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Sample records for iron corrosion products

  1. Speciation and distribution of vanadium in drinking water iron pipe corrosion by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Gerke, Tammie L.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Maynard, J. Barry

    2010-11-12

    Vanadium (V) when ingested from drinking water in high concentrations (> 15 {micro}g L{sup -1}) is a potential health risk and is on track to becoming a regulated contaminant. High concentrations of V have been documented in lead corrosion by-products as Pb{sub 5}(V{sup 5+}O{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl (vanadinite) which, in natural deposits is associated with iron oxides/oxyhydroxides, phases common in iron pipe corrosion by-products. The extent of potential reservoirs of V in iron corrosion by-products, its speciation, and mechanism of inclusion however are unknown. The aim of this study is to assess these parameters in iron corrosion by-products, implementing synchrotron-based {mu}-XRF mapping and {mu}-XANES along with traditional physiochemical characterization. The morphologies, mineralogies, and chemistry of the samples studied are superficially similar to typical iron corrosion by-products. However, we found V present as discrete grains of Pb{sub 5}(V{sup 5+}O{sub 4}){sub 3}Cl likely embedded in the surface regions of the iron corrosion by-products. Concentrations of V observed in bulk XRF analysis ranged from 35 to 899 mg kg{sup -1}. We calculate that even in pipes with iron corrosion by-products with low V concentration, 100 mg kg{sup -1}, as little as 0.0027% of a 0.1-cm thick X 100-cm long section of that corrosion by-product needs to be disturbed to increase V concentrations in the drinking water at the tap to levels well above the 15 {micro}g L{sup -1} notification level set by the State of California and could adversely impact human health. In addition, it is likely that large reservoirs of V are associated with iron corrosion by-products in unlined cast iron mains and service branches in numerous drinking water distribution systems.

  2. Speciation and distribution of vanadium in drinking water iron pipe corrosion by-products.

    PubMed

    Gerke, Tammie L; Scheckel, Kirk G; Maynard, J Barry

    2010-11-01

    Vanadium (V) when ingested from drinking water in high concentrations (>15 μg L(-1)) is a potential health risk and is on track to becoming a regulated contaminant. High concentrations of V have been documented in lead corrosion by-products as Pb(5)(V(5+)O(4))(3)Cl (vanadinite) which, in natural deposits is associated with iron oxides/oxyhydroxides, phases common in iron pipe corrosion by-products. The extent of potential reservoirs of V in iron corrosion by-products, its speciation, and mechanism of inclusion however are unknown. The aim of this study is to assess these parameters in iron corrosion by-products, implementing synchrotron-based μ-XRF mapping and μ-XANES along with traditional physiochemical characterization. The morphologies, mineralogies, and chemistry of the samples studied are superficially similar to typical iron corrosion by-products. However, we found V present as discrete grains of Pb(5)(V(5+)O(4))(3)Cl likely embedded in the surface regions of the iron corrosion by-products. Concentrations of V observed in bulk XRF analysis ranged from 35 to 899 mg kg(-1). We calculate that even in pipes with iron corrosion by-products with low V concentration, 100 mg kg(-1), as little as 0.0027% of a 0.1-cm thick X 100-cm long section of that corrosion by-product needs to be disturbed to increase V concentrations in the drinking water at the tap to levels well above the 15 μg L(-1) notification level set by the State of California and could adversely impact human health. In addition, it is likely that large reservoirs of V are associated with iron corrosion by-products in unlined cast iron mains and service branches in numerous drinking water distribution systems.

  3. Formation and Release Behavior of Iron Corrosion Products under the Influence of Bacterial Communities in a Simulated Water Distribution System

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the effects of biofilm on the iron corrosion, iron release and associated corrosion by-products is critical for maintaining the water quality and the integrity of drinking water distribution system (DWDS). In this work, iron corrosion experiments under sterilized a...

  4. Effect of natural and synthetic iron corrosion products on silicate glass alteration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillmann, Philippe; Gin, Stéphane; Neff, Delphine; Gentaz, Lucile; Rebiscoul, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Glass long term alteration in the context of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) storage is influenced by near-field materials and environmental context. As previous studies have shown, the extent of glass alteration is strongly related to the presence of iron in the system, mainly provided by the steel overpack around surrounding the HLW glass package. A key to understanding what will happen to the glass-borne elements in the geological disposal lies in the relationship between the iron-bearing phases and the glass alteration products formed. In this study, we focus on the influence of the formation conditions (synthetized or in-situ) and the age of different iron corrosion products on SON68 glass alteration. Corrosion products obtained from archaeological iron artifacts are considered here to be true analogues of the corrosion products in a waste disposal system due to the similarities in formation conditions and physical properties. These representative corrosion products (RCP) are used in the experiment along with synthetized iron anoxic corrosion products and pristine metallic iron. The model-cracks of SON68 glass were altered in cell reactors, with one of the different iron-sources inserted in the crack each time. The study was successful in reproducing most of the processes observed in the long term archaeological system. Between the different systems, alteration variations were noted both in nature and intensity, confirming the influence of the iron-source on glass alteration. Results seem to point to a lesser effect of long term iron corrosion products (RCP) on the glass alteration than that of the more recent products (SCP), both in terms of general glass alteration and of iron transport.

  5. Corrosion rate estimations of microscale zerovalent iron particles via direct hydrogen production measurements.

    PubMed

    Velimirovic, Milica; Carniato, Luca; Simons, Queenie; Schoups, Gerrit; Seuntjens, Piet; Bastiaens, Leen

    2014-04-15

    In this study, the aging behavior of microscale zerovalent iron (mZVI) particles was investigated by quantifying the hydrogen gas generated by anaerobic mZVI corrosion in batch degradation experiments. Granular iron and nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) particles were included in this study as controls. Firstly, experiments in liquid medium (without aquifer material) were performed and revealed that mZVI particles have approximately a 10-30 times lower corrosion rate than nZVI particles. A good correlation was found between surface area normalized corrosion rate (RSA) and reaction rate constants (kSA) of PCE, TCE, cDCE and 1,1,1-TCA. Generally, particles with higher degradation rates also have faster corrosion rates, but exceptions do exists. In a second phase, the hydrogen evolution was also monitored during batch tests in the presence of aquifer material and real groundwater. A 4-9 times higher corrosion rate of mZVI particles was observed under the natural environment in comparison with the aquifer free artificial condition, which can be attributed to the low pH of the aquifer and its buffer capacity. A corrosion model was calibrated on the batch experiments to take into account the inhibitory effects of the corrosion products (dissolved iron, hydrogen and OH(-)) on the iron corrosion rate.

  6. Evaluation of Characterization Techniques for Iron Pipe Corrosion Products and Iron Oxide Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Borch, Thomas; Camper, Anne K.; Biederman, Joel A.; Butterfield, Phillip; Gerlach, Robin; Amonette, James E.

    2008-10-01

    A common problem faced by drinking water studies is that of properly characterizing the corrosion products (CP) in iron pipescor synthetic Fe (hydr)oxides used to simulate the iron pipe used in municipal drinking-water systems. The present work compares the relative applicability of a suite of imaging and analytical techniques for the characterization of CPs and synthetic Fe oxide thin films and provide an overview of the type of data that each instrument can provide as well as their limitations to help researchers and consultants choose the best technique for a given task. Crushed CP from a water distribution system and synthetic Fe oxide thin films formed on glass surfaces were chosen as test samples for this evaluation. The CP and synthetic Fe oxide thin films were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), grazing incident diffractometry (GID), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared, Mössbauer spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller N2 adsorption and Fe concentration was determined by the ferrozine method. XRD and GID were found to be the most suitable techniques for identification of the mineralogical composition of CP and synthetic Fe oxide thin films, respectively. AFM and a combined ToF-SIMS-AFM approach proved excellent for roughness and depth profiling analysis of synthetic Fe oxide thin films, respectively. Corrosion products were difficult to study by AFM due to their surface roughness, while synthetic Fe oxide thin films resisted most spectroscopic methods due to their limited thickness (118 nm). XPS analysis is not recommended for mixtures of Fe (hydr)oxides due to their spectral similarities. SEM and TEM provided great detail on mineralogical morphology.

  7. Mini-review: the morphology, mineralogy and microbiology of accumulated iron corrosion products.

    PubMed

    Little, Brenda J; Gerke, Tammie L; Lee, Jason S

    2014-09-01

    Despite obvious differences in morphology, substratum chemistry and the electrolyte in which they form, accumulations of iron corrosion products have the following characteristics in common: stratification of iron oxides/hydroxides with a preponderance of α-FeOOH (goethite) and accumulation of metals. Bacteria, particularly iron-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria have been identified in some accumulations. Both biotic and abiotic mechanisms have been used to rationalize observations for particular sets of environmental data. This review is the first to compare observations and interpretations. PMID:25271874

  8. Mini-review: the morphology, mineralogy and microbiology of accumulated iron corrosion products

    PubMed Central

    Little, Brenda J.; Gerke, Tammie L.; Lee, Jason S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite obvious differences in morphology, substratum chemistry and the electrolyte in which they form, accumulations of iron corrosion products have the following characteristics in common: stratification of iron oxides/hydroxides with a preponderance of α-FeOOH (goethite) and accumulation of metals. Bacteria, particularly iron-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria have been identified in some accumulations. Both biotic and abiotic mechanisms have been used to rationalize observations for particular sets of environmental data. This review is the first to compare observations and interpretations. PMID:25271874

  9. Mini-review: the morphology, mineralogy and microbiology of accumulated iron corrosion products.

    PubMed

    Little, Brenda J; Gerke, Tammie L; Lee, Jason S

    2014-09-01

    Despite obvious differences in morphology, substratum chemistry and the electrolyte in which they form, accumulations of iron corrosion products have the following characteristics in common: stratification of iron oxides/hydroxides with a preponderance of α-FeOOH (goethite) and accumulation of metals. Bacteria, particularly iron-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria have been identified in some accumulations. Both biotic and abiotic mechanisms have been used to rationalize observations for particular sets of environmental data. This review is the first to compare observations and interpretations.

  10. Characterisation of Corrosion Products on Iron in Contact With Hot Water

    SciTech Connect

    Carbucicchio, M.; Rateo, M.; Zini, F.; Palombarini, G.

    2005-04-26

    The corrosion of galvanised sheets of carbon steel in contact with hot water in two household systems was investigated by means of metallographic techniques, X-ray diffraction analysis and trasmission Moessbauer spectroscopy. The corrosion process gave rise to localised attack of the inner wall of the steel sheets, with formation of tubercules of reaction products in zones where the protective effect of the zinc coating vanished, probably for an excessive increase in the heating temperature leading zinc to become cathodic to iron. Significant differences were found in the phase composition of the corrosion products depending on the in-service life of the steel component. After {approx}1 year of exposure to hot water, siderite and lepidocrocite were found to be the prevailing corrosion products, formed together with lower amounts of akaganeite, mixed Zn-Fe carbonate and hydrozincite. After about a double exposure time to hot water, the corrosion products were mainly constituted by magnetite, siderite and lepidocrocite, together with lower amounts of goethite, akaganeite, Zn-Fe carbonate and hydrozincite. A complementary use of X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer techniques proved to be determining for a satisfactory identification of the corrosion products.

  11. Corrosion of iron by iodide-oxidizing bacteria isolated from brine in an iodine production facility.

    PubMed

    Wakai, Satoshi; Ito, Kimio; Iino, Takao; Tomoe, Yasuyoshi; Mori, Koji; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2014-10-01

    Elemental iodine is produced in Japan from underground brine (fossil salt water). Carbon steel pipes in an iodine production facility at Chiba, Japan, for brine conveyance were found to corrode more rapidly than those in other facilities. The corroding activity of iodide-containing brine from the facility was examined by immersing carbon steel coupons in "native" and "filter-sterilized" brine samples. The dissolution of iron from the coupons immersed in native brine was threefold to fourfold higher than that in the filter-sterilized brine. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analyses revealed that iodide-oxidizing bacteria (IOBs) were predominant in the coupon-containing native brine samples. IOBs were also detected in a corrosion deposit on the inner surface of a corroded pipe. These results strongly suggested the involvement of IOBs in the corrosion of the carbon steel pipes. Of the six bacterial strains isolated from a brine sample, four were capable of oxidizing iodide ion (I(-)) into molecular iodine (I(2)), and these strains were further phylogenetically classified into two groups. The iron-corroding activity of each of the isolates from the two groups was examined. Both strains corroded iron in the presence of potassium iodide in a concentration-dependent manner. This is the first report providing direct evidence that IOBs are involved in iron corrosion. Further, possible mechanisms by which IOBs corrode iron are discussed.

  12. Formation and release behavior of iron corrosion products under the influence of bacterial communities in a simulated water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huifang; Shi, Baoyou; Lytle, Darren A; Bai, Yaohui; Wang, Dongsheng

    2014-03-01

    To understand the formation and release behavior of iron corrosion products in a drinking water distribution system, annular reactors (ARs) were used to investigate the development processes of corrosion products and biofilm community as well as the concomitant iron release behavior. Results showed that the formation and transformation of corrosion products and bacterial community are closely related to each other. The presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB, e.g. Desulfovibrio and Desulfotomaculum), sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB, e.g. Sulfuricella), and iron-oxidizing bacteria (IOB, e.g. Acidovorax, Gallionella, Leptothrix, and Sphaerotilus) in biofilms could speed up iron corrosion; however, iron-reducing bacteria (IRB, e.g. Bacillus, Clostridium, and Pseudomonas) could inhibit iron corrosion and iron release. Corrosion scales on iron coupons could develop into a two-layered structure (top layer and inner layer) with time. The relatively stable constituents such as goethite (α-FeOOH) and magnetite (Fe3O4) mainly existed in the top layers, while green rust (Fe6(OH)12CO3) mainly existed in the inner layers. The IOB (especially Acidovorax) contributed to the formation of α-FeOOH, while IRB and the anaerobic conditions could facilitate the formation of Fe3O4. Compared with the AR test without biofilms, the iron corrosion rate with biofilms was relatively higher (p < 0.05) during the whole experimental period, but the iron release with biofilms was obviously lower both at the initial stage and after 3 months. Biofilm and corrosion scale samples formed under different water supply conditions in an actual drinking water distribution system verified the relationships between the bacterial community and corrosion products.

  13. Formation and release behavior of iron corrosion products under the influence of bacterial communities in a simulated water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huifang; Shi, Baoyou; Lytle, Darren A; Bai, Yaohui; Wang, Dongsheng

    2014-03-01

    To understand the formation and release behavior of iron corrosion products in a drinking water distribution system, annular reactors (ARs) were used to investigate the development processes of corrosion products and biofilm community as well as the concomitant iron release behavior. Results showed that the formation and transformation of corrosion products and bacterial community are closely related to each other. The presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB, e.g. Desulfovibrio and Desulfotomaculum), sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB, e.g. Sulfuricella), and iron-oxidizing bacteria (IOB, e.g. Acidovorax, Gallionella, Leptothrix, and Sphaerotilus) in biofilms could speed up iron corrosion; however, iron-reducing bacteria (IRB, e.g. Bacillus, Clostridium, and Pseudomonas) could inhibit iron corrosion and iron release. Corrosion scales on iron coupons could develop into a two-layered structure (top layer and inner layer) with time. The relatively stable constituents such as goethite (α-FeOOH) and magnetite (Fe3O4) mainly existed in the top layers, while green rust (Fe6(OH)12CO3) mainly existed in the inner layers. The IOB (especially Acidovorax) contributed to the formation of α-FeOOH, while IRB and the anaerobic conditions could facilitate the formation of Fe3O4. Compared with the AR test without biofilms, the iron corrosion rate with biofilms was relatively higher (p < 0.05) during the whole experimental period, but the iron release with biofilms was obviously lower both at the initial stage and after 3 months. Biofilm and corrosion scale samples formed under different water supply conditions in an actual drinking water distribution system verified the relationships between the bacterial community and corrosion products. PMID:24509822

  14. Arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) reactions with zerovalent iron corrosion products.

    PubMed

    Manning, Bruce A; Hunt, Mathew L; Amrhein, Christopher; Yarmoff, Jory A

    2002-12-15

    Zerovalent iron (Fe0) has tremendous potential as a remediation material for removal of arsenic from groundwater and drinking water. This study investigates the speciation of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) after reaction with two Fe0 materials, their iron oxide corrosion products, and several model iron oxides. A variety of analytical techniques were used to study the reaction products including HPLC-hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The products of corrosion of Fe0 include lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH), magnetite (Fe3O4), and/or maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3), all of which indicate Fe(II) oxidation as an intermediate step in the Fe0 corrosion process. The in-situ Fe0 corrosion reaction caused a high As(III) and As(V) uptake with both Fe0 materials studied. Under aerobic conditions, the Fe0 corrosion reaction did not cause As(V) reduction to As(III) but did cause As(III) oxidation to As(V). Oxidation of As(III) was also caused by maghemite and hematite minerals indicating that the formation of certain iron oxides during Fe0 corrosion favors the As(V) species. Water reduction and the release of OH- to solution on the surface of corroding Fe0 may also promote As(III) oxidation. Analysis of As(III) and As(V) adsorption complexes in the Fe0 corrosion products and synthetic iron oxides by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) gave predominant As-Fe interatomic distances of 3.30-3.36 A. This was attributed to inner-sphere, bidentate As(III) and As(V) complexes. The results of this study suggest that Fe0 can be used as a versatile and economical sorbent for in-situ treatment of groundwater containing As(III) and As(V).

  15. The Corrosion and Preservation of Iron Antiques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Robert

    1982-01-01

    Discusses general corrosion reactions (iron to rust), including corrosion of iron, sulfur dioxide, chlorides, immersed corrosion, and underground corrosion. Also discusses corrosion inhibition, including corrosion inhibitors (anodic, cathodic, mixed, organic); safe/dangerous inhibitors; and corrosion/inhibition in concrete/marble, showcases/boxes,…

  16. Anaerobic corrosion reaction kinetics of nanosized iron.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Eric J; Fagan, Randal; Vogan, John L; Przepiora, Andrzej

    2008-04-01

    Nanosized Fe0 exhibits markedly different anaerobic corrosion rates in water compared to that disseminated in moist quartz sand. In water, hydrogen production from corrosion exhibits an autocatalytic style, attaining a maximum rate of 1.9 mol kg(-1) d(-1) within 2 d of reaction. The rate then drops sharply over the next 20 d and enters a period of uniformly decreasing rate, represented equally well by first-order or diffusion-controlled kinetic expressions. In quartz sand, hydrogen production exhibits a double maximum over the first 20 d, similar to the hydration reaction of Portland cement, and the highest rate attained is less than 0.5 mol kg(-1) d(-1). We ascribe this difference in early time corrosion behavior to the ability of the released hydrogen gas to convect both water and iron particles in an iron/water system and to its inability to do so when the iron particles are disseminated in sand. By 30 d, the hydrogen production rate of iron in quartz sand exhibits a uniform decrease as in the iron/water system, which also can be described by first-order or diffusion-controlled kinetic expressions. However, the corrosion resistance of the iron in moist sand is 4 times greater than in pure water (viz. t1/2 of 365 d vs 78 d, respectively). The lower rate for iron in sand is likely due to the effect of dissolved silica sorbing onto iron reaction sites and acting as an anodic inhibitor, which reduces the iron's susceptibility to oxidation by water. This study indicates that short-term laboratory corrosion tests of nanosized Fe0/water slurries will substantially underestimate both the material's longevity as an electron source and its potential as a long-term source of hydrogen gas in groundwater remediation applications.

  17. Speciation And Distribution Of Vanadium In Drinking Water Iron Pipe Corrosion By-Products

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vanadium (V) when ingested from drinking water in high concentrations (> 15 µg L-1) is a potential health risk and is on track to becoming a regulated contaminant. High concentrations of V have been documented in lead corrosion by-products as Pb5(V5+

  18. Study of ferrous corrosion products on iron archaeological objects by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, Ilanith; Conforto, Egle; Refait, Philippe; Rémazeilles, Céline

    2013-02-01

    The corrosion of iron-based archaeomaterials in anoxic environments leads mainly to Fe(II) compounds, like the hydroxychloride β-Fe2(OH)3Cl, chukanovite Fe2(OH)2CO3 or siderite FeCO3. The understanding of the mechanisms then necessarily implies a thorough investigation of the chemical, mechanical and morphological characteristics of the Fe(II)-based layer that develops between the metal surface and the environment. In the peculiar case of Fe(II) compounds, generally very reactive towards O2, the main concern is to prevent any transformation by air during the analysis. The EBSD technique is adapted on a scanning electron microscope (SEM) where the samples are analysed under vacuum and consequently sheltered from air. Different options offered by EBSD for phase characterisation and microstructural study were tested for the first time on the rust layers of two archaeological iron nails. Results were confronted to those obtained by micro-Raman spectroscopy, which was used as reference method. Magnetite, Fe(II) hydroxychloride β-Fe2(OH)3Cl and siderite were analysed successfully but improvements have to be brought for the study of other compounds such as iron oxyhydroxides and chukanovite. The choice of experimental parameters in our approach as well as the potentialities and limits of the technique for this kind of application are discussed.

  19. Effects of microbial redox cycling of iron on cast iron pipe corrosion in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Lili; Li, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min

    2014-11-15

    Bacterial characteristics in corrosion products and their effect on the formation of dense corrosion scales on cast iron coupons were studied in drinking water, with sterile water acting as a reference. The corrosion process and corrosion scales were characterized by electrochemical and physico-chemical measurements. The results indicated that the corrosion was more rapidly inhibited and iron release was lower due to formation of more dense protective corrosion scales in drinking water than in sterile water. The microbial community and denitrifying functional genes were analyzed by pyrosequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR), respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the bacteria in corrosion products played an important role in the corrosion process in drinking water. Nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Acidovorax and Hydrogenophaga enhanced iron corrosion before 6 days. After 20 days, the dominant bacteria became NRB Dechloromonas (40.08%) with the protective corrosion layer formation. The Dechloromonas exhibited the stronger corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron, to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4. Subsequently, other minor bacteria appeared in the corrosion scales, including iron-respiring bacteria and Rhizobium which captured iron by the produced siderophores, having a weaker corrosion-inhibition effect. Therefore, the microbially-driven redox cycling of iron with associated microbial capture of iron caused more compact corrosion scales formation and lower iron release.

  20. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1993-03-01

    Iron aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in fossil energy systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe[sub 3]Al-based alloys to improve the engineering ductility of these alloys. This paper describes results from the ongoing program to evaluate the corrosion performance of these alloys. The experimental program at Argonne National Laboratory involvesthermogravimetric analyses of alloys exposed to environments that simulate coal gasification and fluidized-bed combustion. Experiments were conducted at 650--1000[degrees]C in simulated oxygen/sulfur gas mixtures. In addition, oxidation/sulfidation behavior of several alumina-forming Fe-Al and Fe-Cr-Ni-Al alloys was determined for comparison with the corrosion rates obtained on iron aluminides. Other aspects of the program are corrosion evaluation of the aluminides in the presence of HC1-containing gases and in the presence of slag from a slogging gasifier. Results are used to establish threshold Al levels in the alloys for development of protective alumina scales. Thermal cycling tests are used to examine the spalling resistance of the scales.

  1. Microbial iron respiration: impacts on corrosion processes.

    PubMed

    Lee, A K; Newman, D K

    2003-08-01

    In this review, we focus on how biofilms comprising iron-respiring bacteria influence steel corrosion. Specifically, we discuss how biofilm growth can affect the chemistry of the environment around the steel at different stages of biofilm development, under static or dynamic fluid regimes. We suggest that a mechanistic understanding of the role of biofilm metabolic activity may facilitate corrosion control.

  2. Formation of ferrihydrite and associated iron corrosion products in permeable reactive barriers of zero-valent iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furukawa, Yoko; Kim, Jin-Wook; Watkins, Janet; Wilkin, Richard T.

    2002-01-01

    Ferrihydrite, which is known to form in the presence of oxygen and to be stabilized by the adsorption of Si, PO4 and SO4, is ubiquitous in the fine-grained fractions of permeable reactive barrier (PRB) samples from the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center (Elizabeth City, NC) and the Denver Federal Center (Lakewood, CO) studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The concurrent energy-dispersive X-ray data indicate a strong association between ferrihydrite and metals such as Si, Ca, and Cr. Magnetite, green rust 1, aragonite, calcite, mackinawite, greigite and lepidocrocite were also present, indicative of a geochemical environment that is temporally and spatially heterogeneous. Whereas magnetite, which is known to form due to anaerobic Fe0 corrosion, passivates the Fe0 surface, ferrihydrite precipitation occurs away from the immediate Fe0 surface, forming small (<0.1 microm) discrete clusters. Consequently, Fe0-PRBs may remain effective for a longer period of time in slightly oxidized groundwater systems where ferrihydrite formation occurs compared to oxygen-depleted systems where magnetite passivation occurs. The ubiquitous presence of ferrihydrite suggests that the use of Fe0-PRBs may be extended to applications that require contaminant adsorption rather than, or in addition to, redox-promoted contaminant degradation.

  3. Formation of ferrihydrite and associated iron corrosion products in permeable reactive barriers of zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Yoko; Kim, Jin-Wook; Watkins, Janet; Wilkin, Richard T

    2002-12-15

    Ferrihydrite, which is known to form in the presence of oxygen and to be stabilized by the adsorption of Si, PO4 and SO4, is ubiquitous in the fine-grained fractions of permeable reactive barrier (PRB) samples from the U.S. Coast Guard Support Center (Elizabeth City, NC) and the Denver Federal Center (Lakewood, CO) studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The concurrent energy-dispersive X-ray data indicate a strong association between ferrihydrite and metals such as Si, Ca, and Cr. Magnetite, green rust 1, aragonite, calcite, mackinawite, greigite and lepidocrocite were also present, indicative of a geochemical environment that is temporally and spatially heterogeneous. Whereas magnetite, which is known to form due to anaerobic Fe0 corrosion, passivates the Fe0 surface, ferrihydrite precipitation occurs away from the immediate Fe0 surface, forming small (<0.1 microm) discrete clusters. Consequently, Fe0-PRBs may remain effective for a longer period of time in slightly oxidized groundwater systems where ferrihydrite formation occurs compared to oxygen-depleted systems where magnetite passivation occurs. The ubiquitous presence of ferrihydrite suggests that the use of Fe0-PRBs may be extended to applications that require contaminant adsorption rather than, or in addition to, redox-promoted contaminant degradation.

  4. Interaction of sulfuric acid corrosion and mechanical wear of iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments were conducted with elemental iron sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid at concentrations ranging from very dilute (0.00007 N; i.e., 4 ppm) to very concentrated (96 percent acid). Load and reciprocating sliding speed were kept constant. With the most dilute acid concentration of 0.00007 to 0.0002 N, a complex corrosion product formed that was friable and often increased friction and wear. At slightly higher concentrations of 0.001 N, metal losses were essentially by wear alone. Because no buildup of corrosion products occurred, this acid concentration became the standard from which to separate metal loss from direct corrosion and mechanical wear losses. When the acid concentration was increased to 5 percent (1 N), the well-established high corrosion rate of iron in sulfuric acid strongly dominated the total wear loss. This strong corrosion increased to 30 percent acid and decreased somewhat to 50 percent acid in accordance with expectations. However, the low corrosion of iron expected at acid concentrations of 65 to 96 percent was not observed in the wear area. It was apparent that the normal passivating film was being worn away and a galvanic cell established that rapidly attacked the wear area. Under the conditions where direct corrosion losses were highest, the coefficient of friction was the lowest.

  5. Interaction of sulfuric acid corrosion and mechanical wear of iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Friction and wear experiment were conducted with elemental iron sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid at concentrations ranging from very dilute (0.00007 N; i.e., 4 ppm) to very concentrated (96 percent acid). Load and reciprocating sliding speed were kept constant. With the most dilute acid concentration of 0.00007 to 0.0002 N, a complex corrosion product formed that was friable and often increased friction and wear. At slightly higher concentrations of 0.001 N, metal losses were essentially by wear alone. Because no buildup of corrosion products occurred, this acid concentration became the standard from which to separate metal loss from direct corrosion and mechanical wear losses. When the acid concentration was increased to 5 percent (1 N), the well-established high corrosion rate of iron in sulfuric acid strongly dominated the total wear loss. This strong corrosion increased to 30 percent acid and decreased somewhat to 50 percent acid in accordance with expectations. However, the low corrosion of iron expected at acid concentrations of 65 to 96 percent was not observed in the wear area. It was apparent that the normal passivating film was being worn away and a galvanic cell established that rapidly attacked the wear area. Under the conditions where direct corrosion losses were highest, the coefficient of friction was the lowest.

  6. High-temperature corrosion of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Cho, W.D.

    1994-04-01

    Iron aluminides are being developed for use as structural materials and/or cladding alloys in fossil energy systems. Extensive development has been in progress on Fe{sub 3}Al-based alloys to improve their engineering ductility. This paper describes results from an ongoing program to evaluate the corrosion performance of these alloys. The experimental program at Argonne involves thermogravimetric analyses of alloys exposed to environments that simulate coal gasification and coal combustion. Corrosion experiments were conducted to determine the effect of gas flow rate and different levels of HCl at a gas temperature of 650 C on three heats of aluminide material, namely, FA 61, FA 129, and FAX. In addition, specimens of Type 316 stainless steel with an overlay alloying of iron aluminide were prepared by electrospark deposition and tested for their corrosion resistance. Detailed microstructural evaluations of tested specimens were performed. Results are used to assess the corrosion resistance of various iron aluminides for service in fossil energy systems that utilize coal as a feedstock.

  7. Corrosion of iron by sulfate-reducing bacteria: new views of an old problem.

    PubMed

    Enning, Dennis; Garrelfs, Julia

    2014-02-01

    About a century ago, researchers first recognized a connection between the activity of environmental microorganisms and cases of anaerobic iron corrosion. Since then, such microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) has gained prominence and its technical and economic implications are now widely recognized. Under anoxic conditions (e.g., in oil and gas pipelines), sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are commonly considered the main culprits of MIC. This perception largely stems from three recurrent observations. First, anoxic sulfate-rich environments (e.g., anoxic seawater) are particularly corrosive. Second, SRB and their characteristic corrosion product iron sulfide are ubiquitously associated with anaerobic corrosion damage, and third, no other physiological group produces comparably severe corrosion damage in laboratory-grown pure cultures. However, there remain many open questions as to the underlying mechanisms and their relative contributions to corrosion. On the one hand, SRB damage iron constructions indirectly through a corrosive chemical agent, hydrogen sulfide, formed by the organisms as a dissimilatory product from sulfate reduction with organic compounds or hydrogen ("chemical microbially influenced corrosion"; CMIC). On the other hand, certain SRB can also attack iron via withdrawal of electrons ("electrical microbially influenced corrosion"; EMIC), viz., directly by metabolic coupling. Corrosion of iron by SRB is typically associated with the formation of iron sulfides (FeS) which, paradoxically, may reduce corrosion in some cases while they increase it in others. This brief review traces the historical twists in the perception of SRB-induced corrosion, considering the presently most plausible explanations as well as possible early misconceptions in the understanding of severe corrosion in anoxic, sulfate-rich environments.

  8. IN DRIFT CORROSION PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Jolley

    1999-12-02

    As directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M&O 1999a), a conceptual model for steel and corrosion products in the engineered barrier system (EBS) is to be developed. The purpose of this conceptual model is to assist Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department in modeling the geochemical environment within a repository drift, thus allowing PAO to provide a more detailed and complete in-drift geochemical model abstraction and to answer the key technical issues (KTI) raised in the NRC Issue Resolution Status Report (IRSR) for the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (NFE) Revision 2 (NRC 1999). This document provides the conceptual framework for the in-drift corrosion products sub-model to be used in subsequent PAO analyses including the EBS physical and chemical model abstraction effort. This model has been developed to serve as a basis for the in-drift geochemical analyses performed by PAO. However, the concepts discussed within this report may also apply to some near and far-field geochemical processes and may have conceptual application within the unsaturated zone (UZ) and saturated zone (SZ) transport modeling efforts.

  9. Corrosion of Iron by Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria: New Views of an Old Problem

    PubMed Central

    Garrelfs, Julia

    2014-01-01

    About a century ago, researchers first recognized a connection between the activity of environmental microorganisms and cases of anaerobic iron corrosion. Since then, such microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) has gained prominence and its technical and economic implications are now widely recognized. Under anoxic conditions (e.g., in oil and gas pipelines), sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are commonly considered the main culprits of MIC. This perception largely stems from three recurrent observations. First, anoxic sulfate-rich environments (e.g., anoxic seawater) are particularly corrosive. Second, SRB and their characteristic corrosion product iron sulfide are ubiquitously associated with anaerobic corrosion damage, and third, no other physiological group produces comparably severe corrosion damage in laboratory-grown pure cultures. However, there remain many open questions as to the underlying mechanisms and their relative contributions to corrosion. On the one hand, SRB damage iron constructions indirectly through a corrosive chemical agent, hydrogen sulfide, formed by the organisms as a dissimilatory product from sulfate reduction with organic compounds or hydrogen (“chemical microbially influenced corrosion”; CMIC). On the other hand, certain SRB can also attack iron via withdrawal of electrons (“electrical microbially influenced corrosion”; EMIC), viz., directly by metabolic coupling. Corrosion of iron by SRB is typically associated with the formation of iron sulfides (FeS) which, paradoxically, may reduce corrosion in some cases while they increase it in others. This brief review traces the historical twists in the perception of SRB-induced corrosion, considering the presently most plausible explanations as well as possible early misconceptions in the understanding of severe corrosion in anoxic, sulfate-rich environments. PMID:24317078

  10. Development of an Escherichia coli K12-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay and DNA isolation suited to biofilms associated with iron drinking water pipe corrosion products.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingrang; Gerke, Tammie L; Buse, Helen Y; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2014-12-01

    A quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay (115 bp amplicon) specific to Escherichia coli K12 with an ABI(TM) internal control was developed based on sequence data encoding the rfb gene cluster. Assay specificity was evaluated using three E. coli K12 strains (ATCC W3110, MG1655 & DH1), 24 non-K12 E. coli and 23 bacterial genera. The biofilm detection limit was 10(3) colony-forming units (CFU) E. coli K12 mL(-1), but required a modified protocol, which included a bio-blocker Pseudomonas aeruginosa with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid buffered to pH 5 prior to cell lysis/DNA extraction. The novel protocol yielded the same sensitivity for drinking water biofilms associated with Fe3O4 (magnetite)-coated SiO2 (quartz) grains and biofilm-surface iron corrosion products from a drinking water distribution system. The novel DNA extraction protocol and specific E. coli K12 assay are sensitive and robust enough for detection and quantification within iron drinking water pipe biofilms, and are particularly well suited for studying enteric bacterial interactions within biofilms.

  11. The role of iron in sulfide induced corrosion of sewer concrete.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangming; Wightman, Elaine; Donose, Bogdan C; Yuan, Zhiguo; Bond, Philip L; Keller, Jurg

    2014-02-01

    The sulfide-induced corrosion of concrete sewer is a widespread and expensive problem for water utilities worldwide. Fundamental knowledge of the initiation and propagation of sewer corrosion, especially the interactions between chemical reactions and physical structure changes, is still largely unknown. Advanced mineral analytical techniques were applied to identify the distribution of corrosion products and the micro-cracking that developed along the corrosion boundary. It was found that sewer concrete corrosion caused by reactions with sulfuric acid progressed uniformly in the cement of concrete. In contrast to conventional knowledge, iron rust rather than gypsum and ettringite was likely the factor responsible for cracking ahead of the corrosion front. The analysis also allowed quantitative determination of the major corrosion products, i.e., gypsum and ettringite, with the latter found closer to the corrosion front. The conceptual model based on these findings clearly demonstrated the complex interactions among different chemical reactions, diffusion, and micro-structure changes. PMID:24326021

  12. The role of iron in sulfide induced corrosion of sewer concrete.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangming; Wightman, Elaine; Donose, Bogdan C; Yuan, Zhiguo; Bond, Philip L; Keller, Jurg

    2014-02-01

    The sulfide-induced corrosion of concrete sewer is a widespread and expensive problem for water utilities worldwide. Fundamental knowledge of the initiation and propagation of sewer corrosion, especially the interactions between chemical reactions and physical structure changes, is still largely unknown. Advanced mineral analytical techniques were applied to identify the distribution of corrosion products and the micro-cracking that developed along the corrosion boundary. It was found that sewer concrete corrosion caused by reactions with sulfuric acid progressed uniformly in the cement of concrete. In contrast to conventional knowledge, iron rust rather than gypsum and ettringite was likely the factor responsible for cracking ahead of the corrosion front. The analysis also allowed quantitative determination of the major corrosion products, i.e., gypsum and ettringite, with the latter found closer to the corrosion front. The conceptual model based on these findings clearly demonstrated the complex interactions among different chemical reactions, diffusion, and micro-structure changes.

  13. Microbial iron respiration can protect steel from corrosion.

    PubMed

    Dubiel, M; Hsu, C H; Chien, C C; Mansfeld, F; Newman, D K

    2002-03-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MC) of steel has been attributed to the activity of biofilms that include anaerobic microorganisms such as iron-respiring bacteria, yet the mechanisms by which these organisms influence corrosion have been unclear. To study this process, we generated mutants of the iron-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 that were defective in biofilm formation and/or iron reduction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to determine changes in the corrosion rate and corrosion potential as a function of time for these mutants in comparison to the wild type. Counter to prevailing theories of MC, our results indicate that biofilms comprising iron-respiring bacteria may reduce rather than accelerate the corrosion rate of steel. Corrosion inhibition appears to be due to reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions and increased consumption of oxygen, both of which are direct consequences of microbial respiration.

  14. Assessment of Corrosion Behavior of Ductile Irons by Factorial Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surendranathan, A. O.; Narayan Prabhu, K.; Sudhaker Nayak, H. V.

    2009-12-01

    The corrosion behavior of unalloyed and alloyed ductile irons (as cast, annealed, and cold worked) in sea water, dilute sulfuric acid, and dilute sodium hydroxide solutions was assessed. Specimen history had a significant effect on the corrosion potential except in ductile iron alloyed with Ni. When the specimens were subjected to different levels of cold working, the corrosion rate was influenced by both the history and the medium. Temperature had a significant effect on the corrosion rate except in the case of unalloyed ductile iron. Factorial experiments indicated that the cold-worked samples were more sensitive to the effect of temperature and composition on the corrosion rate as compared to annealed and as-cast samples. The medium had a significant effect on the corrosion rate in all the cases.

  15. Study of biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiya; Tian, Yimei; Wan, Jianmei; Zhao, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm influenced corrosion on cast iron pipes in reclaimed water was systemically studied using the weight loss method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results demonstrated that compared to sterile water, the existence of the biofilm in reclaimed water promoted the corrosion process significantly. The characteristics of biofilm on cast iron coupons were examined by the surface profiler, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The bacterial counts in the biofilm were determined using the standard plate count method and the most probable number (MPN). The results demonstrated that the corrosion process was influenced by the settled bacteria, EPS, and corrosion products in the biofilm comprehensively. But, the corrosion mechanisms were different with respect to time and could be divided into three stages in our study. Furthermore, several corresponding corrosion mechanisms were proposed for different immersion times.

  16. Morphological and physicochemical characteristics of iron corrosion scales formed under different water source histories in a drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Shi, Baoyou; Gu, Junnong; Wang, Dongsheng; Yang, Min

    2012-10-15

    The corrosion scales on iron pipes could have great impact on the water quality in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS). Unstable and less protective corrosion scale is one of the main factors causing "discolored water" issues when quality of water entering into distribution system changed significantly. The morphological and physicochemical characteristics of corrosion scales formed under different source water histories in duration of about two decades were systematically investigated in this work. Thick corrosion scales or densely distributed corrosion tubercles were mostly found in pipes transporting surface water, but thin corrosion scales and hollow tubercles were mostly discovered in pipes transporting groundwater. Magnetite and goethite were main constituents of iron corrosion products, but the mass ratio of magnetite/goethite (M/G) was significantly different depending on the corrosion scale structure and water source conditions. Thick corrosion scales and hard shell of tubercles had much higher M/G ratio (>1.0), while the thin corrosion scales had no magnetite detected or with much lower M/G ratio. The M/G ratio could be used to identify the characteristics and evaluate the performances of corrosion scales formed under different water conditions. Compared with the pipes transporting ground water, the pipes transporting surface water were more seriously corroded and could be in a relatively more active corrosion status all the time, which was implicated by relatively higher siderite, green rust and total iron contents in their corrosion scales. Higher content of unstable ferric components such as γ-FeOOH, β-FeOOH and amorphous iron oxide existed in corrosion scales of pipes receiving groundwater which was less corroded. Corrosion scales on groundwater pipes with low magnetite content had higher surface area and thus possibly higher sorption capacity. The primary trace inorganic elements in corrosion products were Br and heavy metals. Corrosion

  17. Morphological and physicochemical characteristics of iron corrosion scales formed under different water source histories in a drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Shi, Baoyou; Gu, Junnong; Wang, Dongsheng; Yang, Min

    2012-10-15

    The corrosion scales on iron pipes could have great impact on the water quality in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS). Unstable and less protective corrosion scale is one of the main factors causing "discolored water" issues when quality of water entering into distribution system changed significantly. The morphological and physicochemical characteristics of corrosion scales formed under different source water histories in duration of about two decades were systematically investigated in this work. Thick corrosion scales or densely distributed corrosion tubercles were mostly found in pipes transporting surface water, but thin corrosion scales and hollow tubercles were mostly discovered in pipes transporting groundwater. Magnetite and goethite were main constituents of iron corrosion products, but the mass ratio of magnetite/goethite (M/G) was significantly different depending on the corrosion scale structure and water source conditions. Thick corrosion scales and hard shell of tubercles had much higher M/G ratio (>1.0), while the thin corrosion scales had no magnetite detected or with much lower M/G ratio. The M/G ratio could be used to identify the characteristics and evaluate the performances of corrosion scales formed under different water conditions. Compared with the pipes transporting ground water, the pipes transporting surface water were more seriously corroded and could be in a relatively more active corrosion status all the time, which was implicated by relatively higher siderite, green rust and total iron contents in their corrosion scales. Higher content of unstable ferric components such as γ-FeOOH, β-FeOOH and amorphous iron oxide existed in corrosion scales of pipes receiving groundwater which was less corroded. Corrosion scales on groundwater pipes with low magnetite content had higher surface area and thus possibly higher sorption capacity. The primary trace inorganic elements in corrosion products were Br and heavy metals. Corrosion

  18. Effect of sulfate on the transformation of corrosion scale composition and bacterial community in cast iron water distribution pipes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Shi, Baoyou; Bai, Yaohui; Sun, Huifang; Lytle, Darren A; Wang, Dongsheng

    2014-08-01

    The chemical stability of iron corrosion scales and the microbial community of biofilm in drinking water distribution system (DWDS) can have great impact on the iron corrosion and corrosion product release, which may result in "red water" issues, particularly under the situation of source water switch. In this work, experimental pipe loops were set up to investigate the effect of sulfate on the dynamical transformation characteristics of iron corrosion products and bacterial community in old cast iron distribution pipes. All the test pipes were excavated from existing DWDS with different source water supply histories, and the test water sulfate concentration was in the range of 50-350 mg/L. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA was used for bacterial community analysis. The results showed that iron release increased markedly and even "red water" occurred for pipes with groundwater supply history when feed water sulfate elevated abruptly. However, the iron release of pipes with only surface water supply history changed slightly without noticeable color even the feed water sulfate increased multiply. The thick-layered corrosion scales (or densely distributed tubercles) on pipes with surface water supply history possessed much higher stability due to the larger proportion of stable constituents (mainly Fe3O4) in their top shell layer; instead, the rather thin and uniform non-layered corrosion scales on pipes with groundwater supply history contained relatively higher proportion of less stable iron oxides (e.g. β-FeOOH, FeCO3 and green rust). The less stable corrosion scales tended to be more stable with sulfate increase, which was evidenced by the gradually decreased iron release and the increased stable iron oxides. Bacterial community analysis indicated that when switching to high sulfate water, iron reducing bacteria (IRB) maintained dominant for pipes with stable corrosion scales, while significant increase of sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB), sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB

  19. Effect of sulfate on the transformation of corrosion scale composition and bacterial community in cast iron water distribution pipes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Shi, Baoyou; Bai, Yaohui; Sun, Huifang; Lytle, Darren A; Wang, Dongsheng

    2014-08-01

    The chemical stability of iron corrosion scales and the microbial community of biofilm in drinking water distribution system (DWDS) can have great impact on the iron corrosion and corrosion product release, which may result in "red water" issues, particularly under the situation of source water switch. In this work, experimental pipe loops were set up to investigate the effect of sulfate on the dynamical transformation characteristics of iron corrosion products and bacterial community in old cast iron distribution pipes. All the test pipes were excavated from existing DWDS with different source water supply histories, and the test water sulfate concentration was in the range of 50-350 mg/L. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA was used for bacterial community analysis. The results showed that iron release increased markedly and even "red water" occurred for pipes with groundwater supply history when feed water sulfate elevated abruptly. However, the iron release of pipes with only surface water supply history changed slightly without noticeable color even the feed water sulfate increased multiply. The thick-layered corrosion scales (or densely distributed tubercles) on pipes with surface water supply history possessed much higher stability due to the larger proportion of stable constituents (mainly Fe3O4) in their top shell layer; instead, the rather thin and uniform non-layered corrosion scales on pipes with groundwater supply history contained relatively higher proportion of less stable iron oxides (e.g. β-FeOOH, FeCO3 and green rust). The less stable corrosion scales tended to be more stable with sulfate increase, which was evidenced by the gradually decreased iron release and the increased stable iron oxides. Bacterial community analysis indicated that when switching to high sulfate water, iron reducing bacteria (IRB) maintained dominant for pipes with stable corrosion scales, while significant increase of sulfur oxidizing bacteria (SOB), sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB

  20. An in situ corrosion study of Middle Ages wrought iron bar chains in the Amiens Cathedral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassini, S.; Angelini, E.; Parvis, M.; Bouchar, M.; Dillmann, P.; Neff, D.

    2013-12-01

    The corrosion behaviour of Middle Ages wrought iron bar chains exposed to indoor atmospheric corrosion for hundred of years in the Notre Dame Cathedral of Amiens (France) has been evaluated by means of Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS), a well-established electrochemical technique extensively used for testing anticorrosive properties of metal coatings. The measurements have been performed in situ with a portable EIS instrument designed to work as a standalone device, in six different areas of the wrought iron bar chains characterized by different aesthetical appearance. Moreover, a properly designed electrochemical cell has been employed to carry out the impedance measurements without affecting the artefacts surfaces. The wrought iron bar chains, as evidenced by μ-Raman and microscopic analyses, are covered by corrosion products constituted by iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, such as goethite, lepidocrocite, maghemite, akaganeite, organized in complex layered structures. In situ EIS allows one to investigate the phenomena involved at the electrochemical interfaces among the various corrosion products and to assess and predict their corrosion behaviour. From the analysis of the experimental findings of this monitoring campaign, EIS measurements can be proposed to restorers/conservators as a reliable indicator of dangerous situations on which they must act for the preservation of the iron artefacts.

  1. Iron corrosion in Callovo Oxfordian argilite: From experiments to thermodynamic/kinetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Combarieu, G.; Barboux, P.; Minet, Y.

    Many designs for high-level nuclear waste deep geological disposal include steel waste canister and low-alloy steel overpacks. The container and overpack corrosion products may affect the alteration kinetics of nuclear waste glass and contaminant retention properties due to mineralogical transformation in the surrounding clay. To better quantify the effect of corrosion on the mineralogical alteration of the clay, the present study reports the corrosion of pure iron in raw Callovo-Oxfordian argilite. Batch experiments have been carried out at 90 °C, from one to six months, under oxygen-free atmosphere. Iron corrosion kinetics and secondary mineral formation have been studied with quantitative XRD measurements. Chemical analyses have been performed by ICP-AES, ICP-MS and ionic chromatography. Eh and pH have also been monitored along with the reaction progress. The phases formed from the Fe release in solution are magnetite and Fe-rich silicate from the serpentine group (greenalite or cronstedtite) or chlorite. These phases are associated to the dissolution of quartz, illite and interstratified illite/smectite mixed layers. Solution analyses show that the Si, Fe, Mg and Al concentrations are controlled at a very low level by the precipitation of newly formed phases, although a noticeable pH increase (from 7 to 10 at 90 °C) is associated to iron corrosion. In the conditions of the experiments, the iron corrosion rate has been measured ( Riron = 6 × 10 -9 mol/m 2/s equivalent to 1.4 μm/year) and is in good agreement with previous works. The use of the geochemical code CHESS based on (i) solution analysis, (ii) mineral quantification and (iii) determination of kinetic data for iron corrosion allows to reproduce accurately this reaction-path. Fractionation of dissolved iron between iron silicate and magnetite can be correctly predicted, as well as the pH, Eh and other minerals stability.

  2. The impact of gallic acid on iron gall ink corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouchon-Quillet, V.; Remazeilles, C.; Bernard, J.; Wattiaux, A.; Fournes, L.

    Many old manuscripts suffer from iron-gall ink corrosion, threatening our graphic heritage. Corroded papers become brown and brittle with age. The chemical reactions involved in this corrosion are relatively well known: they include both acidic hydrolysis and oxidation catalysed by free iron(II). Yet, a great variety of iron-gall ink recipes, including a wide range of constituents can be found in the literature and the visual aspect of old inks, can be very different from one inscription to another, even if they have been written on the same sheet of paper. This suggests that even if the free iron(II) plays a dominant role in the paper alteration, the contribution of other ingredients should not be neglected. For this reason, we explored the impact gallic acid may have on the corrosion mechanisms and in particular on the oxidation reactions. These investigations were carried out on laboratory probes prepared with paper sheets immersed in different solutions, all containing the same amount of iron sulphate, and different gallic acid concentrations. These probes were then artificially aged and their degradation state was evaluated by bursting strength measurements, FTIR spectrometry and Mössbauer spectrometry. All these analyses lead us to conclude that gallic acid has an influence on the iron(III)/iron(II) ratio, probably because of its reducing properties.

  3. Identification of Corrosion Products Due to Seawater and Fresh Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gismelseed, A.; Elzain, M.; Yousif, A.; Al Rawas, A.; Al-Omari, I. A.; Widatallah, H.; Rais, A.

    2004-12-01

    Mössbauer and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements were performed on corrosion products extracted from the inner surface of two different metal tubes used in a desalination plant in Oman. One of the tubes corroded due to the seawater while the second was corroded due to fresh water. The corrosion products thus resulted due to seawater were scrapped off in to two layers, the easily removable rust from the top is termed outer surface corrosion product and the strongly adhered rust as internal corrosion product. The Mössbauer spectra together with the XRD pattern of the outer surface showed the presence of magnetite (Fe3O4), akaganeite (β-FeOOH), lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH), goethite (α-FeOOH) and hematite (Fe2O3). The inner surface however showed the presence of akaganite, goethite, and magnetite. On the other hand, the corrosion products due to the fresh water showed only the presence of goethite and magnetite. The mechanism of the corrosion process will be discussed based on the significant differences between the formation of the iron components of the corrosion products due to seawater and the fresh water.

  4. Development and the Educational Effect of a System of the Corrosion of Iron and the Anti-corrosion Ability of Conductive Polymer Polyaniline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun; Nakamura, Noriyuki; Yamazaki, Suzuko; Ichimori, Hayato; Osaki, Nobukazu; Okano, Hiroshi

    Few general chemistry textbooks of high schools, colleges and universities introduce the corrosion of iron into the oxidation-reduction (redox) section, although the corrosion is very popular phenomena for students. Besides, no description appears about conductive polymers as anti-corrosion materials. The corrosion is a redox reaction proceeding through the local cell mechanism : the iron oxidation half-cell reaction at the local anode and the reduction of oxygen at the local cathode. To prepare a teaching tool for understanding of the mechanism, the visualization of the corrosion was attempted using phenolphthalein and potassium hexacyanoferrate (III) as color couplers for the anodic and cathodic products : Fe2+ and OH-. The local anode and cathode were obviously shown as gradual blue and red coloration when commercial nails were soaked in 4% NaCl aqueous solution containing phenolphthalein and potassium hexacyanoferrate (III) . On the other hand, no coloration occurred for the nail covered with a conductive polymer polyaniline. To know the anti-corrosion mechanism, the open-circuit potential of the nail was measured. The fact that the potential was kept at the potential range where iron was passivated implied that polyaniline acted as an in-situ oxidant. The visualization was experimentally performed at an actual chemistry class and the utility value was estimated. As a result, the visualization is expected to be a useful teaching tool for the corrosion and the understanding of the role of polyaniline as the anti-corrosion material.

  5. Spatial distribution of crystalline corrosion products formed during corrosion of stainless steel in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Serdar, Marijana; Meral, Cagla; Kunz, Martin; Bjegovic, Dubravka; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2015-05-15

    The mineralogy and spatial distribution of nano-crystalline corrosion products that form in the steel/concrete interface were characterized using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction (μ-XRD). Two types of low-nickel high-chromium reinforcing steels embedded into mortar and exposed to NaCl solution were investigated. Corrosion in the samples was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). μ-XRD revealed that goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) are the main iron oxide–hydroxides formed during the chloride-induced corrosion of stainless steel in concrete. Goethite is formed closer to the surface of the steel due to the presence of chromium in the steel, while akaganeite is formed further away from the surface due to the presence of chloride ions. Detailed microstructural analysis is shown and discussed on one sample of each type of steel. - Highlights: • Synchrotron micro-diffraction used to map the distribution of crystalline phases. • Goethite and akaganeite are the main corrosion products during chloride induced corrosion in mortar. • Layers of goethite and akaganeite are negatively correlated. • EDS showed Cr present in corrosion products identified by SEM.

  6. Microbial extracellular electron transfer and its relevance to iron corrosion.

    PubMed

    Kato, Souichiro

    2016-03-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a microbial metabolism that enables efficient electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials. Microorganisms harbouring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, including bioleaching and bioelectrochemical systems. On the other hand, recent research revealed that microbial EET potentially induces corrosion of iron structures. It has been well known that corrosion of iron occurring under anoxic conditions is mostly caused by microbial activities, which is termed as microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Among diverse MIC mechanisms, microbial EET activity that enhances corrosion via direct uptake of electrons from metallic iron, specifically termed as electrical MIC (EMIC), has been regarded as one of the major causative factors. The EMIC-inducing microorganisms initially identified were certain sulfate-reducing bacteria and methanogenic archaea isolated from marine environments. Subsequently, abilities to induce EMIC were also demonstrated in diverse anaerobic microorganisms in freshwater environments and oil fields, including acetogenic bacteria and nitrate-reducing bacteria. Abilities of EET and EMIC are now regarded as microbial traits more widespread among diverse microbial clades than was thought previously. In this review, basic understandings of microbial EET and recent progresses in the EMIC research are introduced. PMID:26863985

  7. Corrosion of high-level radioactive waste iron-canisters in contact with bentonite.

    PubMed

    Kaufhold, Stephan; Hassel, Achim Walter; Sanders, Daniel; Dohrmann, Reiner

    2015-03-21

    Several countries favor the encapsulation of high-level radioactive waste (HLRW) in iron or steel canisters surrounded by highly compacted bentonite. In the present study the corrosion of iron in contact with different bentonites was investigated. The corrosion product was a 1:1 Fe layer silicate already described in literature (sometimes referred to as berthierine). Seven exposition test series (60 °C, 5 months) showed slightly less corrosion for the Na-bentonites compared to the Ca-bentonites. Two independent exposition tests with iron pellets and 38 different bentonites clearly proved the role of the layer charge density of the swelling clay minerals (smectites). Bentonites with high charged smectites are less corrosive than bentonites dominated by low charged ones. The type of counterion is additionally important because it determines the density of the gel and hence the solid/liquid ratio at the contact to the canister. The present study proves that the integrity of the multibarrier-system is seriously affected by the choice of the bentonite buffer encasing the metal canisters in most of the concepts. In some tests the formation of a patina was observed consisting of Fe-silicate. Up to now it is not clear why and how the patina formed. It, however, may be relevant as a corrosion inhibitor.

  8. A Theoretical Study of Carbohydrates as Corrosion Inhibitors of Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Salim M.; Ali-Shattle, Elbashir E.; Ali, Nozha M.

    2013-09-01

    The inhibitive effect of fructose, glucose, lactose, maltose, and sucrose against the iron corrosion is investigated using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31 G level (d) to search the relation between the molecular structure and corrosion inhibition. The electronic properties such as the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), the energy of lowest unoccupied orbital (LUMO), the energy gap (LUMO-HOMO), quantum chemical parameters such as hardness, softness, the fraction of the electron transferred, and the electrophilicity index are reported. The inhibition efficiency of the investigated carbohydrates follows the trend: maltose

  9. Electrochemical corrosion of iron-magnesium-alumina spinel (FMAS) in molten potassium salts and coal slag

    SciTech Connect

    Marchant, D.D.; Griffin, C.W.; Bates, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Iron, magnesium-alumina spinel (FMAS) (0.25 Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ . 0.75 MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/) has been considered for use as an electrode in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator channels. Predominantly an electronic conductor, FMAS has adequate electrical conductivity (>1 S/m) above 520/sup 0/K. In addition, FMAS can be easily fabricated into a form and sintered in air to >90% theoretical density and has a melting point of 2124 +- 20/sup 0/K. Laboratory tests to measure both the electrochemical and chemical corrosion of FMAS in molten K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and coal slags were developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to evaluate the relative corrosion of FMAS. Under isothermal conditions, a direct electric current was passed between an anode and a cathode through a molten electrolyte. The molten coal slags were synthetic high-calcium, low-iron Montana Rosebud and low-calcium, high-iron Illinois No. 6. Evaluations of electrochemical corrosion were made as functions of current density, temperature, and slag composition. These results were compared to those of FMAS tested without electric current. The corrosion rates and reaction products were investigated by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Overall, FMAS has too-high an electrochemical corrosion rate to be considered as MHD electrodes in Montana Rosebud coal slag or in systems where only molten potassium salts are present. However, FMAS may be considered for use in high-iron coal slags although the corrosion rates are still quite high even in these slags.

  10. Enhanced Corrosion Resistance of Iron-Based Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Day, S D; Lian, T; Aprigliano, L F; Hailey, P D; Farmer, J C

    2007-02-18

    Iron-based amorphous alloys possess enhanced hardness and are highly resistant to corrosion, which make them desirable for wear applications in corrosive environments. It was of interest to examine the behavior of amorphous alloys during anodic polarization in concentrated salt solutions and in the salt-fog testing. Results from the testing of one amorphous material (SAM2X5) both in ribbon form and as an applied coating are reported here. Cyclic polarization tests were performed on SAM2X5 ribbon as well as on other nuclear engineering materials. SAM2X5 showed the highest resistance to localized corrosion in 5 M CaCl{sub 2} solution at 105 C. Salt fog tests of 316L SS and Alloy 22 coupons coated with amorphous SAM2X5 powder showed resistance to rusting. Partial devitrification may be responsible for isolated pinpoint rust spots in some coatings.

  11. Investigation on corrosion stratigraphy and morphology in some Iron Age bronze alloys vessels by OM, XRD and SEM-EDS methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oudbashi, Omid; Hasanpour, Ata; Davami, Parviz

    2016-04-01

    The recently study of the corrosion in some bronze artefacts from the Sangtarashan Iron Age site, western Iran, was established to identify corrosion morphology and mechanism in these objects. The corrosion layers in 22 samples were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. The results showed that a thin corrosion crust has formed on the surface of bronzes with a triple-layer structure, including two internal and one external corrosion layers. The formation of these layers is due to copper leaching from the bronze surface. The internal corrosion part has been a compact, tin-rich corrosion/oxidation product (noble patina) with some evidences from original metallurgical aspects of the bronze as well as a very thin layer beneath the tin-rich layer. External corrosion products have been identified as basic copper carbonates, malachite and azurite. Based on the results, the corrosion morphology in the Sangtarashan Iron Age bronzes is due to long-term burial in an appropriate environment in a moderately corrosive soil. Although it is the first time to investigate Iron Age bronzes from Iran, this corrosion morphology is partially similar to type I corrosion morphology observed in archaeological bronze objects; nevertheless, some deviations are visible in comparison with previously established patterns.

  12. Glass corrosion in the presence of iron-bearing materials and potential corrosion suppressors

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Joelle T.; Neill, Lindsay; Weaver, Jamie L.; Parruzot, Benjamin; Musa, Christopher; Neeway, James J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Gin, Stephane; Wall, Nathalie

    2015-07-16

    A complete understanding of radioactive waste glass interactions with near-field materials is essential for appropriate nuclear waste repository performance assessment. In many geologic repository designs, Fe is present in both the natural environment and in the containers that will hold the waste glasses. In this paper we discuss investigations into the alteration of International Simple Glass (ISG) in the presence of Fe0 foil and hematite (Fe2O3). ISG alteration is more pronounced in the presence of Fe0 than with hematite. Additionally, minimal glass corrosion is observed for distances equal to 5 mm between Fe materials and ISG, but substantial glass corrosion is observed for systems exhibiting full contact between Fe0 material and ISG. Diatomaceous earth appears to be a better corrosion suppressant than silica when present with iron and ISG.

  13. Corrosion resistant iron aluminides exhibiting improved mechanical properties and corrosion resistance

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.; McKamey, Claudette G.; Tortorelli, Peter F.; David, Stan A.

    1994-01-01

    The specification discloses a corrosion-resistant intermetallic alloy comprising, in atomic percent, an FeAl iron aluminide containing from about 30 to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.01 to 0.4% zirconium and from 0.01 to about 0.8% boron. The alloy exhibits considerably improved room temperature ductility for enhanced usefulness in structural applications. The high temperature strength and fabricability is improved by alloying with molybdenum, carbon, chromium and vanadium.

  14. Corrosion resistant iron aluminides exhibiting improved mechanical properties and corrosion resistance

    DOEpatents

    Liu, C.T.; McKamey, C.G.; Tortorelli, P.F.; David, S.A.

    1994-06-14

    The specification discloses a corrosion-resistant intermetallic alloy comprising, in atomic percent, an FeAl iron aluminide containing from about 30 to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.01 to 0.4% zirconium and from 0.01 to about 0.8% boron. The alloy exhibits considerably improved room temperature ductility for enhanced usefulness in structural applications. The high temperature strength and fabricability is improved by alloying with molybdenum, carbon, chromium and vanadium. 9 figs.

  15. Iron Corrosion Observations: Pu(VI)-Fe Reduction Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Donald T.; Swanson, Juliet S.; Richmann, Michael K.; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Borkowski, Marian

    2012-09-11

    Iron and Pu Reduction: (1) Very different appearances in iron reaction products were noted depending on pH, brine and initial iron phase; (2) Plutonium was associated with the Fe phases; (3) Green rust was often noted at the higher pH; (4) XANES established the green rust to be an Fe2/3 phase with a bromide center; and (5) This green rust phase was linked to Pu as Pu(IV).

  16. Graphitic corrosion -- Don`t forget about buried cast iron pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.R.

    1999-08-01

    Graphitic corrosion is a form of de-alloying or selective leaching that occurs in cast iron material. This corrosion mechanism is unique to gray cast irons and is caused by the graphitic matrix present. The graphite is cathodic to the iron matrix. Exposure to an electrolyte results in leaching of the iron matrix, leaving behind a porous mass of graphite flakes. Graphite corrosion often occurs in buried gray cast iron pipes, although exposure to an aqueous environment is all that is necessary for the de-alloying to occur. The process of de-alloying in cast iron typically is long-term, taking several years to occur. In fact, many cases of graphitic corrosion-caused failure in cast iron piping occur in piping that has been in service for 50 years or more. Mechanical testing to determine the tensile strength of cast iron can provide information regarding the remaining strength of the pipe.

  17. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides in single- and multioxidant environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1998-06-22

    Iron aluminide intermetallics are being developed for use as structural materials and/or as cladding for conventional engineering alloys. In addition to their strength advantages, these materials exhibit excellent resistance to corrosion in single- and multioxidant environments at elevated temperatures through the formation of slow-growing, adherent alumina scales. Even though these intermetallics develop protective oxide scales in single-oxidant environments, the simultaneous presence of several reactants in the environment (typical of practical systems) can lead to development of oxide scales that are nonprotective and that undergo breakaway corrosion, or to nonoxide scales that are detrimental to the performance of the underlying alloy. This paper describes the corrosion performance of Fe-Al intermetallics in environments that contain sulfur, carbon, chlorine, and oxygen and that are typical of fossil energy systems. Emphasis is on mechanisms of scale development and breakdown, performance envelopes for long-term usage of these materials, and approaches to modifying the surfaces of engineering alloys by cladding or coating them with intermetallics to improve their corrosion resistance.

  18. Corrosion performance of iron aluminides in fossil energy environments

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1997-12-01

    Corrosion of metallic structural materials in complex gas environments of coal gasification and combustion is a potential problem. The corrosion process is dictated by concentrations of two key constituents: sulfur as H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} and chlorine as HCl. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the current status of the corrosion performance of alumina scales that are thermally grown on Fe-base alloys, including iron aluminides, in multicomponent gas environments of typical coal-conversion systems. Mechanisms of scale development/breakdown, performance envelopes for long-term usage of these materials, approaches to modifying the surfaces of engineering alloys by cladding or coating them with intermetallics, and in-service experience with these materials are emphasized. The results are compared with the performance of chromia-forming alloys in similar environments. The paper also discusses the available information on corrosion performance of alloys whose surfaces were enriched with Al by the electrospark deposition process or by weld overlay techniques.

  19. Effect of multiphase slug flow on the stability of corrosion product layer

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, M.; Rajappa, S.

    1999-11-01

    Corrosion experiments were carried out under iron carbonate scale-forming conditions in a large diameter, multiphase flow system. Both oil/water and oil/water/gas slug flows were studied at pressures up to 0.79 MPa and temperatures of 60 C and 80 C. It was found that with increasing iron concentration, the corrosion rates were reduced to negligible values in oil/water flows. However, significant corrosion was seen in slug flow with clear evidence of damage to the corrosion product layer due to impact and possible collapse of gas bubbles and a considerable reduction in the layer thickness. Details of corrosion rates and corrosion coupon surface analysis are presented.

  20. The influence of environment on corrosion of cast iron and carbon steel representing samples of outdoor metal technical heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzelec, M.; Marczak, J.; Skrzeczanowski, W.; Zatorska, A.; Sarzynski, A.; Czyz, K.; Zasada, D.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the results of annual measurements of the corrosion progress at test samples of cast iron and carbon steel placed in different natural environments. Comparative tests were performed in two outdoor stations, one at the Railway Museum in central Warsaw and one at the location of a Railway Museum in the small town of Sochaczew, 50 km west of Warsaw. The influence of surface roughness on the development of corrosion was determined by two kinds of treatment of all sample surfaces - metal brush or grinding. Stratigraphy and composition of corrosion products in quarterly periods were analyzed with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and Raman laser spectroscopy. Comparative tests were performed using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) system equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and micro-chemical analytical methods. The corrosion layers on carbon steel have proven to be thicker on average than on cast iron, and thicker on the brushed parts of both materials. Furthermore, a thicker corrosion layer was found on the cast iron test samples exposed in Sochaczew than in Warsaw. Different iron oxides, namely lepidocrocite, goethite, hematite and magnetite were identified in the surface Raman spectra of corrosion layers, the last compound only in the sample from Sochaczew. SEM EDS measurements of surface elemental concentrations showed a higher concentration of sulfur in all samples from Sochaczew. Registered LIBS spectra have been additionally analyzed with statistical approach, using Factorial Analysis (FA). Results generally confirmed conclusions drawn from SEM/Raman/LIBS results.

  1. Corrosion of stainless steel during acetate production

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, J.S.; Lester, G.C.

    1996-07-01

    Corrosion of types 304, 304L, 316, and 316L stainless steel (SS) during the esterification of acetic acid and alcohol or glycol ether was investigated. The catalyst for this reaction, sulfuric acid or para-toluene sulfonic acid (PTSA), was shown to cause more corrosion on reactor equipment than CH{sub 3}COOH under the process conditions commonly practiced in industry. The corrosive action of the catalyst occurred only in the presence of water. Thus, for the batch processes, corrosion occurred mostly during the initial stage of esterification, where water produced by the reaction created an aqueous environment. After water was distilled off, the corrosion rate declined to a negligible value. The corrosion inhibitor copper sulfate, often used in industrial acetate processes, was found to work well for a low-temperature process (< 95 C) such as in production of butyl acetate, but it accelerated corrosion in the glycol ether acetate processes where temperatures were > 108 C. Process conditions that imparted low corrosion rates were determined.

  2. Determining the Effect of Environmental Conditions on Iron Corrosion by Atomic Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malel, Esteban; Shalev, Deborah E.

    2013-01-01

    Iron corrosion is a complex process that occurs when iron is exposed to oxygen and humidity and is exacerbated by the presence of chloride ions. The deterioration of iron structures or other components can be costly to society and is usually evaluated by following the properties of the corroding material. Here, the iron ions released into solution…

  3. The effects of cold rolling temperature on corrosion resistance of pure iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinlong, Lv; Hongyun, Luo

    2014-10-01

    The effects of cold rolling temperature on grain size and grain orientation of pure iron were investigated. Comparing with sample rolled at room temperature, the grain refinement was facilitated in sample obtained by cryogenic cold rolling at liquid-nitrogen temperature. However, the grain orientation changed little for two samples. It was shown that cathodic hydrogen evolution reaction could govern the corrosion reaction for pure iron in sulfuric acid solution. The grain refinement obtained by rolling improved the corrosion resistance of iron in sulfuric acid solution, borate buffer solution and borate buffer solution with chloride ion. However, comparing with iron rolled at room temperature, the corrosion resistance of iron obtained by cryogenic temperature rolling was lower. Comparing with iron rolled at room temperature, higher dislocation density in iron rolled at cryogenic temperature reduced its corrosion resistance.

  4. Corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and electrochemistry of the iron and nickel base alloys in caustic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, R.; Beck, F. H.; Agrawal, A. K.; Soendjasmono, B.; Staehle, R. W.

    1980-02-01

    The electrochemical behavior of high purity (99.95% to 99.99%) iron in 0.6M NaCl and 1.0M Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ containing H/sub 2/S (50 ppM to 34,000 ppM) was studied using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and slow scan rate polarization. Results have indicated that iron does undergo passivation in sulfate solutions containing H/sub 2/S. Iron dissolution depends on the presence of Cl/sup -/, the concentration of H/sub 2/S and solution pH. An equation is given that describes the anodic Tafel current densities. The slow strain rate test was used to evaluate the effect of electrode potential on the susceptibility of 2-1/4Cr, Mo steel to stress corrosion cracking in boiling 50% NaOH solution. Susceptibility decreased and general corrosion increased with increasing potentials. Failures contained a combination of ductile and brittle fracture. Time-to-failure was longest for controlled potentials of -700 and -600mV (Hg/HgO reference) in the -1100 to -400mV range used in this study.

  5. Effect of sulfate on the transformation of corrosion scale composition and bacterial community in cast iron water distribution pipes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The stability of iron corrosion products and the bacterial composition of biofilm in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) could have great impact on the water safety at the consumer ends. In this work, pipe loops were setup to investigate the transformation characteristics ...

  6. Corrosion Product Film-Induced Stress Facilitates Stress Corrosion Cracking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhiliang; Ren, Xuechong; Guan, Yongjun; Su, Yanjing

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analyses were conducted to clarify the role of corrosion product films (CPFs) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Flat and U-shaped edge-notched specimens were investigated in terms of the CPF-induced stress in the metallic substrate and the stress in the CPF. For a U-shaped edge-notched specimen, the stress field in front of the notch tip is affected by the Young’s modulus of the CPF and the CPF thickness and notch geometry. The CPF-induced tensile stress in the metallic substrate is superimposed on the applied load to increase the crack tip strain and facilitate localized plasticity deformation. In addition, the stress in the CPF surface contributes to the rupture of the CPFs. The results provide physical insights into the role of CPFs in SCC. PMID:26066367

  7. Wear of iron and nickel in corrosive liquid environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Rengstorff, George W. P.

    1988-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior of Fe and Ni sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid and hydrochloric acid were investigated. The results show that the concentration of acid is an important factor in controlling the metal loss caused by wear corrosion processes in the acids. At very dilute acid concentration (10 to the -4 N), Fe behaves differently from Ni. Fe develops a soft, friable deposit, while Ni develops no corrosion layer. The formation and removal of the corrosion deposit on Fe resulted in high metal loss and coefficient of friction, as compared to the relatively low metal loss and coefficient of friction observed for Ni. At slightly higher acid concentration (10 to the -3 and 10 to the -2 N), no corrosion products were produced on both Fe and Ni. Wear of Fe and Ni was generally at a minimum. At higher acid concentration (10 to the -1 N and above), loss of Fe and Ni increased as the acid concentration increased. In sulfuric acid the maximum loss of both Fe and Ni was at 7.5 N (30 percent) concentration, and the metal losses of both Fe and Ni dropped markedly at 15 N (50 percent) and above. In hydrochloric acid, however, the Fe loss continued to increase with the increase of acid concentration, and the maximum Fe loss occurred in the most concentrated acid (12.1 N, 37 percent). There were variations in loss with Ni from specimen to specimen examined in hydrochloric acids (10 to the -1 N and above). The coefficient of friction for Ni increased slightly with an increase in acid concentration up to 10 to the -2 N. When corrosion started to dominate in the wear-corrosion process, the coefficient of friction decreased in both sulfuric and hydrochloric acids at 10 to the -1 N and above.

  8. Wear of iron and nickel in corrosive liquid environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Rengstorff, George W. P.

    1987-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior of Fe and Ni sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid and hydrochloric acid were investigated. The results show that the concentration of acid is an important factor in controlling the metal loss caused by wear corrosion processes in the acids. At very dilute acid concentration (10 to the -4 N), Fe behaves differently from Ni. Fe develops a soft, friable deposit, while Ni develops no corrosion layer. The formation and removal of the corrosion deposit on Fe resulted in high metal loss and coefficient of friction, as compared to the relatively low metal loss and coefficient of friction observed for Ni. At slightly higher acid concentration (10 to the -3 and 10 to the -2 N), no corrosion products were produced on both Fe and Ni. Wear of Fe and Ni was generally at a minimum. At higher acid concentration (10 to the -1 N and above), loss of Fe and Ni increased as the acid concentration increased. In sulfuric acid the maximum loss of both Fe and Ni was at 7.5 N (30%) concentration, and the metal losses of both Fe and Ni dropped markedly at 15 N (50%) and above. In hydrochloric acid, however, the Fe loss continued to increase with the increase of acid concentration, and the maximum Fe loss occurred in the most concentrated acid (12.1 N, 37%). There were variations in loss with Ni from specimen to specimen examined in hydrochloric acids (10 to the -1 N and above). The coefficient of friction for Ni increased slightly with an increase in acid concentration up to 10 to the -2 N. When corrosion started to dominate in the wear-corrosion process, the coefficient of friction decreased in both sulfuric and hydrochloric acids at 10 to the -1 N and above.

  9. Corrosion resistance of cast irons and titanium alloys as reference engineered metal barriers for use in basalt geologic storage: a literature assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Charlot, L.A.; Westerman, R.E.

    1981-07-01

    A survey and assessment of the literature on the corrosion resistance of cast irons and low-alloy titanium are presented. Selected engineering properties of cast iron and titanium are briefly described; however, the corrosion resistance of cast iron and titanium in aqueous solutions or in soils and their use in a basalt repository are emphasized. In evaluating the potential use of cast iron and titanium as structural barrier materials for long-lived nuclear waste packages, it is assumed that titanium has the general corrosion resistance to be used in relatively thin cross sections whereas the cost and availability of cast iron allows its use even in very thick cross sections. Based on this assumption, the survey showed that: The uniform corrosion of low-alloy titanium in a basalt environment is expected to be extremely low. A linear extrapolation of general corrosion rates with an added corrosion allowance suggests that a 3.2- to 6.4-mm-thick wall may have a life of 1000 yr. Pitting and crevice corrosion are not likely corrosion modes in basalt ground waters. It is also unlikely that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) will occur in the commercially pure (CP) titanium alloy or in palladiumor molybdenum-alloyed titanium materials. Low-alloy cast irons may be used as barrier metals if the environment surrounding the metal keeps the alloy in the passive range. The solubility of the corrosion product and the semipermeable nature of the oxide film allow significant uniform corrosion over long time periods. A linear extrapolation of high-temperature corrosion rates on carbon steels and corrosion rates of cast irons in soils gives an estimated metal penetration of 51 to 64 mm after 1000 yr. A corrosion allowance of 3 to 5 times that suggests that an acceptable cast iron wall may be from 178 to 305 mm thick. Although they cannot be fully assessed, pitting and crevice corrosion should not affect cast iron due to the ground-water chemistry of basalt.

  10. Friction and Wear of Iron in Corrosive Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    Friction and wear experiments were conducted with elemental iron exposed to various corrosive media including two acids, base, and a salt. Studies involved various concentrations of nitric and sulfuric acids, sodium hydroxide, and sodium chloride. Load and reciprocating sliding speed were kept constant. With the base NaOH an increase in normality beyond 0.01 N resulted in a decrease in both friction and wear. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of the surface showed a decreasing concentration of ferric oxide (Fe2O3) on the iron surface with increasing NaOH concentration. With nitric acid (HNO3) friction decreased in solutions to 0.05 N, beyond which no further change in friction was observed. The concentration of Fe2O3 on the surface continued to increase with increasing normality. XPS analysis revealed the presence of sulfates in addition of Fe2O3 on surfaces exposed to sulfuric acid and iron chlorides but no sodium on surfaces exposed to NaCl.

  11. Can Dynamic Bubble Templating Play a Role in Corrosion Product Morphology?

    SciTech Connect

    Gerke, T.L.; Scheckel, K.G.; Ray, R.I.; Little, B.J.

    2012-05-09

    Dynamic templating as a result of cathodic hydrogen gas production is suggested as a possible mechanism for the formation of tube-like corrosion products on an unlined cast iron pipe in a drinking water distribution system. Mounds of corrosion product, with protruding tubes and freestanding tubes, were observed within a single 30 cm section of piping. Internal morphologies for all shapes were texturally complex although mineralogically simple, composed of two iron oxide/oxyhydroxides minerals: {alpha}-FeOOH (goethite) and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite). Static templating by either microorganisms or minerals was rejected as a possible mechanism for tube formation in this study.

  12. The electrochemical corrosion of bulk nanocrystalline ingot iron in acidic sulfate solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, S G; Shen, C B; Long, K; Zhang, T; Wang, F H; Zhang, Z D

    2006-01-12

    The corrosion properties of bulk nanocrystalline ingot iron (BNII) fabricated from conventional polycrystalline ingot iron (CPII) by severe rolling were investigated by means of immersion test, potentiodynamic polarization (PDP), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. These experimental results indicate that BNII possesses excellent corrosion resistance in comparison with CPII in acidic sulfate solution at room temperature. It may mainly result from different surface microstructures between CPII and BNII. However, the corrosion resistance of nanocrystalline materials is usually degraded because of their metastable microstructure nature, and the residual stress in nanocrystalline materials also can result in degradation of corrosion resistance according to the traditional point of view.

  13. Thermodynamic Development of Corrosion Rate Modeling in Iron Phosphate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Schlesinger, Mark; Brow, Richard

    2011-10-31

    A two-year research program investigated links between the thermodynamic properties of phosphate glasses and their corrosion rates in different solutions. Glasses in the Na2O-CaO-P2O5 and Na2O-Fe2O3-PO5 systems were prepared and characterized. These glasses were then exposed in bulk and powder form to acid (0.1M HCl), basic (0.1M KOH) and neutral (deionized water) solutions at varying exposure times and temperatures. Analysis of the solution and the glass after exposure determined the rate and type of corrosion that occurred. Simultaneously, efforts were made to determine the thermodynamic properties of solid iron phosphate compounds. This included measurement of low temperature (5-300 K) heat capacities, measured at Brigham Young University; the attempted use of a Parr calorimeter to measure ambient temperature enthalpies of formation; and attempted measurement of temperature heat capacities. Only the first of the three tasks was successfully accomplished. In lieu of experimental measurement of enthalpies of formation, first-principles calculation of enthalpies of formation was performed at Missouri S&T; these results will be used in subsequent modeling efforts.

  14. Impacts of Transport Properties of Porous Corrosion Product Layer on Effective Corrosion Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaobai; Cook, David

    2012-11-01

    Condensing exhaust gases containing H2O, SO3 and NOx cause serious corrosion failure in various industry processes. For example, in modern compact heat cells, corrosion products deposit on top of the heat exchanger cooling fins, blocking the flow passages and drastically decreasing system performance. The transport properties of porous corrosion product layers play important role in determining the corrosion tendency and observed corrosion rate. To understand the corrosion mechanism for Aluminum alloy in sulfuric acid environment, impacts of transport properties of corrosion residual layers are investigated with different numerical models for porous layer diffusivity. The effective corrosion rates resulted from these models are compared to corresponding experimental measurements. A multilayer diffusivity model in which diffusivity depends both on porous layer structure and composition shows excellent agreements with experimental data. This model is currently being used in a multi-scale flow simulation framework to predict corrosion phenomena in heat cells.

  15. Corrosion behaviour of four handguns in aqueous environments: corrosion product characterization and effects on estimating the time since deposition.

    PubMed

    Wogan, Megan E; Webster-Hoffmeyer, Katie S; Grgicak, Catherine M

    2013-09-01

    When a firearm has been disposed of in a body of water and becomes corroded, its appearance is altered and determining a time-since-immersion may be of import to the investigation. Therefore, in this study, the corrosion and mass loss of four handgun slides over a period of 180days were examined. Solid-state characterization of the metals and their corrosion products via SEM/EDX and powder X-ray Diffraction (pXRD) was performed. The pXRDs were analyzed against the NIST Powder Diffraction Database to determine the crystalline phases. Filings from the SS416 standard, Llama and Ruger handgun slide predominantly consisted of iron alloys. After 180-days in solution, pXRD indicated that the adherent corrosion products consisted of 1) γ-FeOOH and 2) iron oxide (Fe3O4 or Fe2O3). Additionally, pXRD analysis indicated that the adherent corrosion products of the SS416 standard also consisted of CrO3. Metal filings from the Raven and Jennings handgun slides were a mixture of iron-nickel-zinc and EDX and pXRD analyses of the corrosion products, when submersed in deionized water, indicated that the products consisted of: 1) γ-FeOOH, 2) iron oxide (Fe3O4 or Fe2O3), and 3) ZnFe2O4 or ZnO; where the Jennings adherent rust contained ZnFe2O4 and the Raven adherent rust contained ZnO. Further, pXRD of the corrosion products from these alloys, when submersed in 25 PSU (Practical Salinity Unit) solution, indicated that the products consisted of: 1) ZnO, 2) Zn(OH)2, 3) α-Ni(OH)2, and 4) NaCl. The data thus indicated that both metal composition and the presence of chloride ions had significant impacts on rates and products of corrosion and suggest that the presence of Cl(-) changes not only the rate of corrosion, but also the corroding species itself. While mechanisms and rates of the chloride driven corrosion processes offer explanations as to the different oxides and hydroxides observed between immersion conditions, they do not offer an explanation for the differences observed

  16. Corrosion behaviour of four handguns in aqueous environments: corrosion product characterization and effects on estimating the time since deposition.

    PubMed

    Wogan, Megan E; Webster-Hoffmeyer, Katie S; Grgicak, Catherine M

    2013-09-01

    When a firearm has been disposed of in a body of water and becomes corroded, its appearance is altered and determining a time-since-immersion may be of import to the investigation. Therefore, in this study, the corrosion and mass loss of four handgun slides over a period of 180days were examined. Solid-state characterization of the metals and their corrosion products via SEM/EDX and powder X-ray Diffraction (pXRD) was performed. The pXRDs were analyzed against the NIST Powder Diffraction Database to determine the crystalline phases. Filings from the SS416 standard, Llama and Ruger handgun slide predominantly consisted of iron alloys. After 180-days in solution, pXRD indicated that the adherent corrosion products consisted of 1) γ-FeOOH and 2) iron oxide (Fe3O4 or Fe2O3). Additionally, pXRD analysis indicated that the adherent corrosion products of the SS416 standard also consisted of CrO3. Metal filings from the Raven and Jennings handgun slides were a mixture of iron-nickel-zinc and EDX and pXRD analyses of the corrosion products, when submersed in deionized water, indicated that the products consisted of: 1) γ-FeOOH, 2) iron oxide (Fe3O4 or Fe2O3), and 3) ZnFe2O4 or ZnO; where the Jennings adherent rust contained ZnFe2O4 and the Raven adherent rust contained ZnO. Further, pXRD of the corrosion products from these alloys, when submersed in 25 PSU (Practical Salinity Unit) solution, indicated that the products consisted of: 1) ZnO, 2) Zn(OH)2, 3) α-Ni(OH)2, and 4) NaCl. The data thus indicated that both metal composition and the presence of chloride ions had significant impacts on rates and products of corrosion and suggest that the presence of Cl(-) changes not only the rate of corrosion, but also the corroding species itself. While mechanisms and rates of the chloride driven corrosion processes offer explanations as to the different oxides and hydroxides observed between immersion conditions, they do not offer an explanation for the differences observed

  17. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  18. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  19. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  20. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... Drug products containing iron or iron salts. Drug products containing elemental iron or iron salts as...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement:...

  1. Mechanism for Corrosion Prevention by a Mechanical Plating of Uniform Zinc-Iron Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Naoya; Kaku, Yoshihiko; Okazaki, Shinji; Hirai, Kuninori

    2016-09-01

    In situ electrochemical monitoring with a three-electrode cell was applied to investigate the anti-corrosion properties of a mechanical zinc-iron alloy plating. Several electron probe microanalyses were also conducted to identify the chemical elements in the plating. The results indicated the formation of a Zn-Fe intermetallic compound, which allowed a mechanism for corrosion prevention to be proposed. In the proposed mechanism, Zn(OH)2 plays a significant role in the corrosion prevention of steel alloys.

  2. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Joseph; Choi, Jor-Shan; Saw, Cheng; Haslam, Jeffrey; Day, Dan; Hailey, Phillip; Lian, Tiangan; Rebak, Raul; Perepezko, John; Payer, Joe; Branagan, Daniel; Beardsley, Brad; D'Amato, Andy; Aprigliano, Lou

    2009-06-01

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition, materials synthesis, thermal stability, corrosion resistance, environmental cracking, mechanical properties, damage tolerance, radiation effects, and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4) and SAM1651 (Fe48Mo14Cr15Y2C15B6) have been produced as meltspun ribbons (MSRs), dropcast ingots, and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo), and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of MSRs and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently, thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests; good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while the open-circuit corrosion potentials (OCPs) were simultaneously monitored; reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber and suitable for criticality-control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional stainless steel and Ni-based materials, and are proving to have excellent wear

  3. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Material (HPCRM) Development

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J S; Saw, C; Haslam, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D'Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2008-01-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  4. Iron-Based Amorphous Metals:The High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials(HPCRM) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J

    2007-07-09

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  5. Effects of 1000 C oxide surfaces on room temperature aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L.

    1997-12-01

    Results of electrochemical aqueous-corrosion studies at room temperature indicate that retained in-service-type high-temperature surface oxides (1000 C in air for 24 hours) on FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo iron aluminides cause major reductions in pitting corrosion resistance in a mild acid-chloride solution designed to simulate aggressive atmospheric corrosion. Removal of the oxides by mechanical grinding restores the corrosion resistance. In a more aggressive sodium tetrathionate solution, designed to simulate an aqueous environment contaminated by sulfur-bearing combustion products, only active corrosion occurs for both the 1000 C oxide and mechanically cleaned surfaces at FAL. Results of slow-strain-rate stress-corrosion-cracking tests on FA-129, FAL and FAL-Mo at free-corrosion and hydrogen-charging potentials in the mild acid chloride solution indicate somewhat higher ductilities (on the order of 50%) for the 1000 C oxides retard the penetration of hydrogen into the metal substrates and, consequently, are beneficial in terms of improving resistance to environmental embrittlement. In the aggressive sodium tetrathionate solution, no differences are observed in the ductilities produced by the 1000 C oxide and mechanically cleaned surfaces for FAL.

  6. Modeling of corrosion product migration in the secondary circuit of nuclear power plants with WWER-1200

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritskii, V. G.; Berezina, I. G.; Gavrilov, A. V.; Motkova, E. A.; Zelenina, E. V.; Prokhorov, N. A.; Gorbatenko, S. P.; Tsitser, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Models of corrosion and mass transfer of corrosion products in the pipes of the condensate-feeding and steam paths of the secondary circuit of NPPs with WWER-1200 are presented. The mass transfer and distribution of corrosion products over the currents of the working medium of the secondary circuit were calculated using the physicochemical model of mass transfer of corrosion products in which the secondary circuit is regarded as a cyclic system consisting of a number of interrelated elements. The circuit was divided into calculated regions in which the change in the parameters (flow rate, temperature, and pressure) was traced and the rates of corrosion and corrosion products entrainment, high-temperature pH, and iron concentration were calculated. The models were verified according to the results of chemical analyses at Kalinin NPP and iron corrosion product concentrations in the feed water at different NPPs depending on pH at 25°C (pH25) for service times τ ≥ 5000 h. The calculated pH values at a coolant temperature t (pH t ) in the secondary circuit of NPPs with WWER-1200 were presented. The calculation of the distribution of pH t and ethanolamine and ammonia concentrations over the condensate feed (CFC) and steam circuits is given. The models are designed for developing the calculation codes. The project solutions of ATOMPROEKT satisfy the safety and reliability requirements for power plants with WWER-1200. The calculated corrosion and corrosion product mass transfer parameters showed that the model allows the designer to choose between the increase of the correcting reagent concentration, the use of steel with higher chromium contents, and intermittent washing of the steam generator from sediments as the best solution for definite regions of the circuit.

  7. Corrosion of iron: A study for radioactive waste canisters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagha, S. Ben; Crusset, D.; Mabille, I.; Tran, M.; Bernard, M. C.; Sutter, E.

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the risks of atmospheric corrosion of steel waste canisters following their deep geological disposal in the temperature range from 303 to 363 K. The work was performed using iron samples deposited as thin films on a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and disposed in a climatic chamber. The experiments showed that, in the temperature under study (298-363 K), the mass increase due to the formation of oxide/hydroxide rose sharply above 70% RH, as is commonly observed at room temperatures, indicating that the phenomenon remains electrochemical in nature. Ex situ Raman spectrometric analyses indicate the formation of magnetite, maghemite and oxyhydroxides species in the 298-363 K temperature range, and for oxygen contents above 1 vol.%, whereas only Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3 are detected at 363 K. In this work, the kinetics of the rust growth is discussed, on the bases of the rate of mass increase and of the composition of the rust, as a function of the climatic parameters and the oxygen content of the atmosphere.

  8. Behavior of tritium permeation induced by water corrosion of alpha iron around room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, T.; Hashizume, K.

    2015-03-15

    Tritium (T) permeation leakage to surroundings is a great safety concern in fission and fusion reactor systems. T permeation potentially occurs from T contaminated water through cooling tubes or storage tank made of metals which dissolve some T evolved by water corrosion. In order to understand behaviors of hydrogen uptake and permeation in pure α-iron (αFe) during water corrosion around room temperature, hydrogen permeation experiments for an αFe membrane have been conducted by means of tritium tracer techniques. The present study suggests that hydrogen produced by water corrosion of αFe is trapped in product oxide layers to delay hydrogen uptake in αFe for a moment. However, the oxide layers do not work as a sufficient barrier for hydrogen uptake. Some of hydrogen dissolved in αFe normally diffuses and permeates through the bulk in the early stage of permeation. In a later stage, hydrogen permeation could be apparently stopped by the disappearance of concentration difference of tritium. Hydrogen partial pressure at the water/αFe interface could be ranged from 0.7 to 9.5 kPa around room temperature.

  9. Vacuum ultraviolet fluorine laser formation of corrosion-resistant iron thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoshi, Masayuki; Awaihara, Yuta; Yamashita, Tsugito; Inoue, Narumi

    2015-06-01

    Corrosion-, chemical-resistant pure iron thin films were formed by the vacuum ultraviolet fluorine laser of 157 nm wavelength induced surface modification of 30- to 50-nm-thick iron thin films. Transmission electron microscope and electron energy-loss spectroscopy were conducted to analyze structure and oxidation state of the thin modified layer of iron thin films. No rust was observed on the surface of the fluorine laser-irradiated iron thin films in air for 2 years. The samples also showed high chemical resistance to a HNO3 aqueous solution to fabricate a micropattern of pure iron thin films.

  10. Modeling pitting corrosion of iron exposed to alkaline solutions containing nitrate and nitrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lifeng

    2001-07-01

    Pitting corrosion could be extremely serious for dilute high-level radioactive waste stored or processed in carbon steel tanks at the Savannah River Site. In these solutions, nitrate is an aggressive ion with respect to pitting of carbon steel while nitrite can be used as an inhibitor. Excessive additions of nitrite increase the risk of generating unstable nitrogen compounds during waste processing, and insufficient additions of nitrite could increase the risk of corrosion-induced failure. Thus there are strong incentives to obtain a fundamental understanding of the role of nitrite in pitting corrosion prevention with these solution chemistries. In this dissertation, both a 1-D and a 2-D model are used to study the pitting mechanism as a function of nitrite/nitrate ratios. The 1-D model used BAND(J) to test a reaction mechanism for the passivation behavior by comparing the predicted Open Circuit Potential (OCP) with OCP data from experiments at different NO2-/NO3- ratio. The model predictions are compared with Cyclic Potentiodynamic Polarization (CPP) experiments. A 2-D model was developed for the propagation of a pit in iron by writing subroutines for finite element software of GAMBIT and FIDAP. Geometrically distributed anodic and cathodic reactions are assumed. The results show three partial explanations describing the inhibition influence of nitrite to iron corrosion: the competing reduction reaction of nitrate to nitrite, the formation of Fe(OH)+, and the function of the porous film. The current distributions and the effect of porosity of the film on pH are also explained. The calculation results also show that rate of pit growth decreases as the pit diameter increases until it reaches a constant value. The profile of the local current density on the pit wall is parabolic for small pits and it changes to a linear distribution for large pits. The model predicts that addition of nitrite will decrease the production of ferrous ions and those can prevent iron from

  11. Corrosion of iron, aluminum and copper-base alloys in glycols under simulated solar collector conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.A.; Diegle, R.B.

    1981-10-01

    The corrosion behavior of iron, aluminum and copperbase alloys was studied in uninhibited glycol solutions under conditions that simulate those found in non-concentrating solar collectors. It was found that only Type 444 stainless steel exhibited adequate corrosion resistance; there was no evidence of pitting, crevice corrosion, or galvanic attack, and general corrosion rates were low. The general corrosion rate of CDA 122 copper was high (greater than 200 ..mu..m/y) under some test conditions, but copper was resistant to pitting and crevice attack. General corrosion rates of the aluminum alloys (1100, 3003 and 6061) were low, but these alloys were susceptible to pitting and crevice attack. The propensity for pitting was greatest in the presence of chlorides but it also was severe in the absence of chlorides following long exposures. The onset of pitting of the aluminum alloys in chloride-free solutions was attributed to degradation of the glycols.

  12. Impact of iron-reducing bacteria on the corrosion rate of carbon steel under simulated geological disposal conditions.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Marta K; Schlegel, Michel L; Libert, Marie; Bildstein, Olivier

    2015-06-16

    The current projects for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste rely on underground burial and confinement by metallic envelopes that are susceptible to corrosion processes. The impact of microbial activity must be fully clarified in order to provide biological parameters for predictive reactive transport models. This study investigates the impact of hydrogenotrophic iron-reducing bacteria (Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1) on the corrosion rate of carbon steel under simulated geological disposal conditions by using a geochemical approach. It was found that corrosion damage changes mostly according to the experimental solution (i.e., chemical composition). Magnetite and vivianite were identified as the main corrosion products. In the presence of bacteria, the corrosion rate increased by a factor of 1.3 (according to weight loss analysis) to 1.8 (according to H2 measurements), and the detected amount of magnetite diminished. The mechanism likely to enhance corrosion is the destabilization and dissolution of the passivating magnetite layer by reduction of structural Fe(III) coupled to H2 oxidation.

  13. Intravenous iron-containing products: EMA procrastination.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    A European reassessment has led to identical changes in the summaries of product characteristics (SPCs) for all intravenous iron-containing products: the risk of serious adverse effects is now highlighted, underlining the fact that intravenous iron-containing products should only be used when the benefits clearly outweigh the harms. Unfortunately, iron dextran still remains on the market despite a higher risk of hypersensitivity reactions than with iron sucrose. PMID:25162093

  14. Intravenous iron-containing products: EMA procrastination.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    A European reassessment has led to identical changes in the summaries of product characteristics (SPCs) for all intravenous iron-containing products: the risk of serious adverse effects is now highlighted, underlining the fact that intravenous iron-containing products should only be used when the benefits clearly outweigh the harms. Unfortunately, iron dextran still remains on the market despite a higher risk of hypersensitivity reactions than with iron sucrose.

  15. An electrochemical and surface analysis study of the influence of phosphorus on the corrosion of iron in calcium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Baer, D.R.; Jones, R.H.; Engelhard, M.H.

    1990-10-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of metallic alloys including iron is strongly influenced by the presence of grain boundary impurities such as phosphorus. In this study to determine how phosphorus affects the corrosion of iron, electrochemical polarization methods were used in conjunction with surface analyses employing ultra-high vacuum transfer. Specifically, these methods were used to examine the corrosion of iron, iron/phosphorus alloys, and iron implanted with phosphorus in deaerated 55 wt % Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} solutions at 60{degree}C. 18 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Application of Mössbauer spectroscopy to the study of tannins inhibition of iron and steel corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaén, Juan A.; de Obaldía, J.; Rodríguez, M. V.

    2011-11-01

    The inhibitory effect of tannins was investigated using, among others, potentiodynamic polarizations and Mössbauer spectroscopy. These techniques confirmed that the nature, pH and concentration of tannic solution are of upmost importance in the inhibitory properties of the solutions. It is observed that at low tannin concentration or pH, both, hydrolizable and condensed tannins, effectively inhibit iron corrosion, due to the redox properties of tannins. At pH ≈ 0, Mössbauer spectra of the frozen aqueous solutions of iron(III) with the tannin solutions showed that iron is in the form of a monomeric species [Fe(H2O)6]3 + , without coordination with the functional hydroxyl groups of the tannins. The suspended material consisted of amorphous ferric oxide and oxyhydroxides, though with quebracho tannin partly resulted in complex formation and in an iron (II) species from a redox process. Other tannins, such as chestnut hydrolysable tannins, do not complex iron at this low pH. Tannins react at high concentrations or pH (3 and 5) to form insoluble blue-black amorphous complexes of mono-and bis-type tannate complexes, with a relative amount of the bis-ferric tannate generally increasing with pH. Some Fe2 + in the form of hydrated polymeric ferrous tannate could be obtained. At pH 7, a partially hydrolyzed ferric tannate complex was also formed. The latter two phases do not provide corrosion protection. Tannin solutions at natural pH react with electrodeposited iron films (approx. 6 μm) to obtain products consisting only on the catecholate mono-complex of ferric tannate. Some aspects of the mechanism of tannins protection against corrosion are discussed.

  17. OSCAR-Na: A New Code for Simulating Corrosion Product Contamination in SFR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Génin, J.-B.; Brissonneau, L.; Gilardi, T.

    2016-07-01

    A code named OSCAR-Na has been developed to calculate the mass transfer of corrosion products in the primary circuit of sodium fast reactors (SFR). It is based on a solution/precipitation model, including diffusion in the steel (enhanced under irradiation), diffusion through the sodium boundary layer, equilibrium concentration of each element, and velocity of the interface (bulk corrosion or deposition). The code uses a numerical method for solving the diffusion equation in the steel and the complete mass balance in sodium for all elements. Corrosion and deposition rates are mainly determined by the iron equilibrium concentration in sodium and its oxygen-enhanced dissolution rate. All parameters of the model have been assessed from a literature review, but iron solubility had to be adjusted. A simplified primary system description of PHENIX French SFR was able to assess the correct amounts and profiles of contamination on heat exchanger surfaces for the main radionuclides.

  18. Iron-based alloys with corrosion resistance to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, Krishnamurti

    1992-01-01

    An iron-based alloy with improved performance with exposure to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases with the alloy containing about 9-30 wt. % Cr and a small amount of Nb and/or Zr implanted on the surface of the alloy to diffuse a depth into the surface portion, with the alloy exhibiting corrosion resistance to the corrosive gases without bulk addition of Nb and/or Zr and without heat treatment at temperatures of 1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.

  19. Iron-based alloys with corrosion resistance to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases

    DOEpatents

    Natesan, K.

    1992-11-17

    An iron-based alloy with improved performance with exposure to oxygen-sulfur mixed gases with the alloy containing about 9--30 wt. % Cr and a small amount of Nb and/or Zr implanted on the surface of the alloy to diffuse a depth into the surface portion, with the alloy exhibiting corrosion resistance to the corrosive gases without bulk addition of Nb and/or Zr and without heat treatment at temperatures of 1000--1100 C. 7 figs.

  20. Marine sulfate-reducing bacteria cause serious corrosion of iron under electroconductive biogenic mineral crust.

    PubMed

    Enning, Dennis; Venzlaff, Hendrik; Garrelfs, Julia; Dinh, Hang T; Meyer, Volker; Mayrhofer, Karl; Hassel, Achim W; Stratmann, Martin; Widdel, Friedrich

    2012-07-01

    Iron (Fe(0) ) corrosion in anoxic environments (e.g. inside pipelines), a process entailing considerable economic costs, is largely influenced by microorganisms, in particular sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The process is characterized by formation of black crusts and metal pitting. The mechanism is usually explained by the corrosiveness of formed H(2) S, and scavenge of 'cathodic' H(2) from chemical reaction of Fe(0) with H(2) O. Here we studied peculiar marine SRB that grew lithotrophically with metallic iron as the only electron donor. They degraded up to 72% of iron coupons (10 mm × 10 mm × 1 mm) within five months, which is a technologically highly relevant corrosion rate (0.7 mm Fe(0) year(-1) ), while conventional H(2) -scavenging control strains were not corrosive. The black, hard mineral crust (FeS, FeCO(3) , Mg/CaCO(3) ) deposited on the corroding metal exhibited electrical conductivity (50 S m(-1) ). This was sufficient to explain the corrosion rate by electron flow from the metal (4Fe(0)  → 4Fe(2+)  + 8e(-) ) through semiconductive sulfides to the crust-colonizing cells reducing sulfate (8e(-)  + SO(4) (2-)  + 9H(+)  → HS(-)  + 4H(2) O). Hence, anaerobic microbial iron corrosion obviously bypasses H(2) rather than depends on it. SRB with such corrosive potential were revealed at naturally high numbers at a coastal marine sediment site. Iron coupons buried there were corroded and covered by the characteristic mineral crust. It is speculated that anaerobic biocorrosion is due to the promiscuous use of an ecophysiologically relevant catabolic trait for uptake of external electrons from abiotic or biotic sources in sediments.

  1. Marine sulfate-reducing bacteria cause serious corrosion of iron under electroconductive biogenic mineral crust

    PubMed Central

    Enning, Dennis; Venzlaff, Hendrik; Garrelfs, Julia; Dinh, Hang T; Meyer, Volker; Mayrhofer, Karl; Hassel, Achim W; Stratmann, Martin; Widdel, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    Iron (Fe0) corrosion in anoxic environments (e.g. inside pipelines), a process entailing considerable economic costs, is largely influenced by microorganisms, in particular sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The process is characterized by formation of black crusts and metal pitting. The mechanism is usually explained by the corrosiveness of formed H2S, and scavenge of ‘cathodic’ H2 from chemical reaction of Fe0 with H2O. Here we studied peculiar marine SRB that grew lithotrophically with metallic iron as the only electron donor. They degraded up to 72% of iron coupons (10 mm × 10 mm × 1 mm) within five months, which is a technologically highly relevant corrosion rate (0.7 mm Fe0 year−1), while conventional H2-scavenging control strains were not corrosive. The black, hard mineral crust (FeS, FeCO3, Mg/CaCO3) deposited on the corroding metal exhibited electrical conductivity (50 S m−1). This was sufficient to explain the corrosion rate by electron flow from the metal (4Fe0 → 4Fe2+ + 8e−) through semiconductive sulfides to the crust-colonizing cells reducing sulfate (8e− + SO42− + 9H+ → HS− + 4H2O). Hence, anaerobic microbial iron corrosion obviously bypasses H2 rather than depends on it. SRB with such corrosive potential were revealed at naturally high numbers at a coastal marine sediment site. Iron coupons buried there were corroded and covered by the characteristic mineral crust. It is speculated that anaerobic biocorrosion is due to the promiscuous use of an ecophysiologically relevant catabolic trait for uptake of external electrons from abiotic or biotic sources in sediments. PMID:22616633

  2. Corrosion resistance and electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation testing of some iron-base hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-11-01

    Hardfacing alloys are weld deposited on a base material to provide a wear resistant surface. Commercially available iron-base hardfacing alloys are being evaluated for replacement of cobalt-base alloys to reduce nuclear plant activation levels. Corrosion testing was used to evaluate the corrosion resistance of several iron-base hardfacing alloys in highly oxygenated environments. The corrosion test results indicate that iron-base hardfacing alloys in the as-deposited condition have acceptable corrosion resistance when the chromium to carbon ratio is greater than 4. Tristelle 5183, with a high niobium (stabilizer) content, did not follow this trend due to precipitation of niobium-rich carbides instead of chromium-rich carbides. This result indicates that iron-base hardfacing alloys containing high stabilizer contents may possess good corrosion resistance with Cr:C < 4. NOREM 02, NOREM 01, and NoCo-M2 hardfacing alloys had acceptable corrosion resistance in the as-deposited and 885 C/4 hour heat treated condition, but rusting from sensitization was observed in the 621 C/6 hour heat treated condition. The feasibility of using an Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation (EPR) test method, such as used for stainless steel, to detect sensitization in iron-base hardfacing alloys was evaluated. A single loop-EPR method was found to provide a more consistent measurement of sensitization than a double loop-EPR method. The high carbon content that is needed for a wear resistant hardfacing alloy produces a high volume fraction of chromium-rich carbides that are attacked during EPR testing. This results in inherently lower sensitivity for detection of a sensitized iron-base hardfacing alloy than stainless steel using conventional EPR test methods.

  3. In vitro and in vivo corrosion properties of new iron-manganese alloys designed for cardiovascular applications.

    PubMed

    Drynda, Andreas; Hassel, Thomas; Bach, Friedrich Wilhelm; Peuster, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    The principle of biodegradation for the production of temporary implant materials (e.g. stents) plays an important role in the treatment of congenital heart defects. In the last decade several attempts have been made with different alloy materials-mainly based on iron and magnesium. None of the currently available materials in this field have demonstrated satisfying results and have therefore not found entry into broad clinical practice. While magnesium or magnesium alloy systems corrode too fast, the corrosion rate of pure iron-stents is too slow for cardiovascular applications. In the last years FeMn alloy systems were developed with the idea that galvanic effects, caused by different electrochemical properties of Fe and Mn, would increase the corrosion rate. In vitro tests with alloys containing up to 30% Mn showed promising results in terms of biocompatibility. This study deals with the development of new FeMn alloy systems with lower Mn concentrations (FeMn 0.5 wt %, FeMn 2.7 wt %, FeMn 6.9 wt %) to avoid Mn toxicity. Our results show, that these alloys exhibit good mechanical features as well as suitable in vitro biocompatibility and corrosion properties. In contrast, the evaluation of these alloys in a mouse model led to unexpected results-even after 9 months no significant corrosion was detectable. Preliminary SEM investigations showed that passivation layers (FeMn phosphates) might be the reason for corrosion resistance. If this can be proved in further experiments, strategies to prevent or dissolve those layers need to be developed to expedite the in vivo corrosion of FeMn alloys.

  4. EFFECT OF BACTERIAL SULFATE REDUCTION ON IRON-CORROSION SCALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron-sulfur geochemistry is important in many natural and engineered environments including drinking water systems. In the anaerobic environment beneath scales of corroding iron drinking water distribution system pipes, sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) produce sulfide from natura...

  5. Development and Testing of a Linear Polarization Resistance Corrosion Rate Probe for Ductile Iron Pipe (Web Report 4361)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The North American water and wastewater community has hundreds of millions of feet of ductile iron pipe in service. Only a portion of the inventory has any form of external corrosion control. Ductile iron pipe, in certain environments, is subject to external corrosion.Linear Pola...

  6. Effect of High Temperature Aging on the Corrosion Resistance of Iron Based Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S D; Haslam, J J; Farmer, J C; Rebak, R B

    2007-08-10

    Iron-based amorphous alloys can be more resistant to corrosion than polycrystalline materials of similar compositions. However, when the amorphous alloys are exposed to high temperatures they may recrystallize (or devitrify) thus losing their resistance to corrosion. Four different types of amorphous alloys melt spun ribbon specimens were exposed to several temperatures for short periods of time. The resulting corrosion resistance was evaluated in seawater at 90 C and compared with the as-prepared ribbons. Results show that the amorphous alloys can be exposed to 600 C for 1-hr. without losing the corrosion resistance; however, when the ribbons were exposed at 800 C for 1-hr. their localized corrosion resistance decreased significantly.

  7. Corrosion Characterization of Iron-Based High-Performance Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Day, S D; Branagan, D J; Blue, C A; Rivard, J K; Aprigliano, L F; Yang, N; Perepezko, J H; Beardsley, M B

    2005-03-21

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. One of these compositions, SAM1651, is discussed in detail to illustrate the promise of this general class of materials.

  8. [Effect of biofilm on the corrosion and fouling of cast iron pipe for water supply].

    PubMed

    Teng, Fei; Guan, Yun-Tao; Li, Sha-Sha; Zhu, Wan-Peng

    2009-02-15

    The crystalline phase and the element composition in the scales on cast iron pipe for drinking water was identified with XRD and XPS respectively to investigate the effect of biofilm existence on the corrosion and fouling of cast iron pipe. The total iron concentration in the water phase was measured simultaneously. The results showed that on 0-7 d the total iron concentration was higher in the water phase of the group with biofilm growth, but on 15-30 d it was higher in the water phase of the control without biofilm growth. The major peak of XRD patterns for the scales with biofilm growth was characterized as Fe oxide, while for the scales in the control it was always characterized as CaCO3. As presented by XPS atomic ratio, the Ca atomic percentage in the scales with biofilm growth was lower than that in the scales in the control, which might be contributed to the Ca2+ absorption by extracellular polymeric substances or Ca2+ consumption by microorganism growth. In comparison with that in the scales in the control, the iron atomic percentage in the scales with biofilm growth was higher on 7 d, while lower after 7 d. It can be concluded that on 0-7 d the existence of biofilm could promote the corrosion of cast iron pipe while inhibit corrosion after 7 d. The variance of major peak of XRD pattern and XPS atomic ratio indicated that biofilm had important effect on the configuration and composition of the scales of cast iron pipe. The corrosion inhibition of biofilm thus provided a new pathway to control the corrosion of metal pipes in drinking water distribution system. PMID:19402487

  9. Effects of Copper and Austempering on Corrosion Behavior of Ductile Iron in 3.5 Pct Sodium Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Cheng-Hsun; Lin, Kuan-Ting

    2013-10-01

    Although alloying and heat treatments are common industrial practices to obtain ductile irons with desired mechanical properties, related information on how the two practices affect corrosion behavior is scarce. In this study, two ductile irons—with and without 1 wt pct copper addition—were austempered to obtain austempered ductile irons (ADIs). Polarization tests and salt spray tests were conducted to explore how both copper-alloying and austempering heat treatments influenced the corrosion behavior of ductile irons. The results showed that the corrosion resistance of 1 wt pct copper-alloyed ductile iron was better than that of the unalloyed one, while ADI had improved corrosion resistance compared with the as-cast. In particular, the ductile iron combined with the copper-alloying and austempering treatments increased the corrosion inhibition efficiency up to 84 pct as tested in 3.5 wt pct NaCl solution.

  10. Effects of the Exposure to Corrosive Salts on the Frictional Behavior of Gray Cast Iron and a Titanium-Based Metal Matrix Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Truhan, Jr., John J; Kenik, Edward A

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of increasingly aggressive road-deicing chemicals has created significant and costly corrosion problems for the trucking industry. From a tribological perspective, corrosion of the sliding surfaces of brakes after exposure to road salts can create oxide scales on the surfaces that affect friction. This paper describes experiments on the effects of exposure to sodium chloride and magnesium chloride sprays on the transient frictional behavior of cast iron and a titanium-based composite sliding against a commercial brake lining material. Corrosion scales on cast iron initially act as abrasive third-bodies, then they become crushed, spread out, and behave as a solid lubricant. The composition and subsurface microstructures of the corrosion products on the cast iron were analyzed. Owing to its greater corrosion resistance, the titanium composite remained scale-free and its frictional response was markedly different. No corrosion scales were formed on the titanium composite after aggressive exposure to salts; however, a reduction in friction was still observed. Unlike the crystalline sodium chloride deposits that tended to remain dry, hygroscopic magnesium chloride deposits absorbed ambient moisture from the air, liquefied, and retained a persistent lubricating effect on the titanium surfaces.

  11. THE EFFECT OF SMECTITE ON THE CORROSION OF IRON METAL

    SciTech Connect

    Balko, Barbara A.; Bosse, Stephanie A.; Cade, Anne E.; Jones-Landry, Elise F.; Amonette, James E.; Daschbach, John L.

    2012-04-24

    The combination of zero-valent iron and a clay-type amendment is often observed to have a synergistic effect on the rate of reduction reactions. In this paper, electrochemical techniques are used to determine the mechanism of interaction between the iron and smectite clay minerals. Iron electrodes coated with an evaporated smectite suspension (clay-modified iron electrodes, CMIEs) were prepared using five different smectites: SAz-1, SWa-1, STx-1, SWy-1, and SHCa-1. All the smectites were exchanged with Na+ and one sample of SWy-1 was also exchanged with Mg2+. Potentiodynamic potential scans and cyclic voltammograms were taken using the CMIEs and uncoated but passivated iron electrodes. These electrochemical experiments, along with measurements of the amount of Fe2+ and Fe3+ sorbed in the smectite coating, suggested that the smectite removed the passive layer of the underlying iron electrode during the evaporation process. Cyclic voltammograms taken after the CMIEs were biased at the active-passive transition potential for varying amounts of time suggested that the smectite limited growth of a passive layer, preventing passivation. These results are attributed to the Broensted acidity of the smectite as well as to its ability to sorb iron cations. Oxides that did form on the surface of the iron in the presence of the smectite when it was biased anodically seemed to be different than those that form on the surface of an uncoated iron electrode under otherwise similar conditions; this difference suggested that the smectite reacted with the Fe2+ formed from the oxidation of the underlying iron. No significant correlation could be found between the ability of the smectite to remove the iron passive film and the smectite type. The results have implications for the mixing of sediments and iron particles in permeable reactive barriers, underground storage of radioactive waste in steel canisters, and the use of smectite supports in preventing aggregation of nano-sized zero

  12. Corrosion and environmental-mechanical characterization of iron-base nuclear waste package structural barrier materials. Annual report, FY 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Westerman, R.E.; Haberman, J.H.; Pitman, S.G.; Pulsipher, B.A.; Sigalla, L.A.

    1986-03-01

    Disposal of high-level nuclear waste in deep underground repositories may require the development of waste packages that will keep the radioisotopes contained for up to 1000 y. A number of iron-base materials are being considered for the structural barrier members of waste packages. Their uniform and nonuniform (pitting and intergranular) corrosion behavior and their resistance to stress-corrosion cracking in aqueous environments relevant to salt media are under study at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The purpose of the work is to provide data for a materials degradation model that can ultimately be used to predict the effective lifetime of a waste package overpack in the actual repository environment. The corrosion behavior of the candidate materials was investigated in simulated intrusion brine (essentially NaCl) in flowing autoclave tests at 150/sup 0/C, and in combinations of intrusion/inclusion (high-Mg) brine environments in moist salt tests, also at 150/sup 0/C. Studies utilizing a /sup 60/Co irradiation facility were performed to determine the corrosion resistance of the candidate materials to products of brine radiolysis at dose rates of 2 x 10/sup 3/ and 1 x 10/sup 5/ rad/h and a temperature of 150/sup 0/C. These irradiation-corrosion tests were ''overtests,'' as the irradiation intensities employed were 10 to 1000 times as high as those expected at the surface of a thick-walled waste package. With the exception of the high general corrosion rates found in the tests using moist salt containing high-Mg brines, the ferrous materials exhibited a degree of corrosion resistance that indicates a potentially satisfactory application to waste package structural barrier members in a salt repository environment.

  13. ALKALINITY, PH, AND COPPER CORROSION BY-PRODUCT RELEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contrary to expectations, higher bicarbonate concentrations exacerbate copper corrosion rates and by-product release. In fact, as illustrated by monitoring experiences of large utilities and by laboratory data, the concentration of copper corrosion by-products in drinking water i...

  14. Microelectrodes Based investigation of the Impacts of Water Chemistry on Copper and Iron Corrosion

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of bulk drinking water quality on copper and iron pipe corrosion has been extensively studied. Despite past research, many have argued that bulk water quality does not necessarily reflect water quality near the water-metal interface and that such knowledge is necessary...

  15. Oxidation kinetics of reaction products formed in uranium metal corrosion.

    SciTech Connect

    Totemeier, T. C.

    1998-04-22

    The oxidation behavior of uranium metal ZPPR fuel corrosion products in environments of Ar-4%O{sub 2} and Ar-20%O{sub 2} were studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). These tests were performed to extend earlier work in this area specifically, to assess plate-to-plate variations in corrosion product properties and the effect of oxygen concentration on oxidation behavior. The corrosion products from two relatively severely corroded plates were similar, while the products from a relatively intact plate were not reactive. Oxygen concentration strongly affected the burning rate of reactive products, but had little effect on low-temperature oxidation rates.

  16. Fe sub 3 Al-type iron aluminides: Aqueous corrosion properties in a range of electrolytes and slow-strain-rate ductilities during aqueous corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, R.A.; Kim, J.G. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    The Fe{sub 3}Al-type iron aluminides have undergone continued development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for enhancement of mechanical and corrosion properties. Improved alloys and thermomechanical processing methods have evolved. The overall purpose of the project herein described was to evaluate the aqueous corrosion properties of the most recent alloy compositions in a wide range of possibly-aggressive solutions and under several different types of corrosion-test conditions. The work supplements previous aqueous-corrosion studies on iron aluminides by the present authors. Four stages of this one-year aqueous-corrosion investigation are described. First the corrosion properties of selected iron aluminides were evaluated by means of electrochemical tests and longer-time immersion tests in a range of acidic, basic and chloride solutions. Theses tests were performed under non-crevice conditions, i.e. the specimens were not designed to contain crevice geometries. Second, the iron-aluminide alloy that proved most resistance to chloride-induced localized corrosion under non-crevice conditions was further evaluated under more-severe crevice conditions by electrochemical and immersion testing. Third, in order to study the relative roles of Fe, Al, Cr and Mo in the formation of passive films, the chemical compositions of passive films were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). And fourth, in order to study aqueous-corrosion effects on the ductilities of iron aluminides as related to hydrogen embrittlement and/or stress-corrosion cracking, slow-strain-rate corrosion (SSRC) tests were conducted over a range of electrochemical potentials.

  17. Fe{sub 3}Al-type iron aluminides: Aqueous corrosion properties in a range of electrolytes and slow-strain-rate ductilities during aqueous corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, R.A.; Kim, J.G.

    1992-08-01

    The Fe{sub 3}Al-type iron aluminides have undergone continued development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for enhancement of mechanical and corrosion properties. Improved alloys and thermomechanical processing methods have evolved. The overall purpose of the project herein described was to evaluate the aqueous corrosion properties of the most recent alloy compositions in a wide range of possibly-aggressive solutions and under several different types of corrosion-test conditions. The work supplements previous aqueous-corrosion studies on iron aluminides by the present authors. Four stages of this one-year aqueous-corrosion investigation are described. First the corrosion properties of selected iron aluminides were evaluated by means of electrochemical tests and longer-time immersion tests in a range of acidic, basic and chloride solutions. Theses tests were performed under non-crevice conditions, i.e. the specimens were not designed to contain crevice geometries. Second, the iron-aluminide alloy that proved most resistance to chloride-induced localized corrosion under non-crevice conditions was further evaluated under more-severe crevice conditions by electrochemical and immersion testing. Third, in order to study the relative roles of Fe, Al, Cr and Mo in the formation of passive films, the chemical compositions of passive films were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). And fourth, in order to study aqueous-corrosion effects on the ductilities of iron aluminides as related to hydrogen embrittlement and/or stress-corrosion cracking, slow-strain-rate corrosion (SSRC) tests were conducted over a range of electrochemical potentials.

  18. Analysis of ZVI corrosion products and their functions in the combined ZVI and anaerobic sludge system.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liang; Gao, Kaituo; Jin, Jie; Lin, Haizhuan; Xu, Xiangyang

    2014-11-01

    The zero-valent iron (ZVI) corrosion products and their functions were investigated in the combined ZVI and anaerobic sludge system. Results showed that ZVI corrosion occurred, and the reductive transformation and dechlorination of p-chloronitrobenzene (p-ClNB) by the anaerobic sludge were enhanced. In the combined systems with different types of ZVIs and mass ratios of anaerobic sludge to ZVI, a considerable amount of suspended iron compounds was produced and coated onto the microbial cells. However, the microbial cellular structure was damaged, and the p-ClNB reductive transformation was affected adversely after the long-term presence of nanoscale ZVI (NZVI) or reduced ZVI (RZVI) with a high concentration of 5 g L(-1). The oxidized products of FeOOH and Fe3O4 were found on the surface of ZVI, which are speculated to act as electron mediators and consequently facilitate the utilization of electron donors by the anaerobic microbes.

  19. Erosion-corrosion for carbon steel in sweet production with sand: Modeling and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mutahar, Faisal M.

    In the oil and gas production industry, carbon steel tubing and piping are susceptible to erosion-corrosion damage due to the erosive and corrosive nature of the flow. The combined effect of sand erosion and corrosion can be very significant. One form of erosion-corrosion of carbon steels occurs when impinging sand particles remove part or all of a protective iron carbonate (FeCO3) scale allowing corrosion rates to increase to bare metal rates. The role of a FeCO3 layer in reducing corrosion rates in sand-free environments has been studied by many investigators. However, the protection offered by FeCO3 scale when sand is produced is not well defined. A mechanistic approach for predicting metal loss due to sand erosion and CO2 corrosion of carbon steel was developed in the research presented in this thesis. The main contributions of the research were to develop: (1) a mechanistic model of the competition between FeCO 3 scale growth by precipitation and scale removal by erosion; (2) a procedure for predicting erosion-corrosion rates in oil and gas production and transportation systems; and, (3) a computer program to facilitate the prediction of the erosion-corrosion rates. Models from the literature for quantifying iron carbonate scale precipitation and growth rates, and diffusion rates of cathodic reactants and corrosion product species through iron carbonate scale were adapted to this purpose. The solid particle erosion resistance of FeCO3 scale produced under a range of environmental and flow conditions was characterized by direct impingement experiments. Dry and wet FeCO3 scales were subjected to direct impingement by sand at various impingement angles. Scales were pre-formed in a flow loop at 150-200°F (65-93°C), from 6.1-6.5 pH, and 2.4 bar CO2 pressure and then removed from the flow loop for direct impingement testing. The erosion pattern of the scale was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Specimens with iron carbonate scale were partially

  20. Complementary Microorganisms in Highly Corrosive Biofilms from an Offshore Oil Production Facility

    PubMed Central

    Alsop, Eric B.; Chambers, Brian; Lomans, Bartholomeus P.; Head, Ian M.; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Offshore oil production facilities are frequently victims of internal piping corrosion, potentially leading to human and environmental risks and significant economic losses. Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) is believed to be an important factor in this major problem for the petroleum industry. However, knowledge of the microbial communities and metabolic processes leading to corrosion is still limited. Therefore, the microbial communities from three anaerobic biofilms recovered from the inside of a steel pipe exhibiting high corrosion rates, iron oxide deposits, and substantial amounts of sulfur, which are characteristic of MIC, were analyzed in detail. Bacterial and archaeal community structures were investigated by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis, multigenic (16S rRNA and functional genes) high-throughput Illumina MiSeq sequencing, and quantitative PCR analysis. The microbial community analysis indicated that bacteria, particularly Desulfovibrio species, dominated the biofilm microbial communities. However, other bacteria, such as Pelobacter, Pseudomonas, and Geotoga, as well as various methanogenic archaea, previously detected in oil facilities were also detected. The microbial taxa and functional genes identified suggested that the biofilm communities harbored the potential for a number of different but complementary metabolic processes and that MIC in oil facilities likely involves a range of microbial metabolisms such as sulfate, iron, and elemental sulfur reduction. Furthermore, extreme corrosion leading to leakage and exposure of the biofilms to the external environment modify the microbial community structure by promoting the growth of aerobic hydrocarbon-degrading organisms. PMID:26896143

  1. Complementary Microorganisms in Highly Corrosive Biofilms from an Offshore Oil Production Facility.

    PubMed

    Vigneron, Adrien; Alsop, Eric B; Chambers, Brian; Lomans, Bartholomeus P; Head, Ian M; Tsesmetzis, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Offshore oil production facilities are frequently victims of internal piping corrosion, potentially leading to human and environmental risks and significant economic losses. Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) is believed to be an important factor in this major problem for the petroleum industry. However, knowledge of the microbial communities and metabolic processes leading to corrosion is still limited. Therefore, the microbial communities from three anaerobic biofilms recovered from the inside of a steel pipe exhibiting high corrosion rates, iron oxide deposits, and substantial amounts of sulfur, which are characteristic of MIC, were analyzed in detail. Bacterial and archaeal community structures were investigated by automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis, multigenic (16S rRNA and functional genes) high-throughput Illumina MiSeq sequencing, and quantitative PCR analysis. The microbial community analysis indicated that bacteria, particularly Desulfovibrio species, dominated the biofilm microbial communities. However, other bacteria, such as Pelobacter, Pseudomonas, and Geotoga, as well as various methanogenic archaea, previously detected in oil facilities were also detected. The microbial taxa and functional genes identified suggested that the biofilm communities harbored the potential for a number of different but complementary metabolic processes and that MIC in oil facilities likely involves a range of microbial metabolisms such as sulfate, iron, and elemental sulfur reduction. Furthermore, extreme corrosion leading to leakage and exposure of the biofilms to the external environment modify the microbial community structure by promoting the growth of aerobic hydrocarbon-degrading organisms. PMID:26896143

  2. Correlation Of 2-Chlorobiphenyl Dechlorination By Fe/Pd With Iron Corrosion At Different pH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of 2-chlorobiphenyl dechlorination by palladized iron (Fe/Pd) decreased with increasing pH until pH > 12.5. Iron corrosion potential (Ec) and current (jc), obtained from polarization curves of a rotating disk electrode of iron, followed the Tafel e...

  3. Physicochemical studies of glucose, gellan gum, and hydroxypropyl cellulose--inhibition of cast iron corrosion.

    PubMed

    Rajeswari, Velayutham; Kesavan, Devarayan; Gopiraman, Mayakrishnan; Viswanathamurthi, Periasamy

    2013-06-01

    Glucose, gellan gum, and hydroxypropyl cellulose were studied against the acid corrosion of cast iron by means of weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, and AC impedance spectroscopy techniques. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increasing concentration of the inhibitors. The effect of immersion time and temperature were also studied. The addition of potassium iodide to the corrosion-inhibition system showed both antagonism and synergism toward inhibition efficiency. Polarization studies revealed the mixed-type inhibiting nature of the carbohydrates. The adsorption of inhibitors on the cast iron surface obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm model, both in presence and absence of KI. Physical interaction between the inhibitor molecules and the iron surface was suggested by the thermochemical parameters, rather than chemical interaction.

  4. Evaluation of steel corrosion products in tropical climates

    SciTech Connect

    Rincon, A.; Rincon, O.T. de; Haces, C.; Furet, N.R.; Corvo, F.

    1997-11-01

    Phase variations occurring in corrosion products obtained in steels exposed to different zones of tropical climate in Cuba and Venezuela were determined to establish their relationship to corrosion phenomena. Steel corrosion products were obtained at four test stations in both countries with marine, industrial, and rural characteristics. Phase composition was determined using x-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and Moessbauer spectroscopy. In the rural climate of both countries, the predominant phase was lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH), which was in agreement with reported corrosion rates. In the marine environments, corrosion products varied in composition. In Adicora, Venezuela, akaganeite ({beta}-FeOOH) was found, but in Cuba, this phase was nonexistent. Results were discussed in light of the contamination present and meteorological parameters recorded in the test zones.

  5. Strontium concentrations in corrosion products from residential drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Gerke, Tammie L; Little, Brenda J; Luxton, Todd P; Scheckel, Kirk G; Maynard, J Barry

    2013-05-21

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) will require some U.S. drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) to monitor nonradioactive strontium (Sr(2+)) in drinking water in 2013. Iron corrosion products from four DWDS were examined to assess the potential for Sr(2+) binding and release. Average Sr(2+) concentrations in the outermost layer of the corrosion products ranged from 3 to 54 mg kg(-1) and the Sr(2+) drinking water concentrations were all ≤0.3 mg L(-1). Micro-X-ray adsorption near edge structure spectroscopy and linear combination fitting determined that Sr(2+) was principally associated with CaCO3. Sr(2+) was also detected as a surface complex associated with α-FeOOH. Iron particulates deposited on a filter inside a home had an average Sr(2+) concentration of 40.3 mg kg(-1) and the associated drinking water at a tap was 210 μg L(-1). The data suggest that elevated Sr(2+) concentrations may be associated with iron corrosion products that, if disturbed, could increase Sr(2+) concentrations above the 0.3 μg L(-1) US EPA reporting threshold. Disassociation of very small particulates could result in drinking water Sr(2+) concentrations that exceed the US EPA health reference limit (4.20 mg kg(-1) body weight).

  6. Characterization of biofilm and corrosion of cast iron pipes in drinking water distribution system with UV/Cl2 disinfection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Wang, Haibo; Li, Xiaoxiao; Hu, Chun; Yang, Min; Qu, Jiuhui

    2014-09-01

    The effect of UV/Cl2 disinfection on the biofilm and corrosion of cast iron pipes in drinking water distribution system were studied using annular reactors (ARs). Passivation occurred more rapidly in the AR with UV/Cl2 than in the one with Cl2 alone, decreasing iron release for higher corrosivity of water. Based on functional gene, pyrosequencing assays and principal component analysis, UV disinfection not only reduced the required initial chlorine dose, but also enhanced denitrifying functional bacteria advantage in the biofilm of corrosion scales. The nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Dechloromonas exhibited the greatest corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4 in the AR with UV/Cl2, while the rhizobia Bradyrhizobium and Rhizobium, and the NRB Sphingomonas, Brucella producing siderophores had weaker corrosion-inhibition effect by capturing iron in the AR with Cl2. These results indicated that the microbial redox cycling of iron was possibly responsible for higher corrosion inhibition and lower effect of water Larson-Skold Index (LI) changes on corrosion. This finding could be applied toward the control of water quality in drinking water distribution systems.

  7. Neutrophilic iron-oxidizing "zetaproteobacteria" and mild steel corrosion in nearshore marine environments.

    PubMed

    McBeth, Joyce M; Little, Brenda J; Ray, Richard I; Farrar, Katherine M; Emerson, David

    2011-02-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of mild steel in seawater is an expensive and enduring problem. Little attention has been paid to the role of neutrophilic, lithotrophic, iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) in MIC. The goal of this study was to determine if marine FeOB related to Mariprofundus are involved in this process. To examine this, field incubations and laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted. Mild steel samples incubated in nearshore environments were colonized by marine FeOB, as evidenced by the presence of helical iron-encrusted stalks diagnostic of the FeOB Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, a member of the candidate class "Zetaproteobacteria." Furthermore, Mariprofundus-like cells were enriched from MIC biofilms. The presence of Zetaproteobacteria was confirmed using a Zetaproteobacteria-specific small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene primer set to amplify sequences related to M. ferrooxydans from both enrichments and in situ samples of MIC biofilms. Temporal in situ incubation studies showed a qualitative increase in stalk distribution on mild steel, suggesting progressive colonization by stalk-forming FeOB. We also isolated a novel FeOB, designated Mariprofundus sp. strain GSB2, from an iron oxide mat in a salt marsh. Strain GSB2 enhanced uniform corrosion from mild steel in laboratory microcosm experiments conducted over 4 days. Iron concentrations (including precipitates) in the medium were used as a measure of corrosion. The corrosion in biotic samples (7.4 ± 0.1 mM) was significantly higher than that in abiotic controls (5.0 ± 0.1 mM). These results have important implications for the role of FeOB in corrosion of steel in nearshore and estuarine environments. In addition, this work shows that the global distribution of Zetaproteobacteria is far greater than previously thought.

  8. Metallic plate corrosion and uptake of corrosion products by nafion in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Bozzini, Benedetto; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Kaulich, Burkhard; Kiskinova, Maya; Prasciolu, Mauro; Sgura, Ivonne

    2010-07-19

    Nafion contamination by ferrous-alloy corrosion products, resulting in dramatic drops of the Ohmic potential, is a suspected major failure mode of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells that make use of metallic bipolar plates. This study demonstrates the potential of scanning transmission X-ray microscopy combined with X-ray absorption and fluorescence microspectroscopy for exploring corrosion processes of Ni and Fe electrodes in contact with a hydrated Nafion film in a thin-layer cell. The imaged morphology changes of the Ni and Fe electrodes and surrounding Nafion film that result from relevant electrochemical processes are correlated to the spatial distribution, local concentration, and chemical state of Fe and Ni species. The X-ray fluorescence maps and absorption spectra, sampled at different locations, show diffusion of corrosion products within the Nafion film only in the case of the Fe electrodes, whereas the Ni electrodes appear corrosion resistant. PMID:20564283

  9. Characterization of cathodic corrosion products in the Ca/CaCrO/sub 4/ thermal battery

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, R.A.; Reinhardt, F.W.; Venturini, E.L.; Rogers, J.W. Jr.; Cathey, W.N.

    1985-05-01

    Using thermal analysis techniques, we investigated the corrosion process resulting from the reaction of iron, nickel, and stainless steel (used as current collectors in Ca/CaCrO/sub 4/ thermal batteries) with CaCrO/sub 4/ dissolved in LiCl-KCl eutectic. The reaction product for iron was synthesized in bulk external to the battery and was characterized by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, static magnetization, and electrical conductivity. This characterization provides a better understanding of the cathodic corrosion processes that occur in the Ca/CaCrO/sub 4/ thermal battery, and how the properties of the reaction layer at the catholyte-current collector interface influence battery performance.

  10. Characterization of cathodic corrosion products in the Ca/CaCrO4 thermal battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidotti, R. A.; Reinhardt, F. W.; Venturini, E. L.; Rogers, J. W., Jr.; Cathey, W. N.

    1985-05-01

    Using thermal analysis techniques, the corrosion process resulting from the reaction of iron, nickel, and stainless steel (used as current collectors in Ca/CaCrO4 thermal batteries) with CaCrO4 dissolved in LiCl-KCl eutectic was investigated. The reaction product for iron was synthesized in bulk external to the battery and was characterized by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, static magnetization, and electrical conductivity. This characterization provides a better understanding of the cathodic corrosion processes that occur in the Ca/CaCrO4 thermal battery, and how the properties of the reaction layer at the catholyte-current collector interface influence battery performance.

  11. Long-Term Corrosion Processes of Iron and Steel Shipwrecks in the Marine Environment: A Review of Current Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, James D.

    2015-12-01

    Methodologies for examining the corrosion behavior of iron and steel shipwrecks have steadily progressed since the 1970s, but the analytical techniques utilized since then are comparatively site-specific, and the overall quantity of data available for independent review is seemingly limited. Laudable advancements in the fields of maritime archaeology, oceanography, and corrosion science support the determination that microbiologically-influenced corrosion primarily controls the degradation rates of iron and steel shipwrecks over archaeological timescales. Future in situ analyses performed on these shipwreck sites need to consider the overreaching impacts that microbiological metabolism have on long-term corrosion rates. The corrosion behavior of an iron or steel archaeological shipwreck site should also not be readily applied to similar sites or to other wrecked vessels that are in close proximity.

  12. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metals: The Effects of Composition, Structure and Environment on Corrosion Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Choi, J S; Haslam, J; Lian, T; Day, S; Yang, N; Blue, C; Peters, W; Bayles, R; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Lavernia, E; Ajdelsztajn, A; Grave, O; Aprigliano, L; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J; Branagan, D J; Beardsley, B

    2006-04-11

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative thermal phase stability, microstructure, mechanical properties, damage tolerance, and corrosion resistance. Some alloy additions are known to promote glass formation and to lower the critical cooling rate [F. Guo, S. J. Poon, Applied Physics Letters, 83 (13) 2575-2577, 2003]. Other elements are known to enhance the corrosion resistance of conventional stainless steels and nickel-based alloys [A. I. Asphahani, Materials Performance, Vol. 19, No. 12, pp. 33-43, 1980] and have been found to provide similar benefits to iron-based amorphous metals. Many of these materials can be cast as relatively thick ingots, or applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. A wide variety of thermal spray processes have been developed by industry, and can be used to apply these new materials as coatings. Any of these can be used for the deposition of the formulations discussed here, with varying degrees of residual porosity and crystalline structure. Thick protective coatings have now been made that are fully dense and completely amorphous in the as-sprayed condition. An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Project will be given, with particular emphasis on the corrosion resistance of several different types of iron-based amorphous metals in various environments of interest. The salt fog test has been used to compare the performance of various wrought alloys, melt-spun ribbons, arc-melted drop-cast ingots, and thermal-spray coatings for their susceptibility to corrosion in marine environments. Electrochemical tests have also been performed in seawater. Spontaneous breakdown of the passive film and localized corrosion require that the open-circuit corrosion potential exceed the critical potential. The resistance to localized corrosion is seawater has been

  13. An energetic evaluation of dissolution corrosion capabilities of liquid metals on iron surface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yichun; Song, Chi; Zhang, Yange; Liu, C S; Pan, B C; Wang, Zhiguang

    2014-08-21

    Using first principles calculations, dissolution corrosion of liquid metals on iron surfaces has been investigated by calculating adsorption energies of metal atoms in the liquid phase on the surface and escape energies of surface Fe atoms. The adsorption energies, characterizing the stability of the adsorbed atoms on the investigated surfaces, show that Bi is more stable than Pb and Au. The escape energies, representing the energy required for an Fe atom to escape from the surface, show that adsorbed Pb makes surface Fe atoms escape more easily than Bi and Au. The combination of adsorption energy and escape energy indicates that the corrosion capabilities of liquid metals decrease in the order Bi > Pb > Au. This is further proved by the investigation of surface properties, such as inter-layer distance, magnetic momentum and charge density difference. The results are consistent with experimental results that Fe can be corroded more severely in Bi than in Pb. In the case of liquid alloys, chemical proportions of compositions are incorporated to evaluate the corrosion capabilities of Pb-Bi eutectic (LBE) and Pb-Au eutectic (LGE). It is found that LBE has more severe corrosion capability than LGE. The energetic calculation is further developed in evaluating the effect of alloying elements in popular steels on the dissolution corrosion. The results indicate that Si, V, Nb and Mo may mitigate the dissolution corrosion of martensite steels in liquid Pb, Bi and Au.

  14. Corrosion Testing of Carbon Steel in Oxalic Acid that Contains Dissolved Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, Bruce J.; Mickalonis, John I.; Subramanian, Karthik H.

    2012-10-11

    Radioactive liquid waste has been stored in underground carbon steel tanks for nearly 60 years at the Savannah River Site. The site is currently in the process of removing the waste from these tanks in order to place it into vitrified, stable state for longer term storage. The last stage in the removal sequence is a chemical cleaning step that breaks up and dissolves metal oxide solids that cannot be easily pumped out of the tank. Oxalic acid (OA) will be used to chemically clean the tanks after waste retrieval is completed. The waste tanks at SRS were constructed from carbon steel materials and thus are vulnerable to corrosion in acidic media. In addition to structural impacts, the impact of corrosion on the hydrogen generated during the process must be assessed. Electrochemical and coupon immersion tests were used to investigate the corrosion mechanism at anticipated process conditions. The testing showed that the corrosion rates were dependent upon the reduction of the iron species that had dissolved in solution. Initial corrosion rates were elevated due to the reduction of the ferric species to ferrous species. At later times, as the ferric species depleted, the corrosion rate decreased. On the other hand, the hydrogen evolution reaction became more dominant.

  15. COUPLED IRON CORROSION AND CHROMATE REDUCTION: MECHANISMS FOR SUBSURFACE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reduction of chromium from the Cr(VI) to the Cr- (Ill) state by the presence of elemental, or zero-oxidation-state, iron metal was studied to evaluate the feasibility of such a process for subsurface chromate remediation. Reactions were studied in systems of natural aquifer m...

  16. Development of weldable, corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, P.J.; Goodwin, G.M.; Wang, X.L.

    1995-05-01

    Corrosion-resistant, weldable FeAl alloys have been developed with improved high-temperature strength industrial applications. Previous processing difficulties with these alloys led to their evaluation as weld-overlay claddings on conventional structural steels to take advantage of their good properties now. Simplified and better processing methods for monolithic FeAl components are also currently being developed so that components for industrial testing can be made. Other avenues for producing FeAl coatings are currently being explored. Neutron scattering experiments residual stress distributions in the FeAl weld-overlay cladding began in FY 1993 and continued this year.

  17. Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Development Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Choi, J; Saw, C; Haslem, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D'Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

    2009-03-16

    An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal make this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of these iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional

  18. Corrosion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slabaugh, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    Presents some materials for use in demonstration and experimentation of corrosion processes, including corrosion stimulation and inhibition. Indicates that basic concepts of electrochemistry, crystal structure, and kinetics can be extended to practical chemistry through corrosion explanation. (CC)

  19. Superhydrophobic surface fabricated on iron substrate by black chromium electrodeposition and its corrosion resistance property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Feng, Haitao; Lin, Feng; Wang, Yabin; Wang, Liping; Dong, Yaping; Li, Wu

    2016-08-01

    The fabrication of superhydrophobic surface on iron substrate is carried out through 20 min black chromium electrodeposition, followed by immersing in 0.05 M ethanolic stearic acid solution for 12 h. The resultant superhydrophobic complex film is characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), disperse Spectrometer (EDS), atomic force microscope (AFM), water contact angle (CA), sliding angle (SA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS), and its corrosion resistance property is measured with cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that the fabricated superhydrophobic film has excellent water repellency (CA, 158.8°; SA, 2.1°) and significantly high corrosion resistance (1.31 × 106 Ω cm-2) and excellent corrosion protection efficiency (99.94%).

  20. Inhibition of iron corrosion in 0.5 M sulphuric acid by metal cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiyanarayanan, S.; Jeyaprabha, C.; Muralidharan, S.; Venkatachari, G.

    2006-09-01

    Corrosion inhibitors are widely used in acid solutions during pickling and descaling. Mostly organic compounds containing N, O, and S groups are employed as inhibitors. In this study, the inhibition performance of metal cations such as Zn 2+, Mn 2+ and Ce 4+ ions in the concentration range 1-10 × 10 -3 M has been found out. The corrosion behaviour of iron in 0.5 M H 2SO 4 in the presence of metal cations is studied using polarization and impedance methods. It is found that the addition of these metal cations inhibits the corrosion markedly. The inhibition effect is in the following order Ce 4+ ≫ Mn 2+ > Zn 2+.

  1. Influence of poly(aminoquinone) on corrosion inhibition of iron in acid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyaprabha, C.; Sathiyanarayanan, S.; Phani, K. L. N.; Venkatachari, G.

    2005-11-01

    The inhibitor performance of chemically synthesized water soluble poly(aminoquinone) (PAQ) on iron corrosion in 0.5 M sulphuric acid was studied in relation to inhibitor concentration using potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. On comparing the inhibition performance of PAQ with that of the monomer o-phenylenediamine (OPD), the OPD gave an efficiency of 80% for 1000 ppm while it was 90% for 100 ppm of PAQ. PAQ was found to be a mixed inhibitor. Besides, PAQ was able to improve the passivation tendency of iron in 0.5 M H 2SO 4 markedly.

  2. Effects of surface condition on aqueous corrosion and environmental embrittlement of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin, R.L.; Buchanan, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    Effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion and environmental-embrittlement characteristics of Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides (FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo), a FeAl-based iron aluminide (FA-385), and a disordered low-aluminum Fe-Al alloy (FAPY) were evaluated. All tests were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution. In cyclic-anodic-polarization testing for aqueous-corrosion behavior, the surface conditions examined were: as-received (i.e., with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned and chemically cleaned. For all materials, the polarization tests showed the critical pitting potentials to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. These results indicate detrimental effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased susceptibilities to localized corrosion. In 200-hour U-bend stress-corrosion-cracking tests for environmental-embrittlement behavior, conducted at open-circuit corrosion potentials and at a hydrogen-charging potential of {minus}1500 mV (SHE), the above materials (except FA-385) were examined with retained oxides and with mechanically cleaned surfaces. At the open-circuit corrosion potentials, none of the materials in either surface condition underwent cracking. At the hydrogen-charging potential, none of the materials with retained oxides underwent cracking, but FA-84, FA-129 and FAL-Mo in the mechanically cleaned condition did undergo cracking. These results suggest beneficial effects of the retained high-temperature oxides in terms of increased resistance to environmental hydrogen embrittlement.

  3. Effect of bacterial communities on the formation of cast iron corrosion tubercles in reclaimed water.

    PubMed

    Jin, Juntao; Wu, Guangxue; Guan, Yuntao

    2015-03-15

    To understand the role bacterial communities play in corrosion scale development, the morphological and physicochemical characteristics of corrosion scales in raw and disinfected reclaimed water were systematically investigated. Corrosion tubercles were found in raw reclaimed water while thin corrosion layers formed in disinfected reclaimed water. The corrosion tubercles, composed mainly of α-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, and CaCO3, consisted of an top surface; a shell containing more magnetite than other layers; a core in association with stalks produced by bacteria; and a corroded layer. The thin corrosion layers also had layered structures. These had a smooth top, a dense middle, and a corroded layer. They mostly consisted of the same main components as the tubercles in raw reclaimed water, but with different proportions. The profiles of the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, redox potential, and pH in the tubercles were different to those in the corrosion layers, which demonstrated that these parameters changed with a shift in the microbial processes in the tubercles. The bacterial communities in the tubercles were found to be dominated by Proteobacteria (56.7%), Bacteroidetes (10.0%), and Nitrospira (6.9%). The abundance of sequences affiliated to iron-reducing bacteria (IRB, mainly Geothrix) and iron-oxidizing bacteria (mainly Aquabacterium) was relatively high. The layered characteristics of the corrosion layers was due to the blocking of DO transfer by the development of the scales themselves. Bacterial communities could at least promote the layering process and formation of corrosion tubercles. Possible mechanisms might include: (1) bacterial communities mediated the pH and redox potential in the tubercles (which helped to form shell-like and core layers), (2) the metabolism of IRB and magnetic bacteria (Magnetospirillum) might contribute to the presence of Fe3O4 in the shell-like layer, while IRB contributed to green rust in the core layer, and (3) the diversity of

  4. Effect of bacterial communities on the formation of cast iron corrosion tubercles in reclaimed water.

    PubMed

    Jin, Juntao; Wu, Guangxue; Guan, Yuntao

    2015-03-15

    To understand the role bacterial communities play in corrosion scale development, the morphological and physicochemical characteristics of corrosion scales in raw and disinfected reclaimed water were systematically investigated. Corrosion tubercles were found in raw reclaimed water while thin corrosion layers formed in disinfected reclaimed water. The corrosion tubercles, composed mainly of α-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, and CaCO3, consisted of an top surface; a shell containing more magnetite than other layers; a core in association with stalks produced by bacteria; and a corroded layer. The thin corrosion layers also had layered structures. These had a smooth top, a dense middle, and a corroded layer. They mostly consisted of the same main components as the tubercles in raw reclaimed water, but with different proportions. The profiles of the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration, redox potential, and pH in the tubercles were different to those in the corrosion layers, which demonstrated that these parameters changed with a shift in the microbial processes in the tubercles. The bacterial communities in the tubercles were found to be dominated by Proteobacteria (56.7%), Bacteroidetes (10.0%), and Nitrospira (6.9%). The abundance of sequences affiliated to iron-reducing bacteria (IRB, mainly Geothrix) and iron-oxidizing bacteria (mainly Aquabacterium) was relatively high. The layered characteristics of the corrosion layers was due to the blocking of DO transfer by the development of the scales themselves. Bacterial communities could at least promote the layering process and formation of corrosion tubercles. Possible mechanisms might include: (1) bacterial communities mediated the pH and redox potential in the tubercles (which helped to form shell-like and core layers), (2) the metabolism of IRB and magnetic bacteria (Magnetospirillum) might contribute to the presence of Fe3O4 in the shell-like layer, while IRB contributed to green rust in the core layer, and (3) the diversity of

  5. Microbially-Promoted Solubilization of Steel Corrosion Products and Fate of Associated Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Gill Geesey; Timothy Magnuson; Andrew Neal

    2002-06-15

    Microorganisms have the capacity to modify iron oxides during anaerobic respiration. When the dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 respires soluble sulfate during colonization of the solid-phase iron oxide hematite, the sulfide product reacts with the iron to produce the insoluble iron sulfide, pyrrhotite. When soluble uranium is present as uranyl ion, these microorganisms reduce the U(VI) to U(IV) as insoluble uraninite on the hematite surface. There is also evidence that a stable form of U is produced under these conditions that displays an oxidation state between U(VI) and U(iv). The dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR1 can utilize insoluble hematite as the sole electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration during growth and biofilm development on the mineral. The growth rate, maximum cell density and detachment rate for this bacterium are significantly greater on hematite than on magnetite (111) and (100). The difference could not be attributed to iron site density in the iron oxide. A gene (ferA) encoding a c-tyoe cytochrome involved in dissimulatory iron reduction in the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens was completed sequenced and characterized. The sequence information was used to develop an in-situ reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay that could detect expression of the gene during growth and biofilm development on ferrihydrite at the single cell and microcolony level. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis revealed that the ferrihydrite was reduced during expression of this gene. The assay was extended to detect expression of genes involved in sulfate reduction and hydrogen reduction in sulfate-reducing bacteria. This assay will be useful to assess mechanisms of biotransformation of minerals including corrosion products on buried metal containers containing radionuclide waste. In summary, the research has shown that dissimilatory sulfate and iron reducing bacteria can

  6. Microstructure Aspects of a Newly Developed, Low Cost, Corrosion-Resistant White Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sain, P. K.; Sharma, C. P.; Bhargava, A. K.

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the influence of heat treatment on the corrosion resistance of a newly developed white cast iron, basically suitable for corrosion- and wear-resistant applications, and to attain a microstructure that is most suitable from the corrosion resistance point of view. The composition was selected with an aim to have austenitic matrix both in as-cast and heat-treated conditions. The difference in electrochemical potential between austenite and carbide is less in comparison to that between austenite and graphite. Additionally, graphitic corrosion which is frequently encountered in gray cast irons is absent in white cast irons. These basic facts encouraged us to undertake this work. Optical metallography, hardness testing, X-ray diffractometry, and SEM-EDX techniques were employed to identify the phases present in the as-cast and heat-treated specimens of the investigated alloy and to correlate microstructure with corrosion resistance and hardness. Corrosion testing was carried out in 5 pct NaCl solution (approximate chloride content of sea water) using the weight loss method. In the investigated alloy, austenite was retained the in as-cast and heat-treated conditions. The same was confirmed by X-ray and EDX analysis. The stability and volume fraction of austenite increased with an increase of heat-treated temperature/time with a simultaneous decrease in the volume fraction of massive carbides. The decrease in volume fraction of massive carbides resulted in the availability of alloying elements. These alloying elements, on increasing the heat treatment temperature or increasing the soaking period at certain temperatures, get dissolved in austenite. As a consequence, austenite gets enriched as well as becomes more stable. On cooling from lower soaking period/temperature, enriched austenite decomposes to lesser enriched austenite and to a dispersed phase due to decreasing solid solubility of alloying elements with decreasing temperature

  7. Analyses of fuel crud and coolant-borne corrosion products in normal water chemistry BWRs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawicki, Jerzy A.

    2011-12-01

    The samples of crud removed from the surface of fuel rods and corrosion products sampled by filtration of condensate and feed water in three boiling water reactors (BWR) operating at normal water chemistry (NWC) were analyzed using 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The corrosion products concentration and phase composition was examined in filter membranes exposed to influent and effluent of condensate polishing resin beds, as well as to final feed water. The brushed and scraped portions of fuel crud extracted from fuel rods during refueling outage comprised mostly hematite, α-Fe 2O 3, and submicron-sized goethite particles, α-FeOOH, in weight ratio similar to that observed in feed water. The observed phases are consistent with the oxidizing water chemistry of NWC BWRs. The feasibility of identifying other iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, as well as copper and zinc bearing phases in corrosion products from BWRs is briefly discussed. The results of this work can be used to better understand and minimize iron transport and crud deposition on fuel rods in BWRs.

  8. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    ... cereals and breads. White beans, lentils, spinach, kidney beans, and peas. Nuts and some dried fruits, such as raisins. Iron in food comes in two forms: heme iron and nonheme iron. Nonheme iron is found in plant foods and iron-fortified food products. Meat, seafood, ...

  9. ROLE OF IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST IN ARSENIC REMEDIATION USING ZEROVALENT IRON IN COLUMN TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined corrosion products of zerovalent iron (Peerless iron) that was used in three column tests for removing arsenic under dynamic flow conditions with and without added phosphate and silicate. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate and magnetite were major iron corrosion products...

  10. F2-laser-induced surface modification of iron thin films to obtain corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoshi, Masayuki; Awaihara, Yuta; Yamashita, Tsugito; Inoue, Narumi

    2014-02-01

    Rustproof, chemical-resistant pure-iron thin films were successfully fabricated by the 157 nm F2-laser-induced surface modification of 50-nm-thick iron thin films. An approximately 2-nm-thick Fe3O4 layer underneath a native Fe2O3 layer of approximately 0.6 nm in thickness was formed on the iron thin films after F2 laser irradiation, as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The anodic polarization measurement in a 3 wt % NaCl aqueous solution (quasi-seawater) was conducted; the F2-laser-irradiated samples showed high corrosion resistance to the quasi-seawater. Moreover, no rust was observed on the samples after the immersion test in quasi-seawater for 48 h and longer. The measurement also revealed that the F2-laser-irradiated samples showed high corrosion resistance to a HNO3 aqueous solution. Thus, the micropatterning of iron thin films was demonstrated by the combination of F2 laser irradiation and subsequent HNO3 chemical etching.

  11. Fracture of concrete caused by the reinforcement corrosion products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. T.; Millard, A.; Caré, S.; L'Hostis, V.; Berthaud, Y.

    2006-11-01

    One of the most current degradations in reinforced concrete structures is related to the corrosion of the reinforcements. The corrosion products during active corrosion induce a mechanical pressure on the surrounding concrete that leads to cover cracking along the rebar. The objective of this work is to study the cracking of concrete due to the corrosion of the reinforcements. The phenomenon of corrosion/cracking is studied in experiments through tests of accelerated corrosion on plate and cylindrical specimens. A CCD camera is used to take images every hour and the pictures are analyzed by using the intercorrelation image technique (Correli^LMT) to derive the displacement and strain field. Thus the date of appearance of the first through crack is detected and the cinematic crack initiations are observed during the test. A finite element model that allows prediction of the mechanical consequences of the corrosion of steel in reinforced concrete structures is proposed. From the comparison between the test results and numerical simulations, it may be concluded that the model is validated in term of strains up to the moment when the crack becomes visible, and in terms of crack pattern.

  12. 21 CFR 310.518 - Drug products containing iron or iron salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) that contains iron or iron salts for use as an iron source shall bear the following statement: WARNING... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Drug products containing iron or iron salts. 310... SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE NEW DRUGS Requirements for Specific New Drugs or Devices §...

  13. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Shen, Dejiu

    2016-08-01

    The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  14. Facile fabrication of iron-based superhydrophobic surfaces via electric corrosion without bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qinghe; Liu, Hongtao; Chen, Tianchi; Wei, Yan; Wei, Zhu

    2016-04-01

    Superhydrophobic surface is of wide application in the field of catalysis, lubrication, waterproof, biomedical materials, etc. The superhydrophobic surface based on hard metal is worth further study due to its advantages of high strength and wear resistance. This paper investigates the fabrication techniques towards superhydrophobic surface on carbon steel substrate via electric corrosion and studies the properties of as-prepared superhydrophobic surface. The hydrophobic properties were characterized by a water sliding angle (SA) and a water contact angle (CA) measured by the Surface tension instrument. A Scanning electron microscope was used to analyze the structure of the corrosion surface. The surface compositions were characterized by an Energy Dispersive Spectrum. The Electrochemical workstation was used to measure its anti-corrosion property. The anti-icing performance was characterized by a steam-freezing test in Environmental testing chamber. The SiC sandpaper and 500 g weight were used to test the friction property. The research result shows that the superhydrophobic surface can be successfully fabricated by electrocorrosion on carbon steel substrate under appropriate process; the contact angle of the as-prepared superhydrophobic surface can be up to 152 ± 0.5°, and the sliding angle is 1-2°; its anti-corrosion property, anti-icing performance and the friction property all show an excellent level. This method provides the possibility of industrialization of superhydrophobic surface based on iron substrate as it can prepare massive superhydrophobic surface quickly.

  15. Study of mechanical, physical, and corrosion behavior of 0.5% cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Bulan; Jaffar, Ahmed; Alias, Siti Khadijah; Ramli, Abdullah; Izham, Mohd Faizul

    2009-12-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of 0.5% Co-DI before and after heat treatment and compare with commercial ductile iron. Methods: Molten metal of newly developed ductile iron which alloyed with 0.5% Cobalt produced through CO2 sand casting method. The specimens then performed preheat to 500°C in an hour then oil quenched. Specimens then performed annealing to 900°C in half an hour before oil quenched again. 500°C, 600°C and 700°C austempering temperature had been selected subjected to the specimens in half an hour before cooled to room temperature. The tests involved are microstructure analysis which included nodule count and phase analysis, polarization test, spectrometer test, density test, tensile test (ASTM E 8M), hardness test and impact test (ASTM A327) on as cast and austempered specimen. Results: 0.5% Cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron with 500°C austempered temperature is the optimum temperature for 0.5% Co-ADI. It's not only increase the nodule count in the content, but also improve the mechanical properties such as impact toughness and tensile strength. Corrosion rate of 0.5% Co-DI also improved compare to unalloyed DI.

  16. Study of mechanical, physical, and corrosion behavior of 0.5% cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Bulan; Jaffar, Ahmed; Alias, Siti Khadijah; Ramli, Abdullah; Izham, Mohd Faizul

    2010-03-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this research was to determine the mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of 0.5% Co-DI before and after heat treatment and compare with commercial ductile iron. Methods: Molten metal of newly developed ductile iron which alloyed with 0.5% Cobalt produced through CO2 sand casting method. The specimens then performed preheat to 500°C in an hour then oil quenched. Specimens then performed annealing to 900°C in half an hour before oil quenched again. 500°C, 600°C and 700°C austempering temperature had been selected subjected to the specimens in half an hour before cooled to room temperature. The tests involved are microstructure analysis which included nodule count and phase analysis, polarization test, spectrometer test, density test, tensile test (ASTM E 8M), hardness test and impact test (ASTM A327) on as cast and austempered specimen. Results: 0.5% Cobalt alloyed austempered ductile iron with 500°C austempered temperature is the optimum temperature for 0.5% Co-ADI. It's not only increase the nodule count in the content, but also improve the mechanical properties such as impact toughness and tensile strength. Corrosion rate of 0.5% Co-DI also improved compare to unalloyed DI.

  17. Aqueous corrosion of phosphide minerals from iron meteorites: a highly reactive source of prebiotic phosphorus on the surface of the early Earth.

    PubMed

    Pasek, Matthew A; Lauretta, Dante S

    2005-08-01

    We present the results of an experimental study of aqueous corrosion of Fe-phosphide under conditions relevant to the early Earth. The results strongly suggest that iron meteorites were an important source of reactive phosphorus (P), a requirement for the formation of P-based life. We further demonstrate that iron meteorites were an abundant source of phosphide minerals early in Earth history. Phosphide corrosion was studied in five different solutions: deionized water, deionized water buffered with sodium bicarbonate, deionized water with dissolved magnesium and calcium chlorides, deionized water containing ethanol and acetic acid, and deionized water containing the chlorides, ethanol, and acetic acid. Experiments were performed in the presence of both air and pure Ar gas to evaluate the effect of atmospheric chemistry. Phosphide corrosion in deionized water results in a metastable mixture of mixed-valence, P-bearing ions including pyrophosphate and triphosphate, key components for metabolism in modern life. In a pH-buffered solution of NaHCO(3), the condensed and reduced species diphosphonate is an abundant corrosion product. Corrosion in ethanol- and acetic acid-containing solutions yields additional P-bearing organic molecules, including acetyl phosphonate and a cyclic triphosphorus molecule. Phosphonate is a major corrosion product of all experiments and is the only P-bearing molecule that persists in solutions with high concentrations of magnesium and calcium chlorides, which suggests that phosphonate may have been a primitive oceanic source of P. The stability and reactivity of phosphonate and hypophosphite in solution were investigated to elucidate reaction mechanisms and the role of mineral catalysts on P-solution chemistry. Phosphonate oxidation is rapid in the presence of Fe metal but negligible in the presence of magnetite and in the control sample. The rate of hypophosphite oxidation is independent of reaction substrate.

  18. Corrosion protection

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

  19. Corrosion behavior of surface films on boron-implanted high purity iron and stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. J.; Carter, W. B.; Hochman, R. F.; Meletis, E. I.

    1985-01-01

    Boron (dose, 2 x 10 to the 17th ions/sq cm) was implanted into high purity iron, AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel, and AISI 440C martensitic stainless steel, at 40 keV. The film structure of implanted samples was examined and characterized by contrast and diffraction analyses utilizing transmission electron microscopy. The effect of B(+) ion implantation on the corrosion behavior was studied using the potentiodynamic polarization technique. Tests were performed in deaerated 1 N H2SO4 and 0.1 M NaCl solutions. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the morphology of the corroded surfaces after testing.

  20. High-temperature corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide (FeAl) alloys exhibiting improved weldability

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Goodwin, Gene M.; Liu, Chain T.

    1996-01-01

    This invention relates to improved corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide intermetallic alloys. The alloys of this invention comprise, in atomic percent, from about 30% to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.1% to about 0.5% carbon, no more than about 0.04% boron such that the atomic weight ratio of boron to carbon in the alloy is in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.08:1, from about 0.01 to about 3.5% of one or more transition metals selected from Group IVB, VB, and VIB elements and the balance iron wherein the alloy exhibits improved resistance to hot cracking during welding.

  1. High-temperature corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide (FeAl) alloys exhibiting improved weldability

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Goodwin, G.M.; Liu, C.T.

    1996-08-13

    This invention relates to improved corrosion-resistant iron-aluminide intermetallic alloys. The alloys of this invention comprise, in atomic percent, from about 30% to about 40% aluminum alloyed with from about 0.1% to about 0.5% carbon, no more than about 0.04% boron such that the atomic weight ratio of boron to carbon in the alloy is in the range of from about 0.01:1 to about 0.08:1, from about 0.01 to about 3.5% of one or more transition metals selected from Group IVB, VB, and VIB elements and the balance iron wherein the alloy exhibits improved resistance to hot cracking during welding. 13 figs.

  2. Effects of blending of desalinated and conventionally treated surface water on iron corrosion and its release from corroding surfaces and pre-existing scales.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haizhou; Schonberger, Kenneth D; Peng, Ching-Yu; Ferguson, John F; Desormeaux, Erik; Meyerhofer, Paul; Luckenbach, Heidi; Korshin, Gregory V

    2013-07-01

    This study examined effects of blending desalinated water with conventionally treated surface water on iron corrosion and release from corroding metal surfaces and pre-existing scales exposed to waters having varying fractions of desalinated water, alkalinities, pH values and orthophosphate levels. The presence of desalinated water resulted in markedly decreased 0.45 μm-filtered soluble iron concentrations. However, higher fractions of desalinated water in the blends were also associated with more fragile corroding surfaces, lower retention of iron oxidation products and release of larger iron particles in the bulk water. SEM, XRD and XANES data showed that in surface water, a dense layer of amorphous ferrihydrite phase predominated in the corrosion products. More crystalline surface phases developed in the presence of desalinated water. These solid phases transformed from goethite to lepidocrocite with increased fraction of desalinated water. These effects are likely to result from a combination of chemical parameters, notably variations of the concentrations of natural organic matter, calcium, chloride and sulfate when desalinated and conventionally treated waters are blended.

  3. Effects of blending of desalinated and conventionally treated surface water on iron corrosion and its release from corroding surfaces and pre-existing scales.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haizhou; Schonberger, Kenneth D; Peng, Ching-Yu; Ferguson, John F; Desormeaux, Erik; Meyerhofer, Paul; Luckenbach, Heidi; Korshin, Gregory V

    2013-07-01

    This study examined effects of blending desalinated water with conventionally treated surface water on iron corrosion and release from corroding metal surfaces and pre-existing scales exposed to waters having varying fractions of desalinated water, alkalinities, pH values and orthophosphate levels. The presence of desalinated water resulted in markedly decreased 0.45 μm-filtered soluble iron concentrations. However, higher fractions of desalinated water in the blends were also associated with more fragile corroding surfaces, lower retention of iron oxidation products and release of larger iron particles in the bulk water. SEM, XRD and XANES data showed that in surface water, a dense layer of amorphous ferrihydrite phase predominated in the corrosion products. More crystalline surface phases developed in the presence of desalinated water. These solid phases transformed from goethite to lepidocrocite with increased fraction of desalinated water. These effects are likely to result from a combination of chemical parameters, notably variations of the concentrations of natural organic matter, calcium, chloride and sulfate when desalinated and conventionally treated waters are blended. PMID:23651514

  4. Kinetics of soluble chromium removal from contaminated water by zerovalent iron media: corrosion inhibition and passive oxide effects.

    PubMed

    Melitas, N; Chuffe-Moscoso, O; Farrell, J

    2001-10-01

    Permeable reactive barriers containing zerovalent iron are being increasingly employed for in situ remediation of groundwater contaminated with redox active metals and chlorinated organic compounds. This research investigated the effect of chromate concentration on its removal from solution by zerovalent iron. Removal rates of aqueous Cr(VI) by iron wires were measured in batch experiments for initial chromium concentrations ranging from 100 to 10 000 microg/L. Chromate removal was also measured in columns packed with zerovalent iron filings over this same concentration range. Electrochemical measurements were made to determine the free corrosion potential and corrosion rate of the iron reactants. In both the batch and column reactors, absolute rates of chromium removal declined with increasing chromate concentration. Corrosion current measurements indicated that the rate of iron corrosion decreased with increasing Cr(VI) concentrations between 0 and 5000 microg/L. At a Cr(VI) concentration of 10 000 microg/L, Tafel polarization diagrams showed that chromium removal was affected by its diffusion rate through a passivating oxide film and by the ability of iron to release Fe2+ at anodic sites. In contrast, water reduction was not mass transfer limited, but chromium did decrease the exchange current for the hydrogen evolution reaction. Even at the most passivating concentration of 10 000 microng/L, effluent Cr(VI) concentrations in the column reactors reached a steady state, indicating that passivation had also reached a steady state. Although chromate contributes to iron surface passivation, the removal rates are still sufficiently fast for in situ iron barriers to be effective for Cr(VI) removal at most environmentally relevant concentrations.

  5. High-temperature corrosion behavior of iron-aluminide alloys and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.; Saunders, S.R.J.

    1995-07-01

    An Fe-28 at.% Al-2% Cr alloy doped with Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} showed improved scale adhesion relative to a dispersion-free form of the same composition. However, doping with CeO{sub 2} or La{sub 2}O{sub 3} was detrimental to oxidation behavior. A study of weld-overlay iron-aluminide coatings showed that, those with sufficiently high aluminum concentrations had sulfidation resistance in H{sub 2}S-H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-Ar at 800 C equivalent to the most resistant bulk iron aluminides. These corrosion-resistant coatings have the potential to be effective barriers in high-temperature sulfidizing environments provided the appropriate combinations of filler metal, process parameters, and substrate are used to produce adequate aluminum concentrations and minimal chromium contents. Exposures in an oxidizing/sulfidizing environment containing varying amounts of HCI at 450 and 550 C showed that Fe{sub 3}Al alloys had good corrosion resistance.

  6. Influence of multi-element ion beam bombardment on the corrosion behavior of iron and steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Tian; Run, Wu; Weiping, Cai; Rutao, Wang ); Godechot, X.; Brown, I. )

    1991-06-01

    The effect of multi-element ion implantation on the corrosion resistance to acid solution has been studied for stainless steel, medium carbon steel, pure iron, and chromium-deposited iron. The implanted elements were Cu, Mo, Cr, Ni, Yb and Ti at doses of each species of from 5 {times} 10{sup 15} to 1 {times} 10{sup 17} cm{sup {minus}2} and at ion energies of up to 100 keV. The stainless steel used was 18-8 Cr-Ni, and the medium carbon steel was 0.45% C. The implanted samples were soaked in dilute sulfuric acid solution for periods up to 48 hours and the weight loss measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The kinetic parameter values describing the weight loss as a function of time were determined for all samples. In this paper we summarize the corrosion resistance behavior for the various different combinations of implanted species, doses, and substrates. The influence of the composition and structure of the modified surface layer is discussed.8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Microstructure, corrosion properties and bio-compatibility of calcium zinc phosphate coating on pure iron for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyan; Zhang, Erlin; Yang, Ke

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the biocompatibility and the corrosion resistance in the initial stage of implantation, a phosphate (CaZn2(PO4)2·2H2O) coating was obtained on the surface of pure iron by a chemical reaction method. The anti-corrosion property, the blood compatibility and the cell toxicity of the coated pure iron specimens were investigated. The coating was composed of some fine phosphate crystals and the surface of coating was flat and dense enough. The electrochemical data indicated that the corrosion resistance of the coated pure iron was improved with the increase of phosphating time. When the specimen was phosphated for 30min, the corrosion resistance (Rp) increased to 8006 Ω. Compared with that of the naked pure iron, the anti-hemolysis property and cell compatibility of the coated specimen was improved significantly, while the anti-coagulant property became slightly worse due to the existence of element calcium. It was thought that phosphating treatment might be an effective method to improve the biocompatibility of pure iron for biomedical application.

  8. Effects of iron-reducing bacteria on carbon steel corrosion induced by thermophilic sulfate-reducing consortia.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Cantero, Eduardo; Peña-Cabriales, Juan José

    2014-02-28

    Four thermophilic bacterial species, including the iron-reducing bacterium Geobacillus sp. G2 and the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfotomaculum sp. SRB-M, were employed to integrate a bacterial consortium. A second consortium was integrated with the same bacteria, except for Geobacillus sp. G2. Carbon steel coupons were subjected to batch cultures of both consortia. The corrosion induced by the complete consortium was 10 times higher than that induced by the second consortium, and the ferrous ion concentration was consistently higher in iron-reducing consortia. Scanning electronic microscopy analysis of the carbon steel surface showed mineral films colonized by bacteria. The complete consortium caused profuse fracturing of the mineral film, whereas the non-iron-reducing consortium did not generate fractures. These data show that the iron-reducing activity of Geobacillus sp. G2 promotes fracturing of mineral films, thereby increasing steel corrosion.

  9. Influence of temperature on corrosion rate and porosity of corrosion products of carbon steel in anoxic bentonite environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoulil, J.; Kaňok, J.; Kouřil, M.; Parschová, H.; Novák, P.

    2013-11-01

    The study focuses on the porosity of layers of corrosion products and its impact on corrosion rate of carbon steel in moist bentonite. Measurements were performed in an aggressive Czech type of bentonite - Rokle B75 at temperatures of 90 and 40 °C. Aggressiveness of B75 bentonite consists in low content of chlorides. Presence of chlorides in pore solution allows formation of more protective magnetite. The evaluation was made by electrochemical techniques (red/ox potential, open circuit potential, linear polarization resistance, impedance spectroscopy) and resistometric sensor measurements. The result imply that the higher the temperature the more compact is the layer of corrosion products that slightly decelerates corrosion rate compared to the state at 40 °C. The state of corrosion products at both temperatures is reversible.

  10. Characterization of Corrosion Product Layers from CO2 Corrosion of 13Cr Stainless Steel in Simulated Oilfield Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Z. F.; Wang, X. Z.; Liu, L.; Wu, J. Q.; Zhang, Y. Q.

    2011-10-01

    The influence of temperature and flow rate on the characterization and mechanisms of corrosion product layers from CO2 corrosion of 13Cr stainless steel was carried out in simulated oilfield solution. Cyclic potentiodynamic polarization method as well as weight loss tests in autoclave were utilized to investigate pitting corrosion behavior at various temperatures. Weight loss tests were performed at 100 and 160 °C under dynamic and static flow conditions. At the same time, the significant pitting parameters such as E corr, E pit, E pp, ∆ E, and I pass in cyclic polarization curves at various temperatures were analyzed and compared for revealing the pitting behavior of 13Cr stainless steel. The surface measurement techniques such as SEM, XRD, and XPS were used to detect the corrosion product layers. The results showed that both temperature and flow rate had significant effects on characterization of corrosion product layers or passive films formed on 13Cr stainless steel in CO2 corrosion system. At high temperature, lots of pits were formed at the localized corrosion areas of metal surfaces. Corrosion rates under the condition of 5 m/s were higher than those under the static condition regardless of the test temperatures.

  11. Mechanical, physical, and corrosion characteristics of 2% vanadium alloyed ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Bulan; Jaffar, Ahmed; Alias, Siti Khadijah; Jaafar, Roseleena; Ramli, Abdullah; Faitullah, Ahmad

    2010-03-01

    This study was to investigate the effect of 2% vanadium alloyed austempered ductile iron on mechanical properties and microstructure and also to determine the desired austempering temperatures of vanadium alloyed ductile iron. In this study, specimens of 2%vanadium DI were produced by using the Y-block casting in the foundry lab. The specimen produced were machine according to the tensile and impact dimension followed the TSEN1002-1 and ASTM E23 standard. Then, austempering process was performed at the three different temperatures to the sample which are 500°, 600° and 700° in high temperature furnace. The specimens has been machine were undergoes the tensile, impact, density and hardness test. The microstructures were observed by using Olympus BX 41 M Microscopes image analysis system before and after etching by Nital 15%. Polarization test also were conduct between commercial DI and 2%V-DI. The results show that 2% vanadium alloyed ductile iron (2% V-DI) not only increases the nodule count and ferrite content in the microstructure, but also improves the mechanical properties such as tensile strength, impact toughness proportional to the austempered temperature as compared to unalloyed DI. The low corrosion rates also show for the 2% of vanadium alloyed compare to the commercial DI.

  12. Mechanical, physical, and corrosion characteristics of 2% vanadium alloyed ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Bulan; Jaffar, Ahmed; Alias, Siti Khadijah; Jaafar, Roseleena; Ramli, Abdullah; Faitullah, Ahmad

    2009-12-01

    This study was to investigate the effect of 2% vanadium alloyed austempered ductile iron on mechanical properties and microstructure and also to determine the desired austempering temperatures of vanadium alloyed ductile iron. In this study, specimens of 2%vanadium DI were produced by using the Y-block casting in the foundry lab. The specimen produced were machine according to the tensile and impact dimension followed the TSEN1002-1 and ASTM E23 standard. Then, austempering process was performed at the three different temperatures to the sample which are 500°, 600° and 700° in high temperature furnace. The specimens has been machine were undergoes the tensile, impact, density and hardness test. The microstructures were observed by using Olympus BX 41 M Microscopes image analysis system before and after etching by Nital 15%. Polarization test also were conduct between commercial DI and 2%V-DI. The results show that 2% vanadium alloyed ductile iron (2% V-DI) not only increases the nodule count and ferrite content in the microstructure, but also improves the mechanical properties such as tensile strength, impact toughness proportional to the austempered temperature as compared to unalloyed DI. The low corrosion rates also show for the 2% of vanadium alloyed compare to the commercial DI.

  13. Effect of carbon on stress corrosion cracking and anodic oxidation of iron in NaOH solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Flis, J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret

    2008-06-01

    Anodic behaviour of decarburised iron and of quenched Fe–C materials with up to 0.875 wt% C was examined in 8.5 M NaOH at 100 °C to explain the role of carbon in caustic stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of plain steels. Removal of carbon from Armco iron strongly reduced its intergranular SCC. Slip steps on grains did not initiate cracks. It has been shown that carbon at low contents deteriorates the passivation of iron, whereas at high contents it promotes the formation of magnetite. High resistance to SCC of high carbon steels can be explained by an intense formation of magnetite on these steels.

  14. High-temperature corrosion and applications of nickel and iron aluminides in coal-conversion power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-10-01

    Nickel and iron aluminide intermetallics are being developed for use as structural materials and/or as cladding for conventional engineering alloys. In addition to strength advantages, these materials exhibit excellent resistance to corrosion in single- and multioxidant environments at elevated temperatures by the formation of slow-growing, adherent alumina scales. Corrosion resistance in a given environment is strongly dependent on the composition of the alloy and on the nature of the corrosive species prevalent in the service environment. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the current status of the corrosion performance of these intermetallics in oxidizing, sulfidizing, and multicomponent gas environments of typical coal-conversion systems. Mechanisms of scale development/breakdown, performance envelopes for long-term usage of these materials, approaches to modifying the surfaces of engineering alloys by cladding or coating them with intermetallics, and in-service experience with these materials are emphasized.

  15. Iron based photoanodes for solar fuel production.

    PubMed

    Bassi, Prince Saurabh; Gurudayal; Wong, Lydia Helena; Barber, James

    2014-06-28

    In natural photosynthesis, the water splitting reaction of photosystem II is the source of the electrons/reducing equivalents for the reduction of carbon dioxide to carbohydrate while oxygen is formed as the by-product. Similarly, for artificial photosynthesis where the end product is a solar fuel such as hydrogen, a water splitting-oxygen evolving system is required to supply high energy electrons to drive the reductive reactions. Very attractive candidates for this purpose are iron based semiconductors which have band gaps corresponding to visible light and valence band energies sufficient to oxidise water. The most studied system is hematite (Fe2O3) which is highly abundant with many attributes for incorporation into photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells. We review the recent progress in manipulating hematite for this purpose through nanostructuring, doping and surface modifications. We also consider several hybrid iron-based semiconducting systems like ferrites and iron titanates as alternatives to hematite for light driven water splitting emphasizing their advantages with respect to their band levels and charge transport properties.

  16. ARSENIC INTERACTION WITH IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST: IMPLICATIONS FOR ARSENIC REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zerovalent iron is being used in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remediate groundwater arsenic contamination. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under anaerobic conditions. The interaction between arsenic and this green...

  17. Effect of surface condition on the aqueous corrosion behavior of iron aluminies

    SciTech Connect

    Buchanan, R.A.; Perrin, R.L.

    1995-08-01

    The effects of retained high-temperature surface oxides, produced during thermomechanical processing and/or heat treatment, on the aqueous-corrosion characteristics of Fe-Al-based alloys were evaluated by electrochemical methods. Cyclic anodic polarization evaluations were conducted at room temperature in a mild acid-chloride solution (pH = 4,200 ppm Cl{sup {minus}}) on the Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminides, FA-84 (Fe-28Al-2Cr-0.05B, at %), FA-129 (Fe-28Al-5Cr-0.5Nb-0.2C, at %), and FAL-Mo (Fe-28Al-5Cr-1Mo-0.04B-0.08Zr, at %), on the FeAl-based iron aluminide, FA-385 (Fe-35.65Al-0.20Mo-0.05Zr-0.11C, at %). The surface conditions evaluated were: As received (i.e. with the retained high-temperature oxides), mechanically cleaned (ground through 600-grit SiC paper), and chemically cleaned (10% HNO{sub 3}, 2%HF, at 43 {degree}C). The principal electrochemical parameter of interest was the critical putting potential with lower values indicating less resistance to chloride-induced localized corrosion. For all materials evaluated, the critical pitting potential was found to be significantly lower in the as-received condition than in the mechanically-cleaned and chemically-cleaned conditions. Mechanisms responsible for the detrimental high-temperature-oxide effect are under study.

  18. Iron Corrosion Induced by Nonhydrogenotrophic Nitrate-Reducing Prolixibacter sp. Strain MIC1-1

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kimio; Wakai, Satoshi; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Ohkuma, Moriya; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2014-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of metallic materials imposes a heavy economic burden. The mechanism of MIC of metallic iron (Fe0) under anaerobic conditions is usually explained as the consumption of cathodic hydrogen by hydrogenotrophic microorganisms that accelerates anodic Fe0 oxidation. In this study, we describe Fe0 corrosion induced by a nonhydrogenotrophic nitrate-reducing bacterium called MIC1-1, which was isolated from a crude-oil sample collected at an oil well in Akita, Japan. This strain requires specific electron donor-acceptor combinations and an organic carbon source to grow. For example, the strain grew anaerobically on nitrate as a sole electron acceptor with pyruvate as a carbon source and Fe0 as the sole electron donor. In addition, ferrous ion and l-cysteine served as electron donors, whereas molecular hydrogen did not. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain MIC1-1 was a member of the genus Prolixibacter in the order Bacteroidales. Thus, Prolixibacter sp. strain MIC1-1 is the first Fe0-corroding representative belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. Under anaerobic conditions, Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 corroded Fe0 concomitantly with nitrate reduction, and the amount of iron dissolved by the strain was six times higher than that in an aseptic control. Scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that microscopic crystals of FePO4 developed on the surface of the Fe0 foils, and a layer of FeCO3 covered the FePO4 crystals. We propose that cells of Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 accept electrons directly from Fe0 to reduce nitrate. PMID:25548048

  19. Iron corrosion induced by nonhydrogenotrophic nitrate-reducing Prolixibacter sp. strain MIC1-1.

    PubMed

    Iino, Takao; Ito, Kimio; Wakai, Satoshi; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Ohkuma, Moriya; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2015-03-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of metallic materials imposes a heavy economic burden. The mechanism of MIC of metallic iron (Fe(0)) under anaerobic conditions is usually explained as the consumption of cathodic hydrogen by hydrogenotrophic microorganisms that accelerates anodic Fe(0) oxidation. In this study, we describe Fe(0) corrosion induced by a nonhydrogenotrophic nitrate-reducing bacterium called MIC1-1, which was isolated from a crude-oil sample collected at an oil well in Akita, Japan. This strain requires specific electron donor-acceptor combinations and an organic carbon source to grow. For example, the strain grew anaerobically on nitrate as a sole electron acceptor with pyruvate as a carbon source and Fe(0) as the sole electron donor. In addition, ferrous ion and l-cysteine served as electron donors, whereas molecular hydrogen did not. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain MIC1-1 was a member of the genus Prolixibacter in the order Bacteroidales. Thus, Prolixibacter sp. strain MIC1-1 is the first Fe(0)-corroding representative belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. Under anaerobic conditions, Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 corroded Fe(0) concomitantly with nitrate reduction, and the amount of iron dissolved by the strain was six times higher than that in an aseptic control. Scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that microscopic crystals of FePO4 developed on the surface of the Fe(0) foils, and a layer of FeCO3 covered the FePO4 crystals. We propose that cells of Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 accept electrons directly from Fe(0) to reduce nitrate.

  20. Corrosion fatigue of iron-chromium-nickel alloys: Fracture mechanics, microstructure and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, R.P.

    1992-01-29

    This progress report briefly summarizes the research performed under the referenced grant for the period from 1 December 1990 to 31 December 1991, and contains a cumulative listing of technical presentations and publications dating back to 1 June 1988. Under this grant, a multi-disciplinary research program is undertaken to address certain fundamental issues relating to corrosion fatigue crack growth in structurally important alloys in aqueous environments. The principal goal of the research is to develop and expand the scientific understanding of the processes that control corrosion fatigue crack growth, particularly for ferrous alloys in terms of the controlling mechanical and chemical/electrochemical processes and their interactions with the microstructure. Focus is placed upon the austenitic iron-chromium-nickel (FeCrNi) alloys because of the need to resolve certain mechanistic issues and because of extensive utilization of these alloys in the power generation and chemical industries. Emphasis is given to the growth of short (small) cracks at low growth rates because crack growth in this regime is expected to be more sensitive to changes in external chemical/electrochemical variables.

  1. Erosion-Corrosion of Iron and Nickel Alloys at Elevated Temperature in a Combustion Gas Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Tylczak, Joseph

    2014-05-02

    This paper reports on the results of a study that compares the erosion-corrosion behavior of a variety of alloys (Fe- 2¼Cr 1Mo, 304 SS, 310 SS, Incoloy 800, Haynes 230 and a Fe3Al) in a combustion environment. Advanced coal combustion environments, with higher temperatures, are driving re-examination of traditional and examination of new alloys in these hostile environments. In order to simulate conditions in advanced coal combustion boilers, a special erosion apparatus was used to allow for impingement of particles under a low abrasive flux in a gaseous environment comprised of 20 % CO2, 0.05 % HCl, 77 % N2, 3 % O2, and 0.1 % SO2. Tests were conducted at room temperature and 700 °C with ~ 270 μm silica, using an impact velocity of 20 m/s in both air and the simulated combustion gas environment. The erosion-corrosion behavior was characterized by gravimetric measurements and by examination of the degraded surfaces optically and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). At room temperature most of the alloys had similar loss rates. Not surprisingly, at 700 °C the lower chrome-iron alloy had a very high loss rate. The nickel alloys tended to have higher loss rates than the high chrome austenitic alloys.

  2. X-rays absorption study on medieval corrosion layers for the understanding of very long-term indoor atmospheric iron corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, J.; Réguer, S.; Vantelon, D.; Dillmann, P.; Neff, D.; Guillot, I.

    2010-05-01

    The study and prediction of very long-term atmospheric corrosion behaviour of ferrous alloys is of great importance in different fields. First the conservation of metallic artefacts in museum and the corrosion diagnosis on ferrous reinforcement used in ancient monuments since medieval times needs reliable data to understand the mechanisms. Second, in the frame of the interim storage of nuclear waste in France, it is necessary to model the long-term corrosion of low alloy steel overcontainer. The nature of phases and elements constituting the corrosion layers can greatly influence the corrosion mechanisms. On the one hand, it is crucial to precisely determine the nature of microscopic phases that can be highly reactive. On the other hand, some elements as P and S could modify this reactivity. To clarify this point and complementary to other studies using Raman micro spectroscopy technique, X-rays Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) under synchrotron radiation plays a crucial role. It allows one to precisely identify the reactive phases in the corrosion layers. Micro-XAS was required in order to refine the spatial variation, at micrometer scale, of the predominant Fe oxidation state and to characterise the corresponding corrosion products. Moreover, the role of minor elements on phase’s stability and the chemical form of these elements in the rust layer, especially phosphorus and sulphur, was investigated.

  3. Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy for the Investigation of Galvanic Corrosion of Iron with Zinc in 0.1 M NaCl Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph Raj, X.; Nishimura, T.

    2016-02-01

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy was used to monitor microscopic aspects of the electrochemical processes at the iron-zinc couple immersed in 0.1 M NaCl aqueous solution. The SECM measured the concentration of chemical species relevant to the corrosion processes. The electrochemical behavior of galvanic Fe/Zn coupling was investigated as a function of time using SECM microelectrode both as Fe/Zn joined together as well as away from each other. SECM amperometric line scan curves were obtained over the Fe/Zn at a constant distance. In the first case, the chemical species participating in the corrosion reactions at the sample are detected at the SECM tip by applying appropriate potential values to the microelectrode. The release of Zn2+ ionic species into the solution phase from local anodic sites, as well as the consumption of dissolved oxygen at the corresponding cathodic locations, was successfully monitored. The results revealed that the galvanic couple where Fe/Zn is close to each other will show higher corrosion rate of zinc than that of galvanic couple away from each other. The Fe/Zn couple away from each other showed a decrease in current values with time. This is due to the formation of oxide layer of Zn over the Fe followed by the protection of the corrosion products with further exposure times.

  4. Inhibiting mild steel corrosion from sulfate-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria using gramicidin-S-producing biofilms.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Rongjun; Wood, Thomas K

    2004-11-01

    A gramicidin-S-producing Bacillus brevis 18-3 biofilm was shown to reduce corrosion rates of mild steel by inhibiting both the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfosporosinus orientis and the iron-oxidizing bacterium Leptothrix discophora SP-6. When L. discophora SP-6 was introduced along with D. orientis to a non-antimicrobial-producing biofilm control, Paenibacillus polymyxa ATCC 10401, a corrosive synergy was created and mild steel coupons underwent more severe corrosion than when only D. orientis was present, showing a 2.3-fold increase via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and a 1.8-fold difference via mass-loss measurements. However, when a gramicidin-S-producing, protective B. brevis 18-3 biofilm was established on mild steel, the metal coupons were protected against the simultaneous attack of D. orientis and L. discophora SP-6. EIS data showed that the protective B. brevis 18-3 biofilm decreased the corrosion rate about 20-fold compared with the non-gramicidin-producing P. polymyxa ATCC 10401 biofilm control. The mass loss for the protected mild steel coupons was also significantly lower than that for the unprotected ones (4-fold decrease). Scanning electron microscope images corroborated the corrosion inhibition by the gramicidin-S-producing B. brevis biofilm on mild steel by showing that the metal surface remained untarnished, i.e., the polishing grooves were still visible after exposure to the simultaneous attack of the sulfate-reducing bacterium and the iron-oxidizing bacterium. PMID:15278311

  5. Inhibiting mild steel corrosion from sulfate-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria using gramicidin-S-producing biofilms.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Rongjun; Wood, Thomas K

    2004-11-01

    A gramicidin-S-producing Bacillus brevis 18-3 biofilm was shown to reduce corrosion rates of mild steel by inhibiting both the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfosporosinus orientis and the iron-oxidizing bacterium Leptothrix discophora SP-6. When L. discophora SP-6 was introduced along with D. orientis to a non-antimicrobial-producing biofilm control, Paenibacillus polymyxa ATCC 10401, a corrosive synergy was created and mild steel coupons underwent more severe corrosion than when only D. orientis was present, showing a 2.3-fold increase via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and a 1.8-fold difference via mass-loss measurements. However, when a gramicidin-S-producing, protective B. brevis 18-3 biofilm was established on mild steel, the metal coupons were protected against the simultaneous attack of D. orientis and L. discophora SP-6. EIS data showed that the protective B. brevis 18-3 biofilm decreased the corrosion rate about 20-fold compared with the non-gramicidin-producing P. polymyxa ATCC 10401 biofilm control. The mass loss for the protected mild steel coupons was also significantly lower than that for the unprotected ones (4-fold decrease). Scanning electron microscope images corroborated the corrosion inhibition by the gramicidin-S-producing B. brevis biofilm on mild steel by showing that the metal surface remained untarnished, i.e., the polishing grooves were still visible after exposure to the simultaneous attack of the sulfate-reducing bacterium and the iron-oxidizing bacterium.

  6. Neutrophilic Iron-Oxidizing “Zetaproteobacteria” and Mild Steel Corrosion in Nearshore Marine Environments ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    McBeth, Joyce M.; Little, Brenda J.; Ray, Richard I.; Farrar, Katherine M.; Emerson, David

    2011-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of mild steel in seawater is an expensive and enduring problem. Little attention has been paid to the role of neutrophilic, lithotrophic, iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) in MIC. The goal of this study was to determine if marine FeOB related to Mariprofundus are involved in this process. To examine this, field incubations and laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted. Mild steel samples incubated in nearshore environments were colonized by marine FeOB, as evidenced by the presence of helical iron-encrusted stalks diagnostic of the FeOB Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, a member of the candidate class “Zetaproteobacteria.” Furthermore, Mariprofundus-like cells were enriched from MIC biofilms. The presence of Zetaproteobacteria was confirmed using a Zetaproteobacteria-specific small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene primer set to amplify sequences related to M. ferrooxydans from both enrichments and in situ samples of MIC biofilms. Temporal in situ incubation studies showed a qualitative increase in stalk distribution on mild steel, suggesting progressive colonization by stalk-forming FeOB. We also isolated a novel FeOB, designated Mariprofundus sp. strain GSB2, from an iron oxide mat in a salt marsh. Strain GSB2 enhanced uniform corrosion from mild steel in laboratory microcosm experiments conducted over 4 days. Iron concentrations (including precipitates) in the medium were used as a measure of corrosion. The corrosion in biotic samples (7.4 ± 0.1 mM) was significantly higher than that in abiotic controls (5.0 ± 0.1 mM). These results have important implications for the role of FeOB in corrosion of steel in nearshore and estuarine environments. In addition, this work shows that the global distribution of Zetaproteobacteria is far greater than previously thought. PMID:21131509

  7. Changes of the corrosion potential of iron in stagnation and flow conditions and their relationship with metal release.

    PubMed

    Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Korshin, Gregory V

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the behavior of corrosion potential (Ecorr) of iron exposed to drinking water during episodes of stagnation and flow. These measurements showed that during stagnation episodes, Ecorr values decrease prominently and consistently. This decrease is initially rapid but it becomes slower as the stagnation time increases. During flow episodes, the Ecorr values increase and reach a quasi-steady state. Experiments with varying concentrations of dissolved oxygen showed that the decrease of Ecorr values characteristic for stagnation is likely to be associated with the consumption of dissolved oxygen by the exposed metal. The corrosion potential of iron and its changes during stagnation were sensitive to the concentrations of sulfate and chloride ions. Measurements of iron release showed that both the absolute values of Ecorr measured prior to or after stagnation episodes were well correlated with the logarithms of concentrations of total iron. The slope of this dependence showed that the observed correlations between Ecorr values and Fe concentrations corresponded to the coupling between the oxidant consumption and changes of Fe redox status. These results demonstrate that in situ Ecorr measurements can be a sensitive method with which to ascertain effects of hydrodynamic conditions and short-term variations of water chemistry on metal release and corrosion in drinking water. This approach is valuable practically because Ecorr measurements are precise, can be carried out in situ with any desired time resolution, do not affect the state of exposed surface in any extent and can be carried out with readily available equipment.

  8. Surface analysis and depth profiling of corrosion products formed in lead pipes used to supply low alkalinity drinking water.

    PubMed

    Davidson, C M; Peters, N J; Britton, A; Brady, L; Gardiner, P H E; Lewis, B D

    2004-01-01

    Modern analytical techniques have been applied to investigate the nature of lead pipe corrosion products formed in pH adjusted, orthophosphate-treated, low alkalinity water, under supply conditions. Depth profiling and surface analysis have been carried out on pipe samples obtained from the water distribution system in Glasgow, Scotland, UK. X-ray diffraction spectrometry identified basic lead carbonate, lead oxide and lead phosphate as the principal components. Scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry revealed the crystalline structure within the corrosion product and also showed spatial correlations existed between calcium, iron, lead, oxygen and phosphorus. Elemental profiling, conducted by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and secondary neutrals mass spectrometry (SNMS) indicated that the corrosion product was not uniform with depth. However, no clear stratification was apparent. Indeed, counts obtained for carbonate, phosphate and oxide were well correlated within the depth range probed by SIMS. SNMS showed relationships existed between carbon, calcium, iron, and phosphorus within the bulk of the scale, as well as at the surface. SIMS imaging confirmed the relationship between calcium and lead and suggested there might also be an association between chloride and phosphorus.

  9. Characterization of corrosion products formed on different surfaces of steel exposed to simulated groundwater solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiufa; Gao, Kewei; Wang, Yanbin; Pang, Xiaolu

    2015-08-01

    The corrosion behavior of a low alloy steel in simulated groundwater was investigated. The upward surface of the steel underwent more serious corrosion than the downward surface. The corrosion products formed on the upward and downward surfaces were characterized by SEM, EDX, and XRD, and the electrochemical properties of bare and rusted samples were analyzed. The difference in the corrosion rates of the different surfaces of the steel could be attributed to the potential difference between the upward and downward surfaces as well as the higher amount of CaCO3 deposits on the downward surface leading to a compact corrosion product.

  10. Characterization of uranium corrosion products involved in the March 13, 1998 fuel manufacturing facility pyrophoric event.

    SciTech Connect

    Totemeier, T.C.

    1999-04-26

    Uranium metal corrosion products from ZPPR fuel plates involved in the March 13, 1998 pyrophoric event in the Fuel Manufacturing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West were characterized using thermo-gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, and BET gas sorption techniques. Characterization was performed on corrosion products in several different conditions: immediately after separation from the source metal, after low-temperature passivation, after passivation and extended vault storage, and after burning in the pyrophoric event. The ignition temperatures and hydride fractions of the corrosion product were strongly dependent on corrosion extent. Corrosion products from plates with corrosion extents less than 0.7% did not ignite in TGA testing, while products from plates with corrosion extents greater than 1.2% consistently ignited. Corrosion extent is defined as mass of corrosion products divided by the total mass of uranium. The hydride fraction increased with corrosion extent. There was little change in corrosion product properties after low-temperature passivation or vault storage. The burned products were not reactive and contained no hydride; the principal constituents were UO{sub 2} and U{sub 3}O{sub 7}. The source of the event was a considerable quantity of reactive hydride present in the corrosion products. No specific ignition mechanism could be conclusively identified. The most likely initiator was a static discharge in the corrosion product from the 14th can as it was poured into the consolidation can. The available evidence does not support scenarios in which the powder in the consolidation can slowly self-heated to the ignition point, or in which the powder in the 14th can was improperly passivated.

  11. The mutual co-regulation of extracellular polymeric substances and iron ions in biocorrosion of cast iron pipes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Juntao; Guan, Yuntao

    2014-10-01

    New insights into the biocorrosion process may be gained through understanding of the interaction between extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and iron. Herein, the effect of iron ions on the formation of biofilms and production of EPS was investigated. Additionally, the impact of EPS on the corrosion of cast iron coupons was explored. The results showed that a moderate concentration of iron ions (0.06 mg/L) promoted both biofilm formation and EPS production. The presence of EPS accelerated corrosion during the initial stage, while inhibited corrosion at the later stage. The functional groups of EPS acted as electron shuttles to enable the binding of iron ions. Binding of iron ions with EPS led to anodic dissolution and promoted corrosion, while corrosion was later inhibited through oxygen reduction and availability of phosphorus from EPS. The presence of EPS also led to changes in crystalline phases of corrosion products.

  12. Corrosion inhibition of Eleusine aegyptiaca and Croton rottleri leaf extracts on cast iron surface in 1 M HCl medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeswari, Velayutham; Kesavan, Devarayan; Gopiraman, Mayakrishnan; Viswanathamurthi, Periasamy; Poonkuzhali, Kaliyaperumal; Palvannan, Thayumanavan

    2014-09-01

    The adsorption and corrosion inhibition activities of Eleusine aegyptiaca (E. aegyptiaca) and Croton rottleri (C. rottleri) leaf extracts on cast iron corrosion in 1 M hydrochloric acid solution were studied first time by weight loss and electrochemical techniques viz., Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results obtained from the weight loss and electrochemical methods showed that the inhibition efficiency increased with inhibitor concentrations. It was found that the extracts acted as mixed-type inhibitors. The addition of halide additives (KCl, KBr, and KI) on the inhibition efficiency has also been investigated. The adsorption of the inhibitors on cast iron surface both in the presence and absence of halides follows the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The inhibiting nature of the inhibitors was supported by FT-IR, UV-vis, Wide-angle X-ray diffraction and SEM methods.

  13. M"ossbauer study of corrosion and abrasion products in oil transporting pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Raul W.; Perez Mazariego, Jose Luis; Marquina, Vivianne; Marquina, Ma. Luisa; Ridaura, Rosalia; Martinez, Lorenzo

    2012-02-01

    It is known that one of the main technological problems in carbon steel oleoducts is the corrosion produced by different substances, such as water, carbon dioxide, sulfur, and microorganisms. In addition, if in such mixture there is sand, aggressive sludge can be form that abrasions material from the oleoduct. A room temperature M"ossbauer study of corroded material taken from different sites of oleoducts is presented. Most of the M"ossbauer spectra reveal the presence of nanoparticles, indicating that in these pipes the abrasion problem is severe. A preliminary identification of the oxidized samples suggests the presence of magnetite, and some Iron hydroxides. Further studies are in course in order to identify unambiguously the products present in the corroded materials.

  14. Evaluation of iron aluminide weld overlays for erosion - corrosion resistant boiler tube coatings in low NO{sub x} boilers

    SciTech Connect

    DuPont, J.N.; Banovic, S.W.; Marder, A.R.

    1996-08-01

    Low NOx burners are being installed in many fossil fired power plants in order to comply with new Clean Air Regulations. Due to the operating characteristics of these burners, boiler tube sulfidation corrosion is often enhanced and premature tube failures can occur. Failures due to oxidation and solid particle erosion are also a concern. A program was initiated in early 1996 to evaluate the use of iron aluminide weld overlays for erosion/corrosion protection of boiler tubes in Low NOx boilers. Composite iron/aluminum wires will be used with the Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process to prepare overlays on boiler tubes steels with aluminum contents from 8 to 16wt%. The weldability of the composite wires will be evaluated as a function of chemical composition and welding parameters. The effect of overlay composition on corrosion (oxidation and sulfidation) and solid particle erosion will also be evaluated. The laboratory studies will be complemented by field exposures of both iron aluminide weld overlays and co-extruded tubing under actual boiler conditions.

  15. Study of MHD Corrosion and Transport of Corrosion Products of Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in the Flowing PbLi and its Application to Fusion Blanket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeidi, Sheida

    Two important components of a liquid breeder blanket of a fusion power reactor are the liquid breeder/coolant and the steel structure that the liquid is enclosed in. One candidate combination for such components is Lead-Lithium (PbLi) eutectic alloy and advanced Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel. The research performed here is aimed at: (1) better understanding of corrosion processes in the system including RAFM steel and flowing PbLi in the presence of a strong magnetic field and (2) prediction of corrosion losses in conditions of a Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) blanket, which is at present the key liquid metal blanket concept in the US. To do this, numerical and analytical tools have been developed and then applied to the analysis of corrosion processes. First, efforts were taken to develop a computational suite called TRANSMAG (Transport phenomena in Magnetohydrodynamic Flows) as an analysis tool for corrosion processes in the PbLi/RAFM system, including transport of corrosion products in MHD laminar and turbulent flows. The computational approach in TRANSMAG is based on simultaneous solution of flow, energy and mass transfer equations with or without a magnetic field, assuming mass transfer controlled corrosion and uniform dissolution of iron in the flowing PbLi. Then, the new computational tool was used to solve an inverse mass transfer problem where the saturation concentration of iron in PbLi was reconstructed from the experimental data resulting in the following correlation: CS = e 13.604--12975/T, where T is the temperature of PbLi in K and CS is in wppm. The new correlation for saturation concentration was then used in the analysis of corrosion processes in laminar flows in a rectangular duct in the presence of a strong transverse magnetic field. As shown in this study, the mass loss increases with the magnetic field such that the corrosion rate in the presence of a magnetic field can be a few times higher compared to purely

  16. Application of iron electrode corrosion enhanced electrokinetic-Fenton oxidation to remediate diesel contaminated soils: A laboratory feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Tzai-Tang; Sah, Jygau; Kao, Chih-Ming

    2010-01-01

    SummaryDiesel soil contamination on gas stations or refinery plants is a worldwide environmental problem. The main objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate the efficiency of electrokinetic (EK) by using different electrode materials (graphite and iron rods) and electrolytes (tap water, 0.01 M NaCl, and 0.1 M NaCl) on the remediation of diesel contaminated soils, and (2) evaluate the feasibility of total petroleum hydrocarbon-diesel (TPH-D) reducing in soils via EK-Fenton oxidation enhanced by corroded iron electrode. The EK and EK-Fenton experiments were conducted in batch and sand box experiments, respectively. Batch experiments reveal that the most appropriate electrolyte was 0.1 M NaCl when iron electrode was used in the EK system. Sand box experiments indicate that the TPH-D concentration dropped from 10,000 to 300 mg kg -1 when amorphous iron/total iron (Fe o/Fe t) ratio increased from 0.1 to 0.33, with the addition of 8% of H 2O 2 and 0.1 M NaCl after 60 days of EK-Fenton operation. Electrokinetically enhanced oxidation with the presence of both H 2O 2 and Fe 3O 4 (iron electrode corrosion) resulted in higher TPH-D removal efficiency (97%) compared to the efficiencies observed from EK (55%) or Fenton oxidation (27%) alone. This demonstrates that EK-Fenton oxidation catalyzed by iron electrode corrosion is a valuable direction to efficiently and effectively remediate diesel contaminated soils.

  17. A Scanning Auger Microprobe analysis of corrosion products associated with sulfate reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Sadowski, R.A.; Chen, G.; Clayton, C.R.; Kearns, J.R.; Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.J.

    1995-03-01

    A Scanning Auger Microprobe analysis was performed on the corrosion products of an austenitic AISI type 304 SS after a potentiostatic polarization of one volt for ten minutes in a modified Postgate`s C media containing sulfate reducing bacteria. The corrosion products were characterized and mapped in local regions where pitting was observed. A critical evaluation of the applicability of this technique for the examination of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) is presented.

  18. Mass transfer of corrosion products and corrosion of steel in sodium at high hydrogen concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, V. V.; Kozlov, F. A.; Sorokin, A. P.; Varseev, E. V.; Orlova, E. A.; Torbenkova, I. Yu.

    2015-10-01

    Serviceability of steels in a loop having an increased content of hydrogen is estimated. The equilibrium pressure of hydrogen in a sodium loop saturated with hydrogen is around 10 MPa at a temperature of approximately 630°C and around 100 MPa at 800°C. At the hydrogen pressure equal to 10 MPa, steel with a chromium content of 5% is serviceable to a temperature of 840°C, and steel with a chromium content of 25% is serviceable in the entire considered range of temperatures (above 600°C). At a hydrogen pressure of 80 MPa, steel containing 5% of chromium is not serviceable in the entire considered range of temperatures, and steel containing 25% of chromium is serviceable to a temperature of 830°C. The article presents the results from experimental investigations of the effect of hydrogen on corrosion and mass transfer of corrosion products in a sodium loop at the hydrogen concentration in sodium equal to 6 ppm, which were carried out in the high-temperature section of the sodium test facility (the test facility and the investigation methodology were described in the previous publications of the authors). The distributions of chromium and nickel flows toward the walls over the channel length are obtained at increased hydrogen content (around 6 ppm) and at low oxygen content (less than 2 ppm) in sodium and at a temperature of up to 780°C. For the conditions with relatively low content of oxygen and hydrogen in sodium, the experimental values of chromium flow toward the channel wall are consistent with the calculated data. This fact confirms the possibility of using the previously obtained physicochemical constants for calculating the mass transfer of chromium in high-temperature sodium loops at an increased content of hydrogen in sodium.

  19. Iron nutrition, biomass production, and plant product quality.

    PubMed

    Briat, Jean-François; Dubos, Christian; Gaymard, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    One of the grand challenges in modern agriculture is increasing biomass production, while improving plant product quality, in a sustainable way. Of the minerals, iron (Fe) plays a major role in this process because it is essential both for plant productivity and for the quality of their products. Fe homeostasis is an important determinant of photosynthetic efficiency in algae and higher plants, and we review here the impact of Fe limitation or excess on the structure and function of the photosynthetic apparatus. We also discuss the agronomic, plant breeding, and transgenic approaches that are used to remediate Fe deficiency of plants on calcareous soils, and suggest ways to increase the Fe content and bioavailability of the edible parts of crops to improve human diet.

  20. High temperature corrosion behavior of iron-aluminide alloys and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1997-08-01

    The long-term oxidation performance of ingot- and powder-processed Fe-28 at.% Al-(2--5)% Cr alloys with minor oxygen-active element or oxide additions was characterized for exposures in air at 1,000--1,300 C. Additions of zirconium or yttria substantially improved the adhesion of alumina scales grown on iron aluminides. At lower temperatures, the ingot-processed alloys performed similarly to ODS Fe{sub 3}Al alloys and other alumina-formers. However, at 1,200 and 1,300 C, the oxidation resistance of the ingot-processed Fe{sub 3}Al was degraded due to deformation of the substrate and some localized reaction product growth. Other oxidation experiments showed that the addition of an oxide dispersion to iron aluminides reduced the critical aluminum concentration for protective alumina scale formation. Oxide-dispersion-strengthened Fe{sub 3}Al alloys made from commercially prepared powders and an iron-aluminide coating with 21% Al and 1% Cr, prepared by a gas metal arc weld-overlay techniques, showed excellent oxidation/sulfidation resistance.

  1. IRON COATED URANIUM AND ITS PRODUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.

    1960-03-15

    A method of applying a protective coating to a metallic uranium article is given. The method comprises etching the surface of the article with an etchant solution containlng chloride ions, such as a solution of phosphoric acid and hydrochloric acid, cleaning the etched surface, electroplating iron thereon from a ferrous ammonium sulfate electroplating bath, and soldering an aluminum sheath to the resultant iron layer.

  2. Production of iron from metallurgical waste

    DOEpatents

    Hendrickson, David W; Iwasaki, Iwao

    2013-09-17

    A method of recovering metallic iron from iron-bearing metallurgical waste in steelmaking comprising steps of providing an iron-bearing metallurgical waste containing more than 55% by weight FeO and FeO equivalent and a particle size of at least 80% less than 10 mesh, mixing the iron-bearing metallurgical waste with a carbonaceous material to form a reducible mixture where the carbonaceous material is between 80 and 110% of the stoichiometric amount needed to reduce the iron-bearing waste to metallic iron, and as needed additions to provide a silica content between 0.8 and 8% by weight and a ratio of CaO/SiO.sub.2 between 1.4 and 1.8, forming agglomerates of the reducible mixture over a hearth material layer to protect the hearth, heating the agglomerates to a higher temperature above the melting point of iron to form nodules of metallic iron and slag material from the agglomerates by melting.

  3. Electrochemical Studies of Packed Iron Powder Electrodes: Effects of Common Constituents of Natural Waters on Corrosion Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Nurmi, J. T.; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2008-01-01

    Using a powder disk electrode (PDE) made with micron-sized, high purity iron metal we investigated how the corrosion of this material is affected by solution conditions that are relevant to the degradation of containments in environmental remediation applications. Changes in corrosion potential (Ecoor) with time showed that low pH, high concentrations, of chloride, ad natural organic matter led to breakdwon of the passive film. Bicarbonate caused Ecoor to decline into the active potential region rapidly, but the Ecoor rose back into the passive region over 10's of hours. The short term decline in Ecoor was greatest at higher pH's, suggesting a specific effect of HCO3 rather than a general effeoc of pH.

  4. Effect of biologically relevant ions on the corrosion products formed on alloy AZ31B: an improved understanding of magnesium corrosion.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yongseok; Collins, Boyce; Sankar, Jagannathan; Yun, Yeoheung

    2013-11-01

    Simulated physiological solutions mimicking human plasma have been utilized to study the in vitro corrosion of biodegradable metals. However, corrosion and corrosion product formation are different for different solutions with varied responses and, hence, the prediction of in vivo degradation behavior is not feasible based on these studies alone. This paper reports the role of physiologically relevant salts and their concentrations on the corrosion behavior of a magnesium alloy (AZ31B) and subsequent corrosion production formation. Immersion tests were performed for three different concentrations of Ca(2+), HPO4(2-), HCO3(-) to identify the effect of each ion on the corrosion of AZ31B assessed at 1, 3 and 10 days. Time-lapse morphological characterization of the samples was performed using X-ray computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy. The chemical composition of the surface corrosion products was determined by electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results show that: (1) calcium is not present in the corrosion product layer when only Cl(-) and OH(-) anions are available; (2) the presence of phosphate induces formation of a densely packed amorphous magnesium phosphate corrosion product layer when HPO4(2-) and Cl(-) are present in solution; (3) octacalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite (HAp) are deposited on the surface of the magnesium alloy when HPO4(2-) and Ca(2+) are present together in NaCl solution (this coating limits localized corrosion and increases general corrosion resistance); (4) addition of HCO3(-) accelerates the overall corrosion rate, which increases with increasing bicarbonate concentration; (5) the corrosion rate decreases due to the formation of insoluble HAp on the surface when HCO3(-), Ca(2+), and HPO4(2-) are present together.

  5. Bench-scale evaluation of ferrous iron oxidation kinetics in drinking water: effect of corrosion control and dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Safiur; Gagnon, Graham A

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion control strategies are important for many utilities in maintaining water quality from the water treatment plant to the customers' tap. In drinking water with low alkalinity, water quality can become significantly degraded in iron-based pipes if water utilities are not diligent in maintaining proper corrosion control. This article reports on experiments conducted in bicarbonate buffered (5 mg-C/L) synthetic water to determine the effects of corrosion control (pH and phosphate) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the rate constants of the Fe(II) oxidation process. A factorial design approach elucidated that pH (P = 0.007, contribution: 42.5%) and phosphate (P = 0.025, contribution: 22.7%) were the statistically significant factors in the Fe(II) oxidation process at a 95% confidence level. The comprehensive study revealed a significant dependency relationship between the Fe(II) oxidation rate constants (k) and phosphate-to- Fe(II) mole ratio. At pH 6.5, the optimum mole ratio was found to be 0.3 to reduce the k values. Conversely, the k values were observed to increase for the phosphate-to- Fe(II) mole ratio > 1. The factorial design approach revealed that chlorine and DOM for the designated dosages did not cause a statistically significant (α = 0.05, P > 0.05)change in rate constants. However, an increment of the chlorine to ferrous iron mole ratio by a factor of ∼ 2.5 resulted in an increase k values by a factor of ∼ 10. This study conclusively demonstrated that the lowest Fe(II) oxidation rate constant was obtained under low pH conditions (pH ≤ 6.5), with chlorine doses less than 2.2 mg/L and with a phosphate-to-Fe(II) mole ratio ≈ 0.3 in the iron water systems.

  6. Effect of molybdenum plus chromium on the corrosion of iron-, nickel-, and cobalt-base alloys in basaltic lava and simulated magmatic gas at 1150/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, S.A.; Douglass, D.L.

    1982-06-01

    The compatibility of several binary and ternary alloys in a magma environment was studied. Binary alloys containing molybdenum and ternary alloys containing chromium and molybdenum were exposed to basaltic lava at 1150/sup 0/C for periods of 24 and 96 hours. A cover gas was used to produce oxygen and sulfur fugacities corresponding to those of the gases dissolved in basaltic melts. Three base metals were used. These included iron, nickel, and cobalt. The primary reactions in binary alloys were found to be sulfidation. Oxide scales with a spinel layer formed on ternary alloys. The synergistic effect of molybdenum and chromium additions in ternary alloys exhibited superior corrosion resistance to binary alloys which formed base-metal sulfides down grain-boundaries. Extensive analyses of the reaction products by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive analysis, electron microprobe analysis, and metallography are presented for each alloys. The products formed are discussed with reference to thermodynamic stability diagrams, and the reaction path concept is used to explain some of the corrosion.

  7. Excellent anti-corrosive pretreatment layer on iron substrate based on three-dimensional porous phytic acid/silane hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Lu, Ke; Xu, Lei; Xu, Hua; Lu, Haifeng; Gao, Feng; Hou, Shifeng; Ma, Houyi

    2016-01-01

    A novel, highly effective and environmentally friendly film-forming material, phytic acid (PA)/silane (denoted as PAS) hybrid with a three-dimensional (3D) network structure, was prepared through a condensation reaction of PA with methyltrihydroxysilane generated from the hydrolysis of methyltriethoxysilane (MTES). Two kinds of PAS-based pretreatment layers, namely NaBrO3-free and NaBrO3-doped PAS layers, were fabricated on iron substrates using the dip-coating method. SEM and AFM observations showed that the as-fabricated PAS-based layers possessed a 3D porous microstructure at the nanoscale and a rough surface morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopic characterization demonstrated that the above PAS layers bound to the iron surface via the -P-O- bond. Moreover, analyses of steady-state polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) data indicated that the corrosion rates of the iron substrates decreased considerably in the presence of the two PAS-based pretreatment layers. In particular, the NaBrO3-dosed PAS layer displayed the better corrosion resistance ability as well as maintaining the original microstructure and surface morphology. The PAS-based pretreatment layers are expected to act as substitutes for chromate and phosphate conversion layers and will find widespread application in the surface pretreatment of iron and steel materials due to the advantages of being environmentally friendly, the rapid film-forming process, and, especially, the nanoporous microstructure and rough surface morphology.A novel, highly effective and environmentally friendly film-forming material, phytic acid (PA)/silane (denoted as PAS) hybrid with a three-dimensional (3D) network structure, was prepared through a condensation reaction of PA with methyltrihydroxysilane generated from the hydrolysis of methyltriethoxysilane (MTES). Two kinds of PAS-based pretreatment layers, namely Na

  8. Excellent anti-corrosive pretreatment layer on iron substrate based on three-dimensional porous phytic acid/silane hybrid.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Lu, Ke; Xu, Lei; Xu, Hua; Lu, Haifeng; Gao, Feng; Hou, Shifeng; Ma, Houyi

    2016-01-21

    A novel, highly effective and environmentally friendly film-forming material, phytic acid (PA)/silane (denoted as PAS) hybrid with a three-dimensional (3D) network structure, was prepared through a condensation reaction of PA with methyltrihydroxysilane generated from the hydrolysis of methyltriethoxysilane (MTES). Two kinds of PAS-based pretreatment layers, namely NaBrO3-free and NaBrO3-doped PAS layers, were fabricated on iron substrates using the dip-coating method. SEM and AFM observations showed that the as-fabricated PAS-based layers possessed a 3D porous microstructure at the nanoscale and a rough surface morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopic characterization demonstrated that the above PAS layers bound to the iron surface via the -P-O- bond. Moreover, analyses of steady-state polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) data indicated that the corrosion rates of the iron substrates decreased considerably in the presence of the two PAS-based pretreatment layers. In particular, the NaBrO3-dosed PAS layer displayed the better corrosion resistance ability as well as maintaining the original microstructure and surface morphology. The PAS-based pretreatment layers are expected to act as substitutes for chromate and phosphate conversion layers and will find widespread application in the surface pretreatment of iron and steel materials due to the advantages of being environmentally friendly, the rapid film-forming process, and, especially, the nanoporous microstructure and rough surface morphology. PMID:26689810

  9. Excellent anti-corrosive pretreatment layer on iron substrate based on three-dimensional porous phytic acid/silane hybrid.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Lu, Ke; Xu, Lei; Xu, Hua; Lu, Haifeng; Gao, Feng; Hou, Shifeng; Ma, Houyi

    2016-01-21

    A novel, highly effective and environmentally friendly film-forming material, phytic acid (PA)/silane (denoted as PAS) hybrid with a three-dimensional (3D) network structure, was prepared through a condensation reaction of PA with methyltrihydroxysilane generated from the hydrolysis of methyltriethoxysilane (MTES). Two kinds of PAS-based pretreatment layers, namely NaBrO3-free and NaBrO3-doped PAS layers, were fabricated on iron substrates using the dip-coating method. SEM and AFM observations showed that the as-fabricated PAS-based layers possessed a 3D porous microstructure at the nanoscale and a rough surface morphology. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopic characterization demonstrated that the above PAS layers bound to the iron surface via the -P-O- bond. Moreover, analyses of steady-state polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) data indicated that the corrosion rates of the iron substrates decreased considerably in the presence of the two PAS-based pretreatment layers. In particular, the NaBrO3-dosed PAS layer displayed the better corrosion resistance ability as well as maintaining the original microstructure and surface morphology. The PAS-based pretreatment layers are expected to act as substitutes for chromate and phosphate conversion layers and will find widespread application in the surface pretreatment of iron and steel materials due to the advantages of being environmentally friendly, the rapid film-forming process, and, especially, the nanoporous microstructure and rough surface morphology.

  10. GEOCHEMISTRY OF SULFUR IN IRON CORROSION SCALES FOUND IN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron-sulfur geochemistry is important in many natural and engineered environments, including drinking water systems. In the anaerobic environment beneath scales of corroding iron drinking water distribution system pipes, sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) produce sulfide from natu...

  11. Bioaccumulation and food chain transfer of corrosion products from radioactive stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.S.

    1986-07-01

    Two sets of experiments were conducted to determine if corrosion products from radioactive Type 347 stainless steel could be biologically transferred from sediment through a marine food chain, and whether corrosion products dissolved in seawater could be bioaccumulated and then eliminated. Corrosion products containing /sup 60/Co and /sup 63/Ni from the radioactive stainless steel were introduced into marine sediments. Infaunal polychaete worms exposed to these sediments bioaccumulated the radionuclides. The feeding of these worms to shrimp and fish resulted in a trophic transfer of the radioactive products across a one-step food chain. The magnitude of the transfers are described in terms of transfer factors. Dissolved corrosion products as measured by the radionuclides were also bioaccumulated by shrimp and fish concentrating more than fish. Concentration factors were calculated.

  12. Effect of Mercapto and Methyl Groups on the Efficiency of Imidazole and Benzimidazole-based Inhibitors of Iron Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Milošev, Ingrid; Kovačević, Nataša; Kokalj, Anton

    2016-01-01

    We report on the combined experimental and computational study of imidazole- and benzimidazole-based corrosion inhibitors containing methyl and/or mercapto groups. Electrochemical measurements and long-term immersion tests were performed on iron in NaCl solution, whilst computational study explicitly addresses the molecular level details of the bonding on iron surface by means of density functional theory calculations (DFT). Experimental data were the basis for the determination of inhibition efficiency and mechanism. Methyl group combined with mercapto group has a beneficial effect on corrosion inhibition at all inhibitor concentrations. The beneficial effect of mercapto group combined with benzene group is not so pronounced as when combined with methyl group. The latter is in stark contrast with the behaviour found previously on copper, where the effect of methyl group was detrimental and that of mercapto and benzene beneficial. Explicit DFT calculations reveal that methyl-group has a small effect on the inhibitor-surface interaction. In contrast, the presence of mercapto group involves the strong S-surface bonding and consequently the adsorption of inhibitors with mercapto group is found to be more exothermic.

  13. Effect of Mercapto and Methyl Groups on the Efficiency of Imidazole and Benzimidazole-based Inhibitors of Iron Corrosion.

    PubMed

    Milošev, Ingrid; Kovačević, Nataša; Kokalj, Anton

    2016-01-01

    We report on the combined experimental and computational study of imidazole- and benzimidazole-based corrosion inhibitors containing methyl and/or mercapto groups. Electrochemical measurements and long-term immersion tests were performed on iron in NaCl solution, whilst computational study explicitly addresses the molecular level details of the bonding on iron surface by means of density functional theory calculations (DFT). Experimental data were the basis for the determination of inhibition efficiency and mechanism. Methyl group combined with mercapto group has a beneficial effect on corrosion inhibition at all inhibitor concentrations. The beneficial effect of mercapto group combined with benzene group is not so pronounced as when combined with methyl group. The latter is in stark contrast with the behaviour found previously on copper, where the effect of methyl group was detrimental and that of mercapto and benzene beneficial. Explicit DFT calculations reveal that methyl-group has a small effect on the inhibitor-surface interaction. In contrast, the presence of mercapto group involves the strong S-surface bonding and consequently the adsorption of inhibitors with mercapto group is found to be more exothermic. PMID:27640381

  14. Method for forming a layer of synthetic corrosion products on tubing surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Lane, Michael H.; Salamon, Eugene J. M.

    1996-01-01

    A method is provided for forming a synthetic corrosion product layer on tube surfaces. The method utilizes two dissimilar materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion. An object tube and sacrificial tube are positioned one inside the other such that an annular region is created between the two tubes' surfaces. A slurry of synthetic corrosion products is injected into this annular region and the assembly is heat treated. This heat causes the tubes to expand, the inner tube with the higher coefficient of expansion expanding more than the outer tube, thereby creating internal pressures which consolidate the corrosion products and adhere the corrosion products to the tubing surfaces. The sacrificial tube may then be removed by conventional chemical etching or mechanical methods.

  15. A comparative study on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of iron and X-65 steel in 4.0 wt % sodium chloride solution after different exposure intervals.

    PubMed

    Sherif, El-Sayed M

    2014-07-09

    In this work, the results obtained from studying the anodic dissolution of pure iron and API X-65 5L pipeline steel after 40 min and 12 h exposure period in 4.0 wt % NaCl solutions at room temperature were reported. Potential-time, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, potentiodynamic polarization, and chronoamperometric current-time at constant potential techniques were employed. It has been found that the iron electrode corrodes in the chloride test solutions faster than the API X-65 5L steel does under the same conditions. Increasing the exposure period for the electrodes from 40 min to 12 h showed a significant reduction in the corrosion parameters for both iron and steel in the 4.0 wt % NaCl solution. Results together confirmed clearly that the X-65 steel is superior to iron against corrosion in sodium chloride solutions.

  16. Carbon dioxide corrosion in cool production wells of a high pressure steam drive

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, R.W.; Treseder, R.S.; Craycraft, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    Severe localized corrosion of carbon steel tubing and flowlines in production wells from a high pressure steam drive occurred during the first 6 weeks of operation. Corrosion was attributed to carbon dioxide, with localization occurring at points of high temperature. Corrosion rates declined rapidly as the wellhead temperatures in the production wells increased from 38 to above 100 C, and the hydrogen sulfide content of the gas increased from a trace to 1--2%. The inhibiting effect of hydrogen sulfide is consistent with observations in other high carbon dioxide environments.

  17. Iron Depletion Enhances Production of Antimicrobials by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Angela T.; Jones, Jace W.; Ruge, Max A.; Kane, Maureen A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a heritable disease characterized by chronic, polymicrobial lung infections. While Staphylococcus aureus is the dominant lung pathogen in young CF patients, Pseudomonas aeruginosa becomes predominant by adulthood. P. aeruginosa produces a variety of antimicrobials that likely contribute to this shift in microbial populations. In particular, secretion of 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolones (AQs) contributes to lysis of S. aureus in coculture, providing an iron source to P. aeruginosa both in vitro and in vivo. We previously showed that production of one such AQ, the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), is enhanced by iron depletion and that this induction is dependent upon the iron-responsive PrrF small RNAs (sRNAs). Here, we demonstrate that antimicrobial activity against S. aureus during coculture is also enhanced by iron depletion, and we provide evidence that multiple AQs contribute to this activity. Strikingly, a P. aeruginosa ΔprrF mutant, which produces very little PQS in monoculture, was capable of mediating iron-regulated growth suppression of S. aureus. We show that the presence of S. aureus suppresses the ΔprrF1,2 mutant's defect in iron-regulated PQS production, indicating that a PrrF-independent iron regulatory pathway mediates AQ production in coculture. We further demonstrate that iron-regulated antimicrobial production is conserved in multiple P. aeruginosa strains, including clinical isolates from CF patients. These results demonstrate that iron plays a central role in modulating interactions of P. aeruginosa with S. aureus. Moreover, our studies suggest that established iron regulatory pathways of these pathogens are significantly altered during polymicrobial infections. IMPORTANCE Chronic polymicrobial infections involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, as the interplay between these two organisms exacerbates infection. This is in part due to enhanced

  18. Spontaneous activation of CO2 and corrosion pathways on iron surface Fe(100): a quantum mechanical study informed by DFT-based dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glezakou, V. A.; McGrail, P.; Dang, L. X.

    2009-12-01

    Because of the rapidly increasing interest in technologies for capturing and permanently sequestering CO2 as part of a climate change mitigation strategy, understanding the interaction of CO2 with materials that comprise a sequestration system (steels, cements, silicate minerals, etc.) is of fundamental importance. The majority of models for corrosion of metals involve water-mediated processes, with CO2 dissolved in the aqueous phase playing a minor role in the process. In contrast, recent experiments with mild steels have shown that much greater corrosivity actually occurs in the dense CO2 phase, provided sufficient molecular water is present in the CO2 phase to catalyse certain reactions. In our study, we use DFT-based dynamics to study the internal structure of the the super-critical CO2/(H2O)n system, with n=0-4. While water does not disturb the super-critical CO2 phase, it also gives rise to short-lived CO2...H2O bonds which are likely to facilitate the activation of CO2 on the surface, but otherwise maintains its molecular form. We also use DFT methods to probe the fundamental interactions of CO2 or SO2 and H2O with clean or doped iron surfaces and determine the reactive pathways that lead to CO2 chemisorption, dissociation and further formation of corrosion products in the form of carbonates or sulfites. DFT-based molecular dynamics are employed to sample the configurational space of reactants and products more efficiently. CO2 adsorbs readily on the surface assuming a bent geometry, indicative of charge transfer from the surface to CO2, which closely resembles a CO2- moiety. Once CO2 is adsorbed, it can decompose to adsorbed O+CO, which further reacts with CO2 or SO2 to form corrosion products. Molecularly adsorbed water acts as catalyst to lower these reaction barriers. Clearly, the reactive pathways on the surface are quite different than those in aqueous solution. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy.

  19. A study on the production processes of granulated iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokhrina, O. I.; Rozhikhina, I. D.; Khodosov, I. E.

    2016-09-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental studies on the production process of high-quality granulated iron using hematite-magnetite iron ore and coal of different brands as a raw material are presented. According to the research the optimal coal consumption, temperature and time parameters of the metallization process, necessary for obtaining metallized materials with the specified composition and metallization degree, are defined. The conditions for the formation of metal granules with high content (over 98%) of primary iron are found. The process includes two stages: initially the solid-phase reduction of iron from oxides with production of metallized sponge material is carried out, further as the temperature increases the separation of slag and metal phases takes place.

  20. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Choi, J; Haslam, J; Day, S; Yang, N; Headley, T; Lucadamo, G; Yio, J; Chames, J; Gardea, A; Clift, M; Blue, G; Peters, W; Rivard, J; Harper, D; Swank, D; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Brown, R; Wolejsza, T; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Aprigliano, L; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Lavernia, E; Schoenung, J; Ajdelsztajn, L; Dannenberg, J; Graeve, O; Lewandowski, J; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Boudreau, J

    2007-09-20

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  1. Production of direct reduced iron using coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sanzenbacher, C.W.

    1982-10-01

    The use of direct reduced iron as feedstock is rapidly becoming more attractive as electric arc steelmaking continues to grow worldwide. Because of uncertainties in both price and availability of natural gas in the US, coal is being investigated as a stable energy source. Current technology is presented in this paper including coal gasification with direct reduction shaft furnaces, coke-oven gas in direct reduction, and the Midrex electrothermal direct reduction process which involves the use of coal and electrical energy.

  2. LITERATURE REVIEW ON THE SORPTION OF PLUTONIUM, URANIUM, NEPTUNIUM, AMERICIUM AND TECHNETIUM TO CORROSION PRODUCTS ON WASTE TANK LINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Kaplan, D.

    2012-02-29

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has conducted performance assessment (PA) calculations to determine the risk associated with closing liquid waste tanks. The PA estimates the risk associated with a number of scenarios, making various assumptions. Throughout all of these scenarios, it is assumed that the carbon-steel tank liners holding the liquid waste do not sorb the radionuclides. Tank liners have been shown to form corrosion products, such as Fe-oxyhydroxides (Wiersma and Subramanian 2002). Many corrosion products, including Fe-oxyhydroxides, at the high pH values of tank effluent, take on a very strong negative charge. Given that many radionuclides may have net positive charges, either as free ions or complexed species, it is expected that many radionuclides will sorb to corrosion products associated with tank liners. The objective of this report was to conduct a literature review to investigate whether Pu, U, Np, Am and Tc would sorb to corrosion products on tank liners after they were filled with reducing grout (cementitious material containing slag to promote reducing conditions). The approach was to evaluate radionuclides sorption literature with iron oxyhydroxide phases, such as hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) and ferrihydrite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} {center_dot} 0.5H{sub 2}O). The primary interest was the sorption behavior under tank closure conditions where the tanks will be filled with reducing cementitious materials. Because there were no laboratory studies conducted using site specific experimental conditions, (e.g., high pH and HLW tank aqueous and solid phase chemical conditions), it was necessary to extend the literature review to lower pH studies and noncementitious conditions. Consequently, this report relied on existing lower pH trends, existing geochemical modeling, and experimental spectroscopic evidence conducted at lower pH levels. The scope did not include evaluating the appropriateness

  3. Integrating Mobile Phones into Science Teaching to Help Students Develop a Procedure to Evaluate the Corrosion Rate of Iron in Simulated Seawater

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraes, Edgar P.; Confessor, Mario R.; Gasparotto, Luiz H. S.

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes an indirect method to evaluate the corrosion rate of iron nail in simulated seawater. The official procedure is based on the direct measurement of the specimen's weight loss over time; however, a highly precise scale is required and such equipment may not be easily available. On the other hand, mobile phones equipped with…

  4. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Microstructure and Corrosion Performance of Carbonitriding Layers on Cast Iron by Plasma Electrolytic Carbonitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Hua; Lv, Guo-Hua; Chen, Huan; Wang, Xin-Quan; Zhang, Gu-Ling; Yang, Si-Ze

    2009-08-01

    The surface carbonitriding of cast iron is investigated in an aqueous solution of acetamide and glycerin. Microstructure, chemical and phase composition and corrosion performance of the carbonitriding layers are investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction, as well as potentiodynamic polarization testing. X-ray diffraction results show that the carbonitriding coatings are composed of martensite, austenite(γ-Fe), Fe2C, Fe3C, Fe5C2, FeN and in-Fe2-3N. After the plasma electrolytic carbonitriding treatment the corrosion resistance of cast iron is clearly improved compared to the substrate, and the coatings produced at 350 V for 30s give the best corrosion resistance.

  5. Corrosion fatigue of iron-chromium-nickel alloys: Fracture mechanics and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, R.P.

    1990-11-29

    Peak bare-surface current densities based on the scratched electrode test are seriously in error and repasivation rates grossly overestimated. Influences of potential and pH on reactions of bare surfaces are better understood. Correlation between charge transfer and corrosion fatigue crack growth response was established for Fe18Cr12Ni alloy in deaerated 0.6N NaCl at RT. Strong correlation was established between morphology of corrosion fatigue fracture surfaces and cracking in hydrogen charged samples. Attempts at growing bicrystals by strain annealing were not successful.

  6. Alkalinity, pH, and copper corrosion by-product release

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M.; Meyer, T.E.; Schock, M.R.

    1996-03-01

    Contrary to expectations, higher bicarbonate concentrations exacerbate copper corrosion rates and by-product release. In fact, as illustrated by monitoring experiences of large utilities and by laboratory data, the concentration of copper corrosion by-products in drinking water increases linearly with bicarbonate concentration at constant pH. This relationship implicates cupric hydroxide solubility in control of copper release from relatively new (less than a few years old) copper plumbing. Decision-marking guidance from a traditional Larson`s ratio or Langelier index approach can aggravate copper corrosion problems; consequently, their use should be discontinued for copper corrosion mitigation. In contrast, aeration-CO{sub 2} stripping is a particularly attractive strategy because benefits from higher pH are realized without adverse effects from higher alkalinity.

  7. Role of orthophosphate as a corrosion inhibitor in chloraminated solutions containing tetravalent lead corrosion product PbO2.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ding-Quan; Strathmann, Timothy J; Lin, Yi-Pin

    2012-10-16

    Addition of orthophosphate has been commonly employed to suppress lead levels in drinking water. Its detailed mechanism and time required for it to become effective, however, have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the mechanistic role of orthophosphate as a corrosion inhibitor in controlling lead release from tetravalent lead corrosion product PbO(2) in chloraminated solutions, a system representing distribution networks experiencing disinfectant changeover from free chlorine to monochloramine. In all experiments with orthophosphate addition of at least 1 mg/L as P, peaking of soluble Pb(II) concentration within the first 24 h was observed before lead concentrations decreased and stabilized at levels lower than 15 μg/L. The variation of soluble Pb(II) concentration could be attributed to the dynamics between the rate of PbO(2) reductive dissolution, primarily induced by monochloramine decomposition, and that of chloropyromorphite (Pb(5)(PO(4))(3)Cl) precipitation, which did not occur until a critical supersaturation ratio of about 2.36 was reached in the solution. Our findings provide insights to how orthophosphate reduces lead levels under drinking water conditions and highlight the potential risk of short-term elevated lead concentrations. Intensive monitoring following the disinfectant changeover may be required to determine the overall lead exposure when using orthophosphate as a corrosion inhibitor.

  8. Role of orthophosphate as a corrosion inhibitor in chloraminated solutions containing tetravalent lead corrosion product PbO2.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ding-Quan; Strathmann, Timothy J; Lin, Yi-Pin

    2012-10-16

    Addition of orthophosphate has been commonly employed to suppress lead levels in drinking water. Its detailed mechanism and time required for it to become effective, however, have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the mechanistic role of orthophosphate as a corrosion inhibitor in controlling lead release from tetravalent lead corrosion product PbO(2) in chloraminated solutions, a system representing distribution networks experiencing disinfectant changeover from free chlorine to monochloramine. In all experiments with orthophosphate addition of at least 1 mg/L as P, peaking of soluble Pb(II) concentration within the first 24 h was observed before lead concentrations decreased and stabilized at levels lower than 15 μg/L. The variation of soluble Pb(II) concentration could be attributed to the dynamics between the rate of PbO(2) reductive dissolution, primarily induced by monochloramine decomposition, and that of chloropyromorphite (Pb(5)(PO(4))(3)Cl) precipitation, which did not occur until a critical supersaturation ratio of about 2.36 was reached in the solution. Our findings provide insights to how orthophosphate reduces lead levels under drinking water conditions and highlight the potential risk of short-term elevated lead concentrations. Intensive monitoring following the disinfectant changeover may be required to determine the overall lead exposure when using orthophosphate as a corrosion inhibitor. PMID:22958199

  9. A Comparison of the Corrosion Resistance of Iron-Based Amorphous Metals and Austenitic Alloys in Synthetic Brines at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C

    2008-11-25

    Several hard, corrosion-resistant and neutron-absorbing iron-based amorphous alloys have now been developed that can be applied as thermal spray coatings. These new alloys include relatively high concentrations of Cr, Mo, and W for enhanced corrosion resistance, and substantial B to enable both glass formation and neutron absorption. The corrosion resistances of these novel alloys have been compared to that of several austenitic alloys in a broad range of synthetic brines, with and without nitrate inhibitor, at elevated temperature. Linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy have been used for in situ measurement of corrosion rates for prolonged periods of time, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) have been used for ex situ characterization of samples at the end of tests. The application of these new coatings for the protection of spent nuclear fuel storage systems, equipment in nuclear service, steel-reinforced concrete will be discussed.

  10. Impaired interleukin 1 production by rat leukocytes during iron deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Helyar, L.; Sherman, A.R.

    1986-03-05

    Because specific leukocyte functions and protein synthesis in general are impaired in iron deficiency, the production of interleukin 1 (IL-1) by peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) was examined in iron-deficient and control rats. Three groups of weanling male SD rats (n=19-22) were fed a semi-purified diet containing 6, 12, or 35 ppm iron in order to produce severe iron deficiency (SID), moderate iron deficiency (MID), or adequate iron status (AIS). Animals were killed at 42-47 d of age and acute PEC harvested. Crude IL-1 samples were prepared from these PEC, and assayed for activity by in vitro and in vivo methods. IL-1 preparations from SID and MID rats enhanced mouse thymocyte proliferation in vitro less than half as much as IL-1 preparations from AIS rats (p = 0.01). In a rabbit bioassay, injection of IL-1 prepared with 1 x 10/sup 7/ PEC from either SID or MID rats resulted in virtually no change in maximum body temperature. In contrast, IL-1 from AIS source PEC produced a marked change in maximum body temperature of approximately 0.5 F, which was significantly different from the other two groups (p < 0.01). IL-1 preparations from SID or MID source PEC decreased rabbit plasma iron and zinc only one-third to one-eight as much as IL-1 from AIS source PEC (p less than or equal to 0.01). Severe or moderate iron deficiency clearly impairs IL-1 production by rat PEC. This may be another mechanism by which this nutritional deficiency alters the immune inflammatory response.

  11. Corrosion consequences and inhibition of galvanic couples in petroleum production equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.L.

    1995-06-01

    Electrochemical potential and polarization behavior measurements made in the laboratory, along with zero resistance ammeter (ZRA) measurements made under laboratory and field conditions, were used to delineate galvanic behavior in petroleum production equipment. These measurements, confirmed by electrode weight loss data, were used to predict corrosion rates for brass/carbon steel and stainless steel/carbon steel couples in the presence and absence of a corrosion inhibitor.

  12. Rust and corrosion in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: the problem of iron and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Evens, A M; Mehta, J; Gordon, L I

    2004-10-01

    Iron overload is a common acute and long-term event associated with autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In a state of iron excess, free iron becomes available to catalyze the conversion of reactive oxygen species (ROS) intermediates such as superoxide anion (O2*-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to highly toxic free radicals such as hydroxyl radical (OH*). ROS may help to promote chronic liver disease, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, idiopathic pneumonia syndrome and bacterial, fungal and other opportunistic infections. Phlebotomy has been effectively and safely used to deplete excess iron stores post-HSCT in thalassemic and other iron-overloaded patients. Intracellular iron levels may also be decreased through pharmacologic chelating agents, while antioxidants such as N-acetylcysteine, glutamine (glutathione precursor) and captopril have been shown to replenish glutathione redox potential and scavenge free radicals. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the iron-generated pro-oxidant state associated with HSCT will likely lead to reduced toxicity and improved patient outcomes.

  13. An investigation of the corrosion of polycrystalline iron by XPS, TMS and CEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idczak, K.; Idczak, R.; Konieczny, R.

    2016-06-01

    The room temperature studies of polycrystalline iron exposed to air at various temperatures were performed using: the transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy (TMS), the conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The unique combination of these techniques allows to determine changes of chemical composition and content of iron oxides simultaneously on the surface region, the 300 nm pre-surface region and the bulk of the samples. The results show that the chemical composition of samples changes significantly and it is strongly dependent on temperature at which the iron sample is exposed to air as well as on investigated region.

  14. Corrosion of aluminides by molten nitrate salt

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Bishop, P.S.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion of titanium-, iron-, and nickel-based aluminides by a highly aggressive, oxidizing NaNO{sub 3}(-KNO{sub 3})-Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} has been studied at 650{degree}C. It was shown that weight changes could be used to effectively evaluate corrosion behavior in the subject nitrate salt environments provided these data were combined with salt analyses and microstructural examinations. The studies indicated that the corrosion of relatively resistant aluminides by these nitrate salts proceeded by oxidation and a slow release from an aluminum-rich product layer into the salt at rates lower than that associated with many other types of metallic materials. The overall corrosion process and resulting rate depended on the particular aluminide being exposed. In order to minimize corrosion of nickel or iron aluminides, it was necessary to have aluminum concentrations in excess of 30 at. %. However, even at a concentration of 50 at. % Al, the corrosion resistance of TiAl was inferior to that of Ni{sub 3}Al and Fe{sub 3}Al. At higher aluminum concentrations, iron, nickel, and iron-nickel aluminides exhibited quite similar weight changes, indicative of the principal role of aluminum in controlling the corrosion process in NaNO{sub 3}(-KNO{sub 3})-Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} salts. 20 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Iron-niobium-aluminum alloy having high-temperature corrosion resistance

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Huey S.

    1988-04-14

    An alloy for use in high temperature sulfur and oxygen containing environments, having aluminum for oxygen resistance, niobium for sulfur resistance and the balance iron, is discussed. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Iron management and production of electricity by microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Folgosa, Filipe; Tavares, Pedro; Pereira, Alice S

    2015-10-01

    The increasing dependency on fossil fuels has driven researchers to seek for alternative energy sources. Renewable energy sources such as sunlight, wind, or water are the most common. However, since the 1990s, other sources for energy production have been studied. The use of microorganisms such as bacteria or archaea to produce energy is currently in great progress. These present several advantages even when compared with other renewable energy sources. Besides the energy production, they are also involved in bioremediation such as the removal of heavy metal contaminants from soils or wastewaters. Several research groups have demonstrated that these organisms are able to interact with electrodes via heme and non-heme iron proteins. Therefore, the role of iron as well as iron metabolism in these species must be of enormous relevance. Recently, the influence of cellular iron regulation by Fur in the Geobacter sulfurreducens growth and ability to produce energy was demonstrated. In this review, we aim to briefly describe the most relevant proteins involved in the iron metabolism of bacteria and archaea and relate them and their biological function with the ability of selected organisms to produce energy.

  17. 77 FR 301 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea: Institution of Five-Year...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ...-resistant carbon steel flat products from Korea (58 FR 43752). On August 19, 1993, Commerce issued... corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from Germany and Korea (72 FR 7009). The Commission is now... COMMISSION Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea: Institution of...

  18. High-temperature corrosion of iron in sulfur dioxide at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Gilewicz-Wolter, J.

    1996-08-01

    The composition and morphology of scales formed on iron in sulfur dioxide at 3 x 10{sup 3} Pa and 1073 K have been investigated by means of various X-ray techniques of analysis (XRD, EDAX, EPMA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The transport phenomena have been studied using platinum markers and tracers. The scales were composed of a sulfide and oxide mixture and grew by outward diffusion of iron. There was also some inward transport of sulfur and oxygen which occured through the discontinuities of the scale. These oxidants, as well as those originating from the dissociation of the scale, take part in the formation of the inner scale layers in the metal-consumption zone. The initial stage of the process proceeds mainly by the reaction of iron with SO{sub 2} molecules.

  19. Pacific patterns of dust deposition, iron supply and export production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winckler, G.; Anderson, R. F.; Park, J.; Schwartz, R.; Pahnke, K.; Struve, T.; Lamy, F.; Gersonde, R.

    2015-12-01

    The scarcity of iron limits marine export production and carbon uptake in about a quarter of the global ocean where the surface concentration of nitrate and phosphate is high, as biological utilization of these macronutrients is incomplete. Of these high nutrient low chlorophyll (HNLC) regions, the Southern Ocean is the region where variations in iron availability can have the largest effect on Earth's carbon cycle through its fertilizing effect on marine ecosystems, both in the modern and in the past. Recent work in the Subantarctic South Atlantic (Martínez-Garcia et al., 2009, 2014, Anderson et al., 2014) suggests that dust-driven iron fertilization lowered atmospheric CO2 by up to 40 ppm in the latter half of each glacial cycle of the late Pleistocene, with the increase in Subantarctic productivity consuming a greater fraction of the surface nutrients and thus driving more storage of carbon in the ocean interior. The other sectors of the Southern Ocean remain poorly constrained, including the Pacific Sector, that accounts for the largest surface area of the Subantarctic Southern Ocean. Here we report records of dust deposition, iron supply and export production from a set of cores from the Subantarctic Pacific (PS75, Lamy et al 2014) and initial results about the origin of dust transported to the Subantarctic Pacific Ocean from radiogenic isotopes and rare earth elements. We test how tightly dust and biological productivity are coupled over glacial/interglacial and millennial timescales in the Subantarctic Pacific and place the region in a context of global patterns of biological productivity, nutrient utilization and iron fertilization by dust, including comparisons to the other Pacific HNLC regions, the Subarctic North Pacific and equatorial Pacific.

  20. Corrosion fatigue of iron-chromium-nickel alloys: Fracture mechanics, microstructure and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, R.P.

    1993-01-25

    Phase transformation and cracking during RT aging of charged, high-purity Fe18Cr12Ni alloy and commerical 304 ss were examined; results show that [epsilon]* (hcp) hydride formed on Fe18Cr12Ni upon charging, and it decomposed rapidly to form first [epsilon] and then [alpha]' martensite. Morphology of fracture surfaces of Fe18Cr12Ni produced by corrosion fatigue in NaCl solutions and in hydrogen was found to be identical. Effort was made to examine the approaches and methodologies used in service life predictions and reliability analyses.

  1. Application of Mössbauer spectroscopy on corrosion products of NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekan, J.; Lipka, J.; Slugeň, V.

    2013-04-01

    Steam generator (SG) is generally one of the most important components at all nuclear power plants (NPP) with close impact to safe and long-term operation. Material degradation and corrosion/erosion processes are serious risks for long-term reliable operation. Steam generators of four VVER-440 units at nuclear power plants V-1 and V-2 in Jaslovske Bohunice (Slovakia) were gradually changed by new original "Bohunice" design in period 1994-1998, in order to improve corrosion resistance of SGs. Corrosion processes before and after these design and material changes in Bohunice secondary circuit were studied using Mössbauer spectroscopy during last 25 years. Innovations in the feed water pipeline design as well as material composition improvements were evaluated positively. Mössbauer spectroscopy studies of phase composition of corrosion products were performed on real specimens scrapped from water pipelines or in form of filters deposits. Newest results in our long-term corrosion study confirm good operational experiences and suitable chemical regimes (reduction environment) which results mostly in creation of magnetite (on the level 70 % or higher) and small portions of hematite, goethite or hydrooxides. Regular observation of corrosion/erosion processes is essential for keeping NPP operation on high safety level. The output from performed material analyses influences the optimisation of operating chemical regimes and it can be used in optimisation of regimes at decontamination and passivation of pipelines or secondary circuit components. It can be concluded that a longer passivation time leads more to magnetite fraction in the corrosion products composition.

  2. Modeling of hydrogen sulfide oxidation in concrete corrosion products from sewer pipes.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2009-04-01

    Abiotic and biotic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide related to concrete corrosion was studied in corrosion products originating from a sewer manhole. The concrete corrosion products were suspended in an acidic solution, mimicking the conditions in the pore water of corroded concrete. The removal of hydrogen sulfide and dissolved oxygen was measured in parallel in the suspension, upon which the suspension was sterilized and the measurement repeated. The results revealed the biotic oxidation to be fast compared with the abiotic oxidation. The stoichiometry of the hydrogen sulfide oxidation was evaluated using the ratio between oxygen and hydrogen sulfide uptake. The ratio for the biotic oxidation pointed in the direction of elemental sulfur being formed as an intermediate in the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfuric acid. The experimental results were applied to suggest a hypothesis and a mathematical model describing the hydrogen sulfide oxidation pathway in a matrix of corroded concrete. PMID:19445325

  3. Influence of solid corrosion by-products on the consumption of dissolved oxygen in copper pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Ignacio T.; Alsina, Marco A.; Pastén, Pablo A.; Pizarro, Gonzalo E.

    2009-06-12

    Research on corrosion of copper pipes has given little consideration to the influence of solid corrosion by-products on the processes occurring at the metal-liquid interface. Consequently, the effect of such solid phases on the rate of dissolved oxygen (DO) consumption remains poorly understood. In-situ experiments were performed in copper pipes under different carbonate concentrations and ageing times. Our results show that the amount of solid corrosion by-products and concentration of hydrogen ions affect the rate of DO consumption during stagnation. Furthermore, our findings support the existing hypothesis that the available concentration of hydrogen ions, rather than DO, is the limiting factor for copper release into drinking water.

  4. Modeling of hydrogen sulfide oxidation in concrete corrosion products from sewer pipes.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Henriette Stokbro; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Vollertsen, Jes

    2009-04-01

    Abiotic and biotic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide related to concrete corrosion was studied in corrosion products originating from a sewer manhole. The concrete corrosion products were suspended in an acidic solution, mimicking the conditions in the pore water of corroded concrete. The removal of hydrogen sulfide and dissolved oxygen was measured in parallel in the suspension, upon which the suspension was sterilized and the measurement repeated. The results revealed the biotic oxidation to be fast compared with the abiotic oxidation. The stoichiometry of the hydrogen sulfide oxidation was evaluated using the ratio between oxygen and hydrogen sulfide uptake. The ratio for the biotic oxidation pointed in the direction of elemental sulfur being formed as an intermediate in the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfuric acid. The experimental results were applied to suggest a hypothesis and a mathematical model describing the hydrogen sulfide oxidation pathway in a matrix of corroded concrete.

  5. 77 FR 24221 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea; Notice of Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... institution (77 FR 301, January 4, 2012) were adequate. A record of the Commissioners' votes, the Commission's... COMMISSION Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea; Notice of Commission... countervailing duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from Korea and the antidumping...

  6. 76 FR 77775 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... FR 54209 (August 31, 2011) (``Preliminary Results''). The final results were originally due no later... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from the Republic of Korea... countervailing duty order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products from the Republic of Korea...

  7. Sulphide production and corrosion in seawaters during exposure to FAME diesel.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason S; Ray, Richard I; Little, Brenda J; Duncan, Kathleen E; Oldham, Athenia L; Davidova, Irene A; Suflita, Joseph M

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were designed to evaluate the corrosion-related consequences of storing/transporting fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) alternative diesel fuel in contact with natural seawater. Coastal Key West, FL (KW), and Persian Gulf (PG) seawaters, representing an oligotrophic and a more organic- and inorganic mineral-rich environment, respectively, were used in 60 day incubations with unprotected carbon steel. The original microflora of the two seawaters were similar with respect to major taxonomic groups but with markedly different species. After exposure to FAME diesel, the microflora of the waters changed substantially, with Clostridiales (Firmicutes) becoming dominant in both. Despite low numbers of sulphate-reducing bacteria in the original waters and after FAME diesel exposure, sulphide levels and corrosion increased markedly due to microbial sulphide production. Corrosion morphology was in the form of isolated pits surrounded by an intact, passive surface with the deepest pits associated with the fuel/seawater interface in the KW exposure. In the presence of FAME diesel, the highest corrosion rates measured by linear polarization occurred in the KW exposure correlating with significantly higher concentrations of sulphur and chlorine (presumed sulphide and chloride, respectively) in the corrosion products. PMID:22594394

  8. Corrosion considerations for thermochemical biomass liquefaction process systems in biofuel production

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brady, Michael P.; Keiser, James R.; Leonard, Donovan N.; Whitmer, Lysle; Thomson, Jeffery K.

    2014-11-11

    Thermochemical liquifaction processing of biomass to produce bio-derived fuels (e.g. gasoline, jet fuel, diesel, home heating oil, etc.) is of great recent interest as a renewable energy source. Approaches under investigation include direct liquefaction, hydrothermal liquefaction, hydropyrolysis, fast pyrolysis, etc. to produce energy dense liquids that can be utilized as produced or further processed to provide products of higher value. An issue with bio-oils is that they tend to contain significant concentrations of organic compounds, which make the bio-oil acidic and a potential source of corrosion issues in in transport, storage, and use. Efforts devoted to modified/further processing of bio-oilsmore » to make them less corrosive are currently being widely pursued. Another aspect that must also be addressed is potential corrosion issues in the bio-oil liquefaction process equipment itself. Depending on the specific process, bio-oil liquefaction production temperatures can reach up to 400-600 °C, and involve the presence of aggressive sulfur, and halide species from both the biomass used and/or process additives. Detailed knowledge of the corrosion resistance of candidate process equipment alloys in these bio-oil production environments is currently lacking. Lastly, this paper summarizes our recent, ongoing efforts to assess the extent to which corrosion of bio-oil process equipment may be an issue, with the ultimate goal of providing the basis to select the lowest cost alloy grades capable of providing the long-term corrosion resistance needed for future bio-oil production plants.« less

  9. Corrosion considerations for thermochemical biomass liquefaction process systems in biofuel production

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P.; Keiser, James R.; Leonard, Donovan N.; Whitmer, Lysle; Thomson, Jeffery K.

    2014-11-11

    Thermochemical liquifaction processing of biomass to produce bio-derived fuels (e.g. gasoline, jet fuel, diesel, home heating oil, etc.) is of great recent interest as a renewable energy source. Approaches under investigation include direct liquefaction, hydrothermal liquefaction, hydropyrolysis, fast pyrolysis, etc. to produce energy dense liquids that can be utilized as produced or further processed to provide products of higher value. An issue with bio-oils is that they tend to contain significant concentrations of organic compounds, which make the bio-oil acidic and a potential source of corrosion issues in in transport, storage, and use. Efforts devoted to modified/further processing of bio-oils to make them less corrosive are currently being widely pursued. Another aspect that must also be addressed is potential corrosion issues in the bio-oil liquefaction process equipment itself. Depending on the specific process, bio-oil liquefaction production temperatures can reach up to 400-600 °C, and involve the presence of aggressive sulfur, and halide species from both the biomass used and/or process additives. Detailed knowledge of the corrosion resistance of candidate process equipment alloys in these bio-oil production environments is currently lacking. Lastly, this paper summarizes our recent, ongoing efforts to assess the extent to which corrosion of bio-oil process equipment may be an issue, with the ultimate goal of providing the basis to select the lowest cost alloy grades capable of providing the long-term corrosion resistance needed for future bio-oil production plants.

  10. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  11. Study of archaeological artefacts to refine the model of iron long-term indoor atmospheric corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, J.; Legrand, L.; Bellot-Gurlet, L.; Foy, E.; Reguer, S.; Rocca, E.; Dillmann, P.; Neff, D.; Mirambet, F.; Perrin, S.; Guillot, I.

    2008-09-01

    The study of long-term indoor atmospheric corrosion is involved in the field of the interim storage of nuclear wastes. Indeed study of archaeological artefacts is one of the only mean to gather information on very long periods. Concerning ancient items, due to the complexity of the system, it is necessary to couple many analytical techniques from the macro to the microscopic scale. This enables to propose a description of the Amiens cathedral chain rust layers, made of a matrix of goethite, with lepidocrocite and akaganeite locally present and marbling of a poor crystallized phase associated to ferrihydrite. Electrochemical measurements permit to study the reduction capacity of the rust layer and to draw reduction mechanisms of the so-called active phases, by in situ experiments coupled with X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  12. Corrosion study of iron-cobalt alloys for MRI-based propulsion embedded in untethered microdevices operating in the vascular network.

    PubMed

    Pouponneau, Pierre; Savadogo, Oumarou; Napporn, Teko; Yahia, L'hocine; Martel, Sylvain

    2010-04-01

    Our group have shown in an experiment performed in the carotid artery of a living swine that magnetic gradients generated by a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system could propel and navigate untethered medical microdevices and micro-nanorobots in the human vasculature. The main problem with these devices is that the metal necessary for magnetic propulsion may corrode and induce cytotoxic effects. The challenge, then, is to find an alloy with low corrosion yet providing an adequate magnetization level for propulsion in often stringent physiological conditions. Because of their high magnetization, we studied the corrosion behavior of two iron-cobalt alloys, Permendur (49% Fe, 49% Co, 2% V) and Vacoflux 17 (81% Fe, 17% Co, 2% Cr), in physiological solution by potentiodynamic polarization assay, surface analysis, and corrosion electrolyte analysis. Both alloys exhibited low corrosion parameters such as a corrosion potential (E(corr)) of -0.57 V/SCE and E(corr) of -0.42 V/SCE for Vacoflux 17. The surface of Permendur samples was homogenously degraded. Vacoflux 17 surface was impaired by cracks and crevices. Both alloys had a stoichiometric dissolution in the electrolyte, and they released enough cobalt to induce cytotoxic effects. This study concluded that Fe-Co alloys could be used preferably in medical microdevices if they were coated so as not to come in contact with physiological solutions.

  13. "A L C L A D" A New Corrosion Resistant Aluminum Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dix, E H , Jr

    1927-01-01

    Described here is a new corrosion resistant aluminum product which is markedly superior to the present strong alloys. Its use should result in greatly increased life of a structural part. Alclad is a heat-treated aluminum, copper, manganese, magnesium alloy that has the corrosion resistance of pure metal at the surface and the strength of the strong alloy underneath. Of particular importance is the thorough character of the union between the alloy and the pure aluminum. Preliminary results of salt spray tests (24 weeks of exposure) show changes in tensile strength and elongation of Alclad 17ST, when any occurred, to be so small as to be well within the limits of experimental error. Some surface corrosion of the pure metal had taken place, but not enough to cause the specimens to break through those areas.

  14. [Influence of corrosion products of the dental alloys on the excitable tissues].

    PubMed

    Panaite, S; Mârţu, S; Tatarciuc, M; Viţalariu, A

    2000-01-01

    The surface of dental alloys in contact with well conducting electricity solutions are electrochemically corroded. This phenomenon is determined by a proper electric wave generated by electrochemical phenomena present at the limit between the two phases. Because during dental treatments similar conditions with the generation of corrosion waves are present, we decided to study the electrochemical behaviour of the most commonly used dental alloys. The method used in our study is based on the anodic and catodic reactions developed simultaneously, represented by the global curve of polarization that gives informations on the intensity of corrosion waves. We have also studied the influence of corrosion products on the excitable tissues. The results demonstrate the significant influence of metallic ions on the excitable tissues.

  15. 1999 F. N. Speller award lecture: Extending the limits of growth through development of corrosion-resistant steel products

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, H.E. )

    1999-06-01

    The costs of corrosion have been estimated at [approximately]4.2% of the gross domestic product (GDP) or [approximately]$330 billion in 1997 for the United States. However, when the potential effects on extending resource productivity are taken into account, the benefits of corrosion control are substantially greater. Previous reports have suggested that more efficient utilization of resources is essential to avoiding serious economic collapse in the next century. In preventing corrosion losses, corrosion specialists can extend the Earth's materials and energy resources, reduce pollution, and improve the quality of life for future generations. Three examples of achieving significant increases in resource productivity through the development and implementation of corrosion-resistant steel products are: (1) galvanized sheet for automobiles, (2) weathering steel for bridges, and (3) 55% Al-Zn alloy-coated steel sheet for metal buildings.

  16. Rhenium Uptake, as Analogue for Tc-99, by Steel Corrosion Products

    SciTech Connect

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Brown, Christopher F.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Heald, Steve M.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Arey, Bruce W.

    2006-04-30

    Static batch experiments were used to examine the sorption of dissolved perrhenate [Re(VII)], as a surrogate for pertechnetate [Tc(VII)], on corrosion products of A-516 carbon steel coupons contacted with synthetic groundwater or dilute water. After 109 days of contact time, the concentration of dissolved Re(VII) in the synthetic groundwater matrix decreased by approximately 26%; the dilute water matrix experienced a 99% decrease in dissolved Re(VII) over the same time period. Bulk XRD results for the corroded steel coupons showed that the corrosion products consisted primarily of maghemite, lepidocrocite, and goethite. Analyses of the coupons by SEM/EDS indicated that Re was present with the morphologically complex assemblages of Fe oxide/hydroxide corrosion products for samples spiked with the highest dissolved Re(VII) concentration (1.0 mmol/L) used for these experiments. Analyses of corroded steel coupons contacted with solutions containing 1.0 mmol/L Re(VII) by synchrotron-based methods confirmed the presence of Re sorbed with the corrosion product on the steel coupons. Analyses showed that the Re sorbed on these corroded coupons was in the +7 oxidation state, suggesting that the Re(VII) uptake mechanism did not involve reduction of Re to a lower oxidation state, such as +4. The results of our studies using Re(VII) as an analogue for Tc(VII)-99 suggest that Tc(VII)-99 would also be sorbed with steel corrosion products and that the inventory of Tc(VII)-99 released from breached waste packages would be lower than what is now conservatively estimated.

  17. Magnesium and iron nanoparticles production using microorganisms and various salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaul, R. K.; Kumar, P.; Burman, U.; Joshi, P.; Agrawal, A.; Raliya, R.; Tarafdar, J. C.

    2012-09-01

    Response of five fungi and two bacteria to different salts of magnesium and iron for production of nanoparticles was studied. Pochonia chlamydosporium, and Aspergillus fumigatus were exposed to three salts of magnesium while Curvularia lunata, Chaetomium globosum, A. fumigatus, A. wentii and the bacteria Alcaligenes faecalis and Bacillus coagulans were exposed to two salts of iron for nanoparticle production. The results revealed that P. chlamydosporium induces development of extracellular nanoparticles in MgCl2 solution while A. fumigatus produces also intracellular nanoparticles when exposed to MgSO4 solution. C. globosum was found as the most effective in producing nanoparticles when exposed to Fe2O3 solution. The FTIR analysis of the nanoparticles obtained from Fe2O3 solution showed the peaks similar to iron (Fe). In general, the species of the tested microbes were selective to different chemicals in their response for synthesis of nanoparticles. Further studies on their characterization and improving the efficiency of promising species of fungi need to be undertaken before tapping their potential as nanonutrients for plants.

  18. Oxygen controlled product formation in CCl{sub 4} dechlorination using zero-valent iron

    SciTech Connect

    Helland, B.R.; Alvarez, P.J.J.; Schnoor, J.L.

    1995-12-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) was abiotically dechlorinated using zero-valent iron powder (Fe{sup o}) to yield chloroform (CHCl{sub 3}) and methylene chloride (CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}), which did not undergo further dechlorination. Dechlorination was rapid and approximated first-order kinetics in the range of concentrations tested (CCl{sub 4}: 1.5 to 5.5 {mu}M; Fe{sup o}: 1 to 10 g per 265 mL distilled deionized water). Initial dechlorination rate coefficients for anoxic batch reactors (0.290 {plus_minus} 0.009 hr{sup -1} for 1 g Fe{sup o}; 1.723 {plus_minus} 0.078 hr{sup -1} for 10 g Fe{sup o}) increased with iron surface area (initially 2.4 {plus_minus} 0.2 m{sup 2}/g). Dechlorination also occurred under oxic conditions, although rates were significantly slower (e.g., 0.085 {plus_minus} 0.041 hr{sup -1} for 1 g Fe{sup o} and 7.4 mg/L initial dissolved oxygen). Rate coefficients increased with time, probably due to an increase in reactive surface area from pitting and dissolution of the iron surface. A rapid pH increase was synchronous to dissolved oxygen consumption, and the pH remained constant after oxygen depletion. This was attributed to the proton and oxygen consuming aerobic corrosion of the Fe{sup o} surface. Recalcitrant CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} was decreased in the presence of dissolved oxygen, which reacted with dechlorinated intermediates to yield less environmentally onerous products such as formic acid and carbon monoxide.

  19. Constitution of green rust and its significance to the corrosion of steel in Portland cement

    SciTech Connect

    Sagoe-Crentsil, K.K. . Div. of Building Construction and Engineering); Glasser, F.P. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1993-06-01

    Studies of the corrosion of pure iron showed green rust, approximately Fe[sub 4][sup 2+]Fe[sub 2][sup 3+] (OH)[sub 12](Cl,OH)[sub 2], was a stable corrosion product at high pH and low E[sub h] in the presence of chloride. The structure, constitution, preparation, and characterization of green rust was reviewed. A diagram relevant to the corrosion of iron in cement, constructed for pH 12, showed stability fields of green rust, [alpha],[delta] FeO(OH), and [beta]FeO(OH,Cl). Overall implications of chloride to the corrosion process were investigated.

  20. 78 FR 16832 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and the Republic of Korea: Revocation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-19

    ...-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 77 FR 85 (January 3, 2012). \\2\\ See Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat... Corrosion- Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea, 77 FR 301 (January 4, 2012). As a...: Final Results of Expedited Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review of the Countervailing Duty Order, 77 FR...

  1. Comparative study of the corrosion product films formed in biotic and abiotic media

    SciTech Connect

    Videla, H.A.; Mele, M.F.L. de; Swords, C.; Edyvean, R.G.J.; Beech, I.B.

    1999-11-01

    The growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) affects several important parameters at the metal/solution interface of carbon steel in liquid media such as pH and redox potential values, as well as modifications of the composition and structure of corrosion product layers. Electrochemical techniques for corrosion assessment and surface analyses by energy dispersion X-ray analysis (EDAX), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), X-ray distraction (XRD) and electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) complemented with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (MM) observations, were used to study the structure and composition of protective films on carbon steel in abiotic and biotic media containing different sulfur anions. The results revealed that in biotic and abiotic sulfide films the outer layers were formed by both FeS and FeS{sub 2}, although the relative content of these compounds varied in each case. Usually, the corrosion product films biotically formed were more adherent to the metal surface than those developed abiotically. The latter were flaky and loosely adherent, thus differing in their function during the corrosion process.

  2. A study on the corrosion and erosion behavior of electroless nickel and TiAlN/ZrN duplex coatings on ductile iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chung-Kwei; Hsu, Cheng-Hsun; Cheng, Yin-Hwa; Ou, Keng-Liang; Lee, Sheng-Long

    2015-01-01

    This study utilized electroless nickel (EN) and cathodic arc evaporation (CAE) technologies to deposit protective coatings onto ductile iron. Polarization corrosion tests were performed in 3.5 wt.% sodium chloride, and also erosion tests were carried out by using Al2O3 particles (∼177 μm in size and Mohr 7 scale) of about 5 g. Surface morphologies of the corroded and eroded specimens were observed separately. To further understand the coating effects on both the corrosive and erosive behavior of ductile iron, coating structure, morphology, and adhesion were analyzed using X-ray diffractormeter, scanning electron microscopy, and Rockwell-C indenter, respectively. The results showed that the EN exhibited an amorphous structure while the CAE-TiAlN/ZrN coating was a multilayered nanocrystalline. When the TiAlN/ZrN coated specimen with EN interlayer could effectively increase the adhesion strength between the CAE coating and substrate. Consequently, the combination of TiAlN/ZrN and EN delivered a better performance than did the monolithic EN or TiAlN/ZrN for both corrosion and erosion protection.

  3. Effect of Phosphate on the Corrosion of Carbon Steel and on the Composition of Corrosion Products in Two-Stage Continuous Cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans†

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Paul J.; Van Kavelaar, Margaret J.; Michel, Charles B.; Ng, Thomas K.

    1988-01-01

    A field isolate of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was grown in defined medium in a two-stage continuous culture apparatus with different concentrations of phosphate in the feed medium. The first state (V1) was operated as a conventional chemostat (D = 0.045 h−1) that was limited in energy source (lactate) or phosphate. The second stage (V2) received effluent from V1 but no additional nutrients, and contained a healthy population of transiently starved or resting cells. An increase in the concentration of phosphate in the medium fed to V1 resulted in increased corrosion rates of carbon steel in both V1 and V2. Despite the more rapid corrosion observed in growing cultures relative to that in resting cultures, corrosion products that were isolated under strictly anaerobic conditions from the two culture modes had similar bulk compositions which varied with the phosphate content of the medium. Crystalline mackinawite (Fe9S8), vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2 · 8H2O], and goethite [FeO(OH)] were detected in amounts which varied with the culture conditions. Chemical analyses indicated that the S in the corrosion product was almost exclusively in the form of sulfides, while the P was present both as phosphate and as unidentified components, possibly reduced P species. Some differential localization of S and P was observed in intact corrosion products. Cells from lactate-limited, but not from phosphate-limited, cultures contained intracellular granules that were enriched in P and Fe. The results are discussed in terms of several proposed mechanisms of microbiologically influenced corrosion. Images PMID:16347552

  4. A High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal - The Effects of Composition, Structure and Environment on Corrosion Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.; Haslam, J.; Day, D.; Lian, T.; Saw, C.; Hailey, P.; Choi, J.S.; Rebak, R.; Yang, N.; Bayles, R.; Aprigliano, L.; Payer, J.; Perepezko, J.; Hildal, K.; Lavernia, E.; Ajdelsztajn, L.; Branagan, D.; Beardsley, B.

    2007-07-01

    The passive film stability of several Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found to be comparable to that of high-performance Ni-based alloys, and superior to that of stainless steels, based on electrochemical measurements of the passive film breakdown potential and general corrosion rates. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) provide corrosion resistance; boron (B) enables glass formation; and rare earths such as yttrium (Y) lower critical cooling rate (CCR). The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal also makes it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications, as discussed in companion publications. Corrosion data for SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) is discussed here. (authors)

  5. Neutron-induced hydrogen and helium production in iron

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    In support of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, cross sections for hydrogen and helium production by neutrons are being investigated on structural materials from threshold to 100 MeV with the continuous-in-energy spallation neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The present measurements are for elemental iron. The results are compared with values from the ENDF/B-VI library and its extension with LA150 evaluations. For designs in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, structural materials will be subjected to very large fluences of neutrons, and the selection of these materials will be guided by their resistance to radiation damage. The macroscopic effects of radiation damage result both from displacement of atoms in the materials as well as nuclear transmutation. We are studying the production of hydrogen and helium by neutrons, because these gases can lead to significant changes in materials properties such as embrittlement and swelling. Our experiments span the full range from threshold to 100 MeV. The lower neutron energies are those characteristic of fission neutrons, whereas the higher energies are relevant for accelerator-based irradiation test facilities. Results for the nickel isotopes, {sup 58,60}Ni, have been reported previously. The present studies are on natural iron.

  6. Binding of nitrided type 410 stainless steel valve stems caused by corrosion product build-up

    SciTech Connect

    Coffin, S.M.; Hardies, R.O.

    1996-10-01

    Nitrided type 410 stainless steel governor valve stems are used in safety-related reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) and auxiliary feedwater (AFW) pumps at Boiling Water Reactors and Pressurized Water Reactors, respectively. Corrosion of the governor valve stems in the packing assembly area has been noted in at least seventeen nuclear power plants. Corrosion product build-up between the valve stem and packing assembly has resulted in binding of the valve stem in at least nine of these plants. Nitriding is known to degrade the corrosion resistance of, stainless steels. This is due to the formation of chromium nitrides in the diffusion layer of the hardened case which leave the surrounding matrix depleted in chromium. The rate of corrosion is substantially affected by the presence or absence of a continuous, adherent compound layer. The compound layer is less susceptible to corrosion than the diffusion layer and acts to protect the underlying diffusion layer from being exposed to moisture. At Calvert Cliffs, the original nitrided stem had a continuous, adherent compound layer and a hardened case of approximately 60 microns in depth. This stem performed acceptably for years. In contrast, the replacement nitrided stems did not have a continuous, adherent compound layer and had a hardened case of approximately 10 microns in depth. These stems performed acceptably for three or four months. This difference in performance is attributed primarily to the absence of an adherent, continuous compound layer in the recently-supplied nitrided stems. Since nitrided type 410 stainless steel valve stems will corrode in the presence of moisture (although at substantially different rates), the replacement valve stems will be fabricated from Inconel 718.

  7. Simulation of the state of carbon steel n years after disposal with n years of corrosion product on its surface in a bentonite environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Yoichi; Tsujikawa, Shigeo; Hioki, Toshinobu |

    1995-12-31

    The use of bentonite as buffer and carbon steel as overpack material for the geological disposal of nuclear waste is under investigation. To better assess the long term integrity of the carbon steel overpack, a quantitative analysis of the corrosion behavior on the steel surface for time frames beyond that of feasible empirical determination is required. The state n years after disposal, consisting of Carbon Steel/Corrosion products + Bentonite/Water, was simulated and the corrosion behavior of the carbon steel in this state investigated. The following facts became apparent. Both the corrosion rate and the non-uniformity of it increased with increase in the corrosion product content in the compacted bentonite. When the corrosion product layer was formed between the carbon steel and the bentonite, it enabled the corrosion potential and increased the corrosion rate.

  8. ARSENATE AND ARSENITE SORPTION AND ARSENITE OXIDATION BY IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron (II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron that is being used in permeable reactive barriers to remediate groundwater arsenic contamination. To optimize the design of iron barriers, it is important to evaluate the influence of geoch...

  9. CHEMICAL INTERACTIONS OF ARSENATE, ARSENITE, PHOSPHATE, AND SILICATE WITH IRON (II,III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular zerovalent iron has been proposed to be used as a medium in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remove arsenic from contaminated groundwater. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust (carbonate green rust, or CGR) is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under ...

  10. CHEMICAL INTERACTIONS OF ARSENATE, ARSENITE, PHOSPHATE, AND SILICATE WITH IRON (II, III) HYDROXYCARBONATE GREEN RUST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular zerovalent iron has been proposed to be used as a medium in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remove arsenic from contaminated groundwater. Iron(II, III) hydroxycarbonate green rust (carbonate green rust, or CGR) is a major corrosion product of zerovalent iron under ...

  11. [Using Raman spectrum analysis to research corrosive productions occurring in alloy of ancient bronze wares].

    PubMed

    Jia, La-jiang; Jin, Pu-jun

    2015-01-01

    The present paper analyzes the interior rust that occurred in bronze alloy sample from 24 pieces of Early Qin bronze wares. Firstly, samples were processed by grinding, polishing and ultrasonic cleaning-to make a mirror surface. Then, a confocal micro-Raman spectrometer was employed to carry out spectroscopic study on the inclusions in samples. The conclusion indicated that corrosive phases are PbCO3 , PbO and Cu2O, which are common rusting production on bronze alloy. The light-colored circular or massive irregular areas in metallographic structure of samples are proved as Cu2O, showing that bronze wares are not only easy to be covered with red Cu2O rusting layer, but also their alloy is easy to be eroded by atomic oxygen. In other words, the rust Cu2O takes place in both the interior and exterior parts of the bronze alloy. In addition, Raman spectrum analysis shows that the dark grey materials are lead corrosive products--PbCO3 and PbO, showing the corroding process of lead element as Pb -->PbO-->PbCO3. In the texture of cast state of bronze alloy, lead is usually distributed as independent particles between the different alloy phases. The lead particles in bronze alloy would have oxidation reaction and generate PbO when buried in the soil, and then have chemical reaction with CO3(2-) dissolved in the underground water to generate PbCO3, which is a rather stable lead corrosive production. A conclusion can be drawn that the external corrosive factors (water, dissolved oxygen and carbonate, etc) can enter the bronze ware interior through the passageway between different phases and make the alloy to corrode gradually. PMID:25993834

  12. [Using Raman spectrum analysis to research corrosive productions occurring in alloy of ancient bronze wares].

    PubMed

    Jia, La-jiang; Jin, Pu-jun

    2015-01-01

    The present paper analyzes the interior rust that occurred in bronze alloy sample from 24 pieces of Early Qin bronze wares. Firstly, samples were processed by grinding, polishing and ultrasonic cleaning-to make a mirror surface. Then, a confocal micro-Raman spectrometer was employed to carry out spectroscopic study on the inclusions in samples. The conclusion indicated that corrosive phases are PbCO3 , PbO and Cu2O, which are common rusting production on bronze alloy. The light-colored circular or massive irregular areas in metallographic structure of samples are proved as Cu2O, showing that bronze wares are not only easy to be covered with red Cu2O rusting layer, but also their alloy is easy to be eroded by atomic oxygen. In other words, the rust Cu2O takes place in both the interior and exterior parts of the bronze alloy. In addition, Raman spectrum analysis shows that the dark grey materials are lead corrosive products--PbCO3 and PbO, showing the corroding process of lead element as Pb -->PbO-->PbCO3. In the texture of cast state of bronze alloy, lead is usually distributed as independent particles between the different alloy phases. The lead particles in bronze alloy would have oxidation reaction and generate PbO when buried in the soil, and then have chemical reaction with CO3(2-) dissolved in the underground water to generate PbCO3, which is a rather stable lead corrosive production. A conclusion can be drawn that the external corrosive factors (water, dissolved oxygen and carbonate, etc) can enter the bronze ware interior through the passageway between different phases and make the alloy to corrode gradually.

  13. Testing and prediction of erosion-corrosion for corrosion resistant alloys used in the oil and gas production industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon, Hernan E.

    The corrosion behavior of CRAs has been thoroughly investigated and documented in the public literature by many researchers; however, little work has been done to investigate erosion-corrosion of such alloys. When sand particles are entrained in the flow, the degradation mechanism is different from that observed for sand-free corrosive environment. There is a need in the oil and gas industry to define safe service limits for utilization of such materials. The effects of flow conditions, sand rate, pH and temperature on the erosion-corrosion of CRAs were widely studied. An extensive experimental work was conducted using scratch tests and flow loop tests using several experimental techniques. At high erosivity conditions, a synergistic effect between erosion and corrosion was observed. Under the high sand rate conditions tested, erosivity is severe enough to damage the passive layer protecting the CRA thereby enhancing the corrosion rate. In most cases there is likely a competition between the rates of protective film removal due to mechanical erosion and protective film healing. Synergism occurs for each of the three alloys examined (13Cr and Super13Cr and 22Cr); however, the degree of synergism is quite different for the three alloys and may not be significant for 22Cr for field conditions where erosivities are typically much lower that those occurring in the small bore loop used in this research. Predictions of the corrosion component of erosion-corrosion based on scratch test data compared reasonably well to test results from flow loops for the three CRAs at high erosivity conditions. Second order behavior appears to be an appropriate and useful model for representing the repassivation process of CRAs. A framework for a procedure to predict penetration rates for erosion-corrosion conditions was developed based on the second order model behavior observed for the re-healing process of the passive film of CRAs and on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations

  14. FY05 HPCRM Annual Report: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Iron-Based Amorphous Metal Coatings Evaluation of Corrosion Reistance FY05 HPCRM Annual Report # Rev. 1DOE-DARPA Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C; Haslam, J J; Day, S D

    2007-09-19

    New corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals have been identified from published data or developed through combinatorial synthesis, and tested to determine their relative corrosion resistance. Many of these materials can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in some very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Two Fe-based amorphous metal formulations have been found that appear to have corrosion resistance comparable to, or better than that of Ni-based Alloy C-22, based on breakdown potential and corrosion rate. Both Cr and Mo provide corrosion resistance, B enables glass formation, and Y lowers critical cooling rate (CCR). SAM1651 has yttrium added, and has a nominal critical cooling rate of only 80 Kelvin per second, while SAM2X7 (similar to SAM2X5) has no yttrium, and a relatively high critical cooling rate of 610 Kelvin per second. Both amorphous metal formulations have strengths and weaknesses. SAM1651 (yttrium added) has a low critical cooling rate (CCR), which enables it to be rendered as a completely amorphous thermal spray coating. Unfortunately, it is relatively difficult to atomize, with powders being irregular in shape. This causes the powder to be difficult to pneumatically convey during thermal spray deposition. Gas atomized SAM1651 powder has required cryogenic milling to eliminate irregularities that make flow difficult. SAM2X5 (no yttrium) has a high critical cooling rate, which has caused problems associated with devitrification. SAM2X5 can be gas atomized to produce spherical powders of SAM2X5, which enable more facile thermal spray deposition. The reference material, nickel-based Alloy C-22, is an outstanding corrosion-resistant engineering material. Even so, crevice corrosion has been observed with C-22 in hot sodium chloride environments without buffer

  15. F2-laser-induced micro/nanostructuring and surface modification of iron thin film to realize hydrophobic and corrosion resistant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoshi, Masayuki; Awaihara, Yuta; Yamashita, Tsugito; Inoue, Narumi

    2014-11-01

    Nanoswellings of 60 nm height and 500 nm diameter on average of an iron thin film deposited on a silica glass substrate at regular intervals of 2.5 µm were fabricated by the irradiation of a 157 nm F2 laser. The F2 laser was focused on the iron thin film by each microsphere made of silica glass of 2.5 µm diameter, which covered the entire surface of the films. The surface of the silica glass substrate underneath the F2-laser-irradiated iron thin film selectively swelled to push up the film. After the laser-induced micro/nanostructuring, the F2 laser was again irradiated onto the entire surface of the periodic micro/nanostructured iron thin film to form an approximately 2-nm-thick Fe3O4 modified layer. As a result, the samples showed hydrophobicity and high corrosion resistance to 3 wt % NaCl aqueous solution (quasi-seawater). No rust was observed on the samples after the immersion test in the quasi-seawater for 24 h.

  16. Associations between iron concentration and productivity in montane streams of the Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayer, Cari Ann; Holcomb, Benjamin M.; Chipps, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient found in aquatic systems that can influence nutrient availability (e.g., phosphorus) and primary productivity. In streams, high iron concentrations often are associated with low pH as a result of acid mine drainage, which is known to affect fish and invertebrate communities. Streams in the Black Hills of South Dakota are generally circumneutral in pH, yet select streams exhibit high iron concentrations associated with natural iron deposits. In this study, we examined relationships among iron concentration, priphyton biomass, macroinvertebrate abundance, and fish assemblages in four Black Hills streams. The stream with the highest iron concentration (~5 mg Fe/L) had reduced periphyton biomass, invertebrate abundance, and fish biomass compared to the three streams with lower iron levels (0.1 to 0.6 mg Fe/L). Reduced stream productivity was attributed to indirect effects of ferric iron Fe+++), owing to iron-hydroxide precipitation that influenced habitat quality (i.e., substrate and turbidity) and food availability (periphyton and invertebrates) for higher trophic levels (e.g., fish). Additionally, reduced primary and secondary production was associated with reduced standing stocks of salmonid fishes. Our findings suggested that naturally occurring iron deposits may constrain macroinvertebrate and fish production.

  17. Significance of Iron(II,III) Hydroxycarbonate Green Rust in Arsenic Remediation Using Zerovalent Iron in Laboratory Column Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the corrosion products of zerovalent iron used in three column tests for removing arsenic from water under dynamic flow conditions. Each column test lasted three- to four-months using columns consisting of a 10.3-cm depth of 50 : 50 (w : w, Peerless iron : sand) in t...

  18. Iron migration from the anode surface in alumina electrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravleva, Elena N.; Drozdova, Tatiana N.; Ponomareva, Svetlana V.; Kirik, Sergei D.

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion destruction of two-component iron-based alloys used as an anode in high-temperature alumina electrolysis in the melt of NaF/KF/AlF3 electrolyte has been considered. Ni, Si, Cu, Cr, Mn, Al, Ti in the amount of up to 10% have been tested as the dopants to an anode alloys. The composition of the corrosion products has been studied using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and electron microprobe analysis. It has been established that the anode corrosion is induced by a surface electrochemical polarization and iron atom oxidation. Iron ions come into an exchange interaction with the fluoride components of the melted electrolyte, producing FeF2. The last interacts with oxyfluoride species transforming into the oxide forms: FeAl2O4, Fe3O4, Fe2O3. Due to the low solubility, the iron oxides are accumulated in the near-electrode sheath. The only small part of iron from anode migrates to cathode that makes an production of high purity aluminum of a real task. The alloy dopants are also subjected to corrosion in accordance with electromotive series resulting corrosion tunnels on the anode surface. The oxides are final compounds which collect in the same area. The corrosion products form an anode shell which is electronic conductor at electrolysis temperature. The electrolysis of alumina occurs beyond the corrosion shell. The rate limiting step in the corrosion is the electrolyte penetration through corrosion shell to the anode surface. The participation of the released oxygen in the corrosion has not been observed.

  19. Analysis of the magnetic corrosion product deposits on a boiling water reactor cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, Andrey; Degueldre, Claude; Kaufmann, Wilfried

    2013-01-15

    The buildup of corrosion product deposits (CRUD) on the fuel cladding of the boiling water reactor (BWR) before and after zinc injection has been investigated by applying local experimental analytical techniques. Under the BWR water chemistry conditions, Zn addition together with the presence of Ni and Mn induce the formation of (Zn,Ni,Mn)[Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}] spinel solid solutions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) revealed inversion ratios of cation distribution in spinels deposited from the solid solution. Based on this information, a two-site ferrite spinel solid solution model is proposed. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) findings suggest the zinc-rich ferrite spinels formation on BWR fuel cladding mainly at lower pin. - Graphical Abstract: Analysis of spinels in corrosion product deposits on boiling water reactor fuel rod. Combining EPMA and XAFS results: schematic representation of the ferrite spinels in terms of the end members and their extent of inversion. Note that the ferrites are represented as a surface between the normal (upper plane, M[Fe{sub 2}]O{sub 4}) and the inverse (lower plane, Fe[MFe]O{sub 4}). Actual compositions red Black-Small-Square for the specimen at low elevation (810 mm), blue Black-Small-Square for the specimen at mid elevation (1800 mm). The results have an impact on the properties of the CRUD material. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Buildup of corrosion product deposits on fuel claddings of a boiling water reactor (BWR) are investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Under BWR water conditions, Zn addition with Ni and Mn induced formation of (Zn,Ni,Mn)[Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}]. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-Ray Adsorption Spectroscopy (XAS) revealed inversion of cations in spinel solid solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc-rich ferrite spinels are formed on BWR fuel cladding mainly at lower pin elevations.

  20. High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO & DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Wong, F; Ji, S; Day, S; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Weaver, D; Aprigliano, L; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Wolejsza, T; Martin, F; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A; Ernst, F; Michal, G; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E

    2007-09-19

    The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent.

  1. Comparison of microbial communities involved in souring and corrosion in offshore and onshore oil production facilities in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okoro, Chuma; Smith, Seun; Chiejina, Leo; Lumactud, Rhea; An, Dongshan; Park, Hyung Soo; Voordouw, Johanna; Lomans, Bart P; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2014-04-01

    Samples were obtained from the Obigbo field, located onshore in the Niger delta, Nigeria, from which oil is produced by injection of low-sulfate groundwater, as well as from the offshore Bonga field from which oil is produced by injection of high-sulfate (2,200 ppm) seawater, amended with 45 ppm of calcium nitrate to limit reservoir souring. Despite low concentrations of sulfate (0-7 ppm) and nitrate (0 ppm), sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and heterotrophic nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) were present in samples from the Obigbo field. Biologically active deposits (BADs), scraped from corrosion-failed sections of a water- and of an oil-transporting pipeline (both Obigbo), had high counts of SRB and high sulfate and ferrous iron concentrations. Analysis of microbial community composition by pyrosequencing indicated anaerobic, methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation to be a dominant process in all samples from the Obigbo field, including the BADs. Samples from the Bonga field also had significant activity of SRB, as well as of heterotrophic and of sulfide-oxidizing NRB. Microbial community analysis indicated high proportions of potentially thermophilic NRB and near-absence of microbes active in methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation. Anaerobic incubation of Bonga samples with steel coupons gave moderate general corrosion rates of 0.045-0.049 mm/year, whereas near-zero general corrosion rates (0.001-0.002 mm/year) were observed with Obigbo water samples. Hence, methanogens may contribute to corrosion at Obigbo, but the low general corrosion rates cannot explain the reasons for pipeline failures in the Niger delta. A focus of future work should be on understanding the role of BADs in enhancing under-deposit pitting corrosion.

  2. Perforation corrosion and its mechanism on galvanized steel sheets on vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Sakae

    1998-12-31

    Mechanism of perforation corrosion on vehicles in the area where deicing salts are dispersed on roads in winter was investigated, using the Gumbel probability plots of the maximum depth of corrosion inside the lapped portion and quantitative analyses of crystalline compositions of the iron rusts which formed on the steel panels of vehicles. It was estimated that perforation occurred in 7 years for zincrometal steel sheet and more than 14 years for galvanized steel sheet with zinc coating weight of 120g/m{sup 2} in the crevice of lapped panel. The composition of the rust in the lapped portion of galvanized steel panels was mainly amorphous at the initial stage of corrosion and moves towards the high content of ({gamma}-FeOOH+Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) regions of the non-galvanized parts. Zinc corrosion product prevented the redox reaction of the iron rust and performed as corrosion inhibitor of steel in laboratory simulation tests. Perforation mechanism on vehicles in real environments will be also discussed in the following stages; (1) corrosion of zinc layer, (2) galvanic corrosion of zinc, (3) corrosion of steel under zinc corrosion product, (4) corrosion of steel.

  3. Corrosion resistance of stainless steels during thermal cycling in alkali nitrate molten salts.

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, Robert W.; Goods, Steven Howard

    2001-09-01

    The corrosion behavior of three austenitic stainless steels was evaluated during thermal cycling in molten salt mixtures consisting of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3}. Corrosion tests were conducted with Types 316, 316L and 304 stainless steels for more than 4000 hours and 500 thermal cycles at a maximum temperature of 565 C. Corrosion rates were determined by chemically descaling coupons. Metal losses ranged from 5 to 16 microns and thermal cycling resulted in moderately higher corrosion rates compared to isothermal conditions. Type 316 SS was somewhat more corrosion resistant than Type 304 SS in these tests. The effect of carbon content on corrosion resistance was small, as 316L SS corroded only slightly slower than 316 SS. The corrosion rates increased as the dissolved chloride content of the molten salt mixtures increased. Chloride concentrations approximating 1 wt.%, coupled with thermal cycling, resulted in linear weight loss kinetics, rather than parabolic kinetics, which described corrosion rates for all other conditions. Optical microscopy and electron microprobe analysis revealed that the corrosion products consisted of iron-chromium spinel, magnetite, and sodium ferrite, organized as separate layers. Microanalysis of the elemental composition of the corrosion products further demonstrated that the chromium content of the iron-chromium spinel layer was relatively high for conditions in which parabolic kinetics were observed. However, linear kinetics were observed when the spinel layer contained relatively little chromium.

  4. Metallic corrosion in the polluted urban atmosphere of Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Wang, Da-Wei; Guo, Hai; Ling, Zhen-Hao; Cheung, Kalam

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the relationship between air pollutants, particularly acidic particles, and metallic material corrosion. An atmospheric corrosion test was carried out in spring-summer 2012 at a polluted urban site, i.e., Tung Chung in western Hong Kong. Nine types of metallic materials, namely iron, Q235 steel, 20# steel, 16Mn steel, copper, bronze, brass, aluminum, and aluminum alloy, were selected as specimens for corrosion tests. Ten sets of the nine materials were all exposed to ambient air, and then each set was collected individually after exposure to ambient air for consecutive 6, 13, 20, 27, 35, 42, 49, 56, 63, and 70 days, respectively. After the removal of the corrosion products on the surface of the exposed specimens, the corrosion rate of each material was determined. The surface structure of materials was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after the corrosion tests. Environmental factors including temperature, relative humidity, concentrations of gaseous pollutants, i.e., sulfur dioxide (SO₂), nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O₃), and particulate-phase pollutants, i.e., PM₂.₅ (FSP) and PM₁₀ (RSP), were monitored. Correlation analysis between environmental factors and corrosion rate of materials indicated that iron and carbon steel were damaged by both gaseous pollutants (SO₂ and NO₂) and particles. Copper and copper alloys were mainly corroded by gaseous pollutants (SO₂ and O₃), while corrosion of aluminum and aluminum alloy was mainly attributed to NO₂ and particles.

  5. Impact of sea ice on the marine iron cycle and phytoplankton productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Bailey, D.; Lindsay, K.; Moore, J. K.; Holland, M.

    2014-09-01

    Iron is a key nutrient for phytoplankton growth in the surface ocean. At high latitudes, the iron cycle is closely related to the dynamics of sea ice. In recent decades, Arctic sea ice cover has been declining rapidly and Antarctic sea ice has exhibited large regional trends. A significant reduction of sea ice in both hemispheres is projected in future climate scenarios. In order to adequately study the effect of sea ice on the polar iron cycle, sea ice bearing iron was incorporated in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Sea ice acts as a reservoir for iron during winter and releases the trace metal to the surface ocean in spring and summer. Simulated iron concentrations in sea ice generally agree with observations in regions where iron concentrations are relatively low. The maximum iron concentrations simulated in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice are much lower than observed, which is likely due to underestimation of iron inputs to sea ice or missing mechanisms. The largest iron source to sea ice is suspended sediments, contributing fluxes of iron of 2.2 × 108 mol Fe month-1 in the Arctic and 4.1 × 106 mol Fe month-1 in the Southern Ocean during summer. As a result of the iron flux from ice, iron concentrations increase significantly in the Arctic. Iron released from melting ice increases phytoplankton production in spring and summer and shifts phytoplankton community composition in the Southern Ocean. Results for the period of 1998 to 2007 indicate that a reduction of sea ice in the Southern Ocean will have a negative influence on phytoplankton production. Iron transport by sea ice appears to be an important process bringing iron to the central Arctic. The impact of ice to ocean iron fluxes on marine ecosystems is negligible in the current Arctic Ocean, as iron is not typically the growth-limiting nutrient. However, it may become a more important factor in the future, particularly in the central Arctic, as iron concentrations will decrease with declining sea

  6. Development of an Accelerated Test Method for the Determination of Susceptibility to Atmospheric Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical rationale is presented for use of a repetitive cyclic current reversal voltammetric technique for characterization of localized corrosion processes, including atmospheric corrosion. Applicability of this proposed experimental protocol is applied to characterization of susceptibility to crevice and pitting corrosion, atmospheric corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Criteria upon which relative susceptibility is based were determined and tested using two iron based alloys commonly in use at NASA-Kennedy; A36 (a low carbon steel) and 4130 (a low alloy steel). Practicality of the procedure was demonstrated by measuring changes in anodic polarization behavior during high frequency current reversal cycles of 25 cycles per second with 1 mA/sq cm current density amplitude in solutions containing Cl anions. The results demonstrated that, due to excessive polarization which affects conductivity of barrier corrosion product layers, A36 was less resistant to atmospheric corrosion than its 4130 counterpart; behavior which was also demonstrated during exposure tests.

  7. Factors affecting catalysis of copper corrosion products in NDMA formation from DMA in simulated premise plumbing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Andrews, Susan A

    2013-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of corrosion products of copper, a metal commonly employed in household plumbing systems, on N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) formation from a known NDMA precursor, dimethylamine (DMA). Copper-catalyzed NDMA formation increased with increasing copper concentrations, DMA concentrations, alkalinity and hardness, but decreased with increasing natural organic matter (NOM) concentration. pH influenced the speciation of chloramine and the interactions of copper with DMA. The transformation of monochloramine (NH2Cl) to dichloramine and complexation of copper with DMA were involved in elevating the formation of NDMA by copper at pH 7.0. The inhibiting effect of NOM on copper catalysis was attributed to the rapid consumption of NH2Cl by NOM and/or the competitive complexation of NOM with copper to limit the formation of DMA-copper complexes. Hardness ions, as represented by Ca(2+), also competed with copper for binding sites on NOM, thereby weakening the inhibitory effect of NOM on NDMA formation. Common copper corrosion products also participated in these reactions but in different ways. Aqueous copper released from malachite [Cu2CO3(OH)2] was shown to promote NDMA formation while NDMA formation decreased in the presence of CuO, most likely due to the adsorption of DMA.

  8. 77 FR 25141 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and South Korea: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and South Korea... Germany and South Korea (Korea), pursuant to section 751(c) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (the Act...-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products from Germany and South Korea: Adequacy Redetermination...

  9. Anomalously deep and fast failure of copper and bronze under the action of the corrosion products existing on them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozhidaeva, S. D.; Eliseeva, A. Yu.; Ivanov, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    When the corrosion products on copper and bronze are in close contact with a diluted aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid and atmospheric oxygen, they rapidly transform into effective metal (alloy) oxidizers, which provide rapid and deep metal consumption. The metal can be almost fully consumed in a reasonable technological time provided the accumulated solid phase of the products is periodically removed.

  10. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  11. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... cast iron or ductile iron lines. 192.487 Section 192.487 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... the purpose of this paragraph. (b) Localized corrosion pitting. Except for cast iron or ductile...

  12. A model of the ocean iron cycle and its influence on biological production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, S.; Parekh, P.; Follows, M.

    2003-04-01

    Biological productivity in large regions of the ocean, specifically high nutrient, low chlorophyll regions, is limited by the deficit in iron relative to other nutrients. We have developed a parameterization of the iron cycle of the world's oceans which attempts to explicitly represent the processes by which this deficit in iron occurs. We have implemented this parameterization in the context of the MIT three dimensional global ocean model and examined the consequences for nutrient distributions, new production and primary production. The iron model parameterizes the mechanisms of scavenging of iron onto sinking particles and complexation with an organic ligand and is driven by specified aeolian flux patterns. First, using an idealized representation of export production, limited by light, phosphate and iron, the model reproduces the broad features of the observed ocean phosphate and iron distributions. We replace the simplified export parameterization with an explicit, but highly idealized, ecosystem model. The model represents a simplified food web with two phytoplankton size classes and a single grazer. The base currency for this model is phosphorus, but the larger phytoplankton class (i.e. diatoms) is also limited by silica. Both classes are limited by the availability of iron. The results of this model are also generally consistent with the observed patterns of phosphate and iron. In addition, the model captures the broad features of the distributions and cycles of silica, chlorophyll and primary production. We will also explore the sensitivities of this model to the forcing fields (e.g. aeolian iron flux) and parameter choices of the ecosystem model. This model represents a step towards the explicit representation of the ocean iron cycle, and its biogeochemical influences, in global biogeochemical models.

  13. Al-26 and Be-10 production in iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aylmer, D.; Bonanno, V.; Herzog, G. F.; Weber, H.; Klein, J.

    1988-01-01

    To compare the Al-26/Ne-21 ages with K-40/K-41 ages, the contents of Al-26 were determined in seven iron meteorites using accelerator mass spectrometry and the light noble gas contents were determined using conventional mass spectrometry, for samples for which these values were not available. In addition, contents of Be-10 were measured. Due to the presence of boron in the samples, the values of Al-26 were found to be at least 30 percent lower than the literature values obtained by low-level counting techniques, while the Be-10 values were 10-15 percent lower. The production rates of these nuclides at different He-4/Ne-21 ratios were estimated, showing that the increase in He-4/Ne-21 ratios corresponded with decreases in Al-26 and Be-10. It was shown that the exposure ages calculated from the Ne-21/Al-26 ratio cannot be calibrated so as to agree with both the K-40/K-41 ages and ages based on the shorter-lived nuclides Ar-39 and Cl-36.

  14. Characterization of corrosion products of AB{sub 5}-type hydrogen storage alloys for nickel-metal hydride batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Maurel, F.; Knosp, B.; Backhaus-Ricoult, M.

    2000-01-01

    To better understand the decrease in storage capacity of AB{sub 5}-type alloys in rechargeable Ni/MH batteries undergoing repeated charge/discharge cycles, the corrosion of a MnNi{sub 3.55}Co{sub 0.75}Mn{sub 0.4}Al{sub 0.3} alloy in aqueous KOH electrolyte was studied. The crystal structure, chemical composition, and distribution of corrosion products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Hollow and filed needles of a mixed rare earth hydroxide Mn(OH){sub 3} were found to cover a continuous nanocrystalline corrosion scale composed of metal (Ni, Co) solid solution, oxide (Ni,Co)O solid solution and rare earth hydroxide, and a Mn-depleted alloy subscale. Corrosion kinetics were measured for three different temperatures. Growth kinetics of the continuous corrosion scale and of the Mm(OH){sub 3} needles obeyed linear and parabolic rate laws, respectively. Models for the corrosion mechanism were developed on the basis of diffusional transport of Mn and OH through the hydroxide needles and subsequent diffusion along grain boundaries through the nanocrystalline scale.

  15. PHOTOCHEICAL PRODUCTION OF HYDROXYL RADICAL IN NATURAL WATER - THE ROLE OF IRON AND DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photochemical hydroxyl radical (OH) production was measured in several natural waters to investigate the importance of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and iron-CDOM complexes as sources of OH. High rates of OH photoproduction in highly colored, iron-rich, acidic waters a...

  16. Zirconium alloys with small amounts of iron and copper or nickel show improved corrosion resistance in superheated steam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, S.; Youngdahl, C. A.

    1967-01-01

    Heat treating various compositions of zirconium alloys improve their corrosion resistance to superheated steam at temperatures higher than 500 degrees C. This increases their potential as fuel cladding for superheated-steam nuclear-fueled reactors as well as in autoclaves operating at modest pressures.

  17. Deposition of corrosion products from dowels on human dental root surfaces measured with proton microprobe technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, D.; Brunell, G.; Lindh, U.

    1982-06-01

    Distribution of copper, mercury and zinc on human teeth root surfaces adjacent to dowels of gold alloy or brass as well as dowels of brass in conjunction with an amalgam crown has been measured with a proton microprobe using PIXE techniques. Upper limits of the contents of gold and silver on the root surfaces were established. Pronounced concentration profiles of copper and zinc were observed on the root surfaces of teeth prepared with dowels of brass. The dowel of gold alloy revealed only zinc deposition. The major part of copper on the root surfaces is assumed to arise from corrosion of the dowels, and has been transported to the surface by diffusion through the dential tubuli. Zinc in the volume analysed is a constituent of dentin tissue as well as a corrosion product of the brass dowel. Part of the zinc level could also be ascribed to erosion of the zinc phosphate cement matrix. The volumes analysed were (25×25×25)μm 3. The levels of copper, mercury and zinc on the tooth root surfaces attained values up to about 200, 20 and 600 ppm, respectively.

  18. Corrosion fatigue of iron-chromium-nickel alloys: Fracture mechanics, microstructure and chemistry. Progress report, December 1, 1990--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, R.P.

    1992-01-29

    This progress report briefly summarizes the research performed under the referenced grant for the period from 1 December 1990 to 31 December 1991, and contains a cumulative listing of technical presentations and publications dating back to 1 June 1988. Under this grant, a multi-disciplinary research program is undertaken to address certain fundamental issues relating to corrosion fatigue crack growth in structurally important alloys in aqueous environments. The principal goal of the research is to develop and expand the scientific understanding of the processes that control corrosion fatigue crack growth, particularly for ferrous alloys in terms of the controlling mechanical and chemical/electrochemical processes and their interactions with the microstructure. Focus is placed upon the austenitic iron-chromium-nickel (FeCrNi) alloys because of the need to resolve certain mechanistic issues and because of extensive utilization of these alloys in the power generation and chemical industries. Emphasis is given to the growth of short (small) cracks at low growth rates because crack growth in this regime is expected to be more sensitive to changes in external chemical/electrochemical variables.

  19. Effects of recasting on the amount of corrosion products released from two Ni-Cr base metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, S; Arikan, A

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion products released from two recast Ni-Cr base metal alloys Wirolloy and Wiron 99 were investigated. Cast samples were placed in Meyer's modified Fusayama solution for 2 months and in 0.1M Lactic acid 0.1M NaCl solution for 7 days. The release of Ni, Cr and Mo ions from both alloys was measured by using a flame model Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. A Scanning Electron Microscope was used to evaluate the surface morphology of the samples before and after corrosion tests. Release of Ni and Cr from Wirolloy samples immersed in 0.1M Lactic acid 0.1M NaCl solution were much higher than those of Wiron 99. The number of recastings was found to have negligible effect on surface texture and on the amount of corrosion products released. PMID:10596615

  20. Iron-Regulated Expression of Alginate Production, Mucoid Phenotype, and Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Jacinta R.; Vasil, Adriana I.; Schurr, Michael J.; Vasil, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains of non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF) origin do not produce significant amounts of extracellular alginate and are nonmucoid. In CF, such isolates can become mucoid through mutation of one of the genes (mucA, mucB, mucC, or mucD) that produce regulatory factors that sequester AlgU, required for increased expression of alginate genes. Mutation of the muc genes in the nonmucoid PAO1, PA14, PAKS-1, and Ps388 strains led to increased levels of extracellular alginate and an obvious mucoid phenotype, but only under iron-limiting growth conditions (≤5 µM), not under iron-replete conditions (≥10 µM). In contrast, >50% of P. aeruginosa isolates from chronic CF pulmonary infections expressed increased levels of alginate and mucoidy both under iron-limiting and iron-replete conditions (i.e., iron-constitutive phenotype). No single iron regulatory factor (e.g., Fur, PvdS) was associated with this loss of iron-regulated alginate expression and mucoidy in these CF isolates. However, the loss of only pyoverdine production, or its uptake, abrogated the ability of P. aeruginosa to produce a robust biofilm that represents the Psl-type of biofilm. In contrast, we show that mutation of the pyoverdine and pyochelin biosynthesis genes and the pyoverdine receptor (FpvA) lead to iron-constitutive expression of the key alginate biosynthesis gene, algD, and an explicitly mucoid phenotype in both iron-limiting and iron-replete conditions. These data indicate that alginate production and mucoidy, in contrast to other types of biofilms produced by P. aeruginosa, are substantially enhanced under iron limitation. These results also have compelling implications in relation to the use of iron chelators in the treatment of P. aeruginosa CF infections. PMID:24496793

  1. Corrosion detection in steel-reinforced concrete using a spectroscopic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garboczi, E. J.; Stutzman, P. E.; Wang, S.; Martys, N. S.; Hassan, A. M.; Duthinh, D.; Provenzano, V.; Chou, S. G.; Plusquellic, D. F.; Surek, J. T.; Kim, S.; McMichael, R. D.; Stiles, M. D.

    2014-02-01

    Detecting the early corrosion of steel that is embedded in reinforced concrete (rebar) is a goal that would greatly facilitate the inspection and measurement of corrosion in the US physical infrastructure. Since 2010, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has been working on a large project to develop an electromagnetic (EM) probe that detects the specific corrosion products via spectroscopic means. Several principal iron corrosion products, such as hematite and goethite, are antiferromagnetic at field temperatures. At a given applied EM frequency, which depends on temperature, these compounds undergo a unique absorption resonance that identifies the presence of these particular iron corrosion products. The frequency of the resonances tends to be on the order of 100 GHz or higher, so transmitting EM waves through the cover concrete and back out again at a detectable level has been challenging. NIST has successfully detected these two iron corrosion products, and is developing equipment and methodologies that will be capable of penetrating the typical 50 mm of cover concrete in the field. The novel part of this project is the detection of specific compounds, rather than only geometrical changes in rebar cross-section. This method has the potential of providing an early-corrosion probe for steel in reinforced concrete, and for other applications where steel is covered by various layers and coatings.

  2. Effects of AISI 316L corrosion products in in vitro bone formation.

    PubMed

    Morais, S; Sousa, J P; Fernandes, M H; Carvalho, G S; de Bruijn, J D; van Blitterswijk, C A

    1998-06-01

    Rat bone marrow cells were cultured in experimental conditions that favour the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic cells (i.e., 2.52 x 10(-4) mol l(-1) ascorbic acid, 10(-2) mol l(-1) beta-glycerophosphate and 10(-8) mol l(-1) dexamethasone) in the absence and in the presence of stainless-steel corrosion products, for a period of 18 days. An AISI 316L stainless-steel slurry (SS) was obtained by electrochemical means and the concentrations of the major metal ions, determined by atomic absorption spectrometry, were 8.78 x 10(-3) mol l(-1) of Fe, 4.31 x 10(-3) mol l(-1) of Cr and 2.56 x 10(-3) mol l(-1) of Ni. Bone marrow cells were exposed to 0.01, 0.1 and 1% of the SS and at the end of the incubation period, control and treated cultures were evaluated by histochemical assays for the identification of the presence of alkaline phosphatase and also calcium and phosphate deposition. Cultures were further observed by scanning electron microscopy. Levels of total and ionised calcium and phosphorus in the culture media collected from control and metal exposed cell cultures were also quantified. Histochemical staining showed that control cultures presented a strong reaction for the presence of alkaline phosphatase and exhibited formation of calcium and phosphates deposits. The presence of 0.01% SS caused no detectable biological effects in these cultures, 0.1% SS impaired osteoblastic behaviour and, 1% SS resulted in cell death. In the absence of bone cells, levels of total and ionised calcium and phosphorus in the control and metal added culture medium were similar throughout the incubation period. A significant decrease in the levels of ionised calcium and phosphorus were observed in the culture medium of control cultures and also in cultures exposed to 0.01% SS after two weeks of incubation, an event related with the formation of mineral calcium phosphate deposits in these cultures. In cultures grown in the presence of 0.1 and 1% SS corrosion products

  3. Iron control in west Texas sour-gas wells provides sustained production increases

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, M.L.; Dill, W.R.; Besler, M.R.; McFatridge, D.G. )

    1991-05-01

    Permian Basin operators have recorded sustained production increases in oil wells by preventing precipitation of iron sulfide and other sulfur-containing species. This improvement has resulted largely from cleaning out tubing before acidizing and from preventing the precipitation of ferrous sulfide and the formation of elemental sulfur by simultaneous use of iron chelants and sulfide-control agents. Previously used methods gave only temporary production increases that terminated when iron dissolved by the stimulation acid reprecipitated in the pay zone and damage the formation after the stimulation acid was spent. This paper describes a method to optimize iron sulfide control, methods to minimize reprecipitation, and case histories from the Permian Basin that show improved methods to control iron in sour-well environments.

  4. Mineralogy and crystal chemistry of iron in the Timan bauxite and products of their technological processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, O.; Silaev, V.; Lutoev, V.; Vakhrushev, A.

    2016-04-01

    Mineralogical and geochemical features of two series of samples of typical bauxites from two deposits of Middle Timan mining area (Vezhayu-Vorykva and Svetlinskoe) were studied. The phase composition of ferrous bauxites generally is boehmite, hematite, ultradisperse low-ordered goethite and berthierine. In a boehmite and kaolinite structural impurity of iron to 10%, and in the iron oxidehydroxides aluminum impurity is revealed. On iron content bauxites are subdivided into three mineral types for which quantitative data on valence states of ions of iron and proportions of their distribution last on nonequivalent structural positions in hematite, goethite and berthierine are obtained. Noble metals (Ag, Au, Ir, Rh, Pd) concentrating in bauxites are revealed for the first time. Obtained data can lead to decrease of power consumption during aluminum production and high quality ceramics, to provide production of valuable iron oxide, and also to minimize the ecological harm from accumulation of bauxite wastes.

  5. The impact of bacterial strain on the products of dissimilatory iron reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Everett C.; Berelson, William M.; Hammond, Douglas E.; Kampf, Anthony R.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2010-01-01

    Three bacterial strains from the genus Shewanella were used to examine the influence of specific bacteria on the products of dissimilatory iron reduction. Strains CN32, MR-4 and W3-18-1 were incubated with HFO (hydrous ferric oxide) as the terminal electron acceptor and lactate as the organic carbon and energy source. Mineral products of iron reduction were analyzed using X-ray powder diffraction, electron microscopy, coulometry and susceptometry. Under identical nutrient loadings, iron reduction rates for strains CN32 and W3-18-1 were similar, and about twice as fast as MR-4. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of mineralized end products (secondary minerals) indicated that different products were formed during experiments with similar reduction rates but different strains (CN32 and W3-18-1), and similar products were formed during experiments with different iron reduction rates and different strains (CN32 and MR-4). The major product of iron reduction by strains CN32 and MR-4 was magnetite, while for W3-18-1 it was a mixture of magnetite and iron carbonate hydroxide hydrate (green rust), a precursor to fougerite. Another notable difference was that strains CN32 and MR-4 converted all of the starting ferric iron material into magnetite, while W3-18-1 did not convert most of the Fe 3+ into a recognizable crystalline material. Biofilm formation is more robust in W3-18-1 than in the other two strains used in this study. The differences in mineralization may be an indicator that EPS (or another cellular product from W3-18-1) may interfere with the crystallization of magnetite or facilitate formation of green rust. These results suggest that the relative abundance of mineral end products and the relative distribution of these products are strongly dependent on the bacterial species or strain catalyzing iron reduction.

  6. The Impact of Bacterial Strain on the Products of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Everett C.; Berelson, William M.; Hammond, Douglas E.; Kampf, Anthony R.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2009-01-01

    Three bacterial strains from the genus Shewanella were used to examine the influence of specific bacteria on the products of dissimilatory iron reduction. Strains CN32, MR-4 and W3-18-1 were incubated with HFO (hydrous ferric oxide) as the terminal electron acceptor and lactate as the organic carbon and energy source. Mineral products of iron reduction were analyzed using X-ray powder diffraction, electron microscopy, coulometry and susceptometry. Under identical nutrient loadings, iron reduction rates for strains CN32 and W3-18-1 were similar, and about twice as fast as MR-4. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of mineralized end products (secondary minerals) indicated that different products were formed during experiments with similar reduction rates but different strains (CN32 and W3-18-1), and similar products were formed during experiments with different iron reduction rates and different strains (CN32 and MR-4). The major product of iron reduction by strains CN32 and MR-4 was magnetite, while for W3-18-1 it was a mixture of magnetite and iron carbonate hydroxide hydrate (green rust), a precursor to fougerite. Another notable difference was that strains CN32 and MR-4 converted all of the starting ferric iron material into magnetite, while W3-18-1 did not convert most of the Fe3+ into a recognizable crystalline material. Biofilm formation is more robust in W3-18-1 than in the other two strains used in this study. The differences in mineralization may be an indicator that EPS (or another cellular product from W3-18-1) may interfere with the crystallization of magnetite or facilitate formation of green rust. These results suggest that the relative abundance of mineral end products and the relative distribution of these products are strongly dependent on the bacterial species or strain catalyzing iron reduction. PMID:20161499

  7. Influence of hydronium, sulfate, chloride and other non-carbonate ions on hydrogen generation by anaerobic corrosion of granular cast iron.

    PubMed

    Ruhl, Aki S; Jekel, Martin

    2013-10-15

    Permeable reactive barriers are successfully applied for the removal of various contaminants. The concomitant reduction of hydrogen ions and the subsequent formation of hydrogen gas by anaerobic corrosion lead to decreased pore volume filled with water and thus residence times, so called gas clogging. Long term column experiments were conducted to elucidate the impact of ubiquitous water constituents on the formation of hydrogen gas and potential passivation due to corrosion products. The collected gas volumes revealed a relation to the hydronium concentration (pH) but were only slightly increased in the presence of chloride and sulfate and not significantly influenced in the presence of phosphate, silicate, humic acid and ammonium compared to deionized water. Significant gas volumes within the reactive filling were verified by gravimetry. The presence of nitrate completely eliminated hydrogen formation by competition for electrons. Solid phase analyses revealed that neither chloride nor sulfate was incorporated in corrosion products in concentrations above 0.1 weight percent, and they did not alter the formation of mainly magnetite in comparison to deionized water.

  8. Corrosion/96 conference papers

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Topics covered by this conference include: cathodic protection in natural waters; cleaning and repassivation of building HVAC systems; worldwide opportunities in flue gas desulfurization; advancements in materials technology for use in oil and gas service; fossil fuel combustion and conversion; technology of corrosion inhibitors; computers in corrosion control--modeling and information processing; recent experiences and advances of austenitic alloys; managing corrosion with plastics; corrosion measurement technology; corrosion inhibitors for concrete; refining industry; advances in corrosion control for rail and tank trailer equipment; CO{sub 2} corrosion--mechanisms and control; microbiologically influenced corrosion; corrosion in nuclear systems; role of corrosion in boiler failures; effects of water reuse on monitoring and control technology in cooling water applications; methods and mechanisms of scale and deposit control; corrosion detection in petroleum production lines; underground corrosion control; environmental cracking--relating laboratory results and field behavior; corrosion control in reinforced concrete structures; corrosion and its control in aerospace and military hardware; injection and process addition facilities; progress reports on the results of reinspection of deaerators inspected or repaired per RP0590 criteria; near 100% volume solids coating technology and application methods; materials performance in high temperature environments containing halides; impact of toxicity studies on use of corrosion/scale inhibitors; mineral scale deposit control in oilfield related operations; corrosion in gas treating; marine corrosion; cold climate corrosion; corrosion in the pulp and paper industry; gaseous chlorine alternatives in cooling water systems; practical applications of ozone in recirculating cooling water systems; and water reuse in industry. Over 400 papers from this conference have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  9. Mechanism of Corrosion by Naphthenic Acids and Organosulfur Compounds at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Peng

    Due to the law of supply and demand, the last decade has witnessed a skyrocketing in the price of light sweet crude oil. Therefore, refineries are increasingly interested in "opportunity crudes", characterized by their discounted price and relative ease of procurement. However, the attractive economics of opportunity crudes come with the disadvantage of high acid/organosulfur compound content, which could lead to corrosion and even failure of facilities in refineries. However, it is generally accepted that organosulfur compounds may form protective iron sulfide layers on the metal surface and decrease the corrosion rate. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the corrosive property of crudes at high temperatures, the mechanism of corrosion by acids (naphthenic acids) in the presence of organosulfur compounds, and methods to mitigate its corrosive effect. In 2004, an industrial project was initiated at the Institute for Corrosion and Multiphase Technology to investigate the corrosion by naphthenic acids and organosulfur compounds. In this project, for each experiment there were two experimentation phases: pretreatment and challenge. In the first pretreatment phase, a stirred autoclave was filled with a real crude oil fraction or model oil of different acidity and organosulfur compound concentration. Then, the stirred autoclave was heated to high temperatures to examine the corrosivity of the oil to different materials (specimens made from CS and 5% Cr containing steel were used). During the pretreatment, corrosion product layers were formed on the metal surface. In the second challenge phase, the steel specimens pretreated in the first phase were inserted into a rotating cylinder autoclave, called High Velocity Rig (HVR). The HVR was fed with a high-temperature oil solution of naphthenic acids to attack the iron sulfide layers. Based on the difference of specimen weight loss between the two steps, the net corrosion rate could be calculated and the protectiveness

  10. Experimental investigation of solid by-product as sensible heat storage material: Characterization and corrosion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Fernández, Iñigo; Faik, Abdessamad; Mani, Karthik; Rodriguez-Aseguinolaza, Javier; D'Aguanno, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    The experimental investigation of water cooled electrical arc furnace (EAF) slag used as filler material in the storage tank for sensible heat storage application was demonstrated in this study. The physicochemical and thermal properties of the tested slags were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microcopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and laser flash analysis, respectively. In addition, the chemical compatibility between slags and molten nitrate salt (60 wt. % NaNO3 and 40 wt. % KNO3) was investigated at 565 °C for 500 hrs. The obtained results were clearly demonstrated that the slags showed a good corrosion resistance in direct contact with molten salt at elevated temperature. The present study was clearly indicated that a low-cost filler material used in the storage tank can significantly reduce the overall required quantities of the relatively higher cost molten salt and consequently reduce the overall cost of the electricity production.

  11. Effect of Temperature on the Loss of Ductility of S-135 Grade Drill Pipe Steel and Characterization of Corrosion Products in CO2 Containing Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajvani Gavanluei, Arshad; Mishra, Brajendra; Olson, David L.

    2012-08-01

    Evaluation of loss of ductility of the API S-135 grade drill pipe steel was studied at different temperatures from 298 K to 448 K (25 °C to 175 °C) in CO2 containing solution using a constant extension rate test in connection with a high-temperature/high-pressure autoclave. The effect of temperature on the composition and morphology of corrosion product layers of this steel were also investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results indicated the change of loss of ductility with temperature and the maximum loss of ductility was observed at 448 K (175 °C). XRD studies of the specimens revealed the formation of iron carbonate on the surface. SEM study of the surface of the specimens showed a rhombohedric crystalline iron carbonate layer above 373 K (100 °C), while no FeCO3 was detected at temperatures below 373 K (100 °C). Also, the crack size and depth of the cracks increased with temperature.

  12. Fate of corrosion products released from stainless steel in marine sediments and seawater. Part 1. Northeast Pacific pelagic red clay

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.L.

    1982-03-01

    To provide information useful for determining the biogeochemical cycling of corrosion products in the benthic boundary layer of the deep ocean, neutron-activated stainless steel was exposed to seawater and to Northeast Pacific red clay under aerobic and non-oxygenated conditions. This report describes the trace metal geochemistry of the sediment and the chemical speciation of the corrosion products. The sediments generally consisted of reddish-brown clay at the surface grading to a dark-brown transition zone below which mottled olive-gray clay prevailed. Neutron-irradiated 347 stainless steel specimens were exposed to seawater and sediment slurry under aerobic and non-oxygenated conditions for 108 days. The presence of aerated sediment more than doubled the amount of corrosion products released compared to aerated seawater and non-oxygenated sediment treatments. The distribution of /sup 60/Co released from the stainless steel exposed to aerated seawater show that almost 70% of /sup 60/Co activity became associated with suspended particulate matter. No detectable /sup 60/Co activity was present in the soluble, readily dissolved, or inorganic or weakly complexed fractions of aerated sediment which had been used to treat neutron-activated stainless steel. Almost 50% of the /sup 60/Co activity was extracted in the combined soluble, easily dissolved, adsorbed, and organically complexed fractions from the non-oxygenated sediment treatment indicating that this much of the corrosion products may be initially released in ionic form.

  13. 76 FR 17381 - Certain Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Certain Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Notice of Final Results of the Sixteenth Administrative Review Correction In notice document 2011-6566 beginning on page 15291 in...

  14. 76 FR 54209 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ...The Department of Commerce (the Department) is conducting an administrative review of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on corrosion-resistant carbon steel flat products (CORE) from the Republic of Korea (Korea) for the period of review (POR) January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2009. For information on the net subsidy for Hyundai HYSCO Ltd. (HYSCO), the company reviewed, see the......

  15. A process for the production of a scale-proof and corrosion-resistant coating on graphite and carbon bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzer, E.

    1981-01-01

    A process for the production of a corrosion resistant coating on graphite and carbon bodies is described. The carbon or graphite body is coated or impregnated with titanium silicide under the addition of a metal containing wetting agent in a nitrogen free atmosphere, so that a tight coating is formed.

  16. 77 FR 25405 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ... for Revocation in Part, 76 FR 61076 (October 3, 2011). The preliminary results of this review are... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea...'') published a notice of initiation of the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on...

  17. 75 FR 25841 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ... for Revocation in Part, 74 FR 48224 (September 22, 2009). The preliminary results of this review were... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea...'') published a notice of initiation of the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on...

  18. 77 FR 67395 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea; Revised Schedule for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... these five-year reviews (77 FR 31877, May 30, 2012). As noted in the Commission's original scheduling... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From Germany and Korea; Revised Schedule for...

  19. 76 FR 21332 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Extension of Time...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ... for Revocation in Part, 75 FR 60076 (September 29, 2010). The preliminary results of this review are... International Trade Administration Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea...'') published a notice of initiation of the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on...

  20. Iron availability, nitrate uptake, and exportable new production in the subarctic Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banse, Karl

    1991-01-01

    Rates of nitrate uptake in bioassays from the open Gulf of Alaska by Martin et al. (1989) are reinterpreted. During the exponential phase of phytoplankton growth, iron addition affected the rate of nitrate uptake significantly at only one of the three stations (position of the former ocean weather station "Papa"); results from one station (northern) are not interpretable. Appreciable nitrate uptake and algal growth in all controls during the first few days appears to have consumed a few to several times as much dissolved iron as was found initially; this suggests high solubilization (regeneration) rates or uptake of iron moities other than iron measured as dissolved. Exponential increases of biomass at demonstrated reduced grazing made the iron demand in the controls outrun the supply after the first few days, in contrast to the iron treatments. It is suggested that in the field, grazing normally seems to prevent the phytoplankton from reaching concentrations that reduce the iron (and nitrate) to levels that depress division rates drastically. It is unclear whether the flourishing of medium-sized diatoms in the assays reflects removal of iron limitation on division rates of these rare species or exclusion of grazers from the containers. Although nitrate uptake may be equated with new production, the export to depth of new organic material (and hence of CO2) is not predictable from assays in small (liter) containers, especially so because the role of the large grazers on the size composition of the phytoplankton and the production of large sinking particles is not evaluated.

  1. Investigation of the weldability of iron-aluminum-chromium overlay coatings for corrosion protection in oxidizing/sulfidizing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regina, Jonathan R.

    The current study investigated the effect of chromium additions on the hydrogen cracking susceptibility of Fe-Al weld overlay claddings containing chromium additions. It was found that the weldability of FeAlCr claddings was a function of both the aluminum and chromium concentrations of the weld coatings. Weld overlay compositions that were not susceptible to hydrogen cracking were identified and the underlying mechanism behind the hydrogen cracking phenomenon was investigated further. It was concluded that the cracking behavior of the FeAlCr welds depended strongly on the microstructure of the weld fusion zone. Although it was found that the cracking susceptibility was influenced by the presence of Fe-Al intermetallic phases (namely Fe3 Al and FeAl), the cracking behavior of FeAlCr weld overlay claddings also depended on the size and distribution of carbide and oxide particles present within the weld structure. These particles acted as hydrogen trapping sites, which are areas where free hydrogen segregates and can no longer contribute to the hydrogen embrittlement of the metal. It was determined that in practical applications of these FeAlCr weld overlay coatings, carbon should be present within these welds to reduce the amount of hydrogen available for hydrogen cracking. Based on the weldability results of the FeAlCr weld claddings, coating compositions that were able to be deposited crack-free were used for long-term corrosion testing in a simulated low NOx environment. These alloys were compared to a Ni-based superalloy (622), which is commonly utilized as boiler tube coatings in power plant furnaces for corrosion protection. It was found that the FeAlCr alloys demonstrated superior corrosion resistance when compared to the Ni-based superalloy. Due to the excellent long-term corrosion behavior of FeAlCr weld overlays that were immune to hydrogen cracking, it was concluded that select FeAlCr weld overlay compositions would make excellent corrosion resistant

  2. Microbial Methane Production Associated with Carbon Steel Corrosion in a Nigerian Oil Field.

    PubMed

    Mand, Jaspreet; Park, Hyung S; Okoro, Chuma; Lomans, Bart P; Smith, Seun; Chiejina, Leo; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in oil field pipeline systems can be attributed to many different types of hydrogenotrophic microorganisms including sulfate reducers, methanogens and acetogens. Samples from a low temperature oil reservoir in Nigeria were analyzed using DNA pyrotag sequencing. The microbial community compositions of these samples revealed an abundance of anaerobic methanogenic archaea. Activity of methanogens was demonstrated by incubating samples anaerobically in a basal salts medium, in the presence of carbon steel and carbon dioxide. Methane formation was measured in all enrichments and correlated with metal weight loss. Methanogens were prominently represented in pipeline solids samples, scraped from the inside of a pipeline, comprising over 85% of all pyrosequencing reads. Methane production was only witnessed when carbon steel beads were added to these pipeline solids samples, indicating that no methane was formed as a result of degradation of the oil organics present in these samples. These results were compared to those obtained for samples taken from a low temperature oil field in Canada, which had been incubated with oil, either in the presence or in the absence of carbon steel. Again, methanogens present in these samples catalyzed methane production only when carbon steel was present. Moreover, acetate production was also found in these enrichments only in the presence of carbon steel. From these studies it appears that carbon steel, not oil organics, was the predominant electron donor for acetate production and methane formation in these low temperature oil fields, indicating that the methanogens and acetogens found may contribute significantly to MIC. PMID:26793176

  3. Microbial Methane Production Associated with Carbon Steel Corrosion in a Nigerian Oil Field

    PubMed Central

    Mand, Jaspreet; Park, Hyung S.; Okoro, Chuma; Lomans, Bart P.; Smith, Seun; Chiejina, Leo; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in oil field pipeline systems can be attributed to many different types of hydrogenotrophic microorganisms including sulfate reducers, methanogens and acetogens. Samples from a low temperature oil reservoir in Nigeria were analyzed using DNA pyrotag sequencing. The microbial community compositions of these samples revealed an abundance of anaerobic methanogenic archaea. Activity of methanogens was demonstrated by incubating samples anaerobically in a basal salts medium, in the presence of carbon steel and carbon dioxide. Methane formation was measured in all enrichments and correlated with metal weight loss. Methanogens were prominently represented in pipeline solids samples, scraped from the inside of a pipeline, comprising over 85% of all pyrosequencing reads. Methane production was only witnessed when carbon steel beads were added to these pipeline solids samples, indicating that no methane was formed as a result of degradation of the oil organics present in these samples. These results were compared to those obtained for samples taken from a low temperature oil field in Canada, which had been incubated with oil, either in the presence or in the absence of carbon steel. Again, methanogens present in these samples catalyzed methane production only when carbon steel was present. Moreover, acetate production was also found in these enrichments only in the presence of carbon steel. From these studies it appears that carbon steel, not oil organics, was the predominant electron donor for acetate production and methane formation in these low temperature oil fields, indicating that the methanogens and acetogens found may contribute significantly to MIC. PMID:26793176

  4. Microbial Methane Production Associated with Carbon Steel Corrosion in a Nigerian Oil Field.

    PubMed

    Mand, Jaspreet; Park, Hyung S; Okoro, Chuma; Lomans, Bart P; Smith, Seun; Chiejina, Leo; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in oil field pipeline systems can be attributed to many different types of hydrogenotrophic microorganisms including sulfate reducers, methanogens and acetogens. Samples from a low temperature oil reservoir in Nigeria were analyzed using DNA pyrotag sequencing. The microbial community compositions of these samples revealed an abundance of anaerobic methanogenic archaea. Activity of methanogens was demonstrated by incubating samples anaerobically in a basal salts medium, in the presence of carbon steel and carbon dioxide. Methane formation was measured in all enrichments and correlated with metal weight loss. Methanogens were prominently represented in pipeline solids samples, scraped from the inside of a pipeline, comprising over 85% of all pyrosequencing reads. Methane production was only witnessed when carbon steel beads were added to these pipeline solids samples, indicating that no methane was formed as a result of degradation of the oil organics present in these samples. These results were compared to those obtained for samples taken from a low temperature oil field in Canada, which had been incubated with oil, either in the presence or in the absence of carbon steel. Again, methanogens present in these samples catalyzed methane production only when carbon steel was present. Moreover, acetate production was also found in these enrichments only in the presence of carbon steel. From these studies it appears that carbon steel, not oil organics, was the predominant electron donor for acetate production and methane formation in these low temperature oil fields, indicating that the methanogens and acetogens found may contribute significantly to MIC.

  5. Kinetic study for phenol degradation by ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and related iron corrosion investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, In-Ho; Yoo, Gursong; Hong, Hye-Jin; Kim, Jungmin; Kim, Min Gyu; Choi, Wang-Kyu; Yang, Ji-Won

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigated phenol degradation via zero-valent iron (ZVI)-assisted Fenton reaction through kinetic and spectroscopic analysis. In batch experiments, 100 mg/L of phenol was completely degraded, and 75% of TOC was removed within 3 min under an optimal hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration (50 mM) via the Fenton reaction. In the absence of H2O2, oxygen (O2) was dissolved into the solution and produced H2O2, which resulted in phenol degradation. However, phenol removal efficiency was not very high compared to external H2O2 input. The Fenton reaction rapidly occurred at the surface of ZVI, and then phenol mobility from the solution to the ZVI surface was the rate determining step of the whole reaction. The pseudo-second order adsorption kinetic model well describes phenol removal, and its rate increased according to the H2O2 concentration. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis revealed that iron oxide (Fe-O bonding) was formed on ZVI with [H2O2] > 50 mM. A high concentration of H2O2 led to rapid degradation of phenol and caused corrosion on the ZVI surface, indicating that Fe(2+) ions were rapidly oxidized to Fe(3+) ions due to the Fenton reaction and that Fe(3+) was precipitated as iron oxide on the ZVI surface. However, ZVI did not show corroded characteristics in the absence of H2O2 due to the insufficient ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and oxidation of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+).

  6. Kinetic study for phenol degradation by ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and related iron corrosion investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, In-Ho; Yoo, Gursong; Hong, Hye-Jin; Kim, Jungmin; Kim, Min Gyu; Choi, Wang-Kyu; Yang, Ji-Won

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigated phenol degradation via zero-valent iron (ZVI)-assisted Fenton reaction through kinetic and spectroscopic analysis. In batch experiments, 100 mg/L of phenol was completely degraded, and 75% of TOC was removed within 3 min under an optimal hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration (50 mM) via the Fenton reaction. In the absence of H2O2, oxygen (O2) was dissolved into the solution and produced H2O2, which resulted in phenol degradation. However, phenol removal efficiency was not very high compared to external H2O2 input. The Fenton reaction rapidly occurred at the surface of ZVI, and then phenol mobility from the solution to the ZVI surface was the rate determining step of the whole reaction. The pseudo-second order adsorption kinetic model well describes phenol removal, and its rate increased according to the H2O2 concentration. X-ray absorption spectroscopic analysis revealed that iron oxide (Fe-O bonding) was formed on ZVI with [H2O2] > 50 mM. A high concentration of H2O2 led to rapid degradation of phenol and caused corrosion on the ZVI surface, indicating that Fe(2+) ions were rapidly oxidized to Fe(3+) ions due to the Fenton reaction and that Fe(3+) was precipitated as iron oxide on the ZVI surface. However, ZVI did not show corroded characteristics in the absence of H2O2 due to the insufficient ZVI-assisted Fenton reaction and oxidation of Fe(2+) to Fe(3+). PMID:26692518

  7. Enhanced Carbohydrate Production by Phytoplankton of the Southern Ocean in Response to Iron Fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oijen, T.; Veldhuis, M. J.; van Leeuwe, M. A.; de Baar, H. J.

    2002-12-01

    Iron concentrations in the Southern Ocean are generally low. At these concentrations microalgal growth, in particular of large diatoms, is affected because iron plays a central role in photosynthesis and several metabolic processes. During the Polarstern 2000 iron release experiment, we studied the effect of in situ iron enrichment on the microalgal production and consumption of water-extractable carbohydrates. The experiment was performed in the Southern Polar Frontal Zone and lasted three weeks. During the course of the experiment, discrete samples were taken along vertical profiles (0-100m), both in the center of the iron enriched patch and outside the patch. In the patch, the carbohydrate concentration in the particulate fraction had doubled at the end of the experiment. An increasing part of the carbohydrates was produced by large diatom cells. Outside the patch, little changes were observed. On day 6, 10 and 19 after the release, seawater from inside and outside the patch was incubated on deck for 24h. In all three deck incubations, the diurnal production and nocturnal consumption of carbohydrates by phytoplankton were higher in iron-enriched bottles. Concluding, carbohydrate production showed to be a sensitive parameter that clearly indicated enhanced phytoplankton growth in response to iron fertilization. This study contributes to a better understanding of factors governing phytoplankton growth in High Nitrogen Low Chlorophyll areas.

  8. Hot corrosivity of coal conversion product on high temperature alloys. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, G.H.

    1984-08-29

    This report describes research begun under Contract AS01-76-ET-10577, most of which was continued when the same project was continued under a new number, Contract AC01-79-ET-13547. The areas studied are thermochemistry of high temperature corrosion, hot corrosion of turbine alloys and coatings, and electrochemistry of sulfate melts. A background to the problem of hot corrosion is presented first followed by a description of results obtained in the three areas of this project.

  9. KINETICS OF SOLUBLE CHROMIUM REMOVAL FROM CONTAMINATED WATER BY ZEROVALENT IRON MEDIA: CORROSION INHIBITION AND PASSIVE OXIDE EFFECTS. (R825223)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeable reactive barriers containing zerovalent iron are being increasingly
    employed for in situ remediation of groundwater contaminated with redox active
    metals and chlorinated organic compounds. This research investigated the effect
    of chromate concentration on...

  10. Corrosion performance of structural alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.

    1999-07-15

    Component reliability and long-term trouble-free performance of structural materials are essential in power-generating and gasification processes that utilize coal as a feedstock. During combustion and conversion of coal, the environments encompass a wide range of oxygen partial pressures, from excess-air conditions in conventional boilers to air-deficient conditions in 10W-NO{sub x} and gasification systems. Apart from the environmental aspects of the effluent from coal combustion and conversion, one concern from the systems standpoint is the aggressiveness of the gaseous/deposit environment toward structural components such as waterwall tubes, steam superheaters, syngas coolers, and hot-gas filters. The corrosion tests in the program described in this paper address the individual and combined effects of oxygen, sulfur, and chlorine on the corrosion response of several ASME-coded and noncoded structural alloys that were exposed to air-deficient and excess-air environments typical of coal-combustion and gasification processes. Data in this paper address the effects of preoxidation on the subsequent corrosion performance of structural materials such as 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel, Type 347 austenitic stainless steel, Alloys 800, 825, 625, 214, Hastelloy X, and iron aluminide when exposed at 650 C to various mixed-gas environments with and without HCI. Results are presented for scaling kinetics, microstructural characteristics of corrosion products, detailed evaluations of near-surface regions of the exposed specimens, gains in our mechanistic understanding of the roles of S and Cl in the corrosion process, and the effect of preoxidation on subsequent corrosion.

  11. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.487 Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... engineering tests and analyses show can permanently restore the serviceability of the pipe. Corrosion...

  12. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.487 Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... engineering tests and analyses show can permanently restore the serviceability of the pipe. Corrosion...

  13. 49 CFR 192.487 - Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... STANDARDS Requirements for Corrosion Control § 192.487 Remedial measures: Distribution lines other than cast iron or ductile iron lines. (a) General corrosion. Except for cast iron or ductile iron pipe, each... engineering tests and analyses show can permanently restore the serviceability of the pipe. Corrosion...

  14. Carbohydrate Production and Consumption In Phytoplankton Subjected To Iron Fertilisation In The Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oijen, T.; Veldhuis, M. J. W.; van Leeuwe, M. A.; de Baar, H. J. W.

    Iron concentrations in the Southern Ocean are generally low. At these concentrations microalgal growth, in particular of large diatoms, is affected because iron plays a central role in photosynthesis and several metabolic processes. During the Polarstern 2000 iron release experiment, we studied the effect of in situ iron enrichment on the microalgal production and consumption of intracellular carbohydrates. The experi- ment was performed in the Southern Polar Frontal Zone and lasted three weeks. Dur- ing the course of the experiment, discrete samples were taken along vertical profiles (0-100m), both in the centre of the iron enriched patch and outside the patch. In the patch, the particulate carbohydrate concentration had doubled at the end of the exper- iment. An increasing part of the carbohydrates was produced by large diatom cells (>10 micrometer). Outside the patch, little changes were observed. On day 6, 10 and 19 after the release, seawater from inside and outside the patch was incubated on deck for 24h. In all three deck incubations, the diurnal production and nocturnal con- sumption of intracellular carbohydrates by phytoplankton were higher in iron-enriched bottles. Concluding, particulate carbohydrate concentration showed to be a sensitive parameter that clearly responded to iron fertilisation. This study contributes to a bet- ter understanding of factors governing phytoplankton growth in High Nitrogen Low Chlorophyll areas.

  15. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Amitava Sarkar; James K. Neathery; Burtron H. Davis

    2006-12-31

    A fundamental filtration study was started to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. Slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems is the preferred mode of operation since the reaction is highly exothermic. Consequently, heavy wax products in one approach may be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. Achieving an efficient wax product separation from iron-based catalysts is one of the most challenging technical problems associated with slurry-phase iron-based FTS and is a key factor for optimizing operating costs. The separation problem is further compounded by attrition of iron catalyst particles and the formation of ultra-fine particles.

  16. High temperature corrosion studies. A. Iron: based superalloy in SO/sub 2//O/sub 2/ atmospheres. B. Gas: solid reaction with formation of volatile species

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, T.K.

    1980-03-01

    The thermogravimetric method was used to study high temperature corrosion under SO/sub 2//O/sub 2/ atmosphere applied to Armco 18SR alloys with different heat treatment histories, Armco T310 and pure chromium between 750 and 1100/sup 0/C. The weight gain follows the parabolic rate law. The volatilization of the protective Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ layer via formation of CrO/sub 3/ was taken into account above 900/sup 0/C for long time runs. The parabolic rate and the volatilization rate, derived from fitting the experimental data to the modified Tedmon's non-linear model, were correlated using the Arrhenius equation. Armco 18SR-C has the best corrosion resistance of the Armco 18SR alloys. Armco T310 is not protective at high temperatures. The available rate data on the oxidation of chromium oxide, chlorination of chromium, oxidation-chlorination of chromium oxide, chlorination of nickel and chlorination of iron were found to be predictable. The calculation of high temperature volatilization rate was performed using the available fluid correlation equations and the Lennard-Jones parameters derived from the molecule with similar structure and from the low temperature viscosity measurement. The lower predicted volatilization rate is due to the use of the Chapman-Enskog equation with the Lennard-Jones parameters mostly derived from the low temperature viscosity measurement. This was substantiated by comparing the reliable high temperature diffusion rate in the literature with the above mentioned calculational method. The experimental volatilization rates of this study are compared with the other related studies and the mass transfer predictions.

  17. Investigation of the inhibiting action of O-, S- and N-dithiocarbamato(1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane)cobalt(III) complexes on the corrosion of iron in HClO 4 acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babić-Samardžija, K.; Khaled, K. F.; Hackerman, N.

    2005-02-01

    The inhibiting properties of four macrocyclic cobalt(III) complexes of the general formula [Co III(Rdtc)cyclam](ClO 4) 2, where cyclam and Rdtc- refer to 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane and morpholine-, thiomorpholine-, piperazine-, N-methylpiperazine-dithiocarbamates, respectively, has been studied on the corrosion of iron in aerated 0.1 M HClO 4 solutions by potentiodynamic polarization (dc) technique and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (ac). Inhibitor efficiency for the corrosion of iron is found to be better for cobalt complexes then for related amino-ligands. The impedance increases with inhibitor concentration. Polarization curves indicate that the inhibitors are predominantly mixed-type. Better protection by the complex inhibitors was obtained with longer immersion time. The best fit for inhibitors adsorption is obtained using the Langmuir isotherm model. Molecular modeling calculations were used to correlate structural properties of the complex species and their inhibition efficiency.

  18. Inhibitory effect of oat products on non-haem iron absorption in man.

    PubMed

    Rossander-Hulthén, L; Gleerup, A; Hallberg, L

    1990-11-01

    Oat products are increasingly used in human nutrition due to the rather high content of soluble fibre. Oat products, however, have a high content of phytate which may interfere with the absorption of non-haem iron. The iron balance situation is critical in several groups, especially in children, teenagers and women in their fertile years. It is therefore important to examine the effect of oat products on non-haem iron absorption in man. The present studies showed that oat bran and oat porridge markedly inhibited the absorption of non-haem iron. The inhibition can be explained by the high phytate content of oat products. This is partly due to a high resistance of oat phytate against exogenous phytase and partly to an inactivation of the endogenous phytase in oats caused by the usual heat treatment of oats which is made to prevent rancidity of oat lipids during storage. The inhibitory effect of oat products on iron absorption is sufficiently marked to be a serious consideration if such products are more regularly consumed.

  19. WASTE PACKAGE CORROSION STUDIES USING SMALL MOCKUP EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    B.E. Anderson; K.B. Helean; C.R. Bryan; P.V. Brady; R.C. Ewing

    2005-10-19

    The corrosion of spent nuclear fuel and subsequent mobilization of radionuclides is of great concern in a geologic repository, particularly if conditions are oxidizing. Corroding A516 steel may offset these transport processes within the proposed waste packages at the Yucca Mountain Repository (YMR) by retaining radionuclides, creating locally reducing conditions, and reducing porosity. Ferrous iron, Fe{sup 2+}, has been shown to reduce UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} to UO{sub 2(s)} [1], and some ferrous iron-bearing ion-exchange materials adsorb radionuclides and heavy metals [2]. Of particular interest is magnetite, a potential corrosion product that has been shown to remove TcO{sub 4}{sup -} from solution [3]. Furthermore, if Fe{sup 2+} minerals, rather than fully oxidized minerals such as goethite, are produced during corrosion, then locally reducing conditions may be present. High electron availability leads to the reduction and subsequent immobilization of problematic dissolved species such as TcO{sub 4}{sup -}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}, and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and can also inhibit corrosion of spent nuclear fuel. Finally, because the molar volume of iron material increases during corrosion due to oxygen and water incorporation, pore space may be significantly reduced over long time periods. The more water is occluded, the bulkier the corrosion products, and the less porosity is available for water and radionuclide transport. The focus of this paper is on the nature of Yucca Mountain waste package steel corrosion products and their effects on local redox state, radionuclide transport, and porosity.

  20. Presence of corrosion products and hypersensitivity-associated reactions in periprosthetic tissue after aseptic loosening of total hip replacements with metal bearing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Huber, Monika; Reinisch, Georg; Trettenhahn, Günter; Zweymüller, Karl; Lintner, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Aseptic loosening of articular implants is frequently associated with tissue reactions to wear particles. Some patients, who had received metal-on-metal articulations, present early symptoms including persistent pain and implant failure. These symptoms raise the suspicion about the development of an immunological response. Furthermore, the generation of rare corrosion products in association with metallic implants has been observed. Corrosion products are known to enhance third-body wear and contribute to the loss of the implant. The purpose of this study was to investigate periprosthetic tissue containing solid corrosion products after aseptic loosening of second-generation metal-on-metal total hip replacements made of low-carbon cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy for the presence of immunologically determined tissue changes. Periprosthetic tissue of 11 cases containing uncommon solid deposits was investigated by light microscopy. In order to confirm the presence of corrosion products, additional methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR) analysis were used. All investigated cases revealed solid chromium orthophosphate corrosion products as well as metallic wear particles to a various extent. Moreover, various intense tissue reactions characteristic of immune response were observed in all cases. The simultaneous presence of corrosion products and hypersensitivity-associated tissue reaction indicates that a relationship between corrosion development and implant-related hypersensitivity may exist. PMID:18725188

  1. Corrosion product deposits on boiling-water reactor cladding: Experimental and theoretical investigation of magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A.; Degueldre, C.; Wiese, H.; Ledergerber, G.; Valizadeh, S.

    2011-09-01

    Recent Eddy current investigations on the cladding of nuclear fuel pins have shown that the apparent oxide layers are falsified due to unexpected magnetic properties of corrosion product deposits. Analyses by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) or Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) demonstrated that the deposit layer consists of complex 3-d element oxides (Ni, Mn, Fe) along with Zn, since the reactor operates with a Zn addition procedure to reduce buildup of radiation fields on the recirculation system surfaces. The oxides crystallise in ferritic spinel structures. These spinels are well-known for their magnetic behaviour. Since non-magnetic zinc ferrite (ZnFe 2O 4) may become magnetic when doped with even small amounts of Ni and/or Mn, their occurrence in the deposit layer has been analyzed. The magnetic permeability of zinc ferrite, trevorite and jacobsite and their solid solutions are estimated by magnetic moment additivity. From the void history examination, the low elevation sample (810 mm) did not face significant boiling during the irradiation cycles suggesting growth of (Mn0.092+Zn0.752+Fe0.293+)[(Fe1.713+Mn0.032+Ni0.132+)O] crystals with theoretical value of the magnetic permeability for the averaged heterogeneous CRUD layer of 9.5 ± 3. Meanwhile, (Mn0.162+Zn0.552+Fe0.293+)[(Fe1.713+Mn0.042+Ni0.252+)O] crystallizes at the mid elevation (1810 mm) with theoretical magnetic permeability for the CRUD layer of 4.2 ± 1.5 at the investigated azimuthal location. These theoretical data are compared with the magnetic permeability of the corrosion product deposited layers gained from reactor pool side Eddy current (EC) analyses (9.0 ± 1.0 for low and 3.5 ± 1.0 for high elevation). The calculated thicknesses and magnetic permeability values of the deposition layers (estimated by MAGNACROX multifrequency EC method) match together with these estimated using an "ion magnetic moment additivity" model.

  2. Geochemical and mineralogical composition of bog iron ore as a resource for prehistoric iron production - A case study of the Widawa catchment area in Eastern Silesia, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelemann, Michael; Bebermeier, Wiebke; Hoelzmann, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    Spreading from the Near East in the declining Bronze Age from the 2nd millennium BCE onwards, the technique of iron smelting reached Eastern Silesia, Poland, in approximately the 2nd century BCE (pre-Roman Iron Age). At this time the region of the Widawa catchment area was inhabited by the Przeworsk culture. While the older moraine landscape of the study area lacks ores from geological rock formations, bog iron ores were relatively widespread and, due to their comparatively easy accessibility, were commonly exploited for early iron production. In this poster the mineralogical and elemental composition of local bog iron ore deposits and iron slag finds, as a by-product of the smelting process, are investigated. The crystalline mineralogical composition of local bog iron ores is dominated by quartz (SiO2) and goethite (α FeO(OH)), in contrast to slag samples in which fayalite (Fe2SiO4), wüstite (FeO) and quartz, with traces of goethite, represent the main minerals. Ores and slags are both characterized by notable hematite (Fe2O3), magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) contents. Analyzed bog iron ore samples show iron contents of up to 64.9 mass% Fe2O3 (45.4 mass% Fe), whereas the iron contents of bloomery slags vary between 48.7 and 72.0 mass% FeO (37.9 and 56.0 mass% Fe). A principal component analysis of the element contents, which were quantified by portable energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (p-ED-XRF), indicates local variations in the elemental composition. Our results show that bog iron ores are relatively widely distributed with spatially varying iron contents along the Widawa floodplain but present-day formation conditions (e.g. different ground-water levels) are negatively affected by modern land-use practices, such as agriculture and melioration measures.

  3. The problems of mass transfer and formation of deposits of corrosion products on fuel assemblies of a VVER-1200 reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionov, Yu. A.; Kritskii, V. G.; Berezina, I. G.; Gavrilov, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    On the basis of examination of materials published both in Russia and abroad, as well as their own investigations, the authors explain the reasons for the occurrence of such effects as AOA (Axial Offset Anomalies) and an increase in the coolant pressure difference in the core of nuclear reactors of the VVER type. To detect the occurrence of the AOA effect, the authors suggest using the specific activity of 58Co in the coolant. In the VVER-1200 design the thermohydraulic regime for fuel assemblies in the first year of their service life involves slight boiling of the coolant in the upper part of the core, which may induce the occurrence of the AOA effect, intensification of corrosion of fuel claddings, and abnormal increase in deposition of corrosion products. Radiolysis of the water coolant in the boiling section (boiling in pores of deposits) may intensify not only general corrosion but also a localized (nodular) one. As a result of intensification of the corrosion processes and growth of deposits, deterioration of the radiation situation in the rooms of the primary circuit of a VVER-1200 reactor as compared to that at nuclear power plants equipped with reactors of the VVER-1000 type is possible. Recommendations for preventing the AOA effect at nuclear power plants with VVER-1200 reactors on the matter of the direction of further investigations are made.

  4. Co-Production of Electricity and Hydrogen Using a Novel Iron-based Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Hilaly, Ahmad; Georgas, Adam; Leboreiro, Jose; Arora, Salil; Head, Megann; Trembly, Jason; Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir

    2011-09-30

    The primary objective of this project was to develop a hydrogen production technology for gasification applications based on a circulating fluid-bed reactor and an attrition resistant iron catalyst. The work towards achieving this objective consisted of three key activities: • Development of an iron-based catalyst suitable for a circulating fluid-bed reactor • Design, construction, and operation of a bench-scale circulating fluid-bed reactor system for hydrogen production • Techno-economic analysis of the steam-iron and the pressure swing adsorption hydrogen production processes. This report describes the work completed in each of these activities during this project. The catalyst development and testing program prepared and iron-based catalysts using different support and promoters to identify catalysts that had sufficient activity for cyclic reduction with syngas and steam oxidation and attrition resistance to enable use in a circulating fluid-bed reactor system. The best performing catalyst from this catalyst development program was produced by a commercial catalyst toll manufacturer to support the bench-scale testing activities. The reactor testing systems used during material development evaluated catalysts in a single fluid-bed reactor by cycling between reduction with syngas and oxidation with steam. The prototype SIP reactor system (PSRS) consisted of two circulating fluid-bed reactors with the iron catalyst being transferred between the two reactors. This design enabled demonstration of the technical feasibility of the combination of the circulating fluid-bed reactor system and the iron-based catalyst for commercial hydrogen production. The specific activities associated with this bench-scale circulating fluid-bed reactor systems that were completed in this project included design, construction, commissioning, and operation. The experimental portion of this project focused on technical demonstration of the performance of an iron-based catalyst and a

  5. The Impact of Iron on Soil N2O Production Depends on Oxygen Availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.; Doane, T. A.; Burger, M.; Horwath, W. R.

    2014-12-01

    The continuous increase of nitrous oxide (N2O) abundance in the atmosphere is a global concern. Soils are both an important source and sink of N2O, which is produced and consumed through biological processes including ammonia oxidation, heterotrophic denitrification, codenitrification, and through abiotic processes such as chemodenitrification. Iron is the most abundant element in the earth and is also the most prevalent redox-active metal in the biosphere. Its role in both chemical and biochemical reactions in N biogeochemistry cycling is well recognized. However, iron's significance to N2O production is poorly understood, especially under varying O2 concentration. We examined N2O production under different O2 concentrations following amorphous iron (III) oxyhydroxide and ammonical N fertilizer additions in four soil slurries and two static soils (soil moisture was 50% of water holding capacity). Under 21% O2, the addition of iron (III) significantly decreased N2O production in all the soil slurries and static soils, while the opposite phenomenon was observed once the O2 concentration became limited (≤3% in the soil slurry and ≤0.5% in the static soil). Our results show that the influence of iron on soil N2O production depends on O2 availability, which is the dominant controller of N2O production pathways. We hypothesize that under ambient O2 conditions, iron can react with nitrite produced during ammonia oxidation, thus reducing the probability of NO2- being used by nitrifiers as electron acceptor in nitrifier denitrification. In contrast, under anaerobic conditions (O2<0.5%), less nitrite was detected in the presence of the iron addition. Under these conditions, iron may have inhibited N2O reductase, or reduced iron (II) reacted with nitrite, both of which would lead to greater release of N2O.These findings imply that management practices which focus on mitigating N2O emission should avoid the application of iron-rich materials such as biosolids when

  6. Reduction of iron-bearing lunar minerals for the production of oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massieon, Charles; Cutler, Andrew; Shadman, Farhang

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the reduction of simulants of the iron-bearing lunar minerals olivine ((Fe,Mg)2SiO4), pyroxene ((Fe,Mg,Ca)SiO3), and ilmenite (FeTiO3) are investigated, extending previous work with ilmenite. Fayalite is reduced by H2 at 1070 K to 1480 K. A layer of mixed silica glass and iron forms around an unreacted core. Reaction kinetics are influenced by permeation of hydrogen through this layer and a reaction step involving dissociated hydrogen. Reaction mechanisms are independent of Mg content. Augite, hypersthene, and hedenbergite are reduced in H2 at the same temperatures. The products are iron metal and lower iron silicates mixed throughout the mineral. Activation energy rises with calcium content. Ilmenite and fayalite are reduced with carbon deposited on partially reduced minerals via the CO disproportionation reaction. Reduction with carbon is rapid, showing the carbothermal reduction of lunar minerals is possible.

  7. Effect of water chemistry on the dissolution rate of the lead corrosion product hydrocerussite.

    PubMed

    Noel, James D; Wang, Yin; Giammar, Daniel E

    2014-05-01

    Hydrocerussite (Pb3(CO3)2(OH)2) is widely observed as a corrosion product in drinking water distribution systems. Its equilibrium solubility and dissolution rate can control lead concentrations in drinking water. The dissolution rate of hydrocerussite was investigated as a function of pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and orthophosphate concentrations at conditions relevant to drinking water distribution using continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). In the absence of DIC and orthophosphate, the dissolution rate decreased with increasing pH. Addition of DIC inhibited the dissolution of hydrocerussite. The addition of orthophosphate significantly decreased the dissolution rate of hydrocerussite. At conditions with orthophosphate and without DIC, a lead(II) phosphate solid hydroxylpyromorphite (Pb5(PO4)3OH) was observed after reaction, and orthophosphate's inhibitory effect can be attributed to the formation of this low-solubility lead(II) phosphate solid. In the presence of both orthophosphate and DIC, no lead(II) phosphate solid was observed, but the rate was still lowered by the presence of orthophosphate, which might be due to the adsorption of orthophosphate to block reactive sites on the hydrocerussite surface. For systems in which hydroxylpyromorphite was present, the steady-state effluent lead concentrations from the CSTRs were close to the predicted equilibrium solubility of hydroxylpyromorphite. In the absence of orthophosphate rapid equilibration of hydrocerussite was observed.

  8. Cytotoxicity of corrosion products of degradable Fe-based stents: relevance of pH and insoluble products.

    PubMed

    Fagali, Natalia S; Grillo, Claudia A; Puntarulo, Susana; Fernández Lorenzo de Mele, Mónica A

    2015-04-01

    Fe-based biodegradable metallic materials (Fe-BMMs) have been proposed for cardiovascular applications and are expected to disappear via corrosion after an appropriate period. However, in vivo studies showed that Fe ions release leads to accumulation of orange and brownish insoluble products at the biomaterial/cell interface. As an additional consequence, sharp changes in pH may affect the biocompatibility of these materials. In the present work, the experimental protocols were designed with the aim of evaluating the relative importance that these factors have on biocompatibility evaluation of BMMs. Mitochondrial activity (MTT assay) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay on mammalian cells, exposed to 1-5 mM of added Fe3+ salt, were assessed and compared with results linked exclusively to pH effects. Soluble Fe concentration in culture medium and intracellular Fe content were also determined. The results showed that: (i) mitochondrial activity was affected by pH changes over the entire range of concentrations of added Fe3+ assayed, (ii) at the highest added Fe3+ concentrations (≥3 mM), precipitation was detected and the cells were able to incorporate the precipitate, that seems to be linked to cell damage, (iii) the extent of precipitation depends on the Fe/protein concentration ratio; and (iv) lipid peroxidation products were detected over the entire range of concentrations of added Fe3+. Hence, a new approach opens in the biocompatibility evaluation of Fe-based BMMs, since the cytotoxicity would not be solely a function of released (and soluble) ions but of the insoluble degradation product amount and the pH falling at the biomaterial/cell interface. The concentration of Fe-containing products at the interface depends on diffusional conditions in a very complex way that should be carefully analyzed in the future.

  9. Micro-Raman study of copper hydroxychlorides and other corrosion products of bronze samples mimicking archaeological coins.

    PubMed

    Bertolotti, Giulia; Bersani, Danilo; Lottici, Pier Paolo; Alesiani, Marcella; Malcherek, Thomas; Schlüter, Jochen

    2012-02-01

    Three bronze samples created by CNR-ISMN (National Research Council-Institute of Nanostructured Materials) to be similar to Punic and Roman coins found in Tharros (OR, Sardinia, Italy) were studied to identify the corrosion products on their surfaces and to evaluate the reliability of the reproduction process. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was chosen to investigate the corroded surfaces because it is a non-destructive technique, it has high spatial resolution, and it gives the opportunity to discriminate between polymorphs and to correlate colour and chemical composition. A significant amount of green copper hydroxychlorides (Cu(2)(OH)(3)Cl) was detected on all the coins. Their discrimination by Raman spectroscopy was challenging because the literature on the topic is currently confusing. Thus, it was necessary to determine the characteristic peaks of atacamite, clinoatacamite, and the recently discovered anatacamite by acquiring Raman spectra of comparable natural mineral samples. Clinoatacamite, with different degrees of order in its structure, was the major component identified on the three coins. The most widespread corrosion product, besides hydroxychlorides, was the red copper oxide cuprite (Cu(2)O). Other corrosion products of the elements of the alloy (laurionite, plumbonacrite, zinc carbonate) and those resulting from burial in the soil (anatase, calcite, hematite) were also found. This study shows that identification of corrosion products, including discrimination of copper hydroxychlorides, could be accomplished by micro-Raman on valuable objects, for example archaeological findings or works of art, avoiding any damage because of extraction of samples or the use of a destructive analytical technique.

  10. Uncommon corrosion phenomena of archaeological bronze alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingo, G. M.; de Caro, T.; Riccucci, C.; Khosroff, S.

    2006-06-01

    In the framework of the EFESTUS project (funded by the European Commission, contract No. ICA3-CT-2002-10030) the corrosion products of a large number of archaeological bronze artefacts are investigated by means of the combined use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical microscopy (OM) and tentative correlation of their nature with the chemical composition of the artefacts and the burial context is proposed. The results provide good insight into the corrosion layers and evidence in some bronze Roman coins and artefacts; the occurrence of uncommon corrosion phenomena that give rise to the formation of a yellowish-green complex chlorine-phosphate of lead (pyromorphite, (PbCl)Pb4(PO4)3) and of a gold-like thick layer of an iron and copper sulphide (chalcopyrite, CuFeS2). The micro-chemical and micro-structural results show that the coins were buried in a soil enriched in phosphorus for the accidental presence of a large amount of decomposing fragments of bones or in an anaerobic and humus rich soil where the chalcopyrite layer has been produced via the interaction between the iron of the soil, the copper of the coin and the sulphur produced by the decomposition of organic matter in an almost oxygen free environment. Finally, some unusual periodic corrosion phenomena occurring in high tin bronze mirrors found at Zama (Tunisia) are described.

  11. Enhanced High Temperature Corrosion Resistance in Advanced Fossil Energy Systems by Nano-Passive Layer Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold R. Marder

    2007-06-14

    Due to their excellent corrosion resistance, iron aluminum alloys are currently being considered for use as weld claddings in fossil fuel fired power plants. The susceptibility to hydrogen cracking of these alloys at higher aluminum concentrations has highlighted the need for research into the effect of chromium additions on the corrosion resistance of lower aluminum alloys. In the present work, three iron aluminum alloys were exposed to simulated coal combustion environments at 500 C and 700 C for both short (100 hours) and long (5,000 hours) isothermal durations. Scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze the corrosion products. All alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the short term tests. For longer exposures, increasing the aluminum concentration was beneficial to the corrosion resistance. The addition of chromium to the binary iron aluminum alloy prevented the formation iron sulfide and resulted in lower corrosion kinetics. A classification of the corrosion products that developed on these alloys is presented. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of the as-corroded coupons revealed that chromium was able to form chromium sulfides only on the higher aluminum alloy, thereby preventing the formation of deleterious iron sulfides. When the aluminum concentration was too low to permit selective oxidation of only aluminum (upon initial exposure to the corrosion environment), the formation of chromium oxide alongside the aluminum oxide led to depletion of chromium beneath the oxide layer. Upon penetration of sulfur through the oxide into this depletion layer, iron sulfides (rather than chromium sulfides) were found to form on the low aluminum alloy. Thus, it was found in this work that the role of chromium on alloy corrosion resistance was strongly effected by the aluminum concentration of the alloy. STEM analysis also revealed the encapsulation of external iron sulfide products with a thin layer of aluminum oxide, which may provide a

  12. Characterization of Copper Corrosion Products in Drinking Water by Combining Electrochemical and Surface Analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study focuses on the application of electrochemical approaches to drinking water copper corrosion problems. Applying electrochemical approaches combined with copper solubility measurements, and solid surface analysis approaches were discussed. Tafel extrapolation and Electro...

  13. Characterization of Copper Corrosion Products Formed in Drinking Water by Combining Electrochemical and Surface Analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study focuses on the application of electrochemical approaches to drinking water copper corrosion problems. Applying electrochemical approaches combined with copper solubility measurements, and solid surface analysis approaches were discussed. Tafel extrapolation and Electro...

  14. Study of the corrosion products formed on a multiphase CuAlBe alloy in a sodium chloride solution by micro-Raman and in situ AFM measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montecinos, S.; Simison, S. N.

    2011-06-01

    The corrosion products formed on a multiphase Cu-11.40Al-0.55Be (wt.%) alloy in 3.5% NaCl at open circuit potential, and their evolution with immersion time were studied mainly by micro-Raman and in situ AFM measurements. The aluminium content of each phase affects the formation of the corrosion products on them. After 1 day of immersion, γ 2 precipitates were more susceptible to dealuminization, while α' phase exhibited a high corrosion stability. The corrosion products evolved with immersion time, and CuCl 2 and a Cu 2O/CuO double layer film were the stable products formed on all the phases after long times.

  15. India's iron and steel industry: Productivity, energy efficiency and carbon emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, Katja; Sathaye, Jayant

    1998-10-01

    Historical estimates of productivity growth in India's iron and steel sector vary from indicating an improvement to a decline in the sector's productivity. The variance may be traced to the time period of study, source of data for analysis, and type of indices and econometric specifications used for reporting productivity growth. The authors derive both growth accounting and econometric estimates of productivity growth for this sector. Their results show that over the observed period from 1973--74 to 1993--94 productivity declined by 1.71{percent} as indicated by the Translog index. Calculations of the Kendrick and Solow indices support this finding. Using a translog specification the econometric analysis reveals that technical progress in India's iron and steel sector has been biased towards the use of energy and material, while it has been capital and labor saving. The decline in productivity was caused largely by the protective policy regarding price and distribution of iron and steel as well as by large inefficiencies in public sector integrated steel plants. Will these trends continue into the future, particularly where energy use is concerned? Most likely they will not. The authors examine the current changes in structure and energy efficiency undergoing in the sector. Their analysis shows that with the liberalization of the iron and steel sector, the industry is rapidly moving towards world-best technology, which will result in fewer carbon emissions and more efficient energy use in existing and future plants.

  16. Friction and wear of iron in sulfuric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rengstorff, G. W. P.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Elemental iron sliding on aluminum oxide in aerated sulfuric acid concentrations ranging from very dilute (0.000007 N; i.e., 4 ppm) to very concentrated (96 percent acid) was studied. Load and reciprocating sliding speeds were kept constant. With the most dilute acid of 0.7 to 0.0002 N, a complex corrosion product formed that was friable and often increased friction and wear. At concentrations of 0.001 N, metal losses were essentially by wear alone. Because no buildup of corrosion products occurred, this acid concentration became the standard from which to separate metal loss from direct corrosion and mechanical wear losses. When the acid concentration was increased to 5 percent, the high corrosion rate of iron in sulfuric acid strongly dominated the total wear loss. This strong corrosion increased to 30 percent acid, and decreased somewhat at 50 percent in accordance with expectations. However, the low corrosion of iron expected at acid concentrations of 65 to 96 percent was not observed in the wear area. It is apparent that the normal passivating film was being worn away and a galvanic cell established which rapidly attached to the wear area.

  17. Arsenate and Arsenite Sorption on Magnetite: Relations to Groundwater Arsenic Treatment Using Zerovalent Iron and Natural Attenuation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a zerovalent iron corrosion product; it is also formed in natural soil and sediment. Sorption of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) on magnetite is an important process of arsenic removal from groundwater using zerovalent iron-based permeable reactive ba...

  18. Influence of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria on the corrosion of low carbon steel: Local electrochemical investigations.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Rebeca; Schütz, Marta K; Libert, Marie; Tribollet, Bernard; Vivier, Vincent

    2014-06-01

    Low carbon steel has been considered a suitable material for component of the multi-barrier system employed on the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW). A non negligible amount of dihydrogen (H2) is expected to be produced over the years within the geological repository due to the anoxic corrosion of metallic materials and also to the water radiolysis. The influence of the activity of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria (HOB) and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB) on carbon steel corrosion is considered in this study because of the high availability of energetic nutriments (H2, iron oxides and hydroxides) produced in anoxic disposal conditions. Local electrochemical techniques were used for investigating the activity of IRB as a promoter of local corrosion in the presence of H2 as electron donor. A local consumption of H2 by the bacteria has been evidenced and impedance measurements indicate the formation of a thick layer of corrosion products.

  19. Soil abrasion and eolian dust production: Implications for iron partitioning and solubility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackie, D. S.; Peat, J. M.; McTainsh, G. H.; Boyd, P. W.; Hunter, K. A.

    2006-12-01

    Eolian dust is a source of iron for phytoplankton in many ocean areas, and there are complex pathways of atmospheric processing from soil to ocean. Overlooked parts of the pathways are the impact of large (>10 μm) grains (including a role as proxies for the behavior of smaller grains) and the effect of multiple cycles of uplift and abrasion in the dust source region. Partitioning (readily released, acid-leachable and refractory) and dissolution rates of iron were determined for an artificial dust (produced by abrading an Australian soil), untreated soil, abraded soil (after production of the artificial dust), and a natural Australian eolian dust sample taken during a dust storm. Readily released iron is not created during abrasion, and therefore the amount of readily released iron in a dust or dust-derived soil depends on processing events since the dust or soil last experienced an abrasion event. Our study develops a method for the partitioning of iron within airborne dusts and appears to be the first to consider the effect of multiple uplift events on iron partitioning.

  20. Testosterone alters iron metabolism and stimulates red blood cell production independently of dihydrotestosterone

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Luke A.; Yarrow, Joshua F.; Conover, Christine F.; Meuleman, John R.; Beck, Darren T.; Morrow, Matthew; Zou, Baiming; Shuster, Jonathan J.

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone (T) stimulates erythropoiesis and regulates iron homeostasis. However, it remains unknown whether the (type II) 5α-reduction of T to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) mediates these androgenic effects, as it does in some other tissues. Our purpose was to determine whether inhibition of type II 5α-reductase (via finasteride) alters red blood cell (RBC) production and serum markers of iron homeostasis subsequent to testosterone-enanthate (TE) administration in older hypogonadal men. Sixty men aged ≥60 yr with serum T <300 ng/dl or bioavailable T <70 ng/dl received treatment with TE (125 mg/wk) vs. vehicle paired with finasteride (5 mg/day) vs. placebo using a 2 × 2 factorial design. Over the course of 12 mo, TE increased RBC count 9%, hematocrit 4%, and hemoglobin 8% while suppressing serum hepcidin 57% (P < 0.001 for all measurements). Most of the aforementioned changes occurred in the first 3 mo of treatment, and finasteride coadministration did not significantly alter any of these effects. TE also reduced serum ferritin 32% (P = 0.002) within 3 mo of treatment initiation without altering iron, transferrin, or transferrin saturation. We conclude that TE stimulates erythropoiesis and alters iron homeostasis independently of the type II 5α-reductase enzyme. These results demonstrate that elevated DHT is not required for androgen-mediated erythropoiesis or for alterations in iron homeostasis that would appear to support iron incorporation into RBCs. PMID:25074984

  1. [Microorganisms in heat supply lines and internal corrosion of steel pipes].

    PubMed

    Rozanova, E P; Dubinina, G A; Lebedeva, E V; Suntsova, L A; Lipovskikh, V M; Tsvetkov, N N

    2003-01-01

    In laboratory experiments with batch cultures of thermophilic microorganisms isolated from urban heat supply systems, the growth of sulfate-reducing, iron-oxidizing, and iron-reducing bacteria was found to accelerate the corrosion rate of the steel-3 plates used in the pipelines. In the absence of bacteria and dissolved oxygen, minimal, corrosion was determined. The aforementioned microorganisms, as well as sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, were found to be widespread in water and corrosion deposits in low-alloy steel pipelines (both delivery and return) of the Moscow heat networks, as well as in the corrosion deposits on the steel-3 plates in a testing unit supplied with the network water. The microorganisms were found in samples with water pH ranging from 8.1 to 9.6 and a temperature lower than 90 degrees C. Magnetite, lepidocrocite, goethite, X-ray amorphous ferric oxide were the corrosion products identified on the steel-3 plates, as well as siderite, aragonite, and S0. The effect of microbiological processes on the rate of electrochemical corrosion was evaluated from the accumulation of corrosion deposits and from variation in total and local corrosion of the steel plates in a testing unit.

  2. Oxygen and iron production by electrolytic smelting of lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, Larry A.

    1989-01-01

    Previous work has shown that Fe(sup 0) and O2 can be derived by electrolysis from silicate smelt of a composition typical of lunar soils (Lindstrom and Haskin 1979). In the present study, the goal is to refine further the conditions necessary to optimize production and to determine efficiencies of production (how much product is derived for a given current) and purity of products. These depend on several factors, including potential imposed between electrodes, configuration and surface area of the electrodes, composition of the electrolyzed silicate melt, and oxygen fugacity. Experiments were designed to measure the dependence on these variables of three parameters that must be known before production by electrolysis can be optimized. These parameters are: Limiting Current; Actual Current; and Efficiencies of Production.

  3. Production of carbon nano-tubes via CCVD method and their corrosion protection performance in epoxy based coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, M. A.; Ghauri, F. A.; Awan, M. S.; Farooq, A.; Ahmad, R.

    2016-08-01

    Good yield of carbon products was obtained by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) technique using 100-500mg of ferrocene catalyst at temperature of 900 °C and acetylene flow rate of 150-200cc/min. The effects of amount of ferrocene, temperature and hydrocarbons precursors on the yield of carbon nanomaterial's was calculated and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) andenergy- dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Good yield of carbon nanomaterials primarily consisted of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanoparticles was obtained. CNTs obtained after purification were dispersed in epoxy resin to produce composite coatings which were coated on stainless steel 316L. The coated stainless steel samples’ corrosion behavior was studied using open circuit potential (OCP), cyclic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. Results showed that epoxy coating containing 4 wt. % of CNTs offered improved corrosion resistance to stainless steel.

  4. Modeling the Distribution of Acidity within Nuclear Fuel (UO{sub 2}) Corrosion Product Deposits and Porous Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cheong, W.J.; Keech, P.G.; Wren, J.C.; Shoesmith, D.W.; Qin, Z.

    2007-07-01

    A model for acidity within pores within corrosion products on anodically-dissolving UO{sub 2} was developed using Comsol Multiphysics 3.2 to complement ongoing electrochemical measurements. It was determined that a depression of pH within pores can be maintained if: electrochemically measured dissolution currents used in the calculations are attenuated to reflect very localized pores; corrosion potentials exceed -250 mV (vs. SCE); and pore depths are >1 {mu}m for 300 mV or >100 {mu}m for -50 mV (vs. SCE). Mixed diffusional-chemical equilibria control is suggested through deviations in the shapes between pH-potential and pH-pore depth plots. (authors)

  5. SUNLIGHT AND IRON(III)-INDUCED PHOTOCHEMICAL PRODUCTION OF DISSOLVED GASEOUS MERCURY IN FRESHWATER. (R827632)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mechanistic understanding of sunlight-induced natural processes for
    production of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) in freshwaters has remained
    limited, and few direct field tests of the mechanistic hypotheses are available.
    We exposed ferric iron salt-spiked fresh s...

  6. Mercury mass flow in iron and steel production process and its implications for mercury emission control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengyang; Wang, Shuxiao; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Hai; Gao, Wei; Wu, Qingru; Hao, Jiming

    2016-05-01

    The iron and steel production process is one of the predominant anthropogenic sources of atmospheric mercury emissions worldwide. In this study, field tests were conducted to study mercury emission characteristics and mass flows at two iron and steel plants in China. It was found that low-sulfur flue gas from sintering machines could contribute up to 41% of the total atmospheric mercury emissions, and desulfurization devices could remarkably help reduce the emissions. Coal gas burning accounted for 17%-49% of the total mercury emissions, and therefore the mercury control of coal gas burning, specifically for the power plant burning coal gas to generate electricity, was significantly important. The emissions from limestone and dolomite production and electric furnaces can contribute 29.3% and 4.2% of the total mercury emissions from iron and steel production. More attention should be paid to mercury emissions from these two processes. Blast furnace dust accounted for 27%-36% of the total mercury output for the whole iron and steel production process. The recycling of blast furnace dust could greatly increase the atmospheric mercury emissions and should not be conducted. The mercury emission factors for the coke oven, sintering machine and blast furnace were 0.039-0.047gHg/ton steel, and for the electric furnace it was 0.021gHg/ton steel. The predominant emission species was oxidized mercury, accounting for 59%-73% of total mercury emissions to air.

  7. Use of Moessbauer spectroscopy to study reaction products of polyphenols and iron compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Gust, J. ); Suwalski, J. )

    1994-05-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study parameters of the reaction products of iron compounds (Fe[sup III]) and polyphenols with hydroxyl (OH) groups in ortho positions. Polyphenols used in the reaction were catechol, pyrogallol, gallic acid, and oak tannin. The Fe-containing compounds were hydrated ferric sulfate (Fe[sub 2][SO[sub 4

  8. Mercury mass flow in iron and steel production process and its implications for mercury emission control.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fengyang; Wang, Shuxiao; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Hai; Gao, Wei; Wu, Qingru; Hao, Jiming

    2016-05-01

    The iron and steel production process is one of the predominant anthropogenic sources of atmospheric mercury emissions worldwide. In this study, field tests were conducted to study mercury emission characteristics and mass flows at two iron and steel plants in China. It was found that low-sulfur flue gas from sintering machines could contribute up to 41% of the total atmospheric mercury emissions, and desulfurization devices could remarkably help reduce the emissions. Coal gas burning accounted for 17%-49% of the total mercury emissions, and therefore the mercury control of coal gas burning, specifically for the power plant burning coal gas to generate electricity, was significantly important. The emissions from limestone and dolomite production and electric furnaces can contribute 29.3% and 4.2% of the total mercury emissions from iron and steel production. More attention should be paid to mercury emissions from these two processes. Blast furnace dust accounted for 27%-36% of the total mercury output for the whole iron and steel production process. The recycling of blast furnace dust could greatly increase the atmospheric mercury emissions and should not be conducted. The mercury emission factors for the coke oven, sintering machine and blast furnace were 0.039-0.047gHg/ton steel, and for the electric furnace it was 0.021gHg/ton steel. The predominant emission species was oxidized mercury, accounting for 59%-73% of total mercury emissions to air. PMID:27155436

  9. 78 FR 55241 - Corrosion-Resistant Carbon Steel Flat Products From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-10

    ...: Certain Steel Products From Korea, 58 FR 43752 (August 17, 1993) (Order). \\3\\ See the ``Decision... from Germany and the Republic of Korea: Revocation of Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Orders, 78 FR.... (Dongbu), Hyundai HYSCO Ltd. (HYSCO), and Pohang Iron & Steel Co. Ltd. (POSCO), the companies under...

  10. Oxidative stability of a heme iron-fortified bakery product: Effectiveness of ascorbyl palmitate and co-spray-drying of heme iron with calcium caseinate.

    PubMed

    Alemán, Mercedes; Bou, Ricard; Tres, Alba; Polo, Javier; Codony, Rafael; Guardiola, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    Fortification of food products with iron is a common strategy to prevent or overcome iron deficiency. However, any form of iron is a pro-oxidant and its addition will cause off-flavours and reduce a product's shelf life. A highly bioavailable heme iron ingredient was selected to fortify a chocolate cream used to fill sandwich-type cookies. Two different strategies were assessed for avoiding the heme iron catalytic effect on lipid oxidation: ascorbyl palmitate addition and co-spray-drying of heme iron with calcium caseinate. Oxidation development and sensory acceptability were monitored in the cookies over one-year of storage at room temperature in the dark. The addition of ascorbyl palmitate provided protection against oxidation and loss of tocopherols and tocotrienols during the preparation of cookies. In general, ascorbyl palmitate, either alone or in combination with the co-spray-dried heme iron, prevented primary oxidation and hexanal formation during storage. The combination of both strategies resulted in cookies that were acceptable from a sensory point of view after 1year of storage.

  11. Modelling Iron-Bentonite Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, C.; Savage, D.; Benbow, S.; Wilson, J.

    2009-04-01

    The presence of both iron canisters and bentonitic clay in some engineered barrier system (EBS) designs for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive wastes creates the potential for chemical interactions which may impact upon the long-term performance of the clay as a barrier to radionuclide migration. Flooding of potential radionuclide sorption sites on the clay by ferrous ions and conversion of clay to non-swelling sheet silicates (e.g. berthierine) are two possible outcomes deleterious to long-term performance. Laboratory experimental studies of the corrosion of iron in clay show that corrosion product layers are generally thin (< 1 µm) with magnetite, siderite, or ‘green rust' occurring depending upon temperature and ambient partial pressure of carbon dioxide. In theory, incorporation of iron into clay alteration products could act as a ‘pump' to accelerate corrosion. However, the results of laboratory experiments to characterise the products of iron-bentonite interaction are less than unequivocal. The type and amounts of solid products appear to be strong functions of time, temperature, water/clay ratio, and clay and pore fluid compositions. For example, the products of high temperature experiments (> 250 °C) are dominated by chlorite, whereas lower temperatures produce berthierine, odinite, cronstedtite, or Fe-rich smectite. Unfortunately, the inevitable short-term nature of laboratory experimental studies introduces issues of metastability and kinetics. The sequential formation in time of minerals in natural systems often produces the formation of phases not predicted by equilibrium thermodynamics. Evidence from analogous natural systems suggests that the sequence of alteration of clay by Fe-rich fluids will proceed via an Ostwald step sequence. The computer code, QPAC, has been modified to incorporate processes of nucleation, growth, precursor cannibalisation, and Ostwald ripening to address the issues of the slow growth of bentonite

  12. IRON RELEASE AND COLORED WATER FORMATION FROM IRON SCALES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron corrosion in water distribution networks is of special concern in the drinking water industry because of the large amount of unlined iron pipe that is in use. Corrosion can destroy the pipe, consume oxidants and disinfectants in the water, create scales that increase the en...

  13. Sintered rare earth-iron Laves phase magnetostrictive alloy product and preparation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Malekzadeh, Manoochehr; Pickus, Milton R.

    1979-01-01

    A sintered rare earth-iron Laves phase magnetostrictive alloy product characterized by a grain oriented morphology. The grain oriented morphology is obtained by magnetically aligning powder particles of the magnetostrictive alloy prior to sintering. Specifically disclosed are grain oriented sintered compacts of Tb.sub.x Dy.sub.1-x Fe.sub.2 and their method of preparation. The present sintered products have enhanced magnetostrictive properties.

  14. Types of greenhouse gas emissions in the production of cast iron and steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisienko, V. G.; Chesnokov, Yu N.; Lapteva, A. V.; Noskov, V. Yu

    2016-09-01

    Types of carbon dioxide emissions in iron and steel production are indicated. Production processes have been classified according to mechanisms of carbon dioxide formation. Mathematical models for calculation of carbon dioxide emissions for each type of process are found. Calculations results of carbon dioxide emissions of coke (BF + EAF) and cokeless processes (Corex, Midrex, HyL-3, Romelt) in combination with EAF are provided.

  15. Absorption of zinc and iron by rats fed meals containing sorghum food products

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, S.M.A.; Johnson, P.E.; Hamaker, B.; Kirleis, A.

    1986-03-05

    Zinc and iron absorption from freeze-dried traditionally-prepared sorghum food products was studied in rats. After a period of marginal zinc or iron depletion, rats were fed test meals containing 1 of 4 sorghum foods cooked maize gruel or an inorganic mineral each of which was extrinsically labeled with either /sup 65/Zn or /sup 59/Fe before being added to the diets. Absorption was determined by whole body percent retention of the initial radioisotope dose over a period of 19 days. Iron was highly available from all products tested (75-83%) with no significant differences in absorption among groups (p>0.05). Zinc from fermented Aceta (97%) was more available than that from the other sorghum products (69-78%) or maize gruel (76%). Zinc from acid To (78%) and Aceta (97%) was as available as that from zinc oxide in the control diet (93%) (p>0.05). There were no significant differences in zinc absorption among groups fed Acid To (78%), neutral To (76), alkali To (69%) or maize gruel (76%) (p<0.05). Phytate in the fermented Aceta was 33% lower than in the other sorghum foods. Iron and zinc were highly available from all sorghum foods. Reduction phytate by fermentation increased Zn availability.

  16. Marine Mammal Train Oil Production Methods: Experimental Reconstructions of Norwegian Iron Age Slab-Lined Pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, Gørill

    2016-08-01

    Seal hunting and whaling have played an important part of people's livelihoods throughout prehistory as evidenced by rock carvings, remains of bones, artifacts from aquatic animals and hunting tools. This paper focuses on one of the more elusive resources relating to such activities: marine mammal blubber. Although marine blubber easily decomposes, the organic material has been documented from the Mesolithic Period onwards. Of particular interest in this article are the many structures in Northern Norway from the Iron Age and in Finland on Kökar, Åland, from both the Bronze and Early Iron Ages in which these periods exhibited traits interpreted as being related to oil rendering from marine mammal blubber. The article discusses methods used in this oil production activity based on historical sources, archaeological investigations and experimental reconstruction of Iron Age slab-lined pits from Northern Norway.

  17. The influence of iron concentration on biohydrogen production from organic waste via anaerobic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Boni, M R; Sbaffoni, S; Tuccinardi, L

    2014-01-01

    Different micronutrients are essential for bacterial fermentative metabolism. In particular, some metallic ions, like iron, are able to affect the biological H₂production. In this study, batch tests were carried out in stirred reactors to investigate the effects of Fe²⁺ concentration on fermentative H₂production from two different organic fractions of waste: source-separated organic waste (OW) from a composting plant including organic fraction of municipal solid waste and food waste (FW) from a refectory. Iron supplementation at 1000 mg/L caused twofold increment in the cumulative H₂production from OW (922 mL) compared with the control (without iron doping). The highest H₂production (1736 mL) from FW occurred when Fe²⁺ concentration was equal to 50 mg/L. In addition, the process production from OW was modelled through the modified Gompertz equation. For FW, a translated Gompertz equation was used by the authors, because the initial lag-time for H₂production from FW was almost negligible.

  18. Oxygen and iron production by electrolytic smelting of lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, R. O.; Haskin, L. A.

    1992-01-01

    Work during the past year involved two aspects: (1) electrolysis experiments on a larger scale than done before, and (2) collaboration with Carbotek Inc. on design for a lunar magma electrolysis cell. It was demonstrated previously that oxygen can be produced by direct electrolysis of silicate melts. Previous experiments using 50-100 mg of melt have succeeded in measuring melt resistivities, oxygen production efficiencies, and have identified the character of metal products. A series of experiments using 1-8 grams of silicate melt, done in alumina and spinel containers sufficiently large that surface tension effects between the melt and the wall are expected to have minor effect on the behavior of the melt in the region of the electrodes were completed. The purpose of these experiments was to demonstrate the durability of the electrode and container materials, demonstrate the energy efficiency of the electrolysis process, further characterize the nature of the expected metal and spinel products, measure the efficiency of oxygen production and compare to that predicted on the basis of the smaller-scale experiments, and identify any unexpected benefits or problems of the process. Four experimental designs were employed. Detailed results of these experiments are given in the appendix ('Summary of scaling-up experiments'); a general report of the results is given in terms of implications of the experiments on container materials, cathode materials, anode materials, bubble formation and frothing of the melt, cell potential, anode-cathode distance, oxygen efficiency, and energy efficiency.

  19. Predictive modeling of siderphore production by Pseudomonas fluorescens under iron limitation.

    PubMed

    Fgaier, Hedia; Feher, Balazs; McKellar, Robin C; Eberl, Hermann J

    2008-03-21

    Iron is required by many microorganisms for growth. Although it is the most abundant transition metal on earth, its solubility is very low and therefore its bioavailability is poor. To overcome this limitation, many microorganisms have developed iron chelating mechanisms that enable them to bind the metal to organic molecules from which they are later released. In particular, pseudomonads are prominent producers of the chelator pyoverdine that has a high iron binding capability. We present a mathematical model for pyoverdine production by Pseudomonas fluorescens. It is a nonlinear and non-autonomous system of four ordinary differential equations for the dependent variables size of bacterial population, pyoverdine, dissolved iron and chelated iron. The transient adaptation of the average physiological state of the population to the environmental condition is explicitly included in the model formulation. A complete qualitative description of the model solution is given, based on analytical techniques. The model is quantitatively validated against experimental data of pyoverdine and population size. To this end we conduct and discuss a parameter identification study. It is found that the model, if calibrated using pyoverdine data alone is able to predict the population size and vice versa, with some restrictions. Thus the model can be used as an indirect experimental tool. PMID:18191154

  20. Factors affectig the production and performance of thick section high chromium-molybdenum alloy iron castings

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, J.; Parks, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Massive high chromium-molybdenum alloy iron castings are now being produced in large tonnages for the mining industry, for use in large roller pulverizers, in heavy duty abrasion resistant pumps, and for many other applications demanding a combination of abrasion resistance and toughness unobtainable in other alloy irons. Systematic research, particularly over the past decade, on the interrelated parameters which can cause problems in the foundry or failures in service has played a significant part in the success of the high chromium irons in thick section castings. Data from this research are presented on the separate and combined effects of C, Ch, Mo, Ni, Cu, Mn, Si, Ti and Al on the hardenability, toughness and abrasion resistance of the high chromium irons in both the as-cast and heat treated conditions. Changes in production techniques have helped avoid foundry problems and wasteful use of alloys and energy. These changes are reflected in more consistent performance in service and reduced incidence of casting failures. Changes in composition which facilitate cryogenic transformation of retained austenite, or provide wider latitude in subcritical transformation of austenite, are discussed as these techniques may prove increasingly important as energy becomes more expensive. A summary is presented of the physical metallurgy of high chromium-molybdenum irons, with emphasis on the microstructures obtained in thick section castings, the influence of alloying elements on hardenability and the types of heat treatments available for controlling microstructure. The production and utilization of these irons in thick section castings, particularly the ways of avoiding problems in the foundry and of obtaining castings which provide more consistent performance and reduce incidence of catastrophic failure in service are discussed.

  1. Surface Characterization on Corrosion By-products on Cu in Drinking Water Pipes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Copper is widely used in house-hold plumbing due to its anti-corrosion property. However, as water travels within the distribution system into corroded copper pipes, copper may be released into consumer’s tap causing major problems. In an attempt to understand the mechanism and...

  2. Corrosion behavior and characteristics of the product film of API X100 steel in acidic simulated soil solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Cui-wei; Zhao, Tian-liang; Liu, Zhi-yong; Li, Xiao-gang; Zhang, Da-wei

    2016-02-01

    The short-term corrosion behavior of API X100 steel in an acidic simulated soil was investigated by electrochemical measurements and soaking experiments, followed by corrosion morphology observations and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses. The results show that X100 steel exhibits an obvious pitting susceptibility in an acidic soil environment. Pits nucleate after approximately 10 h of immersion. Along with the nucleation and growth of the pits, the charge-transfer resistance and open-circuit potential first increase sharply, then decrease slowly, and eventually reach a steady state. The maxima of the charge-transfer resistance and open-circuit potential are attained at approximately 10 h. The evolution of the electrochemical process is confirmed by the analysis of the product film. The product film exhibits a porous and loose structure and could not protect the substrate well. The product film is primarily composed of ferrous carbonate and ferrous hydroxide (Fe(OH)2). The concentration of Fe(OH)2 in the product film increases from the inside to the outside layer.

  3. SRB seawater corrosion project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozack, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of 2219 aluminum when exposed to seawater was characterized. Controlled corrosion experiments at three different temperatures (30, 60 and 100 C) and two different environments (seawater and 3.5 percent salt solution) were designed to elucidate the initial stages in the corrosion process. It was found that 2219 aluminum is an active catalytic surface for growth of Al2O3, NaCl, and MgO. Formation of Al2O3 is favored at lower temperatures, while MgO is favored at higher temperatures. Visible corrosion products are formed within 30 minutes after seawater exposure. Corrosion characteristics in 3.5 percent salt solution are different than corrosion in seawater. Techniques utilized were: (1) scanning electron microscopy, (2) energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and (3) Auger electron spectroscopy.

  4. Oxygen and iron production by electrolytic smelting of lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, R. O.; Haskin, L. A.

    1991-01-01

    Oxygen, present in abundance in nearly all lunar materials, can theoretically be extracted by molten silicate electrolysis from any known lunar rock. Derivation of oxygen by this method has been amply demonstrated experimentally in silicate melts of a variety of compositions. This work can be divided into three categories: (1) measurement of solubilities of metals (atomic) in silicate melts; (2) electrolysis experiments under various conditions of temperature, container material, electrode configuration, current density, melt composition, and sample mass (100 to 2000 mg) measuring energy required and character of resulting products; and (3) theoretical assessment of compositional requirements for steady state operations of an electrolysis cell.

  5. Combined production and purification of hydrogen from methanol using steam iron process in fixed bed reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, R.; Durán, P.; Plou, J.; Herguido, J.; Peña, J. A.

    2013-11-01

    A research work is being conducted to study the combined production and purification of hydrogen by means of redox processes departing from biomass fast pyrolysis oils (bio-oils). To achieve that goal, methanol has been used as featured material because it is the most representative compound of the alcoholic fraction of bio-oils. The study has been carried out in a fixed bed reactor where methanol decomposes in H2 and CO when gets in contact with a reactive solid based in an iron oxide at temperatures above 600 °C. During the first stage of the “steam-iron” process, reactive gases reduce the iron oxide to metallic iron. Afterward, in a following step, the previously reduced iron is reoxidized by steam producing a high purity hydrogen stream. Although coke deposition does exist during the reducing stage, this behaves as inert during the reoxidation process. Coke inert role has been corroborated by GC, SEM and TEM techniques, showing that carbon deposits were constituted by ordered structures (carbon nanotubes). The determination of the hydrogen production along successive cycles allowed the evaluation of the effect of temperature and alternating reactive atmospheres on the stability of the solid, as well as the optimum conditions for such purpose.

  6. Zero-valent iron and iron oxide-coated sand as a combination for removal of co-present chromate and arsenate from groundwater with humic acid.

    PubMed

    Mak, Mark S H; Rao, Pinhua; Lo, Irene M C

    2011-02-01

    The combination of zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) and iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS) was used to remove Cr(VI) and As(V) from groundwater in this study. The efficiency and the removal mechanism of Cr(VI) and As(V) by using this combination, with the influence of humic acid (HA), were investigated using batch experiments. Results showed that, compared to using Fe(0) or IOCS alone, the Fe(0)-IOCS can perform better on the removal of both Cr(VI) and As(V). Metal extraction studies showed that As(V) was mainly removed by IOCS and iron corrosion products while Cr(VI) was mainly removed by Fe(0) and its corrosion products. Competition was found between Cr(VI) and As(V) for the adsorption sites on the iron corrosion products. HA had shown insignificant effects on Cr(VI) removal but some effects on As(V) removal kinetics. As(V) was adsorbed on IOCS at the earlier stage, but adsorbed/coprecipitated with the iron corrosion products at the later stage.

  7. Primary productivity, bacterial productivity and nitrogen uptake in response to iron enrichment during the SEEDS II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Isao; Noiri, Yoshifumi; Cochlan, William P.; Suzuki, Koji; Aramaki, Takafumi; Ono, Tsuneo; Nojiri, Yukihiro

    2009-12-01

    Primary productivity (PP), bacterial productivity (BP) and the uptake rates of nitrate and ammonium were measured using isotopic methods ( 13C, 3H, 15N) during a mesoscale iron (Fe)-enrichment experiment conducted in the western subarctic Pacific Ocean in 2004 (SEEDS II). PP increased following Fe enrichment, reached maximal rates 12 days after the enrichment, and then declined to the initial level on day 17. During the 23-day observation period, we observed the development and decline of the Fe-induced bloom. The surface mixed layer (SML) integrated PP increased by 3-fold, but was smaller than the 5-fold increase observed in the previous Fe-enrichment experiment conducted at almost the same location and season during 2001 (SEEDS). Nitrate uptake rates were enhanced by Fe enrichment but decreased after day 5, and became lower than ammonium uptake rates after day 17. The total nitrogenous nutrient uptake rate declined after the peak of the bloom, and accumulation of ammonium was obvious in the euphotic layer. Nitrate utilization accounted for all the requirements of N for the massive bloom development during SEEDS, whereas during SEEDS II, nitrate accounted for >90% of total N utilization on day 5, declining to 40% by the end of the observation period. The SML-integrated BP increased after day 2 and peaked twice on days 8 and 21. Ammonium accumulation and the delayed heterotrophic activity suggested active regeneration occurred after the peak of the bloom. The SML-integrated PP between days 0 and 23 was 19.0 g C m -2. The SML-integrated BP during the same period was 2.6 g C m -2, which was 14% of the SML-integrated PP. Carbon budget calculation for the whole experimental period indicated that 33% of the whole (particulate plus dissolved) PP (21.5 g C m -2) was exported below the SML and 18% was transferred to the meso-zooplankton (growth). The bacterial carbon consumption (43% of the whole PP) was supported by DOC or POC release from phytoplankton, zooplankton

  8. Corrosion protection by anaerobiosis.

    PubMed

    Volkland, H P; Harms, H; Wanner; Zehnder, A J

    2001-01-01

    Biofilm-forming bacteria can protect mild (unalloyed) steel from corrosion. Mild steel coupons incubated with Rhodoccocus sp. strain C125 and Pseudomonas putida mt2 in an aerobic phosphate-buffered medium containing benzoate as carbon and energy source, underwent a surface reaction leading to the formation of a corrosion-inhibiting vivianite layer [Fe3(PO4)2]. Electrochemical potential (E) measurements allowed us to follow the buildup of the vivianite cover. The presence of sufficient metabolically active bacteria at the steel surface resulted in an E decrease to -510 mV, the potential of free iron, and a continuous release of ferrous iron. Part of the dissolved iron precipitated as vivianite in a compact layer of two to three microns in thickness. This layer prevented corrosion of mild steel for over two weeks, even in a highly corrosive medium. A concentration of 20 mM phosphate in the medium was found to be a prerequisite for the formation of the vivianite layer.

  9. Practical aspects of corrosion fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.

    1994-08-01

    Aspects important in corrosion have been introduced. They are: (a) ``Pourbaix Diagrams`` which consider thermodynamic stability of metals as a function of electrical potential and water pH; (b) the anodic interfacial reaction rates which depend on potential and accumulation of reaction products; (c) the prediction of polarization curves based on the kinetics and thermodynamics; and (d) localized corrosion models, as this form of corrosion is a major cause of corrosion failures.

  10. Characterization of corrosive bacterial consortia isolated from petroleum-product-transporting pipelines.

    PubMed

    Rajasekar, Aruliah; Anandkumar, Balakrishnan; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram; Ting, Yen-Peng; Rahman, Pattanathu K S M

    2010-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion is a problem commonly encountered in facilities in the oil and gas industries. The present study describes bacterial enumeration and identification in diesel and naphtha pipelines located in the northwest and southwest region in India, using traditional cultivation technique and 16S rDNA gene sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences of the isolates was carried out, and the samples obtained from the diesel and naphtha-transporting pipelines showed the occurrence of 11 bacterial species namely Serratia marcescens ACE2, Bacillus subtilis AR12, Bacillus cereus ACE4, Pseudomonas aeruginosa AI1, Klebsiella oxytoca ACP, Pseudomonas stutzeri AP2, Bacillus litoralis AN1, Bacillus sp., Bacillus pumilus AR2, Bacillus carboniphilus AR3, and Bacillus megaterium AR4. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were not detected in samples from both pipelines. The dominant bacterial species identified in the petroleum pipeline samples were B. cereus and S. marcescens in the diesel and naphtha pipelines, respectively. Therefore, several types of bacteria may be involved in biocorrosion arising from natural biofilms that develop in industrial facilities. In addition, localized (pitting) corrosion of the pipeline steel in the presence of the consortia was observed by scanning electron microscopy analysis. The potential role of each species in biofilm formation and steel corrosion is discussed.

  11. Multi-Response Optimization of Carbidic Austempered Ductile Iron Production Parameters using Taguchi Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanapal, P.; Mohamed Nazirudeen, S. S.; Chandrasekar, A.

    2012-04-01

    Carbide Austempered Ductile Iron (CADI) is the family of ductile iron containing wear resistance alloy carbides in the ausferrite matrix. This CADI is manufactured by selecting and characterizing the proper material composition through the melting route done. In an effort to arrive the optimal production parameters of multi responses, Taguchi method and Grey relational analysis have been applied. To analyze the effect of production parameters on the mechanical properties signal-to-noise ratio and Grey relational grade have been calculated based on the design of experiments. An analysis of variance was calculated to find the amount of contribution of factors on mechanical properties and their significance. The analytical results of Taguchi method were compared with the experimental values, and it shows that both are identical.

  12. SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

    2005-03-31

    In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was continued to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. In this reporting period, a series of crossflow filtration experiments were initiated to study the effect of olefins and oxygenates on the filtration flux and membrane performance. Iron-based FTS reactor waxes contain a significant amount of oxygenates, depending on the catalyst formulation and operating conditions. Mono-olefins and aliphatic alcohols were doped into an activated iron catalyst slurry (with Polywax) to test their influence on filtration properties. The olefins were varied from 5 to 25 wt% and oxygenates from 6 to 17 wt% to simulate a range of reactor slurries reported in the literature. The addition of an alcohol (1-dodecanol) was found to decrease the permeation rate while the olefin added (1-hexadecene) had no effect on the permeation rate. A passive flux maintenance technique was tested that can temporarily increase the permeate rate for 24 hours.

  13. SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

    2004-09-30

    In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was continued to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. The shakedown phase of the pilot-scale filtration platform was completed at the end of the last reporting period. A study of various molecular weight waxes was initiated to determine the effect of wax physical properties on the permeation rate without catalyst present. As expected, the permeation flux was inversely proportional to the nominal average molecular weight of the polyethylene wax. Even without catalyst particles present in the filtrate, the filtration membranes experience fouling during an induction period on the order of days on-line. Another long-term filtration test was initiated using a batch of iron catalyst that was previously activated with CO to form iron carbide in a separate continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system. The permeation flux stabilized more rapidly than that experienced with unactivated catalyst tests.

  14. Influence of oxide scales on the corrosion behaviors of B510L hot-rolled steel strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Cheng; Dong, Chao-fang; Xue, Hui-bin; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiao-gang; Qi, Hui-bin

    2016-07-01

    The influence of oxide scales on the corrosion behaviors of B510L hot-rolled steel strips was investigated in this study. Focused ion beams and scanning electron microscopy were used to observe the morphologies of oxide scales on the surface and cross sections of the hot-rolled steel. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used for the phase analysis of the oxide scales and corrosion products. The corrosion potential and impedance were measured by anodic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. According to the results, oxide scales on the hot-rolled strips mainly comprise iron and iron oxides. The correlation between mass gain and test time follows a power exponential rule in the damp-heat test. The corrosion products are found to be mainly composed of γ-FeOOH, Fe3O4, α-FeOOH, and γ-Fe2O3. The contents of the corrosion products are different on the surfaces of the steels with and without oxide scales. The steel with oxide scales is found to show a higher corrosion resistance and lower corrosion rate.

  15. A fuel-cell-assisted iron redox process for simultaneous sulfur recovery and electricity production from synthetic sulfide wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Lin-Feng; Song, Wei; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Sun, Min

    2012-12-01

    Sulfide present in wastewaters and waste gases should be removed due to its toxicity, corrosivity, and malodorous property. Development of effective, stable, and feasible methods for sulfur recovery from sulfide attains a double objective of waste minimization and resource recovery. Here we report a novel fuel-cell-assisted iron redox (FC-IR) process for simultaneously recovering sulfur and electricity from synthetic sulfide wastewater. The FC-IR system consists of an oxidizing reactor where sulfide is oxidized to elemental sulfur by Fe(III), and a fuel cell where Fe(III) is regenerated from Fe(II) concomitantly with electricity producing. The oxidation of sulfide by Fe(III) is significantly dependent on solution pH. Increasing the pH from 0.88 to 1.96 accelerates the oxidation of sulfide, however, lowers the purity of the produced elemental sulfur. The performance of fuel cell is also a strong function of solution pH. Fe(II) is completely oxidized to Fe(III) when the fuel cell is operated at a pH above 6.0, whereas only partially oxidized below pH 6.0. At pH 6.0, the highest columbic efficiency of 75.7% is achieved and electricity production maintains for the longest time of 106 h. Coupling operation of the FC-IR system obtains sulfide removal efficiency of 99.90%, sulfur recovery efficiency of 78.6 ± 8.3%, and columbic efficiency of 58.6 ± 1.6%, respectively. These results suggest that the FC-IR process is a promising tool to recover sulfur and energy from sulfide.

  16. Bacteria in an intense competition for iron: Key component of the Campylobacter jejuni iron uptake system scavenges enterobactin hydrolysis product

    PubMed Central

    Raines, Daniel J.; Moroz, Olga V.; Blagova, Elena V.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Wilson, Keith S.

    2016-01-01

    To acquire essential Fe(III), bacteria produce and secrete siderophores with high affinity and selectivity for Fe(III) to mediate its uptake into the cell. Here, we show that the periplasmic binding protein CeuE of Campylobacter jejuni, which was previously thought to bind the Fe(III) complex of the hexadentate siderophore enterobactin (Kd ∼ 0.4 ± 0.1 µM), preferentially binds the Fe(III) complex of the tetradentate enterobactin hydrolysis product bis(2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl-l-Ser) (H5-bisDHBS) (Kd = 10.1 ± 3.8 nM). The protein selects Λ-configured [Fe(bisDHBS)]2− from a pool of diastereomeric Fe(III)-bisDHBS species that includes complexes with metal-to-ligand ratios of 1:1 and 2:3. Cocrystal structures show that, in addition to electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding, [Fe(bisDHBS)]2− binds through coordination of His227 and Tyr288 to the iron center. Similar binding is observed for the Fe(III) complex of the bidentate hydrolysis product 2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl-l-Ser, [Fe(monoDHBS)2]3−. The mutation of His227 and Tyr288 to noncoordinating residues (H227L/Y288F) resulted in a substantial loss of affinity for [Fe(bisDHBS)]2− (Kd ∼ 0.5 ± 0.2 µM). These results suggest a previously unidentified role for CeuE within the Fe(III) uptake system of C. jejuni, provide a molecular-level understanding of the underlying binding pocket adaptations, and rationalize reports on the use of enterobactin hydrolysis products by C. jejuni, Vibrio cholerae, and other bacteria with homologous periplasmic binding proteins. PMID:27162326

  17. Bacteria in an intense competition for iron: Key component of the Campylobacter jejuni iron uptake system scavenges enterobactin hydrolysis product.

    PubMed

    Raines, Daniel J; Moroz, Olga V; Blagova, Elena V; Turkenburg, Johan P; Wilson, Keith S; Duhme-Klair, Anne-K

    2016-05-24

    To acquire essential Fe(III), bacteria produce and secrete siderophores with high affinity and selectivity for Fe(III) to mediate its uptake into the cell. Here, we show that the periplasmic binding protein CeuE of Campylobacter jejuni, which was previously thought to bind the Fe(III) complex of the hexadentate siderophore enterobactin (Kd ∼ 0.4 ± 0.1 µM), preferentially binds the Fe(III) complex of the tetradentate enterobactin hydrolysis product bis(2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl-l-Ser) (H5-bisDHBS) (Kd = 10.1 ± 3.8 nM). The protein selects Λ-configured [Fe(bisDHBS)](2-) from a pool of diastereomeric Fe(III)-bisDHBS species that includes complexes with metal-to-ligand ratios of 1:1 and 2:3. Cocrystal structures show that, in addition to electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding, [Fe(bisDHBS)](2-) binds through coordination of His227 and Tyr288 to the iron center. Similar binding is observed for the Fe(III) complex of the bidentate hydrolysis product 2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl-l-Ser, [Fe(monoDHBS)2](3-) The mutation of His227 and Tyr288 to noncoordinating residues (H227L/Y288F) resulted in a substantial loss of affinity for [Fe(bisDHBS)](2-) (Kd ∼ 0.5 ± 0.2 µM). These results suggest a previously unidentified role for CeuE within the Fe(III) uptake system of C. jejuni, provide a molecular-level understanding of the underlying binding pocket adaptations, and rationalize reports on the use of enterobactin hydrolysis products by C. jejuni, Vibrio cholerae, and other bacteria with homologous periplasmic binding proteins.

  18. Breaking a pathogen's iron will: Inhibiting siderophore production as an antimicrobial strategy.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Audrey L

    2015-08-01

    The rise of antibiotic resistance is a growing public health crisis. Novel antimicrobials are sought, preferably developing nontraditional chemical scaffolds that do not inhibit standard targets such as cell wall synthesis or the ribosome. Iron scavenging has been proposed as a viable target, because bacterial and fungal pathogens must overcome the nutritional immunity of the host to be virulent. This review highlights the recent work toward exploiting the biosynthetic enzymes of siderophore production for the design of next generation antimicrobials. PMID:25970810

  19. Breaking a pathogen’s iron will: inhibiting siderophore production as an antimicrobial strategy

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Audrey L.

    2015-01-01

    The rise of antibiotic resistance is a growing public health crisis. Novel antimicrobials are sought, preferably developing nontraditional chemical scaffolds that do not inhibit standard targets such as cell wall synthesis or the ribosome. Iron scavenging has been proposed as a viable target, because bacterial and fungal pathogens must overcome the nutritional immunity of the host to be virulent. This review highlights the recent work toward exploiting the biosynthetic enzymes of siderophore production for the design of next generation antimicrobials. PMID:25970810

  20. Iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  1. X-ray Powder Diffraction in Conservation Science: Towards Routine Crystal Structure Determination of Corrosion Products on Heritage Art Objects.

    PubMed

    Dinnebier, Robert E; Fischer, Andrea; Eggert, Gerhard; Runčevski, Tomče; Wahlberg, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structure determination and refinement process of corrosion products on historic art objects using laboratory high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) is presented in detail via two case studies. The first material under investigation was sodium copper formate hydroxide oxide hydrate, Cu4Na4O(HCOO)8(OH)2∙4H2O (sample 1) which forms on soda glass/copper alloy composite historic objects (e.g., enamels) in museum collections, exposed to formaldehyde and formic acid emitted from wooden storage cabinets, adhesives, etc. This degradation phenomenon has recently been characterized as "glass induced metal corrosion". For the second case study, thecotrichite, Ca3(CH3COO)3Cl(NO3)2∙6H2O (sample 2), was chosen, which is an efflorescent salt forming needlelike crystallites on tiles and limestone objects which are stored in wooden cabinets and display cases. In this case, the wood acts as source for acetic acid which reacts with soluble chloride and nitrate salts from the artifact or its environment. The knowledge of the geometrical structure helps conservation science to better understand production and decay reactions and to allow for full quantitative analysis in the frequent case of mixtures. PMID:27341300

  2. X-ray Powder Diffraction in Conservation Science: Towards Routine Crystal Structure Determination of Corrosion Products on Heritage Art Objects.

    PubMed

    Dinnebier, Robert E; Fischer, Andrea; Eggert, Gerhard; Runčevski, Tomče; Wahlberg, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structure determination and refinement process of corrosion products on historic art objects using laboratory high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) is presented in detail via two case studies. The first material under investigation was sodium copper formate hydroxide oxide hydrate, Cu4Na4O(HCOO)8(OH)2∙4H2O (sample 1) which forms on soda glass/copper alloy composite historic objects (e.g., enamels) in museum collections, exposed to formaldehyde and formic acid emitted from wooden storage cabinets, adhesives, etc. This degradation phenomenon has recently been characterized as "glass induced metal corrosion". For the second case study, thecotrichite, Ca3(CH3COO)3Cl(NO3)2∙6H2O (sample 2), was chosen, which is an efflorescent salt forming needlelike crystallites on tiles and limestone objects which are stored in wooden cabinets and display cases. In this case, the wood acts as source for acetic acid which reacts with soluble chloride and nitrate salts from the artifact or its environment. The knowledge of the geometrical structure helps conservation science to better understand production and decay reactions and to allow for full quantitative analysis in the frequent case of mixtures.

  3. Iron particle size effects for direct production of lower olefins from synthesis gas.

    PubMed

    Torres Galvis, Hirsa M; Bitter, Johannes H; Davidian, Thomas; Ruitenbeek, Matthijs; Dugulan, A Iulian; de Jong, Krijn P

    2012-10-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of lower olefins (FTO) is an alternative process for the production of key chemical building blocks from non-petroleum-based sources such as natural gas, coal, or biomass. The influence of the iron carbide particle size of promoted and unpromoted carbon nanofiber supported catalysts on the conversion of synthesis gas has been investigated at 340-350 °C, H(2)/CO = 1, and pressures of 1 and 20 bar. The surface-specific activity (apparent TOF) based on the initial activity of unpromoted catalysts at 1 bar increased 6-8-fold when the average iron carbide size decreased from 7 to 2 nm, while methane and lower olefins selectivity were not affected. The same decrease in particle size for catalysts promoted by Na plus S resulted at 20 bar in a 2-fold increase of the apparent TOF based on initial activity which was mainly caused by a higher yield of methane for the smallest particles. Presumably, methane formation takes place at highly active low coordination sites residing at corners and edges, which are more abundant on small iron carbide particles. Lower olefins are produced at promoted (stepped) terrace sites that are available and active, quite independent of size. These results demonstrate that the iron carbide particle size plays a crucial role in the design of active and selective FTO catalysts. PMID:22953753

  4. The Romelt Process -- Prospects for pig iron production in North America

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.W.; Weston, T.R.

    1997-12-31

    The iron and steel industry in North America is undergoing dramatic changes and is being driven by three factors. First, the introduction of new technologies and pace of innovation has placed North America at the forefront of commercializing new technologies. Second, new technologies have changed the market for steelmaking raw materials and stimulated an industry-wide discussion of the ``value in use`` of scrap and scrap substitutes. Finally, an increase in environmental costs has fundamentally changed management`s view toward the environmental impact of iron and steelmaking, particularly in the integrated steel industry. This paper discusses the Romelt Process, an emerging ironmaking technology developed by the Moscow Institute for Steels and Alloys, in the context of these industry trends. ICF Kaiser, a worldwide licensee to the Romelt technology, believes that the current North American climate is probably the most conducive of all steelmaking regions to the commercialization of new technologies. Liquid or cast pig iron, the product of the Romelt Process, is the highest value feed for both the EAF and BOF steelmaking processes. In terms of environmental benefits, Romelt uses non-coking coals for its fuel and reductant, and has a proven large scale pilot plant track record in smelting both low grade fine ores and iron bearing wastes from the integrated works.

  5. Nanophase iron production through laser irradiation and magnetic detection of space weathering analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markley, Matthew; Kletetschka, Gunther

    2016-04-01

    Airless bodies are constantly exposed to space weathering. The Moon and other similar S-type asteroids physically change through comminution, melting, and agglutinate formation, while spectrally they are darkening, steepening (or reddening) the spectral slope toward longer wavelengths, and reducing silicate mineral absorption bands. In these S-type bodies the production of submicroscopic metallic iron, or nanophase iron (SMFe, npFe0) is a major contributor in these spectral changes. We made a qualitative estimate of both quantity and size distribution of produced metallic iron by space weathered analog, olivine irradiated by laser. Through SEM observation we confirmed that nanoparticles of metallic iron formed in the nm range. Spectroscopic and magnetic susceptibility (MS) through temperature analyses reveal an increasing trend of npFe0 formation, darkening, reddening, and shallowing of the 1 μm olivine absorption band. Olivine that produced the larger end of the size range of npFe0 produced similar effects, except for increased reddening. The magnetic data suggests that with laser irradiation there is both a linear increase of nanoparticles and a logarithmic increase in spectral change with SW time.

  6. SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

    2004-03-31

    In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was started to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. Slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems is the preferred mode of production since the reaction is highly exothermic. Consequently, heavy wax products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. Achieving an efficient wax product separation from iron-based catalysts is one of the most challenging technical problems associated with slurry-phase FTS. The separation problem is further compounded by catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. Existing pilot-scale equipment was modified to include a filtration test apparatus. After undergoing an extensive plant shakedown period, filtration tests with cross-flow filter modules using simulant FTS wax slurry were conducted. The focus of these early tests was to find adequate mixtures of polyethylene wax to simulate FTS wax. Catalyst particle size analysis techniques were also developed. Initial analyses of the slurry and filter permeate particles will be used by the research team to design improved filter media and cleaning strategies.

  7. Effects of iron on growth, antioxidant enzyme activity, bound extracellular polymeric substances and microcystin production of Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB-905.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Xun; Wang, Peifang; Chen, Bin; Hou, Jun; Qian, Jin; Yang, Yangyang

    2016-10-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have occurred in various water bodies during recent decades and made serious health hazards to plants, animals and humans. Iron is an important micronutrient for algal growth and recently, the concentration of which has increased remarkably in freshwaters. In this paper, the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB-905 was cultivated under non-iron (0μM), iron-limited (10μM) and iron-replete (100μM) conditions to investigate the effects of iron on growth, antioxidant enzyme activity, EPS and microcystin production. The results showed that algal cell density and chlorophyll-a content were maximal at the highest iron concentration. Antioxidant enzymes activity increased notably under all three conditions in the early stage of experiment, of which the SOD activity recovered soon from oxidative stress in 10μM group. The productions of some protein-like substances and humic acid-like substances of bound EPS were inhibited in iron-containing groups in the early stage of experiment while promoted after the adaptation period of Microcystis aeruginosa. Iron addition is a factor affecting the formation of cyanobacterial blooms through its impact on the content of LB-EPS and the composition of TB-EPS. The intracellular MC-LR concentration and the productivity potential of MC-LR were the lowest in 0μM group and highest in 10μM group. No obvious extracellular release of MC-LR was observed during the cultivation time. Therefore, iron addition can promote the physiological activities of M. aeruginosa, but a greater harm could be brought into environment under iron-limited (10μM) condition than under iron-replete (100μM) condition. PMID:27337497

  8. Effects of iron on growth, antioxidant enzyme activity, bound extracellular polymeric substances and microcystin production of Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB-905.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Xun; Wang, Peifang; Chen, Bin; Hou, Jun; Qian, Jin; Yang, Yangyang

    2016-10-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have occurred in various water bodies during recent decades and made serious health hazards to plants, animals and humans. Iron is an important micronutrient for algal growth and recently, the concentration of which has increased remarkably in freshwaters. In this paper, the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB-905 was cultivated under non-iron (0μM), iron-limited (10μM) and iron-replete (100μM) conditions to investigate the effects of iron on growth, antioxidant enzyme activity, EPS and microcystin production. The results showed that algal cell density and chlorophyll-a content were maximal at the highest iron concentration. Antioxidant enzymes activity increased notably under all three conditions in the early stage of experiment, of which the SOD activity recovered soon from oxidative stress in 10μM group. The productions of some protein-like substances and humic acid-like substances of bound EPS were inhibited in iron-containing groups in the early stage of experiment while promoted after the adaptation period of Microcystis aeruginosa. Iron addition is a factor affecting the formation of cyanobacterial blooms through its impact on the content of LB-EPS and the composition of TB-EPS. The intracellular MC-LR concentration and the productivity potential of MC-LR were the lowest in 0μM group and highest in 10μM group. No obvious extracellular release of MC-LR was observed during the cultivation time. Therefore, iron addition can promote the physiological activities of M. aeruginosa, but a greater harm could be brought into environment under iron-limited (10μM) condition than under iron-replete (100μM) condition.

  9. Inflammation and functional iron deficiency regulate fibroblast growth factor 23 production

    PubMed Central

    David, Valentin; Martin, Aline; Isakova, Tamara; Spaulding, Christina; Qi, Lixin; Ramirez, Veronica; Zumbrennen-Bullough, Kimberly B.; Sun, Chia Chi; Lin, Herbert Y.; Babitt, Jodie L.; Wolf, Myles

    2015-01-01

    Circulating levels of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) are elevated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we tested whether inflammation and iron deficiency regulate FGF23. In wild-type mice, acute inflammation induced by single injections of heat-killed Brucella abortus or interleukin-1β (IL-1β) decreased serum iron within 6 hours, and was accompanied by significant increases in osseous Fgf23 mRNA expression and serum levels of C-terminal FGF23, but no changes in intact FGF23. Chronic inflammation induced by repeated bacteria or IL-1β injections decreased serum iron, increased osseous Fgf23 mRNA and serum C-terminal FGF23, but modestly increased biologically active, intact FGF23 serum levels. Chronic iron deficiency mimicked chronic inflammation. Increased osseous FGF23 cleavage rather than a prolonged half-life of C-terminal FGF23 fragments accounted for the elevated C-terminal FGF23 but near-normal intact FGF23 levels in inflammation. IL-1β injection increased Fgf23 mRNA and C-terminal FGF23 levels similarly in wild-type and Col4a3KO mice with CKD, but markedly increased intact FGF23 levels only in the CKD mice. Inflammation increased Fgf23 transcription by activating Hif1α signaling. Thus, inflammation and iron deficiency stimulate FGF23 production. Simultaneous upregulation of FGF23 cleavage in osteocytes maintains near-normal levels of biologically active, intact circulating FGF23, whereas downregulated or impaired FGF23 cleavage may contribute to elevated intact serum FGF23 in CKD. PMID:26535997

  10. Inflammation and functional iron deficiency regulate fibroblast growth factor 23 production.

    PubMed

    David, Valentin; Martin, Aline; Isakova, Tamara; Spaulding, Christina; Qi, Lixin; Ramirez, Veronica; Zumbrennen-Bullough, Kimberly B; Sun, Chia Chi; Lin, Herbert Y; Babitt, Jodie L; Wolf, Myles

    2016-01-01

    Circulating levels of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) are elevated in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we tested whether inflammation and iron deficiency regulate FGF23. In wild-type mice, acute inflammation induced by single injections of heat-killed Brucella abortus or interleukin-1β (IL-1β) decreased serum iron within 6 h, and was accompanied by significant increases in osseous Fgf23 mRNA expression and serum levels of C-terminal FGF23, but no changes in intact FGF23. Chronic inflammation induced by repeated bacteria or IL-1β injections decreased serum iron, increased osseous Fgf23 mRNA, and serum C-terminal FGF23, but modestly increased biologically active, intact FGF23 serum levels. Chronic iron deficiency mimicked chronic inflammation. Increased osseous FGF23 cleavage rather than a prolonged half-life of C-terminal FGF23 fragments accounted for the elevated C-terminal FGF23 but near-normal intact FGF23 levels in inflammation. IL-1β injection increased Fgf23 mRNA and C-terminal FGF23 levels similarly in wildtype and Col4a3(ko) mice with CKD but markedly increased intact FGF23 levels only in the CKD mice. Inflammation increased Fgf23 transcription by activating Hif1α signaling. Thus, inflammation and iron deficiency stimulate FGF23 production. Simultaneous upregulation of FGF23 cleavage in osteocytes maintains near-normal levels of biologically active, intact circulating FGF23, whereas downregulated or impaired FGF23 cleavage may contribute to elevated intact serum FGF23 in CKD.

  11. Refractory Corrosion Mechanisms in a Novel High Carbon Ferromanganese Production Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregurek, D.; Wenzl, C.; Kreuzer, D.; Spanring, A.; Kirschen, M.; Zeelie, D.; Groenewald, J.

    2016-09-01

    The present paper presents the refractory design for a novel HCFeMn smelting furnace that, other than standard submerged arc furnaces, allows the processing of fine ores. A combination of basic and non-basic materials, comprising bricks, castables and ramming was chosen, under consideration of the unique furnace design and process conditions. Post-mortem investigations on refractory samples from the different furnace zones were carried out and provided information about the main wear mechanism. Additionally, investigations of the process slag and metal were carried out both practically and theoretically using thermodynamic calculations, to better understand the corrosion phenomena observed in the post mortem samples.

  12. Mentha pulegium extract as a natural product for the inhibition of corrosion. Part I: electrochemical studies.

    PubMed

    Khadraoui, Abdelkader; Khelifa, Abdellah; Boutoumi, Hocine; Hammouti, Belkheir

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of Mentha pulegium extract (MPE) on steel corrosion in 1 M HCl solution was investigated using potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The inhibition efficiency of MPE was found to increase with the concentration and reached 88% at 33% (v/v). Polarisation measurements show that the natural extract acted as a mixed inhibitor. The remarkable inhibition efficiency of MPE was discussed in terms of blocking of electrode surface by adsorption of inhibitor molecules through active centres. The adsorption of MPE was found to accord with the Temkin isotherm.

  13. Ca-41 in iron falls, Grant and Estherville - Production rates and related exposure age calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, D.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.; Vogt, S.; Herzog, G. F.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of the first phase of a Ca-41 cosmogenic studies program aimed at establishing baseline concentrations and trends in selected meteorites and the use of Ca-41 in estimating exposure ages and preatmospheric meteorite radii. The average Ca-41 saturation activity recorded in four small iron falls is 24 +/-1 dpm/kg. This finding, together with measurements at the center and surface of the large iron Grant, indicates that production of Ca-41 from spallation on iron is weakly dependent on shielding to depths as large as 250 g/sq cm. The (K-41)-Ca-41 exposure age of Grant is estimated at 330 +/-50 My, and an upper limit to its terrestrial age of 43 +/-15 ky. A comparison of the Ca-41 contents of stony and metallic material separated from the mesosiderite Estherville identifies low-energy neutron capture on native Ca as a second important channel of production. It is found that the Ca-41 signal in the stone phase from three meteorites correlates with their size, and that the inferred low-energy neutron fluxes vary by a factor of at least 20.

  14. Method for the production of mineral wool and iron from serpentine ore

    DOEpatents

    O'Connor, William K.; Rush, Gilbert E.; Soltau, Glen F.

    2011-10-11

    Magnesium silicate mineral wools having a relatively high liquidus temperature of at least about 1400.degree. C. and to methods for the production thereof are provided. The methods of the present invention comprise melting a magnesium silicate feedstock (e.g., comprising a serpentine or olivine ore) having a liquidus temperature of at least about 1400.degree. C. to form a molten magnesium silicate, and subsequently fiberizing the molten magnesium silicate to produce a magnesium silicate mineral wool. In one embodiment, the magnesium silicate feedstock contains iron oxide (e.g., up to about 12% by weight). Preferably, the melting is performed in the presence of a reducing agent to produce an iron alloy, which can be separated from the molten ore. Useful magnesium silicate feedstocks include, without limitation, serpentine and olivine ores. Optionally, silicon dioxide can be added to the feedstock to lower the liquidus temperature thereof.

  15. Characterisation of the surface topography, tomography and chemistry of fretting corrosion product found on retrieved polished femoral stems.

    PubMed

    Bryant, M; Ward, M; Farrar, R; Freeman, R; Brummitt, K; Nolan, J; Neville, A

    2014-04-01

    This study presents the characterisation of the surface topography, tomography and chemistry of fretting corrosion product found on retrieved polished femoral stems. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FI-IR) were utilised in order to assess the surface morphology of retrieved Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Replacements and surface chemistry of the films found on the surface. Gross slip, plastic deformation and directionality of the surface were extensively seen on the proximal surfaces of the retrievals. A more corrosive phenomenon was observed in the distal regions of the stem, demonstrating a seemingly intergranular attack. Tribochemical reactions were seen to occur within the stem-cement interfaces with tribofilms being observed on the femoral stem and counterpart PMMA bone cement. XPS, TEM-EDX and FT-IR analyses demonstrated that the films present in the stem surfaces were a complex mixture of chromium oxide and amorphous organic material. A comparison between current experimental and clinical literature has been conducted and findings from this study demonstrate that the formation and chemistry of films are drastically influenced by the type of wear or degradation mechanism. Films formed in the stem-cement interface are thought to further influence the biological environment outside the stem-cement interface due to the formation of Cr and O rich films within the interface whilst Co is free to migrate away.

  16. Simulation of Radioactive Corrosion Product in Primary Cooling System of Japanese Sodium-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matuo, Youichirou; Miyahara, Shinya; Izumi, Yoshinobu

    Radioactive Corrosion Product (CP) is a main cause of personal radiation exposure during maintenance with no breached fuel in fast breeder reactor (FBR) plants. The most important CP is 54Mn and 60Co. In order to establish techniques of radiation dose estimation for radiation workers in radiation-controlled areas of the FBR, the PSYCHE (Program SYstem for Corrosion Hazard Evaluation) code was developed. We add the Particle Model to the conventional PSYCHE analytical model. In this paper, we performed calculation of CP transfer in JOYO using an improved calculation code in which the Particle Model was added to the PSYCHE. The C/E (calculated / experimentally observed) value for CP deposition was improved through use of this improved PSYCHE incorporating the Particle Model. Moreover, among the percentage of total radioactive deposition accounted for by CP in particle form, 54Mn was estimated to constitute approximately 20 % and 60Co approximately 40 % in the cold-leg region. These calculation results are consistent with the measured results for the actual cold-leg piping in the JOYO.

  17. Response of iron overload to deferasirox in rare transfusion-dependent anaemias: equivalent effects on serum ferritin and labile plasma iron for haemolytic or production anaemias

    PubMed Central

    Porter, John B; Lin, Kai-Hsin; Beris, Photis; Forni, Gian Luca; Taher, Ali; Habr, Dany; Domokos, Gabor; Roubert, Bernard; Thein, Swee Lay

    2011-01-01

    Objectives It is widely assumed that, at matched transfusional iron-loading rates, responses to chelation therapy are similar, irrespective of the underlying condition. However, data are limited for rare transfusion-dependent anaemias, and it remains to be elucidated if response differs, depending on whether the anaemia has a primary haemolytic or production mechanism. Methods The efficacy and safety of deferasirox (Exjade®) in rare transfusion-dependent anaemias were evaluated over 1 yr, with change in serum ferritin as the primary efficacy endpoint. Initial deferasirox doses were 10–30 mg/kg/d, depending on transfusion requirements; 34 patients had production anaemias, and 23 had haemolytic anaemias. Results Patients with production anaemias or haemolytic anaemias had comparable transfusional iron-loading rates (0.31 vs. 0.30 mL red blood cells/kg/d), mean deferasirox dosing (19.3 vs. 19.0 mg/kg/d) and baseline median serum ferritin (2926 vs. 2682 ng/mL). Baseline labile plasma iron (LPI) levels correlated significantly with the transfusional iron-loading rates and with serum ferritin levels in both cohorts. Reductions in median serum ferritin levels were initially faster in the production than the haemolytic anaemias, but at 1 yr, similar significant reductions of 940 and 617 ng/mL were attained, respectively (−26.0% overall). Mean LPI decreased significantly in patients with production (P < 0.0001) and haemolytic (P = 0.037) anaemias after the first dose and was maintained at normal mean levels (<0.4 μm) subsequently. The most common drug-related, investigator-assessed adverse events were diarrhoea (n = 16) and nausea (n = 12). Conclusions At matched transfusional iron-loading rates, the responses of rare transfusion-dependent anaemias to deferasirox are similar at 1 yr, irrespective of the underlying pathogenic mechanism. PMID:21649735

  18. Inspection indications, stress corrosion cracks and repair of process piping in nuclear materials production reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; West, S.L.; Nelson, D.Z.

    1991-12-31

    Ultrasonic inspection of Schedule 40 Type 304 stainless steel piping in the process water system of the Savannah River Site reactors has provided indications of discontinuities in less than 10% of the weld heat affected zones. Pipe sections containing significant indications are replaced with Type 304L components. Post removal metallurgical evaluation showed that the indications resulted from stress corrosion cracking in weld heat-affected zones and that the overall weld quality was excellent. The evaluation also revealed weld fusion zone discontinuities such as incomplete penetration, incomplete fusion, inclusions, underfill at weld roots and hot cracks. Service induced extension of these discontinuities was generally not significant although stress corrosion cracking in one weld fusion zone was noted. One set of UT indications was caused by metallurgical discontinuities at the fusion boundary of an extra weld. This extra weld, not apparent on the outer pipe surface, was slightly overlapping and approximately parallel to the weld being inspected. This extra weld was made during a pipe repair, probably associated with initial construction processes. The two nearly parallel welds made accurate assessment of the UT signal difficult. The implications of these observations to the inspection and repair of process water systems of nuclear reactors is discussed.

  19. Inspection indications, stress corrosion cracks and repair of process piping in nuclear materials production reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; West, S.L.; Nelson, D.Z.

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of Schedule 40 Type 304 stainless steel piping in the process water system of the Savannah River Site reactors has provided indications of discontinuities in less than 10% of the weld heat affected zones. Pipe sections containing significant indications are replaced with Type 304L components. Post removal metallurgical evaluation showed that the indications resulted from stress corrosion cracking in weld heat-affected zones and that the overall weld quality was excellent. The evaluation also revealed weld fusion zone discontinuities such as incomplete penetration, incomplete fusion, inclusions, underfill at weld roots and hot cracks. Service induced extension of these discontinuities was generally not significant although stress corrosion cracking in one weld fusion zone was noted. One set of UT indications was caused by metallurgical discontinuities at the fusion boundary of an extra weld. This extra weld, not apparent on the outer pipe surface, was slightly overlapping and approximately parallel to the weld being inspected. This extra weld was made during a pipe repair, probably associated with initial construction processes. The two nearly parallel welds made accurate assessment of the UT signal difficult. The implications of these observations to the inspection and repair of process water systems of nuclear reactors is discussed.

  20. Iron and alloys of iron. [lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastri, Sankar

    1992-01-01

    All lunar soil contains iron in the metallic form, mostly as an iron-nickel alloy in concentrations of a few tenths of 1 percent. Some of this free iron can be easily separated by magnetic means. It is estimated that the magnetic separation of 100,000 tons of lunar soil would yield 150-200 tons of iron. Agglutinates contain metallic iron which could be extracted by melting and made into powder metallurgy products. The characteristics and potential uses of the pure-iron and iron-alloy lunar products are discussed. Processes for working iron that might be used in a nonterrestrial facility are also addressed.

  1. Carbothermic Reduction of Nickeliferous Laterite Ores for Nickel Pig Iron Production in China: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Mingjun; Li, Guanghui; Jiang, Tao; Luo, Jun; Zhang, Yuanbo; Fan, Xiaohui

    2013-11-01

    Both the consumption and production of crude stainless steel in China rank first in the world. In 2011, the nickel production in China amounted to 446 kilotons, with the proportion of electrolytic nickel and nickel pig iron (NPI) registering 41.5% and 56.5%, respectively. NPI is a low-cost feedstock for stainless steel production when used as a substitute for electrolytic nickel. The existing commercial NPI production processes such as blast furnace smelting, rotary kiln-electric furnace smelting, and Krupp-Renn (Nipon Yakin Oheyama) processes are discussed. As low-temperature (below 1300°C) reduction of nickeliferous laterite ores followed by magnetic separation could provide an alternative avenue without smelting at high temperature (~1500°C) for producing ferronickel with low cost, the fundamentals and recent developments of the low-temperature reduction of nickeliferous laterite ores are reviewed.

  2. Utilization of food industry wastes for the production of zero-valent iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Machado, S; Grosso, J P; Nouws, H P A; Albergaria, J T; Delerue-Matos, C

    2014-10-15

    The proper disposal of the several types of wastes produced in industrial activities increases production costs. As a consequence, it is common to develop strategies to reuse these wastes in the same process and in different processes or to transform them for use in other processes. This work combines the needs for new synthesis methods of nanomaterials and the reduction of production cost using wastes from citrine juice (orange, lime, lemon and mandarin) to produce a new added value product, green zero-valent iron nanoparticles that can be used in several applications, including environmental remediation. The results indicate that extracts of the tested fruit wastes (peel, albedo and pulp fractions) can be used to produce zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVIs). This shows that these wastes can be an added value product. The resulting nZVIs had sizes ranging from 3 up to 300 nm and distinct reactivities (pulp>peel>albedo extracts). All the studied nanoparticles did not present a significant agglomeration/settling tendency when compared to similar nanoparticles, which indicates that they remain in suspension and retain their reactivity. PMID:25089685

  3. Zero valent iron simultaneously enhances methane production and sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge reactors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-05-15

    Zero valent iron (ZVI) packed anaerobic granular sludge reactors have been developed for improved anaerobic wastewater treatment. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to describe the enhanced methane production and sulfate reduction in anaerobic granular sludge reactors with the addition of ZVI. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using long-term experimental data sets from two independent ZVI-enhanced anaerobic granular sludge reactors with different operational conditions. The model satisfactorily describes the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, sulfate reduction and methane production data from both systems. Results show ZVI directly promotes propionate degradation and methanogenesis to enhance methane production. Simultaneously, ZVI alleviates the inhibition of un-dissociated H2S on acetogens, methanogens and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) through buffering pH (Fe(0) + 2H(+) = Fe(2+) + H2) and iron sulfide precipitation, which improve the sulfate reduction capacity, especially under deterioration conditions. In addition, the enhancement of ZVI on methane production and sulfate reduction occurs mainly at relatively low COD/ [Formula: see text] ratio (e.g., 2-4.5) rather than high COD/ [Formula: see text] ratio (e.g., 16.7) compared to the reactor without ZVI addition. The model proposed in this work is expected to provide support for further development of a more efficient ZVI-based anaerobic granular system.

  4. Adherent-Invasive Escherichia coli Production of Cellulose Influences Iron-Induced Bacterial Aggregation, Phagocytosis, and Induction of Colitis.

    PubMed

    Ellermann, Melissa; Huh, Eun Young; Liu, Bo; Carroll, Ian M; Tamayo, Rita; Sartor, R Balfour

    2015-10-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC), a functionally distinct subset of resident intestinal E. coli associated with Crohn's disease, is characterized by enhanced epithelial adhesion and invasion, survival within macrophages, and biofilm formation. Environmental factors, such as iron, modulate E. coli production of extracellular structures, which in turn influence the formation of multicellular communities, such as biofilms, and bacterial interactions with host cells. However, the physiological and functional responses of AIEC to variable iron availability have not been thoroughly investigated. We therefore characterized the impact of iron on the physiology of AIEC strain NC101 and subsequent interactions with macrophages. Iron promoted the cellulose-dependent aggregation of NC101. Bacterial cells recovered from the aggregates were more susceptible to phagocytosis than planktonic cells, which corresponded with the decreased macrophage production of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12) p40. Prevention of aggregate formation through the disruption of cellulose production reduced the phagocytosis of iron-exposed NC101. In contrast, under iron-limiting conditions, where NC101 aggregation is not induced, the disruption of cellulose production enhanced NC101 phagocytosis and decreased macrophage secretion of IL-12 p40. Finally, abrogation of cellulose production reduced NC101 induction of colitis when NC101 was monoassociated in inflammation-prone Il10(-/-) mice. Taken together, our results introduce cellulose as a novel physiological factor that impacts host-microbe-environment interactions and alters the proinflammatory potential of AIEC.

  5. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, D.A.; Benicewicz, B.C.; Thompson, K.G.; Bryan, C.J.

    1997-08-19

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  6. Corrosion resistant coating

    DOEpatents

    Wrobleski, Debra A.; Benicewicz, Brian C.; Thompson, Karen G.; Bryan, Coleman J.

    1997-01-01

    A method of protecting a metal substrate from corrosion including coating a metal substrate of, e.g., steel, iron or aluminum, with a conductive polymer layer of, e.g., polyaniline, coating upon said metal substrate, and coating the conductive polymer-coated metal substrate with a layer of a topcoat upon the conductive polymer coating layer, is provided, together with the resultant coated article from said method.

  7. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Amitava Sarkar; Adam Crawford; Burtron H. Davis

    2006-09-30

    In the previous reporting period, modifications were completed for integrating a continuous wax filtration system for a 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor. During the current reporting period, a shakedown of the system was completed. Several problems were encountered with the progressive cavity pump used to circulate the wax/catalyst slurry though the cross-flow filter element and reactor. During the activation of the catalyst with elevated temperature (> 270 C) the elastomer pump stator released sulfur thereby totally deactivating the iron-based catalyst. Difficulties in maintaining an acceptable leak rate from the pump seal and stator housing were also encountered. Consequently, the system leak rate exceeded the expected production rate of wax; therefore, no online filtration could be accomplished. Work continued regarding the characterization of ultra-fine catalyst structures. The effect of carbidation on the morphology of iron hydroxide oxide particles was the focus of the study during this reporting period. Oxidation of Fe (II) sulfate results in predominantly {gamma}-FeOOH particles which have a rod-shaped (nano-needles) crystalline structure. Carbidation of the prepared {gamma}-FeOOH with CO at atmospheric pressure produced iron carbides with spherical layered structure. HRTEM and EDS analysis revealed that carbidation of {gamma}-FeOOH particles changes the initial nano-needles morphology and generates ultrafine carbide particles with irregular spherical shape.

  8. Anaerobic production of magnetite by a dissimilatory iron-reducing microorganism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Stolz, J.F.; Nord, G.L.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The potential contribution of microbial metabolism to the magnetization of sediments has only recently been recognized. In the presence of oxygen, magnetotactic bacteria can form intracellular chains of magnetite while using oxygen or nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor for metabolism1. The production of ultrafine-grained magnetite by magnetotactic bacteria in surficial aerobic sediments may contribute significantly to the natural remanent magnetism of sediments2-4. However, recent studies on iron reduction in anaerobic sediments suggested that bacteria can also generate magnetite in the absence of oxygen5. We report here on a sediment organism, designated GS-15, which produces copious quantities of ultrafine-grained magnetite under anaerobic conditions. GS-15 is not magnetotactic, but reduces amorphic ferric oxide to extracellular magnetite during the reduction of ferric iron as the terminal electron acceptor for organic matter oxidation. This novel metabolism may be the mechanism for the formation of ultrafine-grained magnetite in anaerobic sediments, and couldaccount for the accumulation of magnetite in ancient iron formations and hydrocarbon deposits. ?? 1987 Nature Publishing Group.

  9. Homogenization, lyophilization or acid-extraction of meat products improves iron uptake from cereal-meat product combinations in an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model.

    PubMed

    Pachón, Helena; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J; Glahn, Raymond P

    2009-03-01

    The effect of processing (homogenization, lyophilization, acid-extraction) meat products on iron uptake from meat combined with uncooked iron-fortified cereal was evaluated using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model. Beef was cooked, blended to create smaller meat particles, and combined with electrolytic iron-fortified infant rice cereal. Chicken liver was cooked and blended, lyophilized, or acid-extracted, and combined with FeSO4-fortified wheat flour. In the beef-cereal combination, Caco-2 cell iron uptake, assessed by measuring the ferritin formed by cells, was greater when the beef was blended for the greatest amount of time (360 s) compared with 30 s (P < 0.05). Smaller liver particles (blended for 360 s or lyophilized) significantly enhanced iron uptake compared to liver blended for 60 s (P < 0.001) in the liver-flour combination. Compared to liver blended for 60 s, acid-extraction of liver significantly enhanced iron uptake (P = 0.03) in the liver-flour combination. Homogenization of beef and homogenization, lyophilization, or acid-extraction of chicken liver increases the enhancing effect of meat products on iron absorption in iron-fortified cereals.

  10. Simulated alteration tests on non-radioactive SON 68 nuclear glass in the presence of corrosion products and environmental materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jollivet, Patrick; Minet, Yves; Nicolas, Michèle; Vernaz, Étienne

    2000-10-01

    Alteration tests with non-radioactive French SON 68 (R7T7-type) nuclear glass in the presence of simulated metal canister corrosion products (CP) or environmental materials (EM) were simulated using the LIXIVER2 computer code. The code incorporates hypotheses concerning glass alteration in aqueous media based on the first-order kinetic law for total silicon with variable silicon retention in the gel and silicon diffusion in the gel interstitial water, coupled with silicon adsorption and diffusion in the materials in contact with the glass. The canister CP are considered as a localized medium with a mass adsorption capacity Rad, while the EM are considered as a porous medium with a diffusion coefficient Dp and a distribution coefficient Kd. L IXIVER2 simulates these media in one-dimensional Cartesian geometry. The Kd values determined by simulating alteration tests logically increase with the aggressiveness of the materials with respect to the glass.

  11. Accumulation of radioactive corrosion products on steel surfaces of VVER type nuclear reactors. I. 110mAg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschberg, Gábor; Baradlai, Pál; Varga, Kálmán; Myburg, Gerrit; Schunk, János; Tilky, Péter; Stoddart, Paul

    Formation, presence and deposition of corrosion product radionuclides (such as 60Co, 51Cr, 54Mn, 59Fe and/or 110mAg) in the primary circuits of water-cooled nuclear reactors (PWRs) throw many obstacles in the way of normal operation. During the course of the work presented in this series, accumulations of such radionuclides have been studied at austenitic stainless steel type 08X18H10T (GOST 5632-61) surfaces (this austenitic stainless steel corresponds to AISI 321). Comparative experiments have been performed on magnetite-covered carbon steel (both materials are frequently used in some Soviet VVER type PWRs). For these laboratory-scale investigations a combination of the in situ radiotracer `thin gap' method and voltammetry is considered to be a powerful tool due to its high sensitivity towards the detection of the submonolayer coverages of corrosion product radionuclides. An independent technique (XPS) is also used to characterize the depth distribution and chemical state of various contaminants in the passive layer formed on austenitic stainless steel. In the first part of the series the accumulation of 110mAg has been investigated. Potential dependent sorption of Ag + ions (cementation) is found to be the predominant process on austenitic steel, while in the case of magnetite-covered carbon steel the silver species are mainly depleted in the form of Ag 2O. The XPS depth profile of Ag gives an evidence about the embedding of metallic silver into the entire passive layer of the austenitic stainless steel studied.

  12. Maximizing Modern Distribution of Complex Anatomical Spatial Information: 3D Reconstruction and Rapid Prototype Production of Anatomical Corrosion Casts of Human Specimens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jianyi; Nie, Lanying; Li, Zeyu; Lin, Lijun; Tang, Lei; Ouyang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Anatomical corrosion casts of human specimens are useful teaching aids. However, their use is limited due to ethical dilemmas associated with their production, their lack of perfect reproducibility, and their consumption of original specimens in the process of casting. In this study, new approaches with modern distribution of complex anatomical…

  13. Quantifying sulfate reducing bacteria in microbiologically influenced corrosion. (Reannouncement with new availability information). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Little, B.; Wagner, P.

    1992-11-01

    Iron-oxidizing, sulfur-oxidizing, iron-reducing, sulfate-reducing, acid producing, slime-producing, ammonium-producing, and hydrogen-producing bacteria in addition to other physiological groups have been implicated in the corrosion of metals and alloys. However, the most widely recognized and most easily detected bacteria in most corrosion processes are the bacteria that reduce sulfate to sulfide that are collectively called sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). SRB constitute a physiological-ecological assemblage of morphologically very different types of anaerobic bacteria that have in common the capacity to reduce sulfate to hydrogen sulfide in dissimilatory energy-conserving reactions. Hydrogen sulfide can react with metals to produce metal sulfides as corrosion products. Most techniques for the evaluation of SRB populations are related to their potential to cause microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Standard practices for evaluating the contribution of SRB to corrosion processes depend on the detection and quantification of SRB using culturing techniques that enumerate organisms or quantify intrinsic characteristics of SRB including enzymes and antibodies. Mineralogy of metal sulfides and sulfur isotope fractionation can also be used to verify the involvement of SRB in corrosion. This paper will review standard practices and innovative techniques for detecting and quantifying SRB.

  14. Combined geochemical and electrochemical methodology to quantify corrosion of carbon steel by bacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Marta K; Moreira, Rebeca; Bildstein, Olivier; Lartigue, Jean-Eric; Schlegel, Michel L; Tribollet, Bernard; Vivier, Vincent; Libert, Marie

    2014-06-01

    The availability of respiratory substrates, such as H2 and Fe(II,III) solid corrosion products within nuclear waste repository, will sustain the activities of hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria (HOB) and iron-reducing bacteria (IRB). This may have a direct effect on the rate of carbon steel corrosion. This study investigates the effects of Shewanella oneidensis (an HOB and IRB model organism) on the corrosion rate by looking at carbon steel dissolution in the presence of H2 as the sole electron donor. Bacterial effect is evaluated by means of geochemical and electrochemical techniques. Both showed that the corrosion rate is enhanced by a factor of 2-3 in the presence of bacteria. The geochemical experiments indicated that the composition and crystallinity of the solid corrosion products (magnetite and vivianite) are modified by bacteria. Moreover, the electrochemical experiments evidenced that the bacterial activity can be stimulated when H2 is generated in a small confinement volume. In this case, a higher corrosion rate and mineralization (vivianite) on the carbon steel surface were observed. The results suggest that the mechanism likely to influence the corrosion rate is the bioreduction of Fe(III) from magnetite coupled to the H2 oxidation.

  15. Hematite Core Nanoparticles with Carbon Shell: Potential for Environmentally Friendly Production from Iron Mining Sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stević, Dragana; Mihajlović, Dijana; Kukobat, Radovan; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Sagisaka, Kento; Kaneko, Katsumi; Atlagić, Suzana Gotovac

    2016-08-01

    Hematite nanoparticles with amorphous, yet relatively uniform carbon shell, were produced based exclusively on the waste sludge from the iron mine as the raw material. The procedure for acid digestion-based purification of the sludge with the full recovery of acid vapors and the remaining non-toxic rubble is described. Synthesis of the hematite nanoparticles was performed by the arrested precipitation method with cationic surfactant. The particles were thoroughly characterized and the potential of their economical production for the battery industry is indicated.

  16. Iron-sulfur mineralogy of Mars - Magmatic evolution and chemical weathering products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.; Fisher, Duncan S.

    1990-01-01

    Models are developed for the magmatic evolution and the oxidative weathering of sulfide minerals on Mars, based on petrogenetic associations among komatiitic rock types, Viking geochemical data, SNC meteorites, and terrestrial Fi-Ni deposits. The weathering model was tested by exposing komatiitic pyrrhotites and olivines to sulfuric acid solutions, with or without dissolved ferric iron, and identifying the reaction products by Moessbauer spectroscopy. The results suggest that, on Mars, acidic groundwater has induced oxidative weathering of pyrrhotite, yielding FeS2 and then FeOOH.

  17. Coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant of Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, V.N.; Anikin, G.J.; Gross, M.

    1995-12-01

    Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works, Russia, decided to erect a new coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant to replace the existing obsolete units and to improve the environmental conditions of the area. The paper deals with the technological concept and the design requirements. Commissioning is scheduled at the beginning of 1996. The paper describes H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} removal, sulfur recovery and ammonia destruction, primary gas cooling and electrostatic tar precipitation, and the distributed control system that will be installed.

  18. Green production of zero-valent iron nanoparticles using tree leaf extracts.

    PubMed

    Machado, S; Pinto, S L; Grosso, J P; Nouws, H P A; Albergaria, J T; Delerue-Matos, C

    2013-02-15

    The interest in zero-valent iron nanoparticles has been increasing significantly since the development of a green production method in which extracts from natural products or wastes are used. However, this field of application is yet poorly studied and lacks knowledge that allows the full understanding of the production and application processes. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the viability of the utilization of several tree leaves to produce extracts which are capable of reducing iron(III) in aqueous solution to form nZVIs. The quality of the extracts was evaluated concerning their antioxidant capacity. The results show that: i) dried leaves produce extracts with higher antioxidant capacities than non-dried leaves, ii) the most favorable extraction conditions (temperature, contact time, and volume:mass ratio) were identified for each leaf, iii) with the aim of developing a green, but also low-cost, method water was chosen as solvent, iv) the extracts can be classified in three categories according to their antioxidant capacity (expressed as Fe(II) concentration): >40 mmol L(-1); 20-40 mmol L(-1); and 2-10 mmol L(-1); with oak, pomegranate and green tea leaves producing the richest extracts, and v) TEM analysis proves that nZVIs (d=10-20 nm) can be produced using the tree leaf extracts. PMID:23298788

  19. An iron-based green approach to 1-h production of single-layer graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Li; Xu, Zhen; Liu, Zheng; Wei, Yangyang; Sun, Haiyan; Li, Zheng; Zhao, Xiaoli; Gao, Chao

    2015-01-01

    As a reliable and scalable precursor of graphene, graphene oxide (GO) is of great importance. However, the environmentally hazardous heavy metals and poisonous gases, explosion risk and long reaction times involved in the current synthesis methods of GO increase the production costs and hinder its real applications. Here we report an iron-based green strategy for the production of single-layer GO in 1 h. Using the strong oxidant K2FeO4, our approach not only avoids the introduction of polluting heavy metals and toxic gases in preparation and products but also enables the recycling of sulphuric acid, eliminating pollution. Our dried GO powder is highly soluble in water, in which it forms liquid crystals capable of being processed into macroscopic graphene fibres, films and aerogels. This green, safe, highly efficient and ultralow-cost approach paves the way to large-scale commercial applications of graphene.

  20. The production of proton-rich isotopes beyond iron: The γ-process in stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignatari, Marco; Göbel, Kathrin; Reifarth, René; Travaglio, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Beyond iron, a small fraction of the total abundances in the Solar System is made of proton-rich isotopes, the p-nuclei. The clear understanding of their production is a fundamental challenge for nuclear astrophysics. The p-nuclei constrain the nucleosynthesis in core-collapse and thermonuclear supernovae. The γ-process is the most established scenario for the production of the p-nuclei, which are produced via different photodisintegration paths starting on heavier nuclei. A large effort from nuclear physics is needed to access the relevant nuclear reaction rates far from the valley of stability. This review describes the production of the heavy proton-rich isotopes by the γ-process in stars, and explores the state of the art of experimental nuclear physics to provide nuclear data for stellar nucleosynthesis.

  1. An iron-based green approach to 1-h production of single-layer graphene oxide

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Li; Xu, Zhen; Liu, Zheng; Wei, Yangyang; Sun, Haiyan; Li, Zheng; Zhao, Xiaoli; Gao, Chao

    2015-01-01

    As a reliable and scalable precursor of graphene, graphene oxide (GO) is of great importance. However, the environmentally hazardous heavy metals and poisonous gases, explosion risk and long reaction times involved in the current synthesis methods of GO increase the production costs and hinder its real applications. Here we report an iron-based green strategy for the production of single-layer GO in 1 h. Using the strong oxidant K2FeO4, our approach not only avoids the introduction of polluting heavy metals and toxic gases in preparation and products but also enables the recycling of sulphuric acid, eliminating pollution. Our dried GO powder is highly soluble in water, in which it forms liquid crystals capable of being processed into macroscopic graphene fibres, films and aerogels. This green, safe, highly efficient and ultralow-cost approach paves the way to large-scale commercial applications of graphene. PMID:25607686

  2. Corrosion Resistance of Laser Produced in-situ Particle Reinforced Fe-matrix Composite Coating with High Nickel Content on Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiwen, W.; Mingxing, M.; Cunyuan, P.; Xiaohui, Y.; Weiming, Z.

    Fe-matrix composite coatings reinforced by in-situ particles with high nickel content were produced on QT450-10 by laser alloying. Coatings with different microstructure proportions and particle distributions were obtained by the adjustment of the content of Ni, Ti and Zr in the alloying powder and the laser parameters. The influence of the content of Ni and the particle distribution on coating's corrosion resistance is studied, which is revealed by the electrochemical characteristics. The results indicate that the alloying coating with more content of nickel and less particles get corroded much harder with a higher corrosion rate.

  3. Corrosion fatigue of iron-chromium-nickel alloys: Fracture mechanics and chemistry. Progress report, 1 January 1990--30 November 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, R.P.

    1990-11-29

    Peak bare-surface current densities based on the scratched electrode test are seriously in error and repasivation rates grossly overestimated. Influences of potential and pH on reactions of bare surfaces are better understood. Correlation between charge transfer and corrosion fatigue crack growth response was established for Fe18Cr12Ni alloy in deaerated 0.6N NaCl at RT. Strong correlation was established between morphology of corrosion fatigue fracture surfaces and cracking in hydrogen charged samples. Attempts at growing bicrystals by strain annealing were not successful.

  4. DETERMINATION OF THE RATES AND PRODUCTS OF FERROUS IRON OXIDATION IN ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED POND WATER.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dissolved ferrous iron and arsenic in the presence of insufficient oxygenated ground water is released into a pond. When the mixing of ferrous iron and oxygenated water within the pond occurs, the ferrous iron is oxidized and precipitated as an iron oxide. Groups of experiments...

  5. Zero valent iron significantly enhances methane production from waste activated sludge by improving biochemical methane potential rather than hydrolysis rate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Qilin; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-02-05

    Anaerobic digestion has been widely applied for waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment. However, methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS is usually limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor biochemical methane potential of WAS. This work systematically studied the effects of three different types of zero valent iron (i.e., iron powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap) on methane production from WAS in anaerobic digestion, by using both experimental and mathematical approaches. The results demonstrated that both the clean and the rusty iron scrap were more effective than the iron powder for improving methane production from WAS. Model-based analysis showed that ZVI addition significantly enhanced methane production from WAS through improving the biochemical methane potential of WAS rather than its hydrolysis rate. Economic analysis indicated that the ZVI-based technology for enhancing methane production from WAS is economically attractive, particularly considering that iron scrap can be freely acquired from industrial waste. Based on these results, the ZVI-based anaerobic digestion process of this work could be easily integrated with the conventional chemical phosphorus removal process in wastewater treatment plant to form a cost-effective and environment-friendly approach, enabling maximum resource recovery/reuse while achieving enhanced methane production in wastewater treatment system.

  6. Zero Valent Iron Significantly Enhances Methane Production from Waste Activated Sludge by Improving Biochemical Methane Potential Rather Than Hydrolysis Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiwen; Wang, Qilin; Zhang, Yaobin; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-02-01

    Anaerobic digestion has been widely applied for waste activated sludge (WAS) treatment. However, methane production from anaerobic digestion of WAS is usually limited by the slow hydrolysis rate and/or poor biochemical methane potential of WAS. This work systematically studied the effects of three different types of zero valent iron (i.e., iron powder, clean scrap and rusty scrap) on methane production from WAS in anaerobic digestion, by using both experimental and mathematical approaches. The results demonstrated that both the clean and the rusty iron scrap were more effective than the iron powder for improving methane production from WAS. Model-based analysis showed that ZVI addition significantly enhanced methane production from WAS through improving the biochemical methane potential of WAS rather than its hydrolysis rate. Economic analysis indicated that the ZVI-based technology for enhancing methane production from WAS is economically attractive, particularly considering that iron scrap can be freely acquired from industrial waste. Based on these results, the ZVI-based anaerobic digestion process of this work could be easily integrated with the conventional chemical phosphorus removal process in wastewater treatment plant to form a cost-effective and environment-friendly approach, enabling maximum resource recovery/reuse while achieving enhanced methane production in wastewater treatment system.

  7. Solid Fuel - Oxygen Fired Combustion for Production of Nodular Reduced Iron to Reduce CO2 Emissions and Improve Energy Efficiencies

    SciTech Connect

    Donald R. Fosnacht; Richard F. Kiesel; David W. Hendrickson; David J. Englund; Iwao Iwasaki; Rodney L. Bleifuss; Mathew A. Mlinar

    2011-12-22

    The current trend in the steel industry is an increase in iron and steel produced in electric arc furnaces (EAF) and a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the market demands of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling capabilities. This demand creates opportunity to convert iron ore or other iron bearing materials to Nodular Reduced Iron (NRI) in a recently designed Linear Hearth Furnace (LHF). NRI is a metallized iron product containing 98.5 to 96.0% iron and 2.5 to 4% C. It is essentially a scrap substitute with little impurity that can be utilized in a variety of steelmaking processes, especially the electric arc furnace. The objective of this project was to focus on reducing the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) through reducing the energy intensity using specialized combustion systems, increasing production and the use of biomass derived carbon sources in this process. This research examined the use of a solid fuel-oxygen fired combustion system and compared the results from this system with both oxygen-fuel and air-fuel combustion systems. The solid pulverized fuels tested included various coals and a bio-coal produced from woody biomass in a specially constructed pilot scale torrefaction reactor at the Coleraine Minerals Research Laboratory (CMRL). In addition to combustion, the application of bio-coal was also tested as a means to produce a reducing atmosphere during key points in the fusion process, and as a reducing agent for ore conversion to metallic iron to capture the advantage of its inherent reduced carbon footprint. The results from this study indicate that the approaches taken can reduce both greenhouse gas emissions and the associated energy intensity with the Linear Hearth Furnace process for converting

  8. Effectivity of fluoride treatment on hydrogen and corrosion product generation in temporal implants for different magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Trinidad, Javier; Arruebarrena, Gurutze; Marco, Iñigo; Hurtado, Iñaki; Sáenz de Argandoña, Eneko

    2013-12-01

    The increasing interest on magnesium alloys relies on their biocompatibility, bioabsorbility and especially on their mechanical properties. Due to these characteristics, magnesium alloys are becoming a promising solution to be used, as temporary implants. However, magnesium alloys must overcome their poor corrosion resistance. This article analyses the corrosion behaviour in phosphate-buffered saline solution of three commercial magnesium alloys (AZ31B, WE43 and ZM21) as well as the influence of fluoride treatment on their corrosion behaviour. It is shown that the corrosion rate of all the alloys is decreased by fluoride treatment. However, fluoride treatment affects each alloy differently.

  9. Iron-binding characterization and polysaccharide production by Klebsiella oxytoca strain isolated from mine acid drainage

    PubMed Central

    Baldi, F; Marchetto, D; Battistel, D; Daniele, S; Faleri, C; De Castro, C; Lanzetta, R

    2009-01-01

    Aims: To investigate Klebsiella oxytoca strain BAS-10 growth on ferric citrate under anaerobic conditions for exopolysaccharide (EPS) production and localization on cell followed by the purification and the EPS determination of the iron-binding stability constant to EPS or biotechnological applications. Methods and Results: Klebsiella oxytoca ferments ferric citrate under anaerobic conditions and produces a ferric hydrogel, whereas ferrous ions were formed in solution. During growth, cells precipitate and a hydrogel formation was observed: the organic material was constituted of an EPS bound to Fe(III) ions, this was found by chemical analyses of the iron species and transmission electron microscopy of the cell cultures. Iron binding to EPS was studied by cyclic voltammetric measurements, either directly on the hydrogel or in an aqueous solutions containing Fe(III)-citrate and purified Fe(III)-EPS. From the voltammetric data, the stability constant for the Fe(III)-EPS complex can be assumed to have values of approx. 1012–1013. It was estimated that this is higher than for the Fe(III)-citrate complex. Conclusions: The production of Fe(III)-EPS under anaerobic conditions is a strategy for the strain to survive in mine drainages and other acidic conditions. This physiological feature can be used to produce large amounts of valuable Fe(III)-EPS, starting from a low cost substrate such as Fe(III)-citrate. Significant and Impact of the Study: The data herein demonstrates that an interesting metal-binding molecule can be produced as a novel catalyst for a variety of potential applications and the EPS itself is a valuable source for rhamnose purification. PMID:19508299

  10. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles

    SciTech Connect

    James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Amitava Sarkar; Burtron H. Davis

    2005-09-30

    In this reporting period, a study of ultra-fine iron catalyst filtration was initiated to study the behavior of ultra-fine particles during the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids filtration. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. The change of particle size during the slurry-phase FTS has monitored by withdrawing catalyst sample at different TOS. The measurement of dimension of the HRTEM images of samples showed a tremendous growth of the particles. Carbon rims of thickness 3-6 nm around the particles were observed. This growth in particle size was not due to carbon deposition on the catalyst. A conceptual design and operating philosophy was developed for an integrated wax filtration system for a 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor to be used in Phase II of this research program. The system will utilize a primary inertial hydroclone followed by a Pall Accusep cross-flow membrane. Provisions for cleaned permeate back-pulsing will be included to as a flux maintenance measure.

  11. Corrosion of Submerged Artifacts and the Conservation of the USS Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Desmond C.; Peterson, Curtiss E.

    2005-04-26

    The USS Monitor, the first ironclad warship to be constructed in the United States, was built in 1862 to serve in the American Civil War. It took part in the infamous battle of Hampton Roads, Virginia with the iron covered Confederate frigate, CSS Virginia. The USS Monitor eventually sank at sea in a storm in 1862, and following its discovery in 1973 many important pieces have been recovered. In order to evaluate the extent of degradation of the iron artifacts due to prolonged seawater submersion, a spectroscopic study of the corrosion products and marine sediments attached to the artifacts has begun, with some of the early findings being reported in this document. It has been determined that under anaerobic, aqueous and high chloride exposure, the predominant rust component formed on the wrought iron artifacts was Corrosion Magnetite, an unstable compound whose Moessbauer signature is different to that of the pure, natural and synthetic forms. The Corrosion Magnetite changed with time of exposure in air, with its oxidation forming non-stoichiometric maghemite. No akaganeite was detected in the anaerobically formed rust, but was identified if the iron artifact was allowed to dry in air. This is an important finding for archaeologists since formation of akaganeite indicates significant effort may be required to remove the insoluble chlorides from an artifact. Analysis of some ocean sediments trapped between wrought iron plates has shown that the pH is low, and the composition is mainly calcite and siderite, with the latter forming as a result of the rusting iron. The sulfur content was high at 1.5 weight percent, indicating the potential presence of microbial activity. Rusticles formed on iron surfaces of the USS Monitor have been identified as a solid outer casing of siderite, lepidocrocite and goethite, and a liquidous inner core of unstable Corrosion Magnetite having a low pH of about 3.

  12. Corrosion of Submerged Artifacts and the Conservation of the USS Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Desmond C.; Peterson, Curtiss E.

    2005-04-01

    The USS Monitor, the first ironclad warship to be constructed in the United States, was built in 1862 to serve in the American Civil War. It took part in the infamous battle of Hampton Roads, Virginia with the iron covered Confederate frigate, CSS Virginia. The USS Monitor eventually sank at sea in a storm in 1862, and following its discovery in 1973 many important pieces have been recovered. In order to evaluate the extent of degradation of the iron artifacts due to prolonged seawater submersion, a spectroscopic study of the corrosion products and marine sediments attached to the artifacts has begun, with some of the early findings being reported in this document. It has been determined that under anaerobic, aqueous and high chloride exposure, the predominant rust component formed on the wrought iron artifacts was Corrosion Magnetite, an unstable compound whose Mössbauer signature is different to that of the pure, natural and synthetic forms. The Corrosion Magnetite changed with time of exposure in air, with its oxidation forming non-stoichiometric maghemite. No akaganeite was detected in the anaerobically formed rust, but was identified if the iron artifact was allowed to dry in air. This is an important finding for archaeologists since formation of akaganeite indicates significant effort may be required to remove the insoluble chlorides from an artifact. Analysis of some ocean sediments trapped between wrought iron plates has shown that the pH is low, and the composition is mainly calcite and siderite, with the latter forming as a result of the rusting iron. The sulfur content was high at 1.5 weight percent, indicating the potential presence of microbial activity. Rusticles formed on iron surfaces of the USS Monitor have been identified as a solid outer casing of siderite, lepidocrocite and goethite, and a liquidous inner core of unstable Corrosion Magnetite having a low pH of about 3.

  13. Method for inhibiting corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Stapp, P. R.

    1985-12-03

    A composition comprising the reaction adduct or neutralized product resulting from the reaction of a maleic anhydride and an oil containing a polynuclear aromatic compound is provided which, when applied to a metal surface, forms a corrosion-inhibiting film thereon. The composition is particularly useful in the treatment of down-hole metal surfaces in oil and gas wells to inhibit the corrosion of the metal.

  14. Increased bioclogging and corrosion risk by sulfate addition during iodine recovery at a natural gas production plant.

    PubMed

    Lim, Choon-Ping; Zhao, Dan; Takase, Yuta; Miyanaga, Kazuhiko; Watanabe, Tomoko; Tomoe, Yasuyoshi; Tanji, Yasunori

    2011-02-01

    Iodine recovery at a natural gas production plant in Japan involved the addition of sulfuric acid for pH adjustment, resulting in an additional about 200 mg/L of sulfate in the waste brine after iodine recovery. Bioclogging occurred at the waste brine injection well, causing a decrease in well injectivity. To examine the factors that contribute to bioclogging, an on-site experiment was conducted by amending 10 L of brine with different conditions and then incubating the brine for 5 months under open air. The control case was exposed to open air but did not receive additional chemicals. When sulfate addition was coupled with low iodine, there was a drastic increase in the total amount of accumulated biomass (and subsequently the risk of bioclogging) that was nearly six times higher than the control. The bioclogging-associated corrosion rate of carbon steel was 84.5 μm/year, which is four times higher than that observed under other conditions. Analysis of the microbial communities by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis revealed that the additional sulfate established a sulfur cycle and induced the growth of phototrophic bacteria, including cyanobacteria and purple bacteria. In the presence of sulfate and low iodine levels, cyanobacteria and purple bacteria bloomed, and the accumulation of abundant biomass may have created a more conducive environment for anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria. It is believed that the higher corrosion rate was caused by a differential aeration cell that was established by the heterogeneous distribution of the biomass that covered the surface of the test coupons. PMID:20922384

  15. Kinetics and mechanism of the electrochemical formation of iron oxidation products on steel immersed in sour acid media.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Espejel, Antonio; Palomar-Pardavé, Manuel; Cabrera-Sierra, Román; Romero-Romo, Mario; Ramírez-Silva, María Teresa; Arce-Estrada, Elsa M

    2011-03-01

    From electrochemical techniques (cyclic voltammetry, potential steps, and EIS), XRD, and SEM-EDX, the kinetics and mechanism of anodic film formation applying anodic potential steps on steel immersed in sour acid media was determined. It was found, from a thermodynamic analysis, based on equilibrium phase diagrams of the system considered in this work, that iron oxidation may produce different new solid phases, depending on the applied potential, the first being the iron oxidation associated with formation of FeS((c)) species, which in turn can be reoxidized to FeS(2(c)) or even to Fe(2)O(3(c)) at higher potential values. From analysis of the corresponding experimental potentiostatic current density transients, it was concluded that the electrochemical anodic film formation involves an E(1)CE(2) mechanism, whereby the first of the two simultaneous processes were the Fe electrochemical oxidation (E(1)) followed by FeS precipitation (C) that occurs by 3D nucleation and growth limited by mass transfer reaction and FeS oxidation (E(2)) forming a mix of different stoichiometry iron sulphides and oxides. From EIS measurements, it was revealed that the anodic film's charge transfer resistance diminishes as the potential applied for its formation becomes more anodic, thus behaving poorly against corrosion.

  16. Hydrogen production by the naked active site of the di-iron hydrogenases in water.

    PubMed

    Zipoli, Federico; Car, Roberto; Cohen, Morrel H; Selloni, Annabella

    2009-10-01

    We explored the reactivity of the active center of the [FeFe]-hydrogenases detached from the enzyme and immersed in acidified water by first-principles Car-Parrinello molecular-dynamics simulations. We focused on the identification of the structures that are stable and metastable in acidified water and on their activity for hydrogen production. Our calculations revealed that the naked active center could be an efficient catalyst provided that electrons are transferred to the cluster. We found that both bridging and terminal isomers are present at equilibrium and that the bridging configuration is essential for efficient hydrogen production. The formation of the hydrogen molecule occurs via sequential protonations of the distal iron and of the N-atom of the S-CH(2)-NH-CH(2)-S chelating group. H(2) desorption does not involve a significant energy barrier, making the process very efficient at room temperature. We established that the bottleneck in the reaction is the direct proton transfer from water to the vacant site of the distal iron. Moreover, we found that even if the terminal isomer is present at the equilibrium, its strong local hydrophobicity prevents poisoning of the cluster. PMID:19737003

  17. Hydrogen production by the naked active site of the di-iron hydrogenases in water.

    PubMed

    Zipoli, Federico; Car, Roberto; Cohen, Morrel H; Selloni, Annabella

    2009-10-01

    We explored the reactivity of the active center of the [FeFe]-hydrogenases detached from the enzyme and immersed in acidified water by first-principles Car-Parrinello molecular-dynamics simulations. We focused on the identification of the structures that are stable and metastable in acidified water and on their activity for hydrogen production. Our calculations revealed that the naked active center could be an efficient catalyst provided that electrons are transferred to the cluster. We found that both bridging and terminal isomers are present at equilibrium and that the bridging configuration is essential for efficient hydrogen production. The formation of the hydrogen molecule occurs via sequential protonations of the distal iron and of the N-atom of the S-CH(2)-NH-CH(2)-S chelating group. H(2) desorption does not involve a significant energy barrier, making the process very efficient at room temperature. We established that the bottleneck in the reaction is the direct proton transfer from water to the vacant site of the distal iron. Moreover, we found that even if the terminal isomer is present at the equilibrium, its strong local hydrophobicity prevents poisoning of the cluster.

  18. Laboratory Feasibility Evaluation of a New Modified Iron Product for Use as a Filter Material to Treat Agricultural Drainage Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, B. J.

    2010-12-01

    The removal of excess soil water with a subsurface drainage pipe system is a common agricultural practice employed to improve crop yields, especially in the Midwest U.S. However, fertilizer nutrients (nitrate and phosphate) and pesticides applied on farm fields will frequently leach downwards through the soil profile to be intercepted by the buried drainage pipes and then discharged with drainage water into neighboring streams and lakes, oftentimes producing adverse environmental impacts on local, regional, and national scales. On-site drainage water filter treatment systems can potentially be employed to prevent the release of agricultural nutrients/pesticides into adjacent waterways. A recently developed modified iron product may have promise as a filter material used within this type of drainage water treatment system. Therefore, a laboratory study was initiated to directly evaluate the feasibility of employing this new modified iron product as a filter material to treat drainage waters. Laboratory research included saturated falling-head hydraulic conductivity tests, contaminant (nutrient/pesticide) removal batch tests, and saturated solute transport column experiments. The saturated falling-head hydraulic conductivity tests indicate that the unaltered modified iron product by itself has a high enough hydraulic conductivity (> 1.0 x 10-3 cm/s) to normally allow sufficient water flow rates that are needed to make this material hydraulically practical for use in drainage water filter treatment systems. Modified iron hydraulic conductivity can be improved substantially (> 1 x 10-2 cm/s) by using only the portion of this material that is retained on a 100 mesh sieve (particle size > 0.15 mm). Batch test results carried out with spiked drainage water and either unaltered or 100 mesh sieved modified iron showed nitrate reductions of greater than 30% and 100% removal of the pesticide, atrazine. Saturated solute transport columns tests with spiked drainage water

  19. Microbial Corrosion in Linepipe Steel Under the Influence of a Sulfate-Reducing Consortium Isolated from an Oil Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlAbbas, Faisal M.; Williamson, Charles; Bhola, Shaily M.; Spear, John R.; Olson, David L.; Mishra, Brajendra; Kakpovbia, Anthony E.

    2013-11-01

    This work investigates microbiologically influenced corrosion of API 5L X52 linepipe steel by a sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) consortium. The SRB consortium used in this study was cultivated from a sour oil well in Louisiana, USA. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the mixed bacterial consortium contained three phylotypes: members of Proteobacteria ( Desulfomicrobium sp.), Firmicutes ( Clostridium sp.), and Bacteroidetes ( Anaerophaga sp.). The biofilm and the pits that developed with time were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). In addition, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) and open circuit potential (OCP) were used to analyze the corrosion behavior. Through circuit modeling, EIS results were used to interpret the physicoelectric interactions between the electrode, biofilm and solution interfaces. The results confirmed that extensive localized corrosion activity of SRB is due to a formed biofilm in conjunction with a porous iron sulfide layer on the metal surface. X-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed semiconductive corrosion products predominantly composed of a mixture of siderite (FeCO3), iron sulfide (Fe x S y ), and iron (III) oxide-hydroxide (FeOOH) constituents in the corrosion products for the system exposed to the SRB consortium.

  20. Hot Corrosion at Air-Ports in Kraft Recovery Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Russell, James H.

    2003-01-01

    Hot corrosion can occur on the cold-side of airports in Kraft recovery boilers. The primary corrosion mechanism involves the migration of sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide vapors through leaks in the furnace wall at the airports and their subsequent condensation. It has been reported that stainless steel is attacked much faster than carbon steel in composite tubes, and that carbon steel tubing, when used with a low-chromium refractory, does not exhibit this type of corrosion. For hot corrosion fluxing of metal oxides, either acidic or basic fluxing takes place, with a solubility minimum at the basicity of transition between the two reactions. For stainless steel, if the basicity of the fused salt is between the iron and chromium oxide solubility minima, then a synergistic effect can occur that leads to rapid corrosion. The products of one reaction are the reactants of the other, which eliminates the need for rate-controlling diffusion. This effect can explain why stainless steel is attacked more readily than carbon steel.

  1. 7 CFR 3201.44 - Corrosion preventatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Corrosion preventatives. 3201.44 Section 3201.44... Designated Items § 3201.44 Corrosion preventatives. (a) Definition. Products designed to prevent the deterioration (corrosion) of metals. (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have...

  2. 7 CFR 3201.44 - Corrosion preventatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Corrosion preventatives. 3201.44 Section 3201.44... Designated Items § 3201.44 Corrosion preventatives. (a) Definition. Products designed to prevent the deterioration (corrosion) of metals. (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have...

  3. 7 CFR 3201.44 - Corrosion preventatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Corrosion preventatives. 3201.44 Section 3201.44... Designated Items § 3201.44 Corrosion preventatives. (a) Definition. Products designed to prevent the deterioration (corrosion) of metals. (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have...

  4. 7 CFR 2902.44 - Corrosion preventatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Corrosion preventatives. 2902.44 Section 2902.44... Items § 2902.44 Corrosion preventatives. (a) Definition. Products designed to prevent the deterioration (corrosion) of metals. (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product must have a...

  5. Corrosivity Of Pyrolysis Oils

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, James R; Bestor, Michael A; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Storey, John Morse

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis oils from several sources have been analyzed and used in corrosion studies which have consisted of exposing corrosion coupons and stress corrosion cracking U-bend samples. The chemical analyses have identified the carboxylic acid compounds as well as the other organic components which are primarily aromatic hydrocarbons. The corrosion studies have shown that raw pyrolysis oil is very corrosive to carbon steel and other alloys with relatively low chromium content. Stress corrosion cracking samples of carbon steel and several low alloy steels developed through-wall cracks after a few hundred hours of exposure at 50 C. Thermochemical processing of biomass can produce solid, liquid and/or gaseous products depending on the temperature and exposure time used for processing. The liquid product, known as pyrolysis oil or bio-oil, as produced contains a significant amount of oxygen, primarily as components of water, carboxylic acids, phenols, ketones and aldehydes. As a result of these constituents, these oils are generally quite acidic with a Total Acid Number (TAN) that can be around 100. Because of this acidity, bio-oil is reported to be corrosive to many common structural materials. Despite this corrosive nature, these oils have the potential to replace some imported petroleum. If the more acidic components can be removed from this bio-oil, it is expected that the oil could be blended with crude oil and then processed in existing petroleum refineries. The refinery products could be transported using customary routes - pipelines, barges, tanker trucks and rail cars - without a need for modification of existing hardware or construction of new infrastructure components - a feature not shared by ethanol.

  6. Effects of Selected Dietary Secondary Metabolites on Reactive Oxygen Species Production Caused by Iron(II) Autoxidation

    PubMed Central

    Chobot, Vladimir; Hadacek, Franz; Kubicova, Lenka

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential co-factor for many enzymes that catalyze electron transfer reactions. It is well known that so-called “poorly liganded” iron can increase ROS concentrations and trigger oxidative stress that is capable of initiating apoptosis. Conversely, controlled ROS production has been recognized as an integral part of cellular signaling. Elevated ROS concentrations are associated with aging, inflammatory and degenerative diseases. Anti-aging properties have been attributed especially to antioxidant phenolic plant metabolites that represent food additives in our diet. Consequently, this study explores the effects of flavonoids (quercetin and rutin), several phenolic acids (caffeic, chlorogenic, and protocatechuic acid), and the alkaloid caffeine on iron(II) autoxidation and ROS production in comparison to the standard antioxidants ascorbic acid and Trolox. The iron(II) autoxidation assay was carried out in pH 6.0 (plant apoplast and inflamed human tissue) and 7.4 (cell cytoplasm and human blood plasma). The obtained results accentuate phenolic acids as the more specific antioxidants compared to ascorbic acid and Trolox. Flavonoid redox chemistry depends more on the chemical milieu, specifically on pH. In vivo, the presence of iron cannot be ruled out and “wrongly” or “poorly” complexed iron has been pointed out as causative agent of various age-related diseases. PMID:25470272

  7. Enhanced Biogas Production from Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron-Amended Anaerobic Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Alexis Wells; Laughton, Stephanie N.; Wiesner, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Addition of nanoscale zero valent iron (NZVI) to anaerobic batch reactors to enhance methanogenic activity is described. Two NZVI systems were tested: a commercially available NZVI (cNZVI) slurry and a freshly synthesized NZVI (sNZVI) suspension that was prepared immediately before addition to the reactors. In both systems, the addition of NZVI increased pH and decreased oxidation/reduction potential compared with unamended control reactors. Biodegradation of a model brewery wastewater was enhanced as indicated by an increase in chemical oxygen demand removal with both sNZVI and cNZVI amendments at all concentrations tested (1.25–5.0 g Fe/L). Methane production increased for all NZVI-amended bioreactors, with a maximum increase of 28% achieved on the addition of 2.5 and 5.0 g/L cNZVI. Addition of bulk zero-valent iron resulted in only a 5% increase in methane, indicating the advantage of using the nanoscale particles. NZVI amendments further improved produced biogas by decreasing the amount of CO2 released from the bioreactor by approximately 58%. Overall, addition of cNZVI proved more beneficial than the sNZVI at equal iron concentrations, due to decreased colloidal stability and larger effective particle size of sNZVI. Although some have reported cytotoxicity of NZVI to anaerobic microorganisms, work presented here suggests that NZVI of a certain particle size and reactivity can serve as an amendment to anaerobic digesters to enhance degradation and increase the value of the produced biogas, yielding a more energy-efficient anaerobic method for wastewater treatment. PMID:26339183

  8. Influence of respiratory substrate in carbon steel corrosion by a Sulphate Reducing Prokaryote model organism.

    PubMed

    Dall'agnol, Leonardo T; Cordas, Cristina M; Moura, José J G

    2014-06-01

    Sulphate Reducing Prokaryotes (SRP) are an important group of microorganisms involved in biocorrosion processes. Sulphide production is recognized as a fundamental cause of corrosion and nitrate is often used as treatment. The present work analyses the influence of respiratory substrates in the metal, from off-shore installations, SRP influenced corrosion, using Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATTC 27774 as model organism, since this can switch from sulphate to nitrate. Open Circuit Potential over 6days in different conditions was measured, showing an increase around 200 and 90mV for the different media. Tafel plots were constructed allowing Ecorr and jcorr calculations. For SRP in sulphate and nitrate media Ecorr values of -824 and -728mV, and jcorr values of 2.5 and 3.7μAcm(-2), respectively, were attained indicating that in nitrate, the resultant corrosion rate is larger than in sulphate. Also, it is shown that the equilibrium of sulphide in the solution/gas phases is a key factor to the evolution of corrosion Nitrate prevents pitting but promotes general corrosion and increases the corrosion potential and iron dissolution 40 times when compared to sulphate. Our results demonstrate that nitrate injection strategy in oil fields has to be considered carefully as option to reduce souring and localized corrosion.

  9. Significance of iron(II,III) hydroxycarbonate green rust in arsenic remediation using zerovalent iron in laboratory column tests.

    PubMed

    Su, Chunming; Puls, Robert W

    2004-10-01

    We examined the corrosion products of zerovalent iron used in three column tests for removing arsenic from water under dynamic flow conditions. Each column test lasted 3-4 months using columns consisting of a 10.3-cm depth of 50:50 (w:w, Peerless iron:sand) in the middle and a 10.3cm depth of a sediment from Elizabeth City, NC, in both upper and lower portions of the 31-cm-long glass column (2.5 cm in diameter). The feeding solutions were 1 mg of As(V) L(-1) + 1 mg of As(III) L(-1) in 7 mM NaCl + 0.86 mM CaSO4 with or without added phosphate (0.5 or 1 mg of P L(-1)) and silicate (10 or 20 mg of Si L(-1)) at pH 6.5. Iron(II,III) hydroxycarbonate green rust (or simply, carbonate green rust) and magnetite were the major iron corrosion products identified with X-ray diffraction for the separated fractions (5 and 1 min sedimentation and residual). The presence of carbonate green rust was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (hexagonal morphology) and FTIR-photoacoustic spectroscopy (interlayer carbonate stretching mode at 1352-1365 cm(-1)). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigation revealed the presence of predominantly As(V) at the surface of corroded iron particles despite the fact that the feeding solution in contact with Peerless iron contained more As(III) than As(V) as a result of a preferential uptake of As(V) over As(III) by the Elizabeth City sediment. Extraction of separated corrosion products with 1.0 M HCI showed that from 86 to 96% of the total extractable As (6.9-14.6 g kg(-1)) was in the form of As(V) in agreement with the XPS results. Combined microscopic and macroscopic wet chemistry results suggest that sorbed As(III) was partially oxidized by the carbonate green rust at the early stage of iron corrosion. The column experiments suggest that either carbonate green rust is kinetically favored or is thermodynamically more stable than sulfate green rust in the studied Peerless iron corrosion systems.

  10. Corrosion manual for internal corrosion of water distribution systems

    SciTech Connect

    Singley, J.E.; Beaudet, B.A.; Markey, P.H.

    1984-04-01

    Corrosion of distribution piping and of home plumbing and fixtures has been estimated to cost the public water supply industry more than $700 million per year. Two toxic metals that occur in tap water, almost entirely because of corrosion, are lead and cadmium. Three other metals, usually present because of corrosion, cause staining of fixtures, or metallic taste, or both. These are copper (blue stains and metallic taste), iron (red-brown stains and metallic taste), and zinc (metallic taste). Since the Safe Drinking Water Act (P.L. 93-523) makes the supplying utility responsible for the water quality at the customer's tap, it is necessary to prevent these metals from getting into the water on the way to the tap. This manual was written to give the operators of potable water treatment plants and distribution systems an understanding of the causes and control of corrosion.

  11. Crude unit corrosion and corrosion control

    SciTech Connect

    Bagdasarian, A.; Feather, J.; Hull, B.; Stephenson, R.; Strong, R.

    1996-08-01

    In the petroleum refining process, the Crude Unit is the initial stage of distillation of the crude oil into useable fractions, either as end products or feed to downstream units. The major pieces of equipment found on units will vary depending on factors such as the assay of the design crude, the age of the refinery, and other downstream units. The unit discussed in this paper has all of the major pieces of equipment found on crude units including double desalting, a preflash section, an atmospheric section, a vacuum section, and a stabilization section. This paper reviews fundamental corrosion issues concerning the Crude Unit process. It is, in concise form, a description of the process and major equipment found in the Crude Unit; types of corrosion and where they occur; corrosion monitoring and inspection advice; and a list of related references for further reading. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Prevention of Acid Mine Drainage Through Complexation of Ferric Iron by Soluble Microbial Growth Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, S.; Yacob, T. W.; Silverstein, J.; Rajaram, H.; Minchow, K.; Basta, J.

    2011-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a widespread environmental problem with deleterious impacts on water quality in streams and watersheds. AMD is generated largely by the oxidation of metal sulfides (i.e. pyrite) by ferric iron. This abiotic reaction is catalyzed by conversion of ferrous to ferric iron by iron and sulfur oxidizing microorganisms. Biostimulation is currently being investigated as an attempt to inhibit the oxidation of pyrite and growth of iron oxidizing bacteria through addition of organic carbon. This may stimulate growth of indigenous communities of acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria to compete for oxygen. The goal of this research is to investigate a secondary mechanism associated with carbon addition: complexation of free Fe(III) by soluble microbial growth products (SMPs) produced by microorganisms growing in waste rock. Exploratory research at the laboratory scale examined the effect of soluble microbial products (SMPs) on the kinetics of oxidation of pure pyrite during shaker flask experiments. The results confirmed a decrease in the rate of pyrite oxidation that was dependent upon the concentration of SMPs in solution. We are using these data to verify results from a pyrite oxidation model that accounts for SMPs. This reactor model involves differential-algebraic equations incorporating total component mass balances and mass action laws for equilibrium reactions. Species concentrations determined in each time step are applied to abiotic pyrite oxidation rate expressions from the literature to determine the evolution of total component concentrations. The model was embedded in a parameter estimation algorithm to determine the reactive surface area of pyrite in an abiotic control experiment, yielding an optimized value of 0.0037 m2. The optimized model exhibited similar behavior to the experiment for this case; the root mean squared of residuals for Fe(III) was calculated to be 7.58 x 10-4 M, which is several orders of magnitude less than the actual

  13. Production, energy, and carbon emissions: A data profile of the iron and steel industry

    SciTech Connect

    Battles, S.J.; Burns, E.M.; Adler, R.K.

    1999-07-01

    The complexities of the manufacturing sector unquestionably make energy-use analysis more difficult here than in other energy-using sectors. Therefore, this paper examines only one energy-intensive industry within the manufacturing sector--blast furnaces and steel mills (SIC 3312). SIC 3312, referred to as the iron and steel industry in this paper, is profiled with an examination of the products produced, how they are produced, and energy used. Energy trends from 1985 to 1994 are presented for three major areas of analysis. The first major area includes trends in energy consumption and expenditures. The next major area includes a discussion of energy intensity--first as to its definition, and then its measurement. Energy intensities presented include the use of different (1) measures of total energy, (2) energy sources, (3) end-use energy measures, (4) energy expenditures, and (5) demand indicators-economic and physical values are used. The final area of discussion is carbon emissions. Carbon emissions arise both from energy use and from certain industrial processes involved in the making of iron and steel. This paper focuses on energy use, which is the more important of the two. Trends are examined over time.

  14. Tracing iron-fueled microbial carbon production within the hydrothermal plume at the Loihi seamount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Sarah A.; Hansman, Roberta L.; Sessions, Alex L.; Nakamura, Ko-ichi.; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2011-10-01

    The Loihi hydrothermal plume provides an opportunity to investigate iron (Fe) oxidation and microbial processes in a system that is truly Fe dominated and distinct from mid-ocean ridge spreading centers. The lack of hydrogen sulfide within the Loihi hydrothermal fluids and the presence of an oxygen minimum zone at this submarine volcano's summit, results in a prolonged presence of reduced Fe within the dispersing non-buoyant plume. In this study, we have investigated the potential for microbial carbon fixation within the Loihi plume. We sampled for both particulate and dissolved organic carbon in hydrothermal fluids, microbial mats growing around vents, and the dispersing plume, and carried out stable carbon isotope analysis on the particulate fraction. The δ13C values of the microbial mats ranged from -23‰ to -28‰, and are distinct from those of deep-ocean particulate organic carbon (POC). The mats and hydrothermal fluids were also elevated in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) compared to background seawater. Within the hydrothermal plume, DOC and POC concentrations were elevated and the isotopic composition of POC within the plume suggests mixing between background seawater POC and a 13C-depleted hydrothermal component. The combination of both DOC and POC increasing in the dispersing plume that cannot solely be the result of entrainment and DOC adsorption, provides strong evidence for in-situ microbial productivity by chemolithoautotrophs, including a likelihood for iron-oxidizing microorganisms.

  15. Reductive dechlorination of trichloroethylene by iron bimetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, R.G.; Dauda, T.; McKenzie, D.E.

    1998-07-01

    Reductive dechlorination using a zero valence metal such as iron has seen an increase in interest with the extension of iron dechlorination to in-situ treatment of ground water. Studies to increase the rate of dechlorination and the long term stability have lead many to examine the use of bimetallic iron systems. Results are shown for bimetallic iron systems of Cu, Sn, Ni, Ag, Au, and Pd. All of these bimetallic couples form a galvanic couple which increase corrosion rates and the production of hydrogen. Increased rates of reaction normalized to surface area were observed for all the couples. The reaction rates were found to depended on surface area and surface coverage of the iron. The results of studies in deuterium oxide indicate that the pathways changed as the bimetallic is changed and that the pathway in all cases could be a combination of dehydrohalgenation and sequential dechlorination. Degradation of DNAPL TCE by iron was found to be zero order and the type of product observed was different from that observed for TCE dissolved in water.

  16. Corrosion in supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Propp, W.A.; Carleson, T.E.; Wai, Chen M.; Taylor, P.R.; Daehling, K.W.; Huang, Shaoping; Abdel-Latif, M.

    1996-05-01

    Integrated studies were carried out in the areas of corrosion, thermodynamic modeling, and electrochemistry under pressure and temperature conditions appropriate for potential applications of supercritical fluid (SCF) extractive metallurgy. Carbon dioxide and water were the primary fluids studied. Modifiers were used in some tests; these consisted of 1 wt% water and 10 wt% methanol for carbon dioxide and of sulfuric acid, sodium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium nitrate at concentrations ranging from 0.00517 to 0.010 M for the aqueous fluids. The materials studied were Types 304 and 316 (UNS S30400 and S31600) stainless steel, iron, and AISI-SAE 1080 (UNS G10800) carbon steel. The thermodynamic modeling consisted of development of a personal computer-based program for generating Pourbaix diagrams at supercritical conditions in aqueous systems. As part of the model, a general method for extrapolating entropies and related thermodynamic properties from ambient to SCF conditions was developed. The experimental work was used as a tool to evaluate the predictions of the model for these systems. The model predicted a general loss of passivation in iron-based alloys at SCF conditions that was consistent with experimentally measured corrosion rates and open circuit potentials. For carbon-dioxide-based SCFs, measured corrosion rates were low, indicating that carbon steel would be suitable for use with unmodified carbon dioxide, while Type 304 stainless steel would be suitable for use with water or methanol as modifiers.

  17. Corrosive wear principles

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    The dual effects of corrosion and wear operate together in such industries as paper and pulp, coal handling, mining, and sugar beet extraction. There is a synergistic effect that causes far greater wastage to carbon steels, alloy steels, and even much more abrasion resistant cast irons. Several laboratory and in situ studies have been conducted to better understand the contributions of corrosion and wear to the wastage process. The environmental conditions are usually set by the process. However, there are a few instances where inhibitors as sodium nitrite, sodium chromate, and sodium metasilicate have been successfully used to reduce metal wastage of carbon steels. Hardness has been found to be an unreliable guide to performance under wet sliding conditions. Heat treated alloy steels and cast irons are inferior to stainless steels. Even distilled water is too severe a corrodent for steels. While the austenitic stainlesses perform the best, cold rolling to increase hardness does not further improve their performance. The surface roughness of stainless steels gets smoother during corrosive wear testing while it gets rougher for the alloy steels. This observation substantiated the reputation of improved slideability for stainless alloys over alloy steels.

  18. MPK3/MPK6 are involved in iron deficiency-induced ethylene production in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Lingxiao; Li, Lin; Wang, Lu; Wang, Shoudong; Li, Sen; Du, Juan; Zhang, Shuqun; Shou, Huixia

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient that participates in various biological processes important for plant growth. Ethylene production induced by Fe deficiency plays important roles in plant tolerance to stress induced by Fe deficiency. However, the activation and regulatory mechanisms of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (ACS) genes in this response are not clear. In this study, we demonstrated that Fe deficiency increased the abundance of ACS2, ACS6, ACS7, and ACS11 transcripts in both leaves and roots as well as the abundance of ACS8 transcripts in leaves and ACS9 transcripts in roots. Furthermore, we investigated the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase 3 and 6 (MPK3/MPK6)-regulated ACS2/6 activation in Fe deficiency-induced ethylene production. Our results showed that MPK3/MPK6 transcript abundance and MPK3/MPK6 phosphorylation are elevated under conditions of Fe deficiency. Furthermore, mpk3 and mpk6 mutants show a lesser induction of ethylene production under Fe deficiency and a greater sensitivity to Fe deficiency. Finally, in mpk3, mpk6, and acs2 mutants under conditions of Fe deficiency, induction of transcript expression of the Fe-deficiency response genes FRO2, IRT1, and FIT is partially compromised. Taken together, our results suggest that the MPK3/MPK6 and ACS2 are part of the Fe starvation-induced ethylene production signaling pathway. PMID:26579185

  19. Recycling of iron foundry sand and glass waste as raw material for production of whiteware.

    PubMed

    Bragança, Saulo R; Vicenzi, Juliane; Guerino, Kareline; Bergmann, Carlos P

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the production feasibility of triaxial whiteware using sand from cast iron moulds as a raw material instead of silica, and recycled glass in place of feldspar. Formulations were prepared using sand, glass waste, and white-firing clay such that only 50% of the composition was virgin material (clay). The ceramic bodies were formed by pressing and fired at different temperatures (between 1100 and 1300 degrees C). Specimens were characterized in terms of green density prior to firing; and their flexural strength, linear shrinkage, and water absorption were measured after firing. The microstructure was determined by scanning electron microscopy. Possible environmental impacts of this recycling process were also evaluated, through solubility and leaching tests, according to Brazilian standards. Gaseous emissions during the firing process were also analysed. The results showed that it is possible to produce triaxial ceramics by using such alternative raw materials. PMID:16496871

  20. Engineering the iron-oxidizing chemolithoautotroph Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans for biochemical production.

    PubMed

    Kernan, Timothy; Majumdar, Sudipta; Li, Xiaozheng; Guan, Jingyang; West, Alan C; Banta, Scott

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in developing non-photosynthetic routes for the conversion of CO2 to fuels and chemicals. One underexplored approach is the transfer of energy to the metabolism of genetically modified chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is an obligate chemolithoautotroph that derives its metabolic energy from the oxidation of iron or sulfur at low pH. Two heterologous biosynthetic pathways have been expressed in A. ferrooxidans to produce either isobutyric acid or heptadecane from CO2 and the oxidation of Fe(2+). A sevenfold improvement in productivity of isobutyric acid was obtained through improved media formulations in batch cultures. Steady-state efficiencies were lower in continuous cultures, likely due to ferric inhibition. If coupled to solar panels, the photon-to-fuel efficiency of this proof-of-principle process approaches estimates for agriculture-derived biofuels. These efforts lay the foundation for the utilization of this organism in the exploitation of electrical energy for biochemical synthesis. PMID:26174759

  1. Engineering the iron-oxidizing chemolithoautotroph Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans for biochemical production.

    PubMed

    Kernan, Timothy; Majumdar, Sudipta; Li, Xiaozheng; Guan, Jingyang; West, Alan C; Banta, Scott

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in developing non-photosynthetic routes for the conversion of CO2 to fuels and chemicals. One underexplored approach is the transfer of energy to the metabolism of genetically modified chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is an obligate chemolithoautotroph that derives its metabolic energy from the oxidation of iron or sulfur at low pH. Two heterologous biosynthetic pathways have been expressed in A. ferrooxidans to produce either isobutyric acid or heptadecane from CO2 and the oxidation of Fe(2+). A sevenfold improvement in productivity of isobutyric acid was obtained through improved media formulations in batch cultures. Steady-state efficiencies were lower in continuous cultures, likely due to ferric inhibition. If coupled to solar panels, the photon-to-fuel efficiency of this proof-of-principle process approaches estimates for agriculture-derived biofuels. These efforts lay the foundation for the utilization of this organism in the exploitation of electrical energy for biochemical synthesis.

  2. Recycling of iron foundry sand and glass waste as raw material for production of whiteware.

    PubMed

    Bragança, Saulo R; Vicenzi, Juliane; Guerino, Kareline; Bergmann, Carlos P

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the production feasibility of triaxial whiteware using sand from cast iron moulds as a raw material instead of silica, and recycled glass in place of feldspar. Formulations were prepared using sand, glass waste, and white-firing clay such that only 50% of the composition was virgin material (clay). The ceramic bodies were formed by pressing and fired at different temperatures (between 1100 and 1300 degrees C). Specimens were characterized in terms of green density prior to firing; and their flexural strength, linear shrinkage, and water absorption were measured after firing. The microstructure was determined by scanning electron microscopy. Possible environmental impacts of this recycling process were also evaluated, through solubility and leaching tests, according to Brazilian standards. Gaseous emissions during the firing process were also analysed. The results showed that it is possible to produce triaxial ceramics by using such alternative raw materials.

  3. Radiation effects in moist-air systems and the influence of radiolytic product formation on nuclear waste glass corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Wang, L.M.

    1997-07-01

    Ionizing radiation may affect the performance of glass in an unsaturated repository site by interacting with air, water vapor, or liquid water to produce a variety of radiolytic products. Tests were conducted to examine the effects of radiolysis under high gas/liquid ratios. Results indicate that nitrate is the predominant radiolytic product produced following both gamma and alpha radiation exposure, with lesser amounts of nitrite and carboxylic acids. The formation of nitrogen acids during exposure to long-lived, alpha-particle-emitting transuranic elements indicates that these acids may play a role in influencing nuclear waste form reactions in a long-term unsaturated disposal scenario. Experiments were also conducted with samples that simulate the composition of Savannah River Plant nuclear waste glasses. Radiolytic product formation in batch tests (340 m{sup {minus}1}, 90 C) resulted in a small increase in the release rates of many glass components, such as alkali and alkaline earth elements, although silicon and uranium release rates were slightly reduced indicating an overall beneficial effect of radiation on waste form stability. The radiolytic acids increased the rate of ion exchange between the glass and the thin film of condensate, resulting in accelerated corrosion rates for the glass. The paragenetic sequence of alteration phases formed on both the irradiated and nonirradiated glass samples reacted in the vapor hydration tests matches closely with those developed during volcanic glass alteration in naturally occurring saline-alkaline lake systems. This correspondence suggests that the high temperatures used in these tests have not changed the underlying glass reaction mechanism relate to that which controls glass reactions under ambient surficial conditions.

  4. Corrosion Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles V.

    A description is provided for a Corrosion and Corrosion Control course offered in the Continuing Engineering Education Program at the General Motors Institute (GMI). GMI is a small cooperative engineering school of approximately 2,000 students who alternate between six-week periods of academic study and six weeks of related work experience in…

  5. Fireside Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon

    2011-07-14

    Oxy-fuel fireside research goals are: (1) determine the effect of oxyfuel combustion on fireside corrosion - flue gas recycle choice, staged combustion ramifications; and (2) develop methods to use chromia solubility in ash as an ash corrosivity measurement - synthetic ashes at first, then boiler and burner rig ashes.

  6. Corrosion inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Wisotsky, M.J.; Metro, S.J.

    1989-10-31

    A corrosion inhibitor for use in synthetic ester lubricating oils is disclosed. It comprises an effective amount of: at least one aromatic amide; and at least one hydroxy substituted aromatic compound. The corrosion inhibitor thus formed is particularly useful in synthetic ester turbo lubricating oils.

  7. Iron oxidation kinetics for H-2 and CO production via chemical looping

    SciTech Connect

    Stehle, RC; Bobek, MM; Hahn, DW

    2015-01-30

    Solar driven production of fuels by means of an intermediate reactive metal for species splitting has provided a practical and potentially efficient pathway for disassociating molecules at significantly lower thermal energies. The fuels of interest are of or derive from the separation of oxygen from H2O and CO2 to form hydrogen and carbon monoxide, respectively. The following study focuses on iron oxidation through water and CO2 splitting to explore the fundamental reaction kinetics and kinetic rates that are relevant to these processes. In order to properly characterize the reactive metal potential and to optimize a scaled-up solar reactor system, a monolith-based laboratory reactor was implemented to investigate reaction temperatures over a range from 990 to 1400 K. The presence of a single, solid monolith as a reacting surface allowed for a limitation in mass transport effects in order to monitor kinetically driven reaction steps. The formation of oxide layers on the iron monoliths followed Cabrera-Mott models for oxidation of metals with kinetic rates being measured using real-time mass spectrometry to calculate kinetic constants and estimate oxide layer thicknesses. Activation energies of 47.3 kJ/mol and 32.8 kJ/mol were found for water-splitting and CO2 splitting, respectively, and the conclusions of the independent oxidation reactions where applied to experimental results for syngas (H-2-CO) production to explore ideal process characteristics. Copyright (C) 2014, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chloro-benzoquinones cause oxidative DNA damage through iron-mediated ROS production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhilan; Zhou, Qiaohong; Zou, Dandan; Tian, Yun; Liu, Biyun; Zhang, Yongyuan; Wu, Zhenbin

    2015-09-01

    Chloro-benzoquinones (CBQs) are a group of disinfection byproducts that are suspected to be potentially carcinogenic. Here, the mechanism of DNA damage caused by CBQs in the presence of ferrous ions was investigated in an Escherichia coli wild type M5 strain and a mutant L5 (ahpCF katEG mutant) strain that carried an enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter under the control of a SOS response gene (recA) promoter. All tested CBQs (including para-benzoquinone, 2-chloro-para-benzoquinone, and dichloro-para-benzoquinones with different substitutes) caused substantial oxidative DNA damage with EC50 values in the micromolar range. Moreover, 2,5-dichloro-para-benzoquinone (2,5-DCBQ), a typical CBQ, caused substantial ROS production in E. coli mutant cells. And ROS scavengers provided partial protective effects on genotoxicity of 2,5-DCBQ to E. coli mutant cells. The addition of Fe(2+) to the 2,5-DCBQ exposure system caused an increase in DNA oxidative damage; iron-chelating agents could partially prevent these cells from DNA damage. Finally, intracellular AhpCF, catalase E, and catalase G were all found to play an important role in the survival of E. coli cells exposed to CBQs, as indicated by an increased sensitivity of the ahpCF katEG mutant L5 strain to treatment compared with wild type M5 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that CBQs cause oxidative DNA damage in E. coli cells through the participation of iron-mediated ROS production.

  9. Mars surface weathering products and spectral analogs: Palagonites and synthetic iron minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    There are several hypotheses regarding the formation of Martian surface fines. These surface fines are thought to be products of weathering processes occurring on Mars. Four major weathering environments of igneous rocks on Mars have been proposed; (1) impact induced hydrothermal alterations; (2) subpermafrost igneous intrusion; (3) solid-gas surface reactions; and (4) subaerial igneous intrusion over permafrost. Although one or more of these processes may be important on the Martian surface, one factor in common for all these processes is the reaction of solid or molten basalt with water (solid, liquid, or gas). These proposed processes, with the exception of solid-gas surface reactions, are transient processes. The most likely product of transient hydrothermal processes are layer silicates, zeolites, hydrous iron oxides and palagonites. The long-term instability of hydrous clay minerals under present Martian conditions has been predicted; however, the persistence of such minerals due to slow kinetics of dehydration, or entrapment in permafrost, where the activity of water is high, can not be excluded. Anhydrous oxides of iron (e.g., hematite and maghemite) are thought to be stable under present Martian surface conditions. Oxidative weathering of sulfide minerals associated with Martian basalts has been proposed. Weathering of sulfide minerals leads to a potentially acidic permafrost and the formation of Fe(3) oxides and sulfates. Weathering of basalts under acidic conditions may lead to the formation of kaolinite through metastable halloysite and metahalloysite. Kaolinite, if present, is thought to be a thermodynamically stable phase at the Martian surface. Fine materials on Mars are important in that they influence the surface spectral properties; these fines are globally distributed on Mars by the dust storms and this fraction will have the highest surface area which should act as a sink for most of the absorbed volatiles near the surface of Mars. Therefore

  10. Production and validation of model iron-tannate dyed textiles for use as historic textile substitutes in stabilisation treatment studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background For millennia, iron-tannate dyes have been used to colour ceremonial and domestic objects shades of black, grey, or brown. Surviving iron-tannate dyed objects are part of our cultural heritage but their existence is threatened by the dye itself which can accelerate oxidation and acid hydrolysis of the substrate. This causes many iron-tannate dyed textiles to discolour and decrease in tensile strength and flexibility at a faster rate than equivalent undyed textiles. The current lack of suitable stabilisation treatments means that many historic iron-tannate dyed objects are rapidly crumbling to dust with the knowledge and value they hold being lost forever. This paper describes the production, characterisation, and validation of model iron-tannate dyed textiles as substitutes for historic iron-tannate dyed textiles in the development of stabilisation treatments. Spectrophotometry, surface pH, tensile testing, SEM-EDX, and XRF have been used to characterise the model textiles. Results On application to textiles, the model dyes imparted mid to dark blue-grey colouration, an immediate tensile strength loss of the textiles and an increase in surface acidity. The dyes introduced significant quantities of iron into the textiles which was distributed in the exterior and interior of the cotton, abaca, and silk fibres but only in the exterior of the wool fibres. As seen with historic iron-tannate dyed objects, the dyed cotton, abaca, and silk textiles lost tensile strength faster and more significantly than undyed equivalents during accelerated thermal ageing and all of the dyed model textiles, most notably the cotton, discoloured more than the undyed equivalents on ageing. Conclusions The abaca, cotton, and silk model textiles are judged to be suitable for use as substitutes for cultural heritage materials in the testing of stabilisation treatments. PMID:22616934

  11. Fate of corrosion products released from stainless steel in marine sediments and seawater. Part 2. Sequim Bay clayey silt

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.L.

    1982-04-01

    This report describes laboratory experiments in which neutron-activated 347 stainless steel specimens were exposed to clayey silt from Sequim Bay, Washington. The properties and trace metal geochemistry of the sediment and the amounts of corrosion products that were released under oxic and reduced conditions and their distribution among different chemical fractions of the sediment are discussed. The distributions of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Cu among different chemical forms in the Sequim Bay sediment show that DTPA removed <10% of extractable Cr, Fe and Mn, approx. 20% of extractable Ni and approx. 30% of extractable Cu. The inorganic fraction (material soluble in 2.5% acetic acid) accounted for approx. 30% of total extractable Mn and approx. 10% or less of Cr, Fe, Ni and Cu. Major portions of Cr and Cu, and a large amount of Fe were in the organic fraction. Extractable Mn, Fe and Ni were associated with hydrous oxides likely as coatings on the mineral substrate of the sediment. No Co was detectable in any of the extracts. (PSB)

  12. Effect of amalgam corrosion products in non-discolored dentin on the bond strength of replaced composite resin

    PubMed Central

    Ghavamnasiri, Marjaneh; Eslami, Samaneh; Ameri, Hamide; Chasteen, Joseph E.; Majidinia, Sara; Moghadam, Fatemeh Velayaty

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of amalgam corrosion products in non-discolored dentin on the bond strength of replaced composite resin. Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty-one Class I cavities were prepared on extracted premolars and divided into seven groups. Group 1: Light-cured composite; Groups 2, 3, and 4: Amalgam stored in 37°C normal saline for respectively 1, 3, and 6 months and then replaced with composite leaving the cavity walls intact. Groups 5, 6, and 7: Identical to Groups 2, 3, and 4, except the cavity walls were extended 0.5 mm after amalgam removal. Eighteen specimens from each group were selected for shear bond strength testing, while on remaining five samples, elemental microanalysis was conducted. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney and Freidman (α = 0.05). Results: There was a significant difference between Groups 1 and 4 and also between Group 1 and Groups 5, 6, and 7. However, Groups 1, 2, and 3 showed no significant difference regarding bond strength. Bond strengths of Group 4 was significantly less than Groups 2 and 3. However, Groups 5, 6, and 7 showed similar bond strength. There was no difference among all groups in terms of metal elements at any storage times. PMID:25657522

  13. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, Robert S.; Clarke, Jr., Willis L.; Ciarlo, Dino R.

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  14. Corrosion sensor

    DOEpatents

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1994-04-26

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figures.

  15. Corrosion in a temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; White, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    High temperature corrosion limits the operation of equipment used in the Power Generation Industry. Some of the more destructive corrosive attack occurs on the surfaces of heat exchangers, boilers, and turbines where the alloys are subjected to large temperature gradients that cause a high heat flux through the accumulated ash, the corrosion product, and the alloy. Most current and past corrosion research has, however, been conducted under isothermal conditions. Research on the thermal-gradient-affected corrosion of various metals and alloys is currently being studied at the Albany Research Center’s SECERF (Severe Environment Corrosion and Erosion Research Facility) laboratory. The purpose of this research is to verify theoretical models of heat flux effects on corrosion and to quantify the differences between isothermal and thermal gradient corrosion effects. The effect of a temperature gradient and the resulting heat flux on corrosion of alloys with protective oxide scales is being examined by studying point defect diffusion and corrosion rates. Fick’s first law of diffusion was expanded, using irreversible thermodynamics, to include a heat flux term – a Soret effect. Oxide growth rates are being measured for the high temperature corrosion of cobalt at a metal surface temperature of 900ºC. Corrosion rates are also being determined for the high temperature corrosion of carbon steel boiler tubes in a simulated waste combustion environment consisting of O2, CO2, N2, and water vapor. Tests are being conducted both isothermally and in the presence of a temperature gradient to verify the effects of a heat flux and to compare to isothermal oxidation.

  16. Solution behavior of iron(III) and iron(II) porphyrins in DMSO and reaction with superoxide. Effect of neighboring positive charge on thermodynamics, kinetics and nature of iron-(su)peroxo product.

    PubMed

    Duerr, K; Troeppner, O; Olah, J; Li, J; Zahl, A; Drewello, T; Jux, N; Harvey, J N; Ivanović-Burmazović, I

    2012-01-14

    The solution behavior of iron(III) and iron(II) complexes of 5(4),10(4),15(4),20(4)-tetra-tert-butyl-5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin (H(2)tBuTPP) and the reaction with superoxide (KO(2)) in DMSO have been studied in detail. Applying temperature and pressure dependent NMR studies, the thermodynamics of the low-spin/high-spin equilibrium between bis- and mono-DMSO Fe(II) forms have been quantified (K(DMSO) = 0.082 ± 0.002 at 298.2 K, ΔH° = +36 ± 1 kJ mol(-1), ΔS° = +101 ± 4 J K(-1) mol(-1), ΔV° = +16 ± 2 cm(3) mol(-1)). This is a key activation step for substitution and inner-sphere electron transfer. The superoxide binding constant to the iron(II) form of the studied porphyrin complex was found to be (9 ± 0.5) × 10(3) M(-1), and does not change significantly in the presence of the externally added crown ether in DMSO (11 ± 4) × 10(3) M(-1). The rate constants for the superoxide binding (k(on) = (1.30 ± 0.01) × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)) and release (k(off) = 11.6 ± 0.7 s(-1)) are not affected by the presence of the external crown ether in solution. The resulting iron(II)-superoxide adduct has been characterized (mass spectrometry, EPR, high-pressure UV/Vis spectroscopy) and upon controlled addition of a proton source it regenerates the starting iron(II) complex. Based on DFT calculations, the reaction product without neighboring positive charge has iron(II)-superoxo character in both high-spin side-on and low-spin end-on forms. The results are compared to those obtained for the analogous complex with covalently attached crown ether, and more general conclusions regarding the spin-state equilibrium of iron(II) porphyrins, their reaction with superoxide and the electronic structure of the product species are drawn.

  17. Iron-Sulfide-Associated Products Formed during Reductive Dechlorination of Carbon Tetrachloride.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ying; Butler, Elizabeth C

    2016-06-01

    This paper investigated the mackinawite (FeS)-associated products formed during reaction between FeS and carbon tetrachloride (CT) at pH 7 and 8. At pH 8, reaction of FeS with CT led to formation of abundant spherical particles with diameters between 50 and 400 nm on the FeS surface and in solution; far fewer such particles were observed at pH 7. Analysis of the FeS surface by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy after reaction with CT at pH 8 showed decreased sulfur and elevated oxygen compared to unreacted FeS. The spherical particles that formed upon FeS reaction with CT were mostly amorphous with localized areas of poorly crystalline two-line ferrihydrite. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the predominant Fe surface species after reaction with CT at pH 8 was Fe(III)-O, consistent with ferrihydrite and other amorphous iron (hydr)oxides as major products. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis suggested formation of greigite upon reaction of FeS with CT at pH 7. Both ferrihydrite and Fe(2+), which is a product of greigite dissolution, can react with dissolved HS(-) to form FeS, suggesting that, after oxidation by chlorinated aliphatics, FeS can be regenerated by addition or microbial generation of sulfide.

  18. Effect of ferric iron on siderophore production and pyrene degradation by Pseudomonas fluorescens 29L.

    PubMed

    Husain, Saleha

    2008-10-01

    The effect of ferric iron [Fe(III)] on pyrene degradation and siderophore production was studied in Pseudomonas fluorescens 29L. In the presence of 0.5 microM of Fe(III) and 50 mg of pyrene per liter of medium as a carbon source, 2.2 mg of pyrene was degraded per liter of medium per day and 25.3 microM of 2,3-DHBA (2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid) equivalent of siderophores was produced per day. However, the pyrene degradation rate was 1.3 times higher and no siderophores were produced with the addition of 1 microM of Fe(III). Similar trends were seen with 50 mg of succinate per liter of medium as a carbon source, although the growth of strain 29L and the succinate degradation rate were higher. In the absence of siderophore production, pyrene and succinate continued to be biodegraded. This indicates that Fe(III) and not siderophore production affects the hydrocarbon degradation rate. Only 18% of strain 29L mutants capable of growth on pyrene produced siderophores, while among the mutants capable of growth on succinate, only 10% produced siderophores. This indicates that siderophores are not required for pyrene biodegradation. Fe(III) enhances pyrene degradation in Pseudomonas fluorescens 29L but it may be utilized by mechanisms other than siderophores. PMID:18626691

  19. Corrosion fatigue of iron-chromium-nickel alloys: Fracture mechanics, microstructure and chemistry. Progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, R.P.

    1993-01-25

    Phase transformation and cracking during RT aging of charged, high-purity Fe18Cr12Ni alloy and commerical 304 ss were examined; results show that {epsilon}* (hcp) hydride formed on Fe18Cr12Ni upon charging, and it decomposed rapidly to form first {epsilon} and then {alpha}` martensite. Morphology of fracture surfaces of Fe18Cr12Ni produced by corrosion fatigue in NaCl solutions and in hydrogen was found to be identical. Effort was made to examine the approaches and methodologies used in service life predictions and reliability analyses.

  20. The effect of soy products in the diet on retention of non-heme iron from radiolabeled test meals fed to marginally iron-deficient young rats

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Diets based either on casein or soy products and containing about 25 ppm iron were fed to weanling rats for 13 days. Rats were fasted overnight and fed a {sup 59}Fe-radiolabeled casein test meal the morning of day 14. On day 21 less {sup 59}Fe was retained by rats fed various diets based on selected soy products than by rats fed the casein-based diet. A similar adverse effect of diet components on {sup 59}Fe retention from a casein test meal was observed for lactalbumin and for psyllium husk. No adverse effect of diet on {sup 59}Fe retention was observed for the fiber of soy cotyledons or for rapeseed protein concentrate. For a commercial soy protein isolated (SPI) fed throughout the 21-day experiment, the adverse effect of diet on {sup 59}Fe retention was observed to the sum of the effect of dietary SPI previous to the {sup 59}Fe-radiolabeled casein test meal fed on day 14 and the effect of dietary SPI subsequent to the casein test meal. An effect of dietary soy products on {sup 59}Fe retention from a casein test meal was not observed with diets containing higher iron levels (83 ppm) or when diets were fed for a longer period prior to the test meal (56 days). The present work shows that in some circumstances the concept of iron bioavailability must be expanded to include not only the influence of meal composition, but also the influence of diet previous to and subsequent to a meal.