, cancer and ageing. New developments include the complete treatment of iron overload and reduction of morbidity and mortality in thalassaemia using deferiprone and selected deferiprone/deferoxamine combinations and also the use of the maltol iron complex in the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia. There is also a prospect of using deferiprone as a universal antioxidant in non iron overloaded diseases such as neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, renal, infectious diseases and cancer. New regulatory molecules of iron metabolism such as endogenous and dietary chelating molecules, hepcidin, mitochondrial ferritin and their role in health and disease is under evaluation. Similarly, new mechanisms of iron deposition, removal, distribution and toxicity have been identified using new techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging increasing our understanding of iron metabolic processes and the targeted treatment of related diseases. The uniform distribution of iron in iron overload between organs and within each organ is no longer valid. Several other controversies such as the toxicity impact of non transferrin bound iron vs injected iron, the excess levels of iron in tissues causing toxicity and the role of chelation on iron absorption need further investigation. Commercial interests of pharmaceutical companies and connections to leading journals are playing a crucial role in shaping worldwide medical opinion on drug sales and use but also patients' therapeutic outcome and safety. Major controversies include the selection criteria and risk/benefit assessment in the use of deferasirox in thalassaemia and more so in idiopathic

  16. New developments and controversies in iron metabolism and iron chelation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for all organisms including microbial, cancer and human cells. More than a quarter of the human population is affected by abnormalities of iron metabolism, mainly from iron deficiency and iron overload. Iron also plays an important role in free radical pathology and oxidative damage which is observed in almost all major diseases, cancer and ageing. New developments include the complete treatment of iron overload and reduction of morbidity and mortality in thalassaemia using deferiprone and selected deferiprone/deferoxamine combinations and also the use of the maltol iron complex in the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia. There is also a prospect of using deferiprone as a universal antioxidant in non iron overloaded diseases such as neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, renal, infectious diseases and cancer. New regulatory molecules of iron metabolism such as endogenous and dietary chelating molecules, hepcidin, mitochondrial ferritin and their role in health and disease is under evaluation. Similarly, new mechanisms of iron deposition, removal, distribution and toxicity have been identified using new techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging increasing our understanding of iron metabolic processes and the targeted treatment of related diseases. The uniform distribution of iron in iron overload between organs and within each organ is no longer valid. Several other controversies such as the toxicity impact of non transferrin bound iron vs injected iron, the excess levels of iron in tissues causing toxicity and the role of chelation on iron absorption need further investigation. Commercial interests of pharmaceutical companies and connections to leading journals are playing a crucial role in shaping worldwide medical opinion on drug sales and use but also patients’ therapeutic outcome and safety. Major controversies include the selection criteria and risk/benefit assessment in the use of deferasirox in thalassaemia and more so in idiopathic

  17. New developments and controversies in iron metabolism and iron chelation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2016-03-26

    Iron is essential for all organisms including microbial, cancer and human cells. More than a quarter of the human population is affected by abnormalities of iron metabolism, mainly from iron deficiency and iron overload. Iron also plays an important role in free radical pathology and oxidative damage which is observed in almost all major diseases, cancer and ageing. New developments include the complete treatment of iron overload and reduction of morbidity and mortality in thalassaemia using deferiprone and selected deferiprone/deferoxamine combinations and also the use of the maltol iron complex in the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia. There is also a prospect of using deferiprone as a universal antioxidant in non iron overloaded diseases such as neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, renal, infectious diseases and cancer. New regulatory molecules of iron metabolism such as endogenous and dietary chelating molecules, hepcidin, mitochondrial ferritin and their role in health and disease is under evaluation. Similarly, new mechanisms of iron deposition, removal, distribution and toxicity have been identified using new techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging increasing our understanding of iron metabolic processes and the targeted treatment of related diseases. The uniform distribution of iron in iron overload between organs and within each organ is no longer valid. Several other controversies such as the toxicity impact of non transferrin bound iron vs injected iron, the excess levels of iron in tissues causing toxicity and the role of chelation on iron absorption need further investigation. Commercial interests of pharmaceutical companies and connections to leading journals are playing a crucial role in shaping worldwide medical opinion on drug sales and use but also patients' therapeutic outcome and safety. Major controversies include the selection criteria and risk/benefit assessment in the use of deferasirox in thalassaemia and more so in idiopathic

  18. Assessing the aggregation behaviour of iron oxide nanoparticles under relevant environmental conditions using a multi-method approach.

    PubMed

    Chekli, Laura; Phuntsho, Sherub; Roy, Maitreyee; Lombi, Enzo; Donner, Erica; Shon, Ho Kyong

    2013-09-01

    Iron nanoparticles are becoming increasingly popular for the treatment of contaminated soil and groundwater; however, their mobility and reactivity in subsurface environments are significantly affected by their tendency to aggregate. Assessing their stability under environmental conditions is crucial for determining their environmental fate. A multi-method approach (including different size-measurement techniques and the DLVO theory) was used to thoroughly characterise the behaviour of iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe2O3NPs) under environmentally relevant conditions. Although recent studies have demonstrated the importance of using a multi-method approach when characterising nanoparticles, the majority of current studies continue to use a single-method approach. Under some soil conditions (i.e. pH 7, 10 mM NaCl and 2 mM CaCl2) and increasing particle concentration, Fe2O3NPs underwent extensive aggregation to form large aggregates (>1 μm). Coating the nanoparticles with dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated as an alternative "green" solution to overcoming the aggregation issue instead of using the more commonly proposed polyelectrolytes. At high concentrations, DOM effectively covered the surface of the Fe2O3NPs, thereby conferring negative surface charge on the particles across a wide range of pH values. This provided electrostatic stabilisation and considerably reduced the particle aggregation effect. DOM-coated Fe2O3NPs also proved to be more stable under high ionic strength conditions. The presence of CaCl2, however, even at low concentrations, induced the aggregation of DOM-coated Fe2O3NPs, mainly via charge neutralisation and bridging. This has significant implications in regards to the reactivity and fate of these materials in the environment. PMID:23764608

  19. Measuring brain manganese and iron accumulation in rats following 14 weeks of low-dose manganese treatment using atomic absorption spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Fitsanakis, Vanessa A; Zhang, Na; Anderson, Joel G; Erikson, Keith M; Avison, Malcolm J; Gore, John C; Aschner, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Chronic exposure to manganese (Mn) may lead to a movement disorder due to preferential Mn accumulation in the globus pallidus and other basal ganglia nuclei. Iron (Fe) deficiency also results in increased brain Mn levels, as well as dysregulation of other trace metals. The relationship between Mn and Fe transport has been attributed to the fact that both metals can be transported via the same molecular mechanisms. It is not known, however, whether brain Mn distribution patterns due to increased Mn exposure vs. Fe deficiency are the same, or whether Fe supplementation would reverse or inhibit Mn deposition. To address these questions, we utilized four distinct experimental populations. Three separate groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats on different diets (control diet [MnT], Fe deficient [FeD], or Fe supplemented [FeS]) were given weekly intravenous Mn injections (3 mg Mn/kg body mass) for 14 weeks, whereas control (CN) rats were fed the control diet and received sterile saline injections. At the conclusion of the study, both blood and brain Mn and Fe levels were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy and magnetic resonance imaging. The data indicate that changes in dietary Fe levels (either increased or decreased) result in regionally specific increases in brain Mn levels compared with CN or MnT animals. Furthermore, there was no difference in either Fe or Mn accumulation between FeS or FeD animals. These data suggest that dietary Fe manipulation, whether increased or decreased, may contribute to brain Mn deposition in populations vulnerable to increased Mn exposure.

  20. Structural diversity of the 3-micron absorption band in Enceladus’ plume from Cassini VIMS: Insights into subsurface environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhingra, Deepak; Hedman, Matthew M.; Clark, Roger N.

    2015-11-01

    Water ice particles in Enceladus’ plume display their diagnostic 3-micron absorption band in Cassini VIMS data. These near infrared measurements of the plume also exhibit noticeable variations in the character of this band. Mie theory calculations reveal that the shape and location of the 3-micron band are controlled by a number of environmental and structural parameters. Hence, this band provides important insights into the properties of the water ice grains and about the subsurface environmental conditions under which they formed. For example, the position of the 3-micron absorption band minimum can be used to distinguish between crystalline and amorphous forms of water ice and to constrain the formation temperature of the ice grains. VIMS data indicates that the water ice grains in the plume are dominantly crystalline which could indicate formation temperatures above 113 K [e.g. 1, 2]. However, there are slight (but observable) variations in the band minimum position and band shape that may hint at the possibility of varying abundance of amorphous ice particles within the plume. The modeling results further indicate that there are systematic shifts in band minimum position with temperature for any given form of ice but the crystalline and amorphous forms of water ice are still distinguishable at VIMS spectral resolution. Analysis of the eruptions from individual source fissures (tiger stripes) using selected VIMS observations reveal differences in the 3-micron band shape that may reflect differences in the size distributions of the water ice particles along individual fissures. Mie theory models suggest that big ice particles (>3 micron) may be an important component of the plume.[1] Kouchi, A., T. Yamamoto, T. Kozasa, T. Kuroda, and J. M. Greenberg (1994) A&A, 290, 1009-1018 [2] Mastrapa, R. M. E., W. M. Grundy, and M. S. Gudipati (2013) in M. S. Gudipati and J. Castillo-Rogez (Eds.), The Science of Solar System Ices, pp. 371.

  1. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2003-06-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and attaching a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service (which results in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1-Program Management was previously completed. Two reports, one describing the program management plan and the other consisting of the technology assessment, were submitted to the DOE COR in the first quarter. Task 2-Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications and Task 3-Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves are now well underway. First-quarter activities included conducting detailed analyses to determine the capabilities of coiled-tubing locomotion for entering and repairing gas mains and the first design iteration of the joint-sealing sleeve. The maximum horizontal reach of coiled tubing inside a pipeline before buckling prevents further access was calculated for a wide

  2. SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran M. Kothari; Gerard T. Pittard

    2003-01-01

    Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and attaching a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service (which results in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management was previously completed. Two reports, one describing the program management plan and the other consisting of the technology assessment, were submitted to the DOE COR in the first quarter. Task 2--Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications and Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves are now well underway. First-quarter activities included conducting detailed analyses to determine the capabilities of coiled-tubing locomotion for entering and repairing gas mains and the first design iteration of the joint-sealing sleeve. The maximum horizontal reach of coiled tubing inside a pipeline before buckling prevents further access was calculated for a

  3. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked.

  4. Mechanisms of mammalian iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pantopoulos, Kostas; Porwal, Suheel Kumar; Tartakoff, Alan; Devireddy, L

    2012-07-24

    Iron is vital for almost all organisms because of its ability to donate and accept electrons with relative ease. It serves as a cofactor for many proteins and enzymes necessary for oxygen and energy metabolism, as well as for several other essential processes. Mammalian cells utilize multiple mechanisms to acquire iron. Disruption of iron homeostasis is associated with various human diseases: iron deficiency resulting from defects in the acquisition or distribution of the metal causes anemia, whereas iron surfeit resulting from excessive iron absorption or defective utilization causes abnormal tissue iron deposition, leading to oxidative damage. Mammals utilize distinct mechanisms to regulate iron homeostasis at the systemic and cellular levels. These involve the hormone hepcidin and iron regulatory proteins, which collectively ensure iron balance. This review outlines recent advances in iron regulatory pathways as well as in mechanisms underlying intracellular iron trafficking, an important but less studied area of mammalian iron homeostasis.

  5. First-principles calculations of properties of orthorhombic iron carbide Fe7C3 at the Earth's core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Zamaan; Shulumba, Nina; Caffrey, Nuala M.; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Abrikosov, Igor A.

    2015-06-01

    A recently discovered phase of orthorhombic iron carbide o-Fe7C3 [Prescher et al., Nat. Geosci. 8, 220 (2015), 10.1038/ngeo2370] is assessed as a potentially important phase for interpretation of the properties of the Earth's core. In this paper, we carry out first-principles calculations on o-Fe7C3 , finding properties to be in broad agreement with recent experiments, including a high Poisson's ratio (0.38). Our enthalpy calculations suggest that o-Fe7C3 is more stable than Eckstrom-Adcock hexagonal iron carbide (h-Fe7C3 ) below approximately 100 GPa. However, at 150 GPa, the two phases are essentially degenerate in terms of Gibbs free energy, and further increasing the pressure towards Earth's core conditions stabilizes h-Fe7C3 with respect to the orthorhombic phase. Increasing the temperature tends to stabilize the hexagonal phase at 360 GPa, but this trend may change beyond the limit of the quasiharmonic approximation.

  6. Removal of chromium (VI) by acid-washed zero-valent iron under various groundwater geochemistry conditions.

    PubMed

    Lai, Keith C K; Lo, Irene M C

    2008-02-15

    The hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) removal capacity of acid-washed zerovalent iron (AW-Fe0) was evaluated under different groundwater geochemistry conditions through column experiments. It was found that each gram of the AW-Fe0 could remove 0.65-1.76 mg of Cr(VI) from synthetic groundwater in the absence of bicarbonate (HCO3-), magnesium and/or calcium ions. Groundwater geochemistry was found to exert various degrees of impact on Cr(VI) removal by the AW-Fe0, in which HCO3- alone gave the mildest impact whereas the copresence of calcium and HCO3- exerted the greatest impact In comparison with the unwashed Fe0, the AW-Fe0 showed a poorer Cr(VI) removal capacity and was also more susceptible to the influence of the dissolved groundwater constituents on Cr(VI) removal,thereby indicating the unsuitability of using AW-Fe0 in permeable reactive barriers for remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater. On the AW-Fe0 surface, where the indigenous iron precipitates were almost erased, trivalent chromium including chromium (III) oxides, hydroxides, and oxyhydroxides in irregular strip, chick footmark-liked or boulder-liked forms as well as Cr(III)-Cr(VI) mixed oxides were detected.

  7. Intracellular iron storage and the pathogenesis of paratuberculosis. Comparative studies with other mycobacterial, parasitic or infectious conditions of veterinary importance.

    PubMed

    Lepper, A W; Wilks, C R

    1988-01-01

    macrophages and overwhelming mycobacterial multiplication occurred. These studies indicate that, in most infections with mycobacteria, differentiation of macrophages radically reverses their iron acquisitive properties, creating an intracellular environment unsuitable for mycobacterial multiplication. It seems likely that allergically mediated microvascular haemorrhage, local tolerance of commensal mycobacteria and attenuation of the macrophage siderosis reversal mechanism provide unique conditions for early, uninhibited, intracellular multiplication of M. paratuberculosis in the ileo-caecal valve of certain mature ruminants.

  8. Predicting laser-induced bulk damage and conditioning for deuterated potassium di-hydrogen phosphate crystals using ADM (absorption distribution model)

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Z M; Spaeth, M L; Manes, K; Adams, J J; Carr, C W

    2010-02-26

    We present an empirical model that describes the experimentally observed laser-induced bulk damage and conditioning behavior in deuterated Potassium dihydrogen Phosphate (DKDP) crystals in a self-consistent way. The model expands on an existing nanoabsorber precursor model and the multi-step absorption mechanism to include two populations of absorbing defects, one with linear absorption and another with nonlinear absorption. We show that this model connects previously uncorrelated small-beam damage initiation probability data to large-beam damage density measurements over a range of ns pulse widths relevant to ICF lasers such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In addition, this work predicts the damage behavior of laser-conditioned DKDP and explains the upper limit to the laser conditioning effect. The ADM model has been successfully used during the commissioning and early operation of the NIF.

  9. Ammonium Oxidation Under Iron Reducing Conditions: Environmental Factors Characterization and Process Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shan; Ruiz, Melany; Jaffe, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Ammonium (NH4+) oxidation coupled to iron (Fe) reduction in the absence of oxygen and nitrate/nitrite (NO3-/NO2-) has been reported by several investigators and is referred to as Feammox. Feammox is a biological reaction, where Fe(III) is the electron acceptor, which is reduced to Fe(II), and NH4+ is the electron donor, which is oxidized to NO2-. An Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium named A6, a previously unreported species in the Acidimicrobiaceae family, has been identified as being responsible for the Feammox process(1, 2) Feammox process was noted in riparian wetland soils in New Jersey(1,3), in tropical rainforest soils in Puerto Rico (4) and in paddy soils in China (5). In addition to these published locations, Feammox process was also found in samples collected from a series of local wetland-, upland-, as well as storm-water detention pond-sediments in New Jersey, river sediments from South Carolina, and forested soils near an acid mine drainage (Dabaoshan, Guangdong province) in China. Using primers acm342f - 439r (2), Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 was detected in samples where Feammox was observed, after strictly anaerobic incubations. According to a canonical correspondence analysis with environmental characteristics and soil microbial communities, the species-environment relationship indicated that pH and Fe oxides content were the primary factors controlling Feammox process. Anaerobic incubations of Feammox enrichment cultures adjusted to different pH, revealed that the optimal pH for Feammox is 4 ~ 5, and the reaction does not proceed when pH > 7. No correlation was found between the distributions of Feammox bacteria and other NH4+ oxidation bacteria. Pure Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 strain was isolated in an autotrophic medium, from an active Feammox membrane reactor (A6 was enriched to 65.8% of the total bacteria). A 13C labeled CO2 amendment was conducted, and the 13C in cells of A6 increased from 1.80% to 10.3% after 14 days incubation. In a separate

  10. Microscale speciation of arsenic and iron in ferric-based sorbents subjected to simulated landfill conditions.

    PubMed

    Root, Robert A; Fathordoobadi, Sahar; Alday, Fernando; Ela, Wendell; Chorover, Jon

    2013-11-19

    During treatment for potable use, water utilities generate arsenic-bearing ferric wastes that are subsequently dispatched to landfills. The biogeochemical weathering of these residuals in mature landfills affects the potential mobilization of sorbed arsenic species via desorption from solids subjected to phase transformations driven by abundant organic matter and bacterial activity. Such processes are not simulated with the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) currently used to characterize hazard. To examine the effect of sulfate on As retention in landfill leachate, columns of As(V) loaded amorphous ferric hydroxide were reacted biotically at two leachate sulfate concentrations (0.064 mM and 2.1 mM). After 300 days, ferric sorbents were reductively dissolved. Arsenic released to porewaters was partially coprecipitated in mixed-valent secondary iron phases whose speciation was dependent on sulfate concentration. As and Fe XAS showed that, in the low sulfate column, 75-81% of As(V) was reduced to As(III), and 53-68% of the Fe(III) sorbent was transformed, dominantly to siderite and green rust. In the high sulfate column, Fe(III) solids were reduced principally to FeS(am), whereas As(V) was reduced to a polymeric sulfide with local atomic structure of realgar. Multienergy micro-X-ray fluorescence (ME-μXRF) imaging at Fe and As K-edges showed that As formed surface complexes with ferrihydrite > siderite > green rust in the low sulfate column; while discrete realgar-like phases formed in the high sulfate systems. Results indicate that landfill sulfur chemistry exerts strong control over the potential mobilization of As from ferric sorbent residuals by controlling secondary As and Fe sulfide coprecipitate formation. PMID:24102155

  11. Microscale speciation of arsenic and iron in ferric-based sorbents subjected to simulated landfill conditions

    PubMed Central

    Root, Robert A.; Fathordoobadi, Sahar; Alday, Fernando; Ela, Wendell; Chorover, Jon

    2013-01-01

    During treatment for potable use, water utilities generate arsenic-bearing ferric wastes that are subsequently dispatched to landfills. The biogeochemical weathering of these residuals in mature landfills affects the potential mobilization of sorbed arsenic species via desorption from solids subjected to phase transformations driven by abundant organic matter and bacterial activity. Such processes are not simulated with the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) currently used to characterize hazard. To examine the effect of sulfate on As retention in landfill leachate, columns of As(V) loaded amorphous ferric hydroxide were reacted biotically at two leachate sulfate concentrations (0.064 mM and 2.1 mM). After 300 d, ferric sorbents were reductively dissolved. Arsenic released to porewaters was partially co-precipitated in mixed-valent secondary iron phases whose speciation was dependent on sulfate concentration. As and Fe XAS showed that, in the low sulfate column, 75–81% of As(V) was reduced to As(III), and 53–68% of the Fe(III) sorbent was transformed, dominantly to siderite and green rust. In the high sulfate column, Fe(III) solids were reduced principally to FeS(am), whereas As(V) was reduced to a polymeric sulfide with local atomic structure of realgar. Multi-energy micro-X-ray fluorescence (ME-μXRF) imaging at Fe and As K-edges showed that As formed surface complexes with ferrihydrite > siderite > green rust in the low sulfate column; while discrete realgar-like phases formed in the high sulfate systems. Results indicate that landfill sulfur chemistry exerts strong control over the potential mobilization of As from ferric sorbent residuals by controlling secondary As and Fe sulfide co-precipitate formation. PMID:24102155

  12. Microscale speciation of arsenic and iron in ferric-based sorbents subjected to simulated landfill conditions.

    PubMed

    Root, Robert A; Fathordoobadi, Sahar; Alday, Fernando; Ela, Wendell; Chorover, Jon

    2013-11-19

    During treatment for potable use, water utilities generate arsenic-bearing ferric wastes that are subsequently dispatched to landfills. The biogeochemical weathering of these residuals in mature landfills affects the potential mobilization of sorbed arsenic species via desorption from solids subjected to phase transformations driven by abundant organic matter and bacterial activity. Such processes are not simulated with the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) currently used to characterize hazard. To examine the effect of sulfate on As retention in landfill leachate, columns of As(V) loaded amorphous ferric hydroxide were reacted biotically at two leachate sulfate concentrations (0.064 mM and 2.1 mM). After 300 days, ferric sorbents were reductively dissolved. Arsenic released to porewaters was partially coprecipitated in mixed-valent secondary iron phases whose speciation was dependent on sulfate concentration. As and Fe XAS showed that, in the low sulfate column, 75-81% of As(V) was reduced to As(III), and 53-68% of the Fe(III) sorbent was transformed, dominantly to siderite and green rust. In the high sulfate column, Fe(III) solids were reduced principally to FeS(am), whereas As(V) was reduced to a polymeric sulfide with local atomic structure of realgar. Multienergy micro-X-ray fluorescence (ME-μXRF) imaging at Fe and As K-edges showed that As formed surface complexes with ferrihydrite > siderite > green rust in the low sulfate column; while discrete realgar-like phases formed in the high sulfate systems. Results indicate that landfill sulfur chemistry exerts strong control over the potential mobilization of As from ferric sorbent residuals by controlling secondary As and Fe sulfide coprecipitate formation.

  13. Constraints on Earth's inner core composition inferred from measurements of the sound velocity of hcp-iron in extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Ohtani, Eiji; Fukui, Hiroshi; Kamada, Seiji; Takahashi, Suguru; Sakairi, Takanori; Takahata, Akihiro; Sakai, Takeshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Shiraishi, Rei; Seto, Yusuke; Tsuchiya, Taku; Baron, Alfred Q R

    2016-02-01

    Hexagonal close-packed iron (hcp-Fe) is a main component of Earth's inner core. The difference in density between hcp-Fe and the inner core in the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) shows a density deficit, which implies an existence of light elements in the core. Sound velocities then provide an important constraint on the amount and kind of light elements in the core. Although seismological observations provide density-sound velocity data of Earth's core, there are few measurements in controlled laboratory conditions for comparison. We report the compressional sound velocity (V P) of hcp-Fe up to 163 GPa and 3000 K using inelastic x-ray scattering from a laser-heated sample in a diamond anvil cell. We propose a new high-temperature Birch's law for hcp-Fe, which gives us the V P of pure hcp-Fe up to core conditions. We find that Earth's inner core has a 4 to 5% smaller density and a 4 to 10% smaller V P than hcp-Fe. Our results demonstrate that components other than Fe in Earth's core are required to explain Earth's core density and velocity deficits compared to hcp-Fe. Assuming that the temperature effects on iron alloys are the same as those on hcp-Fe, we narrow down light elements in the inner core in terms of the velocity deficit. Hydrogen is a good candidate; thus, Earth's core may be a hidden hydrogen reservoir. Silicon and sulfur are also possible candidates and could show good agreement with PREM if we consider the presence of some melt in the inner core, anelasticity, and/or a premelting effect.

  14. Constraints on Earth's inner core composition inferred from measurements of the sound velocity of hcp-iron in extreme conditions.

    PubMed

    Sakamaki, Tatsuya; Ohtani, Eiji; Fukui, Hiroshi; Kamada, Seiji; Takahashi, Suguru; Sakairi, Takanori; Takahata, Akihiro; Sakai, Takeshi; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Daisuke; Shiraishi, Rei; Seto, Yusuke; Tsuchiya, Taku; Baron, Alfred Q R

    2016-02-01

    Hexagonal close-packed iron (hcp-Fe) is a main component of Earth's inner core. The difference in density between hcp-Fe and the inner core in the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM) shows a density deficit, which implies an existence of light elements in the core. Sound velocities then provide an important constraint on the amount and kind of light elements in the core. Although seismological observations provide density-sound velocity data of Earth's core, there are few measurements in controlled laboratory conditions for comparison. We report the compressional sound velocity (V P) of hcp-Fe up to 163 GPa and 3000 K using inelastic x-ray scattering from a laser-heated sample in a diamond anvil cell. We propose a new high-temperature Birch's law for hcp-Fe, which gives us the V P of pure hcp-Fe up to core conditions. We find that Earth's inner core has a 4 to 5% smaller density and a 4 to 10% smaller V P than hcp-Fe. Our results demonstrate that components other than Fe in Earth's core are required to explain Earth's core density and velocity deficits compared to hcp-Fe. Assuming that the temperature effects on iron alloys are the same as those on hcp-Fe, we narrow down light elements in the inner core in terms of the velocity deficit. Hydrogen is a good candidate; thus, Earth's core may be a hidden hydrogen reservoir. Silicon and sulfur are also possible candidates and could show good agreement with PREM if we consider the presence of some melt in the inner core, anelasticity, and/or a premelting effect. PMID:26933678

  15. Meal conditions affect the absorption of supplemental vitamin D3 but not the plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D response to supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is sometimes assumed that dietary fat is required for vitamin D absorption, although the impact of different amounts of dietary fat on vitamin D absorption is not established. This study was conducted to determine whether the presence of a meal and the fat content of the meal influences vitamin D...

  16. Doppler-broadened NICE-OHMS beyond the cavity-limited weak absorption condition - I. Theoretical description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Weiguang; Silander, Isak; Hausmaninger, Thomas; Axner, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Doppler-broadened (Db) noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectrometry (NICE-OHMS) is conventionally described by an expression (here referred to as the CONV expression) that is restricted to the case when the single-pass absorbance, α0L, is much smaller than the empty cavity losses, π/F [here termed the conventional cavity-limited weak absorption (CCLWA) condition]. This limits the applicability of the technique, primarily its dynamic range and calibration capability. To remedy this, this work derives extended descriptions of Db NICE-OHMS that are not restricted to the CCLWA condition. First, the general principles of Db NICE-OHMS are scrutinized in some detail. Based solely upon a set of general assumptions, predominantly that it is appropriate to linearize the Beer-Lambert law, that the light is modulated to a triplet, and that the Pound-Drever-Hall sidebands are fully reflected, a general description of Db NICE-OHMS that is not limited to any specific restriction on α0L vs. π/F, here referred to as the FULL description, is derived. However, this description constitutes a set of equations to which no closed form solution has been found. Hence, it needs to be solved numerically (by iterations), which is inconvenient. To circumvent this, for the cases when α0L<π/F but without the requirement that the stronger CCLWA condition needs to be fulfilled, a couple of simplified extended expressions that are expressible in closed analytical form, referred to as the extended locking and extended transmission description, ELET, and the extended locking and full transmission description, ELFT, have been derived. An analysis based on simulations validates the various descriptions and assesses to which extent they agree. It is shown that in the CCLWA limit, all extended descriptions revert to the CONV expression. The latter one deviates though from the extended ones for α0L around and above 0.1π/F. The two simplified extended descriptions agree

  17. Inclusion of guava enhances non-heme iron bioavailability but not fractional zinc absorption from a rice-based meal in adolescents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessing the bioavailability of non-heme iron and zinc is essential for recommending diets that meet the increased growth-related demand for these nutrients. We studied the bioavailability of iron and zinc from a rice-based meal in 16 adolescent boys and girls, 13–15 y of age, from 2 government-run...

  18. Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandra Swamy, A. C.

    EXTENDED ABSTRACT Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles A.C.Balachandra swmay & Late C.S.G.K. Setty Absorption of radio waves in the ionosphere is of great practical importance for radio communication and navigation systems. The first attempt to measure the absolute magnitude of the radiowave absorption were made by appletion and Ratcliffe (1930) using the frequency change method for medium frequency waves reflected from the E-region. They concluded from their experiment that the main part of the attenuation occurred below the reflection level and named the absorption region, D-region of the ionosphere. One of the basic properties of the ionosphere is the absorption of high Frequency Radiowaves. HF radiowave absorption results mainly from collisions between electrons (which are set into forced oscillations by the electric field of the wave) and neutral air particles, the RF energy abstracted from the wave being converted into thermal energy. The radiowave absorption in the ionosphere depends on electron density and collision frequency. The most important absorbing regions are the D-region and the lower E-region (50-100 Km.) The regular diurnal variation of the electron density in this height range is caused mainly by the changes in the depth of penetration of solar XUV radiations with solar zenith angle under quiet solar conditions. In 1937 Dellinger J.H.identified fade outs in high frequency radio circuits as due to abnormal ionospheric absorption associated with solar flares. The onset of the fade out was usually rapid and the duration was typically tens of minutes like that of the visible flare, because of the sudden onset, the immediate effects of solar flares are known collectively as sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (STD). The phenomenon discovered by Dellinger is usually called a short Wave Fadeout(SWF). Since the SWF is due to abnormal absorption

  19. Conditional iron and pH-dependent activity of a non-enzymatic glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Keller, Markus A; Zylstra, Andre; Castro, Cecilia; Turchyn, Alexandra V; Griffin, Julian L; Ralser, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the evolutionary origins of metabolism. However, key biochemical reactions of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), ancient metabolic pathways central to the metabolic network, have non-enzymatic pendants that occur in a prebiotically plausible reaction milieu reconstituted to contain Archean sediment metal components. These non-enzymatic reactions could have given rise to the origin of glycolysis and the PPP during early evolution. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high-content metabolomics that allowed us to measure several thousand reaction mixtures, we experimentally address the chemical logic of a metabolism-like network constituted from these non-enzymatic reactions. Fe(II), the dominant transition metal component of Archean oceanic sediments, has binding affinity toward metabolic sugar phosphates and drives metabolism-like reactivity acting as both catalyst and cosubstrate. Iron and pH dependencies determine a metabolism-like network topology and comediate reaction rates over several orders of magnitude so that the network adopts conditional activity. Alkaline pH triggered the activity of the non-enzymatic PPP pendant, whereas gentle acidic or neutral conditions favored non-enzymatic glycolytic reactions. Fe(II)-sensitive glycolytic and PPP-like reactions thus form a chemical network mimicking structural features of extant carbon metabolism, including topology, pH dependency, and conditional reactivity. Chemical networks that obtain structure and catalysis on the basis of transition metals found in Archean sediments are hence plausible direct precursors of cellular metabolic networks.

  20. Conditional iron and pH-dependent activity of a non-enzymatic glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Markus A.; Zylstra, Andre; Castro, Cecilia; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Griffin, Julian L.; Ralser, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the evolutionary origins of metabolism. However, key biochemical reactions of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), ancient metabolic pathways central to the metabolic network, have non-enzymatic pendants that occur in a prebiotically plausible reaction milieu reconstituted to contain Archean sediment metal components. These non-enzymatic reactions could have given rise to the origin of glycolysis and the PPP during early evolution. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high-content metabolomics that allowed us to measure several thousand reaction mixtures, we experimentally address the chemical logic of a metabolism-like network constituted from these non-enzymatic reactions. Fe(II), the dominant transition metal component of Archean oceanic sediments, has binding affinity toward metabolic sugar phosphates and drives metabolism-like reactivity acting as both catalyst and cosubstrate. Iron and pH dependencies determine a metabolism-like network topology and comediate reaction rates over several orders of magnitude so that the network adopts conditional activity. Alkaline pH triggered the activity of the non-enzymatic PPP pendant, whereas gentle acidic or neutral conditions favored non-enzymatic glycolytic reactions. Fe(II)-sensitive glycolytic and PPP-like reactions thus form a chemical network mimicking structural features of extant carbon metabolism, including topology, pH dependency, and conditional reactivity. Chemical networks that obtain structure and catalysis on the basis of transition metals found in Archean sediments are hence plausible direct precursors of cellular metabolic networks. PMID:26824074

  1. Bio-inspired CO2 conversion by iron sulfide catalysts under sustainable conditions.

    PubMed

    Roldan, A; Hollingsworth, N; Roffey, A; Islam, H-U; Goodall, J B M; Catlow, C R A; Darr, J A; Bras, W; Sankar, G; Holt, K B; Hogarth, G; de Leeuw, N H

    2015-05-01

    The mineral greigite presents similar surface structures to the active sites found in many modern-day enzymes. We show that particles of greigite can reduce CO2 under ambient conditions into chemicals such as methanol, formic, acetic and pyruvic acid. Our results also lend support to the Origin of Life theory on alkaline hydrothermal vents.

  2. Design Criteria, Operating Conditions, and Nickel-Iron Hydroxide Catalyst Materials for Selective Seawater Electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Dionigi, Fabio; Reier, Tobias; Pawolek, Zarina; Gliech, Manuel; Strasser, Peter

    2016-05-10

    Seawater is an abundant water resource on our planet and its direct electrolysis has the advantage that it would not compete with activities demanding fresh water. Oxygen selectivity is challenging when performing seawater electrolysis owing to competing chloride oxidation reactions. In this work we propose a design criterion based on thermodynamic and kinetic considerations that identifies alkaline conditions as preferable to obtain high selectivity for the oxygen evolution reaction. The criterion states that catalysts sustaining the desired operating current with an overpotential <480 mV in alkaline pH possess the best chance to achieve 100 % oxygen/hydrogen selectivity. NiFe layered double hydroxide is shown to satisfy this criterion at pH 13 in seawater-mimicking electrolyte. The catalyst was synthesized by a solvothermal method and the activity, surface redox chemistry, and stability were tested electrochemically in alkaline and near-neutral conditions (borate buffer at pH 9.2) and under both fresh seawater conditions. The Tafel slope at low current densities is not influenced by pH or presence of chloride. On the other hand, the addition of chloride ions has an influence in the temporal evolution of the nickel reduction peak and on both the activity and stability at high current densities at pH 9.2. Faradaic efficiency close to 100 % under the operating conditions predicted by our design criteria was proven using in situ electrochemical mass spectrometry.

  3. Design Criteria, Operating Conditions, and Nickel-Iron Hydroxide Catalyst Materials for Selective Seawater Electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Dionigi, Fabio; Reier, Tobias; Pawolek, Zarina; Gliech, Manuel; Strasser, Peter

    2016-05-10

    Seawater is an abundant water resource on our planet and its direct electrolysis has the advantage that it would not compete with activities demanding fresh water. Oxygen selectivity is challenging when performing seawater electrolysis owing to competing chloride oxidation reactions. In this work we propose a design criterion based on thermodynamic and kinetic considerations that identifies alkaline conditions as preferable to obtain high selectivity for the oxygen evolution reaction. The criterion states that catalysts sustaining the desired operating current with an overpotential <480 mV in alkaline pH possess the best chance to achieve 100 % oxygen/hydrogen selectivity. NiFe layered double hydroxide is shown to satisfy this criterion at pH 13 in seawater-mimicking electrolyte. The catalyst was synthesized by a solvothermal method and the activity, surface redox chemistry, and stability were tested electrochemically in alkaline and near-neutral conditions (borate buffer at pH 9.2) and under both fresh seawater conditions. The Tafel slope at low current densities is not influenced by pH or presence of chloride. On the other hand, the addition of chloride ions has an influence in the temporal evolution of the nickel reduction peak and on both the activity and stability at high current densities at pH 9.2. Faradaic efficiency close to 100 % under the operating conditions predicted by our design criteria was proven using in situ electrochemical mass spectrometry. PMID:27010750

  4. X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopic Studies of [L2Fe2S2](n) Model Complexes: Implications for the Experimental Evaluation of Redox States in Iron-Sulfur Clusters.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Joanna K; Hahn, Anselm W; Albers, Antonia; Schiewer, Christine E; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Lima, Frederico A; Meyer, Franc; DeBeer, Serena

    2016-05-01

    Herein, a systematic study of [L2Fe2S2](n) model complexes (where L = bis(benzimidazolato) and n = 2-, 3-, 4-) has been carried out using iron and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and iron Kβ and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopies (XES). These data are used as a test set to evaluate the relative strengths and weaknesses of X-ray core level spectroscopies in assessing redox changes in iron-sulfur clusters. The results are correlated to density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the spectra in order to further support the quantitative information that can be extracted from the experimental data. It is demonstrated that due to canceling effects of covalency and spin state, the information that can be extracted from Fe Kβ XES mainlines is limited. However, a careful analysis of the Fe K-edge XAS data shows that localized valence vs delocalized valence species may be differentiated on the basis of the pre-edge and K-edge energies. These findings are then applied to existing literature Fe K-edge XAS data on the iron protein, P-cluster, and FeMoco sites of nitrogenase. The ability to assess the extent of delocalization in the iron protein vs the P-cluster is highlighted. In addition, possible charge states for FeMoco on the basis of Fe K-edge XAS data are discussed. This study provides an important reference for future X-ray spectroscopic studies of iron-sulfur clusters.

  5. Corrosion behavior of iron and nickel base alloys under solid oxide fuel cell exposure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.

    2006-03-01

    Topography and phase composition of the scales formed on commercial ferritic stainless steels and experimental low CTE nickel-based alloys were studied in atmospheres simulating solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) environments. The materials were studied under dual environment conditions with air on one side of the sample and carbon monoxide on the other side at 750°C. Surface characterization techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis were used in this study.

  6. Analysis of an Air Conditioning Coolant Solution for Metal Contamination Using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Exercise Simulating an Industrial Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    A real-life analytical assignment is presented to students, who had to examine an air conditioning coolant solution for metal contamination using an atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). This hands-on access to a real problem exposed the undergraduate students to the mechanism of AAS, and promoted participation in a simulated industrial activity.

  7. Biological reduction of uranium coupled with oxidation of ammonium by Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 under iron reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Emily R; Huang, Shan; Jaffé, Peter R

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the possibility of links between the biological immobilization of uranium (U) and ammonium oxidation under iron (Fe) reducing conditions. The recently-identified Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 (ATCC, PTA-122488) derives energy from ammonium oxidation coupled with Fe reduction. This bacterium has been found in various soil and wetland environments, including U-contaminated wetland sediments. Incubations of Acidimicrobiaceae bacteria A6 with nontronite, an Fe(III)-rich clay, and approximately 10 µM U indicate that these bacteria can use U(VI) in addition to Fe(III) as an electron acceptor in the presence of ammonium. Measurements of Fe(II) production and ammonium oxidation support this interpretation. Concentrations of approximately 100 µM U were found to entirely inhibit Acidimicrobiaceae bacteria A6 activity. These results suggest that natural sites of active ammonium oxidation under Fe reducing conditions by Acidimicrobiaceae bacteria A6 could be hotspots of U immobilization by bioreduction. This is the first report of biological U reduction that is not coupled to carbon oxidation.

  8. Mini-Column Ion-Exchange Separation and Atomic Absorption Quantitation of Nickel, Cobalt, and Iron: An Undergraduate Quantitative Analysis Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate quantitative analysis experiment, describing an atomic absorption quantitation scheme that is fast, sensitive and comparatively simple relative to other titration experiments. (CS)

  9. The genes that encode the gonococcal transferrin binding proteins, TbpB and TbpA, are differentially regulated by MisR under iron-replete and iron-depleted conditions.

    PubMed

    Kandler, Justin L; Acevedo, Rosuany Vélez; Dickinson, Mary Kathryne; Cash, Devin R; Shafer, William M; Cornelissen, Cynthia Nau

    2016-10-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae produces two transferrin binding proteins, TbpA and TbpB, which together enable efficient iron transport from human transferrin. We demonstrate that expression of the tbp genes is controlled by MisR, a response regulator in the two-component regulatory system that also includes the sensor kinase MisS. The tbp genes were up-regulated in the misR mutant under iron-replete conditions but were conversely down-regulated in the misR mutant under iron-depleted conditions. The misR mutant was capable of transferrin-iron uptake at only 50% of wild-type levels, consistent with decreased tbp expression. We demonstrate that phosphorylated MisR specifically binds to the tbpBA promoter and that MisR interacts with five regions upstream of the tbpB start codon. These analyses confirm that MisR directly regulates tbpBA expression. The MisR binding sites in the gonococcus are only partially conserved in Neisseria meningitidis, which may explain why tbpBA was not MisR-regulated in previous studies using this related pathogen. This is the first report of a trans-acting protein factor other than Fur that can directly contribute to gonococcal tbpBA regulation.

  10. Serpentinization, iron oxidation, and aqueous conditions in an ophiolite: Implications for hydrogen production and habitability on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberger, Rebecca N.; Mustard, John F.; Cloutis, Edward A.; Pratt, Lisa M.; Sauer, Peter E.; Mann, Paul; Turner, Kathryn; Dyar, M. Darby; Bish, David L.

    2015-04-01

    Molecular hydrogen produced through iron oxidation during formation of serpentine and magnetite can sustain terrestrial subsurface ecosystems. The Fe3+ in serpentine partitions into octahedral and tetrahedral sites differently as serpentinization proceeds, and tetrahedral Fe3+ is present toward the end of serpentinization. We map Fe oxidation states in a serpentinite to determine the degree to which serpentinization progressed and where hydrogen production has been maximized to assess habitability at an abandoned chrysotile mine in Norbestos, Quebec, in association with the Canadian Space Agency's Mars Methane Analogue Mission. We also analyzed stable isotopes of carbon and oxygen in carbonates to constrain the conditions of water-rock interaction during serpentinization. Iron oxidation and coordination was determined through field imaging of rock walls with a visible hyperspectral imager (420-720 nm), and samples collected from imaged rocks and elsewhere in the mine were imaged in the laboratory (420-1100 nm). Sample chemistry, mineralogy, and oxidation state were determined with laboratory measurements of visible through mid-infrared reflectance spectra, major element chemistry, mineralogy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Mapping with hyperspectral imaging of outcrops and hand samples shows that tetrahedral Fe3+ is common in serpentinites at this site, and results are confirmed through other measurements. Major element chemistry and mineralogy are consistent with serpentine plus minor carbonate. Carbonate samples show an exceptional range in δ13C (-13.14 to + 16.12 ‰ VPDB) and δ18O (-15.48 to - 3.20 ‰ VPDB) that vary with location in the mine. Carbonates south of a shear zone (δ13C more positive) likely formed during periods of serpentinization in a carbon-limited reservoir closed to carbon addition but open to methane escape. Carbonates in a shear zone (δ13C more negative) probably formed later at low temperatures through CO2-metasomatism or atmospheric

  11. Bioremediation of benzene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes in groundwater under iron-amended, sulfate-reducing conditions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Song; Fallgren, Paul H; Bilgin, A Azra; Morris, Jeffrey M; Barnes, Paul W

    2007-02-01

    Elevated concentrations of sulfide in groundwater (approximately 63 mg S(2-)/L in water and 500 mg dissolved H2S/L dissipating from the wellhead) at a field site near South Lovedale (OK, USA) were inhibiting the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) that are known to degrade contaminants, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes. Elevated concentrations of these contaminants, except for toluene, also were present in this groundwater. Microcosms were established in the laboratory using groundwater and sediment collected from the field site and amended with various nutrient, substrate, and inhibitor treatments. All microcosms initially were amended with FeCl2 to induce FeS precipitation and, thereby, to reduce aqueous sulfide concentrations. Complete removal of benzene, ethylbenzene, and m+p-xylenes (BEX; o-xylene not detected) was observed within 39 d in treatments with various combinations of nutrient and substrate amendments, including treatments with no amendments (other than FeCl2). This indicates that the elevated concentration of sulfide is the only limiting factor to BEX biodegradation at this site under anaerobic conditions and that treating the groundwater with FeCl2 may be a simple remedy to both facilitate and enhance BEX degradation by the indigenous SRB population.

  12. Increasing concentrations of iron in surface waters as a consequence of reducing conditions in the catchment area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekström, Sara M.; Regnell, Olof; Reader, Heather E.; Nilsson, P. Anders; Löfgren, Stefan; Kritzberg, Emma S.

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies report trends of strongly increasing iron (Fe) concentrations in freshwaters. Since Fe is a key element with a decisive role in the biogeochemical cycling of major elements, it is important to understand the mechanisms behind these trends. We hypothesized that variations in Fe concentration are driven mainly by redox dynamics in hydraulically connected soils. Notably, Fe(III), which is the favored oxidation state except in environments where microbial activity provide strong reducing intensity, has several orders of magnitude lower water solubility than Fe(II). To test our hypothesis, seasonal variation in water chemistry, discharge, and air temperature was studied in three Swedish rivers. Methylmercury and sulfate were used as indicators of seasonal redox changes. Seasonal variability in water chemistry, discharge, and air temperature in the Emån and Lyckeby Rivers implied that the variation in Fe was primarily driven by the prevalence of reducing conditions in the catchment. In general, high Fe concentrations were observed when methylmercury was high and sulfate was low, indicative of reducing conditions. The Fe concentrations showed no or weak relationships with variations in dissolved organic matter concentration and aromaticity. The seasonal variation in Fe concentration of the Ume river was primarily dependent on timing of the snowmelt in high- versus low-altitude areas of the catchment. There were long-term trends of increasing temperature in all catchments and also trends of increasing discharge in the southern rivers, which should increase the probability for anaerobic conditions in space and time and thereby increase Fe transport to the aquatic systems.

  13. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  14. Flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS) determination of copper, iron and zinc in food samples after solid-phase extraction on Schiff base-modified duolite XAD 761.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Mortazavi, K; Montazerozohori, M; Shokrollahi, A; Soylak, M

    2013-05-01

    The present study involves the development of solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure for the preconcentration of trace amounts of copper (Cu(2+)), iron (Fe(3+)) and zinc (Zn(2+)) ions on duolite XAD 761 modified by bis(2-hydroxyacetophenone)-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediimine(BHAPDMPDI). The complexation between the metal ions and the proposed ligand was investigated potentiometrically. The metal ions retained on the sorbent were quantitatively determined via complexation with BHAPDMPDI. The complexed metal ions were efficiently eluted using 6 mL of 4 mol L(-1) nitric acid in acetone. The influences of the analytical parameters, including pH, amounts of the ligand and the solid phase, eluent conditions and sample volume, on the recoveries of the metal ions were optimized. Using the optimized parameters, the linear response of the SPE method for Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Fe(3+) ions were in the ranges of 0.01-0.34, 0.01-0.28 and 0.02-0.31 μg mL(-1), respectively, and the detection limits for Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Fe(3+) ions were 1.8, 1.6 and 2.4 μg mL(-1), respectively. The proposed method exhibits a preconcentration factor of 208 for all of the ions studied and an enhancement factor for Cu(2+), Fe(3+) and Zn(2+) ions of 34, 28 and 38, respectively. The presented results demonstrate the successful application of the proposed method for the determination of these metal ions in some real samples with high recoveries (> 95%) and reasonable relative standard deviation (RDS <5%).

  15. Flame atomic absorption spectrometric (FAAS) determination of copper, iron and zinc in food samples after solid-phase extraction on Schiff base-modified duolite XAD 761.

    PubMed

    Ghaedi, M; Mortazavi, K; Montazerozohori, M; Shokrollahi, A; Soylak, M

    2013-05-01

    The present study involves the development of solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure for the preconcentration of trace amounts of copper (Cu(2+)), iron (Fe(3+)) and zinc (Zn(2+)) ions on duolite XAD 761 modified by bis(2-hydroxyacetophenone)-2,2-dimethyl-1,3-propanediimine(BHAPDMPDI). The complexation between the metal ions and the proposed ligand was investigated potentiometrically. The metal ions retained on the sorbent were quantitatively determined via complexation with BHAPDMPDI. The complexed metal ions were efficiently eluted using 6 mL of 4 mol L(-1) nitric acid in acetone. The influences of the analytical parameters, including pH, amounts of the ligand and the solid phase, eluent conditions and sample volume, on the recoveries of the metal ions were optimized. Using the optimized parameters, the linear response of the SPE method for Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Fe(3+) ions were in the ranges of 0.01-0.34, 0.01-0.28 and 0.02-0.31 μg mL(-1), respectively, and the detection limits for Cu(2+), Zn(2+) and Fe(3+) ions were 1.8, 1.6 and 2.4 μg mL(-1), respectively. The proposed method exhibits a preconcentration factor of 208 for all of the ions studied and an enhancement factor for Cu(2+), Fe(3+) and Zn(2+) ions of 34, 28 and 38, respectively. The presented results demonstrate the successful application of the proposed method for the determination of these metal ions in some real samples with high recoveries (> 95%) and reasonable relative standard deviation (RDS <5%). PMID:23498267

  16. Water absorption kinetics in different wettability conditions studied at pore and sample scales in porous media by NMR with portable single-sided and laboratory imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolotti, V.; Camaiti, M.; Casieri, C.; De Luca, F.; Fantazzini, P.; Terenzi, C.

    2006-08-01

    NMR relaxation time distributions of water 1H obtained by a portable single-sided surface device have been compared with MRI internal images obtained with a laboratory imaging apparatus on the same biocalcarenite (Lecce Stone) samples during capillary water uptake. The aim of this work was to check the ability of NMR methods to quantitatively follow the absorption phenomenon under different wettability conditions of the internal pore surfaces. Stone wettability changes were obtained by capillary absorption of a chloroform solution of Paraloid PB72, a hydrophobic acrylic resin frequently used to protect monuments and buildings, through one face of each sample. Both relaxation and imaging data have been found in good quantitative agreement each other and with masses of water determined by weighing the samples. In particular the Washburn model of water capillary rise applied to the imaging data allowed us to quantify the sorptivity in both treated and untreated samples. Combining relaxation and imaging data, a synergetic improvement of our understanding of the water absorption kinetics at both pore and sample scales is obtained. Since relaxation data have been taken over the course of time without interrupting the absorption process, simply by keeping the portable device on the surface opposite to the absorption, the results show that the single-sided NMR technique is a powerful tool for in situ evaluation of water-repellent treatments frequently used for consolidation and/or protection of stone artifacts.

  17. Water absorption kinetics in different wettability conditions studied at pore and sample scales in porous media by NMR with portable single-sided and laboratory imaging devices.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, V; Camaiti, M; Casieri, C; De Luca, F; Fantazzini, P; Terenzi, C

    2006-08-01

    NMR relaxation time distributions of water (1)H obtained by a portable single-sided surface device have been compared with MRI internal images obtained with a laboratory imaging apparatus on the same biocalcarenite (Lecce Stone) samples during capillary water uptake. The aim of this work was to check the ability of NMR methods to quantitatively follow the absorption phenomenon under different wettability conditions of the internal pore surfaces. Stone wettability changes were obtained by capillary absorption of a chloroform solution of Paraloid PB72, a hydrophobic acrylic resin frequently used to protect monuments and buildings, through one face of each sample. Both relaxation and imaging data have been found in good quantitative agreement each other and with masses of water determined by weighing the samples. In particular the Washburn model of water capillary rise applied to the imaging data allowed us to quantify the sorptivity in both treated and untreated samples. Combining relaxation and imaging data, a synergetic improvement of our understanding of the water absorption kinetics at both pore and sample scales is obtained. Since relaxation data have been taken over the course of time without interrupting the absorption process, simply by keeping the portable device on the surface opposite to the absorption, the results show that the single-sided NMR technique is a powerful tool for in situ evaluation of water-repellent treatments frequently used for consolidation and/or protection of stone artifacts.

  18. Reduced mass absorption cross section of black carbon under an extremely polluted condition in southern suburb of Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Hua, Y.; Jiang, J.; Zhao, B.; Xing, J.; Jiang, S.; Cai, R.; Hao, J.

    2015-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), as one of the most important climate-warming agent, has been the focus of extensive studies in recent years. Mass absorption cross section (MAC) is a key parameter to assess the radiative forcing by linking the mass concentration with the radiation effect. In this study, we conducted a two-month field campaign in Beijing, the capital city of China, in a October and November, a period that severe PM2.5 pollution occurred. PM2.5 offline samples were collected daily onto quartz fiber filters by a Partisol 2300 Speciation Sampler. Size-segregated aerosol samples of the size ranged from 0.056 - 10 µm with 11 bins were collected onto quartz fiber filters by a cascade impactor developed by National Chiao Tung University (NCTU). A DRI Model 2001 thermal/optical carbon analyzer were used to analyze the samples. The MAC of BC is measured by a thermal-optical carbon analyzer. In contrast to previous studies, we found that after "shadow effect" has been corrected, the MAC is reduced from 14 m2/g to 5 m2/g with the increase of BC concentrations. There was no significant correlation between MAC with secondary inorganic aerosols. Such unexpected reduction in MAC of BC is possibly associated with the microphysical property of BC modulated under serious pollution condition. The study of size-segregated species concentrations shows that the size distribution of BC is unimodal, with the peak around 0.56-1.8 µm. The results also show the proportion of BC larger than 0.56 µm is significant increased. Additionally, "soot superaggregate", as distinct from conventional sub-micron aggregates, was found in the bins of BC with size ranged from 1 to1.8 µm. Such high carbon aerosol proportion and large BC size distribution suggests that emissions from residential biomass burning is dominant during this episode. This study suggests that the optical property for BC from different emission sectors should be considered in the estimation of radiative forcing.

  19. Ferrous Sulfate (Iron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells. It is used to treat or prevent iron-deficiency anemia, a condition that occurs when the body ... than prescribed by your doctor.Although symptoms of iron deficiency usually improve within a few days, you may ...

  20. Anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum-contaminated harbor sediments under sulfate-reducing and artificially imposed iron-reducing conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, J.D.; Anderson, R.T.; Woodward, J.C.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Lovley, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The potential use of iron(III) oxide to stimulate in-situ hydrocarbon degradation in anaerobic petroleum-contaminated harbor sediments was investigated. Previous studies have indicated that Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (FeRB) can oxidize some electron donors more effectively than sulfate- reducing bacteria (SRB). In contrast to previous results in freshwater sediments, the addition of Fe(III) to marine sediments from San Diego Bay, CA did not switch the terminal electron-accepting process (TEAP) from sulfate reduction to Fe-(III) reduction. Addition of Fe(III) also did not stimulate anaerobic hydrocarbon oxidation. Exposure of the sediment to air [to reoxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III)] followed by anaerobic incubation of the sediments, resulted in Fe-(III) reduction as the TEAP, but contaminant degradation was not stimulated and in some instances was inhibited. The difference in the ability of FeRB to compete with the SRB in the different sediment treatments was related to relative population sizes. Although the addition of Fe(III) did not stimulate hydrocarbon degradation, the results presented here as well as other recent studies demonstrate that there may be significant anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation under sulfate-reducing conditions in harbor sediments.

  1. Impact of iron-reducing bacteria on the corrosion rate of carbon steel under simulated geological disposal conditions.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Marta K; Schlegel, Michel L; Libert, Marie; Bildstein, Olivier

    2015-06-16

    The current projects for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste rely on underground burial and confinement by metallic envelopes that are susceptible to corrosion processes. The impact of microbial activity must be fully clarified in order to provide biological parameters for predictive reactive transport models. This study investigates the impact of hydrogenotrophic iron-reducing bacteria (Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1) on the corrosion rate of carbon steel under simulated geological disposal conditions by using a geochemical approach. It was found that corrosion damage changes mostly according to the experimental solution (i.e., chemical composition). Magnetite and vivianite were identified as the main corrosion products. In the presence of bacteria, the corrosion rate increased by a factor of 1.3 (according to weight loss analysis) to 1.8 (according to H2 measurements), and the detected amount of magnetite diminished. The mechanism likely to enhance corrosion is the destabilization and dissolution of the passivating magnetite layer by reduction of structural Fe(III) coupled to H2 oxidation.

  2. The ColRS system of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is required for virulence and growth in iron-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Subramoni, Sujatha; Pandey, Alok; Vishnu Priya, M R; Patel, Hitendra Kumar; Sonti, Ramesh V

    2012-09-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the causal agent of bacterial blight of rice, produces siderophores only under iron-limiting conditions. We screened 15 400 mTn5-induced mutants of X. oryzae pv. oryzae and isolated 27 mutants that produced siderophores even under iron-replete conditions. We found that the mTn5 insertions in 25 of these mutants were in or close to six genes. Mutants with insertions in five of these genes [colS, XOO1806 (a conserved hypothetical protein), acnB, prpR and prpB] exhibited a deficiency for growth on iron-limiting medium and a decrease in virulence. Insertions in a sixth gene, XOO0007 (a conserved hypothetical protein), were found to affect the ability to grow on iron-limiting medium, but did not affect the virulence. Targeted gene disruptants for colR (encoding the predicted cognate regulatory protein for ColS) also exhibited a deficiency for growth on iron-limiting medium and a decrease in virulence. colR and colS mutants were defective in the elicitation of hypersensitive response symptoms on the nonhost tomato. In addition, colR and colS mutants induced a rice basal defence response, suggesting that they are compromised in the suppression of host innate immunity. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that a functional ColRS system is required for the optimal expression of several genes encoding components of the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) of X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Our results demonstrate the role of several novel genes, including colR/colS, in the promotion of growth on iron-limiting medium and the virulence of X. oryzae pv. oryzae.

  3. Sodium iron EDTA and ascorbic acid, but not polyphenol oxidase treatment, counteract the strong inhibitory effect of polyphenols from brown sorghum on the absorption of fortification iron in young women.

    PubMed

    Cercamondi, Colin I; Egli, Ines M; Zeder, Christophe; Hurrell, Richard F

    2014-02-01

    In addition to phytate, polyphenols (PP) might contribute to low Fe bioavailability from sorghum-based foods. To investigate the inhibitory effects of sorghum PP on Fe absorption and the potential enhancing effects of ascorbic acid (AA), NaFeEDTA and the PP oxidase enzyme laccase, we carried out three Fe absorption studies in fifty young women consuming dephytinised Fe-fortified test meals based on white and brown sorghum varieties with different PP concentrations. Fe absorption was measured as the incorporation of stable Fe isotopes into erythrocytes. In study 1, Fe absorption from meals with 17 mg PP (8·5%) was higher than that from meals with 73 mg PP (3·2%) and 167 mg PP (2·7%; P< 0·001). Fe absorption from meals containing 73 and 167 mg PP did not differ (P= 0·9). In study 2, Fe absorption from NaFeEDTA-fortified meals (167 mg PP) was higher than that from the same meals fortified with FeSO₄ (4·6 v. 2·7%; P< 0·001), but still it was lower than that from FeSO₄-fortified meals with 17 mg PP (10·7%; P< 0·001). In study 3, laccase treatment decreased the levels of PP from 167 to 42 mg, but it did not improve absorption compared with that from meals with 167 mg PP (4·8 v. 4·6%; P= 0·4), whereas adding AA increased absorption to 13·6% (P< 0·001). These findings suggest that PP from brown sorghum contribute to low Fe bioavailability from sorghum foods and that AA and, to a lesser extent, NaFeEDTA, but not laccase, have the potential to overcome the inhibitory effect of PP and improve Fe absorption from sorghum foods.

  4. Meal conditions affect the absorption of supplemental vitamin D3 but not the plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D response to supplementation.

    PubMed

    Dawson-Hughes, Bess; Harris, Susan S; Palermo, Nancy J; Ceglia, Lisa; Rasmussen, Helen

    2013-08-01

    It is sometimes assumed that dietary fat is required for vitamin D absorption, although the impact of different amounts of dietary fat on vitamin D absorption is not established. This study was conducted to determine whether the presence of a meal and the fat content of the meal influences vitamin D absorption or the 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] response to supplemental vitamin D3 . Based on earlier studies in rats we postulated that absorption would be greatest in the low-fat meal group. Sixty-two healthy older men and women were randomly assigned to one of three meal groups: no meal, high-fat meal, or low-fat meal; each was given a monthly 50,000 IU vitamin D3 supplement with the test breakfast meal (or after a fast for the no-meal group) and followed for 90 days. Plasma vitamin D3 was measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC/MS) before and 12 hours after the first dose; plasma 25(OH)D was measured by radioimmunoassay at baseline and after 30 and 90 days. The mean 12-hour increments in vitamin D3 , after adjusting for age and sex, were 200.9 nmol/L in the no-meal group, 207.4 nmol/L in the high-fat meal group, and 241.1 nmol/L in the low-fat meal group (p = 0.038), with the increase in the low-fat group being significantly greater than the increases in the other two groups. However, increments in 25(OH)D levels at 30 and 90 days did not differ significantly in the three groups. We conclude that absorption was increased when a 50,000 IU dose of vitamin D was taken with a low-fat meal, compared with a high-fat meal and no meal, but that the greater absorption did not result in higher plasma 25(OH)D levels in the low-fat meal group.

  5. Matrix effects on the determination of manganese in geological materials by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry under different flame conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanzolone, R.F.; Chao, T.T.

    1978-01-01

    Suppression caused by five of the seven matrix elements studied (Si, Al, Fe, Ca and Mg) was observed in the atomic-absorption determination of manganese in geological materials, when synthetic solutions and the recommended oxidizing air-acetylene flame were used. The magnitude of the suppression effects depends on (1) the kind and concentration of the interfering elements, (2) the type of acid medium, and (3) the concentration of manganese to be determined. All interferences noted are removed or alleviated by using a reducing nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The atomic-absorption method using this flame can be applied to the determination of total and extractable manganese in a wide range of geological materials without interferences. Analyses of six U.S. Geological Survey rock standards for manganese gave results in agreement with the reported values. ?? 1978.

  6. Iron-rich condition maintained throughout the mid-Proterozoic ocean: new evidence from the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Zhang, S.; Shi, X.; Zhang, C.; Huang, Y.; Li, H.

    2015-12-01

    The redox characteristics of ocean during Earth's middle age (1.7-0.75 Ga) are less well known, but it is conventionally assumed that the mid-Proterozoic was a period of a globally sulphidic (euxinic) in the deep ocean when the surface oceans were mildly oxygenated. Clay rich sedimentary rocks in Paleo-Mesoproterozoic strata deposited stably in the Yanshan-Taihangshan aulacogen (YTA), North China Craton (NCC), which created a unique opportunity to investigate the marine redox chemistry.Our Fe speciation analysis involved totally 48 samples from the black shale of the Chuanlinggou Formation (~1650 Ma), the mud shale of the Gaoyuzhuang Formation (~1560 Ma) and the black shale of the Xiamaling Formation (~1380 Ma) cropped out in Hebei Province, North China. Of all the 48 samples, 19 of them from Chuanlinggou Formation have FePy/FeHR ratios well below 0.8, while 14 of those have FeHR/FeT values above 0.15. For the 9 samples from Gaoyuzhuang Formation, their FeHR/FeT values are generally above 0.15, while 8 of them have FePy/FeHR ratios well below 0.8. For the 21 samples from Xiamaling Formation, 19 of them have FePy/FeHR values below 0.8, among which 13 samples have FeHR/FeT values above 0.15. Although a few samples analysed are more or less weathered, these data can still point to widespread ferruginous instead of sulfidic conditions over these three stratigraphic units.Abundant Fe containing carbonate concretions have been found in the shale of the Xiamaling Formation, which are significant in revealing the early burial and diagenetic marine environment. Our X-ray diffraction and rock magnetism studies reveal that the major minerals in the concretions are ferron dolomite and siderite, without any signs of sulphide of iron. These results imply that the concretions in the Xiamaling Formation were formed in ferruginous.Our analysis suggests a ferruginous condition was maintained throughout the Paleo-Mesoproterozoic (~1650 Ma to ~1380 Ma) in the YTA, a typical

  7. Physiology of Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Waldvogel-Abramowski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M.; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary A revolution occurred during the last decade in the comprehension of the physiology as well as in the physiopathology of iron metabolism. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent knowledge that has accumulated, allowing a better comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in iron homeostasis. Iron metabolism is very fine tuned. The free molecule is very toxic; therefore, complex regulatory mechanisms have been developed in mammalian to insure adequate intestinal absorption, transportation, utilization, and elimination. ‘Ironomics’ certainly will be the future of the understanding of genes as well as of the protein-protein interactions involved in iron metabolism. PMID:25053935

  8. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Uses Overlapping Pathways for Iron Reduction at a Distance and by Direct Contact under Conditions Relevant for Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Lies, Douglas P.; Hernandez, Maria E.; Kappler, Andreas; Mielke, Randall E.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2005-01-01

    We developed a new method to measure iron reduction at a distance based on depositing Fe(III) (hydr)oxide within nanoporous glass beads. In this “Fe-bead” system, Shewanella oneidensis reduces at least 86.5% of the iron in the absence of direct contact. Biofilm formation accompanies Fe-bead reduction and is observable both macro- and microscopically. Fe-bead reduction is catalyzed by live cells adapted to anaerobic conditions, and maximal reduction rates require sustained protein synthesis. The amount of reactive ferric iron in the Fe-bead system is available in excess such that the rate of Fe-bead reduction is directly proportional to cell density; i.e., it is diffusion limited. Addition of either lysates prepared from anaerobic cells or exogenous electron shuttles stimulates Fe-bead reduction by S. oneidensis, but iron chelators or additional Fe(II) do not. Neither dissolved Fe(III) nor electron shuttling activity was detected in culture supernatants, implying that the mediator is retained within the biofilm matrix. Strains with mutations in omcB or mtrB show about 50% of the wild-type levels of reduction, while a cymA mutant shows less than 20% of the wild-type levels of reduction and a menF mutant shows insignificant reduction. The Fe-bead reduction defect of the menF mutant can be restored by addition of menaquinone, but menaquinone itself cannot stimulate Fe-bead reduction. Because the menF gene encodes the first committed step of menaquinone biosynthesis, no intermediates of the menaquinone biosynthetic pathway are used as diffusible mediators by this organism to promote iron reduction at a distance. CymA and menaquinone are required for both direct and indirect mineral reduction, whereas MtrB and OmcB contribute to but are not absolutely required for iron reduction at a distance. PMID:16085832

  9. Effect of Iron and Carbonation of the Diffusion of Iodine and Rhenium in Waste Encasement Concrete and Soil Fill Material under Hydraulically Unsaturated Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Parker, Kent E.; Powers, Laura; Whyatt, Greg A.; Clayton, Libby N.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2008-07-31

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 cement wasteforms and accurate prediction for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e. sorption or precipitation). A set of sediment-concrete half-cell diffusion experiments was conducted under unsaturated conditions (4% and 7% by weight moisture content) using carbonated and non-carbonated concrete-soil half-cells. Results indicate the behavior of rhenium and iodine release was comparable within a given half-cell test. Diffusivity in soil is a function of moisture content; a 3% increase in moisture content affords a one to two order of magnitude increase in diffusivity. Release of iodine and rhenium was 1 to 3 orders of magnitude less from non-carbonated, relative to carbonated, concrete monoliths. Inclusion of iron in non-carbonate monoliths resulted in the lowest concrete diffusivity values for both iodine and rhenium. This suggests that in the presence of iron, iodine and rhenium are converted to reduced species, which are less soluble and better retained within the concrete monolith. The release of iodine and rhenium was greatest from iron-bearing, carbonated concrete monoliths, suggesting carbonation negates the effect of iron on the retention of iodine and rhenium within concrete monoliths. This is likely due to enhanced formation of microcracks in the presence of iron, which provide preferential paths for contaminant migration. Although the release of iodine and rhenium were greatest from carbonated concrete monoliths containing iron, the migration of iodine and rhenium within a given half-cell is dependent on the moisture content, soil diffusivity, and diffusing species.

  10. Effect of austenitizing conditions on the impact properties of an alloyed austempered ductile iron of initially ferritic matrix structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delia, M.; Alaalam, M.; Grech, M.

    1998-04-01

    The effect of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure and impact properties of an austempered ductile iron (ADI) containing 1.6% Cu and 1.6% Ni as the main alloying elements was investigated. Impact tests were carried out on samples of initially ferritic matrix structure and which had been first austenitized at 850,900, 950, and 1000°C for 15 to 360 min and austempered at 360°C for 180 min. Results showed that the austenitizing temperature, Tγ, and time, tγ, have a significant effect on the impact properties of the alloy. This has been attributed to the influence of these variables on the carbon kinetics. The impact energy is generally high after short tγ, and it falls with further soaking. In samples austenitized at 850 and 900°C, these trends correspond to the gradual disappearance of the pro-eutectoid ferrite and the attainment of fully developed ausferritic structures. In initially ferritic structures, the carbon diffusion distances involved during austenitization are large compared to those in pearlitic structures. This explains the relatively long soaking periods required to attain fully ausferritic structures, which in spite of the lower impact energy values, have a better combination of mechanical properties. Microstructures of samples austenitized at 950 and 1000°C contain no pro-eutectoid ferrite. The impact properties of the former structures are independent of tγ, while those solution treated at 1000°C are generally low and show wide variation over the range of soaking time investigated. For fully ausferritic structures, impact properties fall with an increase in Tγ. This is particularly evident at 1000°C. As the Tγ increases, the amount of carbon dissolved in the original austenite increases. This slows down the rate of austenite transformation and results in coarser structures with lower mechanical properties. Optimum impact properties are obtained following austenitizing between 900 and 950°C for 120 to 180 min.

  11. Iron incorporation and post-malaria anaemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron supplementation is employed to treat post-malarial anaemia in environments where iron deficiency is common. Malaria induces an intense inflammatory reaction that stalls reticulo-endothelial macrophagal iron recycling from haemolysed red blood cells and inhibits oral iron absorption, but the mag...

  12. Hydrolysis of soybean protein improves iron bioavailability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron is an important trace metal element in human body. Iron deficiency affects human health, especially pregnant women and children. Soybean protein is a popular food in Asia and can contain a high amount of iron (145.70±0.74 ug/g); however, it is usually reported as an inhibitor of iron absorption...

  13. Iron Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... detect and help diagnose iron deficiency or iron overload. In people with anemia , these tests can help ... also be ordered when iron deficiency or iron overload is suspected. Early iron deficiency often goes unnoticed. ...

  14. Studying Iron Mineralogy to Understand Redox Conditions in the Mesoproterozoic Belt Basin, USA Using Complementary Microscopic, Spectroscopic, and Magnetic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotznick, S. P.; Webb, S.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Fischer, W. W.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of iron chemistry and mineralogy over time provide a valuable tool for studying paleoenvironments, but questions still remain as to the redox character of Proterozoic basins after the rise of oxygen. To evaluate the mechanisms of iron mineralization in Proterozoic samples, we developed an approach that pairs the microscale textural techniques of light microscopy, magnetic scanning microscopy, and (synchrotron-based) microprobe x-ray spectroscopy with sensitive bulk rock magnetic experiments. Samples were collected from stratigraphic sections across the ~1.4 Ga lower Belt Group, Belt Supergroup, MT and ID, USA with a focus on excellently preserved sedimentary rocks, but also including those altered by a variety of diagenetic, metamorphic, and metasomatic events. Results show that even in the best-preserved parts of the Belt Basin, late diagenetic and/or metasomatic fluids affected (in some cases very mildly) the primary iron phases as evidenced by prevalent post-depositional alterations such as rare base metal sulfides. In more heavily altered rocks, the appearance of pyrrhotite and other minerals signaled transformations in iron mineralogy through metamorphism and metasomatism. Despite these secondary phases crystallizing in an open fluid-rich system, primary records of redox chemistry were preserved in the recrystallized early diagenetic framboidal pyrite and (sub)micron-sized detrital magnetite grains. Detrital magnetite is not the most abundant iron-bearing phase in any of the samples (typically <0.01 wt%), but is widely observed in both proximal and deeper basin facies, illustrating an important detrital flux of iron to the basin and a highly reactive iron source for early diagenetic pyrite. Based on our analyses, we interpret the shallow waters of the Belt Basin to be oxic with sulfidic pore fluids and deeper waters in parts of the basin as likely euxinic, consistent with the results of some bulk geochemical proxies. This redox reconstruction also

  15. [Structural and functional organization of chloroplasts in leaves of Pisum sativum L. under conditions of root hypoxia and iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    Ladygin, V G; Semenova, G A

    2003-01-01

    A combined effect of iron deficiency and root hypoxia on the biochemical composition activity and structure of chloroplasts in pea leaves have been studied. Both factors are shown to affect the accumulation of chlorophyll causing leaf chlorosis. At iron deficiency chlorosis occurs from the top of plant leaves. At root hypoxia chlorosis starts from the lower strata. At a combined action of both factors the destructive effects are summarized. It was established that light-harvesting complexes of photosystems were reduced stronger at iron deficiency, while complexes of reaction centers of photosystem I and photosystem II are lessened at root hypoxia. Nevertheless, even at a combined effect of both factors yellow leaves preserved small amounts of any pigment-protein complexes and their functional activities. The ultrastructure of chloroplasts during leaf chlorosis was gradually reduced. At first, intergranal sites of thylakoids and then granal ones were destroyed, that was typical of iron deficiency. However, even yellow and almost white leaves kept small thylakoids, capable of forming stacking and small grana made of 2-3 thylakoids. It has been concluded that the destructive effects are summarized due to different kinds of action of iron deficiency and root hypoxia on the structure and functioning of leaves at their combined action.

  16. A reaction cell with sample laser heating for in situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies under environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Carlos; Jiang, Peng; Pach, Elzbieta; Borondics, Ferenc; West, Mark W; Tuxen, Anders; Chintapalli, Mahati; Carenco, Sophie; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel

    2013-05-01

    A miniature (1 ml volume) reaction cell with transparent X-ray windows and laser heating of the sample has been designed to conduct X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of materials in the presence of gases at atmospheric pressures. Heating by laser solves the problems associated with the presence of reactive gases interacting with hot filaments used in resistive heating methods. It also facilitates collection of a small total electron yield signal by eliminating interference with heating current leakage and ground loops. The excellent operation of the cell is demonstrated with examples of CO and H2 Fischer-Tropsch reactions on Co nanoparticles.

  17. The impact of in vitro digestion on bioaccessibility of polyphenols from potatoes and sweet potatoes and their influence on iron absorption by human intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Lisa; Deußer, Hannah; Evers, Danièle

    2013-11-01

    The composition of potatoes as determined by chemical extraction has been described extensively. It is thus quite well known that, among other compounds, potato is rich in polyphenols, vitamins and in some minerals. This paper underlines the important role of simulated gastro-intestinal in vitro digestion in the bioaccessibility of polyphenols (chlorogenic acid and derivatives, and rutin) from potatoes and sweet potatoes and their impact on iron uptake. Concentrations of polyphenols in the flesh of two potato cultivars (Nicola, white potato, and Vitelotte, purple potato) and sweet potato were measured by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography after boiling and after in vitro digestion. Chemical extraction underestimates polyphenol amounts that can be released during digestion and that are actually bioaccessible. Iron uptake, as evaluated by a ferritin assay, by intestinal human cells was decreased after incubation with the intestinal phase of in vitro digestion, presumably due to the presence of polyphenols.

  18. The impact of in vitro digestion on bioaccessibility of polyphenols from potatoes and sweet potatoes and their influence on iron absorption by human intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Lisa; Deußer, Hannah; Evers, Danièle

    2013-11-01

    The composition of potatoes as determined by chemical extraction has been described extensively. It is thus quite well known that, among other compounds, potato is rich in polyphenols, vitamins and in some minerals. This paper underlines the important role of simulated gastro-intestinal in vitro digestion in the bioaccessibility of polyphenols (chlorogenic acid and derivatives, and rutin) from potatoes and sweet potatoes and their impact on iron uptake. Concentrations of polyphenols in the flesh of two potato cultivars (Nicola, white potato, and Vitelotte, purple potato) and sweet potato were measured by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography after boiling and after in vitro digestion. Chemical extraction underestimates polyphenol amounts that can be released during digestion and that are actually bioaccessible. Iron uptake, as evaluated by a ferritin assay, by intestinal human cells was decreased after incubation with the intestinal phase of in vitro digestion, presumably due to the presence of polyphenols. PMID:24056541

  19. Tracer test with As(V) under variable redox conditions controlling arsenic transport in the presence of elevated ferrous iron concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hohn, R.; Isenbeck-Schroter, M.; Kent, D.B.; Davis, J.A.; Jakobsen, R.; Jann, S.; Niedan, V.; Scholz, C.; Stadler, S.; Tretner, A.

    2006-01-01

    To study transport and reactions of arsenic under field conditions, a small-scale tracer test was performed in an anoxic, iron-reducing zone of a sandy aquifer at the USGS research site on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA. For four weeks, a stream of groundwater with added As(V) (6.7????M) and bromide (1.6??mM), was injected in order to observe the reduction of As(V) to As(III). Breakthrough of bromide (Br-), As(V), and As(III) as well as additional parameters characterizing the geochemical conditions was observed at various locations downstream of the injection well over a period of 104??days. After a short lag period, nitrate and dissolved oxygen from the injectate oxidized ferrous iron and As(V) became bound to the freshly formed hydrous iron oxides. Approximately one week after terminating the injection, anoxic conditions had been reestablished and increases in As(III) concentrations were observed within 1??m of the injection. During the observation period, As(III) and As(V) were transported to a distance of 4.5??m downgradient indicating significant retardation by sorption processes for both species. Sediment assays as well as elevated concentrations of hydrogen reflected the presence of As(V) reducing microorganisms. Thus, microbial As(V) reduction was thought to be one major process driving the release of As(III) during the tracer test in the Cape Cod aquifer. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Tracer test with As(V) under variable redox conditions controlling arsenic transport in the presence of elevated ferrous iron concentrations.

    PubMed

    Höhn, R; Isenbeck-Schröter, M; Kent, D B; Davis, J A; Jakobsen, R; Jann, S; Niedan, V; Scholz, C; Stadler, S; Tretner, A

    2006-11-20

    To study transport and reactions of arsenic under field conditions, a small-scale tracer test was performed in an anoxic, iron-reducing zone of a sandy aquifer at the USGS research site on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA. For four weeks, a stream of groundwater with added As(V) (6.7 muM) and bromide (1.6 mM), was injected in order to observe the reduction of As(V) to As(III). Breakthrough of bromide (Br(-)), As(V), and As(III) as well as additional parameters characterizing the geochemical conditions was observed at various locations downstream of the injection well over a period of 104 days. After a short lag period, nitrate and dissolved oxygen from the injectate oxidized ferrous iron and As(V) became bound to the freshly formed hydrous iron oxides. Approximately one week after terminating the injection, anoxic conditions had been reestablished and increases in As(III) concentrations were observed within 1 m of the injection. During the observation period, As(III) and As(V) were transported to a distance of 4.5 m downgradient indicating significant retardation by sorption processes for both species. Sediment assays as well as elevated concentrations of hydrogen reflected the presence of As(V) reducing microorganisms. Thus, microbial As(V) reduction was thought to be one major process driving the release of As(III) during the tracer test in the Cape Cod aquifer. PMID:16945450

  1. Fast ultrasound-assisted extraction of copper, iron, manganese and zinc from human hair samples prior to flow injection flame atomic absorption spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Yebra-Biurrun, M C; Cespón-Romero, R M

    2007-06-01

    A dynamic ultrasound-assisted extraction procedure utilizing diluted nitric acid was developed for the determination of copper, iron, manganese and zinc in human hair taken from workers in permanent contact with a polluted environment. The extraction unit of the dynamic ultrasound-assisted extraction system contains a minicolumn into which a specified amount of hair (5-50 mg) is placed. Once inserted into the continuous manifold, trace metals were extracted at 3 mL min(-1) with 3 mol L(-1) nitric acid under the action of ultrasound for 2 min for zinc and 3 min for copper, iron and manganese determination, and using an ultrasonic water-bath temperature of 70 degrees C for zinc and 80 degrees C for copper, iron and manganese determination. The system permits the direct analysis of hair and yields concentrations with relative standard deviations of <3% (n = 11). The applicability of the procedure was verified by analysing human hair samples from workers exposed to welding fumes, and its accuracy was assessed through comparison with a conventional sample dissolution procedure and the use of a certified reference material (BCR 397, human hair).

  2. Characterization of incubation experiments and development of an enrichment culture capable of ammonium oxidation under iron-reducing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Jaffé, P. R.

    2015-02-01

    Incubation experiments were conducted using soil samples from a forested riparian wetland where we have previously observed anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled to iron reduction. Production of both nitrite and ferrous iron was measured repeatedly during incubations when the soil slurry was supplied with either ferrihydrite or goethite and ammonium chloride. Significant changes in the microbial community were observed after 180 days of incubation as well as in a continuous flow membrane reactor, using 16S rRNA gene PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, 454 pyrosequencing, and real-time quantitative PCR analysis. We be Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6), belonging to the Acidimicrobiaceae family, whose closest cultivated relative is Ferrimicrobium acidiphilum (with 92% identity) and Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (with 90% identity), might play a key role in this anaerobic biological process that uses ferric iron as an electron acceptor while oxidizing ammonium to nitrite. After ammonium was oxidized to nitrite, nitrogen loss proceeded via denitrification and/or anammox.

  3. Molecular and Cellular Bases of Iron Metabolism in Humans.

    PubMed

    Milto, I V; Suhodolo, I V; Prokopieva, V D; Klimenteva, T K

    2016-06-01

    Iron is a microelement with the most completely studied biological functions. Its wide dissemination in nature and involvement in key metabolic pathways determine the great importance of this metal for uni- and multicellular organisms. The biological role of iron is characterized by its indispensability in cell respiration and various biochemical processes providing normal functioning of cells and organs of the human body. Iron also plays an important role in the generation of free radicals, which under different conditions can be useful or damaging to biomolecules and cells. In the literature, there are many reviews devoted to iron metabolism and its regulation in pro- and eukaryotes. Significant progress has been achieved recently in understanding molecular bases of iron metabolism. The purpose of this review is to systematize available data on mechanisms of iron assimilation, distribution, and elimination from the human body, as well as on its biological importance and on the major iron-containing proteins. The review summarizes recent ideas about iron metabolism. Special attention is paid to mechanisms of iron absorption in the small intestine and to interrelationships of cellular and extracellular pools of this metal in the human body.

  4. Obesity as an emerging risk factor for iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Aigner, Elmar; Feldman, Alexandra; Datz, Christian

    2014-09-11

    Iron homeostasis is affected by obesity and obesity-related insulin resistance in a many-facetted fashion. On one hand, iron deficiency and anemia are frequent findings in subjects with progressed stages of obesity. This phenomenon has been well studied in obese adolescents, women and subjects undergoing bariatric surgery. On the other hand, hyperferritinemia with normal or mildly elevated transferrin saturation is observed in approximately one-third of patients with metabolic syndrome (MetS) or nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This constellation has been named the "dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome (DIOS)". Both elevated body iron stores and iron deficiency are detrimental to health and to the course of obesity-related conditions. Iron deficiency and anemia may impair mitochondrial and cellular energy homeostasis and further increase inactivity and fatigue of obese subjects. Obesity-associated inflammation is tightly linked to iron deficiency and involves impaired duodenal iron absorption associated with low expression of duodenal ferroportin (FPN) along with elevated hepcidin concentrations. This review summarizes the current understanding of the dysregulation of iron homeostasis in obesity.

  5. Experimental study of germanium adsorption on goethite and germanium coprecipitation with iron hydroxide: X-ray absorption fine structure and macroscopic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovsky, O. S.; Pokrovski, G. S.; Schott, J.; Galy, A.

    2006-07-01

    Adsorption of germanium on goethite was studied at 25 °C in batch reactors as a function of pH (1-12), germanium concentration in solution (10 -7 to 0.002 M) and solid/solution ratio (1.8-17 g/L). The maximal surface site density determined via Ge adsorption experiments at pH from 6 to 10 is equal to 2.5 ± 0.1 μmol/m 2. The percentage of adsorbed Ge increases with pH at pH < 9, reaches a maximum at pH ˜ 9 and slightly decreases when pH is further increased to 11. These results allowed generation of a 2-p K Surface Complexation Model (SCM) which implies a constant capacitance of the electric double layer and postulates the presence of two Ge complexes, >FeO-Ge(OH)30 and >FeO-GeO(OH)2-, at the goethite-solution interface. Coprecipitation of Ge with iron oxy(hydr)oxides formed during Fe(II) oxidation by atmospheric oxygen or by Fe(III) hydrolysis in neutral solutions led to high Ge incorporations in solid with maximal Ge/Fe molar ratio close to 0.5. The molar Ge/Fe ratio in precipitated solid is proportional to that in the initial solution according to the equation (Ge/Fe) solid = k × (Ge/Fe) solution with 0.7 ⩽ k ⩽ 1.0. The structure of adsorbed and coprecipitated Ge complexes was further characterized using XAFS spectroscopy. In agreement with previous data on oxyanions adsorption on goethite, bi-dentate bi-nuclear surface complexes composed of tetrahedrally coordinated Ge attached to the corners of two adjacent Fe octahedra represent the dominant contribution to the EXAFS signal. Coprecipitated samples with Ge/Fe molar ratios >0.1, and samples not aged in solution (<1 day) having intermediate Ge/Fe ratios (0.01-0.1) show 4 ± 0.3 oxygen atoms at 1.76 ± 0.01 Å around Ge. Samples less concentrated in Ge (0.001 < Ge/Fe < 0.10) and aged longer times in solution (up to 280 days) exhibit a splitting of the first atomic shell with Ge in both tetrahedral ( R = 1.77 ± 0.02 Å) and octahedral ( R = 1.92 ± 0.03 Å) coordination with oxygen. In these samples

  6. Microbial degradation of toluene under sulfate-reducing conditions and the influence of iron on the process.

    PubMed Central

    Beller, H R; Grbić-Galić, D; Reinhard, M

    1992-01-01

    Toluene degradation occurred concomitantly with sulfate reduction in anaerobic microcosms inoculated with contaminated subsurface soil from an aviation fuel storage facility near the Patuxent River (Md.). Similar results were obtained for enrichment cultures in which toluene was the sole carbon source. Several lines of evidence suggest that toluene degradation was directly coupled to sulfate reduction in Patuxent River microcosms and enrichment cultures: (i) the two processes were synchronous and highly correlated, (ii) the observed stoichiometric ratios of moles of sulfate consumed per mole of toluene consumed were consistent with the theoretical ratio for the oxidation of toluene to CO2 coupled with the reduction of sulfate to hydrogen sulfide, and (iii) toluene degradation ceased when sulfate was depleted, and conversely, sulfate reduction ceased when toluene was depleted. Mineralization of toluene was confirmed in experiments with [ring-U-14C]toluene. The addition of millimolar concentrations of amorphous Fe(OH)3 to Patuxent River microcosms and enrichment cultures either greatly facilitated the onset of toluene degradation or accelerated the rate once degradation had begun. In iron-amended microcosms and enrichment cultures, ferric iron reduction proceeded concurrently with toluene degradation and sulfate reduction. Stoichiometric data and other observations indicate that ferric iron reduction was not directly coupled to toluene oxidation but was a secondary, presumably abiotic, reaction between ferric iron and biogenic hydrogen sulfide. PMID:1575481

  7. WATER ABSORPTION IN GALACTIC TRANSLUCENT CLOUDS: CONDITIONS AND HISTORY OF THE GAS DERIVED FROM HERSCHEL /HIFI PRISMAS OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Flagey, N.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Lis, D. C.; Monje, R.; Phillips, T. G.; Gerin, M.; De Luca, M.; Godard, B.; Neufeld, D.; Sonnentrucker, P.; Goicoechea, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of the three ground state transitions of H{sub 2}O (556, 1669, and 1113 GHz) and H{sub 2}{sup 18}O (547, 1655, and 1101 GHz)-as well as the first few excited transitions of H{sub 2}O (987, 752, and 1661 GHz)-toward six high-mass star-forming regions, obtained as part of the PRISMAS (PRobing InterStellar Molecules with Absorption line Studies) Guaranteed Time Key Program. Water vapor associated with the translucent clouds in Galactic arms is detected in absorption along every line of sight in all the ground state transitions. The continuum sources all exhibit broad water features in emission in the excited and ground state transitions. Strong absorption features associated with the source are also observed at all frequencies except 752 GHz. We model the background continuum and line emission to infer the optical depth of each translucent cloud along the lines of sight. We derive the column density of H{sub 2}O or H{sub 2}{sup 18}O for the lower energy level of each transition observed. The total column density of water in translucent clouds is usually about a few 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}. We find that the abundance of water relative to hydrogen nuclei is 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} in agreement with models for oxygen chemistry in which high cosmic ray ionization rates are assumed. Relative to molecular hydrogen, the abundance of water is remarkably constant through the Galactic plane with X(H{sub 2}O) =5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}, which makes water a good traced of H{sub 2} in translucent clouds. Observations of the excited transitions of H{sub 2}O enable us to constrain the abundance of water in excited levels to be at most 15%, implying that the excitation temperature, T {sub ex}, in the ground state transitions is below 10 K. Further analysis of the column densities derived from the two ortho ground state transitions indicates that T {sub ex} {approx_equal} 5 K and that the density n(H{sub 2}) in the translucent clouds

  8. Water Absorption in Galactic Translucent Clouds: Conditions and History of the Gas Derived from Herschel/HIFI PRISMAS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flagey, N.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Lis, D. C.; Gerin, M.; Neufeld, D.; Sonnentrucker, P.; De Luca, M.; Godard, B.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Monje, R.; Phillips, T. G.

    2013-01-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of the three ground state transitions of H2O (556, 1669, and 1113 GHz) and H218O (547, 1655, and 1101 GHz)—as well as the first few excited transitions of H2O (987, 752, and 1661 GHz)—toward six high-mass star-forming regions, obtained as part of the PRISMAS (PRobing InterStellar Molecules with Absorption line Studies) Guaranteed Time Key Program. Water vapor associated with the translucent clouds in Galactic arms is detected in absorption along every line of sight in all the ground state transitions. The continuum sources all exhibit broad water features in emission in the excited and ground state transitions. Strong absorption features associated with the source are also observed at all frequencies except 752 GHz. We model the background continuum and line emission to infer the optical depth of each translucent cloud along the lines of sight. We derive the column density of H2O or H218O for the lower energy level of each transition observed. The total column density of water in translucent clouds is usually about a few 1013 cm-2. We find that the abundance of water relative to hydrogen nuclei is 1 × 10-8 in agreement with models for oxygen chemistry in which high cosmic ray ionization rates are assumed. Relative to molecular hydrogen, the abundance of water is remarkably constant through the Galactic plane with X(H2O) =5 × 10-8, which makes water a good traced of H2 in translucent clouds. Observations of the excited transitions of H2O enable us to constrain the abundance of water in excited levels to be at most 15%, implying that the excitation temperature, T ex, in the ground state transitions is below 10 K. Further analysis of the column densities derived from the two ortho ground state transitions indicates that T ex ~= 5 K and that the density n(H2) in the t