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Sample records for iron deficiency anemia

  1. Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2017-03-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common causes of anemia. The 2 main etiologies of iron deficiency are blood loss due to menstrual periods and blood loss due to gastrointestinal bleeding. Beyond anemia, lack of iron has protean manifestations, including fatigue, hair loss, and restless legs. The most efficient test for the diagnosis of iron deficiency is the serum ferritin. Iron replacement can be done orally, or in patients in whom oral iron is not effective or contraindicated, with intravenous iron. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  3. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated? Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia will ... cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , ...

  5. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Breymann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in obstetrics and perinatal care. Any hemoglobin below 10.5 g/dL can be regarded as true anemia regardless of gestational age. Reasons for anemia in pregnancy are mainly nutritional deficiencies, parasitic and bacterial diseases, and inborn red blood cell disorders such as thalassemias. The main cause of anemia in obstetrics is iron deficiency, which has a worldwide prevalence between estimated 20%-80% and consists of a primarily female population. Stages of iron deficiency are depletion of iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis without anemia, and iron deficiency anemia, the most pronounced form of iron deficiency. Pregnancy anemia can be aggravated by various conditions such as uterine or placental bleedings, gastrointestinal bleedings, and peripartum blood loss. In addition to the general consequences of anemia, there are specific risks during pregnancy for the mother and the fetus such as intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity, feto-placental miss ratio, and higher risk for peripartum blood transfusion. Besides the importance of prophylaxis of iron deficiency, the main therapy options for the treatment of pregnancy anemia are oral iron and intravenous iron preparations.

  6. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency.

  7. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA).

    PubMed

    Heeney, Matthew M; Finberg, Karin E

    2014-08-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a common global problem whose etiology is typically attributed to acquired inadequate dietary intake and/or chronic blood loss. However, in several kindreds multiple family members are affected with iron deficiency anemia that is unresponsive to oral iron supplementation and only partially responsive to parenteral iron therapy. The discovery that many of these cases harbor mutations in the TMPRSS6 gene led to the recognition that they represent a single clinical entity: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA). This article reviews clinical features of IRIDA, recent genetic studies, and insights this disorder provides into the regulation of systemic iron homeostasis.

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Iron-Deficiency Anemia Print ... anemia, a common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body ...

  9. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  10. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the “atypical” microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  11. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-05

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field.

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  13. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gunawardena, Shanti; Dunlap, Mark E

    2012-12-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in heart failure (HF), and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. However, it remains unclear whether anemia is merely a marker of poor prognosis or whether anemia itself confers risk. The pathogenesis of anemia in HF is multifactorial. Iron deficiency also confers risk in HF, either with or without associated anemia, and treatment of iron deficiency improves the functional status of patients with HF. An ongoing large clinical trial studying the use of darbepoetin-alfa in patients with anemia and systolic HF is expected to provide information that should improve our understanding of anemia in HF.

  14. Iron deficiency anemia in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Arora, Natasha P; Ghali, Jalal K

    2013-07-01

    Anemia and iron deficiency are quite prevalent in patients with heart failure (HF) and may overlap. Both anemia and iron deficiency are associated with worse symptoms and adverse clinical outcomes. In the past few years, there has been an enormous interest in the subject of iron deficiency and its management in patients with HF. In this review, the etiology and relevance of iron deficiency, iron metabolism in the setting of HF, studies on iron supplementation in patients with HF and potential cardiovascular effects of subclinical iron overload are discussed.

  15. [Iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disorders].

    PubMed

    Metzgeroth, G; Hastka, J

    2015-09-01

    Hypochromic-microcytic anemias are characterized by a hemoglobin deficiency of the erythrocytes. The main reason for the insufficient hemoglobin synthesis is, with exception of thalassemia and a few other rare conditions, primarily a disorder of iron metabolism. Differential diagnostic considerations are focused on iron deficiency anemia, with approximately 80% the most common form of anemia worldwide. Iron deficiency anemia shows a particularly high prevalence in developing countries, but is also in industrialized Western countries the most common cause of anemia. Infants, toddlers, premenopausal or pregnant women, and elderly people are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency anemia. The most important differential diagnosis for iron deficiency anemia is the anemia of chronic disorders (ACD). This anemia is caused by a disturbance of iron utilization (functional iron deficiency), in which iron absorption and iron release, as a nonspecific defense mechanism, is blocked to restrict iron availability for the inflammatory process but also withhold iron from the erythropoiesis. ACD is not rare, but plays a significant role in hospitalized patients and in the elderly. The differentiation between ACD and iron deficiency anemia is highly important from a clinical point of view, due to different types of further management. The cause for iron deficiency should be clarified in each case, whereas the etiology for ACD is often obvious. The standard treatment of iron deficiency anemia is oral iron supplementation. Intravenous iron application is reserved for problem patients. The best treatment for ACD is the elimination of the underlying chronic disorder. In case of persistent ACD, red blood cell transfusions, erythropoietin, and intravenous iron are used therapeutically.

  16. [Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems].

    PubMed

    Dahlerup, Jens; Lindgren, Stefan; Moum, Björn

    2015-03-10

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems leading to deterioration in patients' quality of life and more serious prognosis in patients with chronic diseases. The cause of iron deficiency and anemia is usually a combination of increased loss and decreased intestinal absorption and delivery from iron stores due to inflammation. Oral iron is first line treatment, but often hampered by intolerance. Intravenous iron is safe, and the preferred treatment in patients with chronic inflammation and bowel diseases. The goal of treatment is normalisation of hemoglobin concentration and recovery of iron stores. It is important to follow up treatment to ensure that these objectives are met and also long-term in patients with chronic iron loss and/or inflammation to avoid recurrence of anemia.

  17. Duodenal Amyloidosis Masquerading as Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    The present study is a unique illustration of duodenal amyloidosis initially manifesting with iron deficiency anemia. It underscores the importance of clinical suspicion of amyloidosis while performing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with a biopsy to establish the definite diagnosis in patients with unexplained iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27625911

  18. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in women.

    PubMed

    Coad, Jane; Pedley, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional problems in the world and disproportionately affects women and children. Stages of iron deficiency can be characterized as mild deficiency where iron stores become depleted, marginal deficiency where the production of many iron-dependent proteins is compromised but hemoglobin levels are normal and iron deficiency anemia where synthesis of hemoglobin is decreased and oxygen transport to the tissues is reduced. Iron deficiency anemia is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin levels but this approach lacks both specificity and sensitivity. Failure to identify and treat earlier stages of iron deficiency is concerning given the neurocognitive implications of iron deficiency without anemia. Most of the daily iron requirement is derived from recycling of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages; only 5-10 % comes from the diet. Iron absorption is affected by inhibitors and enhancers of iron absorption and by the physiological state. Inflammatory conditions, including obesity, can result in iron being retained in the enterocytes and macrophages causing hypoferremia as a strategic defense mechanism to restrict iron availability to pathogens. Premenopausal women usually have low iron status because of iron loss in menstrual blood. Conditions which further increase iron loss, compromise absorption or increase demand, such as frequent blood donation, gastrointestinal lesions, athletic activity and pregnancy, can exceed the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to upregulate iron absorption. Women of reproductive age are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency and its consequences however there is a controversial argument that evolutionary pressures have resulted in an iron deficient phenotype which protects against infection.

  19. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gil, Victor M; Ferreira, Jorge S

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a common problem and a major cause of mortality, morbidity and impaired quality of life. Anemia is a frequent comorbidity in heart failure and further worsens prognosis and disability. Regardless of anemia status, iron deficiency is a common and usually unidentified problem in patients with heart failure. This article reviews the mechanisms, impact on outcomes and treatment of anemia and iron deficiency in patients with heart failure.

  20. Iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Altay, Hakan; Çetiner, Mustafa; Güvenç, Tolga Sinan; Temizhan, Ahmet; Ural, Dilek; Yeşilbursa, Dilek; Yıldırım, Nesligül; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure is an important community health problem. Prevalence and incidence of heart failure have continued to rise over the years. Despite recent advances in heart failure therapy, prognosis is still poor, rehospitalization rate is very high, and quality of life is worse. Co-morbidities in heart failure have negative impact on clinical course of the disease, further impair prognosis, and add difficulties to treatment of clinical picture. Therefore, successful management of co-morbidities is strongly recommended in addition to conventional therapy for heart failure. One of the most common co-morbidities in heart failure is presence of iron deficiency and anemia. Current evidence suggests that iron deficiency and anemia are more prevalent in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, as well as those with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction. Moreover, iron deficiency and anemia are referred to as independent predictors for poor prognosis in heart failure. There is strong relationship between iron deficiency or anemia and severity of clinical status of heart failure. Over the last two decades, many clinical investigations have been conducted on clinical effectiveness of treatment of iron deficiency or anemia with oral iron, intravenous iron, and erythropoietin therapies. Studies with oral iron and erythropoietin therapies did not provide any clinical benefit and, in fact, these therapies have been shown to be associated with increase in adverse clinical outcomes. However, clinical trials in patients with iron deficiency in the presence or absence of anemia have demonstrated considerable clinical benefits of intravenous iron therapy, and based on these positive outcomes, iron deficiency has become target of therapy in management of heart failure. The present report assesses current approaches to iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure in light of recent evidence.

  1. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-08-21

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet.

  2. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet. PMID:26309349

  3. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Arora, Natasha P; Ghali, Jalal K

    2014-04-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in patients with heart failure (HF) and is associated with poor prognosis. Iron deficiency, with or without anemia, confers increased risk of mortality and morbidity. Along with the altered iron metabolism in HF patients, inflammation creates challenges in the interpretation of laboratory parameters used to diagnose anemia in HF. Since the RED-HF trial failed to demonstrate any benefit from the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) on mortality or morbidity in HF patients, ESAs are no longer considered a treatment option, although intravenous iron has potential as therapy for anemic and nonanemic HF patients.

  4. Iron deficiency anemia and megaloblastic anemia in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Mahmoud; Jaberian, Sara; Pazouki, Abdolreza; Riazi, Sajedeh; Rangraz, Maryam Aghababa; Mokhber, Somayyeh

    2017-03-01

    The association between obesity and different types of anemia remained uncertain. The present study aimed to assess the relation between obesity parameters and the occurrence of iron deficiency anemia and also megaloblastic anemia among Iranian population. This cross-sectional study was performed on 1252 patients with morbid obesity that randomly selected from all patients referred to Clinic of obesity at Rasoul-e-Akram Hospital in 2014. The morbid obesity was defined according to the guideline as body mass index (BMI) equal to or higher than 40 kg/m2. Various laboratory parameters including serum levels of hemoglobin, iron, ferritin, folic acid, and vitamin B12 were assessed using the standard laboratory techniques. BMI was adversely associated with serum vitamin B12, but not associated with other hematologic parameters. The overall prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was 9.8%. The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was independent to patients' age and also to body mass index. The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency was totally 20.9%. According to the multivariable logistic regression model, no association was revealed between BMI and the occurrence of iron deficiency anemia adjusting gender and age. A similar regression model showed that higher BMI could predict occurrence of vitamin B12 deficiency in morbid obese patients. Although iron deficiency is a common finding among obese patients, vitamin B12 deficiency is more frequent so about one-fifth of these patients suffer vitamin B12 deficiency. In fact, the exacerbation of obesity can result in exacerbation of vitamin B12 deficiency.

  5. New insights into iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Camaschella, Clara

    2017-02-13

    Recent advances in iron metabolism have stimulated new interest in iron deficiency (ID) and its anemia (IDA), common conditions worldwide. Absolute ID/IDA, i.e. the decrease of total body iron, is easily diagnosed based on decreased levels of serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Relative lack of iron in specific organs/tissues, and IDA in the context of inflammatory disorders, are diagnosed based on arbitrary cut offs of ferritin and transferrin saturation and/or marker combination (as the soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin index) in an appropriate clinical context. Most ID patients are candidate to traditional treatment with oral iron salts, while high hepcidin levels block their absorption in inflammatory disorders. New iron preparations and new treatment modalities are available: high-dose intravenous iron compounds are becoming popular and indications to their use are increasing, although long-term side effects remain to be evaluated.

  6. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  7. The Evidence-Based Evaluation of Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Eliana V; Bollard, Edward R

    2016-09-01

    Anemia is a prevalent disease with multiple possible etiologies and resultant complications. Iron deficiency anemia is a common cause of anemia and is typically due to insufficient intake, poor absorption, or overt or occult blood loss. Distinguishing iron deficiency from other causes of anemia is integral to initiating the appropriate treatment. In addition, identifying the underlying cause of iron deficiency is also necessary to help guide management of these patients. We review the key components to an evidence-based, cost-conscious evaluation of suspected iron deficiency anemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Iron deficiency anemia in infants and toddlers

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Eun Young; Kim, Keun Young; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Ji-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background In Korea, the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among older infants and young children remains high. To detect IDA early and to reduce its adverse impact, we assessed the characteristics of infants and young children who had IDA or were at risk of developing IDA, or who exhibited characteristics associated with severe anemia. Methods Among the 1,782 IDA-affected children aged 6 months to 18 years who visited the hospital, we retrospectively analyzed the medical records and laboratory data of 1,330 IDA-affected children aged 6–23 months who were diagnosed between 1996 and 2013. We excluded patients with a C-reactive protein level ≥5 mg/dL. Results IDA was predominant in boys (2.14:1) during infancy and early childhood. The peak IDA incidence was noted among infants aged 9–12 months. Only 7% patients exhibited symptoms of IDA, while 23.6% patients with severe IDA demonstrated classic symptoms/signs of IDA. Low birth weight (LBW) infants with IDA demonstrated low adherence to iron supplementation. In a multivariate analysis, prolonged breastfeeding without iron fortification (odds ratio [OR] 5.70), and a LBW (OR 6.49) were identified as risk factors of severe anemia. Conclusion LBW infants need more attention in order to increase their adherence to iron supplementation. For the early detection of IDA, nutritional status of all infants, and iron batteries of high-risk infants (LBW infants, infants with prolonged breastfeeding, picky eaters, and/or infants with the presence of IDA symptoms) should be evaluated at their health screening visits. PMID:28090490

  9. So you know how to treat iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Schrier, Stanley L

    2015-10-22

    In this issue of Blood, Moretti et al provide data that challenge the entrenched oral treatment of iron deficiency anemia. The paper shows how the newer understanding of hepcidin and iron metabolism in general can lead to very practical improvements in the management of iron deficiency anemia, a disorder that may affect as many as 1 billion people.

  10. Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in children with iron deficiency anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Koc, Ahmet; Cengiz, Murad; Ozdemir, Zeynep Canan; Celik, Hakim

    2012-05-01

    Paraoxonase-1 is an esterase enzyme and it has 3 types of activity, namely paraoxonase, arylesterase, and diazoxonase. It has been reported that paraoxonase-1 deficiency is related to increased susceptibility to development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in children with iron deficiency anemia and vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia. Thirty children with iron deficiency anemia, 30 children with vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia, and 40 healthy children aged 6 months to 6 years were enrolled in this study. Serum paraoxonase and arylesterase activities were measured with a spectrophotometer by using commercially available kits. Mean paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia group (103 ± 73 and 102 ± 41 U/L, respectively) were significantly lower than mean activities of control group (188 ± 100 and 147 ± 34 U/L, respectively; P < .001 for both) and iron deficiency anemia group (165 ± 103 and 138 ± 39 U/L, respectively; P < .05, P < .001), whereas there were no significant differences between iron deficiency anemia and control groups (P > .05). Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities significantly increased after treatment with vitamin B(12) in vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia; however, there were no significant changes in the activities of these enzymes after iron treatment in iron deficiency anemia group. Important correlations were found between vitamin B(12) levels and both paraoxonase and arylesterase activities (r = .367, P < .001; r = .445, P < .001). Our results suggest that vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia causes important reductions in paraoxonase and arylesterase activities, and after vitamin B(12) therapy the activities of these enzymes returned to near-normal levels.

  11. Psychomotor development in children with iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Pala, Emin; Erguven, Muferet; Guven, Sirin; Erdogan, Makbule; Balta, Tulin

    2010-09-01

    Iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia are the most common nutritional deficiencies in children, especially in developing countries. Iron-deficiency anemia in infancy is associated with impaired neurodevelopment. Studies have shown an association between iron deficiency without anemia and adverse effects on psychomotor development. To determine the effects of iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia on psychomotor development in childhood. . We evaluated psychomotor development in healthy children with iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia with the use of the Denver II Developmental Screening Test (DDST-II). If the child score was more than 90th percentile compared to children in the same age group, the test was scored as "delay" it was scored as a "caution" if the child score was between the 75th and 90th percentiles. The test result was interpreted as "normal," if there was no delay and only one "caution" for any item. If the child had one or more "delays" or more than two "cautions," the result was classified as "abnormal." DDST-II scores were abnormal in 67.3% of subjects with iron-deficiency anemia, 21.6% of those with iron deficiency, and 15.0% of control subjects. The difference from the control group in the percentage of abnormal scores was significant for subjects with iron-deficiency anemia (p < .01) but not for those with iron deficiency (p = 0.203); p > .05. (p-value, post-hoc comparison of 2 groups.) Iron-deficiency anemia impaired psychomotor development during childhood. However, the evidence on the adverse effects of iron deficiency remains controversial. The Denver II Developmental Screening Test is a valuable test to detect early developmental delays, especially in infants with risk factors.

  12. Intravenous Iron Sucrose for Children With Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Kaneva, Kristiyana; Chow, Erika; Rosenfield, Cathy G; Kelly, Michael J

    2017-07-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common nutritional deficiency in children. Most children with IDA are treated with oral iron preparations. However, intravenous (IV) iron is an alternative for children with severe IDA who have difficulty in adhering to or absorbing oral iron. We sought to describe the safety and effectiveness of IV iron sucrose for treatment of IDA in children. Pharmacy records of children who received IV iron sucrose at a children's hospital between 2004 and 2014 were reviewed. Laboratory markers of anemia and iron studies were obtained and preinfusion and postinfusion values were compared. Records were also reviewed for adverse reactions. A total of 142 patients received IV iron sucrose over 10 years. The mean age was 11 years, 9 months. One patient of 142 developed cough and wheezing during the infusion. No other adverse events were found. IV iron sucrose resulted in a statistically significant and clinically meaningful increase in hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, serum iron, ferritin, and % iron saturation, with a corresponding decrease in total iron binding capacity. The use of IV iron sucrose in pediatric patients with IDA is safe and leads to a moderate increase in hemoglobin and substantial improvement in iron studies.

  13. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia with Ferro-Folgamma.

    PubMed

    Ghinea, Mihaela Maria

    2004-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a hypochromic anemia in which hemoglobin poor synthesis is due to a decrease in the amount of iron in the body. The decrease of iron quantity has many causes: insufficient intake of aliments rich in iron (meat, viscera, green vegetables), increased necessities during growth period, pregnancy, erythrocytes hyperregeneration, high-performance sportsmen, increased loss by digestive way, genito-urinary way, respiratory, hemorrhagic syndromes. Clinically, symptoms and signs specific to all types of anemia and those specific to lack of iron occur besides the symptoms and signs of the underlying disease: atrophic glositis, angular stomatitis, sideropenic dysphagia, pica, skin and nails changes. Laboratory investigations useful for diagnosis are: microcytic, hypochromic anemia, decreased serum iron level, total capacity of iron binding increased, medullar iron store absent, good response to iron therapy. Ferro-Folgamma is one of the most indicated medicines in iron deficiency anemia. Due to its components this medicine has many indications: insufficient alimentary intake concerning iron, folic acid, B12 vitamin, vegetarian alimentation, increased needs during growth period, iron deficiency anaemia secondary to chronic hemorrhages, malnutrition, anemias associated with chronic alcohol intake, preventive treatment of iron deficiency anemia and megaloblastic anemia during pregnancy and lactation.

  14. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Priya M.; Perrine, Cria G.; Mei, Zuguo; Scanlon, Kelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among children 1–5 years using data from the 2007–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA among children 1–5 years was 7.1% (5.5, 8.7), 3.2% (2.0, 4.3), and 1.1% (0.6, 1.7), respectively. The prevalence of both ID and anemia were higher among children 1–2 years (p < 0.05). In addition, 50% of anemic children 1–2 years were iron deficient. This analysis provides an update on the prevalence of ID, anemia, and IDA for a representative sample of US children. Our results suggest little change in these indicators over the past decade. Monitoring of ID and anemia is critical and prevention of ID in early childhood should remain a public health priority. PMID:27249004

  15. [Iron deficiency anemia. Guideline for diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    2009-08-01

    Iron deficiency is the most important cause of anemia. Preschooler children are particularly vulnerable; a recent analysis reported a prevalence rate higher than 35% among children below 2 year of age. Its early detection, right treatment, and suitable prophylaxis is currently a priority in our country. This guideline establishes the definition of anemia in relation to chronological age, gestational age, and habitat, reviews principal aspects of iron metabolism, enumerates main causes of iron deficiency, and set guidelines for diagnosis, detection, differential diagnosis, treatment and prevention of iron deficiency anemia.

  16. Does iron deficiency anemia affect olfactory function?

    PubMed

    Dinc, Mehmet Emre; Dalgic, Abdullah; Ulusoy, Seckin; Dizdar, Denizhan; Develioglu, Omer; Topak, Murat

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion This study found a negative effect of IDA on olfactory function. IDA leads to a reduction in olfactory function, and decreases in hemoglobin levels result in further reduction in olfactory function. Objective This study examined the effects of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) on olfactory function. Method The study enrolled 50 IDA patients and 50 healthy subjects. Olfactory function was evaluated using the Sniffin' Sticks olfactory test. The diagnosis of IDA was made according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Results Patients with IDA had a significantly lower threshold, discrimination, and identification (TDI) value, and a lower threshold compared with the control group. However, there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of smell selectivity values.

  17. Behavior of Infants with Iron-Deficiency Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozoff, Betsy; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Compared behavior of 52 Costa Rican 12- to 23-month-olds with iron-deficiency anemia to that of 139 infants with better iron status. Found that iron-deficient infants maintained closer contact with caregivers; showed less pleasure and playfulness; were more wary, hesitant, and easily tired; made fewer attempts at test items; and attended less to…

  18. Behavior of Infants with Iron-Deficiency Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozoff, Betsy; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Compared behavior of 52 Costa Rican 12- to 23-month-olds with iron-deficiency anemia to that of 139 infants with better iron status. Found that iron-deficient infants maintained closer contact with caregivers; showed less pleasure and playfulness; were more wary, hesitant, and easily tired; made fewer attempts at test items; and attended less to…

  19. Targeting Iron Deficiency Anemia in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Saraon, Tajinderpal; Katz, Stuart D

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency is common in heart failure (HF) patients, and is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical outcomes. Clinical trials of intravenous iron supplementation in iron-deficient HF patients have demonstrated short-term improvement in functional capacity and quality of life. In some trials, the benefits of iron supplementation were independent of the hemoglobin levels. Additional investigations of iron supplementation are needed to characterize the mechanisms contributing to clinical benefit and long-term safety in HF.

  20. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia should be administered with a target to restore/replenish the iron stores and the hemoglobin level in a suitable way. However, in patients with IBD flares and inadequate responses to or side effects with oral preparations, intravenous iron supplementation is the therapy of choice. Neither oral nor intravenous therapy seems to exacerbate the clinical course of IBD, and intravenous iron therapy can be administered even in active disease stages and concomitantly with biologics. In conclusion, because many physicians are in doubt as to how to manage anemia and iron deficiency in IBD, there is a clear need for the implementation of evidence-based recommendations on this matter. Based on the data presented, oral iron therapy should be preferred for patients with quiescent disease stages and trivial iron deficiency anemia unless such patients are intolerant or have an inadequate response, whereas intravenous iron supplementation may be of advantage in patients with aggravated anemia or flares of IBD because inflammation hampers intestinal absorption of iron. PMID:26061331

  1. Response to parenteral iron therapy distinguish unexplained refractory iron deficiency anemia from iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Akin, M; Sarbay, H; Guler, S; Balci, Y I; Polat, A

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated that response to parenteral iron therapy could be helpful in distinguishing the types of iron deficiency anemia. This study analyzed responses to IV iron sucrose therapy of 15 children with unexplained refractory iron deficiency anemia (URIDA). We compared the results at diagnosis, 6 weeks and 6 months after the therapy. Results were compared with responses of 11 patients' results with iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) from our previous study. Six weeks after the start of treatment, ferritin, MCV, MCH and Hb values were in normal range in 10 patients. The increase in Hb, MCH, MCV, and ferritin values ranged 2.6-3.5 g/dL, 1.7-4.2 pg, 2-9 fL, and 13-25 ng/mL, respectively. In five patients, Hb, MCH, and MCV mean (range) values [11.2 g/dL (11-12.2), 24.5 pg (24-25.6), and 67 fL (65-70)] were nearly normal but ferritin mean (range) values [9.8 ng/mL (8-11)] were below normal. Six weeks after the start of treatment, Hb, MCH, MCV and ferritin values of patients with IRIDA were increased. The increase in Hb, MCH, MCV, and ferritin values ranged 0.8-2.7 g/dL, 1.7-4.2 pg, 2-9 fL, and 13-25 ng/mL, respectively. IRIDA is only partially responsive to parenteral iron supplementation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the response to intravenous iron therapy for the URIDA cases improved blood parameters more effectively than hereditary IRIDA. Response to parenteral iron therapy would be helpful to distinguish unexplained refractory IDA from hereditary IRIDA for clinicians who do not have access to hepcidin or TMPRS6 mutation analysis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Iron deficiency anemia from diagnosis to treatment in children

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Nihal

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and an important public health problem especially in developing countries. Since the most important indicator of iron deficieny is anemia, the terms “iron deficiency” and “iron deficiency anemia” are often used interchangeably. However, iron deficiency may develop in the absence of anemia and the tissues may be affected from this condition. The most common causes of iron deficiency in children include insufficient intake together with rapid growth, low birth weight and gastrointestinal losses related to excessive intake of cow’s milk. If insufficient intake can be excluded and there is insufficient response to oral iron treatment in patients with iron deficiency especially in older children, blood loss should be considered as the underlying cause. The main principles in management of iron deficiency anemia include investigation and elimination of the cause leading to iron deficiency, replacement of deficiency, improvement of nutrition and education of the patient and family. In this article, the practical approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency and the experience of our center have been reviewed. PMID:26078692

  3. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15mg/kg; maximum of 1000mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia.

  4. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15 mg/kg; maximum of 1000 mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  5. [Iron deficiency and pernicious anemia: a rare association?].

    PubMed

    Zulfiqar, Abrar-Ahmad; Dramé, Moustapha; Pennaforte, Jean-Loup; Novella, Jean-Luc; Vogel, Thomas; Andres, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency among patients with pernicious anemia. We realized a retrospective study from 2000 to 2010 including 55 patients suffering from pernicious anemia who were followed in Reims and Strasbourg university hospitals. Inclusion criteria were histological diagnosis of immune atrophic fundic gastritis and criteria of gastric autoimmuninty, and for which ferritin was measured. Iron deficiency is defined as serum ferritin level <20 μg/L in women and <30 μg/L in men. 45 (81.8%) patients were female. The mean age was 61 ± 17 years (range: 25/98).There was anemia in 32 patients (58.2%). Macrocytosis was noted, with or without anemia, in 30 patients (54.5%); microcytosis, with or without anemia, was noted in 8 (14.5%) patients. 17 patients (30.9%) had normal mean corpuscular volume. Vitamin B12 deficiency was objectived in 42 patients (76.4%) in our series. 16 patients (29%) had iron deficiency. 14 patients were female. They were significantly younger than female subjects without iron deficiency (p =0.004). In conclusion, iron deficiency is not rare in patients with pernicious anemia. It could be a complication of achlorhydria. We suggest a dosage of serum ferritin for all patients with pernicious anemia.

  6. Iron deficiency or anemia of inflammation? : Differential diagnosis and mechanisms of anemia of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nairz, Manfred; Theurl, Igor; Wolf, Dominik; Weiss, Günter

    2016-10-01

    Iron deficiency and immune activation are the two most frequent causes of anemia, both of which are based on disturbances of iron homeostasis. Iron deficiency anemia results from a reduction of the body's iron content due to blood loss, inadequate dietary iron intake, its malabsorption, or increased iron demand. Immune activation drives a diversion of iron fluxes from the erythropoietic bone marrow, where hemoglobinization takes place, to storage sites, particularly the mononuclear phagocytes system in liver and spleen. This results in iron-limited erythropoiesis and anemia. This review summarizes current diagnostic and pathophysiological concepts of iron deficiency anemia and anemia of inflammation, as well as combined conditions, and provides a brief outlook on novel therapeutic options.

  7. Factors associated with iron deficiency anemia in Brazilian preschool children.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Carlos A N de; Ricco, Rubens G; Ciampo, Luiz A del; Souza, Ana M; Pinho, Adriana P; Oliveira, José E Dutra de

    2004-01-01

    To examine the determining factors of anemia and iron deficiency in children attending two day care centers in the town of Pontal, southeast of Brazil. Cross-sectional study was conducted in 192 children aged 12 to 72 months. Personal data (age, sex, use of medicinal iron supplements, duration of breast-feeding, type of delivery, prenatal care, weight, and height), and socioeconomic data (number of co-inhabitants, parental schooling, and per capita family income) were obtained and evaluated together with hemoglobin, serum transferrin receptor, ferritin, and iron deficiency anemia. Age was the variable that most affected iron nutritional status, with higher hemoglobin values, lower transferrin receptor concentrations, higher ferritin values and lower iron deficiency anemia being detected with increasing age. The other studied variables did not show any correlation with iron nutritional status. The obtained data suggest that control strategies for this preschool population should be especially directed at younger children.

  8. Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Common and Curable Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jeffery L.

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia arises when the balance of iron intake, iron stores, and the body's loss of iron are insufficient to fully support production of erythrocytes. Iron deficiency anemia rarely causes death, but the impact on human health is significant. In the developed world, this disease is easily identified and treated, but frequently overlooked by physicians. In contrast, it is a health problem that affects major portions of the population in underdeveloped countries. Overall, the prevention and successful treatment for iron deficiency anemia remains woefully insufficient worldwide, especially among underprivileged women and children. Here, clinical and laboratory features of the disease are discussed, and then focus is placed on relevant economic, environmental, infectious, and genetic factors that converge among global populations. PMID:23613366

  9. Individualized treatment for iron deficiency anemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Alleyne, Michael; Horne, McDonald K.; Miller, Jeffery L.

    2008-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common disorders affecting mankind, and iron deficiency anemia continues to represent a major public health problem worldwide. It is especially common among women of childbearing age due to pregnancy and menstrual blood loss. Additional patient groups include those with other sources of blood loss, malnutrition or gut malabsorption. Iron deficiency anemia remains quite prevalent despite the widespread ability to diagnose the disease and availability of medicinal iron preparations. Therefore, new approaches are needed to effectively manage these patient populations. In this review, the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia are discussed with emphasis placed upon consideration of patient specific features. It is proposed that all patients participate in their own care by helping their physician to identify a tolerable daily iron dose, formulation, and schedule. Dosing cycles are recommended for iron replacement based upon the tolerated daily dose and the total iron deficit. Each cycle consists of 5000mg of oral elemental iron ingested over at least one month with appropriate follow-up. This approach should assist physicians and their patients with the implementation of individualized treatment strategies for patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:18954837

  10. Deficiencies in the Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia During Childhood.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Daniel, Catherine L; McCavit, Timothy L; Buchanan, George R

    2016-04-01

    Limited high-quality evidence supports the management of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). To assess our institutional performance in this area, we retrospectively reviewed IDA treatment practices in 195 consecutive children referred to our center from 2006 to mid-2010. The majority of children were ≤4 years old (64%) and had nutritional IDA (74%). In 11- to 18-year-old patients (31%), the primary etiology was menorrhagia (42%). Many were referred directly to the emergency department and/or prescribed iron doses outside the recommended range. Poor medication adherence and being lost-to-follow-up were common. Substantial improvements are required in the management of IDA. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. [Prevention of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in tropical areas].

    PubMed

    Dillon, J C

    2000-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most widespread nutritional disease in the World. It is prevalent in tropical areas especially in pregnant women and children. The main cause in these areas is consumption of foods containing inhibitors of iron absorption resulting in insufficient bioavailability. In advanced stages of iron deficiency, low hemoglobin levels lead to anemia. Functional consequences of anemia depend on age including mental and physical retardation in children and work disability in adults. Although other disorders including parasitic, infectious, genetic, and nutritional diseases may be involved in anemia in tropical areas, iron deficiency is always a factor because of nutritional conditions. The WHO has proposed laboratory criteria for use in establishing the incidence of iron deficiency and related anemia in a given population. Based on several surveys, four preventive strategies have been developed, i.e., dietary diversification, iron supplementation, general public health measures, and food fortification. Each of these strategies has advantages and disadvantages. The prevailing consensus is that coordinated use of these approaches holds forth the only hope of impacting the incidence of iron-deficiency anemia in tropical regions.

  12. Sleep alterations and iron deficiency anemia in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Peirano, Patricio D.; Algarín, Cecilia R.; Chamorro, Rodrigo A.; Reyes, Sussanne C.; Durán, Samuel A.; Garrido, Marcelo I.; Lozoff, Betsy

    2013-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be the most common single nutrient deficiency in the world. An estimated 20-25% of the world’s infants have IDA, with at least as many having iron deficiency without anemia. Infants are at particular risk due to rapid growth and limited dietary sources of iron. We found that infants with IDA showed different motor activity patterning in all sleep-waking states and several differences in sleep states organization. Sleep alterations were still apparent years after correction of anemia with iron treatment in the absence of subsequent IDA. We suggest that altered sleep patterns may represent an underlying mechanism that interferes with optimal brain functioning during sleep and wakefulness in former IDA children. PMID:20620103

  13. Iron Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia: Presentation With Hyperferritinemia and Response to Oral Iron Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khuong-Quang, Dong-Anh; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Westerman, Mark; Lepage, Pierre; Finberg, Karin E.; Majewski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in TMPRSS6. Patients have hypochromic microcytic anemia refractory to oral iron and are only partially responsive to parenteral iron administration. We report a French-Canadian kindred in which 2 siblings presented in early childhood with severe microcytic anemia, hypoferremia, and hyperferritinemia. Both children have been successfully treated solely with low-dose oral iron since diagnosis. Clinical and biological presentation did not fit any previously described genetic iron-deficiency anemia. Whole exome sequencing identified in both patients compound heterozygous mutations of TMPRSS6 leading to p.G442R and p.E522K, 2 mutations previously reported to cause classic IRIDA, and no additional mutations in known iron-regulatory genes. Thus, the phenotype associated with the unique combination of mutations uncovered in both patients expands the spectrum of disease associated with TMPRSS6 mutations to include iron deficiency anemia that is accompanied by hyperferritinemia at initial presentation and is responsive to continued oral iron therapy. Our results have implications for genetic testing in early childhood iron deficiency anemia. Importantly, they emphasize that whole exome sequencing can be used as a diagnostic tool and greatly facilitate the elucidation of the genetic basis of unusual clinical presentations, including hypomorphic mutations or compound heterozygosity leading to different phenotypes in known Mendelian diseases. PMID:23319530

  14. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia: presentation with hyperferritinemia and response to oral iron therapy.

    PubMed

    Khuong-Quang, Dong-Anh; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Westerman, Mark; Lepage, Pierre; Finberg, Karin E; Majewski, Jacek; Jabado, Nada

    2013-02-01

    Iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in TMPRSS6. Patients have hypochromic microcytic anemia refractory to oral iron and are only partially responsive to parenteral iron administration. We report a French-Canadian kindred in which 2 siblings presented in early childhood with severe microcytic anemia, hypoferremia, and hyperferritinemia. Both children have been successfully treated solely with low-dose oral iron since diagnosis. Clinical and biological presentation did not fit any previously described genetic iron-deficiency anemia. Whole exome sequencing identified in both patients compound heterozygous mutations of TMPRSS6 leading to p.G442R and p.E522K, 2 mutations previously reported to cause classic IRIDA, and no additional mutations in known iron-regulatory genes. Thus, the phenotype associated with the unique combination of mutations uncovered in both patients expands the spectrum of disease associated with TMPRSS6 mutations to include iron deficiency anemia that is accompanied by hyperferritinemia at initial presentation and is responsive to continued oral iron therapy. Our results have implications for genetic testing in early childhood iron deficiency anemia. Importantly, they emphasize that whole exome sequencing can be used as a diagnostic tool and greatly facilitate the elucidation of the genetic basis of unusual clinical presentations, including hypomorphic mutations or compound heterozygosity leading to different phenotypes in known Mendelian diseases.

  15. Iron deficiency anemia in newly diagnosed celiac disease in children.

    PubMed

    Sanseviero, Maria T; Mazza, Giuseppe A; Pullano, Maria N; Oliveiro, Antonella C; Altomare, Federica; Pedrelli, Luca; Dattilo, Bruno; Miniero, Roberto; Meloni, Gianfranco; Giancotti, Laura; Talarico, Valentina

    2016-02-01

    Celiac disease (CD) in children may occur with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations: anemia is the most frequent extraintestinal manifestation, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the common presentation. In our study we aimed to assess IDA condition in a large cohort of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed CD. Our study includes a cohort of 518 children (340 females and 178 males), 6 months-18 years old, joined between January 1990 and January 2013. We have analyzed hematological parameters and iron balance: serum iron, serum ferritin and serum transferrin levels. The diagnosis of IDA was considered on the basis of hemoglobin levels below -2SD, associated with serum iron and ferritin reduction, serum transferrin increase; all compared with the normal reference values for age. Of all patients, 156 patients (30.1%) had anemia, including 103 females (19.8%) and 53 males (10.2%); of these, 112 (21.62%) had IDA (in 18 cases associated with α- or β-thalassemia trait), 22 were thalassemic trait without iron deficiency and the remaining 19 suffered from other forms of anemia. One hundred fifteen patients (22.20%) with low ferritin levels but normal hemoglobin levels were considered as preanemic iron deficient patients. Our data confirm that iron depletion and IDA represent a frequent finding at the diagnosis of CD. This significant relation existing between CD and iron deficiency should be considered by pediatricians at the diagnosis of CD in order to treat the patients.

  16. Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemosiderosis Mimicking Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Delayed Diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Koker, Sultan Aydin; Gözmen, Salih; Oymak, Yeşim; Karapinar, Tuba Hilkay; Can, Demet; Genç, Sinan; Vergin, Raziye Canan

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) is an uncommon chronic disorder in children. It is characterized by recurrent pulmonary hemorrhage and may result in hemoptysis and pulmonary insufficiency. The most common hematologic manifestation of IPH is iron deficiency anemia. The etiology of IPH is not known and its diagnosis may be difficult due to the variable clinical courses. The most helpful signs for identifying IPH are iron deficiency anemia and recurrent or chronic cough, hemoptysis, dyspnea, wheezing. We report here 5 pediatric cases of IPH presenting with iron deficiency anemia and without pulmonary symptoms. Mean corpuscular volume was low in all patients; iron was low in 4 out of 5 cases; total iron binding capacity was high in all of them; ferritin was low in 3 patients. At follow up, none of them had responded successfully to the iron therapy. Although they didn’t present with pulmonary symptoms, chest radiographs incidentally revealed diffuse reticulonoduler shadows in all of them. Computed tomography revealed diffuse ground-glass opacities, consolidation, increased density. The diagnosis was confirmed by the detection of hemosiderin-laden macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and gastric aspirate. If patients with iron deficiency anemia don’t respond to iron therapy, they should be examined for IPH. Chest radiographs should be taken even in absence of pulmonary symptoms. Early diagnosis is important for a timely management of IPH. PMID:28670434

  17. Coexistence of megaloblastic anemia and iron deficiency anemia in a young woman with chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Hung, Chia-Sui; Yang, Chao-Ping; Lo, Fu-Sung; Hsu, Hsun-Hui

    2006-10-01

    Pernicious anemia is a megaloblastic anemia caused by vitamin B12 deficiency, and is the end-stage of autoimmune gastritis that typically affects persons older than 60 years. It is the most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Pernicious anemia can also be diagnosed concurrently with other autoimmune diseases. We report the occurrence of megaloblastic anemia in a 22-year-old woman with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis for 10.5 years. Recently, she presented with microcytic anemia, and iron deficiency anemia was diagnosed initially. After administration of ferrous sulfate, macrocytic anemia was revealed and vitamin B12 deficiency was detected. Pernicious anemia was highly suspected because of the endoscopic finding of atrophic gastritis, and high titer of antigastric parietal cell antibody, as well as elevated serum gastrin level. After intramuscular injections of hydroxycobalamine 100 microg daily for 10 days, and monthly later, her blood counts returned to normal.

  18. Celiac disease unmasked by acute severe iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Meseeha, Marcelle G.; Attia, Maximos N.; Kolade, Victor O.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of celiac disease (CD) appears to be increasing in the United States. However, the proportion of new CD cases with atypical presentations is also rising. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CD in the setting of new, severe iron-deficiency anemia, 13 years into treatment of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome associated with chronic mildly elevated liver function tests. While CD and iron deficiency anemia are common, this is a rare presentation of CD. PMID:27406450

  19. Anemia and iron deficiency in gastrointestinal and liver conditions

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jürgen; Connor, Susan; Virgin, Garth; Ong, David Eng Hui; Pereyra, Lisandro

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is associated with a number of pathological gastrointestinal conditions other than inflammatory bowel disease, and also with liver disorders. Different factors such as chronic bleeding, malabsorption and inflammation may contribute to IDA. Although patients with symptoms of anemia are frequently referred to gastroenterologists, the approach to diagnosis and selection of treatment as well as follow-up measures is not standardized and suboptimal. Iron deficiency, even without anemia, can substantially impact physical and cognitive function and reduce quality of life. Therefore, regular iron status assessment and awareness of the clinical consequences of impaired iron status are critical. While the range of options for treatment of IDA is increasing due to the availability of effective and well-tolerated parenteral iron preparations, a comprehensive overview of IDA and its therapy in patients with gastrointestinal conditions is currently lacking. Furthermore, definitions and assessment of iron status lack harmonization and there is a paucity of expert guidelines on this topic. This review summarizes current thinking concerning IDA as a common co-morbidity in specific gastrointestinal and liver disorders, and thus encourages a more unified treatment approach to anemia and iron deficiency, while offering gastroenterologists guidance on treatment options for IDA in everyday clinical practice. PMID:27672287

  20. Anemia and iron deficiency in gastrointestinal and liver conditions.

    PubMed

    Stein, Jürgen; Connor, Susan; Virgin, Garth; Ong, David Eng Hui; Pereyra, Lisandro

    2016-09-21

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is associated with a number of pathological gastrointestinal conditions other than inflammatory bowel disease, and also with liver disorders. Different factors such as chronic bleeding, malabsorption and inflammation may contribute to IDA. Although patients with symptoms of anemia are frequently referred to gastroenterologists, the approach to diagnosis and selection of treatment as well as follow-up measures is not standardized and suboptimal. Iron deficiency, even without anemia, can substantially impact physical and cognitive function and reduce quality of life. Therefore, regular iron status assessment and awareness of the clinical consequences of impaired iron status are critical. While the range of options for treatment of IDA is increasing due to the availability of effective and well-tolerated parenteral iron preparations, a comprehensive overview of IDA and its therapy in patients with gastrointestinal conditions is currently lacking. Furthermore, definitions and assessment of iron status lack harmonization and there is a paucity of expert guidelines on this topic. This review summarizes current thinking concerning IDA as a common co-morbidity in specific gastrointestinal and liver disorders, and thus encourages a more unified treatment approach to anemia and iron deficiency, while offering gastroenterologists guidance on treatment options for IDA in everyday clinical practice.

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Breastfeeding FAQs: How Much and How Often Vegan Food Guide Vegetarianism Anemia Word! Anemia Vitamins About ... Vegetarian Blood Coping With Common Period Problems Anemia Vegan Food Guide Vitamins and Minerals Contact Us Print ...

  2. Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Murawska, Natalia; Fabisiak, Adam; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Anemia coexists with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in up to two-thirds of patients, significantly impairing quality of life. The most common types of anemia in patients with IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, which often overlap. In most cases, available laboratory tests allow successful diagnosis of iron deficiency, where difficulties appear, recently established indices such as soluble transferrin-ferritin ratio or percentage of hypochromic red cells are used. In this review, we discuss the management of the most common types of anemia in respect of the latest available data. Thus, we provide the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology of these entities; furthermore, we discuss the role of hepcidin in developing anemia in IBD. Next, we present the treatment options for each type of anemia and highlight the importance of individual choice of action. We also focus on newly developed intravenous iron preparations and novel, promising drug candidates targeting hepcidin. Concurrently, we talk about difficulties in differentiating between the true and functional iron deficiency, and discuss tools facilitating the process. Finally, we emphasize the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of anemia in IBD. We conclude that management of anemia in patients with IBD is tricky, and appropriate screening of patients regarding anemia is substantial.

  3. The evaluation of iron deficiency and anemia in male blood donors with other related factors

    PubMed Central

    Yousefinejad, Vahid; Darvishi, Nazila; Arabzadeh, Masoumeh; Soori, Masoumeh; Magsudlu, Mahtab; Shafiayan, Madjid

    2010-01-01

    Aims and Background: Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional disorders worldwide and blood donation may cause iron depletion. Limited studies with large sample size have been done on male donors. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among male donors in the Kurdistan Organization of Blood Transfusion in Iran. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Sample size was 1184 blood donors selected by systematic random sampling. Hemoglobin, serum iron, serum ferritin, total iron banding capacity (TIBC) and transferin saturation were measured in donors. Iron depletion, lack of iron stores, iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia and anemia were evaluated among them. Data was analyzed with SPSS software and X2, one-way ANOVA, and LSD test. Results: Iron deficiency, anemia, iron deficiency anemia, iron depletion and lack of iron resources were seen in 2.3, 4.08, 2.14, 22.76 and 4.66 percent respectively. There was a significant relationship of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia with instances of donation and interval from last donation (P < 0.05). A significant relationship was seen between iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among blood donors with more than ten times blood donation (P < 0.05). Conclusions: This study showed regular male donors require especial attention. Therefore, serum ferritin is recommended as a more adequate index to use for iron deficiency screening and planning purposes for iron supplementation among them. PMID:20859513

  4. Prevalence of iron deficiency and anemia among strenuously trained adolescents.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Drorit; Huerta, Michael; Grotto, Itamar; Blum, Dalit; Tal, Orna; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer; Fibach, Eitan; Epstein, Yoram; Shpilberg, Ofer

    2005-09-01

    There is a lack of awareness among physicians, dieticians, and public health planners as to the prevalence of iron deficiency and anemia among adolescents undergoing strenuous physical training. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of iron deficiency and anemia among male adolescents undergoing such activity. We studied 292 male adolescents on the day of entry into a volunteer military unit. Hemoglobin (Hb), mean corpuscular volume, ferritin, iron, iron-transferrin saturation, and soluble transferrin receptor (TfR) were measured, and TfR-F index was calculated. The mean Hb level (+/-SD) in the study population was 14.7 +/- .9 g/dL (range, 10.8-16.8 g/dL), mean ferritin level was 50.6 +/- 32.6 ng/mL (range, 5.4-162.5 ng/mL), and mean iron level was 97.1 +/- 39.9 microg/dL (range, 24-267 microg/dL). The prevalence of anemia (Hb <14 g/dL) was 18.5%, and 3.4% had Hb concentrations less than 13 g/dL. Iron deficiency (ferritin <22 ng/mL) was present in 18% of the subjects, and 11.3% had ferritin levels less than 17 ng/mL. The mean soluble transferrin receptor concentration was 1.9 +/- .8 mg/L, and the mean TfR-F index was 1.21 +/- .57. Nearly 19% of the study subjects had mild anemia at recruitment, and depletion of iron stores was observed among 18%. Overall, these changes were not accompanied by a significant increase in soluble TfR. This high prevalence is most likely the result of "sports anemia" due to the intense physical training regimen adopted prior to their recruitment.

  5. Iron deficiency, anemia, and mortality in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Eisenga, Michele F; Minović, Isidor; Berger, Stefan P; Kootstra-Ros, Jenny E; van den Berg, Else; Riphagen, Ineke J; Navis, Gerjan; van der Meer, Peter; Bakker, Stephan J L; Gaillard, Carlo A J M

    2016-11-01

    Anemia, iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and iron deficiency (ID) are highly prevalent in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Anemia is associated with poor outcome, but the role of ID is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association of ID, irrespective of anemia, with all-cause mortality in RTR. Cox regression analyses were used to investigate prospective associations. In 700 RTR, prevalences of anemia, IDA, and ID were 34%, 13%, and 30%, respectively. During follow-up for 3.1 (2.7-3.9) years, 81 (12%) RTR died. In univariable analysis, anemia [HR, 1.72 (95%CI: 1.11-2.66), P = 0.02], IDA [2.44 (1.48-4.01), P < 0.001], and ID [2.04 (1.31-3.16), P = 0.001] were all associated with all-cause mortality. In multivariable analysis, the association of anemia with mortality became weaker after adjustment for ID [1.52 (0.97-2.39), P = 0.07] and disappeared after adjustment for proteinuria and eGFR [1.09 (0.67-1.78), P = 0.73]. The association of IDA with mortality attenuated after adjustment for potential confounders. In contrast, the association of ID with mortality remained independent of potential confounders, including anemia [1.77 (1.13-2.78), P = 0.01]. In conclusion, ID is highly prevalent among RTR and is associated with an increased risk of mortality, independent of anemia. As ID is a modifiable factor, correction of ID could be a target to improve survival. © 2016 The Authors. Transplant International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Steunstichting ESOT.

  6. Serum transferrin receptor distinguishes the anemia of chronic disease from iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, B J; Skikne, B S; Simpson, K M; Baynes, R D; Cook, J D

    1992-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that the serum transferrin receptor is a sensitive, quantitative measure of tissue iron deficiency. This study was undertaken to determine the serum transferrin receptor's ability to distinguish iron-deficiency anemia from the anemia of chronic inflammation and to identify iron deficiency in patients with liver disease. The mean transferrin receptor level in 17 normal controls was 5.36 +/- 0.82 mg/L compared with 13.91 +/- 4.63 mg/L in 17 patients with iron-deficiency anemia (p less than 0.001). The mean serum receptor level was normal in all 20 patients with acute infection, including five with acute hepatitis, and was also normal in 8 of 10 anemic patients with chronic liver disease. Receptor levels were in the normal range in all but 4 of 41 patients with anemia of chronic disease. We conclude that unlike serum ferritin levels, which are disproportionately elevated in relation to iron stores in patients with inflammation or liver disease, the serum transferrin receptor level is not affected by these disorders and is therefore a reliable laboratory index of iron deficiency anemia.

  7. Association between iron deficiency anemia and febrile seizure in children.

    PubMed

    Derakhshanfar, Hojjat; Abaskhanian, Ali; Alimohammadi, Hosein; ModanlooKordi, Mona

    2012-08-01

    Febrile convulsion (FC) is a common cause of seizure in young children, with an excellent prognosis. In addition to genetic predisposition, FCs are generally thought to be induced by elemental changes such as iron deficiency. Regarding the high prevalence of febrile seizure and iron deficiency anemia in children, the aim was to investigate the role of iron deficiency anemia in FC patients. This case-control study was performed in 500 children with febrile seizures (case) and 500 febrile children without seizures (control), referred to Mofid hospital in Tehran during one year (Nov 2009-Nov 2010). All children were aged between 6-60 months. The groups were matched in age and gender and use of supplemental iron. Laboratory tests consisted of Complete Blood Count (CBC). Serum iron, plasma ferritin and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) analyses were done in each patient. The patients and controls were 26.49+12.65 and 26.84+11.70 months of mean age, respectively. The amount of Hb, Hct, MCV, MCH, MCHC, RBC count, serum iron and plasma ferritin were significantly higher and TIBC was significantly lower among the cases with febrile convulsion than the controls. The incidence of iron deficiency anemia was significantly higher in controls compared with the cases (p less than 0.016). The mean of temperature peak on admission was significantly higher in the febrile convulsion group than controls. The results of this study suggest that the risk of febrile seizure occurrence in anemic children is less common as compared to non-anemic ones.

  8. The frequency of anemia and iron deficiency in the runner.

    PubMed

    Balaban, E P; Cox, J V; Snell, P; Vaughan, R H; Frenkel, E P

    1989-12-01

    The current consensus is that runners commonly experience a mild anemia influenced by iron deficiency. We compared hematologic parameters of 72 (35 males and 37 females) runners with 48 (27 males and 21 females) nonrunners and assessed the impact of iron supplementation. Male runners had lower hemoglobin (Hb) values than male nonrunners (14.8 vs 15.3 g.dl-1) (P less than 0.05) regardless of iron usage. Female runners had higher (P = 0.05) Hb values than female controls (13.5 vs 12.8 g.dl-1). Female runners off iron had Hbs similar to controls off iron (P = 0.30). Iron parameters (total serum iron, TSI; total iron-binding capacity, TIBC; percent saturation of the TIBC, %sat TIBC; and serum ferritin) of runners vs controls, runners vs runners (on or off iron), and nonrunners vs nonrunners (on or off iron) were comparable except 1) male runners off iron had lower (P less than 0.05) %sat TIBC values (26%) than male runners on iron (34%) and 2) female runners taking iron had ferritin values (32 ng.ml-1) similar to those of female nonrunners taking iron (39 ng.ml-1) but higher (P less than 0.05) than their counterparts off iron (15 and 15 ng.ml-1, respectively). This study concludes that running affects Hb in a variable manner and suggests that the runner's iron status is similar to that of the general population.

  9. FastStats: Anemia or Iron Deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Care Adult Day Services Centers Home Health Care Hospice Care Nursing Home Care Residential Care Communities Screenings Mammography ... visits to emergency departments with anemia as the primary hospital discharge diagnosis: 146,000 Source: National Hospital ...

  10. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) cases with 2 novel TMPRSS6 mutations.

    PubMed

    Sal, Ertan; Keskin, Ebru Yılmaz; Yenicesu, Idil; Bruno, Mariasole; De Falco, Luigia

    2016-04-01

    Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) is a rarely diagnosed autosomal recessive disorder that presents with hypochromic, microcytic anemia due to mutations in TMPRSS6, which encodes matriptase-2. Contrary to classical iron deficiency anemia, serum hepcidin levels are found to be elevated in this disorder. Here, we report 5 cases from 4 unrelated families with inadequate response to iron therapy, who were consequently diagnosed as IRIDA. The mean age of the cases at diagnosis was 5.0 years (range: 0.7-11.3 years). All cases were either homozygous or compound heterozygous for missense or frameshift mutations in the TMPRSS6 gene, 2 of the mutations being novel (Cys410Ser and Leu689Pro). IRIDA should be considered in patients with findings of iron deficiency anemia unresponsive to oral iron therapy, whose serum ferritin levels are found normal or elevated.

  11. Evaluation of Reticulocyte Parameters in Iron Deficiency, Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Mixed Anemia.

    PubMed

    Balci, Yasemin Isik; Akpinar, Funda Ozgurler; Polat, Aziz; Uzun, Utku; Ergin, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Reticulocytes are the youngest erythrocytes released from the bone marrow into the blood and they circulate for 1-2 days before becoming mature erythrocytes. In literature, there were studies about reticulocyte parameters that could help in differentiation of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) from vitamin B12 deficiency anemia. However, in those studies there were no data about differentiation of mixed anemia (vitamin B12 deficiency and IDA). The purpose of this study is to explore a response to 'could reticulocyte parameters help in differential diagnosis of mixed anemia?' in 6-12 years old children. The study enrolled 26 patients with IDA, 22 patients with mixed anemia, 32 patients with vitamin B12 deficiency, and 32 age and gender matched healthy controls. Blood for hematological parameters such as complete blood count, reticulocyte count, CHr, MCVr, CHCMr were collected into standard tubes containing EDTA. There is a statistically significant difference of both MCV (mean corpuscular volume)/MCVr (Reticulocyte mean corpuscular volume) ratio and MCVr between IDA and controls; in controls and vitamin B12 deficiency anemia; in controls and mixed anemia; in IDA and vitamin B12 deficiency anemia; in IDA and mixed anemia. Also in terms of both CHr and CHCMr (Corpuscular mean hemoglobin concentration of reticulocyte), there is a statistically significant difference between controls and IDA; controls and mixed anemia; IDA and mixed anemia; IDA and vitamin B12 deficiency anemia. In mixed anemia, MCV could be normal or decreased, and in peripheral blood smear erythrocytes cells could be morphologically normal. For this reason diagnosis of mixed anemia is not easy and needs additional laboratory investigations. Our results suggest that in a differential diagnosis of mixed anemia from vitamin B12 deficiency, IDA, and healthy controls, CHr, CHCMr, and MCVr (together with MCV and individually) could be useful. So, with a simple and cheap laboratory parameter, differentiation of

  12. Iron deficiency and anemia: a common problem in female elite soccer players.

    PubMed

    Landahl, Göran; Adolfsson, Peter; Börjesson, Mats; Mannheimer, Clas; Rödjer, Stig

    2005-12-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among elite women soccer players. Hemoglobin, serum iron, serum total iron binding capacity, and ferritin were determined in 28 female soccer players called up for the national team. Of the investigated female soccer players, 57% had iron deficiency and 29% iron deficiency anemia 6 months before the FIFA Women's World Cup. It is concluded that iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is common in female soccer players at the top international level. Some might suffer from relative anemia and measurement of hemoglobin alone is not sufficient to reveal relative anemia. Regular monitoring of hemoglobin concentration and iron status is necessary to institute iron supplementation when indicated.

  13. Prevalence and Determinants of Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Al Zenki, Sameer; Alomirah, Husam; Al Hooti, Suad; Al Hamad, Nawal; Jackson, Robert T; Rao, Aravinda; Al Jahmah, Nasser; Al Obaid, Ina'am; Al Ghanim, Jameela; Al Somaie, Mona; Zaghloul, Sahar; Al Othman, Amani

    2015-07-31

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency (ID) of a nationally representative sample of the Kuwait population. We also determined if anemia differed by socioeconomic status or by RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. The subjects who were made up of 1830 males and females between the ages of 2 months to 86 years, were divided into the following age groups (0-5, 5-11, 12-14, 15-19, 20-49, ≥50 years). Results showed that the prevalence of anemia was 3% in adult males and 17% in females. The prevalence of ID varied according to age between 4% (≥50 years) and 21% (5-11 years) and 9% (12-14 years) and 23% (15-19 years), respectively, in males and females. The prevalence of anemia and ID was higher in females compared to males. Adults with normal ferritin level, but with low RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels had higher prevalence of anemia than those with normal RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. This first nationally representative nutrition and health survey in Kuwait indicated that anemia and ID are prevalent and ID contributes significantly to anemia prevalence.

  14. Prevalence and Determinants of Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Al Zenki, Sameer; Alomirah, Husam; Al Hooti, Suad; Al Hamad, Nawal; Jackson, Robert T.; Rao, Aravinda; Al Jahmah, Nasser; Al Obaid, Ina’am; Al Ghanim, Jameela; Al Somaie, Mona; Zaghloul, Sahar; Al Othman, Amani

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency (ID) of a nationally representative sample of the Kuwait population. We also determined if anemia differed by socioeconomic status or by RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. The subjects who were made up of 1830 males and females between the ages of 2 months to 86 years, were divided into the following age groups (0–5, 5–11, 12–14, 15–19, 20–49, ≥50 years). Results showed that the prevalence of anemia was 3% in adult males and 17% in females. The prevalence of ID varied according to age between 4% (≥50 years) and 21% (5–11 years) and 9% (12–14 years) and 23% (15–19 years), respectively, in males and females. The prevalence of anemia and ID was higher in females compared to males. Adults with normal ferritin level, but with low RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels had higher prevalence of anemia than those with normal RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. This first nationally representative nutrition and health survey in Kuwait indicated that anemia and ID are prevalent and ID contributes significantly to anemia prevalence. PMID:26264015

  15. Soluble transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor-ferritin index in iron deficiency anemia and anemia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Margetic, Sandra; Topic, Elizabeta; Ruzic, Dragica Ferenec; Kvaternik, Marina

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical efficiency of soluble transferrin receptor and transferrin receptor-ferritin index (sTfR/logF) in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as the differential diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and anemia in rheumatoid arthritis. The study included 96 patients with anemia and 61 healthy volunteers as a control group. In healthy subjects there were no significant sex and age differences in the parameters tested. The study results showed these parameters to be reliable in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as in the differential diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease. The results indicate that sTfR/logF could be used to help differentiate coexisting iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed a higher discriminating power of transferrin receptor-ferritin index vs. soluble transferrin receptor in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia, as well as in the differential diagnosis between iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease. In patients with anemia in rheumatoid arthritis, the parameters tested showed no significant differences with respect to C-reactive protein concentration. These results suggested that the parameters tested are not affected by acute or chronic inflammatory disease.

  16. Reducing iron deficiency anemia in Bolivian school children: calcium and iron combined versus iron supplementation alone.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Melissa; Olivares, Manuel; Brito, Alex; Pizarro, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of combined calcium and iron versus single iron supplementation on iron status in Bolivian schoolchildren. Children ages 6 to 10 y old (N = 195), were randomly assigned to receive either 700 mg Ca (as calcium carbonate) plus 30 mg Fe (as ferrous sulfate) (Ca + Fe group) or 30 mg Fe (as ferrous sulfate) (Fe group). The doses were administered daily, from Monday to Friday, between meals at school over 3 mo. Iron status was assessed at baseline and after intervention. Additionally, overall nutritional status was assessed by anthropometry and an estimation of dietary intake. At baseline, the prevalence of anemia in the Ca + Fe group and the Fe group were 15% and 21.5%, respectively. After 3 mo follow-up, the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia dropped significantly (P < 0.001) to 3% in both groups (χ(2) = NS). Iron dietary intake was within recommended levels, but calcium intake only covered 39% of the Recommended Daily Intake. Combined calcium and iron supplementation is equally as effective as single iron supplementation in reducing the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in Bolivian school children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Responsiveness to parenteral iron therapy in children with oral iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Akin, Mehmet; Atay, Enver; Oztekin, Osman; Karadeniz, Cem; Karakus, Yasin Tugrul; Yilmaz, Bilal; Erdogan, Firat

    2014-02-01

    Intravenous (IV) ferric iron (Fe)-carbohydrate complexes are used for treating Fe deficiency in children with iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA). An optimal treatment has yet to be determined. There are relatively little publications on the responsiveness to IV iron therapy in children with IRIDA. This study analyzed responses to IV iron sucrose therapy given to 11 children, ranging in age from 2 to 13 years (mean 4.8 years), with iron-deficiency anemia who were unresponsive to oral iron therapy. The hemoglobin and ferritin values (mean) of the 11 children with IRIDA were 7.7 g/dL and 4.8 ng/mL at diagnosis. Both hemoglobin and ferritin levels increased to 9.5 g/dL, and 24 ng/mL, respectively, at 6 weeks after the first therapy. Although the level of hemoglobin was steady at 6 months after the first, and 6 weeks after the second therapy, the ferritin levels continued to increase up to 30 ng/mL and 47 ng/mL at 6 months after the first and 6 weeks after the second therapy, respectively. We recommend that IRIDA should be considered in patients presenting with iron-deficiency anemia of unknown cause that is unresponsive to oral iron therapy. Our results suggest that IV iron therapy should be administered only once in cases of IRIDA. Continued administration of IV iron would be of no benefit to increase hemoglobin levels. On the contrary, ferritin levels may continue to increase resulting in untoward effects of hyperferritinemia.

  18. Novel mutation in the TMPRSS6 gene with iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Koya; Noguchi, Atsuko; Adachi, Hiroyuki; Hebiguchi, Miwa; Yano, Michihiro; Takahashi, Tsutomu

    2014-08-01

    Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by congenital hypochromic microcytic anemia, low transferrin saturation, low serum iron, normal-high serum ferritin, and increased hepcidin. This disease is caused by loss-of-function mutations in TMPRSS6 that lead to high hepcidin and result in severe anemia. We report our experience with an 11-year-old Japanese girl with hypochromic microcytic anemia, low serum iron, and high serum ferritin, with anemia that was refractory to the oral iron that was prescribed frequently from early childhood. Presence of high hepcidin suggested a diagnosis of IRIDA, which was eventually confirmed by identification of a novel homozygous mutation, p.Pro354Leu, in the TMPRSS6 gene. This case suggests that serum hepcidin should be routinely measured for differential diagnosis when patients with IDA are unresponsive to oral iron or have unusual clinical features. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  19. Serum paraoxonase 1 activity in patients with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Gedikbasi, Asuman; Akalin, Nilgul; Gunaldi, Meral; Yilmaz, Deniz; Mert, Meral; Harmankaya, Ozlem; Soylu, Aliye; Karakaya, Pinar; Kumbasar, Abdulbaki

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In this study we aimed to detect paraoxonase 1 (PON-1) activity in iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and to compare it with healthy controls by observing the change after iron therapy. Material and methods In this study, 50 adult patients with IDA and 40 healthy subjects were enrolled. All patients were analyzed at the beginning and after treatment according to laboratory assessments. Results Mean paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in the iron deficiency anemia group were significantly lower than mean activities of the control group (102.4 ±19.2 U/l and 163.3 ±13.68 U/l, respectively and 157.3 ±26.4 U/l and 256.1 ±24.6 U/l, respectively; p = 0.0001 for both). Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities significantly increased after treatment for IDA (143.2 ±13.9 and 197.6 ±27.9 U/l, respectively, p = 0.0001). Mean activities after treatment with iron were significantly lower than mean activities in the control group (p = 0.002; p = 0.0001 respectively). Conclusions Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities in patients with IDA significantly increased after treatment with iron therapy. In adults IDA may also be one of the factors associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis. PMID:27478448

  20. Dhatrilauha: Right choice for iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anuradha; Dwivedi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Anemia in pregnancy is multi-factorial. Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common one. Major cause is increased demand of iron during pregnancy. In Ayurveda, under Pandu-Roga the features of anemia are described. It is characterized by Vaivarnyata or Varnanasha (change/destruction in normal color of the body), a disorder of Pitta vitiation. Ayurvedic management is an effective way of curing anemia in general by a large number of Lauha preparations of which Dhatrilauha has been used widely for centuries. To evaluate the effect of Dhatrilauha in the management of IDA based on the scientific parameters among pregnant patients. A total of 58 cases were selected by simple randomized sampling method as per inclusion criteria of pregnant women between 4(th) and 7(th) months of pregnancy with a clinical diagnosis and laboratory confirmation of IDA. Dhatrilauha 500 mg in two divided doses after food with normal potable water were given for 45 days with three follow-ups, each of 15 days intervals. Final assessment was done after completion of 45 days and results were statistically analyzed by using Cochran's Q-test and Student's t-test. Dhatrilauha showed statistically significant (P < 0.01) improvement in the majority of sign-symptoms and objective parameters such as weakness, fatigue, palpitation, effort intolerance, breathlessness, heartburn, pallor, constipation, hemoglobin, red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, RBC distribution width, mean platelet volume, serum iron, and total iron binding capacity. Dhatrilauha possesses many fold effectiveness in anemia (IDA), which was evidenced with the significant results obtained in the majority of parameters in this study.

  1. Efficacy and safety of intravenous iron sucrose in treating adults with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini; de Figueiredo, Pedro Otavio Novis; Olivato, Maria Cristina Albe; Chiattone, Carlos Sérgio

    2011-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency is the most common disorder in the world, affecting approximately 25% of the world`s population and the most common cause of anemia. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous iron sucrose (IS) in the treatment of adults with iron deficiency anemia Methods Eighty-six adult patients with iron deficiency anemia, who had intolerance or showed no effect with oral iron therapy, received a weekly dose of 200 mg of intravenous iron sucrose until the hemoglobin level was corrected or until receiving the total dose of intravenous iron calculated for each patient Results The mean hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels were 8.54 g/dL and 7.63 ng/mL (pre-treatment) and 12.1 g/dL and 99.0 ng/mL (post-treatment) (p-value < 0.0001), respectively. The average increases in hemoglobin levels were 3.29 g/dL for women and 4.58 g/dL for men; 94% of male and 84% of female patients responded (hemoglobin increased by at least 2 g/dL) to intravenous iron therapy. Correction of anemia was obtained in 47 of 69 (68.1%) female patients and in 12 of 17 male (70.6%) patients. A total of 515 intravenous infusions of iron sucrose were administered and iron sucrose was generally well tolerated with no moderate or serious adverse drug reactions recorded by the investigators. Conclusions Our data confirm that the use of intravenous iron sucrose is a safe and effective option in the treatment of adult patients with iron deficiency anemia who lack satisfactory response to oral iron therapy. Intravenous iron sucrose is well tolerated and with a clinically manageable safety profile when using appropriate dosing and monitoring. The availability of intravenous iron sucrose would potentially improve compliance and thereby reduce morbidities from iron deficiency. PMID:23049360

  2. Iron deficiency anemia after subtotal gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Roviello, Franco; Fotia, Giuseppe; Marrelli, Daniele; De Stefano, Alfonso; Macchiarelli, Raffaele; Pinto, Enrico

    2004-01-01

    Sideropenic anemia after a gastrectomy is a frequent complication. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of different factors, such as sex, age, atrophic chronic gastritis, Helicobacter pylori infection and iron malabsorption, in iron deficiency after surgery for gastric cancer. Thirty-seven patients who underwent subtotal gastrectomy for carcinoma of the stomach were prospectively studied following a specific three-year protocol. Iron deficiency was evaluated by hemochromocytometric analysis and serum iron-ferritin level assays. Of the different variables analyzed, atrophic chronic gastritis was associated with a lower mean serum iron level, in particular two years after surgery (65mg/dL vs. 103 mg/dL in subjects without gastritis, P<0.01); a correlation between Helicobacter pylori infection of the gastric stump and lower mean serum ferritin level was also found (25+/-6.3 mg/dL vs. 53+/-0.4 mg/dL, P<0.05). On the contrary, no association was observed with the other factors that were evaluated. Among the factors involved in iron deficiency after gastrectomy for cancer of the stomach, atrophic gastritis seems to be the most important, although Helicobacter pylori infection of the gastric stump also seems to play an important role.

  3. [Anemia and iron deficiency in children with chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Barja, Salesa; Capo, Eduardo; Briceño, Lilian; Jakubson, Leticia; Méndez, Mireya; Becker, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Children with chronic respiratory disease (CRD) are at increased risk of iron deficiency and anemia, which is under-diagnosed. To describe the iron (Fe) status in children with CRD and to evaluate the effects of its prophylactic indication. Prospective study of children with CRD and adequate Fe intake in the diet. At baseline we measured hemogram, C-reactive protein and Fe profile. Subsequently, those with normal plasma hemoglobin (Hb) were not supplemented with Fe (Group A) and those with iron deficiency anemia or at risk of developing it (group B) were supplemented. We evaluated them 3 months later and, after supplementing all, at 4th month. Of 40 patients, median 30 months old (0.5 to 178), 60% were male, 80% eutrophic. Ventilation or oxygen were required in 45%. Diagnoses: 50% Chronic Lung Damage, 17.5% airway diseases, 10% Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, 7.5% Cystic Fibrosis and 13.5% other. At baseline 20% were anemic (mostly ferropenic) and 12.5% had an abnormal iron profile. At all, 25 children completed the study: in group A, serum ferritin decreased to 3(th) month (-22.9 ± 30) and incremented to 4(th)month (+12.8 ± 26) μg/L (p = 0.013), without difference in Hb. Group B had a rise in Hb (91 ± 12 to 102 ± 12% of the mean for age, p = 0.04). Anemia and ferropenia are frequent in children with CRD. Decrease of their iron reserves can be prevented if they are supplemented. We suggest monitoring properly and treating early or supplement them prophylactically. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  4. The association of pagophagia with Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with iron-deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Asma, Suheyl; Boga, Can; Ozdogu, Hakan; Serin, Ender

    2009-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between pagophagia (compulsive ice eating) and H. pylori infection in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. We identified H. pylori infection using the (13)C-urea breath test in 45 patients with iron-deficiency anemia (group 1) and 55 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and pagophagia (group 2). Subgroups for testing oral intestinal iron absorption were randomly assigned from both groups. These subgroups consisted of (a) 10 patients with iron-deficiency anemia, (b) 10 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and pagophagia, (c) 10 patients with iron-deficiency anemia, pagophagia, and H. pylori infection before the eradication of H. pylori and (d) subgroup c after eradication therapy. There was no difference in the rate of H. pylori infection in the iron-deficiency anemia groups, with or without pagophagia. Furthermore, oral intestinal iron absorption was not influenced by pagophagia and/or H. pylori infection. Pagophagia did not increase the risk of H. pylori infection in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Pagophagia and H. pylori infection do not synergistically affect the development of intestinal iron absorption abnormalities.

  5. Prevalence of iron deficiency anemia among adolescent schoolgirls from Kermanshah, Western Iran.

    PubMed

    Akramipour, Reza; Rezaei, Mansour; Rahimi, Zohreh

    2008-12-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a major health problem in developing countries. Anemia reduces physical work capacity and cognitive function and adversely affects learning and scholastic performance in schoolgirls entering adolescence. A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia and anemia among adolescent school girls aged 14-20 years from 20 different high schools located in three educational areas of Kermanshah, the capital of Kermanshah province in Western Iran. The prevalence of anemia (Hb<12 mg/dl) among adolescent school girls was 21.4%. Iron deficiency using a ferritin level <12 microg/l was found in 23.7% of studied girls. There were 47 girls (12.2%) with iron deficiency anemia (Hb<12 g/dl and ferritin <20 microg/l). Around 57.3% of anemic girls were iron deficient. There were no significant differences between the presence of anemia and the level of education of parents. The mean levels of hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin (MCH) and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) in studied adolescent girls from Western Iran were found to be lower than those reported for females aged 12-18 years. In conclusion, regarding the detrimental long-term effects and high prevalence of iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia and anemia in Kermanshah, Western Iran its prevention could be a high priority in the programs of health system of the country and supplementation of a weekly iron dose is recommended.

  6. Autoimmune gastritis presenting as iron deficiency anemia in childhood.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Cristina; Oliveira, Maria Emília; Palha, Ana M; Ferrão, Anabela; Morais, Anabela; Lopes, Ana Isabel

    2014-11-14

    To characterize clinical, laboratorial, and histological profile of pediatric autoimmune gastritis in the setting of unexplained iron deficiency anemia investigation. A descriptive, observational study including pediatric patients with a diagnosis of autoimmune gastritis (positive parietal cell antibody and gastric corpus atrophy) established in a 6 year period (2006-2011) in the setting of refractory iron deficiency anemia (refractoriness to oral iron therapy for at least 6 mo and requirement for intravenous iron therapy) investigation, after exclusion of other potentially contributing causes of anemia. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and anti-secretory therapy were also excluded. Data were retrospectively collected from clinical files, including: demographic data (age, gender, and ethnic background), past medical history, gastrointestinal symptoms, familial history, laboratorial evaluation (Hb, serum ferritin, serum gastrin, pepsinogen I/ pepsinogen II, B12 vitamin, intrinsic factor autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies, and anti-transglutaminase antibodies), and endoscopic and histological findings (HE, Periodic Acid-Schiff/Alcian blue, gastrin, chromogranin A and immunochemistry analysis for CD3, CD20 and CD68). Descriptive statistical analysis was performed (mean, median, and standard deviation). We report a case-series concerning 3 girls and 2 boys with a mean age of 13.6 ± 2.8 years (3 Caucasian and 2 African). One girl had type I diabetes. Familial history was positive in 4/5 cases, respectively for autoimmune thyroiditis (2/5), sarcoidosis (1/5) and multiple myeloma (1/5). Laboratorial evaluation on admission included: Hb: 9.5 ± 0.7 g/dL; serum ferritin: 4.0 ± 0.9 ng/mL; serum gastrin: 393 ± 286 pg/mL; low pepsinogen I/ pepsinogen II ratio in 1/5 patients; normal vitamin B12 levels (analyzed in 3 patients). Endoscopy findings included: duodenal nodularity (2/5) and gastric fold softening (2/5), and histological evaluation showed

  7. Rethinking Iron Regulation and Assessment in Iron Deficiency, Anemia of Chronic Disease, and Obesity: Introducing Hepcidin

    PubMed Central

    Tussing-Humphreys, Lisa; Pustacioglu, Cenk; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Braunschweig, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Adequate iron availability is essential to human development and overall health. Iron is a key component of oxygen-carrying proteins, has a pivotal role in cellular metabolism, and is essential to cell growth and differentiation. Inadequate dietary iron intake, chronic and acute inflammatory conditions, and obesity are each associated with alterations in iron homeostasis. Tight regulation of iron is necessary because iron is highly toxic and human beings can only excrete small amounts through sweat, skin and enterocyte sloughing, and fecal and menstrual blood loss. Hepcidin, a small peptide hormone produced mainly by the liver, acts as the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. Hepcidin controls movement of iron into plasma by regulating the activity of the sole known iron exporter ferroportin-1. Downregulation of the ferroportin-1 exporter results in sequestration of iron within intestinal enterocytes, hepatocytes, and iron-storing macrophages reducing iron bioavailability. Hepcidin expression is increased by higher body iron levels and inflammation and decreased by anemia and hypoxia. Importantly, existing data illustrate that hepcidin may play a significant role in the development of several iron-related disorders, including the anemia of chronic disease and the iron dysregulation observed in obesity. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to discuss iron regulation, with specific emphasis on systemic regulation by hepcidin, and examine the role of hepcidin within several disease states, including iron deficiency, anemia of chronic disease, and obesity. The relationship between obesity and iron depletion and the clinical assessment of iron status will also be reviewed. PMID:22717199

  8. Maternal iron deficiency anemia affects postpartum emotions and cognition.

    PubMed

    Beard, John L; Hendricks, Michael K; Perez, Eva M; Murray-Kolb, Laura E; Berg, Astrid; Vernon-Feagans, Lynne; Irlam, James; Isaacs, Washiefa; Sive, Alan; Tomlinson, Mark

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in mothers alters their maternal cognitive and behavioral performance, the mother-infant interaction, and the infant's development. This article focuses on the relation between IDA and cognition as well as behavioral affect in the young mothers. This prospective, randomized, controlled, intervention trial was conducted in South Africa among 3 groups of mothers: nonanemic controls and anemic mothers receiving either placebo (10 microg folate and 25 mg vitamin C) or daily iron (125 mg FeS0(4), 10 microg folate, 25 mg vitamin C). Mothers of full-term normal birth weight babies were followed from 10 wk to 9 mo postpartum (n = 81). Maternal hematologic and iron status, socioeconomic, cognitive, and emotional status, mother-infant interaction, and the development of the infants were assessed at 10 wk and 9 mo postpartum. Behavioral and cognitive variables at baseline did not differ between iron-deficient anemic mothers and nonanemic mothers. However, iron treatment resulted in a 25% improvement (P < 0.05) in previously iron-deficient mothers' depression and stress scales as well as in the Raven's Progressive Matrices test. Anemic mothers administered placebo did not improve in behavioral measures. Multivariate analysis showed a strong association between iron status variables (hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, and transferrin saturation) and cognitive variables (Digit Symbol) as well as behavioral variables (anxiety, stress, depression). This study demonstrates that there is a strong relation between iron status and depression, stress, and cognitive functioning in poor African mothers during the postpartum period. There are likely ramifications of this poorer "functioning" on mother-child interactions and infant development, but the constraints around this relation will have to be defined in larger studies.

  9. Malabsorption of iron as a cause of iron deficiency anemia in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Qamar, Khansa; Saboor, Muhammad; Qudsia, Fatima; Khosa, Shafi Muhammad; Moinuddin; Usman, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Malabsorption is one of the causes of iron deficiency anemia in postmenopausal women. The main objective of this study was to access the frequency of malabsorption in iron deficient anemic postmenopausal women. Methods: A total of 123 postmenopausal women were enrolled in the study. Of these 123 women, 50 were included as ‘control group’ and 73 patients with comparable severity of anemia were the ‘patient group’. Two tablets of ferrous sulfate (200 mg/tablet) along with one tablet of vitamin C (500 mg) were given to all participants. Serum iron levels were determined on samples collected from all participants before and after the administration of ferrous sulfate. Difference between before and after serum iron levels of normal and patients were compared. Results: No change in serum iron between sample one and sample two represented malabsorption. Out of 73, 5 postmenopausal anemic patients showed no change in their serum iron level after the administration of ferrous sulfate. This study shows that frequency of malabsorption of iron in postmenopausal women is 6.8%. Conclusion: Malabsorption should be considered as a prevalent cause of iron deficiency anemia in postmenopausal women. It should be properly diagnosed and iron response should be monitored properly in postmenopausal women with IDA after oral iron therapy. If a postmenopausal woman does not show any response to oral iron therapy, she should be evaluated for iron loss (blood loss and/or malabsorption). Intravenous route should be used for the administration of iron in these patients. PMID:26101480

  10. Lactoferrin efficacy versus ferrous sulfate in curing iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Paesano, Rosalba; Berlutti, Francesca; Pietropaoli, Miriam; Pantanella, Fabrizio; Pacifici, Enrica; Goolsbee, William; Valenti, Piera

    2010-06-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are the most common iron disorders throughout the world. ID and IDA, particularly caused by increased iron requirements during pregnancy, represent a high risk for preterm delivery, fetal growth retardation, low birth weight, and inferior neonatal health. Oral administration of ferrous sulfate to cure ID and IDA in pregnancy often fails to increase hematological parameters, causes adverse effects and increases inflammation. Recently, we have demonstrated safety and efficacy of oral administration of 30% iron saturated bovine lactoferrin (bLf) in pregnant women suffering from ID and IDA. Oral administration of bLf significantly increases the number of red blood cells, hemoglobin, total serum iron and serum ferritin already after 30 days of the treatment. The increasing of hematological values by bLf is related to the decrease of serum IL-6 and the increase of serum hepcidin, detected as prohepcidin, whereas ferrous sulfate increases IL-6 and fails to increase hematological parameters and prohepcidin. bLf is a more effective and safer alternative than ferrous sulfate for treating ID and IDA in pregnant women.

  11. Iron Deficiency Anemia Coexists with Cancer Related Anemia and Adversely Impacts Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Kanuri, Giridhar; Sawhney, Ritica; Varghese, Jeeva; Britto, Madonna; Shet, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer related anemia (CRA) adversely affects patient Quality of Life (QoL) and overall survival. We prospectively studied the prevalence, etiology and the impact of anemia on QoL in 218 Indian cancer patients attending a tertiary referral hospital. The study used the sTfR/log Ferritin index to detect iron deficiency anemia and assessed patient QoL using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Anemia (FACT-An) tool, standardized for language. Mean patient age was 51±13 years and 60% were female. The prevalence of cancer related anemia in this setting was 64% (n = 139). As expected, plasma ferritin did not differ significantly between anemic (n = 121) and non-anemic cancer patients (n = 73). In contrast, plasma sTfR levels were significantly higher in anemic cancer patients compared to non-anemic cancer patients (31 nmol/L vs. 24 nmol/L, p = 0.002). Among anemic cancer patients, using the sTfR/log Ferritin index, we found that 60% (n = 83) had iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Interestingly, plasma sTfR levels were significantly higher in cancer patients with CRA+IDA (n = 83) compared with patients having CRA (n = 38) alone (39 nmol/L vs. 20 nmol/L, p<0.001). There was a significant linear correlation between Hb and QoL (Spearman ρ = 0.21; p = 0.001) and multivariate regression analysis revealed that every gram rise in Hb was accompanied by a 3.1 unit increase in the QoL score (95% CI = 0.19–5.33; p = 0.003). The high prevalence of anemia in cancer patients, a major portion of which is due to iron deficiency anemia, the availability of sensitive and specific biomarkers of iron status to detect IDA superimposed on anemia of inflammation, suggests an urgent need to diagnose and treat such patients. Despite the potential negative consequences of increasing metabolically available plasma iron in cancer, our clinical data suggest that detecting and treating IDA in anemic cancer patients will have important consequences to their QoL and overall survival. Clinical

  12. Low vitamin D levels are associated with both iron deficiency and anemia in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Ah; Hwang, Jin Soon; Hwang, Il Tae; Kim, Dong Ho; Seo, Ju-Hee; Lim, Jung Sub

    2015-03-01

    We aimed to examine the association between vitamin D deficiency and anemia in a nationally representative sample of Korean children and adolescents. Cross-sectional data on 2526 children and adolescents aged 10-20 years from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey-V (2010-2012) were used. Anemia was defined according to specifications of the World Health Organization. Iron deficiency was defined as serum ferritin level of <12 ng/mL and transferrin saturation (TSAT) <16%. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in Korean children and adolescents was high especially in female (35.7% vs. 50.9%, P < 0.001). The prevalence of anemia was also higher in female (1.1% vs. 6.8%; P < 0.001). In logistic regression, risk factors for anemia were female sex, old age, post-menarche, low household income, vitamin D deficiency, and iron deficiency. The Odds Ratio for anemia, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in subjects with vitamin D deficiency (<15 ng/mL) were 1.81(95% CI, 1.13-2.88), 1.94(95% CI, 1.27-2.97), and 2.26 (95% CI, 1.20-4.24) after controlling for other risk factors. However, after examining the sexes separately, only female subjects showed statistical significance. After further controlling for iron deficiency, the risk of anemia was not significant (P = 0.261). Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased risk of anemia, especially iron deficiency anemia, in healthy female children and adolescents. However, the association is attenuated after adjustment for iron deficiency. Further studies are needed to determine whether vitamin D deficiency is the cause of anemia, or bystander of nutritional deficiency which cause iron deficiency.

  13. A randomized trial of iron isomaltoside versus iron sucrose in patients with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Derman, Richard; Roman, Eloy; Modiano, Manuel R; Achebe, Maureen M; Thomsen, Lars L; Auerbach, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is common in many chronic diseases, and intravenous (IV) iron offers a rapid and efficient iron correction. This trial compared the efficacy and safety of iron isomaltoside and iron sucrose in patients with IDA who were intolerant of, or unresponsive to, oral iron. The trial was an open-label, comparative, multi-center trial. Five hundred and eleven patients with IDA from different causes were randomized 2:1 to iron isomaltoside or iron sucrose and followed for 5 weeks. The cumulative dose of iron isomaltoside was based on body weight and hemoglobin (Hb), administered as either a 1000 mg infusion over more than 15 minutes or 500 mg injection over 2 minutes. The cumulative dose of iron sucrose was calculated according to Ganzoni and administered as repeated 200 mg infusions over 30 minutes. The mean cumulative dose of iron isomaltoside was 1640.2 (standard deviation (SD): 357.6) mg and of iron sucrose 1127.9 (SD: 343.3) mg. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with a Hb increase ≥2 g/dL from baseline at any time between weeks 1-5. Both non-inferiority and superiority were confirmed for the primary endpoint, and a shorter time to Hb increase ≥2 g/dL was observed with iron isomaltoside. For all biochemical efficacy parameters, faster and/or greater improvements were found with iron isomaltoside. Both treatments were well tolerated; 0.6% experienced a serious adverse drug reaction. Iron isomaltoside was more effective than iron sucrose in achieving a rapid improvement in Hb. Furthermore, iron isomaltoside has an advantage over iron sucrose in allowing higher cumulative dosing in fewer administrations. Both treatments were well tolerated in a broad population with IDA.

  14. A randomized trial of iron isomaltoside versus iron sucrose in patients with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Eloy; Modiano, Manuel R.; Achebe, Maureen M.; Thomsen, Lars L.; Auerbach, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is common in many chronic diseases, and intravenous (IV) iron offers a rapid and efficient iron correction. This trial compared the efficacy and safety of iron isomaltoside and iron sucrose in patients with IDA who were intolerant of, or unresponsive to, oral iron. The trial was an open‐label, comparative, multi‐center trial. Five hundred and eleven patients with IDA from different causes were randomized 2:1 to iron isomaltoside or iron sucrose and followed for 5 weeks. The cumulative dose of iron isomaltoside was based on body weight and hemoglobin (Hb), administered as either a 1000 mg infusion over more than 15 minutes or 500 mg injection over 2 minutes. The cumulative dose of iron sucrose was calculated according to Ganzoni and administered as repeated 200 mg infusions over 30 minutes. The mean cumulative dose of iron isomaltoside was 1640.2 (standard deviation (SD): 357.6) mg and of iron sucrose 1127.9 (SD: 343.3) mg. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with a Hb increase ≥2 g/dL from baseline at any time between weeks 1‐5. Both non‐inferiority and superiority were confirmed for the primary endpoint, and a shorter time to Hb increase ≥2 g/dL was observed with iron isomaltoside. For all biochemical efficacy parameters, faster and/or greater improvements were found with iron isomaltoside. Both treatments were well tolerated; 0.6% experienced a serious adverse drug reaction. Iron isomaltoside was more effective than iron sucrose in achieving a rapid improvement in Hb. Furthermore, iron isomaltoside has an advantage over iron sucrose in allowing higher cumulative dosing in fewer administrations. Both treatments were well tolerated in a broad population with IDA. PMID:28052413

  15. [Iron-deficiency anemia in children. A old problem not yet resolved].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Mayans, Jaime A; Ortiz-López, Carolina; García-Campos, Margarita; Cervantes-Bustamante, Roberto; Mata-Rivera, Norberto; Zárate-Mondragón, Flora; Mason-Cordero, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is still a health problem worldwide. Iron supplementation of some foods such as milk formulas and cereals apparently has not been the solution due to bioavailability of iron. In Mexico, there is high prevalence of anemia in children to date, mainly those under 2 years of age and predominantly in the Southern part of the country. Probably the main causes are iron-deficiency anemia in pregnant women, recurrent infections, such as gastroenteritis and parasites, and the most important one undoubtedly, deficient iron intake.

  16. Hepcidin expression in anemia of chronic disease and concomitant iron-deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Pan-pan; Jiao, Xiao-yang; Wang, Xue-hua; Lin, Jing-hua; Cai, Ying-mu

    2011-03-01

    Hepcidin is a key hormone governing mammalian iron homeostasis and may be directly or indirectly involved in the development of most iron deficiency/overload and inflammation-induced anemia. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of hepcidin in anemia of chronic disease. To characterize serum hepcidin, iron and inflammatory indicators associated with anemia of chronic disease (ACD), we studied ACD, ACD concomitant iron-deficiency anemia (ACD/IDA), pure IDA and acute inflammation (AcI) patients and analyzed the associations between hepcidin levels and inflammation parameters in various types of anemia. Serum hepcidin levels in patient groups were statistically different, from high to low: ACD, AcI > ACD/IDA > the control > IDA. Serum ferritin levels were significantly increased in ACD and AcI patients but were decreased significantly in ACD/IDA and IDA. Elevated serum EPO concentrations were found in ACD, ACD/IDA and IDA patients but not in AcI patients and the controls. A positive correlation between hepcidin and IL-6 levels only existed in ACD/IDA, AcI and the control groups. A positive correlation between hepcidin and ferritin was marked in the control group, while a negative correlation between hepcidin and ferritin was noted in IDA. The significant negative correlation between hepcidin expression and reticulocyte count was marked in both ACD/IDA and IDA groups. All of these data demonstrated that hepcidin might play role in pathogenesis of ACD, ACD/IDA and IDA, and it could be a potential marker for detection and differentiation of these anemias.

  17. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children: a comparative study of ferrous ascorbate and colloidal iron.

    PubMed

    Yewale, Vijay N; Dewan, Bhupesh

    2013-05-01

    To compare the efficacy of ferrous ascorbate and colloidal iron in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children. Eighty one children, aged 6 mo to 12 y, were screened for iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and those diagnosed with IDA were randomized to receive ferrous ascorbate or colloidal iron for a period of 12 wk, such that each child received elemental iron 3 mg/kg body weight/d. Increase in hemoglobin (Hb) level was the primary outcome measure. Assessment was performed at baseline, wk 4, wk 8 and wk 12. Of 81 children screened, 73 were included in the study. The mean rise in Hb at the end of the 12 wk was significantly higher in ferrous ascorbate group than the colloidal iron group [3.59 ± 1.67 g/dl vs. 2.43 ± 1.73 g/dl; P < 0.01]. Significantly higher proportion of children receiving ferrous ascorbate (64.86 % vs. 31.03 %; P < 0.01) became non-anemic in comparison to colloidal iron. Ferrous ascorbate provides a significantly higher rise in hemoglobin levels in comparison to colloidal iron. The study supports the use of ferrous ascorbate in the pediatric age group, providing evidence for its role as an efficient oral iron supplement in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

  18. The prevalence of celiac disease in children with iron-deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Ertekin, Vildan; Tozun, Mahya Sultan; Küçük, Nuran

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy caused by a permanent sensitivity to gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Iron-deficiency anemia is the most commonly encountered anemia in humans. Iron-deficiency anemia also is a common extraintestinal manifestation of celiac disease. To determine the celiac disease prevalence in children with iron-deficiency anemia and to compare the hematologic parameters in iron-deficiency anemia patients with and without celiac disease. A total of 61 patients aged 2-16 years who presented with iron-deficiency anemia were included in this study. Hemoglobin, red cell indices (mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, red cell distribution width), serum iron, and serum ferritin were determined. Venous blood samples for anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody immunoglobuline A were obtained from these patients. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was recommended to patients who had positive serology. Of 61 patients with iron-deficiency anemia, 13 (21,3%) had positive serology for celiac disease. The small intestine biopsy of all patients with positive serology showed villous atrophy (Marsh 3). The mean hemoglobin level was significantly lower in iron-deficiency anemia patients with celiac disease when compared to those without celiac disease (7,8±2,6 vs. 11,3±0,9 g/dL, p>0,05). There was a statistically significant negative correlation of tissue transglutaminase titers with hemoglobin, red cell indices, serum iron, and serum ferritin levels. Screening of celiac disease by anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody should be done as a routine investigation in children with iron-deficiency anemia. Biopsy should be recommended in patients with iron-deficiency anemia who have positive celiac disease serology.

  19. Prevalence of Iron Deficiency and Anemia among Young Children with Acute Diarrhea in Bhaktapur, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Chandyo, Ram K.; Ulak, Manjeswori; Adhikari, Ramesh K.; Sommerfelt, Halvor; Strand, Tor A.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is still common in children under five years of age and may impair their growth and cognitive development. Diarrhea is the second most common reason for seeking medical care for young children in Nepal. However, neither screening programs nor effective preventive measures for anemia and iron deficiencies are in place among children with diarrhea in many developing countries. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency and explore their associations with clinical, socioeconomic, and anthropometric parameters in Nepalese children. This was a cross-sectional study based on 1232 children, six to 35 months old, with acute diarrhea participating in a zinc supplementation trial. The mean (SD) hemoglobin was 11.2 g/dL (1.2). Anemia was found in 493 children (40%); this estimate increased to 641 (52%) when we adjusted for the altitude of the study area (hemoglobin <11.3 g/dL). One in every three children had depleted iron stores and 198 (16%) of the children had both depleted iron stores and anemia, indicating iron deficiency anemia. The prevalence of anemia among children presenting with acute diarrhea was high but the degree of severity was mainly mild or moderate. Iron deficiency explained less than half of the total anemia, indicating other nutritional deficiencies inducing anemia might be common in this population. PMID:27417782

  20. Iron deficiency and hemolytic anemia reversed by ventricular septal myectomy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Steven M.; Cable, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia has been reported to occur in the setting of aortic stenosis and prosthetic heart valves, but much more rarely in association with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Of the few descriptions of hemolytic anemia secondary to HC, all but one case involved bacterial endocarditis contributing to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. We present the case of a 67-year-old man with recurrent hemolytic anemia and HC, without infective endocarditis. Attempts at iron repletion and augmentation of beta-blocker therapy proved his anemia to be refractory to medical management. Ventricular septal myectomy led to the resolution of hemolysis, anemia, and its coexisting symptoms. PMID:26424952

  1. Medication adherence to oral iron therapy in patients with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Gereklioglu, Cigdem; Asma, Suheyl; Korur, Asli; Erdogan, Ferit; Kut, Altug

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the factors affecting medication adherence in patients who use oral iron therapy due to iron deficiency anemia. A total of 96 female patients in fertile age with mean age of 30±10.1 years (range 18-53) who were admitted to Family Medicine Clinic between 01 January and 31 March 2015 and who had received iron therapy within the recent three years were enrolled in the study. Data were collected through a questionnaire form. Of the patients, 39 (40,6%) were detected not to use the medication regularly or during the recommended period. A statistically significant relationship was found between non-adherence to therapy and gastrointestinal side effects and weight gain (p<0.05). Medication adherence is deficient in patients with iron deficiency anemia. The most important reason for this seems gastrointestinal side effects, in addition to weight gain under treatment.

  2. Medication adherence to oral iron therapy in patients with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Gereklioglu, Cigdem; Asma, Suheyl; Korur, Asli; Erdogan, Ferit; Kut, Altug

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed at investigating the factors affecting medication adherence in patients who use oral iron therapy due to iron deficiency anemia. Methods: A total of 96 female patients in fertile age with mean age of 30±10.1 years (range 18-53) who were admitted to Family Medicine Clinic between 01 January and 31 March 2015 and who had received iron therapy within the recent three years were enrolled in the study. Data were collected through a questionnaire form. Results: Of the patients, 39 (40,6%) were detected not to use the medication regularly or during the recommended period. A statistically significant relationship was found between non-adherence to therapy and gastrointestinal side effects and weight gain (p<0.05). Conclusion: Medication adherence is deficient in patients with iron deficiency anemia. The most important reason for this seems gastrointestinal side effects, in addition to weight gain under treatment. PMID:27375698

  3. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia: a heterogeneous disease that is not always iron refractory.

    PubMed

    Donker, Albertine E; Schaap, Charlotte C M; Novotny, Vera M J; Smeets, Roel; Peters, Tessa M A; van den Heuvel, Bert L P; Raphael, Martine F; Rijneveld, Anita W; Appel, Inge M; Vlot, Andre J; Versluijs, A Birgitta; van Gelder, Michel; Granzen, Bernd; Janssen, Mirian C H; Rennings, Alexander J M; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Brons, Paul P T; Bakkeren, Dirk L; Nijziel, Marten R; Vlasveld, L Thom; Swinkels, Dorine W

    2016-12-01

    TMPRSS6 variants that affect protein function result in impaired matriptase-2 function and consequently uninhibited hepcidin production, leading to iron refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA). This disease is characterized by microcytic, hypochromic anemia and serum hepcidin values that are inappropriately high for body iron levels. Much is still unknown about its pathophysiology, genotype-phenotype correlation, and optimal clinical management. We describe 14 different TMPRSS6 variants, of which 9 are novel, in 21 phenotypically affected IRIDA patients from 20 families living in the Netherlands; 16 out of 21 patients were female. In 7 out of 21 cases DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification demonstrated only heterozygous TMPRSS6 variants. The age at presentation, disease severity, and response to iron supplementation were highly variable, even for patients and relatives with similar TMPRSS6 genotypes. Mono-allelic IRIDA patients had a milder phenotype with respect to hemoglobin and MCV and presented significantly later in life with anemia than bi-allelic patients. Transferrin saturation (TSAT)/hepcidin ratios were lower in IRIDA probands than in healthy relatives. Most patients required parenteral iron. Genotype alone was not predictive for the response to oral iron. We conclude that IRIDA is a genotypically and phenotypically heterogeneous disease. The high proportion of female patients and the discrepancy between phenotypes of probands and relatives with the same genotype, suggest a complex interplay between genetic and acquired factors in the pathogenesis of IRIDA. In the absence of inflammation, the TSAT/hepcidin ratio is a promising diagnostic tool, even after iron supplementation has been given. Am. J. Hematol. 91:E482-E490, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Anemia and iron deficiency among schoolchildren in the Aral Sea region, Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, M; Kunii, O; Sasaki, S; Shimoda, T; Wakai, S; Mazhitova, Z; Dauletbaev, D; Caypil, W; Aldiyarova, M; Farmer, A; Yamashiro, Y; Chiba, M

    2003-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency among schoolchildren in the Aral Sea region of Kazakhstan and to determine the various factors associated with anemia in this population. We conducted a cross-sectional study of randomly selected schoolchildren. Blood samples were collected for measuring hemoglobin (Hb), serum ferritin (SF), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), and other hematological indices, and subjects were screened for anemia and iron deficiency. Associations between Hb concentration and SF, TIBC, anthropometric, and socioeconomic data were evaluated using regression analysis. The prevalence of anemia was 49.8 per cent although levels were mostly mild. Twenty-two per cent of the children were iron depleted (SF < 12 microg/l). Of the anemic children, 32.4 per cent were found to have iron deficiency anemia (anemia with SF < 12 microg/l). There were significant positive correlations between the levels of Hb and SF, but a negative correlation with serum TIBC. Age, mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and SF were found to be significantly related to Hb by stepwise multiple regression analysis. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that anemia was independently related to living district, education of father, and child's age. The results suggest that iron deficiency is an important determinant of anemia in this population; however, whole anemia cannot be solely explained by iron deficiency. Further studies are needed for consideration of micronutrients status, parasite infestation, hereditary disorders, and exposure to environmental pollutants.

  5. Fortification of drinking water to control iron-deficiency anemia in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Dutra-de-Oliveira, José Eduardo; Lamounier, Joel A; de Almeida, Carlos A Nogueira; Marchini, Julio Sergio

    2007-06-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common type of micronutrient malnutrition in the world. Its etiology and control are well understood, but the problem persists and is increasing in some developing countries. Iron fortification of mass-consumption foods is considered one of the most viable approaches to deliver bioavailable iron to the population. To review and analyze the use of drinking water as an iron vehicle to reduce ferropenic anemia in developing countries. Drinking water with added iron compounds was offered to preschool children at day-care centers in Brazil. Iron solutions were prepared with 10 mg to 20 mg iron/L. Clinical and anthropometric measurements and blood hemoglobin concentrations were obtained at the beginning of each study and 4 to 8 months later. No problems with acceptability or side effects were observed. Daily water intake by children was around 500 mL. Iron-deficiency anemia was found in all studies. Control children not receiving iron supplementation mantained their initial hemoglobin level. Anemia was reduced in the groups receiving iron-fortified drinking water. Based on physical properties, tests in rats, and studies on preschool children at Brazilian day-care centers, we have shown that drinking water locally fortified with iron compounds should be considered and used as a worldwide available vehicle to control iron-deficiency anemia. Drinking water, besides being universally available, is a locally available vehicle, easily fortified, can be a vehicle for hydrosoluble iron, and reduces iron-deficiency anemia in preschool children.

  6. [Iron dysregulation and anemias].

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Katsuya

    2015-10-01

    Most iron in the body is utilized as a component of hemoglobin that delivers oxygen to the entire body. Under normal conditions, the iron balance is tightly regulated. However, iron dysregulation does occasionally occur; total iron content reductions cause iron deficiency anemia and overexpression of the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin disturbs iron utilization resulting in anemia of chronic disease. Conversely, the presence of anemia may ultimately lead to iron overload; for example, thalassemia, a common hereditary anemia worldwide, often requires transfusion, but long-term transfusions cause iron accumulation that leads to organ damage and other poor outcomes. On the other hand, there is a possibility that iron overload itself can cause anemia; iron chelation therapy for the post-transfusion iron overload observed in myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia improves dependency on transfusions in some cases. These observations reflect the extremely close relationship between anemias and iron metabolism.

  7. Prevalence of Iron deficiency anemia in children with liver cirrhosis: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Zareifar, Soheila; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Rahanjam, Najmeh; Farahmand Far, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Among the many complications reported for cirrhosis, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) has attracted much attention. This type of anemia, in contrast to other types of anemia, is easy to treat prophylactically, but if left untreated can lead to a poor quality of life. The aim of this study was to estimate the hemoglobin and serum iron levels among patients with liver cirrhosis for the early diagnosis of IDA and to avoid unnecessary testing and iron supplementation. Subjects and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 88 children diagnosed with cirrhosis were included, and the values of hemoglobin, serum iron levels and relationship between serum iron (SI), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), prothrombine time (PT), international normalization ratio (INR), total and direct bilirubin and hepatic enzymes were estimated using paired t test, Mann-Whitney, Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results: Forty-six (52.3%) of 88 children were girls and 42 (47.7%) were boys. Forty-eight (54.5%) patients had anemia and 8 (9%) had iron deficiency anemia (5 boys, 5.6%, and 3 girls, 3.4%). No relationships were observed between iron deficiency anemia and the patient’s age or gender, whereas there was a relationship between iron deficiency and severity and duration of the disease, although the correlation was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The high frequency of iron deficiency anemia in children with cirrhosis (9%) suggests that timely screening should be used for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26261697

  8. Kleine–Levin syndrome with comorbid iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rajendra Singh; Kumar, Sunil; Srivastava, Trilochan; Sannegowda, Raghavendra Bakki

    2015-01-01

    Kleine–Levin syndrome (KLS) is a rare chronic sleep disorder of unknown etiopathology, which typically occurs in adolescent males. Although the severity of symptoms and disease course varies between the KLS patients, it usually resolves spontaneously, but sometime comorbid conditions may worsen the symptoms. Herein, we report a case of KLS who presented with severe episodic hypersomnia. During episodes, the patient used to sleep as long as 20 h in a day, affecting his daily living activities. All the relevant investigations including electroencephalography, magnetic resonance imaging of brain and cerebrospinal fluid analysis were normal except for severe iron deficiency anemia (IDA). In our patient, the severity of symptoms worsened due to coexistent IDA. The treatment of IDA along with modafinil decreased the severity of symptoms and shortened the hospital stay during episodes. This might be the first case report of KLS with comorbid IDA. PMID:26634130

  9. Iron supplementation as a strategy for the control of iron deficiency and ferropenic anemia.

    PubMed

    Viteri, F E

    1999-09-01

    Iron supplementation is a public health strategy designed for the prevention of iron deficiency and its consecutive anemia. It should be targeted, safe, flexible, long term and ideally, community based under the supervision of the health sector. It must be differentiated from iron therapy, even though, in the intermediate and long term it corrects mild-moderate deficiency of iron and ferropenic anemia. It should complement other measures for the control of iron deficiency. A summary of results comparing daily and intermittent iron supplementation (every 3-days in rats, and weekly in humans) is presented, including studies in an animal model, human supplementary-iron absorption studies, clinical research and field studies. It is concluded that intermittent iron supplementation is efficacious and, that in the long term it achieves an increase in iron reserves while avoiding sustained oxidative stress caused by current practices of excess daily iron supplementation, particularly in the developing world. The stage is set for long-term weekly iron supplementation programs in large population groups to determine its sustainability and effectiveness.

  10. An unusual case of iron deficiency anemia is associated with extremely low level of transferrin receptor.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuangying; Li, Huihui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Li, Juan; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-01-01

    A case study of a female patient, diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia, was unresponsive to oral iron treatment and only partially responsive to parenteral iron therapy, a clinical profile resembling the iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) disorder. However, the patient failed to exhibit microcytic phenotype, one of the IRIDA hallmarks. Biochemical assays revealed that serum iron, hepcidin, interluekin 6, and transferrin saturation were within the normal range of references or were comparable to her non-anemic offspring. Iron contents in serum and red blood cells and hemoglobin levels were measured, which confirmed the partial improvement of anemia after parenteral iron therapy. Strikingly, serum transferrin receptor in patient was almost undetectable, reflecting the very low activity of bone-marrow erythropoiesis. Our data demonstrate that this is not a case of systemic iron deficiency, but rather cellular iron deficit due to the low level of transferrin receptor, particularly in erythroid tissue.

  11. An unusual case of iron deficiency anemia is associated with extremely low level of transferrin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shuangying; Li, Huihui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Li, Juan; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-01-01

    A case study of a female patient, diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia, was unresponsive to oral iron treatment and only partially responsive to parenteral iron therapy, a clinical profile resembling the iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) disorder. However, the patient failed to exhibit microcytic phenotype, one of the IRIDA hallmarks. Biochemical assays revealed that serum iron, hepcidin, interluekin 6, and transferrin saturation were within the normal range of references or were comparable to her non-anemic offspring. Iron contents in serum and red blood cells and hemoglobin levels were measured, which confirmed the partial improvement of anemia after parenteral iron therapy. Strikingly, serum transferrin receptor in patient was almost undetectable, reflecting the very low activity of bone-marrow erythropoiesis. Our data demonstrate that this is not a case of systemic iron deficiency, but rather cellular iron deficit due to the low level of transferrin receptor, particularly in erythroid tissue. PMID:26339443

  12. Iron Deficiency and Other Types of Anemia in Infants and Children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mary

    2016-02-15

    Anemia, defined as a hemoglobin level two standard deviations below the mean for age, is prevalent in infants and children worldwide. The evaluation of a child with anemia should begin with a thorough history and risk assessment. Characterizing the anemia as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic based on the mean corpuscular volume will aid in the workup and management. Microcytic anemia due to iron deficiency is the most common type of anemia in children. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the World Health Organization recommend routine screening for anemia at 12 months of age; the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to assess the benefits vs. harms of screening. Iron deficiency anemia, which can be associated with cognitive issues, is prevented and treated with iron supplements or increased intake of dietary iron. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to recommend screening or treating pregnant women for iron deficiency anemia to improve maternal or neonatal outcomes. Delayed cord clamping can improve iron status in infancy, especially for at-risk populations, such as those who are preterm or small for gestational age. Normocytic anemia may be caused by congenital membranopathies, hemoglobinopathies, enzymopathies, metabolic defects, and immune-mediated destruction. An initial reticulocyte count is needed to determine bone marrow function. Macrocytic anemia, which is uncommon in children, warrants subsequent evaluation for vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies, hypothyroidism, hepatic disease, and bone marrow disorders.

  13. Serum zinc levels in patients with iron deficiency anemia and its association with symptoms of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Kelkitli, Engin; Ozturk, Nurinnisa; Aslan, Nevin Alayvaz; Kilic-Baygutalp, Nurcan; Bayraktutan, Zafer; Kurt, Nezahat; Bakan, Nuri; Bakan, Ebubekir

    2016-04-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a major public health problem especially in underdeveloped and developing countries. Zinc is the co-factor of several enzymes and plays a role in iron metabolism, so zinc deficiency is associated with IDA. In this study, it was aimed to investigate the relationship of symptoms of IDA and zinc deficiency in adult IDA patients. The study included 43 IDA patients and 43 healthy control subjects. All patients were asked to provide a detailed history and were subjected to a physical examination. The hematological parameters evaluated included hemoglobin (Hb); hematocrit (Ht); red blood cell (erythrocyte) count (RBC); and red cell indices mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (МСН), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (МСНС), and red cell distribution width (RDW). Anemia was defined according to the criteria defined by the World Health Organization (WHO). Serum zinc levels were measured in the flame unit of atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Symptoms attributed to iron deficiency or depletion, defined as fatigue, cardiopulmonary symptoms, mental manifestations, epithelial manifestations, and neuromuscular symptoms, were also recorded and categorized. Serum zinc levels were lower in anemic patients (103.51 ± 34.64 μ/dL) than in the control subjects (256.92 ± 88.54 μ/dL; <0.001). Patients with zinc level <99 μ/dL had significantly more frequent mental manifestations (p < 0.001), cardiopulmonary symptoms (p = 0.004), restless leg syndrome (p = 0.016), and epithelial manifestations (p < 0.001) than patients with zinc level > 100 μ/dL. When the serum zinc level was compared with pica, no statistically significant correlation was found (p = 0.742). Zinc is a trace element that functions in several processes in the body, and zinc deficiency aggravates IDA symptoms. Measurement of zinc levels and supplementation if necessary should be considered for IDA patients.

  14. Iron-deficiency anemia as a subclinical celiac disease presentation in an Argentinian population.

    PubMed

    Lasa, J S; Olivera, P; Soifer, L; Moore, R

    There is a wide heterogeneity in the reports of celiac disease prevalence in iron-deficiency anemia patients. To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Adult patients with a diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia were enrolled for upper endoscopy with duodenal biopsies. Healthy volunteers that underwent upper endoscopy were enrolled as controls. A total of 135 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and 133 controls were enrolled. Celiac disease prevalence was higher in the iron-deficiency anemia group [11.11 vs. 1.51%, OR: 8.18 (1.83-36.55), P=.001). Of the celiac disease patients in the iron-deficiency anemia group, 73.3% had at least one endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy, whereas 100% of the celiac disease patients in the control group presented with at least one endoscopic sign. Patients with iron-deficiency anemia have an increased risk for celiac disease. Up to 25% of these patients may not present any endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of unexplained anemia with iron deficiency without overt bleeding.

    PubMed

    Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eivindson, Martin; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius; Jensen, Nanna Martin; Jørgensen, Søren Peter; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Rasmussen, Morten; Nathan, Torben

    2015-04-01

    A general overview is given of the causes of anemia with iron deficiency as well as the pathogenesis of anemia and the para-clinical diagnosis of anemia. Anemia with iron deficiency but without overt GI bleeding is associated with a risk of malignant disease of the gastrointestinal tract; upper gastrointestinal cancer is 1/7 as common as colon cancer. Benign gastrointestinal causes of anemia are iron malabsorption (atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, chronic inflammation, and bariatric surgery) and chronic blood loss due to gastrointestinal ulcerations. The following diagnostic strategy is recommended for unexplained anemia with iron deficiency: conduct serological celiac disease screening with transglutaminase antibody (IgA type) and IgA testing and perform bidirectional endoscopy (gastroscopy and colonoscopy). Bidirectional endoscopy is not required in premenopausal women < 40 years of age. Small intestine investigation (capsule endoscopy, CT, or MRI enterography) is not recommended routinely after negative bidirectional endoscopy but should be conducted if there are red flags indicating malignant or inflammatory small bowel disease (e.g., involuntary weight loss, abdominal pain or increased CRP). Targeted treatment of any cause of anemia with iron deficiency found on diagnostic assessment should be initiated. In addition, iron supplementation should be administered, with the goal of normalizing hemoglobin levels and replenishing iron stores. Oral treatment with a 100-200 mg daily dose of elemental iron is recommended (lower dose if side effects), but 3-6 months of oral iron therapy is often required to achieve therapeutic goals. Intravenous iron therapy is used if oral treatment lacks efficacy or causes side effects or in the presence of intestinal malabsorption or prolonged inflammation. Three algorithms are given for the following conditions: a) the paraclinical diagnosis of anemia with iron deficiency; b) the diagnostic work-up for unexplained anemia with

  16. Association of severe early childhood caries with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Kalpana; Goyal, Meetu; Dhingra, Renuka

    2016-01-01

    Severe tooth decay is known to affect the health and well-being of young children. However, there has been minimal research showing the association of severe early childhood caries (S-ECC) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA). The primary aim of this study was to investigate an association between S-ECC with IDA. The secondary objective was to find an association between severe caries and body weight of the child. The oral health-related quality of life of children with S-ECC was also assessed. Following the ethical approval, 60 children aged 2-6 years (30 with S-ECC and 30 controls with caries status <2) were recruited for this cross-sectional association study. Each child received a clinical examination for dental caries status using deft index and a blood investigation to determine various parameters; hemoglobin (Hb), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and packed cell volume (PCV). Children underwent venipuncture after due parental consent, and 2.5 mL blood was collected from each child to evaluate the above parameters. Following this, the parents filled up a 10 point questionnaire to determine the child's quality of life. Data were then analyzed by t-test and Fischer's exact t-test. On comparison of percentage of children with IDA in S-ECC and control group, it was found that children with S-ECC were more likely to have IDA odds ratio (95% confidence interval): 10.77 (2.0, 104.9), (P = 0.001). In addition to this, S-ECC children were significantly more likely to have low Hb, MCV, and PCV levels (P < 0.001) which imply that S-ECC may be a risk marker for the development of anemia. More children (93%) with severe caries were found to have less body weight than ICMR standard weight for age as compared to children with low caries (P < 0.05%). S-ECC is strongly associated with the anemia due to iron deficiency, and efforts should be made toward the preventive and curative aspects of ECC, which may improve the general well-being and

  17. [Diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency, with or without anemia, before and after bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Jericó, Carlos; Bretón, Irene; García Ruiz de Gordejuela, Amador; de Oliveira, Ana Carla; Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Tinahones, Francisco J; Vidal, Josep; Vilarrasa, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery (BS) is an increasingly used therapeutic option for severe obesity which allows patients to achieve sustained weight loss over time and resolution or improvement in most associated pathological conditions. Major mid- and long-term complications of BS include iron deficiency and iron-deficient anemia, which may occur in up to 50% of cases and significantly impair patient quality of life. These changes may be present before surgery. The aim of this review was to prepare schemes for diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency and iron-deficient anemia before and after bariatric surgery.

  18. Prevention of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Infants and Children of Preschool Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fomon, Samuel J.

    Iron-deficiency anemia is almost certainly the most prevalent nutritional disorder among infants and young children in the United States. Anemia is frequently seen among children of low socioeconomic status but is probably also the most frequent nutritional deficiency disease seen among children cared for by private doctors. Possible reasons for…

  19. Effects of a Tripeptide Iron on Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chen; Lei, Xingen; Wang, Qingyu; Du, Zhongyao; Jiang, Lu; Chen, Silu; Zhang, Mingjie; Zhang, Hao; Ren, Fazheng

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of a tripeptide iron (REE-Fe) on iron-deficiency anemia rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into seven groups: a normal control group, an iron-deficiency control group, and iron-deficiency groups treated with ferrous sulfate (FeSO4), ferrous glycinate (Fe-Gly), or REE-Fe at low-, medium-, or high-dose groups. The rats in the iron-deficiency groups were fed on an iron-deficient diet to establish iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) model. After the model established, different iron supplements were given to the rats once a day by intragastric administration for 21 days. The results showed that REE-Fe had effective restorative action returning body weight, organ coefficients, and hematological parameters in IDA rats to normal level. In addition, comparing with FeSO4 or Fe-Gly, high-dose REE-Fe was more effective on improving the levels of renal coefficient, total iron-binding capacity, and transferrin. Furthermore, the liver hepcidin messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in the high-dose group was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that in the FeSO4 or Fe-Gly group and showed no significant difference (p > 0.05) with the normal control group. The findings suggest that REE-Fe is an effective source of iron supplement for IDA rats and might be exploited as a new iron fortifier.

  20. Iron deficiency anemia in predominantly breastfed young children.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shu-Fan; Chen, Shu-Jen; Yen, Hsiu-Ju; Hung, Giun-Yi; Tsao, Pei-Chen; Jeng, Mei-Jy; Lee, Yu-Sheng; Soong, Wen-Jue; Tang, Ren-Bin

    2014-12-01

    Due to the increase of breastfeeding in infants, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) related to prolonged, predominant breastfeeding should be of concern. Mostly, the manifestation of IDA is indistinguishable and the enthusiastic advocacy of breastfeeding without concomitant education of complementary food may lead to ignorance of breast milk-related IDA, which may result in impaired psychomotor development of the baby. This retrospective study was conducted to re-emphasize this easily ignored but still prevalent illness. This retrospective study involved 15 breastfeeding babies who were diagnosed with IDA between January 2007 and December 2010 at age 6-18 months. The clinical presentation, age at diagnosis, initial hemoglobin level and mean corpuscular volume, growth percentile, and duration of treatment were recorded and analyzed. None of the babies was suspected to have anemia by caregivers. Pallor was noticed by physicians in nine patients; one patient had seizure, one patient had pica, and, for the remaining four patients, IDA was diagnosed incidentally due to other medical events. Oral iron supplementation for an average of 3.6 months improved both hemoglobin level (from 8.0 g/dL to 11.5 g/dL) and mean corpuscular volume (from 57.5 fL to 73.9 fL). Most babies had appropriate growth and normal neurological development; two babies had both IDA and thalassemia. Although the association of IDA with prolonged, predominant breastfeeding is well known, its presentation is so subtle that its detection relies mainly on alert medical personnel. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. [Iron deficiency anemia and anemia in chronic celiac disease in children].

    PubMed

    Bel'mer, S V; Mitina, E V; Karpina, L M; Smetanina, N S

    2014-01-01

    Anemia in celiac disease (CD) may be associated with deficiency of iron, vitamins, macro- and micronutrients. It is also possible the development of chronic disease anemia (CDA), associated with activation of proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of this work is to optimize the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease in children on the basis of study of iron metabolism disorders heterogeneity, including the role of CDA. We observed 34 children with CD aged 1.5 to 17 years, 27 of them children were observed both in the active stage of the disease and in remission. The control group included 25 children aged 1.2 to 17 years who were previously excluded for any chronic (including autoimmune) disease: these children were observed with chronic functional gastrointestinal motility disorders. Special methods of examination were study of iron metabolism, including the determination of the serum hepcidin level, as well as the determination of the serum proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor [TNF] -α, interleukin [IL] -2, IL-6, IL-10). In active CD in 14.71% of children anemia of varying severity (mild or moderate) were diagnosed. Among these children we observed mild decrease of serum iron in the range 2.2-8.0 g/ml in 15 of 34 children (44%) and a marked reduction in serum ferritin level in 59% of children. In the active celiac disease in the majority of children there is a decrease in the serum hepcidin, but approximately in 20% of children serum hepcidin level was increased. This indicates the development of CDA in these children. During the active stage the average values of IL-2 was significantly increased (p < 0.05). Thus, the iron metabolism disorders in celiac disease is a result of immunopathological process which results in a reduction in iron absorption in the gut due to the intestinal mucosa villous atrophy and to improve the hepcidin production by liver cells and iron depot blocking with the CDA development in 20% of children.

  2. [THE DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTIC POSSIBILITIES IN EVALUATION OF IRON-DEFICIENT CONDITION UNDER ANEMIAS].

    PubMed

    Zubrikhina, G N; Blindar, V N; Matveeva, I I

    2016-03-01

    The article presents data concerning differential diagnostic possibilities of evaluation of genuine iron-deficient anemia and anemia of chronic diseases. The variety of mechanisms of development of anemia of chronic diseases is demonstrated, including effect of humoral inhibitors of erythropoiesis, disorder of iron metabolism at the expense of its redistribution into cells of macrophage system, suppression of erythropoiesis resulted in redistributed or functional iron deficiency. The data is presented concerning significance in diagnostic of anemia of chronic diseases of such factors as content of ferritin, dissolving receptors of transferrin and role of hepcidin protein in pathogenesis of anemia of chronic diseases. The analysis of scientific publications demonstrated that hepcidin is a negative regulator of iron metabolism. Under iron-deficient anemia its level in blood decreases that contribute to extensive absorption of iron in gastrointestinal tract. On the contrary, under anemia of chronic diseases its content drastically increases and results in blocking of iron transport everywhere, including internal epithelium, macrophages, placenta and other types of cells. The hyper-production of hepcidin during infection and inflammation is responsible for anemia of chronic diseases. The perspectives of development of pharmaceuticals decreasing level of hepcidin for treatment of anemia of chronic diseases is demonstrated.

  3. Iron polymaltose versus ferrous gluconate in the prevention of iron deficiency anemia of infancy.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Lutfi; Rigler, Shmuel; Taya, Ahmad; Tebi, Fadel; Baloum, Mohamad; Yaniv, Isaac; Haj Yehia, Mohamad; Tamary, Hanna

    2010-11-01

    We prospectively compared the efficacy and safety of iron deficiency anemia prophylaxis with iron gluconate (IG) or iron polymaltose complex (IPC) in healthy infants attending a community pediatric center. Participants were randomly assigned to receive one of the test drugs from age 4 to 6 months to age 12 months. Parents/guardians were given extensive information on iron-rich diets and anemia prevention. Main outcome measures were blood levels of hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, red blood cell distribution width, and serum iron, ferritin, and transferrin, in addition to adverse effects. One hundred five children completed the study: 53 in the IG group and 52 in the IPC group Mean hemoglobin levels at study end were significantly higher in the IG group (12.04±0.09 g/dL vs. 11.68±0.11, P<0.014). A hemoglobin level <11 g/dL was detected in 3 infants of the IG group, and in 10 infants of the IPC group (P<0.04). Adverse effects (spitting, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, discolored teeth) were significantly more common in the IG group (47% vs. 25%, P>0.025). In conclusion, both oral IG and IPC prevent iron deficiency anemia in infants. Iron gluconate seems to be more effective but less tolerable.

  4. Low prevalence of iron deficiency anemia between 1981 and 2010 in Chilean women of childbearing age.

    PubMed

    Ríos-Castillo, Israel; Brito, Alex; Olivares, Manuel; López-de Romaña, Daniel; Pizarro, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of anemia and iron status among Chilean women of childbearing age between 1981 and 2010. Calculation of the prevalence of anemia and iron status was based on multiple cross-sectional iron absorption studies performed in 888 women during this period of time. All studies included measurements of hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, zinc protoporphyrin, percentage of transferrin saturation and serum ferritin. Data were grouped by decade (1981-1990, 1991-2000, and 2001-2010). Prevalence of anemia for these decades was 9, 6 and 10%, respectively (p=NS). Iron deficiency anemia was the main cause of anemia in all periods (55, 85 and 75%, respectively; p=NS). A high prevalence of women with normal iron status was observed for all periods (64, 69, and 67, respectively; p=NS). Prevalence of iron deficiency without anemia in 1981-1990, 1991-2000 and 2001-2010 was 7, 20 and 12%, respectively (p<0.05). Finally, prevalence of iron depleted stores was 20, 6 and 10%, respectively (p<0.05). Prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in Chilean women of childbearing age was mild between 1981 and 2010. More than 60% of childbearing age women presented normal iron status in all periods. However, prevalence of iron depleted stores was moderate during 1981-1990, and was mild during 1991-2000 and 2001-2010.

  5. Iron Deficiency Anemia: Focus on Infectious Diseases in Lesser Developed Countries

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Julia G.; Friedman, Jennifer F.

    2011-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is thought to affect the health of more than one billion people worldwide, with the greatest burden of disease experienced in lesser developed countries, particularly women of reproductive age and children. This greater disease burden is due to both nutritional and infectious etiologies. Individuals in lesser developed countries have diets that are much lower in iron, less access to multivitamins for young children and pregnant women, and increased rates of fertility which increase demands for iron through the life course. Infectious diseases, particularly parasitic diseases, also lead to both extracorporeal iron loss and anemia of inflammation, which decreases bioavailability of iron to host tissues. This paper will address the unique etiologies and consequences of both iron deficiency anemia and the alterations in iron absorption and distribution seen in the context of anemia of inflammation. Implications for diagnosis and treatment in this unique context will also be discussed. PMID:21738863

  6. Anemia and iron deficiency in heart failure: mechanisms and therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Anker, Stefan D; Ponikowski, Piotr; Macdougall, Iain C

    2011-05-31

    Anemia and iron deficiency are common in patients with heart failure (HF), and are associated with worse symptoms and adverse outcomes in this population. Although the two can occur together, anemia in HF is often not caused by iron deficiency, and iron deficiency can be present without causing anemia. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents have been investigated extensively in the past few years and might be of benefit in patients with HF and anemia. However, concerns have arisen regarding the safety of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in patients with chronic kidney disease and so the results of a large mortality trial are eagerly awaited to provide information on safety in patients with HF. Iron supplementation or replacement is a much older treatment option for patients with HF and anemia, but questions about the safety of intravenous iron, and absorption problems with oral formulations have prevented its widespread use to date. In the past few years, however, new data on the importance of iron deficiency in HF have become available, and a number of studies with intravenous iron have shown promising results. Therefore, this treatment approach is likely to become an attractive option for patients with HF and iron deficiency, both with and without anemia.

  7. [Evaluation of treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    O'Farrill-Santoscoy, Fernando; O'Farrill-Cadena, Marcela; Fragoso-Morales, Lilia Esperanza

    2013-07-01

    Pregnancy is a condition that predisposes women to anemia, a problem which is easily solved with the identification of susceptible patients and with proper treatment. To determine the prevalence of anemia in the study group, the characteristics of the patients, and assess the impact of iron therapy in anemic pregnant women. A retrospective study was done in 98 pregnant patients who attended a medical office in San Luis Potosi, S.L.P, between 2010 and 2011. The studied variables were: hemoglobin and hematocrit concentration for anemia diagnosis. Statistical analysis was performed using Epi Info-7 for the association between variables. The prevalence of anemia found in the study was 4.08% in the first weeks of gestation. 75% of those patients were overweight or obese, and as the pregnancy progressed prevalence increased to 16.32%. The patients whose anemia was detected between weeks 28-33 of gestation had 4.58 times the risk of having it than those who were detected in the first trimester (p < .05). While anemia was more frequent among women with overweight or obesity 5% (n = 3), no statistically significant difference with normal weight women was observed in early pregnancy. The prevalence of anemia increased as pregnancy progressed, therefore It is necessary that the physician requests the patient 3 or 4 blood studies to keep adequate prenatal care and have the opportunity for early detection of anemia.

  8. [Prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in pregnant adolescents from northwest Mexico, 2007-2008].

    PubMed

    Méndez Estrada, Rosa Olivia; Pacheco, Bertha; Noriega Verdugo, Hypathia; Quihui, Luis; Morales, Guadalupe; Valencia, Mauro E

    2009-06-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) remains a word public health problem, particularly in children and child-bearing-age women. Iron demands need to be covered by adolescent women due to the increased physical growing, menstruation, pregnancy and fetal growing tissues at this life stage. This study was proposed to investigate the prevalence of iron deficiency and IDA in pregnant adolescent women from Northwestern Mexico. Participated 186 women under 19 years old during the first or second trimester of pregnancy who attended the local health institutions in Hermosillo Sonora. Questionnaires and 24 hr recalls were administered to collect socioeconomic and dietary information respectively. Hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit, ferritin and eritrocytic protoporphyrin were measured. Hb and ferritin values were used to categorize the recruited women into normal (37.4%), iron deficient (55.5%) and IDA (7.1%) groups. Six and seven women showed moderated and light anemia status in the IDA group. Fe and fiber intake and weeks of pregnancy were associated with the biochemical indicators of iron at least in two women groups. The high percentage of iron deficient women in this study is demanding the identification and attention of maternal factors and food habits that are risk of iron deficiency in pregnant women.

  9. [Current recommendations for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia].

    PubMed

    Schaefer, R M; Huch, R; Krafft, A

    2007-04-04

    Iron deficiency is a frequent complication in chronically ill patients and in pregnant women. Iron status can now be characterised precisely and relatively easily by determining serum ferritin, transferritin saturation and if necessary hypochromic erythrocytes and the haemoglobin content of erythrocytes (CHr). Oral iron replacement is usually restricted by limited absorption and low tolerability. Intravenous iron therapy is possible in such cases and can be combined with rHuEPO (e.g. EPREX/ epoetin alfa) in severe cases. Iron saccharate (VENOFER) is commercially available in Switzerland and this permits high dose iron replacement without any danger of anaphylaxis or acute iron toxicity.

  10. Iron deficiency anemia and affective response in rhesus monkey infants.

    PubMed

    Golub, Mari S; Hogrefe, Casey E; Widaman, Keith F; Capitanio, John P

    2009-01-01

    Infant iron deficiency anemia (IDA) occurs spontaneously in monkey populations as it does in humans, providing a model for understanding effects on brain and behavior. A set of 34 monkey infants identified as IDA (hemoglobin <11 g/dl) over a 5-year period at the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) was compared to a set of 57 controls (hemoglobin >12 g/dl) matched for age and caging location. The infants had participated in a Biobehavioral Assessment conducted at 3-4 months of age at CNPRC that included measures of behavioral and adrenocortical response to a novel environment. IDA males differed from control males in two factors ("activity," "emotionality") derived from observational data taken on the first and second day of the exposure to the novel environment. In the male infants, IDA was associated with less restriction of activity in the novel environment on both days and less emotionality on the second day (p < .05). IDA males also displayed less response to approach by a human (human intruder test) than did control males. IDA females did not differ from controls. Adrenocortical response was not significantly affected. These findings may be relevant to functional deficits in human infants with IDA that influence later behavior.

  11. Iron Deficiency Anemia and Affective Response in Rhesus Monkey Infants

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Mari S.; Hogrefe, Casey E.; Capitanio, John P.; Widaman, Keith F.

    2012-01-01

    Infant iron deficiency anemia (IDA) occurs spontaneously in monkey populations as it does in humans, providing a model for understanding effects on brain and behavior. A set of 34 monkey infants identified as IDA (hemoglobin <11 g/dL) over a 5-year period at the California National Primate Research Center (CNPRC) was compared to a set of 57 controls (hemoglobin >12 g/dL) matched for age and caging location. The infants had participated in a Biobehavioral Assessment conducted at 3–4 months of age at CNPRC that included measures of behavioral and adrenocortical response to a novel environment. IDA males differed from control males in two factors (“activity”, “emotionality”) derived from observational data taken on the first and second day of the exposure to the novel environment. In the male infants, IDA was associated with less restriction of activity in the novel environment on both days and less emotionality on the second day (p<.05). IDA males also displayed less response to approach by a human (human intruder test) than did control males. IDA females did not differ from controls. Adrenocortical response was not significantly affected. These findings may be relevant to functional deficits in human infants with IDA that influence later behavior. PMID:18814183

  12. Effect of Iron Deficiency Anemia on Hemoglobin A1c Levels

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Nitin; Mishra, T.K.; Singh, Tejinder

    2012-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia in India. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is used in diabetic patients as an index of glycemic control reflecting glucose levels of the previous 3 months. Like blood sugar levels, HbA1c levels are also affected by the presence of variant hemoglobins, hemolytic anemias, nutritional anemias, uremia, pregnancy, and acute blood loss. However, reports on the effects of iron deficiency anemia on HbA1c levels are inconsistent. We conducted a study to analyze the effects of iron deficiency anemia on HbA1c levels and to assess whether treatment of iron deficiency anemia affects HbA1c levels. Methods Fifty patients confirmed to have iron deficiency anemia were enrolled in this study. HbA1c and absolute HbA1c levels were measured both at baseline and at 2 months after treatment, and these values were compared with those in the control population. Results The mean baseline HbA1c level in anemic patients (4.6%) was significantly lower than that in the control group (5.5%, p<0.05). A significant increase was observed in the patients' absolute HbA1c levels at 2 months after treatment (0.29 g/dL vs. 0.73 g/dL, p<0.01). There was a significant difference between the baseline values of patients and controls (0.29 g/dL vs. 0.74 g/dL, p<0.01). Conclusions In contrast to the observations of previous studies, ours showed that HbA1c levels and absolute HbA1c levels increased with treatment of iron deficiency anemia. This could be attributable to nutritional deficiency and/or certain unknown variables. Further studies are warranted. PMID:22259774

  13. Low Vitamin D Levels: Are Associated with Both Iron Deficiency and Anemia in Children and Adolescents?

    PubMed

    Kartal, Ömer; Kartal, Ayşe Tuğba

    2015-01-01

    We have read, with great interest, the recent article by Lee. In this excellent study, the authors investigated the association between vitamin D deficiency and anemia in a nationally representative sample of Korean children and adolescents. They concluded that vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased risk of anemia, especially iron deficiency anemia, in healthy female children and adolescents. We appreciate and congratulate the authors for having addressed such an important issue. However, we have some concerns regarding this report, which we would like to share with you. As a result, further studies are needed for the association between vitamin D deficiency and anemia. Factors affecting Vitamin D status and anemia such as measurement method, nutrition, medications, and infections should be considered to conclude an association between vitamin D and anemia. Therefore, we think that considering these confounders would add value to this well-written article.

  14. Effect of Maternal Iron Deficiency Anemia on the Iron Store of Newborns in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Birhanu, Asaye; Nigussie, Paulos; Tsegaye, Aster

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia among pregnant women is a widespread problem in developing countries including Ethiopia, though its influence on neonatal iron status was inconsistently reported in literature. This cross-sectional study was conducted to compare hematologic profiles and iron status of newborns from mothers with different anemia status and determine correlation between maternal and neonatal hematologic profiles and iron status in Ethiopian context. We included 89 mothers and their respective newborns and performed complete blood count and assessed serum ferritin and C-reactive protein levels from blood samples collected from study participants. Maternal median hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels were 12.2 g/dL and 47.0 ng/mL, respectively. The median hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels for the newborns were 16.2 g/dL and 187.6 ng/mL, respectively. The mothers were classified into two groups based on hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels as iron deficient anemic (IDA) and nonanemic (NA) and newborns of IDA mothers had significantly lower levels of serum ferritin (P = 0.017) and hemoglobin concentration (P = 0.024). Besides, newborns' ferritin and hemoglobin levels showed significant correlation with maternal hemoglobin (P = 0.018; P = 0.039) and ferritin (P = 0.000; P = 0.008) levels. We concluded that maternal IDA may have an effect on the iron stores of newborns. PMID:25734012

  15. Screening for Iron Deficiency Anemia in Young Children: USPSTF Recommendation Statement.

    PubMed

    Siu, Albert L

    2015-10-01

    Update of the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) 2006 recommendation on screening for iron deficiency anemia. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the association between change in iron status as a result of intervention and improvement in child health outcomes, as well as screening for and treatment of iron deficiency anemia with oral iron formulations, in children ages 6 to 24 months. This recommendation applies to children ages 6 to 24 months living in the United States who are asymptomatic for iron deficiency anemia. It does not apply to children younger than age 6 months or older than 24 months, children who are severely malnourished, children who were born prematurely or with low birth weight, or children who have symptoms of iron deficiency anemia. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for iron deficiency anemia in children ages 6 to 24 months. (I statement). Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. Anemia, iron deficiency, and stress fractures in female combatants during 16 months.

    PubMed

    Yanovich, Ran; Merkel, Drorit; Israeli, Eran; Evans, Rachel K; Erlich, Tomer; Moran, Daniel S

    2011-12-01

    Yanovich, R, Merkel, D, Israeli, E, Evans, RK, Erlich, T, and Moran, DS. Anemia, iron deficiency, and stress fractures in female combatants during 16 months. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3412-3421, 2011-The purpose of this study is to evaluate the hematological profile of military recruits in different settings and training programs and to investigate the link between anemia and iron deficiency with stress fracture (SF) occurrence. We surveyed 3 groups of recruits for 16 months: 221 women (F) and 78 men (M) from 3 different platoons of a gender-integrated combat battalion and a control group (CF) of 121 female soldiers from a noncombat unit. Data were fully collected upon induction and at 4 and 16 months from 48F, 21M, and 31CF. Blood tests, anthropometry, physical aerobic fitness, and SF occurrence were evaluated. On induction day, 18.0 and 19.0% of F and CF were found to be anemic, and 61.4 and 50.9%, respectively, were found to have iron deficiency, whereas 7.7% of M were found to be anemic and 10.2% iron deficient. During the 4 months of army basic training (ABT), anemia and iron deficiency prevalence did not change significantly in any group. After 16-months, anemia prevalence decreased by 8% among F and CF and abated in M. Iron deficiency was prevalent in 50.0, 59.4, and 18.8% of F, CF, and M, respectively. Stress fractures were diagnosed in 14 F during ABT, and they had a significantly higher prevalence (p < 0.05) of anemia and iron deficiency anemia compared to F without SFs. The observed link between anemia and iron deficiency on recruitment day and SFs suggests the importance of screening female combat recruits for these deficiencies. To minimize the health impact of army service on female soldiers, preventative measures related to anemia and iron deficiency should be administered. Further research is needed for evaluating the influence of low iron in kosher meat as a possible explanation for the high prevalence of iron deficiency among young Israeli

  17. Physicochemical properties and inhibition effect on iron deficiency anemia of a novel polysaccharide-iron complex (LPPC).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Shan; Wang, Xiao-Mei; Han, Zhi-Ping; Yin, Li; Zhao, Ming-Xing; Yu, Shu-Chi

    2012-01-01

    Porphyran (P) was extracted from red algae Porphyra by boiling water. A novel polysaccharide-iron complex (LPPC) was prepared under the alkaline condition by adding a ferric chloride solution to the low molecular weight porphyran (LP) solution. Physicochemical properties and inhibition effect on iron deficiency anemia of this complex were studied. The content of iron(III) in the complex is 21.57% determined with iodometry. The results indicate that LPPC was product required. The complex can increase red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), Serum iron (SI), spleen index, spleen mass and mass of mice with iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Although the structure and deeper mechanisms on hemolytic anemia of LPPC should be further studied, LPPC is hoped to be developed as a late-model iron supplement which has a synergism on anemia. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of iron treatment on adhesion molecules in patients with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Arif; Kebapcilar, Levent; Erdur, Erkan; Bozkaya, Giray; Sari, Ismail; Alacacioglu, Ahmet; Kebapcilar, Ayse Gul; Sop, Gulten

    2010-12-01

    The present study was aimed to determine the effect of iron supplementation on levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) in patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA). In this study, 26 female patients diagnosed with iron deficiency were treated approximately 3 months of oral iron supplementation (99 ± 10 days; ferrous glycine sulfate; 100 mg/day of elemental iron). Levels of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 were assessed prior to treatment and after approximately 3 months of treatment and compared with 26 healthy female subjects. A significant increase in sVCAM levels was found in the patients with iron deficiency at the end of the treatment relative to pretreatment levels compared to controls, whereas no significant differences were determined in sICAM levels. In the posttreatment period, no significant change was observed in sICAM levels compared to the pretreatment levels, whereas sVCAM levels decreased. However, after the treatment period, the sVCAM, hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), and serum ferritin levels did not return to the normal range compared to the controls. Pretreatment sVCAM-1 levels were inversely correlated with levels of hemoglobin, hemotocrit, MCV, serum iron, and ferritin. After treatment, the sVCAM-1 levels were negatively correlated with ferritin levels. Levels of sVCAM were significantly higher in patients with IDA than controls. After the treatment period, the sVCAM levels were not completely normalized in patients with IDA compared to controls, regardless of the presence of inadequate levels of hemoglobin, MCV, and serum ferritin. Thus, iron supplementation not only ameliorates anemia, but may also reduce the inflammation markers in cases with IDA.

  19. Management of anemia and iron deficiency in a cancer center in France.

    PubMed

    Laï-Tiong, Florence; Brami, Cloé; Dubroeucq, Olivier; Scotté, Florian; Curé, Hervé; Jovenin, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Anemia affects most patients treated for cancer by chemotherapy. It is a known major contributor to fatigue and loss of quality of life and is likely to have a negative effect on prognosis and mortality from cancer. The main purpose of this study was to characterize the management of anemia and iron deficiency in a French oncology day-care center. A retrospective study was conducted between May and November 2012 in the oncology day unit of the Jean Godinot Cancer Center (France). The 133 patients included were all over the age of 18 and being treated by chemotherapy and had mild, moderate, or severe anemia. Over half (58%) the patients were shown to be receiving no specific treatment for anemia. Iron balance was assessed in 71 patients and iron deficiency diagnosed in 37. Stepwise logistic regression showed that patients with severe to moderate anemia were nearly four times more likely to have an iron balance assessment than those with mild anemia (OR, 3.78; 95% CI, 1.84-7.76; P = 0.0003). Classical logistic regression shows that older patients (≥70) are three times less likely to have an iron balance assessment than patients <70 years (OR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.12-0.86; P = 0.06). An ideal medical setting for the management of anemia and iron deficiency, and the associated quality-of-life concerns, has yet to be defined for patients with cancer. Screening and treatment of mild to moderate anemia are inadequate, despite the advent of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Large scale, multicenter studies are required to define a clear medical framework for the management of anemia and iron deficiency.

  20. Cost effectiveness of routine duodenal biopsies in iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Broide, Efrat; Matalon, Shay; Kriger-Sharabi, Ofra; Richter, Vered; Shirin, Haim; Leshno, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the cost effectiveness of routine small bowel biopsies (SBBs) in patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) independent of their celiac disease (CD) serology test results. METHODS We used a state transition Markov model. Two strategies were compared: routine SBBs during esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in all patients with IDA regardless their celiac serology status (strategy A) vs SBBs only in IDA patients with positive serology (strategy B). The main outcomes were quality adjusted life years (QALY), average cost and the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER). One way sensitivity analysis was performed on all variables and two way sensitivity analysis on selected variables were done. In order to validate the results, a Monte Carlo simulation of 100 sample trials with 10, and an acceptability curve were performed. RESULTS Strategy A of routine SBBs yielded 19.888 QALYs with a cost of $218.10 compared to 19.887 QALYs and $234.17 in strategy B. In terms of cost-effectiveness, strategy A was the dominant strategy, as long as the cost of SBBs stayed less than $67. In addition, the ICER of strategy A was preferable, providing the cost of biopsy stays under $77. Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated that strategy A yielded the same QALY but with lower costs than strategy B. CONCLUSION Our model suggests that EGD with routine SBBs is a cost-effective approach with improved QALYs in patients with IDA when the prevalence of CD is 5% or greater. SBBs should be a routine screening tool for CD among patients with IDA, regardless of their celiac antibody status. PMID:27678365

  1. Coexistence of Essential Thrombocythemia, Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia and Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tekgündüz, Emre; Altuntaş, Fevzi

    2016-01-01

    Essential thrombocythemia (ET) is a Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-negative myeloproliferative neoplasm. It is characterized by thrombocytosis and megakaryocytic hyperplasia of the bone marrow with JAK2V617F mutation. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) is an autosomal recessive disorder, which is mainly characterized by iron deficiency anemia not responding to oral iron intake, but partially responding to parenteral iron therapy. Recently, it has been shown that IRIDA has stemmed from mutations in the gene TMPRSS6, which encodes a transmembrane serine protease (matriptase-2) expressed by the liver. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 2-3% of all cancers. As the most common solid lesion in the kidneys, it represents approximately 90% of all renal malignancies. Approximately 30% of patients with symptomatic RCCs seem to display paraneoplastic syndromes. The symptom that may result from erythrocytosis is the most well-known paraneoplastic hematological event. Here, we report a patient who presents with coexistence of RCC and thrombocytosis, which hasn’t been caused by hormonal factors that are produced in tumor cells. This patient has been therefore diagnosed with ET. The patient who was expected to display RCC with polycythemia, conversely present with IRIDA. PMID:27103977

  2. Coexistence of Essential Thrombocythemia, Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia and Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Namdaroğlu, Sinem; Tekgündüz, Emre; Altuntaş, Fevzi

    2016-03-17

    Essential thrombocythemia (ET) is a Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-negative myeloproliferative neoplasm. It is characterized by thrombocytosis and megakaryocytic hyperplasia of the bone marrow with JAK2V617F mutation. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) is an autosomal recessive disorder, which is mainly characterized by iron deficiency anemia not responding to oral iron intake, but partially responding to parenteral iron therapy. Recently, it has been shown that IRIDA has stemmed from mutations in the gene TMPRSS6, which encodes a transmembrane serine protease (matriptase-2) expressed by the liver. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 2-3% of all cancers. As the most common solid lesion in the kidneys, it represents approximately 90% of all renal malignancies. Approximately 30% of patients with symptomatic RCCs seem to display paraneoplastic syndromes. The symptom that may result from erythrocytosis is the most well-known paraneoplastic hematological event. Here, we report a patient who presents with coexistence of RCC and thrombocytosis, which hasn't been caused by hormonal factors that are produced in tumor cells. This patient has been therefore diagnosed with ET. The patient who was expected to display RCC with polycythemia, conversely present with IRIDA.

  3. Iron Deficiency and Anemia among Collegiate Athletes: A Retrospective Chart Review.

    PubMed

    Parks, Rachel B; Hetzel, Scott J; Brooks, M Alison

    2017-08-01

    To describe the prevalence of anemia among incoming female college athletes and to characterize the results and expenses of iron-related testing at one National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I institution. In this retrospective medical record review, hemoglobin (Hgb) and ferritin laboratory values were obtained for student-athletes at a single institution, 2002 to 2014. Laboratories were collected either as part of the preparticipation examination (PPE) for female athletes, routine screening for cross-country athletes, or as needed for medical evaluation. Anemia was defined as Hgb < 11.6 g·dL for females and < 13.6 g·dL for male athletes. Iron deficiency was defined as Fer < 20 ng·mL for both sexes. A total of 5674 laboratory draws were obtained for 2749 individuals (56% female) from 25 different teams. The prevalence of low Hgb among female athletes at PPE was 5.7% (95% confidence interval, 4.4%-6.9%). At PPE, the incidence of anemia was not significantly higher for any sport when compared with the group mean. Ferritin and Hgb were collected together in approximately one third of all blood draws from females (n = 1059) and one sixth of blood draws from males (n = 411). For female athletes, 2.2% indicated iron deficiency anemia and 30.9% indicated iron deficiency without anemia. For male athletes, 1.2% indicated iron deficiency anemia and 2.9% indicated iron deficiency without anemia. The median cost of iron testing exceeded US $20,000 annually for the institution. One in 20 incoming female athletes was identified with anemia at the PPE. Given the costs of testing, screening practices at each institution should be thoughtfully selected and routinely reassessed.

  4. Clinical efficacy of two forms of intravenous iron--saccharated ferric oxide and cideferron--for iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Takaai, M; Miyazaki, A; Ohshima, S; Shibamiya, T; Nakamura, T; Yamamoto, K

    2012-12-01

    Over 90% of iron deficiency anemia cases are due to iron deficiency associated with depletion of stored iron or inadequate intake. Parenteral iron supplementation is an important part of the management of anemia, and some kinds of intravenous iron are used. However, few studies have evaluated the clinical efficacy of these drugs. The purpose of this study was to compare and assess the clinical efficacy of two types of intravenous iron injection, saccharated ferric oxide (SFO) and cideferron (CF). Medical records were obtained for 91 unrelated Japanese anemia patients treated with SFO (n = 37) or CF (n = 54) from May 2005 to May 2010 at Gunma University Hospital. Patients treated with blood transfusion, erythropoietin or oral iron were excluded. Hemoglobin (Hb) values measured on day 0, 7 and 14 were used to assess the efficacy of intravenous irons. A significant increase was observed in the mean Hb value by day 14 of administration in both the CF group and SFO group, and the mean Hb increase due to administration of CF for 7 days was comparable to that of SFO for 14 days. Age and sex did not affect improvement of Hb value. CF is fast acting and highly effective compared with SFO for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia. The use of CF may shorten a therapeutic period for iron deficiency anemia, and CF may be feasible for reducing the hospitalization period.

  5. The effect of iron deficiency anemia on intelligence quotient (IQ) in under 17 years old students.

    PubMed

    Goudarzi, A; Mehrabi, M R; Goudarzi, K

    2008-05-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of iron deficiency on intelligence of 11-17 years students. This study conducted on the 540 students (11-17 years) that educated at guidance and high school of Boroujerd city. Laboratory investigations were included serum iron, TIBC (total iron binding capacity) and ferretin. Riven matrix was used in order to determine intelligence quotient. Data were analyzed using SPSS 13 and chi2 and t-tests. Results showed that 78 (14.4%) students had iron deficiency and 14 (25.9%) had iron deficiency anemia. There was no significant difference between different sexes for iron deficiency distribution (p > 0.05), while iron deficiency anemia was significantly higher in girls as compared with boys (p > 0.05). Mean quotient was 115 +/- 12.1 in iron deficiency students, while it was 113.7 +/- 13.9 in patients without iron deficiency. There was also no significant difference between normal and iron deficient students for intelligence quotient (p > 0.05).

  6. Iron deficiency anemia and increased urinary norepinephrine excretion.

    PubMed

    Voorhess, M L; Stuart, M J; Stockman, J A; Oski, F A

    1975-04-01

    Chronic iron deficiency in rats resulted in decreased MAO activity both in vitro and in vivo. Since MAO is an important enzyme in inactivation of catecholamines, urinary excretion of DA, NE, E, MN-NMN, and VMA was measured in 24-hour samples from 11 iron-deficient children before and after treatment with intramuscular iron. Pretreatment NE excretion was abnormally high and returned to normal (P=0.001) within one week of therapy. VMA excretion also was higher before than after treatment (P greater than 0.05), but most values were within the normal range for healthy children of comparable size. There was no significant difference between DA, E, and MN-NMN excretion before and after iron therapy. Anemic, non-iron-deficient children had normal urinary NE, E, and VMA excretion before and after transfusion. These findings suggest that the irritability, lack of attentiveness, and low performance scores of iron-deficient children may be related to alterations in catecholamine metabolic pathways secondary to dependence of MAO on adequate iron stores.

  7. Intravenous Iron Therapy in Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia: Dosing Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Todd A.; Myers, Jennifer; Goodnough, Lawrence Tim

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To provide clinicians with evidence-based guidance for iron therapy dosing in patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA), we conducted a study examining the benefits of a higher cumulative dose of intravenous (IV) iron than what is typically administered. Methods. We first individually analyzed 5 clinical studies, averaging the total iron deficit across all patients utilizing a modified Ganzoni formula; we then similarly analyzed 2 larger clinical studies. For the second of the larger studies (Study 7), we also compared the efficacy and retreatment requirements of a cumulative dose of 1500 mg ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) to 1000 mg iron sucrose (IS). Results. The average iron deficit was calculated to be 1531 mg for patients in Studies 1–5 and 1392 mg for patients in Studies 6-7. The percentage of patients who were retreated with IV iron between Days 56 and 90 was significantly (p < 0.001) lower (5.6%) in the 1500 mg group, compared to the 1000 mg group (11.1%). Conclusions. Our data suggests that a total cumulative dose of 1000 mg of IV iron may be insufficient for iron repletion in a majority of patients with IDA and a dose of 1500 mg is closer to the actual iron deficit in these patients. PMID:26257955

  8. Isolated lateral sinus thrombosis presenting as cerebellar infarction in a patient with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Park, Kyung-Jae; Chung, Yong-Gu; Kang, Shin-Hyuk

    2013-07-01

    As a rare cerebrovascular disease, cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is caused by various conditions including trauma, infection, oral contraceptive, cancer and hematologic disorders. However, iron deficiency anemia is not a common cause for CVT in adult. Posterior fossa infarction following CVT is not well demonstrated because posterior fossa has abundant collateral vessels. Here, we report a case of a 55-year-old man who was admitted with complaints of headache, nausea, and mild dizziness. The patient was diagnosed with isolated lateral sinus thrombosis presenting as cerebellar infarction. Laboratory findings revealed normocytic normochromic anemia due to iron deficiency, and the patient's symptoms were improved after iron supplementation.

  9. Ferrous sulfate versus iron polymaltose complex for treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Bopche, Ankur Vikas; Dwivedi, Rashmi; Mishra, Rakesh; Patel, G S

    2009-10-01

    We assessed the clinical response and side effects of Ferrous sulfate (FS) and Iron polymaltose complex (IPC) in 118 children with Iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Subjects were randomized to receive therapy with either oral IPC (Group A, n=59) or oral FS (Group B, n=59); all were given elemental iron in three divided doses of 6 mg/kg/day. One hundred and six children could be followed up; 53 in each group. Children who received ferrous sulfate were having higher hemoglobin level, and less residual complaints as compared to those who had received iron polymaltose complex. Our study suggests ferrous sulfate has a better clinical response and less significant adverse effects during treatment of IDA in children.

  10. Cholangiocarcinoma presenting as hemobilia and recurrent iron-deficiency anemia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Iron-deficiency anemia is a relatively common presenting feature of several gastrointestinal malignancies. However, cholangiocarcinoma has rarely been reported as an underlying cause. The association of cholangiocarcinoma with the rare clinical finding of hemobilia is also highly unusual. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of cholangiocarcinoma presenting with acute hemobilia and chronic iron-deficiency anemia. Case presentation We report the case of a Caucasian, 84-year-old woman presenting with recurrent, severe iron-deficiency anemia who was eventually diagnosed with intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma, following an acute episode of hemobilia. A right hepatectomy was subsequently performed with curative intent, and our patient has now fully recovered. Conclusion This is a rare example of hemobilia and chronic iron-deficiency anemia in association with cholangiocarcinoma. We suggest that a diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma should be considered in patients who present with iron-deficiency anemia of unknown cause, particularly in the presence of abnormal liver function. PMID:20459809

  11. Adaptive response of the heart to long-term anemia induced by iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yoshiro; Tsujino, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Mika; Sakoda, Tsuyoshi; Ohyanagi, Mitsumasa; Masuyama, Tohru

    2009-03-01

    Anemia is common in patients with chronic heart failure and an independent predictor of poor prognosis. Chronic anemia leads to left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and heart failure, but its molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. We investigated the mechanisms, including the molecular signaling pathway, of cardiac remodeling induced by iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed an iron-deficient diet for 20 wk to induce IDA, and the molecular mechanisms of cardiac remodeling were evaluated. The iron-deficient diet initially induced severe anemia, which resulted in LV hypertrophy and dilation with preserved systolic function associated with increased serum erythropoietin (Epo) concentration. Cardiac STAT3 phosphorylation and VEGF gene expression increased by 12 wk of IDA, causing angiogenesis in the heart. Thereafter, sustained IDA induced upregulation of cardiac hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha gene expression and maintained upregulation of cardiac VEGF gene expression and cardiac angiogenesis; however, sustained IDA promoted cardiac fibrosis and lung congestion, with decreased serum Epo concentration and cardiac STAT3 phosphorylation after 20 wk of IDA compared with 12 wk. Upregulation of serum Epo concentration and cardiac STAT3 phosphorylation is associated with a beneficial adaptive mechanism of anemia-induced cardiac hypertrophy, and later decreased levels of these molecules may be critical for the transition from adaptive cardiac hypertrophy to cardiac dysfunction in long-term anemia. Understanding the mechanism of cardiac maladaptation to anemia may lead to a new strategy for treatment of chronic heart failure with anemia.

  12. Intravenous iron alone resolves anemia in patients with functional iron deficiency and lymphoid malignancies undergoing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hedenus, Michael; Karlsson, Torbjörn; Ludwig, Heinz; Rzychon, Beate; Felder, Marcel; Roubert, Bernard; Birgegård, Gunnar

    2014-12-01

    This randomized trial evaluated ferric carboxymaltose without erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) for correction of anemia in cancer patients with functional iron deficiency. Patients on treatment for indolent lymphoid malignancies, who had anemia [hemoglobin (Hb) 8.5-10.5 g/dL] and functional iron deficiency [transferrin saturation (TSAT) ≤ 20%, ferritin >30 ng/mL (women) or >40 ng/mL (men)], were randomized to ferric carboxymaltose (1,000 mg iron) or control. Primary end point was the mean change in Hb from baseline to weeks 4, 6 and 8 without transfusions or ESA. Difficulties with patient recruitment led to premature termination of the study. Seventeen patients (8 ferric carboxymaltose and 9 control) were included in the analysis. In the ferric carboxymaltose arm, mean Hb increase was significantly higher versus control at week 8 (p = 0.021). All ferric carboxymaltose-treated patients achieved an Hb increase >1 g/dL (control 6/9; p = 0.087), and mean TSAT was >20% from week 2 onwards. No treatment-related adverse events were reported. In conclusion, ferric carboxymaltose without ESA effectively increased Hb and iron status in this small patient population.

  13. Proanthocyanidins inhibit iron absorption from soybean (Glycine max) seed ferritin in rats with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yun, Shaojun; Zhang, Tuo; Li, Meiliang; Chen, Bin; Zhao, Guanghua

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of proanthocyanidins (PAs) on iron uptake from soybean seed ferritin (SSF) crude by rats with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) for the first time. Six groups of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (n = 10) were used, which contain (1) SSF crude group; (2) SSF crude + PAs group; (3) PAs group; (4) FeSO(4) group; (5) iron deficiency control group; and (6) control group. The bioavailability of iron was examined by measuring hemoglobin (Hb) concentration value, red blood cell (RBC) numbers, and serum iron stores. After 8 weeks, Hb concentration was almost recovered to the normal level upon feeding SSF crude or FeSO(4) to rats. In contrast, Hb concentration was recovered to less extent when SSF crude plus PAs was used instead of SSF crude alone (P < 0.05). A similar profile was observed with these three sample groups when serum iron and RBC were used as parameters. All rats in PAs group died at the 8th week. Taken together, all these results demonstrated that PAs inhibited iron uptake of rats from SSF, and are toxic for rats with IDA.

  14. [Prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in 12 year old school children from Jujuy].

    PubMed

    Buys, María C; Guerra, Lidia N; Martín, Beatriz; Miranda, Carmen E; Torrejón, Irma; Garrot, Teresa

    2005-01-01

    Iron deficiency is highly frequent among adolescents. Its early detection can prevent the development of a ferropenic anemia, a serious condition. The problem has not been well studied in our country. The purpose of this work was to determine the frequency of iron deficiency and anemia in adolescents. The criteria considered were: hematocrit below 38%, b) saturation transferrin below 16%, c) ferritin below 15 ng/ml. The study was carried out in 2265 schoolchildren, 12 years old, of both sexes, in urban and periurban areas in the city of San Salvador de Jujuy (1250 a.s.l.). The following parameters were measured: hematocrit as well as serum iron and total iron binding capacity, both by colorimetric method. Ferritin was measured by ELISA. Anemia was not found. Iron deficiency as estimated by the iron functional component, was found in 25% of girls and 21% of boys and, through iron stores, in 28% of girls and 18% of boys. Iron deficiency stores in both sexes is the more relevant alteration, indicating that the population sample here studied constitutes a highly vulnerable group. The early detection of iron deficiency will help physical and intellectual development so that adequate sanitary policies are necessary for its prevention.

  15. [Iron deficiency and anemia in female athletes--causes and risks].

    PubMed

    Portal, Shawn; Epstein, Muli; Dubnov, Gal

    2003-10-01

    Iron deficiency is probably the most common nutrient deficiency in the western world. Low levels of iron in the body are caused by several mechanisms, and become symptomatic with the onset of iron deficiency anemia. Athletes are a special group with additional reasons for iron or blood loss, such as plasma expansion, increase perspiration, 'foot strike hemolysis, and occasionally--malnutrition. Female athletes have yet another source of blood loss--menstruation. However, the most common cause for low hemoglobin levels in an athlete is dilutional pseudoanemia, which is caused by exercise-induced fluid retention. Athletes are more sensitive to the effects of anemia and iron deficiency, as exercise performance depends on maximal oxygen carrying capacity to the active muscle, and efficient oxygen utilization. Iron deficiency without anemia can also reduce athletic performance. Diagnosis is ultimately made by a blood count and red blood cell parameters, with ferritin serving as an index of body iron stores. Treatment requires iron supplements, as it is nearly impossible to refill the iron stores through diet alone.

  16. Oxidative stress, HDL functionality and effects of intravenous iron administration in women with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Meroño, Tomás; Dauteuille, Carolane; Tetzlaff, Walter; Martín, Maximiliano; Botta, Eliana; Lhomme, Marie; Saez, María Soledad; Sorroche, Patricia; Boero, Laura; Arbelbide, Jorge; Chapman, M John; Kontush, Anatol; Brites, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) affects around 20-30% of adults worldwide. An association between IDA and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been reported. Oxidative stress, inflammation and low concentration of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) were implicated on endothelial dysfunction and CVD in IDA. We studied the effects of iron deficiency and of an intravenous iron administration on oxidative stress and HDL characteristics in IDA women. Two studies in IDA women are presented: a case-control study, including 18 patients and 18 age-matched healthy women, and a follow-up study 72hr after the administration of intravenous iron (n = 16). Lipids, malondialdehyde, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), paraoxonase-1 (PON-1) and HDL chemical composition and functionality (cholesterol efflux and antioxidative activity) were measured. Cell cholesterol efflux from iron-deficient macrophages to a reference HDL was also evaluated. IDA patients showed higher triglycerides and CETP activity and lower HDL-C than controls (all p < 0.001). HDL particles from IDA patients showed higher triglyceride content (+30%,p < 0.05) and lower antioxidative capacity (-23%,p < 0.05). Although HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux was similar between the patients and controls, iron deficiency provoked a significant reduction in macrophage cholesterol efflux (-25%,p < 0.05). Arylesterase activity of PON-1 was significantly lower in IDA patients than controls (-16%,p < 0.05). The intravenous administration of iron was associated with a decrease in malondialdehyde levels and an increase in arylesterase activity of PON-1 (-22% and +18%, respectively, p < 0.05). IDA is associated with oxidative stress and functionally deficient HDL particles. It remains to be determined if such alterations suffice to impair endothelial function in IDA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  17. Risk-Based Questionnaires Fail to Detect Adolescent Iron Deficiency and Anemia.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Deepa L; Murray-Kolb, Laura E; Schaefer, Eric W; Paul, Ian M

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the predictive ability of screening questionnaires to identify adolescent women at high-risk for iron deficiency or iron deficiency anemia who warrant objective laboratory testing. Cross-sectional study of 96 female individuals 12-21 years old seen at an academic medical center. Participants completed an iron deficiency risk assessment questionnaire including the 4 Bright Futures Adolescent Previsit Questionnaire anemia questions, along with depression, attention, food insecurity, and daytime sleepiness screens. Multiple linear regression controlling for age, race, and hormonal contraception use compared the predictive ability of 2 models for adolescent iron deficiency (defined as ferritin <12 mcg/L) and anemia (hemoglobin <12 g/dL). Model 1, the Bright Futures questions, was compared with model 2, which included the 4 aforementioned screens and body mass index percentile. Among participants, 18% (17/96) had iron deficiency and 5% (5/96) had iron deficiency anemia. Model 1 (Bright Futures) poorly predicted ferritin and hemoglobin values (R(2) = 0.03 and 0.08, respectively). Model 2 demonstrated similarly poor predictive ability (R(2) = 0.05 and 0.06, respectively). Mean differences for depressive symptoms (0.3, 95% CI -0.2, 0.8), attention difficulty (-0.1, 95% CI -0.5, 0.4), food insecurity (0.04, 95% CI -0.5, 0.6), daytime sleepiness (0.1, 95% CI -0.1, 0.3), and body mass index percentile (-0.04, 95% CI -0.3, 0.2) were not significantly associated with ferritin in model 2. Mean differences for hemoglobin were also nonsignificant. Risk-based surveys poorly predict objective measures of iron status using ferritin and hemoglobin. Next steps are to establish the optimal timing for objective assessment of adolescent iron deficiency and anemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of erythrocyte and reticulocyte parameters as indicative of iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Torino, Ana Beatriz Barbosa; Gilberti, Maria de Fátima Pererira; da Costa, Edvilson; de Lima, Gisélia Aparecida Freire; Grotto, Helena Zerlotti Wolf

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mature red cell and reticulocyte parameters to identify three conditions: iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic disease, and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency. Methods Peripheral blood cells from 117 adult patients with anemia were classified according to iron status, inflammation, and hemoglobinopathies as: iron deficiency anemia (n = 42), anemia of chronic disease (n = 28), anemia of chronic disease associated with iron deficiency anemia (n = 22), and heterozygous β-thalassemia (n = 25). The percentage of microcytic erythrocytes, hypochromic erythrocytes, and the levels of hemoglobin in both reticulocytes and mature red cells were determined. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy of the parameters in differentiating anemia. Results There was no difference between the groups of iron deficiency and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency for any of the parameters. The percentage of hypochromic erythrocytes was the best parameter to identify absolute iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease (area under curve = 0.785; 95% confidence interval: 0.661–0.909 with sensitivity of 72.7%, and specificity of 70.4%; cut-off value 1.8%). The formula microcytic erythrocyte count minus hypochromic erythrocyte count was very accurate to differentiate iron deficiency anemia from heterozygous β-thalassemia (area under curve = 0.977; 95% confidence interval: 0.950–1.005 with a sensitivity of 96.2%, and specificity of 92.7%; cut-off value 13.8). Conclusion The erythrocyte and reticulocyte indices are moderately good to identify absolute iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease. PMID:25818816

  19. Evaluation of red cell and reticulocyte parameters as indicative of iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease

    PubMed Central

    Torino, Ana Beatriz Barbosa; Gilberti, Maria de Fátima Pererira; da Costa, Edvilson; de Lima, Gisélia Aparecida Freire; Grotto, Helena Zerlotti Wolf

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mature red cell and reticulocyte parameters under three conditions: iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic disease, and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency. Methods Peripheral blood cells from 117 adult patients with anemia were classified according to iron status, and inflammatory activity, and the results of a hemoglobinopathy investigation as: iron deficiency anemia (n = 42), anemia of chronic disease (n = 28), anemia of chronic disease associated with iron deficiency anemia (n = 22), and heterozygous β thalassemia (n = 25). The percentage of microcytic red cells, hypochromic red cells, and levels of hemoglobin content in both reticulocytes and mature red cells were determined. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy of the parameters in differentiating between the different types of anemia. Results There was no significant difference between the iron deficient group and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency in respect to any parameter. The percentage of hypochromic red cells was the best parameter to discriminate anemia of chronic disease with and without absolute iron deficiency (area under curve = 0.785; 95% confidence interval: 0.661–0.909, with sensitivity of 72.7%, and specificity of 70.4%; cut-off value 1.8%). The formula microcytic red cells minus hypochromic red cells was very accurate in differentiating iron deficiency anemia and heterozygous β thalassemia (area under curve = 0.977; 95% confidence interval: 0.950–1.005; with sensitivity of 96.2%, and specificity of 92.7%; cut-off value 13.8). Conclusion The indices related to red cells and reticulocytes have a moderate performance in identifying absolute iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease. PMID:25453653

  20. Anemias beyond B12 and iron deficiency: the buzz about other B's, elementary, and nonelementary problems.

    PubMed

    Green, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    The term "unexplained anemia" appears frequently in a request for a hematology consultation. Although most anemia consultations are fairly routine, they occasionally represent challenging problems that require an amalgam of experience, insight, and a modicum of "out-of-the-box" thinking. Problem anemia cases and pitfalls in their recognition can arise for one of several reasons that are discussed in the cases presented herein. "Anemias beyond B12 and iron deficiency" covers a vast domain of everything that lies beyond the commonly encountered anemias caused by simple deficiencies of 2 currently major hematologically relevant micronutrients. However, even these deficiencies may be obscured when they coexist or are not considered because of misleading distractions. They may also be mistakenly identified when other less common nutrient deficiencies occur. I present herein case examples of such situations: a young patient with pancytopenia and schistocytes who was responsive to plasmapheresis, but in whom pernicious anemia was not suspected because of ethnicity and age; a bicytopenic patient with anemia and myelodysplastic features caused by copper deficiency after gastric reduction surgery; and a patient with BM hypoplasia and a dimorphic blood smear who was found to have paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. These "pearls" represent but 3 examples of the many varieties of problems in anemia diagnosis and are used to illustrate potential pitfalls and how to avoid them.

  1. Iron-deficiency anemia and the cycle of poverty among human immunodeficiency virus-infected women in the inner city.

    PubMed

    Semba, Richard D

    2003-01-01

    The prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia appears to be extremely high among female injection drug users in the inner city who have human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and/or hepatitis C (HCV) infections. Iron deficiency and its associated anemia may contribute to reduced energetic efficiency, lower aerobic capacity, decreased endurance, and fatigue. In practical terms, the functional limitations of iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia may affect the ability of women to participate in work, school, social, and family activities. Iron deficiency may contribute to the cycle of poverty in the inner city by limiting the ability of women to work, earn money, and afford iron-rich sources of food. Although iron supplementation may prevent or treat iron deficiency, the use of iron supplements needs to be approached with caution in women with HIV and HCV infections.

  2. Anemia, iron deficiency and thalassemia among adolescents in Northeast Thailand: results from two independent surveys.

    PubMed

    Pansuwan, Anupong; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Fucharoen, Supan; Himakhun, Boonmee; Dangwiboon, Samrit

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of adolescent anemia, iron deficiency and thalassemia were examined in 2 provinces of northeast Thailand. Blood specimens were collected from adolescent subjects aged 15-17 years in 2 areas; 185 (85 males and 100 females) in Mukdahan province and 313 (116 males and 197 females) in Roi-Et. RBC parameters, serum ferritin levels, Hb and DNA analyses for the identification of common thalassemia genes in Thailand were investigated. The prevalences of anemia were found to be 21.1% (8.1 in male and 13.0 in female) and 16.6% (8.9 in male and 7.7 in female) in Mukdahan and Roi-Et province, respectively. Iron deficiency was observed to be 24.3% in Mukdahan and 14.7% in Roi-Et. Various types of thalassemia were identified in 62.2 and 58.8% of the subject populations, respectively. The proportions of iron deficiency, thalassemia and combined thalassemia and iron deficiency among anemic subjects were 10.2, 53.8 and 30.8% in Mukdahan, and 7.7, 67.3 and 9.6% in Roi-Et. Hematological characteristics were analyzed and are presented. It is concluded that thalassemia and hemoglobinopathies rather than iron deficiency are major causes of adolescent anemia which should be taken into account in public health strategies for the control of anemia in the region.

  3. Impact of iron deficiency anemia on the function of the immune system in children

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Tamer Hasan; Badr, Mohamed Ahmed; Karam, Nehad Ahmed; Zkaria, Marwa; El Saadany, Hosam Fathy; Abdel Rahman, Doaa Mohamed; Shahbah, Doaa Abdallah; Al Morshedy, Salah Mohamed; Fathy, Manar; Esh, Asmaa Mohamed Hosni; Selim, Amal Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The importance of iron deficiency as a public health problem is based ultimately on the seriousness of its consequences on health. The most extensively investigated consequences of iron deficiency involve work performance and immune function. The significance of the effects on work performance is generally accepted. In contrast, data on the influence of iron deficiency on immune function are often perceived as being confusing and contradictory. We aimed to evaluate the effect of iron deficiency anemia on humoral, cellular, nonspecific immunity, and also the effect on the cytokines that are the key factors of many immunologic steps. Forty children with iron deficiency anemia and 20 age and sex-matched healthy children were included. All children were subjected to full medical history, thorough clinical examination, complete blood count, iron indices (serum iron, serum total iron-binding capacity, serum ferritin, and transferrin saturation), immunoglobulin assay (IgA, IgG, and IgM), interleukin (IL)-6 serum level, study of T-lymphocyte subsets, and evaluation of phagocytic function of macrophages and oxidative burst activity of neutrophils. Patients had significantly lower IgG levels, IL-6, phagocytic activity, and oxidative burst of neutrophils than controls, although there was no significant difference between patients and controls with regard to other immunoglobulins and CD4/CD8 ratio. There was significantly positive correlation between serum iron and IL-6 serum level. We concluded that humoral, nonspecific immunity (phagocytic activity and oxidative burst), and the IL-6 are influenced in patients with iron deficiency anemia. Study of these abnormalities after correction of iron deficiency is strongly needed. PMID:27893677

  4. Impact of iron deficiency anemia on the function of the immune system in children.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Tamer Hasan; Badr, Mohamed Ahmed; Karam, Nehad Ahmed; Zkaria, Marwa; El Saadany, Hosam Fathy; Abdel Rahman, Doaa Mohamed; Shahbah, Doaa Abdallah; Al Morshedy, Salah Mohamed; Fathy, Manar; Esh, Asmaa Mohamed Hosni; Selim, Amal Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    The importance of iron deficiency as a public health problem is based ultimately on the seriousness of its consequences on health. The most extensively investigated consequences of iron deficiency involve work performance and immune function. The significance of the effects on work performance is generally accepted. In contrast, data on the influence of iron deficiency on immune function are often perceived as being confusing and contradictory.We aimed to evaluate the effect of iron deficiency anemia on humoral, cellular, nonspecific immunity, and also the effect on the cytokines that are the key factors of many immunologic steps.Forty children with iron deficiency anemia and 20 age and sex-matched healthy children were included. All children were subjected to full medical history, thorough clinical examination, complete blood count, iron indices (serum iron, serum total iron-binding capacity, serum ferritin, and transferrin saturation), immunoglobulin assay (IgA, IgG, and IgM), interleukin (IL)-6 serum level, study of T-lymphocyte subsets, and evaluation of phagocytic function of macrophages and oxidative burst activity of neutrophils.Patients had significantly lower IgG levels, IL-6, phagocytic activity, and oxidative burst of neutrophils than controls, although there was no significant difference between patients and controls with regard to other immunoglobulins and CD4/CD8 ratio. There was significantly positive correlation between serum iron and IL-6 serum level.We concluded that humoral, nonspecific immunity (phagocytic activity and oxidative burst), and the IL-6 are influenced in patients with iron deficiency anemia. Study of these abnormalities after correction of iron deficiency is strongly needed.

  5. Kidney injury in infants and children with iron-deficiency anemia before and after iron treatment.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Rasha H; Kandil, Shaimaa M; Zeid, Mayada S; Zaki, Maysaa E; Fouda, Ashraf E

    2017-10-01

    Our study aimed to investigate the effects of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) on renal tubular functions before and after iron treatment for infants and children with IDA. We measured urinary levels of two kidney injury markers: neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP). Thirty-six infants and children with IDA and 20 matched healthy controls were included. We assessed different laboratory parameters, estimated glomerular filtration rate, urinary levels of NGAL, and L-FABP. Urinary kidney injury markers were measured in IDA patients before and after 3 months of oral iron therapy. IDA patients had significantly higher urinary NGAL and L-FABP levels compared to their healthy controls. After 3 months of oral iron treatment, there was a significant improvement (decrease) in urinary NGAL and L-FABP in infants and children with IDA. Urinary markers returned to normal levels (healthy control levels) in children with IDA, but not for infants with IDA compared to their healthy controls. Subclinical kidney injury was found in infants and children with IDA. This injury was completely reversible in older children with IDA and partially reversible in infants with IDA after iron therapy. Higher urinary levels of kidney injury molecules in IDA infants after iron treatment are suggestive of more sensitivity of these infants to oxidative stress caused by iron therapy or may be due to the immaturity of the kidney and more damage caused by IDA which may require more time to recover.

  6. Iron-deficiency Anemia in Children with Febrile Seizure: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    GHASEMI, Fateme; VALIZADEH, Fateme; TAEE, Nadere

    2014-01-01

    Objective Considering the recurrence of febrile seizure and costs for families, many studies have attempted to identify its risk factors. Some recent studies have reported that anemia is more common in children with febrile convulsion, whereas others have reported that iron deficiency raises the seizure threshold. This study was done to compare iron-deficiency anemia in children with first FS with children having febrile illness alone and with healthy children. Materials & Methods This case-control study evaluated 300 children in three groups (first FS, febrile without convulsion, and healthy) in Khoramabad Madani Hospital from September 2009 to September 2010. Body temperature on admission was measured using the tympanic method. CBC diff, MCV, MCH, MCHC, serum iron, plasma ferritin and TIBC tests were performed for all participants. Data were analyzed by frequency, mean, standard deviation, ANOVA, and chi-square statistical tests. Odds ratios were estimated by logistic regression at a confidence level of 95%. Results Forty percent of the cases with FS had iron-deficiency anemia, compared to 26% of children with febrile illness without seizure and 12% of healthy children. The Odds ratio for iron-deficiency anemia in the patients with FS was 1.89 (95% CI, 1.04-5.17) compared to the febrile children without convulsion and 2.21 (95% CI, 1.54-3.46) compared to the healthy group. Conclusion Children with FS are more likely to be iron-deficient than those with febrile illness alone and healthy children. Thus, iron-deficiency anemia could be a risk factor for FS. PMID:24949050

  7. [Anemia and iron deficiency in the elderly. Prevalence, diagnostics and new therapeutic options].

    PubMed

    Röhrig, G; Doehner, W; Schaefer, R M; Schulz, R J

    2012-04-01

    The prevalence of anemia in geriatric patients is high. With some variation in different patient cohorts, prevalence of anemia can reach 40%. Anemia is not an age-related disease on its own, but is a symptom with multifactorial genesis and high risk potential. It directly influences mortality, morbidity, and the rate of hospitalization, particularly in older patients suffering from chronic heart failure or chronic kidney disease. The high prevalence of anemia in chronic kidney disease is explained by a combination of erythropoietin and iron deficiency. This review summarizes the recommendations of the iron symposium at the 2010 German Geriatric Society Meeting in Potsdam, Germany. It intends to provide current information on prevalence, diagnostic work-up, and therapeutic options for anemia in the rapidly growing group of elderly patients.

  8. Prevention of iron deficiency anemia (IDA): how far have we reached?

    PubMed

    Lokeshwar, M R; Mehta, Meenakshi; Mehta, Nitin; Shelke, Pallavi; Babar, Nee

    2011-05-01

    Anemia is a global problem of immense public health significance. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common nutritional disorder seen all over the world, more in the developing countries, particularly, affecting young children of 6-24 months of age, adolescents, women of reproductive age group and pregnant/ lactating women. Basic approach in prevention of IDA should include education and associated measures to increase the dietary intake of iron, dietary modification to enhance the iron absorption, fortification of food articles, in addition to control the infection and worm infestations. Supplemenldelim 1, of medicinal iron is key to success which can be achieved by daily or intermittent (biweekly/weekly) administration of oral iron to the target group. Reduction of nutritional anemia should receive top priority through proper planning by using better utilization of existing health infrastructure.

  9. Intravenous Iron Repletion Does Not Significantly Decrease Platelet Counts in CKD Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Dossabhoy, Neville R.; Gascoyne, Rebecca; Turley, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We sought to investigate the effect of IV iron repletion on platelet (PLT) counts in CKD patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Methods. We conducted a retrospective chart review, including all patients with CKD and IDA who were treated with iron dextran total dose infusion (TDI) between 2002 and 2007. Patient demographics were noted, and laboratory values for creatinine, hemoglobin (Hgb), iron stores and PLT were recorded pre- and post-dose. Results. 153 patients received a total of 251 doses of TDI (mean ± SD = 971 ± 175 mg); age 69 ± 12 years and Creatinine 3.3 ± 1.9 mg/dL. All CKD stages were represented (stage 4 commonest). Hgb and Fe stores improved post-TDI (P ≪ 0.001). There was a very mild decrease in PLT (pre-TDI 255 versus post-TDI 244, P = 0.30). The mild reduction in PLT after TDI remained non-significant (P > 0.05) when data was stratified by molecular weight (MW) of iron dextran used (low versus high), as well as by dose administered (<1000 versus ≥1000 mg). Linear regression analysis between pre-dose PLT and Tsat and Fe showed R2 of 0.01 and 0.04, respectively. Conclusion. Correction of iron deficiency did not significantly lower PLT in CKD patients, regardless of MW or dose used. Correlation of PLT to severity of iron deficiency was very weak. PMID:23476772

  10. Intravenous Iron Repletion Does Not Significantly Decrease Platelet Counts in CKD Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Dossabhoy, Neville R; Gascoyne, Rebecca; Turley, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We sought to investigate the effect of IV iron repletion on platelet (PLT) counts in CKD patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Methods. We conducted a retrospective chart review, including all patients with CKD and IDA who were treated with iron dextran total dose infusion (TDI) between 2002 and 2007. Patient demographics were noted, and laboratory values for creatinine, hemoglobin (Hgb), iron stores and PLT were recorded pre- and post-dose. Results. 153 patients received a total of 251 doses of TDI (mean ± SD = 971 ± 175 mg); age 69 ± 12 years and Creatinine 3.3 ± 1.9 mg/dL. All CKD stages were represented (stage 4 commonest). Hgb and Fe stores improved post-TDI (P ≪ 0.001). There was a very mild decrease in PLT (pre-TDI 255 versus post-TDI 244, P = 0.30). The mild reduction in PLT after TDI remained non-significant (P > 0.05) when data was stratified by molecular weight (MW) of iron dextran used (low versus high), as well as by dose administered (<1000 versus ≥1000 mg). Linear regression analysis between pre-dose PLT and Tsat and Fe showed R2 of 0.01 and 0.04, respectively. Conclusion. Correction of iron deficiency did not significantly lower PLT in CKD patients, regardless of MW or dose used. Correlation of PLT to severity of iron deficiency was very weak.

  11. Critical appraisal of discriminant formulas for distinguishing thalassemia from iron deficiency in patients with microcytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Urrechaga, Eloísa; Hoffmann, Johannes J M L

    2017-08-28

    Many discriminant formulas have been reported for distinguishing thalassemia trait from iron deficiency in patients with microcytic anemia. Independent verification of several discriminant formulas is deficient or even lacking. Therefore, we have retrospectively investigated discriminant formulas in a large, well-characterized patient population. The investigational population consisted of 2664 patients with microcytic anemia: 1259 had iron deficiency, 1196 'pure' thalassemia trait (877 β- and 319 α-thalassemia), 150 had thalassemia trait with concomitant iron deficiency or anemia of chronic disease, and 36 had other diseases. We investigated 25 discriminant formulas that only use hematologic parameters available on all analyzers; formulas with more advanced parameters were disregarded. The diagnostic performance was investigated using ROC analysis. The three best performing formulas were the Jayabose (RDW index), Janel (11T), and Green and King formulas. The differences between them were not statistically significant (p>0.333), but each of them had significantly higher area under the ROC curve than any other formula. The Jayabose and Green and King formulas had the highest sensitivities: 0.917 both. The highest specificity, 0.925, was found for the Janel formula, which is a composite score of 11 other formulas. All investigated formulas performed significantly better in distinguishing β- than α-thalassemia from iron deficiency. In our patient population, the Jayabose RDW index, the Green and King formula and the Janel 11T score are superior to all other formulas examined for distinguishing between thalassemia trait and iron deficiency anemia. We confirmed that all formulas perform much better in β- than in α-thalassemia carriers and also that they incorrectly classify approximately 30% of thalassemia carriers with concomitant other anemia as not having thalassemia. The diagnostic performance of even the best formulas is not high enough for making a final

  12. Increased incidence of iron deficiency anemia secondary to inadequate iron intake in institutionalized, young patients with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Athanasios; Ntaios, George; Kaiafa, Georgia; Girtovitis, Fotios; Saouli, Zoi; Kontoninas, Zisis; Diamantidis, Michael D; Savopoulos, Christos; Hatzitolios, Apostolos

    2008-12-01

    We observed high incidence of anemia in patients with cerebral palsy sheltered in a specialized institution in Thessaloniki, Greece. Therefore, we decided to investigate its cause. We studied 108 patients, and assessed complete blood cell count, peripheral blood smear, serum iron, ferritin, folate, B12 and the presence of hemoglobin or parasites in the stools. In all cases, anemia was hypochromic and microcytic. Approximately 33% of patients suffered from hypochromic anemia, whereas 38% were iron deficient. There was no statistical difference in the incidence of iron deficiency between different age groups. All tests for fecal occult blood or intestinal parasites were negative. Folic acid and B12 levels were within normal range in all cases. We also found that 87 and 95.6% of patients on liquid diet were anemic and iron deficient, respectively, compared to only 18.8 and 22.3% of patients on normal diet. The high incidence of anemia was attributed to iron deficiency which was secondary to inadequate iron intake and decreased iron absorption. Thus, it would not be irrational to consider iron supplementation as the first measure in such patients and postpone endoscopic procedures for a later stage, unless there are clinical or laboratory findings (such as fecal occult blood) suggestive of gastrointestinal blood loss.

  13. Hematologic manifestations of systemic disease (including iron deficiency, anemia of inflammation and DIC).

    PubMed

    Witmer, Char M

    2013-12-01

    A complete blood cell count (CBC) is a frequent test sent to aid in the diagnostic evaluation of ill patients. Not uncommonly hematologic abnormalities may be the first sign of an underlying systemic disorder. The astute clinician needs to understand how systemic disease can affect the CBC to direct further diagnostic investigations. This article focuses on the 2 most common acquired anemias including iron deficiency and anemia of inflammation as well as disseminated intravascular coagulation.

  14. The prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency is more common in breastfed infants than their mothers in Bhaktapur, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Chandyo, R K; Henjum, S; Ulak, M; Thorne-Lyman, A L; Ulvik, R J; Shrestha, P S; Locks, L; Fawzi, W; Strand, T A

    2016-04-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a widespread public health problem, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Maternal iron status around and during pregnancy may influence infant iron status. We examined multiple biomarkers to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and anemia among breastfed infants and explored its relationship with maternal and infant characteristics in Bhaktapur, Nepal. In a cross-sectional survey, we randomly selected 500 mother-infant pairs from Bhaktapur municipality. Blood was analyzed for hemoglobin, ferritin, total iron-binding capacity, transferrin receptors and C-reactive protein. The altitude-adjusted prevalence of anemia was 49% among infants 2-6-month-old (hemaglobin (Hb) <10.8 g/dl) and 72% among infants 7-12-month-old (Hb <11.3 g/dl). Iron deficiency anemia, defined as anemia and serum ferritin <20 or <12 μg/l, affected 9 and 26% of infants of these same age groups. Twenty percent of mothers had anemia (Hb <12.3 g/dl), but only one-fifth was explained by depletion of iron stores. Significant predictors of infant iron status and anemia were infant age, sex and duration of exclusive breastfeeding and maternal ferritin concentrations. Our findings suggest that iron supplementation in pregnancy is likely to have resulted in a low prevalence of postpartum anemia. The higher prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency among breastfed infants compared with their mothers suggests calls for intervention targeting newborns and infants.

  15. Iron sucrose - characteristics, efficacy and regulatory aspects of an established treatment of iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia in a broad range of therapeutic areas.

    PubMed

    Beguin, Yves; Jaspers, Aurélie

    2014-10-01

    Iron is a key element in the transport and utilization of oxygen and a variety of metabolic pathways. Iron deficiency is a major cause of anemia and can be associated with fatigue, impaired physical function and reduced quality of life. Administration of oral or intravenous (i.v.) iron is the recommended treatment for iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) in different therapeutic areas. This article provides an overview of studies that evaluated i.v. iron sucrose for anemia and iron status management, either alone or in combination with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, across various diseases and conditions. Iron sucrose is an established, effective and well-tolerated treatment of IDA in patients with acute or chronic conditions such as chronic kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease, pregnancy (second and third trimester), postpartum period, heavy menstrual bleeding and cancer who need rapid iron supply and in whom oral iron preparations are ineffective or not tolerated. Available data on patient blood management warrant further studies on preoperative iron treatment. First experience with iron sucrose follow-on products raises questions about their therapeutic equivalence without comparative clinical data in newly diagnosed patients or patients on existing chronic treatment.

  16. The Significance of Serum Transferrin Receptor Levels in the Diagnosis of the Coexistence of Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Yokus, Osman; Yilmaz, Bilal; Albayrak, Murat; Balcik, Ozlem Sahin; Helvaci, Mehmet Rami; Sennaroglu, Engin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Iron deficiency anemia is the most common cause of microcytic anemia throughout the world. Ferritin levels are good indicators of iron stores; however, levels may increase irrespective of iron stores in cases of chronic disease. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose iron deficiency anemia coexisting with anemia of chronic disease. Materials and Methods: To determine the level of transferrin receptor in subjects, 30 patients with iron deficiency anemia, 30 patients with anemia of chronic disease and 30 patients with both diseases were included in the study. Results: Mean serum transferrin receptor levels were 5.99±2.98 mg/L in the iron deficiency anemia group, 1.90±1.15 mg/L in the anemia of chronic disease group and 3.07±0.90 mg/L in the combination group. Comparing groups with each other revealed significant differences (p<0.05). Conclusion: It is concluded that the assessment of serum transferrin receptor levels is a useful method for the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia in patients. PMID:25610152

  17. The significance of serum transferrin receptor levels in the diagnosis of the coexistence of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yokus, Osman; Yilmaz, Bilal; Albayrak, Murat; Balcik, Ozlem Sahin; Helvaci, Mehmet Rami; Sennaroglu, Engin

    2011-04-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most common cause of microcytic anemia throughout the world. Ferritin levels are good indicators of iron stores; however, levels may increase irrespective of iron stores in cases of chronic disease. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose iron deficiency anemia coexisting with anemia of chronic disease. To determine the level of transferrin receptor in subjects, 30 patients with iron deficiency anemia, 30 patients with anemia of chronic disease and 30 patients with both diseases were included in the study. Mean serum transferrin receptor levels were 5.99±2.98 mg/L in the iron deficiency anemia group, 1.90±1.15 mg/L in the anemia of chronic disease group and 3.07±0.90 mg/L in the combination group. Comparing groups with each other revealed significant differences (p<0.05). It is concluded that the assessment of serum transferrin receptor levels is a useful method for the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia in patients.

  18. Gastric Polyposis: A Rare Cause of Iron Deficiency Anemia in a Patient With Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Macaron, Carole; Pai, Rish K.; Alkhouri, Naim

    2015-01-01

    Portal hypertension leading to gastric polyposis has rarely been reported. More common gastric manifestations of portal hypertension are portal hypertensive gastropathy and gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE). We report a case of a patient in whom portal hypertension manifested as bleeding gastric polyps leading to transfusion-dependent iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26157923

  19. Age-related changes in laboratory values used in the diagnosis of anemia and iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yip, R; Johnson, C; Dallman, P R

    1984-03-01

    Laboratory results from the Second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II) were used to define age-related changes in laboratory values that are related to the diagnosis of anemia and iron deficiency. Analyses included Hb, hematocrit, red blood cell count, red cell indices, iron, total iron-binding capacity, transferrin saturation, and erythrocyte protoporphyrin. Computation of median values and 95% ranges by age and sex for each laboratory test were performed on 15,093 subjects between 1 and 74 yr of age who had complete laboratory data on venous blood, after excluding those subjects with an abnormality in one or more of three other laboratory tests. Age-related changes in laboratory measurements, such as those described herein, must be taken into consideration in order to optimize the identification of individuals with anemia and iron deficiency.

  20. Oxidative Stress, Hepcidin and Nesfatin-I Status in Childhood Iron and Vitamin B12 Deficiency Anemias.

    PubMed

    Aşkar, Tünay Kontaş; Büyükleblebici, Olga; Hismioğulları, Adnan Adil; Hünkerler, Zeynep

    2017-06-27

    Anemia is a disease that is long and often repetitive and can result in great burden to the national economy. The most frequent nutritional deficiency anemias in children are related with iron and vitamin B12 deficiencies. The aim of this study was to determine the oxidative stress, hepcidin, and nesfatin-I levels in childhood iron and vitamin B12 deficiency anemias. The study had three groups of 15 children, iron anemia deficiency group, vitamin B12 deficiency group and a control group. The TBARS and nesfatin-I levels were significantly higher in the iron and vitamin B12 deficiency groups and the total antioxidant levels were significantly lower when compared to the control group. In contrast the plasma hepcidin levels were significantly lower in the iron deficiency group (p<0.01) when compared to the control group, however no significant differences were observed in vitamin B12 deficiency group. Plasma homocysteine levels were signifıcantly higher in the vitamin B12 deficiency group when compared to the control group (p<0.001), but no differences were determined between the iron deficiency and control groups. Our results showed that there is high levels of oxidative stress in childhood iron and vitamin B12 deficiency anemias. And we propose that plasma hepcidin and homocycteine levels may be useful in the differential diagnosis of childhood nutritional deficiency anemias. And nesfatin-1 hormone levels were identified for the first time in childhood iron deficiency and vitamin B12 deficiency anemias within this study and this hormone may also be useful in differential diagnosis of anemias.

  1. Management of iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease - a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Stein, Jürgen; Dignass, Axel U

    2013-01-01

    Although anemia is the most common systemic manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), among the broad spectrum of extraintestinal disease complications encountered in IBD, including arthritis and osteopathy, it has generally received little consideration. However, not only in terms of frequency, but also with regard to its potential effect on hospitalization rates and on the quality of life and work, anemia is indeed a significant and costly complication of IBD. Anemia is multifactorial in nature, the most prevalent etiological forms being iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and anemia of chronic disease. In a condition associated with inflammation, such as IBD, the determination of iron status using common biochemical parameters alone is inadequate. A more accurate assessment may be attained using new iron indices including reticulocyte hemoglobin content, percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin. While oral iron supplementation has traditionally been a mainstay of IDA treatment, it has also been linked to extensive gastrointestinal side effects and possible disease exacerbation. However, many physicians are still reluctant to administer iron intravenously, despite the wide availability of a variety of new IV preparations with improved safety profiles, and despite the recommendations of international expert guidelines. This article discusses improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies based on new clinical insights into the regulation of iron homeostasis.

  2. Evaluation of Iron deficiency anemia and BMI in children suffering from Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Bazmamoun, H; Razavi, Z; Esfahani, H; Arefian

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest an association between H. pylori infection and disorders such as iron deficiency anemia and growth delay. Considering the high prevalence of H. pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia, this study was performed in order to evaluate their relevance in children undergoing an upper endoscopy. Materials and Methods In this case-control study, children aged 2 to 16 years old, undergoing endoscopy from March 2012 to March 2013 at Besat Hospital of Hamedan, were selected. Participants were divided in H.Pylori infected and non-infected groups. Then the two groups were compared in terms of body mass index (BMI) and the incidence of iron deficiency anemia. The presence of Helicobacter pylori infection in children was confirmed by Giemsa staining of gastric biopsy specimens. Collected data was analyzed by SPSS 17.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL) and t-test and chi-square. Results In this study, 200 children (94 male and 106 female) were evaluated. The most common presenting symptom in both groups was abdominal pain. 8.2 % (9 cases) of the infected patients and 10.5% (10 cases) of the non-infected patients had iron deficiency anemia which this difference was not statistically significant (p=270). Also, no statistically significant difference was noted between the two groups in terms of gender (p=0.32), hemoglobin (p=0.35), Ferritin levels (p= 0.275) and body mass index (p= 0.273). Conclusion The results of this study not showed an association between H. pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia or body mass index in studied children PMID:25598957

  3. Effects of maternal education on diet, anemia, and iron deficiency in Korean school-aged children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We investigated the relationship among socioeconomic status factors, the risk of anemia, and iron deficiency among school-aged children in Korea. Methods The sample consisted of fourth-grade students aged 10 y recruited from nine elementary schools in Korean urban areas in 2008 (n = 717). Anthropometric and blood biochemistry data were obtained for this cross-sectional observational study. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin levels lower than 11.5 g/dl. Iron deficiency was defined as serum iron levels lower than 40 ug/dl. We also obtained data on parental education from questionnaires and on children's diets from 3-day food diaries. Parental education was categorized as low or high, with the latter representing an educational level beyond high school. Results Children with more educated mothers were less likely to develop anemia (P = 0.0324) and iron deficiency (P = 0.0577) than were those with less educated mothers. This group consumed more protein (P = 0.0004) and iron (P = 0.0012) from animal sources than did the children of less educated mothers, as reflected by their greater consumption of meat, poultry, and derivatives (P < 0.0001). Logistic regression analysis revealed a significant inverse relationship between maternal education and the prevalence of anemia (odds ratio: 0.52; 95% confidence interval: 0.32, 0.85). Conclusions As a contributor to socioeconomic status, maternal education is important in reducing the risk of anemia and iron deficiency and in increasing children's consumption of animal food sources. PMID:22087564

  4. Can routine screening and iron supplementation for iron deficiency anemia in nonsymptomatic pregnant women improve maternal and infant health outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Moin, Anoosh; Lassi, Zohra S.

    2015-01-01

    CLINICAL SCENARIO Pregnant women have an increased need for iron that might not be met with diet alone. Due to physiologic anemia and population differences, no set criteria for defining iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are available globally. Serum ferritin and transferrin levels are often used to guide therapy by clinicians. Studies have reported an association between poor iron status and negative health outcomes such as low birth weight, premature birth, and perinatal death for women and their infants, although the evidence is weak. PMID:26288769

  5. Artificial intelligence models for predicting iron deficiency anemia and iron serum level based on accessible laboratory data.

    PubMed

    Azarkhish, Iman; Raoufy, Mohammad Reza; Gharibzadeh, Shahriar

    2012-06-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide. Measuring serum iron is time consuming, expensive and not available in most hospitals. In this study, based on four accessible laboratory data (MCV, MCH, MCHC, Hb/RBC), we developed an artificial neural network (ANN) and an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) to diagnose the IDA and to predict serum iron level. Our results represent that the neural network analysis is superior to ANFIS and logistic regression models in diagnosing IDA. Moreover, the results show that the ANN is likely to provide an accurate test for predicting serum iron levels with high accuracy and acceptable precision.

  6. Risk factors associated with anemia and iron deficiency among Kuwaiti pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Faruk; Al-Sumaie, Mona A

    2011-09-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to identify the risk factors of anemia and iron deficiency in Kuwaiti pregnant women. Pregnant women (n = 465) aged 18-47 years, of 4-39 weeks at gestation were recruited during antenatal visits from six health facilities in Kuwait. Socio-demographic, pregnancy-related and dietary information were collected. Hemoglobin, serum ferritin and serum C-reactive protein concentrations were determined. Logistic regression analysis revealed that iron deficiency and not taking iron-folate tablets or taking them occasionally were the two most important risk factors associated with anemia. Pregnant women with higher gestational age, short birth spacing ( ≤ 2 years), not taking iron-folate tablets or taking them occasionally, not consuming fruit juice, and consuming brown bread, tea and/or coffee were significant risk factors associated with iron deficiency. In conclusion, various factors including dietary habits appeared to be associated with poor iron status, which is the most important risk factor for anemia among Kuwaiti pregnant women.

  7. Prevalence of Thalassemia Traits and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Sindh, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Kandhro, Abdul H; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Isarankura Na-Ayudhya, Chartchalerm; Nuchnoi, Pornlada

    2017-05-01

    Among microcytic hypochromic anemias, the most common disorders are iron deficiency anemia and co-pathological conditions such as α- or β-thalassemia (α- or β-thal) traits. The aim of the present study was to determine the frequency and prevalence of iron deficiency anemia and α- or β-thal traits based on clinical laboratory data across different ethnic groups in five districts of Sindh Province, Pakistan. The present retrospective study analyzed 3 years (2012-2015) of encoded and unlinked clinical laboratory data, and identified 3030 microcytic hypochromic anemia cases. The data contained complete blood counts (CBCs) with smear morphology examinations, serum ferritin levels, and hemoglobin (Hb) electrophoreses. After reviewing the data, 994 confirmed subjects (iron deficiency anemia and α- and β-thal traits) were then selected for the present study. The prevalence of α- and β-thal traits was highest in Badin district (35.27%), while the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was highest in Larkana district (30.73%). According to the ethnic-wise distribution, higher numbers of α- and β-thal trait cases were seen in the Sindhi ethnic group [375 (64.21%) and 283 (69.02%), respectively] than in the other ethnic groups. In addition, a higher distribution of β-thal trait cases was observed in the Sindhi ethnic group [n = 327 (56%)] in α- and β-thal cases overall. Findings from the present study strongly suggested that screening is important not only for β-thal trait but also other traits as well. However, careful monitoring of CBC parameters, including red blood cell (RBC) indices and morphology, along with clinical findings are essential to diagnose carrier cases, especially in high prevalence areas.

  8. Disruption of the potassium channel regulatory subunit KCNE2 causes iron-deficient anemia

    PubMed Central

    Salsbury, Grace; Cambridge, Emma L.; McIntyre, Zoe; Arends, Mark J.; Karp, Natasha A.; Isherwood, Christopher; Shannon, Carl; Hooks, Yvette; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Adams, David J.; White, Jacqueline K.; Speak, Anneliese O.

    2014-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is a dynamic process that is tightly controlled to balance iron uptake, storage, and export. Reduction of dietary iron from the ferric to the ferrous form is required for uptake by solute carrier family 11 (proton-coupled divalent metal ion transporters), member 2 (Slc11a2) into the enterocytes. Both processes are proton dependent and have led to the suggestion of the importance of acidic gastric pH for the absorption of dietary iron. Potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily E, member 2 (KCNE2), in combination with potassium voltage-gated channel, KQT-like subfamily, member 1 (KCNQ1), form a gastric potassium channel essential for gastric acidification. Deficiency of either Kcne2 or Kcnq1 results in achlorhydia, gastric hyperplasia, and neoplasia, but the impact on iron absorption has not, to our knowledge, been investigated. Here we report that Kcne2-deficient mice, in addition to the previously reported phenotypes, also present with iron-deficient anemia. Interestingly, impaired function of KCNQ1 results in iron-deficient anemia in Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome patients. We speculate that impaired function of KCNE2 could result in the same clinical phenotype. PMID:25127743

  9. A child with severe iron-deficiency anemia and a complex TMPRSS6 genotype.

    PubMed

    Capra, Anna Paola; Ferro, Elisa; Cannavò, Laura; La Rosa, Maria Angela; Zirilli, Giuseppina

    2017-10-01

    We report a case of a 7-year-old girl with severe hypochromic microcytic anemia, who was unresponsive to classical iron supplements. We suspected IRIDA, iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia, a genetic iron metabolism disorder, caused by TMPRSS6 variations. TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a negative regulator of hepcidin, and its pathological variants are related to normal to high levels of hepcidin. We analyzed the TMPRSS6 gene and we improved clinical management of the patient, selecting the appropriate supplementation therapy. Intervention & Technique: The parenteral iron therapy was started, but the patient was only partially responsive and the anemia persisted. To confirm the diagnosis, the TMPRSS6 gene sequence was analyzed by DNA sequencing and other relevant biochemical parameters were evaluated. The TMPRSS6 sequence analysis showed a complex genotype with a rare heterozygous missense variant, in addition to other common polymorphisms. The serum hepcidin value was normal. We unexpectedly observed a normalization of patient's hemoglobin (Hb) levels only after liposomal iron treatment. The proband was symptomatic for IRIDA during a critical phase of growth and development, but we did not find a clearly causative genotype. A long-term result, improving stably patient's Hb levels, was obtained only after liposomal iron supplementation. Children may be at greater risk for iron deficiency and the degree of anemia as well as the response to the iron supplements varies markedly patient to patient. Here, we show the importance of comprehensive study of these patients in order to collect useful information about genotype-phenotype association of genes involved in iron metabolism.

  10. Prenatal Iron Supplementation Reduces Maternal Anemia, Iron Deficiency, and Iron Deficiency Anemia in a Randomized Clinical Trial in Rural China, but Iron Deficiency Remains Widespread in Mothers and Neonates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gengli; Xu, Guobin; Zhou, Min; Jiang, Yaping; Richards, Blair; Clark, Katy M; Kaciroti, Niko; Georgieff, Michael K; Zhang, Zhixiang; Tardif, Twila; Li, Ming; Lozoff, Betsy

    2015-08-01

    Previous trials of prenatal iron supplementation had limited measures of maternal or neonatal iron status. The purpose was to assess effects of prenatal iron-folate supplementation on maternal and neonatal iron status. Enrollment occurred June 2009 through December 2011 in Hebei, China. Women with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies at ≤20 wk gestation, aged ≥18 y, and with hemoglobin ≥100 g/L were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive daily iron (300 mg ferrous sulfate) or placebo + 0.40 mg folate from enrollment to birth. Iron status was assessed in maternal venous blood (at enrollment and at or near term) and cord blood. Primary outcomes were as follows: 1) maternal iron deficiency (ID) defined in 2 ways as serum ferritin (SF) <15 μg/L and body iron (BI) <0 mg/kg; 2) maternal ID anemia [ID + anemia (IDA); hemoglobin <110 g/L]; and 3) neonatal ID (cord blood ferritin <75 μg/L or zinc protoporphyrin/heme >118 μmol/mol). A total of 2371 women were randomly assigned, with outcomes for 1632 women or neonates (809 placebo/folate, 823 iron/folate; 1579 mother-newborn pairs, 37 mothers, 16 neonates). Most infants (97%) were born at term. At or near term, maternal hemoglobin was significantly higher (+5.56 g/L) for iron vs. placebo groups. Anemia risk was reduced (RR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.43, 0.66), as were risks of ID (RR: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.69, 0.79 by SF; RR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.71 by BI) and IDA (RR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.38, 0.62 by SF; RR: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.40, 0.65 by BI). Most women still had ID (66.8% by SF, 54.7% by BI). Adverse effects, all minor, were similar by group. There were no differences in cord blood iron measures; >45% of neonates in each group had ID. However, dose-response analyses showed higher cord SF with more maternal iron capsules reported being consumed (β per 10 capsules = 2.60, P < 0.05). Prenatal iron supplementation reduced anemia, ID, and IDA in pregnant women in rural China, but most women and >45% of neonates had ID, regardless of

  11. Prenatal Iron Supplementation Reduces Maternal Anemia, Iron Deficiency, and Iron Deficiency Anemia in a Randomized Clinical Trial in Rural China, but Iron Deficiency Remains Widespread in Mothers and Neonates123

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gengli; Xu, Guobin; Zhou, Min; Jiang, Yaping; Richards, Blair; Clark, Katy M; Kaciroti, Niko; Georgieff, Michael K; Zhang, Zhixiang; Tardif, Twila; Li, Ming; Lozoff, Betsy

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous trials of prenatal iron supplementation had limited measures of maternal or neonatal iron status. Objective: The purpose was to assess effects of prenatal iron-folate supplementation on maternal and neonatal iron status. Methods: Enrollment occurred June 2009 through December 2011 in Hebei, China. Women with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies at ≤20 wk gestation, aged ≥18 y, and with hemoglobin ≥100 g/L were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive daily iron (300 mg ferrous sulfate) or placebo + 0.40 mg folate from enrollment to birth. Iron status was assessed in maternal venous blood (at enrollment and at or near term) and cord blood. Primary outcomes were as follows: 1) maternal iron deficiency (ID) defined in 2 ways as serum ferritin (SF) <15 μg/L and body iron (BI) <0 mg/kg; 2) maternal ID anemia [ID + anemia (IDA); hemoglobin <110 g/L]; and 3) neonatal ID (cord blood ferritin <75 μg/L or zinc protoporphyrin/heme >118 μmol/mol). Results: A total of 2371 women were randomly assigned, with outcomes for 1632 women or neonates (809 placebo/folate, 823 iron/folate; 1579 mother-newborn pairs, 37 mothers, 16 neonates). Most infants (97%) were born at term. At or near term, maternal hemoglobin was significantly higher (+5.56 g/L) for iron vs. placebo groups. Anemia risk was reduced (RR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.43, 0.66), as were risks of ID (RR: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.69, 0.79 by SF; RR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.59, 0.71 by BI) and IDA (RR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.38, 0.62 by SF; RR: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.40, 0.65 by BI). Most women still had ID (66.8% by SF, 54.7% by BI). Adverse effects, all minor, were similar by group. There were no differences in cord blood iron measures; >45% of neonates in each group had ID. However, dose-response analyses showed higher cord SF with more maternal iron capsules reported being consumed (β per 10 capsules = 2.60, P < 0.05). Conclusions: Prenatal iron supplementation reduced anemia, ID, and IDA in pregnant women in rural China, but most women

  12. Pharmacokinetics of norethisterone and levonorgestrel in experimental iron deficiency anemia in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, B; Nair, K M; Prasad, K V; Rao, B S

    1985-11-01

    Mild-moderate anemia (hemoglobin, 10-12 g/100 ml) was induced in eight female rabbits by feeding a purified diet with low iron content over a period of 4 months and it could be maintained for a further period of 7 months. Nine control animals received the same diet supplemented with iron. Pharmacokinetics of intravenously administered contraceptive steriods, norethindrone and levonorgestrel, were determined in both control and anemic rabbits at the end of 150 and 171 days, respectively. No significant alterations were observed in the disposition of these steroids in deficient rabbits as compared to controls, indicating that mild-moderate forms of iron deficiency anemia may not influence the metabolic handling of either norethindrone or levonogestrel.

  13. Intravenous Ferric Carboxymaltose in Children with Iron Deficiency Anemia Who Respond Poorly to Oral Iron.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Shamoun, Mark; McCavit, Timothy L; Adix, Leah; Buchanan, George R

    2017-01-01

    To assess the benefits and risks of intravenous (IV) ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) in children with iron deficiency anemia (IDA). In a retrospective cohort study of patients seen at our center, we identified all FCM infusions in children with IDA over a 12-month period through a query of pharmacy records. Clinical data, including hematologic response and adverse effects, were extracted from the electronic medical record. A total of 116 IV FCM infusions were administered to 72 patients with IDA refractory to oral iron treatment (median age, 13.7 years; range, 9 months to 18 years). Median preinfusion and postinfusion hemoglobin values were 9.1 g/dL and 12.3 g/dL, respectively (at 4-12 weeks after the initial infusion; n = 53). Sixty-five patients (84%) experienced no adverse effects. Minor transient complications were encountered during or immediately after 7 infusions. FCM administered as a short IV infusion without a test dose proved to be safe and highly effective in a small yet diverse population of infants, children, and adolescents with IDA refractory to oral iron therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Efficacy of to'thema in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in early childhood with concomitant copper deficiency].

    PubMed

    Mtvarelidze, Z; Kvezereli-Kopadze, A; Kvezereli-Kopadze, M; Pagava, K

    2005-04-01

    IDA is still the major medico-social problem in pediatric hematology, especially in early childhood. In this correction ferroresistant forms of IDA are interesting. The aim of our investigation was: studying the Efficacy of Tot'hema in the treatment of Iron Deficiency Anemia in Early childhood with concomitant copper deficiency. We observed 42 patients with IDA (age 0,4 - 3 years) in open control investigation. The carried-out investigations revealed that IDA in early childhood is often proceeded by the concomitant copper deficiency and ceruloplasmin, mainly in premature infants and in children with prolonged diarrhea in anamnesis. In such cases it is important to investigate the copper metabolism together with the peripheral blood index and iron metabolism. Tot'hema improves hematologic and biochemical index, completely supplies iron and copper deficiency, prevents of iron resistant form of IDA. Tot'hema has no side effects.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor SNP haplotypes are associated with iron deficiency anemia in West African children

    PubMed Central

    Rockett, Kirk A.; Morgan, Gareth; Bejon, Philip A.; Sirugo, Giorgio; O'Connell, Maria A.; Hanchard, Neil; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Prentice, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01

    Plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are significantly raised in malaria infection and TNF-α is thought to inhibit intestinal iron absorption and macrophage iron release. This study investigated putative functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes across the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class III region, including TNF and its immediate neighbors nuclear factor of κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells (lκBL), inhibitor-like 1 and lymphotoxin alpha (LTA), in relation to nutritional iron status and anemia, in a cohort of 780 children across a malaria season. The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) increased over the malaria season (P < .001). The TNF−308 AA genotype was associated with an increased risk of iron deficiency (adjusted OR 8.1; P = .001) and IDA (adjusted OR 5.1; P = .01) at the end of the malaria season. No genotypes were associated with IDA before the malaria season. Thus, TNF appears to be a risk factor for iron deficiency and IDA in children in a malaria-endemic environment and this is likely to be due to a TNF-α–induced block in iron absorption. PMID:18716131

  16. Interaction of iron deficiency anemia and hemoglobinopathies among college students and pregnant women: a multi center evaluation in India.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Dipika; Gorakshakar, Ajit C; Colah, Roshan B; Patel, Ramesh Z; Master, Dilip C; Mahanta, J; Sharma, Santanu K; Chaudhari, Utpal; Ghosh, Malay; Das, Sheila; Britt, Reitt P; Singh, Shawinder; Ross, Cecil; Jagannathan, Lata; Kaul, Rajni; Shukla, Deepak K; Muthuswamy, Vasantha

    2014-01-01

    Although iron deficiency anemia is very common in India, systematic large studies on the prevalence and hematological consequences of iron deficiency among carriers of β-thalassemia (β-thal) and other hemoglobinopathies are lacking. A multi center project was undertaken to screen college/university students and pregnant women for iron deficiency anemia and various hemoglobinopathies. Fifty-six thousand, seven hundred and seventy-two subjects from six states, Maharashtra, Gujarat, Karnataka, West Bengal, Assam and Punjab, were studied. Iron deficiency anemia was evaluated by measuring zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) and hemoglobin (Hb) levels, while β-thal and other hemoglobinopathies were detected by measuring the red cell indices and by Hb analysis using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). College boys (2.2%), college girls (14.3%) and antenatal women (27.0%) without any hemoglobinopathies had iron deficiency anemia. Among the β-thal carriers, the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was 17.3% in college boys, 38.1% in college girls and 55.9% in pregnant women, while in the Hb E [β26(B8)Glu→Lys; HBB: c.79G>A] carriers, it was 7.3% in college boys, 25.4% in college girls and 78.0% in antenatal women. In individuals with Hb E disease, the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia varied from 31.2-77.3% in the three groups. A significant reduction in Hb levels was seen when iron deficiency anemia was associated with hemoglobinopathies. However, the Hb A2 levels in β-thal carriers were not greatly reduced in the presence of iron deficiency anemia.

  17. Depleted iron stores and iron deficiency anemia associated with reduced ferritin and hepcidin and elevated soluble transferrin receptors in a multiethnic group of preschool-age children.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Hope A; Jean-Philippe, Sonia; Cohen, Tamara R; Vanstone, Catherine A; Agellon, Sherry

    2015-09-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is prevalent in subgroups of the Canadian population. The objective of this study was to examine iron status and anemia in preschool-age children. Healthy children (n = 430, 2-5 years old, Montreal, Quebec, Canada) were sampled from randomly selected daycares. Anthropometry, demographics, and diet were assessed. Biochemistry included hemoglobin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptors (sTfR), ferritin index, markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)), and hepcidin. Iron deficiency and anemia cutoffs conformed to the World Health Organization criteria. Differences among categories were tested using mixed-model ANOVA or χ(2) tests. Children were 3.8 ± 1.0 years of age, with a body mass index z score of 0.48 ± 0.97, and 51% were white. Adjusted intakes of iron indicated <1% were at risk for deficiency. Hemoglobin was higher in white children, whereas ferritin was higher with greater age and female sex. Inflammatory markers and hepcidin did not vary with any demographic variable. The prevalence of iron deficiency was 16.5% (95% confidence interval (CI), 13.0-20.0). Three percent (95% CI, 1.4-4.6) of children had iron deficiency anemia and 12.8% (95% CI, 9.6-16.0) had unexplained anemia. Children with iron deficiency, with and without anemia, had lower plasma ferritin and hepcidin but higher sTfR, ferritin index, and IL-6, whereas those with unexplained anemia had elevated TNFα. We conclude that iron deficiency anemia is not very common in young children in Montreal. While iron deficiency without anemia is more common than iron deficiency with anemia, the correspondingly reduced circulating hepcidin would have enabled heightened absorption of dietary iron in support of erythropoiesis.

  18. Efficacy and safety of iron isomaltoside (Monofer®) in the management of patients with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Philip A; Bhandari, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    New intravenous (IV) iron preparations should ideally be capable of delivering a wide dosing range to allow iron correction in a single or low number of visits, a rapid infusion (doses up to 1,000 mg must be administered over more than 15 minutes and doses exceeding 1,000 mg must be administered over 30 minutes or more), and minimal potential side effects including low catalytic/labile iron release with minimal risk of anaphylaxis. Furthermore, they should be convenient for the patient and health-care professional, and cost effective for the health-care system. The intention behind the development of iron isomaltoside (Monofer®) was to fulfill these requirements. Iron isomaltoside has been shown to be effective in treating iron deficiency anemia across multiple therapeutic patient groups and compared to placebo, IV iron sucrose, and oral iron. Iron isomaltoside consists of iron and a carbohydrate moiety where the iron is tightly bound in a matrix structure. It has a low immunogenic potential, a low potential to release labile iron, and does not appear to be associated with clinically significant hypophosphatemia. Due to the structure of iron isomaltoside, it can be administered in high doses with a maximum single dosage of 20 mg/kg body weight. Clinical trials and observational studies of iron isomaltoside show that it is an effective and well-tolerated treatment of anemia across different therapeutic areas with a favorable safety profile. PMID:27022297

  19. Red cell distribution width (RDW) in the diagnosis of iron deficiency with microcytic hypochromic anemia.

    PubMed

    Aulakh, Roosy; Sohi, Inderpreet; Singh, Tejinder; Kakkar, Naveen

    2009-03-01

    To study the utility of red cell distribution width (RDW) in the diagnosis of iron deficiency among children with microcytic hypochromic anemia. 151 children (6 months-12 years) with microcytic (MCV<75 fl) anemia were classified into iron deficient (IDA) and non-iron deficient anemia (non-IDA) on the basis of serum ferritin and total iron binding capacity (TIBC). RDW values were obtained on an automated hematology analyzer. Receiver operator curves (ROC) were constructed and the utility of RDW in diagnosis of iron deficiency was studied. The mean RDW value was 18.37+/-2.22% in IDA group (97 children) compared to 16.55+/-1.51 % in the non-IDA group (54 children) (p<0.0001, unpaired t test). In IDA group, the mean RDW value was 16.60+/-1.78%, 17.95+/-1.91% and 20.55+/-1.32% among mild, moderate and severely anemic children (p<0.0001, ANOVA test). The corresponding values in non-IDA group were 16.03+/-1.25%, 16.76+/-1.20% and 16.77+/-2.68% respectively (p=0.269, ANOVA test). At a cut-off value of 17.4%, as obtained from the ROC curve, the sensitivity and specificity of RDW in diagnosis of IDA were 81.0% and 53.4% and a positive and negative predictive value of 63.0% and 72.2% respectively. RDW has a limited specificity for diagnosis of IDA among children with microcytic hypochromic anemia.

  20. Refractory iron deficiency anemia and Helicobacter Pylori Infection in pediatrics: A review

    PubMed Central

    Gheibi, Sh; Farrokh-Eslamlou, HR; Noroozi, M; Pakniyat, A

    2015-01-01

    Background Since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori, several clinical reports have demonstrated that H. Pylori infection has emerged as a new cause of refractory iron stores in children. We carried out a systematic literature review to primarily evaluate the existing evidence on the association between childhood H. Pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and secondly, to investigate the beneficial effects of bacterium elimination. Material and Methods This review concerns important pediatric studies published from January 1991 to October 2014. Fourteen case reports and series of cases, 24 observational epidemiologic studies, seven uncontrolled trials, and 16 randomized clinical trials were included in the review. Results Although there are a few observational epidemiologic studies and some randomized trials mostly due to the potential confounders, most studies reported a positive association linking between H. Pylori infection and iron deficiency or iron deficiency anemia among children. In addition, it seems that elimination of H. Pylori infection induces beneficial effects on iron deficiency. Conclusions Since the evidence for the association of H. pylori eradication therapy and refractory childhood IDA is not enough and there are contrasting data about such association, future high quality and cohort researches are needed to determine the causal association. PMID:25914802

  1. Anemia and iron deficiency in children: association with red meat and poultry consumption.

    PubMed

    Moshe, Galit; Amitai, Yona; Korchia, Gerard; Korchia, Levana; Tenenbaum, Ariel; Rosenblum, Joseph; Schechter, Avi

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to study the relative contribution of dietary sources of iron in children with high prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency (ID). A cross-sectional study in 263 healthy, 1.5- to 6-year-old children in the Jewish sector of Jerusalem, Israel. Venous blood samples and a qualitative Food Frequency Questionnaire on iron-rich foods were obtained. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin <11 g/dL for children younger than 4 years and <11.5 g/dL for children older than 4 years; ID was defined as ferritin <12 μg/L. Anemia was found in 11.2%, ID in 22%, and iron-deficiency anemia in 3.7%. The prevalence of anemia was higher in toddlers ages 1.5 to 3 years compared with children ages 3 to 6 years (17.7% vs 7.3%, P = 0.01). Children with extremely low red meat consumption (seldom) had 4-fold higher rates of ID than those who consumed ≥2 times per week (odds ratio 3.98; 95% confidence interval 1.21-13.03; P = 0.023), whereas poultry consumption was not associated with ID. Soy consumption was inversely associated with ferritin (marginally significant, r = -0.134, P = 0.057). The high prevalence of anemia and ID found in this study, mainly in children 1.5 to 3 years old, is related to low red meat consumption. The characteristically high poultry consumption in the Israeli population was not protective. The shift toward reduced red meat consumption and higher poultry consumption in developed countries may result in increasing the risk of ID.

  2. Distinguishing effects of anemia and muscle iron deficiency on exercise bioenergetics in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, K.J.A.; Donovan, C.M.; Refino, C.J.; Brooks, G.A.; Packer, L.; Dallman, P.R.

    1984-06-01

    Three weeks of dietary iron deficiency in weanling rats resulted in anemia (Hb, 39 vs 14.2 g/dl in controls) and decreased oxidative capacities of skeletal muscle (as much as 90% below control values). Whole-animal maximal O/sub 2/ consumption V/sub 0/sub 2///sub max//, measured in a brief treadmill run of progressively increasing work load, was approx.50% lower for iron-deficient rats than for controls, and maximal endurance capacity (time to exhaustion in a separate treadmill run at a constant, sub- V/sub 0/sub 2///sub max// work load) was 90% lower from iron-deficient rats than for controls. Exchange transfusion with packed erythrocytes or plasma, was used to adjust Hb to an intermediate concentration of approximately 9.5 g/dl in both iron-deficient and control rats. This procedure corrected the V/sub 0/sub 2///sub max// of iron-deficient rats to within 15% of control values, whereas endurance capacity showed no improvement. Our experimental dissociation of V/sub 0/sub 2///sub max/// and endurance capacity provides further evidence that V/sub 0/sub 2///sub max// is not the sole determinant of endurance. We propose that defects in V/sub 0/sub 2///sub max// during iron deficiency result primarily from diminished O/sub 2/ delivery, whereas decreased endurance capacity reflects impaired muscle mitochondrial function.

  3. Gastric inverted hyperplastic polyp: A rare cause of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jin Tak; Lee, Seung Woo; Kim, Dong Pil; Choi, Seung Hwa; Kim, Seok-Hwan; Park, Jun Kyu; Jang, Sun Hee; Park, Yun Jung; Sung, Ye Gyu; Sul, Hae Jung

    2016-01-01

    Gastric inverted hyperplastic polyp (IHP) is a rare gastric polyp characterized by the downward growth of hyperplastic mucosal components into the submucosal layer. Macroscopically, a gastric IHP resembles a subepithelial tumor (SET); as a result, accurately diagnosing gastric IHP is difficult. This issue has clinical significance because gastric IHP can be misdiagnosed as SET or as malignant neoplasm In addition, adenocarcinoma can accompany benign gastric IHP. Although in most cases, gastric IHPs are asymptomatic and are found incidentally, these polyps may cause anemia secondary to chronic bleeding. Here, we report one case involving gastric IHP accompanied by chronic iron deficiency anemia that was successfully managed using endoscopic submucosal dissection. PMID:27099452

  4. Iron deficiency and anemia are prevalent in women with multiple gestations.

    PubMed

    Ru, Yuan; Pressman, Eva K; Cooper, Elizabeth M; Guillet, Ronnie; Katzman, Philip J; Kent, Tera R; Bacak, Stephen J; O'Brien, Kimberly O

    2016-10-01

    Little attention has been placed on the unique iron demands that may exist in women with multiple gestations. This merits attention because iron deficiency (ID) during pregnancy is associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes that are known to be more prevalent in multiple births. We characterized longitudinal changes in iron status across pregnancy in a cohort of healthy women with multiple gestations and identified determinants of maternal ID and anemia. A group of 83 women carrying twins, triplets, or quadruplets (aged 20-46 y) was recruited from 2011 to 2014. Blood samples obtained during pregnancy (∼24 wk; n = 73) and at delivery (∼35 wk; n = 61) were used to assess hemoglobin, serum ferritin (SF), soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), hepcidin, serum iron, erythropoietin, serum folate, vitamin B-12, C-reactive protein, and interleukin-6. The prevalence of tissue ID (sTfR >8.5 mg/L) increased significantly from pregnancy to delivery (9.6% compared with 23%, P = 0.03). Women with depleted iron stores (SF <12 μg/L, n = 20) during pregnancy had a 2-fold greater risk of anemia at delivery, and 25% (n = 5) developed iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Overall, 44.6% of women studied (n = 37/83) were anemic at delivery, and 18% of women (n = 11/61) had IDA. Erythropoietin during pregnancy was significantly negatively associated with hemoglobin at delivery. Women with erythropoietin >75th percentile during pregnancy exhibited a 3-fold greater risk of anemia, suggesting that erythropoietin is a sensitive predictor of anemia at delivery. Inflammation was present at delivery, which limited the utility of ferritin or hepcidin as iron-status indicators at delivery. ID and anemia are highly prevalent in women with multiple gestations. Additional screening and iron supplementation may be warranted in this high-risk population given the known associations between ID anemia and adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01582802

  5. Iron deficiency anemia in a ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) with concurrent chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kadie M; Wolf, Karen N

    2014-02-15

    A 16-year-old vasectomized male ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) with a history of suspected chronic renal failure was evaluated because of extreme lethargy, hyperpnea, and abscess of the right pectoral scent gland. Examination of the anesthetized patient revealed an impacted right pectoral scent gland with serosanguineous exudate. A CBC and serum biochemical analysis revealed severe anemia, marked azotemia, hyperphosphatemia, and hypocalcemia. Supportive care (including fluid therapy and phosphorus binder administration) was initiated for renal failure; the affected gland was cleaned, and antimicrobials were administered. The patient received 1 blood transfusion, and darbepoetin alfa was administered weekly to stimulate RBC production. Anemia and azotemia persisted. Three months after treatment started, serum iron analysis revealed that iron deficiency was the probable cause for the lack of a consistent regenerative response to darbepoetin injections. Iron dextran injections resulted in a marked regenerative response; however, serum biochemical analysis results after the second injection were consistent with hepatic injury. Hepatic enzyme activities normalized following discontinuation of iron dextran treatment, but the lemur's Hct declined rapidly despite supplementary iron administration PO. The patient developed severe mandibular osteomyelitis and was euthanized because of poor prognosis. Postmortem evaluation of hepatic iron concentration confirmed iron deficiency. The family Lemuridae is considered prone to hemosiderosis and hemochromatosis, which delayed rapid diagnosis and treatment of the lemur's disease. Apparent hepatic injury following iron dextran injections further complicated treatment. Findings for this lemur support the use of species-specific total iron binding capacity and total serum iron and ferritin concentrations in evaluation of an animal with suspected iron deficiency.

  6. The incidence of gastrointestinal pathology and subsequent anemia in young men presenting with iron deficiency without anemia.

    PubMed

    Carter, Dan; Bardan, Eytan; Derazne, Estela; Tzur, Dorit; Avidan, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    The etiology of iron deficiency (ID) without anemia in young men is unclear, and there are no evidence-based recommendations for the required gastrointestinal (GI) evaluation. The aims of this study were to examine the incidence of significant GI pathology and the development of anemia during the follow-up of young men presenting with ID, but without anemia. All young men (18-30 years) who served in the Israel Defense Forces during the years 2005-2013 and had at least a single laboratory test indicative of ID without anemia were followed until the diagnosis of significant GI pathology or discharge from military service. The study population included 2061 young men (mean age 20.7±1.8). During follow-up of 3150 person years, significant GI pathologies were diagnosed in 39 patients: inflammatory bowel disease in 25 (1.2%), celiac disease in 8 (0.4%), and peptic disease in 4 (0.1%). No cases of GI-related cancer were diagnosed. ID anemia developed during follow-up in 203 (9.8%). Lower baseline hemoglobin levels, lower ferritin levels, and younger age at diagnosis were more common among those who developed anemia. The development of anemia was a predisposing factor for the diagnosis of GI pathology (risk ratio=3.60, 95% confidence interval 1.34-8.32, P=0.012). Significant GI pathology is very uncommon in young men presenting with ID. Overt anemia developed in close to 10% of the study cohort. Therefore, we advise simple GI evaluation (celiac serology, C-reactive protein or fecal calprotectin, and urease breath test) as well as follow-up in this population.

  7. [A young child with acute abdomen and iron deficiency anemia].

    PubMed

    Schlapbach, L; Liniger, B; Schibli, S; Cholewa, D

    2006-05-31

    The case of a 20 month-old girl that was admitted to the emergency ward because of worsening of her general condition in the setting of acute non-bloody gastroenteritis is reported. The clinical examination revealed signs of severe dehydration and a prominent tender abdomen. Laboratory evaluation showed leucocytosis, elevated C-reactive protein and severe hypochromic microcytic anemia. Abdominal X-ray revealed diffuse meteorism. The child underwent laparascopic evaluation. A perforated Meckel's diverticulum was found. Perforation and anemia due to occult bleeding are unusual presentations of Meckel's diverticulum. The differential diagnosis of children presenting with an acute abdomen with special focus on Meckel's diverticulum is discussed.

  8. Iron deficiency anemia in adolescents; a literature review.

    PubMed

    De Andrade Cairo, Romilda Castro; Rodrigues Silva, Luciana; Carneiro Bustani, Nadya; Ferreira Marques, Cibele Dantas

    2014-06-01

    Introducción: La anemia es una de las deficiencias nutricionales más importantes que afecta a varios estratos sociales y socioeconómicos. Es más frecuente en países en vías de desarrollo, estando los niños y los adolescentes en un riesgo significativamente mayor para padecer esta afección. Objetivo: Realizar una revisión bibliográfica sobre la anemia ferropénica en la adolescencia como un problema de salud pública y sobre los factores de riesgo que podrían contribuir en las deficiencias nutricionales, la detención del crecimiento y el desarrollo en este grupo de edad y poniendo el énfasis sobre la fisiopatología y las causas de la anemia, los diferentes abordajes diagnósticos y sus características clínicas, la prevención y el tratamiento. Metodología: Para este estudio, se consultaron las bases de datos LILACS-BIREME, SCIELO y PUBMED. Se seleccionaron los trabajos científicos publicados en español, portugués o inglés entre 2000 y 2013 sobre la anemia ferropénica. Se identificaron y evaluaron un total de 102 estudios publicados entre el 1º de enero de 2000 y el 30 de junio de 2013. Cuarenta y dos artículos que reunían los criterios de inclusión (adolescentes con anemia) se seleccionaron para esta revisión. Finalmente, se realizó un análisis y se evaluaron los artículos de acuerdo con los objetivos del estudio. Resultados y discusión: Los estudios revisados mostraron una prevalencia de anemia ferropénica cercana al 20 % en los adolescentes y describían los efectos deletéreos de la anemia en este grupo. Conclusión: Se requiere una acción preventiva con respecto a la anemia ferropénica. Los profesionales sanitarios deberían ser conscientes de la necesidad de un diagnóstico, profilaxis y tratamiento precoces.EL.

  9. Suitability of instant noodles for iron fortification to combat iron-deficiency anemia among primary schoolchildren in rural Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Le, Huong Thi; Brouwer, Inge D; de Wolf, Corine A; van der Heijden, Lidwien; Nguyen, Khan Cong; Kok, Frans J

    2007-09-01

    Anemia is a significant public health problem among schoolchildren in Vietnam. Food fortification is considered one of the most sustainable long-term strategies to control iron-deficiency anemia in Vietnam. The success of a food-fortification program depends on the choice of the food vehicle. The aim of the present study was to identify an appropriate vehicle for iron fortification to be used in a school-feeding program aimed at improving the iron and anemia status of schoolchildren in rural Vietnam. Children 6 to 8 years of age in two primary schools in Tam Nong District, Phu Tho Province, and their parents were included in this study. The study consisted of three substudies: a food-consumption study with 24-hour recalls of two nonconsecutive days; a food-beliefs study, with focus group discussions, a pile-sorting test, and a food attributes and differences exercise; and a food-acceptance study using noodles and biscuits fortified with sodium iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (NaFeEDTA). The average number of meals consumed daily was 3.2 +/- 0.4, and the average intakes of energy and iron were 1,218 +/- 406 kcal and 7.5 +/- 4.0 mg, respectively. Compared with biscuits and instant rice soup, instant noodles were consumed more frequently and in larger portion sizes and are more acceptable as children's food in the culture of the local people. The iron level of the fortified product did not affect the mean consumption of noodles, but a higher level of iron was associated with a lower mean consumption of biscuits (p < .05). The production process did not affect the NaFeEDTA level in noodles; however, during preparation at least 70% of the iron is leaked into the soup. Instant noodles are a suitable vehicle for iron fortification for use in school-based intervention to improve iron-deficiency anemia among primary schoolchildren in rural Vietnam.

  10. Iron deficiency anemia in an athlete associated with Campylobacter pylori-negative chronic gastritis

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, D.; Sherman, P. )

    1989-08-01

    A 14-year-old athletic boy with a 1-year history of decreased exercise tolerance presented with unexplained iron deficiency anemia. Panendoscopy, colonoscopy, and barium contrast studies of the gastrointestinal tract were normal. However, persistent uptake of radionuclide using a {sup 99m}technetium-sucralfate scan suggested inflammation localized to the stomach. Mucosal biopsies demonstrated acute and chronic gastritis that was not associated with the presence of Campylobacter pylori.

  11. Recurrent Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Owing to Severe Iron Deficiency Anemia Caused by Inappropriate Habitual Bloodletting

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Na, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hyun-Jung; Kang, Eun Gyu; Seo, Jae-Bin; Chung, Woo-Young; Zo, Joo-Hee; Hong, Jung Ae; Kim, Kwangyoun; Kim, Myung-A

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman visited the emergency department twice with symptoms of acute heart failure including shortness of breath, general weakness, and abdominal distension. Laboratory findings showed extremely low level of serum hemoglobin at 1.4 g/dL. Echocardiographic examination demonstrated dilated left ventricular cavity with systolic dysfunction and moderate amount of pericardial effusion. In this patient, acute heart failure due to severe iron deficiency anemia was caused by inappropriate habitual bloodletting. PMID:26755934

  12. Obesity and iron deficiency anemia as risk factors for asymptomatic bacteriuria.

    PubMed

    Cuttitta, F; Torres, D; Vogiatzis, D; Buttà, C; Bellanca, M; Gueli, D; Lupo, U; Schimmenti, C; Virzì, G; Petrantoni, R; Balistreri, F; Paterna, S; Parrinello, G

    2014-03-01

    Few studies examined the risk factors of asymptomatic bacteriuria, showing contradictory results. Our study aimed to examine the association between different clinical and laboratory parameters and asymptomatic bacteriuria in internal medicine patients. 330 consecutive hospitalized subjects, asymptomatic for urinary tract infections (UTIs), underwent to microscopic examination of urine specimens. 100 subjects were positive for microscopic bacteriuria and were recruited into the study. At the quantitative urine culture 31 subjects of study population were positive while 69 subjects were negative for bacteriuria. The analysis of clinical characteristics showed that the two groups of subjects (positive and negative urine culture for bacteriuria) were significant different (p<0.05) about obesity (76.7% vs 42% respectively), metabolic syndrome (80.6% vs 44,9%), cholelithiasis (35.5% vs 13,2%) and iron deficiency anemia (80.6% vs 53,6%). The univariate analysis showed that only obesity, cholelithiasis and iron deficiency anemia were positively associated with positive urine culture for bacteriuria (Odds Ratios [OR]=3.79, p=0.0003; OR=2,65, p=0.0091; OR=2.63, p=0.0097; respectively). However, the multivariate analysis by logistic regression showed that only obesity and iron deficiency anemia, independently associated with positive urine culture for bacteriuria (OR=3.9695, p=0.0075; OR=3.1569, p=0.03420 respectively). This study shows that obesity and iron deficiency anemia are independent risk factors for asymptomatic bacteriuria. Copyright © 2014 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Iron deficiency anemia in an athlete associated with Campylobacter pylori-negative chronic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Mack, D; Sherman, P

    1989-08-01

    A 14-year-old athletic boy with a 1-year history of decreased exercise tolerance presented with unexplained iron deficiency anemia. Panendoscopy, colonoscopy, and barium contrast studies of the gastrointestinal tract were normal. However, persistent uptake of radionuclide using a 99mtechnetium-sucralfate scan suggested inflammation localized to the stomach. Mucosal biopsies demonstrated acute and chronic gastritis that was not associated with the presence of Campylobacter pylori.

  14. The occurrence of iron-deficiency anemia in children with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wójciak, Rafał W; Mojs, Ewa; Stanisławska-Kubiak, Maia

    2014-08-01

    A higher risk for iron deficiency, which can lead to anemia, has been noticed in children with early stages of type 1 diabetes. Anemia in diabetes is not uncommon and thus may contribute to disease complications. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of type 1 diabetes incidence on the manifestation of iron-deficiency anemia. The study included 100 children with type 1 diabetes, aged 6 to 17 years. The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in all patients was made on the basis of clinical symptoms and, at a later stage, on the basis of the occurrence of islet cell autoantibodies. The patients were divided into groups according to the duration of the disease: those with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes (ND), those who have the disease for 1 to 3 years (FMD), those who have it for 4 to 6 years (SMD), and those who have it for more than 6 years (LD). Morphological parameters of blood have been measured by means of the flame atomic absorption spectrometry method: red blood cells (RBC), hemoglobin (HGB), acetylated HGB, hematocrit (HCT), RBC volume (mean corpuscular volume [MCV]), HGB mass in RBC (mean corpuscular HGB [MCH]), mean HGB content in RBC (MCH concentration), and serum iron concentration. In the ND children, significantly lower concentrations of HCT and HGB as well as the amount of RBC and MCV have been shown, in comparison with the children who have type 1 diabetes longer: for HGB, compared with the FMD children; for HCT, compared with the SMD and LD children; for RBC, compared with the LD children; and for MCV, compared with the SMD children. Some significant inverse correlation has been observed in the MCH concentration in comparison with the children who have type 1 diabetes for more than 1 year. It has been shown that, when compared with the FMD, SMD, and LD children, more ND children are characterized by the coexistence of at least 3 reduced values of the morphological blood parameters associated with iron-deficiency anemia (26%, 17%, 7%, and 3

  15. Women's perceptions of iron deficiency and anemia prevention and control in eight developing countries.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Rae; Dusch, Erin; Elder, Leslie; Achadi, Endang; Grajeda, Ruben; Hurtado, Elena; Favin, Mike; Kanani, Shubhada; Marsaban, Julie; Meda, Nicolas; Moore, K Mona; Morison, Linda; Raina, Neena; Rajaratnam, Jolly; Rodriquez, Javier; Stephen, Chitra

    2002-08-01

    blood or a big baby, making delivery more difficult. Facilitators include women's recognition of improved physical well being with the alleviation of symptoms of anemia, particularly fatigue, a better appetite, increased appreciation of benefits for the fetus, and subsequent increased demand for prevention and treatment of iron deficiency and anemia.

  16. The prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency is more common in breastfed infants than their mothers in Bhaktapur, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Chandyo, R K; Henjum, S; Ulak, M; Thorne- Lyman, A L; Ulvik, R J; Shrestha, P S; Locks, L; Fawzi, W; Strand, T A

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Iron deficiency anemia is a widespread public health problem, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Maternal iron status around and during pregnancy may influence infant iron status. We examined multiple biomarkers to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and anemia among breastfed infants and explored its relationship with maternal and infant characteristics in Bhaktapur, Nepal. Subjects/Methods: In a cross-sectional survey, we randomly selected 500 mother–infant pairs from Bhaktapur municipality. Blood was analyzed for hemoglobin, ferritin, total iron-binding capacity, transferrin receptors and C-reactive protein. Results: The altitude-adjusted prevalence of anemia was 49% among infants 2–6-month-old (hemaglobin (Hb) <10.8 g/dl) and 72% among infants 7–12-month-old (Hb <11.3 g/dl). Iron deficiency anemia, defined as anemia and serum ferritin <20 or <12 μg/l, affected 9 and 26% of infants of these same age groups. Twenty percent of mothers had anemia (Hb <12.3 g/dl), but only one-fifth was explained by depletion of iron stores. Significant predictors of infant iron status and anemia were infant age, sex and duration of exclusive breastfeeding and maternal ferritin concentrations. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that iron supplementation in pregnancy is likely to have resulted in a low prevalence of postpartum anemia. The higher prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency among breastfed infants compared with their mothers suggests calls for intervention targeting newborns and infants. PMID:26626049

  17. Iron Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia in Dizygotic Twins Due to a Novel TMPRSS6 Gene Mutation in Addition to Polymorphisms Associated With High Susceptibility to Develop Ferropenic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Joana; Nobre de Jesus, Gustavo; Palma Anselmo, Mónica; Gonçalves, Lúcia; Brás, Daniela; Madeira Lopes, João; Meneses, João; Victorino, Rui; Faustino, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) is an autosomal recessive ferropenic anemia. Its hypochromic microcytic pattern is associated with low transferrin saturation, normal-high ferritin, and inappropriately high hepcidin level. This entity is caused by mutants of the TMPRSS6 gene that encodes the protein matriptase II, which influences hepcidin expression, an iron metabolism counterregulatory protein. We report two 29-year-old dizygotic female twins with ferropenic, hypochromic microcytic anemia with 20 years of evolution, refractory to oral iron therapy. After exclusion of gastrointestinal etiologies, IRIDA diagnosis was suspected and a novel mutation in the TMPRSS6 gene was identified. It was found in intron 11 (c.1396+4 A>T) and seems to affect the gene expression. In addition, 3 polymorphisms already associated with a higher risk of developing iron deficiency anemia were also found (D521D, V736A, and Y739Y). Our case reports an undescribed mutation causing IRIDA and supports the hypothesis that this clinical syndrome may be more common than previously thought and its genetics more heterogeneous than initially described. PMID:28491880

  18. A novel mutation Gly603Arg of TMPRSS6 in a Korean female with iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyoung Soo; Yang, Hye Ran; Song, Sang Hoon; Seo, Ja-Young; Lee, Ki-O; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2012-04-01

    Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) is a rare hereditary form of IDA with autosomal recessive inheritance. IRIDA is characterized by hypochromic microcytic anemia unresponsive to oral iron treatment, low transferrin saturation, and a high level of iron-regulated hormone hepcidin. The genetic background of IRIDA is mutations in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding matriptase-2 (TMPRSS6) that prevent inactivation of hemojuvelin, an activator of hepcidin transcription. We herein report a Korean female with IRIDA who was compound heterozygous for two mutations in TMPRSS6: a novel missense mutation c.1807G>C (p.Gly603Arg) in the serine protease domain and a known splicing mutation c.863+1G>T (IVS6+1G>T). Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Iron deficiency anemia among children: Addressing a global public health problem within a Canadian context.

    PubMed

    Christofides, Anna; Schauer, Claudia; Zlotkin, Stanley H

    2005-12-01

    Despite current Canadian pre- and perinatal nutrition programs, the prevalence of both iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is very high among young Aboriginal children from Canada's remote north. The major risk factors for IDA include prolonged consumption of evaporated cow's milk, chronic infection and prolonged exclusive breastfeeding. In the present article, the authors discuss IDA as a significant public health problem in Canadian Aboriginal communities. Whereas the prevalence of IDA in Canadian children is between 3.5% and 10.5% in the general population, in two Northern Ontario First Nations communities and one Inuit community, the anemia rate was 36%, with 56% having depleted iron stores. Traditional methods of preventing IDA, including targeted fortification, dietary diversification and supplementation, have not solved the problem. The authors' research group at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario, conceived of the strategy of 'home fortification' with 'Sprinkles' - single-dose sachets containing micronutrients in a powder form, which are easily sprinkled onto any foods prepared in the household. In Sprinkles, the iron (ferrous fumarate) is encapsulated within a thin lipid layer to prevent the iron from interacting with food. Sprinkles have been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of anemia in many developing countries. Their use in Aboriginal communities to treat and prevent anemia is described in the present paper. The authors believe that children in Aboriginal communities across Canada would potentially benefit if Sprinkles were incorporated into Health Canada's current distribution system, in combination with a social marketing strategy to encourage their use.

  20. Iron deficiency anemia among children: Addressing a global public health problem within a Canadian context

    PubMed Central

    Christofides, Anna; Schauer, Claudia; Zlotkin, Stanley H

    2005-01-01

    Despite current Canadian pre- and perinatal nutrition programs, the prevalence of both iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is very high among young Aboriginal children from Canada’s remote north. The major risk factors for IDA include prolonged consumption of evaporated cow’s milk, chronic infection and prolonged exclusive breastfeeding. In the present article, the authors discuss IDA as a significant public health problem in Canadian Aboriginal communities. Whereas the prevalence of IDA in Canadian children is between 3.5% and 10.5% in the general population, in two Northern Ontario First Nations communities and one Inuit community, the anemia rate was 36%, with 56% having depleted iron stores. Traditional methods of preventing IDA, including targeted fortification, dietary diversification and supplementation, have not solved the problem. The authors’ research group at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario, conceived of the strategy of ‘home fortification’ with ‘Sprinkles’ – single-dose sachets containing micronutrients in a powder form, which are easily sprinkled onto any foods prepared in the household. In Sprinkles, the iron (ferrous fumarate) is encapsulated within a thin lipid layer to prevent the iron from interacting with food. Sprinkles have been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of anemia in many developing countries. Their use in Aboriginal communities to treat and prevent anemia is described in the present paper. The authors believe that children in Aboriginal communities across Canada would potentially benefit if Sprinkles were incorporated into Health Canada’s current distribution system, in combination with a social marketing strategy to encourage their use. PMID:19668671

  1. Efficacy and safety of iron sucrose for iron deficiency in patients with dialysis-associated anemia: North American clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Charytan, C; Levin, N; Al-Saloum, M; Hafeez, T; Gagnon, S; Van Wyck, D B

    2001-02-01

    Iron sucrose has been used to provide intravenous (IV) iron therapy to patients outside the United States for more than 50 years. In a multicenter North American clinical trial, we determined the efficacy and safety of iron sucrose therapy in patients with dialysis-associated anemia, evidence of iron deficiency, and below-target hemoglobin (Hgb) levels despite epoetin therapy. Evidence of iron deficiency included a transferrin saturation (Tsat) less than 20% and ferritin level less than 300 ng/mL, and below-target Hgb levels included values less than 11.0 g/dL. We administered iron sucrose in 10 doses, each administered undiluted as 100 mg IV push over 5 minutes, without a prior test dose. We assessed efficacy by determining the subsequent change in Hgb, Tsat, and ferritin values. We assessed safety by recording blood pressure and adverse events after iron sucrose injection and comparing results with those for the same patients during an observation control period. Results showed a significant increase in Hgb level that was first evident after three doses of iron sucrose and persisted at least 5 weeks after the 10th dose. Tsat and ferritin levels also increased significantly and remained elevated. In 77 enrolled patients, including those with previous iron dextran sensitivity, other drug allergies, or concurrent angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use, we saw no serious adverse drug reactions and no change in intradialytic blood pressure associated with iron sucrose administration. We conclude that iron sucrose injection administered as 1,000 mg in 10 divided doses by IV push without a prior test dose is safe and effective for the treatment of iron deficiency in patients with dialysis-associated anemia.

  2. Optimal management of iron deficiency anemia due to poor dietary intake

    PubMed Central

    Aspuru, Kattalin; Villa, Carlos; Bermejo, Fernando; Herrero, Pilar; López, Santiago García

    2011-01-01

    Iron is necessary for the normal development of multiple vital processes. Iron deficiency (ID) may be caused by several diseases, even by physiological situations that increase requirements for this mineral. One of its possible causes is a poor dietary iron intake, which is infrequent in developed countries, but quite common in developing areas. In these countries, dietary ID is highly prevalent and comprises a real public health problem and a challenge for health authorities. ID, with or without anemia, can cause important symptoms that are not only physical, but can also include a decreased intellectual performance. All this, together with a high prevalence, can even have negative implications for a community’s economic and social development. Treatment consists of iron supplements. Prevention of ID obviously lies in increasing the dietary intake of iron, which can be difficult in developing countries. In these regions, foods with greater iron content are scarce, and attempts are made to compensate this by fortifying staple foods with iron. The effectiveness of this strategy is endorsed by multiple studies. On the other hand, in developed countries, ID with or without anemia is nearly always associated with diseases that trigger a negative balance between iron absorption and loss. Its management will be based on the treatment of underlying diseases, as well as on oral iron supplements, although these latter are limited by their tolerance and low potency, which on occasions may compel a change to intravenous administration. Iron deficiency has a series of peculiarities in pediatric patients, in the elderly, in pregnant women, and in patients with dietary restrictions, such as celiac disease. PMID:22114518

  3. Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Vietnamese Children, 6 to 11 Years Old.

    PubMed

    Le Nguyen Bao, Khanh; Tran Thuy, Nga; Nguyen Huu, Chinh; Khouw, Ilse; Deurenberg, Paul

    2016-07-01

    In a population sample of 385 children, 6 to 11 years old, venous blood parameters-hemoglobin (Hb), ferritin, red blood cell count (RBC), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), C-reactive protein (CRP), and α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP)-were determined to get insight into the iron status. The prevalence of anemia was 11.4%; 5.6% had iron deficiency (ID), whereas 0.4% had ID anemia. Correction for inflammation based on CRP and AGP did not markedly change the overall prevalence of ID and ID anemia. Stunted children had lower Hb and ferritin values compared with nonstunted children, and thin children had lower values compared with normal-weight or overweight and obese children. Many nonanemic children had alert values for RBC, MCV, MCH, and MCHC. It is concluded that although the prevalence of anemia is of the magnitude of a mild public health problem, the iron status of many nonanemic children is borderline, as indicated by a high number of children with low values for red blood cytology. © 2016 APJPH.

  4. Resolution of constipation, anal stricture, and iron deficiency anemia after iron infusion: an analogy with Plummer Vinson syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arya, Vijaypal; Singh, Shikha; Agarwal, Shashank; Ohri, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Anal stricture is a disabling condition which is often unresponsive to conservative medical management. The complications of surgical procedures such as dilatations and anoplasty make it a formidable treatment challenge. Through this case, we report and explore a new medical treatment for ano-rectal strictures with an analogy to Plummer Vinson syndrome. A 69-year-old male presented with chronic constipation, rectal pain, and easy fatigability. The physical exam was negative for anal fissure and a digital rectal examination could not be completed because an index finger could not be advanced through the narrowed anus. Laboratory reports revealed microcytic hypochromic anemia with iron deficiency. A colonoscopy performed with a GIF XQ180 OLYMPUS scope, confirmed anal stricture with non-specific colitis. Conservative management with laxatives, high fiber diet, local anesthetics with a trial of mesalamine was initiated but the patient continued to have symptoms. He was referred to a hematologist for an evaluation of anemia and was started on intravenous (IV) iron infusion. The patient's symptoms of constipation, anal stricture and iron deficiency anemia resolved with iron infusion over 3 months. A repeat rectal exam was painless and confirmed resolution of anal stricture. IV iron supplementation combined with conventional anal dilatation presents as a promising approach toward the treatment of anal strictures.

  5. Malondialdehyde, antioxidant enzymes, and renal tubular functions in children with iron deficiency or iron-deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Altun, Demet; Kurekci, Ahmet Emin; Gursel, Orhan; Hacıhamdioglu, Duygu Ovunc; Kurt, Ismail; Aydın, Ahmet; Ozcan, Okan

    2014-10-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of iron deficiency (ID) or iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) on oxidative stress and renal tubular functions before and after treatment of children. A total of 30 children with a diagnosis of IDA constituted the IDA group and 32 children with a diagnosis of ID constituted the ID group. Control group consisted 38 age-matched children. Serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), serum, and urinary sodium (Na), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), creatinine (Cr), uric acid (UA), urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) levels, and intra-erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) levels were measured before and after iron therapy in the IDA and ID groups, whereas it was studied once in the control group. We have divided the study group in groups according to age (infants <2 years, children 3-9 years, and adolescents 10-15 years). Patients with IDA (infant, adolescent) and ID (infant, children, and adolescent) had a significantly high level of MDA in post-treatment period in comparison to those of healthy control. Patients with IDA (children, adolescent) and ID (infant, children) had a significantly high level of pre-treatment GSH-Px than controls. Post-treatment SOD was lower in IDA (children and adolescent) groups than control and post-treatment CAT was lower in IDA and ID (adolescent) groups than control. These findings show that ferrous sulfate used in the treatment of ID or IDA could lead to oxidative stress; however, a marked deterioration of in proximal renal tubular functions was not seen.

  6. Comparison of Different Iron Preparations in the Prophylaxis of Iron-deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Ali; Gur, Emel; Erener-Ercan, Tugba; Can, Gunay; Arvas, Ahmet

    2017-10-01

    We compared the efficacy of ferrous sulfate (divalent) and ferric polymaltose (trivalent) compounds for the prophylaxis of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA). Study infants included exclusively breast milk-fed term infants. Subjects were divided randomly into 2 groups at 4 months of age and group 1 (n=56) received divalent and group 2 (n=56) received trivalent iron (Fe) preparation at a dose of 2 mg/kg/d for 5 months. At 9 months of age, after a 5-month prophylaxis, a significant increase was observed in hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit, serum Fe levels, and transferrin saturation in both groups. However, group 1 had significantly higher Hb, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, Fe, and transferrin saturation than group 2 (11.7±0.6 g/dL, 34.6%±1.7%, 76.2±2.9 fL, 55.5±1.8 mcg, 20.8±3.9 g/L, respectively in group 1 vs. 11.3±0.5 g/dL, 33.5%±1.5%, 74.7±3.2 fL, 42.5±1.8 mcg, 14.1±7.5 g/L, respectively in group 2). No significant difference was found in ferritin values between the groups. Fe deficiency was found in 17 (30.3%) of the subjects in group 1, and 23 (41%) of subjects in group 2 whereas 5 (8.9%) subjects had IDA in group 1 and 12 (12%) in group 2 which were insignificant between groups. No significant difference was found with regard to side effects between 2 Fe preparations. Although divalent Fe therapy led to a higher Hb and serum Fe level, both ferrous and ferric Fe preparations were effective for prophylactic use in the prevention of Fe deficiency and IDA with comparable side effects.

  7. Phagocytosis, oxidative burst, and produced reactive species are affected by iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic diseases in elderly.

    PubMed

    Paino, I M M; Miranda, J C; Marzocchi-Machado, C M; Cesarino, E J; de Castro, F A; de Souza, A M

    2009-01-01

    Iron and oxidative stress have a regulatory interplay. During the oxidative burst, phagocytic cells produce free radicals such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Nevertheless, scarce studies evaluated the effect of either iron deficiency anemia (IDA) or anemia of chronic disease (ACD) on phagocyte function in the elderly. The aim of the present study was to determine the oxidative burst, phagocytosis, and nitric oxide (*NO) and HOCl, reactive species produced by monocytes and neutrophils in elderly with ACD or IDA. Soluble transferrin receptor, serum ferritin, and soluble transferrin receptor/log ferritin (TfR-F) index determined the iron status. The study was constituted of 39 patients aged over 60 (28 women and 11 men) recruited from the Brazilian Public Health System. Oxidative burst fluorescence intensity per neutrophil in IDA group and HOCl generation in both ACD and IDA groups were found to be lower (p < 0.05). The percentages of neutrophils and monocytes expressing phagocytosis in ACD group were found to be higher (p < 0.05). There was an overproduction of *NO from monocytes, whereas the fundamental generation of HOCl appeared to be lower. Phagocytosis, oxidative burst, and *NO and HOCl production are involved in iron metabolism regulation in elderly patients with ACD and IDA.

  8. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia: are monomeric iron compounds suitable for parenteral administration?

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Crumbliss, A L

    2000-11-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional problem worldwide, especially in the developing countries. Oral iron supplementation programs have failed because of noncompliance and gastrointestinal toxicity, thereby necessitating parenteral administration of iron. For parenteral administration, only iron-carbohydrate complexes are currently used, because monomeric iron salts release free iron, thereby causing oxidant injury. However, iron-carbohydrate complexes also have significant toxicity, and they are expensive. We have proposed the hypothesis that monomeric iron salts can be safely administered by the parenteral route if iron is tightly complexed to the ligand, thereby causing clinically insignificant release of free iron, and the kinetic properties of the compound allow rapid transfer of iron to plasma transferrin. A detailed analysis of the physicochemical and kinetic properties reveals that ferric iron complexed to pyrophosphate or acetohydroxamate anions may be suitable for parenteral administration. We have demonstrated that infusion of ferric pyrophosphate into the circulation via the dialysate is safe and effective in maintaining iron balance in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. Parenteral administration of monomeric iron compounds is a promising approach to the treatment of iron deficiency in the general population and merits further investigation.

  9. Detection of iron-deficiency anemia in hospitalized patients by zinc protoporphyrin.

    PubMed

    Wong, S S; Qutishat, A S; Lange, J; Gornet, T G; Buja, L M

    1996-01-15

    The diagnostic value of zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) as an indicator of iron-deficient anemia (IDA) in hospitalized patients is assessed in this study. ZPP was measured using an AVIV hematofluorometer with a coefficient of variation (CV) less than 5% and a recovery of greater than 97%. A reference range of 53-70 mu mol/mol heme was determined for ZPP in non-anemic patients in a hospital population. Hospitalized patients (221) with low hemoglobin (< 120 g/l) were evaluated for their iron status. ZPP and other anemia tests were performed. Macrocytic patients with mean corpuscular volume (MCV) greater than 98 fl) were excluded from the study. Seventy-four microcytic patients (MCV < 80 fl) were determined as having IDA according to a diagnostic algorithm. A distribution study of these microcytic patients showed that there was a significant overlap of values between the IDA and non-IDA patients for all serum anemia tests. A receiver-operator curve analysis revealed that ZPP has a relatively high degree of diagnostic efficiency better than iron and ferritin for this patient population. At a cutoff value > 170 mu mol/mol heme, ZPP has a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 90%. In addition, ZPP is also elevated in normocytic patients (MCV = 80-98 fl) with low ferritin values, who may have iron depletion. From these data, it is proposed that ZPP may be used as a screening tool for IDA in hospitalized patients.

  10. Erythroblast transferrin receptors and transferrin kinetics in iron deficiency and various anemias

    SciTech Connect

    Muta, K.; Nishimura, J.; Ideguchi, H.; Umemura, T.; Ibayashi, H.

    1987-06-01

    To clarify the role of transferrin receptors in cases of altered iron metabolism in clinical pathological conditions, we studied: number of binding sites; affinity; and recycling kinetics of transferrin receptors on human erythroblasts. Since transferrin receptors are mainly present on erythroblasts, the number of surface transferrin receptors was determined by assay of binding of /sup 125/I-transferrin and the percentage of erythroblasts in bone marrow mononuclear cells. The number of binding sites on erythroblasts from patients with an iron deficiency anemia was significantly greater than in normal subjects. Among those with an aplastic anemia, hemolytic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and polycythemia vera compared to normal subjects, there were no considerable differences in the numbers of binding sites. The dissociation constants (Kd) were measured using Scatchard analysis. The apparent Kd was unchanged (about 10 nmol/L) in patients and normal subjects. The kinetics of endocytosis and exocytosis of /sup 125/I-transferrin, examined by acid treatment, revealed no variations in recycling kinetics among the patients and normal subjects. These data suggest that iron uptake is regulated by modulation of the number of surface transferrin receptors, thereby reflecting the iron demand of the erythroblast.

  11. Prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia among the UAE adolescent population.

    PubMed

    Barakat-Haddad, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, and medical diagnoses in relation to blood disorders, among 6,329 adolescent students (age 15 to 18 years) who reside in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Findings indicated that the overall prevalence of high blood pressure and heart disease was 1.8% and 1.3%, respectively. Overall, the prevalence for thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia was 0.9%, 1.6%, and 5%, respectively. Bivariate analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the prevalence of high blood pressure among the local and expatriate adolescent population in the Emirate of Sharjah. Similarly, statistically significant differences in the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia were observed among the local and expatriate population in Abu Dhabi city, the western region of Abu Dhabi, and Al-Ain. Multivariate analysis revealed the following significant predictors of high blood pressure: residing in proximity to industry, nonconventional substance abuse, and age when smoking or exposure to smoking began. Ethnicity was a significant predictor of heart disease, thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia. In addition, predictors of thalassemia included gender (female) and participating in physical activity. Participants diagnosed with sickle-cell anemia and iron-deficiency anemia were more likely to experience different physical activities.

  12. Prevalence of High Blood Pressure, Heart Disease, Thalassemia, Sickle-Cell Anemia, and Iron-Deficiency Anemia among the UAE Adolescent Population

    PubMed Central

    Barakat-Haddad, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, and medical diagnoses in relation to blood disorders, among 6,329 adolescent students (age 15 to 18 years) who reside in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Findings indicated that the overall prevalence of high blood pressure and heart disease was 1.8% and 1.3%, respectively. Overall, the prevalence for thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia was 0.9%, 1.6%, and 5%, respectively. Bivariate analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the prevalence of high blood pressure among the local and expatriate adolescent population in the Emirate of Sharjah. Similarly, statistically significant differences in the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia were observed among the local and expatriate population in Abu Dhabi city, the western region of Abu Dhabi, and Al-Ain. Multivariate analysis revealed the following significant predictors of high blood pressure: residing in proximity to industry, nonconventional substance abuse, and age when smoking or exposure to smoking began. Ethnicity was a significant predictor of heart disease, thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia. In addition, predictors of thalassemia included gender (female) and participating in physical activity. Participants diagnosed with sickle-cell anemia and iron-deficiency anemia were more likely to experience different physical activities. PMID:23606864

  13. Preparation and Bioavailability Analysis of Ferrous Bis Alanine Chelate as a New Micronutrient for Treatment of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Zargaran, Marzieh; Saadat, Ebrahim; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Dorkoosh, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: One of the most nutritional disorders around the world is iron deficiency. A novel iron compound was synthesized by chelating ferrous ions with alanine for prevention and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. Methods: The newly synthesized compound was characterized both qualitatively and quantitatively by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The bioavailability of newly synthesized iron micronutrient was evaluated in four groups of Wistar rats. The group I was a negative control group and the other three groups received three different iron formulations. After 14 days, the blood samples were taken and analyzed accordingly. Results: Calculations showed that more than 91.8% of iron was incorporated in the chelate formulation. In vivo studies showed that serum iron, total iron binding capacity and hemoglobin concentrations were significantly increased in group IV, which received ferrous bis alanine chelate compared with the negative control group (p<0.05) and also group II, which received ferrous sulfate.7H2O (p<0.05). It indicates that the new formulation considerably improves the blood iron status compared with the conventional iron compounds. There were no significant differences (p<0.05) in the serum iron between group IV and group III, which received ferrous bis glycine. Conclusion: The results showed better bioavailability of ferrous bis alanine as a new micronutrient for treatment of iron deficiency anemia in comparison with ferrous sulfate. Ferrous bis alanine could be considered as a suitable supplement for prevention and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. PMID:27766225

  14. Preparation and Bioavailability Analysis of Ferrous Bis Alanine Chelate as a New Micronutrient for Treatment of Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Zargaran, Marzieh; Saadat, Ebrahim; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Dorkoosh, Farid

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: One of the most nutritional disorders around the world is iron deficiency. A novel iron compound was synthesized by chelating ferrous ions with alanine for prevention and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. Methods: The newly synthesized compound was characterized both qualitatively and quantitatively by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The bioavailability of newly synthesized iron micronutrient was evaluated in four groups of Wistar rats. The group I was a negative control group and the other three groups received three different iron formulations. After 14 days, the blood samples were taken and analyzed accordingly. Results: Calculations showed that more than 91.8% of iron was incorporated in the chelate formulation. In vivo studies showed that serum iron, total iron binding capacity and hemoglobin concentrations were significantly increased in group IV, which received ferrous bis alanine chelate compared with the negative control group (p<0.05) and also group II, which received ferrous sulfate.7H2O (p<0.05). It indicates that the new formulation considerably improves the blood iron status compared with the conventional iron compounds. There were no significant differences (p<0.05) in the serum iron between group IV and group III, which received ferrous bis glycine. Conclusion: The results showed better bioavailability of ferrous bis alanine as a new micronutrient for treatment of iron deficiency anemia in comparison with ferrous sulfate. Ferrous bis alanine could be considered as a suitable supplement for prevention and treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

  15. Erythrocyte Catalase Activity in More Frequent Microcytic Hypochromic Anemia: Beta-Thalassemia Trait and Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lazarte, Sandra Stella; Mónaco, María Eugenia; Jimenez, Cecilia Laura; Ledesma Achem, Miryam Emilse; Terán, Magdalena María; Issé, Blanca Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Most common microcytic hypochromic anemias are iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and β-thalassemia trait (BTT), in which oxidative stress (OxS) has an essential role. Catalase causes detoxification of H2O2 in cells, and it is an indispensable antioxidant enzyme. The study was designed to measure erythrocyte catalase activity (ECAT) in patients with IDA (10) or BTT (21), to relate it with thalassemia mutation type (β 0 or β +) and to compare it with normal subjects (67). Ninety-eight individuals were analyzed since September 2013 to June 2014 in Tucumán, Argentina. Total blood count, hemoglobin electrophoresis at alkaline pH, HbA2, catalase, and iron status were performed. β-thalassemic mutations were determined by real-time PCR. Normal range for ECAT was 70,0–130,0 MU/L. ECAT was increased in 14% (3/21) of BTT subjects and decreased in 40% (4/10) of those with IDA. No significant difference (p = 0,245) was shown between normal and BTT groups, while between IDA and normal groups the difference was proved to be significant (p = 0,000). In β 0 and β + groups, no significant difference (p = 0,359) was observed. An altered ECAT was detected in IDA and BTT. These results will help to clarify how the catalase activity works in these anemia types. PMID:26527217

  16. Prevalence of Iron Deficiency Anemia among Iranian Pregnant Women; a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Esmat, Barooti; Mohammad, Rezazadehkermani; Behnam, Sadeghirad; Shahrzad, Motaghipisheh; Soodabeh, Tayeri; Minoo, Arabi; Saman, Salahi; Ali-Akbar, Haghdoost

    2010-04-01

    Anemia, particularly Iron Deficiency Anemia (IDA), is the most common hematological disorder during pregnancy with considerable complications in both mothers and fetuses. The estimation of anemia prevalence is an important step for health policy makers. Despite being considered a hot topic in epidemiological studies in Iran for the last twenty years, lack of a comprehensive overview on the findings encouraged the authors to carry out this study. All published papers in main national and international databases were systematically searched for some specific keywords to find the related studies between the years 1993 and 2007. All published studies which had reported the prevalence of anemia were included in the study except studies on refugees, patients undergoing hemodialysis, patients with thalassemia or cancer or other selective sub-populations. Two trained reviewers independently assessed the inclusion/exclusion criteria and the quality of the selected papers, summarized them and eventually analyzed the data. Ten eligible papers including 11,037 participants were entered into the analysis. The maximum and minimum reported prevalence rates of anemia during pregnancy were 4.3% and 21.5%, respectively. The overall estimate of anemia prevalence in Iranian pregnant women was 13.6 (95% CI: 8.3 - 18.9). Excluding the only out-layer from the meta-analysis, the overall estimated prevalence was 12.4% (95% CI: 9.6% - 17.9%). The prevalence of anemia in Iranian women during pregnancy is considerably lower than that of most EMRO countries or the one reported by WHO for Iran (> 40%) which had been performed on a small group 16 years ago. The lower prevalence rate of anemia in pregnant women versus the regional rates could be due to the improvements of the national health system and prenatal programs in recent years.

  17. Young Zanzibari Children with Iron Deficiency, Iron Deficiency Anemia, Stunting, or Malaria Have Lower Motor Activity Scores and Spend Less Time in Locomotion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Motor activity improves cognitive and social-emotional development through a child’s exploration of his or her physical and social environment. This study assessed anemia, iron deficiency, hemoglobin (Hb), length-for-age Z-score (LAZ), and malaria infection as predictors of motor activity in 771 chi...

  18. Control of iron deficiency anemia in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Pasricha, Sant-Rayn; Drakesmith, Hal; Black, James; Hipgrave, David; Biggs, Beverley-Ann

    2013-04-04

    Despite worldwide economic and scientific development, more than a quarter of the world's population remains anemic, and about half of this burden is a result of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). IDA is most prevalent among preschool children and women. Among women, iron supplementation improves physical and cognitive performance, work productivity, and well-being, and iron during pregnancy improves maternal, neonatal, infant, and even long-term child outcomes. Among children, iron may improve cognitive, psychomotor, and physical development, but the evidence for this is more limited. Strategies to control IDA include daily and intermittent iron supplementation, home fortification with micronutrient powders, fortification of staple foods and condiments, and activities to improve food security and dietary diversity. The safety of routine iron supplementation in settings where infectious diseases, particularly malaria, are endemic remains uncertain. The World Health Organization is revising global guidelines for controlling IDA. Implementation of anemia control programs in developing countries requires careful baseline epidemiologic evaluation, selection of appropriate interventions that suit the population, and ongoing monitoring to ensure safety and effectiveness. This review provides an overview and an approach for the implementation of public health interventions for controlling IDA in low- and middle-income countries, with an emphasis on current evidence-based recommendations.

  19. Antioxidant effect of vitamin E in the treatment of nutritional iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Şimşek Orhon, Filiz; Öztürk, Gülyüz; Erbaş, Deniz; Hasanoğlu, Alev

    2006-03-05

    Oxidant status and antioxidants play important roles in anemias. The present study was conducted to investigate the oxidant-antioxidant status in iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and to evaluate the antioxidant effect of vitamin E in IDA treatment. Ten patients with IDA aged nine months were given only iron treatment, whereas another 10 patients were administered both iron and vitamin E. The complete blood count, plasma malonyldialdehyde (MDA) level, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase level, and the serum vitamin E level, both before and within the treatment phases were examined. The reticulocyte count at the first week of treatment was found lower in the vitamin E-treated group. The mean corpuscular volume (MCV) was found higher in the vitamin E-treated group at the end of therapy. The malonyldialdehyde levels of the group treated with vitamin E were found lower during treatment. These results suggest that iron administration in IDA treatment may stimulate lipid peroxidation, and that vitamin E supplied with iron may reduce the MDA production. The hematological indications of the findings of our study are that the reticulocyte response develops earlier and the microcytosis recovery occurs more rapidly in the vitamin E-administered group in comparison with the group treated with iron only.

  20. Iron deficiency anemia in captive āalayan tapir calves (Tapirus indicus).

    PubMed

    Helmick, Kelly E; Milne, Victoria E

    2012-12-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) was diagnosed in two captive female neonatal Malayan tapirs (Tapirus indicus) at separate institutions. Both calves had unremarkable exams and normal blood parameters within the first 3 days of life. Microcytic hypochromic anemia (hematocrit, HCT= 20%; mean corpuscular volume, MCV = 32.8 fl; mean corpuscular hemoglobin, MCH = 10.5 pg) was diagnosed at day 66 of age in calf EPZ-1. Iron dextran (10 mg/kg i.m.) was administered at day 71. A normal HCT (33%) with microcytosis and hypochromasia (MCV = 33.0 fl; MCH = 11.7 pg) was identified at day 80. No further concerns were noted through 610 days of age. Microcytic hypochromic anemia (HCT = 16%; MCV = 38.4 fl; MCH = 13.3 pg; mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, MCHC= 34.6 g/dl) with thrombocytosis (platelets= 1018 10(3)/UL) and poikilocytosis was diagnosed at day 38 of age in calf WPZ-1 by samples obtained through operant conditioning. Iron dextran (10 mg/kg i.m.) was administered at day 40 and day 68. Improving hematocrit (32%) and low serum iron (45 micorg/dl) was identified at day 88; total iron binding capacity (TIBC; 438 microg/dl) and percentage saturation (10%) were also measured. No further concerns were noted through day 529 of age. Retrospective evaluation identified presumptive IDA in two male siblings of calf WPZ-1. One calf died at day 40 (iron = 40 microg/dl; TIBC = 482 microg/dl; percentage saturation = 4%) and another at day 72 (HCT = 11%; iron = 26 microg/dl; TIBC = 470 microg/dl; percentage saturation = 6%). Death in both calves was attributed to disseminated intravascular coagulation and bacterial septicemia. IDA can develop in Malayan tapirs between day 38 and day 72 of age and may be a significant precursor to bacterial septicemia and death in neonatal Malayan tapirs.

  1. [Physiologic and pathologic role of iron in the human body. Iron deficiency anemia in newborn babies].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Béla; Szentmihályi, Klára; Vinkler, Péter; Balla, György; Balla, József

    2004-09-05

    Iron is one of the most important essential metal ions of which significance is well known for ages. This element is a key moiety of several enzymes in iron containing heme or nonheme form and transfer and storage protein, hemoglobin and myoglobin. Several membrane carriers of iron have already been identified. The redox state of iron is determined by xanthine oxidase, cytochromes and Hp or ceruloplasmin and ferroxidase activity of apo-ferritin, respectively. Some vitamins (C, B2-, B3-, B6-, B12) play also a role in the metabolism of iron. The iron content of cells of the organs is well regulated by the iron homeostasis. Iron has a significant role in the immune system by producing oxygen containing free radicals. Anaemia induced by iron deficiency may cause a challenge concerns for pregnant women, babies and adolescent, primarily.

  2. Eradication of iron deficiency anemia through food fortification: the role of the private sector.

    PubMed

    Mehansho, Haile

    2002-04-01

    Delivering iron fortified foods that provide meaningful levels of bioavailable iron without altering the accepted appearance and taste of the product presents multiple challenges. Issues relating to food technology, product formulation, acceptance and efficacy evaluation, marketing and quality control must all be addressed. Procter & Gamble Company has developed a unique technology that stabilizes iron in an aqueous system. Utilizing this technology, a fortified powder drink has been developed that is easy to distribute, store and use and that delivers 20-30% of the U. S. RDA for iron, as well as significant amounts of vitamin A, iodine, zinc and vitamin C in a single serving. Acceptance, bioavailability and effectiveness trials have all produced positive results. This type of fortified product can contribute to alleviating iron deficiency but requires scaling up, packaging, quality control and distribution through normal trade channels and public institutions to have a sustainable impact. To be effective, a well-planned communications campaign should also accompany any major iron fortification program. Eradication of iron deficiency anemia can be done but requires a holistic approach that addresses multiple barriers and leverages the untapped expertise and strength of the alliance between public and private sectors.

  3. Administration of recombinant erythropoietin alone does not improve the phenotype in iron refractory iron deficiency anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Lehmberg, Kai; Grosse, Regine; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Altamura, Sandro; Nielsen, Peter; Schmid, Hansjörg; Graubner, Ulrike; Oyen, Florian; Zeller, Wolfgang; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Janka, Gritta E

    2013-03-01

    Mutations in transmembrane protease, serine 6 (TMPRSS6) cause iron refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA). Parenteral iron administration may slightly improve hemoglobin level but is troublesome for patients. Optimal treatment has yet to be determined. We identified five patients from four independent families displaying the IRIDA picture with truncating biallelic mutations in TMPRSS6, one of which is novel. Liver iron determined by superconducting quantum interference device biosusceptometry ranged from 390 to 720 µg Fe/g wet weight (normal range 100-500; n = 3). Intestinal iron absorption (12 and 32 %, normal range 10-50; n = 2) and 59Fe erythrocyte incorporation after ingestion of 59Fe (57 and 38 %, normal range 70-90; n = 2) were inadequately low for iron-deficient anemic individuals. Baseline serum erythropoietin was elevated or borderline high in four patients. Administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) at up to 273 and 188 U/kg body weight/week alone did not improve anemia or result in a decrease of urinary hepcidin in two individuals. In conclusion, the ability of exogenous rhEPO to increase hemoglobin level appears to be impaired in IRIDA.

  4. [Identification and characterization of clinical features and gene mutation in a patient with iron refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA)].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yuanyuan; Yang, Wenrui; Li, Yang; Peng, Guangxin; Li, Yuan; Fan, Huihui; Ye, Lei; Song, Lin; Zhao, Xin; Li, Jianping; Jing, Liping; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Kang; Xu, Yidan; Zhang, Fengkui

    2014-06-01

    To report the clinical data of a case of iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA), so as to improve the understanding of IRIDA. The IRIDA patient's hematological characteristics were summarized and analyzed. The hepcidin levels were tested by ELISA kit. The TMPRSS6 gene was amplified by PCR reaction and its mutation was analyzed by sequencing. The effect of TMPRSS6 gene mutation on TMPRSS6 protein tertiary structure was predicted by Swiss-Model. The patient was characterized by typical microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation, more reduction of intracellular iron than exocellular iron. The plasma hepcidin level was 213.77 μg/L which was significantly higher than that of IDA patients [5.19(3.31-12.02) μg/L]. The patient also carried a homozygous missense mutation of K253E in exon 7 of TMPRSS6. In children and younger IDA patients with no reason for iron deficiency but unresponsiveness to routine iron treatment, the diagnosis of IRIDA needs to be considered. Serum hepcidin level and TMPRSS6 gene mutation should be detected.

  5. Prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency, thalassemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency among hill-tribe school children in Omkoi District, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Yanola, Jintana; Kongpan, Chatpat; Pornprasert, Sakorn

    2014-07-01

    The prevalaence of anemia, iron deficiency, thalassemia and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency were examined among 265 hill-tribe school children, 8-14 years of age, from Omkoi District, Chiang Mai Province, Thailand. Anemia was observed in 20 school children, of whom 3 had iron deficiency anemia. The prevalence of G-6-PD deficiency and β-thalassemia trait [codon 17 (A>T), IVSI-nt1 (G>T) and codons 71/72 (+A) mutations] was 4% and 8%, respectively. There was one Hb E trait, and no α-thalassemia-1 SEA or Thai type deletion. Furthermore, anemia was found to be associated with β-thalassemia trait in 11 children. These data can be useful for providing appropriate prevention and control of anemia in this region of Thailand.

  6. Differences on Brain Connectivity in Adulthood Are Present in Subjects with Iron Deficiency Anemia in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Algarin, Cecilia; Karunakaran, Keerthana Deepti; Reyes, Sussanne; Morales, Cristian; Lozoff, Betsy; Peirano, Patricio; Biswal, Bharat

    2017-01-01

    Iron deficiency continues to be the most prevalent micronutrient deficit worldwide. Since iron is involved in several processes including myelination, dopamine neurotransmission and neuronal metabolism, the presence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in infancy relates to long-lasting neurofunctional effects. There is scarce data regarding whether these effects would extend to former iron deficient anemic human adults. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel technique to explore patterns of functional connectivity. Default Mode Network (DMN), one of the resting state networks, is deeply involved in memory, social cognition and self-referential processes. The four core regions consistently identified in the DMN are the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate/retrosplenial cortex and left and right inferior parietal cortex. Therefore to investigate the DMN in former iron deficient anemic adults is a particularly useful approach to elucidate de long term effects on functional brain. We conducted this research to explore the connection between IDA in infancy and altered patterns of resting state brain functional networks in young adults. Resting-state fMRI studies were performed to 31 participants that belong to a follow-up study since infancy. Of them, 14 participants were former iron deficient anemic in infancy and 17 were controls, with mean age of 21.5 years (±1.5) and 54.8% were males. Resting-state fMRI protocol was used and the data was analyzed using the seed based connectivity statistical analysis to assess the DMN. We found that compared to controls, former iron deficient anemic subjects showed posterior DMN decreased connectivity to the left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), whereas they exhibited increased anterior DMN connectivity to the right PCC. Differences between groups were also apparent in the left medial frontal gyrus, with former iron deficient anemic participants having increased connectivity with areas included

  7. Differences on Brain Connectivity in Adulthood Are Present in Subjects with Iron Deficiency Anemia in Infancy.

    PubMed

    Algarin, Cecilia; Karunakaran, Keerthana Deepti; Reyes, Sussanne; Morales, Cristian; Lozoff, Betsy; Peirano, Patricio; Biswal, Bharat

    2017-01-01

    Iron deficiency continues to be the most prevalent micronutrient deficit worldwide. Since iron is involved in several processes including myelination, dopamine neurotransmission and neuronal metabolism, the presence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in infancy relates to long-lasting neurofunctional effects. There is scarce data regarding whether these effects would extend to former iron deficient anemic human adults. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a novel technique to explore patterns of functional connectivity. Default Mode Network (DMN), one of the resting state networks, is deeply involved in memory, social cognition and self-referential processes. The four core regions consistently identified in the DMN are the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate/retrosplenial cortex and left and right inferior parietal cortex. Therefore to investigate the DMN in former iron deficient anemic adults is a particularly useful approach to elucidate de long term effects on functional brain. We conducted this research to explore the connection between IDA in infancy and altered patterns of resting state brain functional networks in young adults. Resting-state fMRI studies were performed to 31 participants that belong to a follow-up study since infancy. Of them, 14 participants were former iron deficient anemic in infancy and 17 were controls, with mean age of 21.5 years (±1.5) and 54.8% were males. Resting-state fMRI protocol was used and the data was analyzed using the seed based connectivity statistical analysis to assess the DMN. We found that compared to controls, former iron deficient anemic subjects showed posterior DMN decreased connectivity to the left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), whereas they exhibited increased anterior DMN connectivity to the right PCC. Differences between groups were also apparent in the left medial frontal gyrus, with former iron deficient anemic participants having increased connectivity with areas included

  8. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    PubMed

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption.

  9. Preschool-Aged Children with Iron Deficiency Anemia Show Altered Affect and Behavior1,2

    PubMed Central

    Lozoff, Betsy; Corapci, Feyza; Burden, Matthew J.; Kaciroti, Niko; Angulo-Barroso, Rosa; Sazawal, Sunil; Black, Maureen

    2012-01-01

    This study compared social looking and response to novelty in preschool-aged children (47–68 mo) with or without iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Iron status of the participants from a low-income community in New Delhi, India, was based on venous hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, and red cell distribution width. Children’s social looking toward adults, affect, and wary or hesitant behavior in response to novelty were assessed in a semistructured paradigm during an in-home play observation. Affect and behavior were compared as a function of iron status: IDA (n = 74) vs. nonanemic (n = 164). Compared with nonanemic preschoolers, preschoolers with IDA displayed less social looking toward their mothers, moved close to their mothers more quickly, and were slower to display positive affect and touch novel toys for the first time. These results indicate that IDA in the preschool period has affective and behavioral effects similar to those reported for IDA in infancy. PMID:17311960

  10. [The antioxidant effects of emoxipin in patients with iron-deficiency anemia].

    PubMed

    Shved, M I; Palamar, T O

    1995-01-01

    A total of 78 female patients of child-bearing age with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) of varying genesis and degree of severity were examined for effectiveness of a synthetic antioxidant emoxypine in a combined treatment of IDA. IDA was found to be associated with activation of lipid peroxidation processes (LPO) and decrement in antioxidant defence of the body. Conventional antianemic therapy does not lead to normalization of parameters characterizing LPO. Incorporation into a complex therapy of a synthetic antioxidant emoxypine reduces activity of free-radical oxidation of lipids, which fact prevents the pathological process from progressing and leads to more rapid and lasting clinical remission.

  11. Obesity modulate serum hepcidin and treatment outcome of iron deficiency anemia in children: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Sanad, Mohammed; Osman, Mohammed; Gharib, Amal

    2011-07-19

    Recently, hepcidin expression in adipose tissue has been described and shown to be increased in patients with severe obesity. We tried to assess the effect of obesity on hepcidin serum levels and treatment outcome of iron deficiency anemia in children. This was a case control study included 70 children with iron deficiency anemia "IDA" (35 obese and 35 non-obese) and 30 healthy non-obese children with comparable age and sex(control group). Parameters of iron status (Serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, total iron binding capacity and transferrin saturation) and serum hepcidin levels were assessed initially and after 3 months of oral iron therapy for IDA. Compared to the control group, serum hepcidin was significantly lower in non-obese children with IDA(p < 0.01) and significantly higher in obese children with IDA (p < 0.01). Hepcidin increased significantly in non-obese children with IDA after 3 months of iron therapy (P < 0.01). On the other hand, obese children showed non-significant change in hepcidin level after iron therapy (p > 0.05). Although hepcidin showed significant positive correlations with Hb, serum iron and transferrin saturation in non-obese children with IDA, it showed significant negative correlations with Hb, serum iron and transferrin saturation in obese children with IDA (P < 0.05). Obesity increased hepcidin levels and was associated with diminished response to oral iron therapy in childhood iron deficiency anemia.

  12. Iron Supplementation in Suckling Piglets: How to Correct Iron Deficiency Anemia without Affecting Plasma Hepcidin Levels

    PubMed Central

    Starzyński, Rafał R.; Laarakkers, Coby M. M.; Tjalsma, Harold; Swinkels, Dorine W.; Pieszka, Marek; Styś, Agnieszka; Mickiewicz, Michał; Lipiński, Paweł

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish an optimized protocol of iron dextran administration to pig neonates, which better meets the iron demand for erythropoiesis. Here, we monitored development of red blood cell indices, plasma iron parameters during a 28-day period after birth (till the weaning), following intramuscular administration of different concentrations of iron dextran to suckling piglets. To better assess the iron status we developed a novel mass spectrometry assay to quantify pig plasma levels of the iron-regulatory peptide hormone hepcidin-25. This hormone is predominantly secreted by the liver and acts as a negative regulator of iron absorption and reutilization. The routinely used protocol with high amount of iron resulted in the recovery of piglets from iron deficiency but also in strongly elevated plasma hepcidin-25 levels. A similar protocol with reduced amounts of iron improved hematological status of piglets to the same level while plasma hepcidin-25 levels remained low. These data show that plasma hepcidin-25 levels can guide optimal dosing of iron treatment and pave the way for mixed supplementation of piglets starting with intramuscular injection of iron dextran followed by dietary supplementation, which could be efficient under condition of very low plasma hepcidin-25 level. PMID:23737963

  13. Iron supplementation in suckling piglets: how to correct iron deficiency anemia without affecting plasma hepcidin levels.

    PubMed

    Starzyński, Rafał R; Laarakkers, Coby M M; Tjalsma, Harold; Swinkels, Dorine W; Pieszka, Marek; Styś, Agnieszka; Mickiewicz, Michał; Lipiński, Paweł

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish an optimized protocol of iron dextran administration to pig neonates, which better meets the iron demand for erythropoiesis. Here, we monitored development of red blood cell indices, plasma iron parameters during a 28-day period after birth (till the weaning), following intramuscular administration of different concentrations of iron dextran to suckling piglets. To better assess the iron status we developed a novel mass spectrometry assay to quantify pig plasma levels of the iron-regulatory peptide hormone hepcidin-25. This hormone is predominantly secreted by the liver and acts as a negative regulator of iron absorption and reutilization. The routinely used protocol with high amount of iron resulted in the recovery of piglets from iron deficiency but also in strongly elevated plasma hepcidin-25 levels. A similar protocol with reduced amounts of iron improved hematological status of piglets to the same level while plasma hepcidin-25 levels remained low. These data show that plasma hepcidin-25 levels can guide optimal dosing of iron treatment and pave the way for mixed supplementation of piglets starting with intramuscular injection of iron dextran followed by dietary supplementation, which could be efficient under condition of very low plasma hepcidin-25 level.

  14. Refractory iron-deficiency anemia and gluten intolerance - Response to gluten-free diet.

    PubMed

    Sáez, Luis Rodrigo; Álvarez, Dolores Fuentes; Martínez, Isabel Pérez; Mieres, Noemí Alvarez; García, Pilar Niño; García, Ruth de Francisco; Menéndez, Sabino Riestra; Alegre, Santiago Vivas; Goñi, José Luis Olcoz

    2011-07-01

    refractory iron-deficiency anemia has a multifactorial origin related to various gastrointestinal conditions, with celiac disease plus malabsorption and IBD together with isolated gluten intolerance being most common. to determine the prevalence of serum, genetic, and histological markers for gluten intolerance, and to analyze the response to gluten withdrawal from the diet in these patients. a number of patients with refractory anemia were prospectively and consecutively enrolled. A protocol to measure serum (TGt-2), genetic (HLA-DQ2/DQ8), and histological markers for celiac disease was applied. All followed a gluten-free diet for a median 3.6 years. Sustained remission of anemia during follow-up was interpreted as positive response. ninety-eight patients (84% females) with a mean age of 54 years were studied. Anti-TGt2 antibodies were positive in 5% of cases. A total of 67 cases (68%) were haplotype HLA-DQ2 or -DQ8 (+). We found villous atrophy (Marsh III) in 13% of patients, and an inflammatory pattern (Marsh I or II) in 13%. All remaining 72 patients (74%) had no histological duodenal changes.Age, anemia duration, number of transfusions, number of parenteral iron doses, and time on a gluten-free diet were all compared according to the presence or absence of villous atrophy and HLA-DQ2/8 positivity, and no significant differences were found for any of the analyzed variables. Response was positive in 92% of subjects. celiac disease with villous atrophy is rarely a cause of refractory anemia. Gluten intolerance with no histological lesions is seen in almost 75% of patients, and therefore plays a relevant role in its development.

  15. Differentiation of beta thalassemia trait from iron deficiency anemia by hematological indices

    PubMed Central

    Jameel, Tahir; Baig, Mukhtiar; Ahmed, Ijaz; Hussain, Muhammad Barakat; Alkhamaly, Motlag bin Doghaim

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We aimed at finding out reliable parameter in the differentiation of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and beta-thalassemia trait (β-TT) in the adult population subjected to Saudi Arabian Premarital Screening Program. Methods: A total of 620 adults (age range 21-36 years) reported during February 2012 to November 2012. Tests for serum iron and ferritin were carried out in individuals showing low hemoglobin (Hb). All the selected subjects’ samples were subjected to blood morphology, comparison of MCV, RBC count. Red Cell Distribution Width (RDW) was noted from the Coulter Report whereas Red Cell Distribution Width Index (RDWI) value was calculated for all the samples. Results: A total of one hundred &thirty-five individuals with hypochromic microcytic anemia having normal hemoglobin F and hemoglobin A2 < 3.2% were inducted in the study. Ninety-three were diagnosed having IDA, whereas thirty-two were having βTT. Ten individuals revealed other causes of anemia. The RBC count was higher, and MCV was much lower in βTT as compared to IDA. Both groups were subjected to RDW and RDWI, however, RDWI which showed better sensitivity and specificity for βTT. Conclusion: RDWI is a reliable and useful index for differentiation among IDA and βTT, as compared to RDW. PMID:28811791

  16. The Lack of Association of Iron Deficiency With Anemia in First Graders.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Lutfi; Diamond, Gary

    2015-10-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) is a disease with worldwide prevalence. The prevalence of IDA and iron deficiency (ID) was ascertained by serum ferritin and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) levels in first graders in Taibe. A total of 1132 first graders were tested for the iron status between the years 1999 and 2004. Serum ferritin, hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit, MCV, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and red and white blood cell counts were checked. Hb<11.5 g/dL, serum ferritin<12 μg/L, and MCV<75 fL were the criteria we chose for establishing IDA, and serum ferritin<12 μg/L and MCV<75 fL for establishing ID. Non-IDA was ascertained by a low Hb value, coupled with normal serum ferritin. The mean value of serum ferritin was 26.6±16.8 μg/L. Eighty-two (11.8%) children had low serum ferritin (<12 μg/L). The mean value of Hb was 12.3±0.8, and 80 (11.5%) of the children had low Hb. A correlation was found between hematological parameters and Hb. The prevalence of IDA, ID, and non-IDA was 2.2%, 11.8%, and 9.4%, respectively. No correlation was found between indices of anemia and demographic characteristics. Non-IDA and ID are prevalent in 5 to 6-year-old Arab children; however, IDA is surprisingly low. We need to look for other causes of anemia in this age group of the population.

  17. α-Thalassemia frequency and mutations in children with hypochromic microcytic anemias and relation with β-thalassemia, iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Gulen, Huseyin; Hanimeli, Ozlem; Karaca, Ozlem; Taneli, Fatma

    2012-04-01

    The majority of the anemias during childhood are hypochromic and microcytic. The aim of the present study was to determine the status of α-thalassemia mutations and its association with other etiologies, such as iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and β-thalassemia trait, that are frequently seen hypochromic microcytic anemias in children. Children with hypochromic microcytic anemias were included in the study. Serum iron (SI), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), ferritin levels, and hemoglobin electrophoresis with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method were analyzed. Reverse hybridization of biotinylated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product method was used for detection of α-globin gene mutations. Of the 46 patients involved in the study, 54.3% (n = 25) were boys, and 45.7% (n = 21) were girls. Iron deficiency anemia and β-thalassemia trait were diagnosed in 67.4% (n = 31) and 19.5% (n = 9), respectively. In 17.4% there were α-thalassemia mutations (in 10.9% 3.7 single-gene heterozygote mutation, in 4.3% 20.5-kb double-gene deletion mutation, and in 2.2% α-2 poly-A-1 heterozygote mutation was detected). In 2 patients (4.3%) no etiology was determined. In 2 patients (4.3%) association between iron deficiency anemia and α-thalassemia, in 1 patient (2.2%) association between β and α-thalassemia was detected. In conclusion, α-thalassemia carrier status and its association with other etiologies are frequently seen in Manisa. So, α-thalassemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hypochromic microcytic anemias, especially in cases without iron deficiency (ID) and β-thalassemia carrier state.

  18. Postnatal anemia and iron deficiency in HIV-infected women and the health and survival of their children

    PubMed Central

    Isanaka, Sheila; Spiegelman, Donna; Aboud, Said; Manji, Karim P.; Msamanga, Gernard I.; Willet, Walter C.; Duggan, Christopher; Fawzi, Wafaie W.

    2011-01-01

    Prenatal iron supplementation may improve pregnancy outcomes and decrease the risk of child mortality. However, little is known about the importance of postnatal maternal iron status for child health and survival, particularly in the context of HIV infection. We examined the association of maternal anemia and hypochromic microcytosis, an erythrocyte morphology consistent with iron deficiency, with child health and survival in the first two to five years of life. Repeated measures of maternal anemia and hypochromic microcytosis from 840 HIV-positive women enrolled in a clinical trial of vitamin supplementation were prospectively related to child mortality, HIV infection, and CD4 T-cell count. Median duration of follow-up for the endpoints of child mortality, HIV infection and CD4 cell count was 58, 17 and 23 months, respectively. Maternal anemia and hypochromic microcytosis were associated with greater risk of child mortality (HR for severe anemia=2.58, 95% CI: 1.66-4.01, P trend<0.0001; HR for severe hypochromic microcytosis=2.36, 95% CI: 1.27-4.38, P trend=0.001). Maternal anemia was not significantly associated with greater risk of child HIV infection (HR for severe anemia=1.46, 95% CI: 0.91, 2.33, P trend=0.08) but predicted lower CD4 T-cell counts among HIV-uninfected children (difference in CD4 T-cell count/μL for severe anemia:-93, 95% CI: -204-17, P trend=0.02). The potential child health risks associated with maternal anemia and iron deficiency may not be limited to the prenatal period. Efforts to reduce maternal anemia and iron deficiency during pregnancy may need to be expanded to include the postpartum period. PMID:22236211

  19. Diet-induced iron deficiency anemia and pregnancy outcome in rhesus monkeys12

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Mari S; Hogrefe, Casey E; Tarantal, Alice F; Germann, Stacey L; Beard, John L; Georgieff, Michael K; Calatroni, Agustin; Lozoff, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is relatively common in the third trimester of pregnancy, but causal associations with low birth weight and compromised neonatal iron status are difficult to establish in human populations. Objective The objective was to determine the effects of diet-induced IDA on intrauterine growth and neonatal iron status in an appropriate animal model for third-trimester IDA in women. Design Hematologic and iron-status measures, pregnancy outcomes, and fetal and neonatal evaluations were compared between pregnant rhesus monkeys (n = 14) fed a diet containing 10 μg Fe/g diet from the time of pregnancy detection (gestation days 28–30) and controls (n = 24) fed 100 μg Fe/g diet. Results By the third trimester, 79% of the iron-deprived dams and 29% of the control monkeys had a hemoglobin concentration <11 g/dL. There were also significant group differences in hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, transferrin saturation, serum ferritin, and serum iron. At birth, the newborns of monkeys iron-deprived during pregnancy had significantly lower hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin values and a lower ratio of erythroid to total colony-forming units in bone marrow than did the control newborns. Pregnancy weight gain did not differ significantly between the iron-deprived and control dams, and the fetuses and newborns of the iron-deprived dams were not growth retarded relative to the controls. Gestation length, the number of stillbirths, and neonatal neurobehavioral test scores did not differ significantly by diet group. Conclusion These data indicate that an inadequate intake of iron from the diet during pregnancy in rhesus monkeys can lead to compromised hematologic status of the neonate without indications of growth retardation or impaired neurologic function at birth. PMID:16522913

  20. Diet-induced iron deficiency anemia and pregnancy outcome in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Golub, Mari S; Hogrefe, Casey E; Tarantal, Alice F; Germann, Stacey L; Beard, John L; Georgieff, Michael K; Calatroni, Agustin; Lozoff, Betsy

    2006-03-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is relatively common in the third trimester of pregnancy, but causal associations with low birth weight and compromised neonatal iron status are difficult to establish in human populations. The objective was to determine the effects of diet-induced IDA on intrauterine growth and neonatal iron status in an appropriate animal model for third-trimester IDA in women. Hematologic and iron-status measures, pregnancy outcomes, and fetal and neonatal evaluations were compared between pregnant rhesus monkeys (n = 14) fed a diet containing 10 microg Fe/g diet from the time of pregnancy detection (gestation days 28-30) and controls (n = 24) fed 100 microg Fe/g diet. By the third trimester, 79% of the iron-deprived dams and 29% of the control monkeys had a hemoglobin concentration <11 g/dL. There were also significant group differences in hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, transferrin saturation, serum ferritin, and serum iron. At birth, the newborns of monkeys iron-deprived during pregnancy had significantly lower hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin values and a lower ratio of erythroid to total colony-forming units in bone marrow than did the control newborns. Pregnancy weight gain did not differ significantly between the iron-deprived and control dams, and the fetuses and newborns of the iron-deprived dams were not growth retarded relative to the controls. Gestation length, the number of stillbirths, and neonatal neurobehavioral test scores did not differ significantly by diet group. These data indicate that an inadequate intake of iron from the diet during pregnancy in rhesus monkeys can lead to compromised hematologic status of the neonate without indications of growth retardation or impaired neurologic function at birth.

  1. Clinical efficacy of Amalaki Rasayana in the management of Pandu (Iron deficiency anemia)

    PubMed Central

    Layeeq, Shaizi; Thakar, Anup B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is one of the most common nutritional deficiencies worldwide, which can be correlated to Pandu described in ayurvedic classics. Poor absorption of iron is one of the main reasons of IDA. Amalaki (Phyllanthus emblica L.) has Tridoshahara, especially Pittashamaka (pacifying Pitta) and Rasayana (rejuvenative) properties, thus nourishes the Dhatus and is also known to enhance the absorption of iron. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of Amalaki Rasayana in the management of Pandu w.s.r. IDA. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled open clinical trial was conducted at Institute for Post Graduate Teaching and Research in Ayurveda, Jamnagar. Iron deficient anemic patients (n = 25) having Hb <12g% in females and 13g% in males and S.Iron <50mg/dl were selected and divided into two groups. Group A was given 2 g of Amalaki Rasayana thrice a day with unequal quantity of honey and ghee for 45 days, while Group B was given 150 mg ferrous fumarate + 1500 mcg folic acid (standard control) once a day with water for 45 days. Assessment was done on the basis of relief in cardinal symptoms of Pandu and hematological parameters. Results and Conclusion: The formulation showed highly significant relief in Panduta (pallor), Daurbalya (weakness), Shirahshoola (headache), Shrama (fatigue), and Gaurava (heaviness) while statistically significant relief in Aruchi (anorexia) and Pindikodweshtan (leg cramps) was reported. On hematological parameters statistically significant increase was found in mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin while on biochemical markers statistically significant decrease was found in total iron binding capacity only. However the formulation was not found as effective as standard control. PMID:27313416

  2. A local equation for differential diagnosis of β-thalassemia trait and iron deficiency anemia by logistic regression analysis in Southeast Iran.

    PubMed

    Sargolzaie, Narjes; Miri-Moghaddam, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    The most common differential diagnosis of β-thalassemia (β-thal) trait is iron deficiency anemia. Several red blood cell equations were introduced during different studies for differential diagnosis between β-thal trait and iron deficiency anemia. Due to genetic variations in different regions, these equations cannot be useful in all population. The aim of this study was to determine a native equation with high accuracy for differential diagnosis of β-thal trait and iron deficiency anemia for the Sistan and Baluchestan population by logistic regression analysis. We selected 77 iron deficiency anemia and 100 β-thal trait cases. We used binary logistic regression analysis and determined best equations for probability prediction of β-thal trait against iron deficiency anemia in our population. We compared diagnostic values and receiver operative characteristic (ROC) curve related to this equation and another 10 published equations in discriminating β-thal trait and iron deficiency anemia. The binary logistic regression analysis determined the best equation for best probability prediction of β-thal trait against iron deficiency anemia with area under curve (AUC) 0.998. Based on ROC curves and AUC, Green & King, England & Frazer, and then Sirdah indices, respectively, had the most accuracy after our equation. We suggest that to get the best equation and cut-off in each region, one needs to evaluate specific information of each region, specifically in areas where populations are homogeneous, to provide a specific formula for differentiating between β-thal trait and iron deficiency anemia.

  3. Severe Iron Deficiency Anemia in Infants and Young Children, Requiring Hospital Admission

    PubMed Central

    Lundblad, Kristin; Rosenberg, Jonathan; Mangurten, Henry; Angst, Denise B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study evaluated patient characteristics, milk intake, and associated lab findings of children 6 months to 5 years old, admitted to a children’s hospital with severe iron-deficiency anemia (IDA). Methods. A chart review was conducted on patients admitted with microcytic anemia (hemoglobin concentration less than 7 g/dL), accompanied by a low serum ferritin and/or low serum iron level between January 2000 and December 2006. Results. A total of 18 children with severe IDA were evaluated. Many had parents with private insurance and jobs. Almost all children drank >24 ounces of milk daily. Hemoglobin on admission was 3.8 g/dL, and the mean of the patients’ mean corpuscular volume was 52.8 fL. Median iron levels were 4 µg/dL. Conclusions. Severe IDA is still prevalent in children, yet physicians may not perform necessary testing. The devastating long-term effects of severe IDA should prompt clinicians to screen for severe IDA in children regardless of absent risk factors. PMID:27335995

  4. [Tolerability of iron preparation Actiferol Fe® in children treated for iron deficiency anemia].

    PubMed

    Jackowska, Teresa; Sapała-Smoczyńska, Alicja; Kamińska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Iron de„ciency anemia is the most frequently occurring anemia during the childhood period. Supplementation with adequate doses of iron remains a basic method of prevention and treatment. The various available products containing iron are characterized by a different degree of patient tolerability. Actiferol Fe® is a micronized, dispersible ferric pyrophosphate which improves its water solubility, and therefore it has better absorption and bioavailability. The assessment of tolerability of Actiferol Fe® in children who were administered this product to treat or prevent of iron de„ciency anemia. The methods of administration and the incidence of adverse effects were analyzed. Eighty children (64 boys and 16 girls) aged from one month to 6 years who met the criteria of an indication to be treated with iron were included into the study. The assessment of selected parameters was based on the questionnaire which included questions about tolerability, method of administration, convenience of usage and adverse e#ects. The questionnaire was „lled in by parents (usually by the mother). The study indicated that Actiferol Fe® has very good or good tolerability in 87.5% (70/80) of patients - 46.3% (37/80) and 41.2% (33/80), respectively. The most frequent method of administration was in liquid form after dissolving: in water - 31,3% (25/80), in orange juice - 18.8% (15/80) or in milk formulas - in 17.5% (14/80) of patients. The method of administration was assessed as convenient or very convenient by 84% (67/80) of participants. Out of the adverse effects reported, the most frequent were change in the stool consistency into harder, abdominal pain and constipation - in 20% (16/80), 11.25% (9/80), 10% (8/80) cases, respectively. Diarrhea, pain during defecation occurred occasionally. A dark color of the stool was reported by 55% (44/80) of patients. In only one case (1.25%) the parents resigned from the product administration and replaced it with another iron product (no

  5. Effects of Dang-Gui-Bu-Xue-Tang, an herbal decoction, on iron uptake in iron-deficient anemia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guan-Cheng; Chen, Shih-Yu; Tsai, Po-Wei; Ganzon, Jerome G; Lee, Chia-Jung; Shiah, Her-Shyong; Wang, Ching-Chiung

    2016-01-01

    Dang-Gui-Bu-Xue-Tang (DBT), a combination of Angelicae Sinensis Radix and Astragali Radix, is a widely used herbal decoction in traditional Chinese medicine primarily to promote or invigorate the "blood". In this study, we explored this ancient formulation and provide evidence of its blood-toning properties. We used the improvement iron uptake as promote or invigorate the "blood" indicator. Ferritin formation of Caco-2 cells in vitro assay and diet-induced anemia (DIA) in rat model were used to prove its improvement iron uptake and ameliorating effects. Finally, the iron-DBT interactions were measured by iron-binding assay. We first demonstrated DBT increased uptake of ferrous iron through the biosynthesis of ferritin by Caco-2 cells and determined which complementary treatment would provide optimum results. Thereafter, effects of the treatment on improving the bioavailability of absorbed iron in the form of hemoglobin (Hb) were established using a DIA-animal model. The results showed that DBT slightly improved Hb levels compared with the baseline Hb and pretreatment with DBT for 2 hours prior to supplementation with ferrous sulfate provided the greatest gain in Hb levels in DIA rats. However, DBT and ferrous sulfate were co-treated with Caco-2 cell or DIA rats, the ferritin formation and Hb levels both were decreased. In iron-binding assay, the DBT extract influenced the free Fe(II) type in the FeSO4 solution. Therefore, we suggest that complementary treatment with DBT and iron supplementation can have a strong ameliorating effect on iron-deficiency anemia in clinical settings, but needs a 2-hour interval of DBT administration prior to ferrous sulfate treatment.

  6. Solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with iron to overcome barriers for treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hosny, Khaled Mohamed; Banjar, Zainy Mohammed; Hariri, Amani H; Hassan, Ali Habiballah

    2015-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, 46% of the world’s children suffer from anemia, which is usually treated with iron supplements such as ferrous sulfate. The aim of this study was to prepare iron as solid lipid nanoparticles, in order to find an innovative way for alleviating the disadvantages associated with commercially available tablets. These limitations include adverse effects on the digestive system resulting in constipation and blood in the stool. The second drawback is the high variability in the absorption of iron and thus in its bioavailability. Iron solid lipid nanoparticles (Fe-SLNs) were prepared by hot homogenization/ultrasonication. Solubility of ferrous sulfate in different solid lipids was measured, and effects of process variables such as the surfactant type and concentration, homogenization and ultrasonication times, and charge-inducing agent on the particle size, zeta potential, and encapsulation efficiency were determined. Furthermore, in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetics were studied in rabbits. Results indicated that Fe-SLNs consisted of 3% Compritol 888 ATO, 1% Lecithin, 3% Poloxamer 188, and 0.2% dicetylphosphate, with an average particle size of 25 nm with 92.3% entrapment efficiency. In vivo pharmacokinetic study revealed more than fourfold enhanced bioavailability. In conclusion, Fe-SLNs could be a promising carrier for iron with enhanced oral bioavailability. PMID:25609917

  7. Solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with iron to overcome barriers for treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Hosny, Khaled Mohamed; Banjar, Zainy Mohammed; Hariri, Amani H; Hassan, Ali Habiballah

    2015-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, 46% of the world's children suffer from anemia, which is usually treated with iron supplements such as ferrous sulfate. The aim of this study was to prepare iron as solid lipid nanoparticles, in order to find an innovative way for alleviating the disadvantages associated with commercially available tablets. These limitations include adverse effects on the digestive system resulting in constipation and blood in the stool. The second drawback is the high variability in the absorption of iron and thus in its bioavailability. Iron solid lipid nanoparticles (Fe-SLNs) were prepared by hot homogenization/ultrasonication. Solubility of ferrous sulfate in different solid lipids was measured, and effects of process variables such as the surfactant type and concentration, homogenization and ultrasonication times, and charge-inducing agent on the particle size, zeta potential, and encapsulation efficiency were determined. Furthermore, in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetics were studied in rabbits. Results indicated that Fe-SLNs consisted of 3% Compritol 888 ATO, 1% Lecithin, 3% Poloxamer 188, and 0.2% dicetylphosphate, with an average particle size of 25 nm with 92.3% entrapment efficiency. In vivo pharmacokinetic study revealed more than fourfold enhanced bioavailability. In conclusion, Fe-SLNs could be a promising carrier for iron with enhanced oral bioavailability.

  8. Iron deficiency, but not anemia, upregulates iron absorption in breast-fed peruvian infants.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Penni D; Zavaleta, Nelly; Chen, Zhensheng; Abrams, Steven A; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2006-09-01

    Iron absorption in adults is regulated by homeostatic mechanisms that decrease absorption when iron status is high. There are few data, however, regarding the existence of a similar homeostatic regulation in infants. We studied 2 groups of human milk-fed infants using (57)Fe (given as ferrous sulfate without any milk) and (58)Fe (given at the time of a breast-milk feeding) stable isotopes to determine whether healthy infants at risk for iron deficiency would regulate their iron absorption based on their iron status. We studied 20 Peruvian infants at 5-6 mo of age and 18 infants at 9-10 mo of age. We found no effect of infant hemoglobin concentration on iron absorption with 5-6 mo-old infants absorbing 19.2 +/- 2.1% and 9- to 10-mo-old infants absorbing 25.8 +/- 2.6% of the (57)Fe dose. For (58)Fe, 5- to 6-mo-old infants absorbed 42.6 +/- 5.0% and 9 to 10-mo-old infants absorbed 51.9 +/- 10.3%. Following log transformation, iron absorption from (57)Fe (r = -0.61, P = < 0.001) and (58)Fe (r = -0.61, P = < 0.001) were inversely correlated to serum ferritin (S-Ft). For both the (57)Fe and (58)Fe doses, infants with S-Ft <12 mg/L (n = 11) had significantly higher iron absorption than those with S-Ft >12 mg/L. We concluded that iron absorption in infants is related to iron status as assessed by serum ferritin but not hemoglobin concentration. Infants with low iron status upregulate iron absorption from breast milk at both 5-6 and 9-10 mo of age.

  9. Response to intravenous iron in patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and restless leg syndrome (Willis-Ekbom disease).

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Tahir; Auerbach, Michael; Earley, Christopher J; Allen, Richard P

    2014-12-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) engenders restless legs syndrome (RLS, aka Willis-Ekbom disease). Intravenous (IV) iron can rapidly reverse IDA and would be expected to similarly reverse RLS caused by IDA. This is the first consecutive case series evaluating the effects of IV iron therapy on RLS occurring with IDA (RLS-IDA). RLS-IDA patients were evaluated before and 7-12 months after a 1000-mg IV infusion of low-molecular-weight iron dextran (INFeD(@)) using validated questionnaires and standardized telephone interview. Patients were classified as respondent versus nonrespondent for RLS improvement. Follow-up data were obtained on 42 (70%) of 60 consecutive RLS-IDA patients. The symptoms of RLS were reduced in 76% (32/42) with 47% (20/42) showing an extended response lasting >6 months. The response did not relate to age or gender, but tended to be less among African-Americans than Whites (40% (2/5) vs. 81% (30/37), p = 0.078). White respondents versus nonrespondents had higher hemoglobin levels after treatment (12.1 vs. 11.3 g/dl, p = 0.03). RLS-IDA is reduced after administration of IV iron in most cases, but the 24% failing to respond was higher than expected. The nonrespondents all showed below-normal hemoglobin levels (<12.5 g/dl) suggesting a failure of adequate treatment of the iron deficiency. IV iron treatment of the RLS with IDA likely requires ensuring more than minimally adequate body iron stores to support iron delivery to the brain. For some, this may require a dose higher than the customary 1000-mg IV iron used for the treatment of either IDA or RLS alone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Iron deficiency anemia in an Egyptian pediatric population: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Al Ghwass, Mohamed M E; Halawa, Eman Fawzy; Sabry, Samar Mohamed; Ahmed, Dalia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the frequency of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and associated sociodemographic factors among children between 6 months and 12 years of age. This cross-sectional study enrolled 300 children from June 2011 to June 2012 visiting the pediatric outpatient clinics of Al-Fayoum University Hospital. Data were collected using a structured interview questionnaire. Sociodemographic variables studied included sex, residence, family size, fathers' education, mothers' education, and crowding index. Included patients were evaluated clinically and laboratory for complete blood picture, serum iron, serum ferritin, and transferrin saturation. It was found that 64% of studied children had IDA (20% mild, 41.7% moderate, and 2.3% severe). The logistic regression analysis found that children from rural areas, those from low social class and those of low maternal educational level had a higher risk for IDA than other children. Infants with IDA were found to consume foods with low iron content 50% below recommended daily allowance. The high frequency of IDA is a severe public health problem in developing countries like Egypt, especially in children from rural areas, those from low social class and those of low maternal educational level. Iron-rich foods should be advised by health care providers. Prophylactic iron supplements should be given to all infants from 6 to 23 months.

  11. Management of iron deficiency anemia: A survey of pediatric hematology/oncology specialists

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Jacquelyn M.; McCavit, Timothy L.; Buchanan, George R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common hematologic condition in children and adolescents in the United States (US). No prior reports have described the management of IDA by a large cohort of pediatric hematology-oncology specialists. Procedure A 20-question electronic survey that solicited responses to two hypothetical cases of IDA was sent to active members of the American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (ASPHO) in the United States. Results Of 1,217 recipients, 398 (32.7%) reported regularly treating IDA and completed the survey. In a toddler with nutritional IDA, 15% (N=61) of respondents reported ordering no diagnostic test beyond a complete blood count. Otherwise, wide variability in laboratory testing was reported. For treatment, most respondents would prescribe ferrous sulfate (N=335, 84%) dosed at 6 mg/kg/day (N=248, 62%) divided twice daily (N=272, 68%). The recommended duration of iron treatment after resolution of anemia and normalized serum ferritin varied widely from 0 months to 3 months. For an adolescent with heavy menstrual bleeding and IDA, most respondents recommended ferrous sulfate (N=327, 83%), with dosing based on the number of tablets daily. For IDA refractory to oral treatment, intravenous iron therapy was recommended most frequently, 48% (N=188) using iron sucrose, 17% (n=68) ferric gluconate, and 15% (N=60) low molecular weight iron dextran. Conclusion The approach to diagnosis and treatment of IDA in childhood was widely variable among responding ASPHO members. Given the lack of an evidence base to guide clinical decision making, further research investigating IDA management is needed. PMID:25663613

  12. Effects of Dang-Gui-Bu-Xue-Tang, an herbal decoction, on iron uptake in iron-deficient anemia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guan-Cheng; Chen, Shih-Yu; Tsai, Po-Wei; Ganzon, Jerome G; Lee, Chia-Jung; Shiah, Her-Shyong; Wang, Ching-Chiung

    2016-01-01

    Dang-Gui-Bu-Xue-Tang (DBT), a combination of Angelicae Sinensis Radix and Astragali Radix, is a widely used herbal decoction in traditional Chinese medicine primarily to promote or invigorate the “blood”. In this study, we explored this ancient formulation and provide evidence of its blood-toning properties. We used the improvement iron uptake as promote or invigorate the “blood” indicator. Ferritin formation of Caco-2 cells in vitro assay and diet-induced anemia (DIA) in rat model were used to prove its improvement iron uptake and ameliorating effects. Finally, the iron–DBT interactions were measured by iron-binding assay. We first demonstrated DBT increased uptake of ferrous iron through the biosynthesis of ferritin by Caco-2 cells and determined which complementary treatment would provide optimum results. Thereafter, effects of the treatment on improving the bioavailability of absorbed iron in the form of hemoglobin (Hb) were established using a DIA-animal model. The results showed that DBT slightly improved Hb levels compared with the baseline Hb and pretreatment with DBT for 2 hours prior to supplementation with ferrous sulfate provided the greatest gain in Hb levels in DIA rats. However, DBT and ferrous sulfate were co-treated with Caco-2 cell or DIA rats, the ferritin formation and Hb levels both were decreased. In iron-binding assay, the DBT extract influenced the free Fe(II) type in the FeSO4 solution. Therefore, we suggest that complementary treatment with DBT and iron supplementation can have a strong ameliorating effect on iron-deficiency anemia in clinical settings, but needs a 2-hour interval of DBT administration prior to ferrous sulfate treatment. PMID:27041997

  13. Elimination of Iron Deficiency Anemia and Soil Transmitted Helminth Infection: Evidence from a Fifty-four Month Iron-Folic Acid and De-worming Program

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Gerard J.; Montresor, Antonio; Cavalli-Sforza, Luca T.; Thu, Hoang; Phu, Luong B.; Tinh, Ta T.; Tien, Nong T.; Phuc, Tran Q.; Biggs, Beverley-Ann

    2013-01-01

    Background Intermittent iron-folic acid supplementation and regular de-worming are effective initiatives to reduce anemia, iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia, and soil transmitted helminth infections in women of reproductive age. However, few studies have assessed the long-term effectiveness of population-based interventions delivered in resource-constrained settings. Methodology/Principal Findings The objectives were to evaluate the impact of weekly iron-folic acid supplementation and de-worming on mean hemoglobin and the prevalence of anaemia, iron deficiency, and soil transmitted helminth infection in a rural population of women in northern Vietnam and to identify predictive factors for hematological outcomes. A prospective cohort design was used to evaluate a population-based supplementation and deworming program over 54 months. The 389 participants were enrolled just prior to commencement of the intervention. After 54 months 76% (95% CI [68%, 84%]) were taking the iron-folic acid supplement and 95% (95% CI [93%, 98%]) had taken the most recently distributed deworming treatment. Mean hemoglobin rose from 122 g/L (95% CI [120, 124]) to 131 g/L (95% CI [128, 134]) and anemia prevalence fell from 38% (95% CI [31%, 45%]) to 18% (95% CI [12%, 23%]); however, results differed significantly between ethnic groups. Iron deficiency fell from 23% (95% CI [17%, 29%]) to 8% (95% CI [4%, 12%]), while the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was reduced to 4% (95% CI [1%, 7%]). The prevalence of hookworm infection was reduced from 76% (95% CI [68%, 83%]) to 11% (95% CI [5%, 18%]). The level of moderate or heavy infestation of any soil-transmitted helminth was reduced to less than 1%. Conclusions/Significance Population-based interventions can efficiently and effectively reduce anemia and practically eliminate iron deficiency anemia and moderate to heavy soil transmitted helminth infections, maintaining them below the level of public health concern. PMID:23593517

  14. Dementia is associated with iron-deficiency anemia in females: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shiu-Dong; Sheu, Jau-Jiuan; Kao, Li-Ting; Lin, Herng-Ching; Kang, Jiunn-Horng

    2014-11-15

    Cognitive derangement and neurological symptoms are observed in patients with anemia. Although it is still controversial, a few studies suggested that anemia may increase the risk of dementia. This study aimed to explore the association between iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) and dementia in a population-based case-control study. We retrieved our study sample from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. We extracted 8300 subjects with a diagnosis of dementia and 8300 age- and gender-matched controls. The results showed that there was a significant difference in the prevalence of prior IDA between cases and controls (6.0% vs. 3.8%, p<0.001). The conditional logistic regression analysis suggested that the odds ratio (OR) of prior IDA for cases was 1.36 (95% CI: 1.07-1.74) compared to controls after adjusting for subjects' monthly income, geographic location, urbanization level, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, hypertension, and alcohol abuse. Among female subjects, the adjusted OR of prior IDA for cases was as high as 2.00 (95% CI: 1.42-2.80) compared to controls. However, in men-no increased odds of prior IDA were observed, compared to controls. We concluded that women with dementia had a higher prevalence of prior IDA, compared to controls.

  15. Serum hepcidin levels in Helicobacter pylori-infected children with iron-deficiency anemia: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Azab, Seham F A; Esh, Asmaa M H

    2013-11-01

    Recently, hepcidin, an antimicrobial-like peptide hormone, has evolved as the master regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. Hepcidin integrates signals from diverse physiological inputs, forming a key connection between iron trafficking and response to infection. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether Helicobacter pylori infection modulates serum hepcidin level and response to oral iron therapy in children with iron-deficiency anemia. This was a case-control study including 60 children with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA; 30 H. pylori infected and 30 H. pylori noninfected) and 30 healthy children with comparable age and gender as the control group. Iron parameters including serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, total iron binding capacity, and transferrin saturation and serum hepcidin levels were assessed initially and after 3 months of oral iron therapy for IDA. Compared to the control group, serum hepcidin was significantly lower in H. pylori-noninfected children with IDA (P < 0.01) and significantly higher in H. pylori-infected children with IDA (P < 0.01). Hepcidin increased significantly in noninfected children with IDA after 3 months of oral iron therapy (P < 0.01). On the other hand, H. pylori-infected children showed nonsignificant change in hepcidin level after oral iron therapy (P > 0.05). Although hepcidin showed significant positive correlations with serum ferritin, hemoglobin (Hb), iron, and transferrin saturation in noninfected children with IDA (P < 0.01), it showed significant negative correlations with serum ferritin, Hb, iron, and transferrin saturation in H. pylori-infected children with IDA (P < 0.05). H. pylori infection upregulates serum hepcidin levels and was associated with diminished response to oral iron therapy in children with iron-deficiency anemia.

  16. Use of iron supplements in children aged 1-2 years with iron deficiency anemia: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Sezik, Handan Atsiz; Can, Huseyin; Kurnaz, Mehmet Ali; Tuna, Mine; Ay, Zeynep

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common nutritional problem in the world and is the most common cause of childhood anemia. In this study, our aim was to find out about the state of usage of iron preparation, which is distributed free of charge by the Ministry of Health, for the infants between 4-12 months in our country, as well as detecting the awareness degree of families those who are informed about iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), prophylaxis of the drug and to determine the drug’s effectiveness. Methods: It was a cross-sectional survey. The laboratory values from the files of the children aged 1-2 those who visited our hospital’s department of pediatrics, between January 2010 to August 2013, were collected. The survey included families who have children diagnosed with IDA. Questions included about families’ sociodemographic characteristics, the state of the usage of the iron drug, how much information received in terms of the side effects- consumption period and dosage. Results: A total of 139 children were enrolled in our study. While 77.7% of the families who participated stated that (n = 108) iron medicine was prescribed other 43.2% of families stated (n = 60) was prescribed and they were informed about iron pills and IDA. 25.9% of families had received information about drug’s side effects, 74.8% of them had information about period of consumption and 77.7% said they were given information about the drug dose. The average duration of use of iron medicine was 6.98±4.52 (min: 1, max: 24) months. It has been noted that; parent’s education level, mother’s occupation, child’s gender, how the child was born and receiving information about how to use the medicine had no effects on usage of the drug in children. Nevertheless, it has been noticed that, when the families were given proper information the drug use increased and the patients compliance with medications also increased. Conclusion: We believe that, due to frequent diagnosis of

  17. Social Costs of Iron Deficiency Anemia in 6-59-Month-Old Children in India.

    PubMed

    Plessow, Rafael; Arora, Narendra Kumar; Brunner, Beatrice; Tzogiou, Christina; Eichler, Klaus; Brügger, Urs; Wieser, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate nutrition has a severe impact on health in India. According to the WHO, iron deficiency is the single most important nutritional risk factor in India, accounting for more than 3% of all disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost. We estimate the social costs of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in 6-59-month-old children in India in terms of intangible costs and production losses. We build a health economic model estimating the life-time costs of a birth cohort suffering from IDA between the ages of 6 and 59 months. The model is stratified by 2 age groups (6-23 and 24-59-months), 2 geographical areas (urban and rural), 10 socio-economic strata and 3 degrees of severity of IDA (mild, moderate and severe). Prevalence of anemia is calculated with the last available National Family Health Survey. Information on the health consequences of IDA is extracted from the literature. IDA prevalence is 49.5% in 6-23-month-old and 39.9% in 24-58-month-old children. Children living in poor households in rural areas are particularly affected but prevalence is high even in wealthy urban households. The estimated yearly costs of IDA in 6-59-month-old children amount to intangible costs of 8.3 m DALYs and production losses of 24,001 m USD, equal to 1.3% of gross domestic product. Previous calculations have considerably underestimated the intangible costs of IDA as the improved WHO methodology leads to a threefold increase of DALYs due to IDA. Despite years of iron supplementation programs and substantial economic growth, IDA remains a crucial public health issue in India and an obstacle to the economic advancement of the poor. Young children are especially vulnerable due to the irreversible effects of IDA on cognitive development. Our research may contribute to the design of new effective interventions aiming to reduce IDA in early childhood.

  18. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Relation to Respiratory Disease and Social Behaviors In Low-Income Infants in France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    1993-01-01

    Examined a sample of 177 infants (age 9 through 12 months) with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) from low-income French, African, and North African Muslim families in Paris. Found a higher than normal incidence of otitis media and respiratory diseases such as bronchitis among the infants. Also examined the relationship between infant IDA and child…

  19. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Relation to Respiratory Disease and Social Behaviors In Low-Income Infants in France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    1993-01-01

    Examined a sample of 177 infants (age 9 through 12 months) with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) from low-income French, African, and North African Muslim families in Paris. Found a higher than normal incidence of otitis media and respiratory diseases such as bronchitis among the infants. Also examined the relationship between infant IDA and child…

  20. Dietary Composition Influences Incidence of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Iron Deficiency Anemia and Gastric Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, Amber C.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Noto, Jennifer M.; Peek, Richard M.; Washington, M. Kay; Algood, Holly M. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have provided conflicting data regarding an association between Helicobacter pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in humans. Here, a Mongolian gerbil model was used to investigate a potential role of H. pylori infection, as well as a possible role of diet, in H. pylori-associated IDA. Mongolian gerbils (either H. pylori infected or uninfected) received a normal diet or one of three diets associated with increased H. pylori virulence: high-salt, low-iron, or a combination of a high-salt and low-iron diet. In an analysis of all infected animals compared to uninfected animals (independent of diet), H. pylori-infected gerbils had significantly lower hemoglobin values than their uninfected counterparts at 16 weeks postinfection (P < 0.0001). The mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and serum ferritin values were significantly lower in H. pylori-infected gerbils than in uninfected gerbils, consistent with IDA. Leukocytosis and thrombocytosis were also detected in infected gerbils, indicating the presence of a systemic inflammatory response. In comparison to uninfected gerbils, H. pylori-infected gerbils had a higher gastric pH, a higher incidence of gastric ulcers, and a higher incidence of fecal occult blood loss. Anemia was associated with the presence of gastric ulceration but not gastric cancer. Infected gerbils consuming diets with a high salt content developed gastric ulcers significantly more frequently than gerbils consuming a normal-salt diet, and the lowest hemoglobin levels were in infected gerbils consuming a high-salt/low-iron diet. These data indicate that H. pylori infection can cause IDA and that the composition of the diet influences the incidence and severity of H. pylori-induced IDA. PMID:27620719

  1. Dietary Composition Influences Incidence of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Iron Deficiency Anemia and Gastric Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Amber C; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Noto, Jennifer M; Peek, Richard M; Washington, M Kay; Algood, Holly M Scott; Cover, Timothy L

    2016-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies have provided conflicting data regarding an association between Helicobacter pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in humans. Here, a Mongolian gerbil model was used to investigate a potential role of H. pylori infection, as well as a possible role of diet, in H. pylori-associated IDA. Mongolian gerbils (either H. pylori infected or uninfected) received a normal diet or one of three diets associated with increased H. pylori virulence: high-salt, low-iron, or a combination of a high-salt and low-iron diet. In an analysis of all infected animals compared to uninfected animals (independent of diet), H. pylori-infected gerbils had significantly lower hemoglobin values than their uninfected counterparts at 16 weeks postinfection (P < 0.0001). The mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and serum ferritin values were significantly lower in H. pylori-infected gerbils than in uninfected gerbils, consistent with IDA. Leukocytosis and thrombocytosis were also detected in infected gerbils, indicating the presence of a systemic inflammatory response. In comparison to uninfected gerbils, H. pylori-infected gerbils had a higher gastric pH, a higher incidence of gastric ulcers, and a higher incidence of fecal occult blood loss. Anemia was associated with the presence of gastric ulceration but not gastric cancer. Infected gerbils consuming diets with a high salt content developed gastric ulcers significantly more frequently than gerbils consuming a normal-salt diet, and the lowest hemoglobin levels were in infected gerbils consuming a high-salt/low-iron diet. These data indicate that H. pylori infection can cause IDA and that the composition of the diet influences the incidence and severity of H. pylori-induced IDA.

  2. Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with low retinol levels in children aged 1 to 5 years.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Bárbara C A; Soares, Michele C C; Santos, Luana C dos; Pereira, Simone C L; Horta, Paula M

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the occurrence of anemia and iron deficiency in children aged 1 to 5 years and the association of these events and retinol deficiency. This was an observational analytic cross-sectional study conducted in Vitoria, ES, Brazil, between April and August of 2008, with healthy children aged 1 to 5 years (n=692) that lived in areas covered by primary healthcare services. Sociodemographic and economic conditions, dietary intake (energy, protein, iron, and vitamin A ingestion), anthropometric data (body mass index-for-age and height-for-age), and biochemical parameters (ferritin, hemoglobin, and retinol serum) were collected. The prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency, and retinol deficiency was 15.7%, 28.1%, and 24.7%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed a higher prevalence of anemia (PR: 4.62, 95% CI: 3.36, 6.34, p<0.001) and iron deficiency (PR: 4.51, 95% CI: 3.30, 6.17, p<0.001) among children with retinol deficiency. The same results were obtained after adjusting for socioeconomic and demographic conditions, dietary intake, and anthropometric variables. There was a positive association between ferritin vs. retinol serum (r=0.597; p<0.001) and hemoglobin vs. retinol serum (r=0.770; p<0.001). Anemia and iron deficiency were associated with low levels of serum retinol in children aged 1 to 5 years, and a positive correlation was verified between serum retinol and serum ferritin and hemoglobin levels. These results indicate the importance of initiatives encouraging the development of new treatments and further research regarding retinol deficiency. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Intravenous iron monotherapy for the treatment of non-iron-deficiency anemia in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Razeq, Hikmat; Abbasi, Salah; Saadi, Iyad; Jaber, Rana; Abdelelah, Hazem

    2013-01-01

    Background Anemia in patients with cancer who are undergoing active therapy is commonly encountered and may worsen quality of life in these patients. The effect of blood transfusion is often temporary and may be associated with serious adverse events. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents are not effective in 30%–50% of patients and may have a negative effect on overall survival. Aims To assess the efficacy and feasibility of intravenous iron therapy in patients with cancer who have non-iron-deficiency anemia and who are undergoing treatment with chemotherapy without the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Methods Adult patients with solid cancers and non-iron-deficiency anemia were included. Ferric sucrose at a dose of 200 mg was given in short intravenous infusions weekly for a total of 12 weeks. Hemoglobin level was measured at baseline, every 3 weeks, and 2 weeks after the last iron infusion (week 14). Adverse events related to intravenous iron were prospectively reported. Results Of 25 patients included, 19 (76.0%) completed at least three iron infusions and 14 (56.0%) finished the planned 12 weeks of therapy. The mean hemoglobin level of the 25 patients at baseline was 9.6 g/dL (median, 9.9 g/dL; range, 6.9 g/dL 10.9 g/dL). The mean change in hemoglobin level for the 15 patients who completed at least 9 treatments was 1.7 g/dL (median, 1.1 g/dL; range, −1.9 g/dL to 3.2 g/dL); it reached 2.1 g/dL (median, 1.3 g/dL; range, −0.2 g/dL to 4.6 g/dL; P = 0.0007) for the 14 patients who completed all 12 weekly treatments. Five (20.0%) patients were transfused and considered as treatment failures. No treatment-related adverse events were reported. Conclusion Intravenous iron treatment alone is safe and may reduce blood transfusion requirements and improve hemoglobin level in patients with cancer who are undergoing anticancer therapy. Further randomized studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:24039403

  4. Microporation and ‘Iron’ tophoresis for treating Iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Modepalli, Naresh; Jo, Seongbong; Repka, Michael A.; Murthy, S. Narasimha

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Iontophoretic mediated transdermal delivery of ferric pyrophosphate (FPP) in combination with microneedle pretreatment was investigated as a potential treatment for iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Methods In vitro transdermal delivery studies were performed using hairless rat skin and pharmacodynamic studies were performed in hairless anemic rat model. The hematological and biochemical parameters like hemoglobin, hematocrit and % serum transferrin were monitored in rats at healthy, anemic condition and post treatment. Micropores created by the microneedles were visualized in histological skin sections after staining with hemotoxylin and eosin. The recovery of micropores was investigated in vivo by measuring Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) at different time points. Results The passive, microneedle and iontophoresis mediated delivery did not lead to significant improvement in hematological and biochemical parameters in anemic rats, when used individually. When iontophoresis (0.15 mA/cm2 for 4 hours) was combined with microneedle pretreatment (for 2 minutes), therapeutically adequate amount of FPP was delivered and there was significant recovery of rats from IDA. Conclusions Microneedle and iontophoresis mediated delivery of iron via transdermal route could be developed as a potential treatment for IDA. The transdermal controlled delivery of iron could become a potential, safe and effective alternative to parenteral iron therapy. PMID:23187864

  5. Long-term Neuroendocrine Effects of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Felt, Barbara T.; Peirano, Patricio; Algarín, Cecilia; Chamorro, Rodrigo; Sir, Teresa; Kaciroti, Niko; Lozoff, Betsy

    2012-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) is recognized to have long-lasting effects on neurodevelopment, but there is little research on neuroendocrine systems. This study examined the effects of IDA in early or later infancy on plasmacortisol and prolactin stress-response patterns for one hour after a venipuncture and catheter placement in 10-year-old healthy Chilean children. Children identified with IDA at 6 months (IDA-6; n = 13) or 12 months (IDA-12; n = 24) and who were iron sufficient at other infancy time points were compared to children who were iron sufficient (IS)at all time-points during infancy (n = 23). All children received at least 6 months of oral iron treatment in infancy. At 10 years of age, IDA-6 and IDA-12 children demonstrated altered cortisol response patterns; both showed a more immediate decline and IDA-12 children showed a blunted curvature compared to IS children. IDA-12 children showed significantly lower cortisol levels at 30 and 45 minutes after venipuncture and catheter placement than IS children. There were no significant differences for stress-responsive plasma prolactin patterns between groups. The results indicate that having IDA during infancy is associated with long-term neuroendocrine effects on stress-responsive cortisol patterns. PMID:22337224

  6. Comparison of intravenous ferrous sucrose and oral ferrous sulphate in treatment of postpartum iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    El Khouly, Nabih I

    2017-04-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy, safety and tolerability of intravenous ferrous sucrose, compared to oral ferrous sulphate in women with postpartum iron deficiency anemia (IDA). In a single center, randomized, controlled study, 352 patients with hemoglobin 9 gm/dl or less and serum ferritin of <15 μg/l two days after delivery were equally randomized to receive intravenous ferrous sucrose (up to three calculated replacement doses) or oral ferrous sulphate (150 mg twice daily for six weeks). Primary measures were to assess the rise in hemoglobin (Hb) and serum ferritin. By day 5, the Hb level in women treated with intravenous ferrous sucrose had rised from 8.48 ± 0.47 to 9.4 ± 0.56 gm/dl. Women treated with intravenous ferrous sucrose had significantly higher Hb levels on day 5, day 14 and day 40 (p < 0.01) than those treated with oral ferrous sulphate. Throughout the study, ferritin level rose rapidly in those treated with intravenous iron and remained significantly higher than in those treated with oral iron (p < 0.001). Intravenous ferrous sucrose increases Hb level more rapidly than ferrous sulphate in women with postpartum IDA. It also replenishes iron stores more rapidly with better tolerability.

  7. Effect of iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy on child mental development in rural China.

    PubMed

    Chang, Suying; Zeng, Lingxia; Brouwer, Inge D; Kok, Frans J; Yan, Hong

    2013-03-01

    To determine the impact of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in pregnancy on young child development. A 2-year follow-up of 850 children born to women who participated in a double-blind cluster randomized controlled trial of prenatal micronutrient supplementation in western rural China. These women were randomly assigned to receive either daily folic acid, iron/folic acid (60 mg iron), or multiple micronutrients (with 30 mg iron) during pregnancy. Children were categorized into the prenatal-IDA and prenatal-non-IDA groups based on the mother's hemoglobin in the third trimester. Each group contained 3 subgroups based on mother's treatment: folic acid, iron/folic acid, and multiple micronutrients. Bayley scales of infant development were administered to the children to assess their development at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months of age. Compared with the prenatal-non-IDA group, the prenatal-IDA group showed a significantly lower mental development index at 12, 18, and 24 months of age. The adjusted mean difference was 5.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-10.5), 5.1 (95% CI, 1.2-9.0), and 5.3 (95% CI, 0.9-9.7), respectively. Further analysis showed that the mental development indexes in the prenatal-IDA group and prenatal-non-IDA group were similar with supplementation of iron/folic acid but were significantly lower in the prenatal-IDA group with supplementation of folic acid or multiple micronutrients. Prenatal IDA in the third trimester is associated with mental development of the child. However, prenatal supplementation with sufficient iron protects child development even when the woman's IDA was not properly corrected in pregnancy.

  8. Incidence and risk factors of iron deficiency anemia in term infants.

    PubMed

    Tantracheewathorn, Supapan; Lohajaroensub, Sirin

    2005-01-01

    To compare the incidence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) between breast-fed (BF) and formula-fed (FF) infants and to identify the risk factors of IDA in these infants. Cohort study. A study of 140 full- term infants (70 BF and 70 FF) was conducted at BMA Medical College and Vajira Hospital from February 2002 to November 2003. All infants were followed at the age of 1, 2, 4, 6, 9 and 12 months for growth and developmental assessment. Blood samples were analyzed for hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) at 9 - 12 months; and infants with Hb < 11.0 g/dl were further investigated for the cause of anemia. The mean values of Hb, Hct, MCV and serum ferritin of BF infants were 10.8 g/dl, 32.8%, 70.9fl and 16.7 ng/ml respectively, which were significantly lower than those of FF infants (11.4 g/dl, 35.1%, 73.3fl, and 36.9 ng/ml, p < 0. 05). Anemia was found in 27 BF infants (38.6%) compared with 10 FF infants (14.39%). The incidence of IDA in BF infants was significantly higher than FF infants (25.7% vs 2.9%, p < 0.001). Risk factors of IDA included low birth weight, breastfeeding and inadequate complementary food (adjusted RR (95% CI): 3.1(1.1 - 9.1), 6.3(1.5 - 25.0), 7.7(2.8 - 20.0), respectively). IDA is more prevalent in BF than FF infants. Risk factors of IDA are low birth weight, breastfeeding and inadequate complementary food. Prevention of IDA in infants should be achieved through adequate iron-rich complementary food and screening for Hb or Hct at 9 - 12 months of age in high risk infants.

  9. [Iron, folic acid and vitamin B12 deficiencies related to anemia in adolescents from a region with a high incidence of congenital malformations in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Suárez, Teresa; Torrealba, Mónica; Villegas, Neifred; Osorio, Crisol; García-Casal, María Nieves

    2005-06-01

    Since in recent years for certain age groups, the main cause of anemia is not iron deficiency, we intended to study the effect of iron, folic acid and vitamin B12 deficiencies on anemia prevalence in adolescents from Venezuela. One hundred adolescents aged between 12 and 19 years participated in the study. Each subject was interviewed about antecedents and habits and a physical examination and a 24-hour food recall questionnaire were performed. From a blood sample, hemoglobin and hematocrit concentrations were determined and serum was separated for quantification of ferritin, folic acid and vitamin B12 concentrations. Prevalence of anemia was 78% and for iron, folic acid and vitamin B12 deficiencies were 34.66, 90.9 and 18.18%, respectively. From anemic cases, 35.89% presented iron deficiency, while 91.02% presented folic acid deficiency. Only 19.23% of adolescents with anemia presented also vitamin B12 deficiency, but all the cases with vitamin B12 deficiency, were anemic. Simultaneous iron and folic acid deficiencies affected 30.76% of anemic cases. The high prevalence of deficiencies found in this work could be explained by insufficient intake and inadequate food habits. The prevalence of anemia was associated to folic acid deficiency rather than to iron deficiency, due to the high prevalence of folic acid deficiency. The high prevalence of nutritional deficiencies found in this work, especially regarding folic acid deficiency, require immediate interventions.

  10. Breastfeeding, Mixed, or Formula Feeding at 9 Months of Age and the Prevalence of Iron Deficiency and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Two Cohorts of Infants in China.

    PubMed

    Clark, Katy M; Li, Ming; Zhu, Bingquan; Liang, Furong; Shao, Jie; Zhang, Yueyang; Ji, Chai; Zhao, Zhengyan; Kaciroti, Niko; Lozoff, Betsy

    2017-02-01

    To assess associations between breastfeeding and iron status at 9 months of age in 2 samples of Chinese infants. Associations between feeding at 9 months of age (breastfed as sole milk source, mixed fed, or formula fed) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA), iron deficiency, and iron sufficiency were determined in infants from Zhejiang (n = 142) and Hebei (n= 813) provinces. Iron deficiency was defined as body iron < 0 mg/kg, and IDA as iron deficiency + hemoglobin < 110 g/L. Multiple logistic regression assessed associations between feeding pattern and iron status. Breastfeeding was associated with iron status (P < .001). In Zhejiang, 27.5% of breastfed infants had IDA compared with 0% of formula-fed infants. The odds of iron deficiency/IDA were increased in breastfed and mixed-fed infants compared with formula-fed infants: breastfed vs formula-fed OR, 28.8 (95% CI, 3.7-226.4) and mixed-fed vs formula-fed OR, 11.0 (95% CI, 1.2-103.2). In Hebei, 44.0% of breastfed infants had IDA compared with 2.8% of formula-fed infants. With covariable adjustment, odds of IDA were increased in breastfed and mixed-fed groups: breastfed vs formula-fed OR, 78.8 (95% CI, 27.2-228.1) and mixed-fed vs formula-fed OR, 21.0 (95% CI, 7.3-60.9). In both cohorts, the odds of iron deficiency/IDA at 9 months of age were increased in breastfed and mixed-fed infants, and iron deficiency/IDA was common. Although the benefits of breastfeeding are indisputable, these findings add to the evidence that breastfeeding in later infancy identifies infants at risk for iron deficiency/IDA in many settings. Protocols for detecting and preventing iron deficiency/IDA in breastfed infants are needed. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00642863 and NCT00613717. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a shortage of iron. This condition is called iron deficiency anemia.There are a few other types of ... Try to avoid these foods if you have iron deficiency anemia.Foods high in vitamin B12 include:meat ...

  12. Iron deficiency without anemia is associated with anger and fatigue in young Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Takako; Konomi, Aki; Yokoi, Katsuhiko

    2014-06-01

    Iron deficiency without anemia (IDNA), the most prevalent nutritional deficiency worldwide, affects young women of reproductive age. This study aimed to elucidate the relationship between IDNA and mental and somatic symptoms including anger and fatigue using the Japanese version of the Cornell Medical Index Health Questionnaire (CMI-J). Data regarding demographic characteristics, anthropometry, hematological, and biochemical indices of the iron status, frequencies of selected food intakes assessed by self-administered food frequency questionnaires (FFQs), frequencies of nonspecific symptoms, and grades of neurotic tendencies assessed by CMI-J were collected from 76 young women aged 18-22 years living in the metropolitan area of Tokyo, Japan. The subjects were classified as having IDNA (hemoglobin (Hb)≥12 g/dL and serum ferritin<20 ng/mL; n=29), having iron deficiency anemia (IDA) (Hb<12 g/dL and serum ferritin<20 ng/mL; n=10), or having a normal iron status (Hb≥12 g/dL and serum ferritin≥20 ng/mL; n=36). One subject was excluded from the analyses because of Hb<12 g/dL and serum ferritin≥20 ng/mL. Fisher's protected least significant difference and the Dwass-Steel-Chritchlow-Fligner multiple comparison tests were used to compare the data of the three groups. P values<0.05 were considered significant. Sections M-R (mental complaints) were significantly higher in the IDNA subjects than in the normal subjects. No significant difference in CMI scores was found between the normal and IDA subjects. Sections I (fatigability), Q (anger), and R (tension) were significantly higher in the IDNA subjects than in the normal subjects, regardless of no significant differences between the normal and IDA subjects in those sections. Young women with IDNA demonstrated a significantly higher proportion of neurotic tendencies (grades II-IV). The intake frequency score of canned or bottled green tea fortified with vitamin C was significantly higher in the IDNA subjects than the

  13. Bed bugs reproductive life cycle in the clothes of a patient suffering from Alzheimer's disease results in iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Sabou, Marcela; Imperiale, Delphine Gallo; Andrès, Emmanuel; Abou-Bacar, Ahmed; Foeglé, Jacinthe; Lavigne, Thierry; Kaltenbach, Georges; Candolfi, Ermanno

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of an 82-year-old patient, hospitalized for malaise. Her clothes were infested by numerous insects and the entomological analysis identified them as being Cimex lectularius (bed bugs). The history of the patient highlighted severe cognitive impairment. The biological assessment initially showed a profound microcytic, aregenerative, iron deficiency anemia. A vitamin B12 deficiency due to pernicious anemia (positive intrinsic factor antibodies) was also highlighted, but this was not enough to explain the anemia without macrocytosis. Laboratory tests, endoscopy and a CT scan eliminated a tumor etiology responsible for occult bleeding. The patient had a mild itchy rash which was linked to the massive colonization by the bed bugs. The C. lectularius bite is most often considered benign because it is not a vector of infectious agents. Far from trivial, a massive human colonization by bed bugs may cause such a hematic depletion that severe microcytic anemia may result.

  14. The Proportion of Anemia Associated with Iron Deficiency in Low, Medium, and High Human Development Index Countries: A Systematic Analysis of National Surveys.

    PubMed

    Petry, Nicolai; Olofin, Ibironke; Hurrell, Richard F; Boy, Erick; Wirth, James P; Moursi, Mourad; Donahue Angel, Moira; Rohner, Fabian

    2016-11-02

    Iron deficiency is commonly assumed to cause half of all cases of anemias, with hereditary blood disorders and infections such as hookworm and malaria being the other major causes. In countries ranked as low, medium, and high by the Human Development Index, we conducted a systematic review of nationally representative surveys that reported the prevalence of iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia, and anemia among pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age. Using random effects meta-analyses techniques, data from 23 countries for pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age was pooled, and the proportion of anemia attributable to iron deficiency was estimated by region, inflammation exposure, anemia prevalence, and urban/rural setting. For pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age, the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was 25.0% (95% CI: 18.0, 32.0) and 37.0% (95% CI: 28.0, 46.0), respectively. The proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was lower in countries where anemia prevalence was >40%, especially in rural populations (14% for pre-school children; 16% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age), and in countries with very high inflammation exposure (20% for pre-school children; 25% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age). Despite large heterogeneity, our analyses suggest that the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency is lower than the previously assumed 50% in countries with low, medium, or high Human Development Index ranking. Anemia-reduction strategies and programs should be based on an analysis of country-specific data, as iron deficiency may not always be the key determinant of anemia.

  15. The Proportion of Anemia Associated with Iron Deficiency in Low, Medium, and High Human Development Index Countries: A Systematic Analysis of National Surveys

    PubMed Central

    Petry, Nicolai; Olofin, Ibironke; Hurrell, Richard F.; Boy, Erick; Wirth, James P.; Moursi, Mourad; Donahue Angel, Moira; Rohner, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency is commonly assumed to cause half of all cases of anemias, with hereditary blood disorders and infections such as hookworm and malaria being the other major causes. In countries ranked as low, medium, and high by the Human Development Index, we conducted a systematic review of nationally representative surveys that reported the prevalence of iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia, and anemia among pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age. Using random effects meta-analyses techniques, data from 23 countries for pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age was pooled, and the proportion of anemia attributable to iron deficiency was estimated by region, inflammation exposure, anemia prevalence, and urban/rural setting. For pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age, the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was 25.0% (95% CI: 18.0, 32.0) and 37.0% (95% CI: 28.0, 46.0), respectively. The proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was lower in countries where anemia prevalence was >40%, especially in rural populations (14% for pre-school children; 16% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age), and in countries with very high inflammation exposure (20% for pre-school children; 25% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age). Despite large heterogeneity, our analyses suggest that the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency is lower than the previously assumed 50% in countries with low, medium, or high Human Development Index ranking. Anemia-reduction strategies and programs should be based on an analysis of country-specific data, as iron deficiency may not always be the key determinant of anemia. PMID:27827838

  16. Screening for Iron Deficiency Anemia and Iron Supplementation in Pregnant Women to Improve Maternal Health and Birth Outcomes: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    PubMed

    Siu, Albert L

    2015-10-06

    Update of the 2006 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for iron deficiency anemia. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the association between change in iron status as a result of intervention (oral supplementation or treatment) in pregnant women and adolescents and improvement in maternal and infant health outcomes. This recommendation applies to pregnant women and adolescents living in the United States who do not have symptoms of iron deficiency anemia. It does not address pregnant women who are malnourished, have symptoms of iron deficiency anemia, or have special hematologic conditions or nutritional needs that may increase their need for iron. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for iron deficiency anemia in pregnant women to prevent adverse maternal health and birth outcomes. (I statement). The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of routine iron supplementation for pregnant women to prevent adverse maternal health and birth outcomes. (I statement).

  17. Severe Respiratory Distress in a Child with Pulmonary Idiopathic Hemosiderosis Initially Presenting with Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Potalivo, A.; Finessi, L.; Facondini, F.; Lupo, A.; Andreoni, C.; Giuliani, G.; Cavicchi, C.

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare cause of alveolar hemorrhage in children but should be considered in children with anemia of unknown origin who develop respiratory complications. It is commonly characterized by the triad of recurrent hemoptysis, diffuse parenchymal infiltrates, and iron-deficiency anemia. Pathogenesis is unclear and diagnosis may be difficult along with a variable clinical course. A 6-year-old boy was admitted to the hospital with a severe iron-deficiency anemia, but he later developed severe acute respiratory failure and hemoptysis requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. The suspicion of IPH led to the use of immunosuppressive therapy with high dose of corticosteroids with rapid improvement in clinical condition and discharge from hospital. PMID:26634166

  18. Evaluation of the Efficiency of the Reticulocyte Hemoglobin Content on Diagnosis for Iron Deficiency Anemia in Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jie; Wu, Meng; Ren, Jie; Du, Yali; Long, Zhangbiao; Li, Guoxun; Han, Bing; Yang, Lichen

    2017-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the cut-off value and efficiency of using reticulocyte hemoglobin content as a marker to diagnose iron deficiency anemia in Chinese adults. 140 adults who needed bone marrow aspiration for diagnosis at the hematology department of the Peking Union Medical College Hospital were enrolled according to the inclusive and exclusive criteria. Venous blood samples were collected to detect complete blood count, including hemoglobin, reticulocyte hemoglobin content, hematocrit, mean cellular volume, corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, hemoglobin content, free erythrocyte protoporphyrin; iron indexes of serum ferritin, serum transferrin receptor, and unsaturated iron-binding capacity; and inflammation markers of C-reactive protein and α-acid glycoprotein. Bone marrow samples were obtained for the bone marrow iron staining, which was used as the standard for the evaluation of iron status in this study. Subjects were divided into three groups according to hemoglobin levels and bone marrow iron staining results: the IDA (iron deficiency anemia) group, the NIDA (non-iron deficiency anemia) group, and the control group. The differences of the above-mentioned indexes were compared among the three groups and the effect of inflammation was also considered. The cut-off value of reticulocyte hemoglobin content was determined by receiver operation curves. The IDA group (n = 56) had significantly lower reticulocyte hemoglobin content, mean cellular volume, corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, hemoglobin content, and serum ferritin; and higher free erythrocyte protoporphyrin, unsaturated iron-binding capacity, and serum transferrin receptor (p < 0.05) compared with the NIDA group (n = 38) and control group (n = 46). Hematocrit, serum ferritin, and unsaturated iron-binding capacity were significantly affected by inflammation while reticulocyte hemoglobin content and other parameters were not. The cut-off value of reticulocyte hemoglobin content for diagnosing

  19. Evaluation of the Efficiency of the Reticulocyte Hemoglobin Content on Diagnosis for Iron Deficiency Anemia in Chinese Adults.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jie; Wu, Meng; Ren, Jie; Du, Yali; Long, Zhangbiao; Li, Guoxun; Han, Bing; Yang, Lichen

    2017-05-02

    Our aim was to evaluate the cut-off value and efficiency of using reticulocyte hemoglobin content as a marker to diagnose iron deficiency anemia in Chinese adults. 140 adults who needed bone marrow aspiration for diagnosis at the hematology department of the Peking Union Medical College Hospital were enrolled according to the inclusive and exclusive criteria. Venous blood samples were collected to detect complete blood count, including hemoglobin, reticulocyte hemoglobin content, hematocrit, mean cellular volume, corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, hemoglobin content, free erythrocyte protoporphyrin; iron indexes of serum ferritin, serum transferrin receptor, and unsaturated iron-binding capacity; and inflammation markers of C-reactive protein and α-acid glycoprotein. Bone marrow samples were obtained for the bone marrow iron staining, which was used as the standard for the evaluation of iron status in this study. Subjects were divided into three groups according to hemoglobin levels and bone marrow iron staining results: the IDA (iron deficiency anemia) group, the NIDA (non-iron deficiency anemia) group, and the control group. The differences of the above-mentioned indexes were compared among the three groups and the effect of inflammation was also considered. The cut-off value of reticulocyte hemoglobin content was determined by receiver operation curves. The IDA group (n = 56) had significantly lower reticulocyte hemoglobin content, mean cellular volume, corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, hemoglobin content, and serum ferritin; and higher free erythrocyte protoporphyrin, unsaturated iron-binding capacity, and serum transferrin receptor (p < 0.05) compared with the NIDA group (n = 38) and control group (n = 46). Hematocrit, serum ferritin, and unsaturated iron-binding capacity were significantly affected by inflammation while reticulocyte hemoglobin content and other parameters were not. The cut-off value of reticulocyte hemoglobin content for diagnosing

  20. Persistent neurochemical and behavioral abnormalities in adulthood despite early iron supplementation for perinatal iron deficiency anemia in rats⋆

    PubMed Central

    Felt, Barbara T.; Beard, John L.; Schallert, Timothy; Shao, Jie; Aldridge, J. Wayne; Connor, James R.; Georgieff, Michael K.; Lozoff, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) has been associated with altered cognitive, motor, and social-emotional outcomes in human infants. We recently reported that rats with chronic perinatal IDA, had altered regional brain iron, monoamines, and sensorimotor skill emergence during early development. Objective To examine the long-term consequences of chronic perinatal IDA on behavior, brain iron and monoamine systems after dietary iron treatment in rats. Methods Sixty dams were randomly assigned to iron-sufficient (CN) or low-iron (EID) diets during gestation and lactation. Thereafter, all offspring were fed the iron-sufficient diet, assessed for hematology and behavior after weaning and into adulthood and for brain measures as adults (regional brain iron, monoamines, dopamine and serotonin transporters, and dopamine receptor). Behavioral assessments included sensorimotor function, general activity, response to novelty, spatial alternation, and spatial water maze performance. Results Hematology and growth were similar for EID and CN rats by postnatal day 35. In adulthood, EID thalamic iron content was lower. Monoamines, dopamine transporter, and dopamine receptor concentrations did not differ from CN. EID serotonin transporter concentration was reduced in striatum and related regions. EID rats had persisting sensorimotor deficits (delayed vibrissae-evoked forelimb placing, longer sticker removal time, and more imperfect grooming chains), were more hesitant in novel settings, and had poorer spatial water maze performance than CN. General activity and spatial alternation were similar for EID and CN. Conclusion Rats that had chronic perinatal IDA showed behavioral impairments that suggest persistent striatal dopamine and hippocampal dysfunction despite normalization of hematology, growth and most brain measures. PMID:16713640

  1. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in patients with iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Cikmazkara, Ipek; Ugurlu, Seyda Karadeniz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) on peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness with optical coherence tomography (OCT). Materials and Methods: 102 female patients who had IDA (hemoglobin <12 g/dl, serum transferrin saturation <15%, serum iron <50 μg/dl, and serum ferritin <15 μg/dl) were enrolled in the study. Optic disc and RNFL parameters obtained by Cirrus high-definition OCT 4000 were compared with those of 49 age and sex-matched nonanemic individuals. The time between blood analysis and OCT measurements was 3.14 ± 5.6 (range, 0–28) days in the anemia group, and 3.5 ± 6.7 (range, 0–27) days in the control group (P = 0.76). Results: Average ages of 102 patients and 49 control subjects were 35.76 ± 10.112 (range, 18–66) years, and 36.08 ± 8.416 (range, 19–57) years (P = 0.850), respectively. The average RNFL thickness was 94.67 ± 9.380 in the anemia group, and 100.22 ± 9.12 in the control group (P = 0.001). Temporal, nasal, and lower quadrant average RNFL thicknesses of IDA group were thinner than the control group (P = 0.001, P = 0.013, P = 0.008). Upper quadrant RNFL thicknesses in IDA and control groups were similar. Correlation analysis revealed positive correlation between mean RNFL thickness and hemoglobin (r = 0.273), iron (r = 0.177), ferritin (r = 0.163), and transferrin saturations (r = 0.185), while a negative correlation was found between total iron binding capacity (r = −0.199) and mean RNFL thickness. Conclusions: Peripapillary RNFL thickness measured by OCT is thinner in adult female patients with IDA. It may have a significant influence on the management of many disorders such as glaucoma and neuro-ophthalmological diseases. PMID:27146929

  2. Sugarcane Molasses - A Potential Dietary Supplement in the Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rahi; Venkatasubramanian, Padma

    2017-09-03

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a serious public health problem that debilitates ∼1.6 billion people globally every year, the majority being pregnant women and children from developing countries. In India, for example, in spite of several operational programs at the national level using iron-folic acid and other allopathic interventions, IDA is still prevalent. Traditional medicines, such as Ayurveda, prescribe herbal formulations containing sugarcane derivatives for the management of pandu, a condition similar to IDA. This article reviews molasses, a sugar industry by-product, as a potential raw material to develop nutraceutical products for IDA. Molasses contains iron and its absorption enhancers, such as sulfur, fructose, and copper, which make it a potential dietary supplement for IDA. More research, product development, and evidence of safety and efficacy of molasses in IDA management can provide a tasty and cost-effective dietary supplement, particularly for children. However, there are challenges, such as competition for raw material from refined sugar manufacturers, quality control, etc., that need to be overcome.

  3. Urinary Kidney Injury Molecules in Children with Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Güneş, Ali; Ece, Aydın; Aktar, Fesih; Tan, İlhan; Söker, Murat; Karabel, Duran; Balık, Hasan; Uluca, Ünal; Şen, Velat; Yolbaş, İlyas

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the urine levels of human kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) in children with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA). Material/Methods Thirty-five children with IDA and 32 matched healthy controls were recruited. We assessed complete blood count, serum iron, iron-binding capacity, ferritin, serum levels of urea, creatinine (Cr), sodium (Na), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), and glucose levels. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated. Urinary NAG, NGAL, KIM-1, and L-FABP were measured and divided by urine creatinine for comparisons. Results There were no significant differences in serum urea, Cr, or eGFR between the IDA group and the control group (p>0.05, for all). IDA patients had significantly higher urine NGAL/Cr, L-FABP/Cr, KIM-1/Cr, and NAG/Cr compared with the control group (p<0.05). There were significant negative correlations between hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cell count, and urine NGAL/Cr, NAG/Cr, L-FABP/Cr, KIM-1/Cr levels (p<0.05). Conclusions Higher urinary kidney injury molecule levels in IDA patients suggest a possible subclinical renal injury in pediatric IDA patients whose renal functions and serum electrolytes were normal. PMID:26697893

  4. Role of dietary iron and fat on vitamin E deficiency anemia of infancy.

    PubMed

    Williams, M L; Shoot, R J; O'Neal, P L; Oski, F A

    1975-04-24

    Thirty-five infants weighing less than 1500 g at birth were fed four commercial formulas (A-D) varying in polyunsaturated fatty acid composition (32 per cent linoleic acid in A and B and 12 per cent linoleic acid in C and D) and in iron content (smaller than 1.0 in A and B; 12 to 12 mg per liter in B and D). Infants receiving formula B showed significantly lower hemoglobins (p smaller than 0.01) and higher reticulocyte counts (p smaller than 0.005) than infants fed the other three formulas. Infants receiving the two formulas with higher concentrations of unsaturated fatty acids (A and B) showed significantly greater hydrogen-peroxide-induced hemolysis (p smaller than 0.001) than those given diets containing lower amounts. Infants in groups A and B also had lower serum tocopherol concentrations. Infant red-cell membranes are altered by the increased amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids and iron in the diet. It appears that the development of vitamin E deficiency anemia occurs in infants receiving iron supplementation.

  5. Direct Comparison of the Safety and Efficacy of Ferric Carboxymaltose versus Iron Dextran in Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Iftikhar; Bhoyroo, Jessica; Butcher, Angelia; Koch, Todd A; He, Andy; Bregman, David B

    2013-01-01

    Several intravenous iron complexes are available for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Iron dextran (DEX) is associated with an elevated risk of potentially serious anaphylactic reactions, whereas others must be administered in several small infusions to avoid labile iron reactions. Ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) is a nondextran intravenous iron which can be administered in high single doses. A randomized, open label, and multicenter comparison of FCM to DEX in adults with IDA and baseline hemoglobin of ≤11.0 g/dL was conducted. A total of 160 patients were in the safety population (FCM n = 82; DEX n = 78). Adverse events, including immune system disorders (0% in FCM versus 10.3% in DEX, P = 0.003) and skin disorders (7.3% in FCM versus 24.4% in DEX, P = 0.004), were less frequently observed in the FCM group. A greater portion of patients in the FCM group experienced a transient, asymptomatic decrease in phosphate compared to patients in the DEX group (8.5% in FCM versus 0% in DEX, P = 0.014). In the FCM arm, the change in hemoglobin from baseline to the highest observed level was 2.8 g/dL, whereas the DEX arm displayed a change of 2.4 g/dL (P = 0.20). Treatment of IDA with FCM resulted in fewer hypersensitivity-related reactions than DEX.

  6. New Bioinformatics-Based Discrimination Formulas for Differentiation of Thalassemia Traits From Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hafeez Kandhro, Abdul; Shoombuatong, Watshara; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Nuchnoi, Pornlada

    2017-08-01

    Thalassemia traits (TTs) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are the most common disorders of hypochromic microcytic anemia (HMA). The present study aimed to differentiate TTs from IDA by analyzing discrimination formulas and provides comprehensive data of hemoglobin disorders prevalent in Pakistan. Among 12 published discrimination formulas, 6 formulas-MI, EF, G&K, RDWI, R, and HHI-were the most reliable to discriminate TTs from IDA. The failure cutoff values were improved by the random forest (RF) decision-tree approach. Moreover, the Shine and Lal (S&L) formula, which completely failed to discriminate IDA from TTs with original cutoff value (<1530), improved with the use of new proposed cutoff value (<1016) and was found to successfully discriminate all cases of TTs from those with IDA. In addition, 2 newly proposed formulas discriminated TTs from IDA more reliably than the original 12 formulas assessed. The proposed formulas could play a crucial role for clinicians to discriminate between TTs and IDA. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to treat cancer can interfere with the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most people with a vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia lack intrinsic factor — a protein secreted by the stomach that is necessary for ...

  8. Matriptase-2 mutations in iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia patients provide new insights into protease activation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Andrew J; Quesada, Victor; Sanchez, Mayka; Garabaya, Cecilia; Sardà, María P; Baiget, Montserrat; Remacha, Angel; Velasco, Gloria; López-Otín, Carlos

    2009-10-01

    Mutations leading to abrogation of matriptase-2 proteolytic activity in humans are associated with an iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) due to elevated hepcidin levels. Here we describe two novel heterozygous mutations within the matriptase-2 (TMPRSS6) gene of monozygotic twin girls exhibiting an IRIDA phenotype. The first is the frameshift mutation (P686fs) caused by the insertion of the four nucleotides CCCC in exon 16 (2172_2173insCCCC) that is predicted to terminate translation before the catalytic serine. The second mutation is the di-nucleotide substitution c.467C>A and c.468C>T in exon 3 that causes the missense mutation A118D in the SEA domain of the extracellular stem region of matriptase-2. Functional analysis of both variant matriptase-2 proteases has revealed that they lead to ineffective suppression of hepcidin transcription. We also demonstrate that the A118D SEA domain mutation causes an intra-molecular structural imbalance that impairs matriptase-2 activation. Collectively, these results extend the pattern of TMPRSS6 mutations associated with IRIDA and functionally demonstrate that mutations affecting protease regions other than the catalytic domain may have a profound impact in the regulatory role of matriptase-2 during iron deficiency.

  9. Egg Yolk Protein Delays Recovery while Ovalbumin Is Useful in Recovery from Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yukiko; Wakasugi, Etsuko; Yasui, Risa; Kuwahata, Masashi; Kido, Yasuhiro

    2015-06-15

    Protein is a main nutrient involved in overall iron metabolism in vivo. In order to assess the prevention of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) by diet, it is necessary to confirm the influence of dietary protein, which coexists with iron, on iron bioavailability. We investigated the usefulness of the egg structural protein in recovery from IDA. Thirty-one female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into a control group (n = 6) fed a casein diet (4.0 mg Fe/100 g) for 42 days and an IDA model group (n = 25) created by feeding a low-iron casein diet (LI, 0.4 mg Fe/100 g) for 21 days and these IDA rats were fed normal iron diet with different proteins from eggs for another 21 days. The IDA rats were further divided into four subgroups depending on the proteins fed during the last 21 days, which were those with an egg white diet (LI-W, 4.0 mg Fe/100 g, n = 6), those with an ovalbumin diet (LI-A, 4.0 mg Fe/100 g, n = 7), those with an egg yolk-supplemented diet (LI-Y, 4.0 mg Fe/100 g, n = 6), and the rest with a casein diet (LI-C, 4.0 mg Fe/100 g, n = 6). In the LI-Y group, recovery of the hematocrit, hemoglobin, transferrin saturation level and the hepatic iron content were delayed compared to the other groups (p < 0.01, 0.01, 0.01, and 0.05, respectively), resulting in no recovery from IDA at the end of the experimental period. There were no significant differences in blood parameters in the LI-W and LI-A groups compared to the control group. The hepatic iron content of the LI-W and LI-A groups was higher than that of the LI-C group (p < 0.05). We found that egg white protein was useful for recovery from IDA and one of the efficacious components was ovalbumin, while egg yolk protein delayed recovery of IDA. This study demonstrates, therefore, that bioavailability of dietary iron varies depending on the source of dietary protein.

  10. Egg Yolk Protein Delays Recovery while Ovalbumin Is Useful in Recovery from Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yukiko; Wakasugi, Etsuko; Yasui, Risa; Kuwahata, Masashi; Kido, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Protein is a main nutrient involved in overall iron metabolism in vivo. In order to assess the prevention of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) by diet, it is necessary to confirm the influence of dietary protein, which coexists with iron, on iron bioavailability. We investigated the usefulness of the egg structural protein in recovery from IDA. Thirty-one female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into a control group (n = 6) fed a casein diet (4.0 mg Fe/100 g) for 42 days and an IDA model group (n = 25) created by feeding a low-iron casein diet (LI, 0.4 mg Fe/100 g) for 21 days and these IDA rats were fed normal iron diet with different proteins from eggs for another 21 days. The IDA rats were further divided into four subgroups depending on the proteins fed during the last 21 days, which were those with an egg white diet (LI-W, 4.0 mg Fe/100 g, n = 6), those with an ovalbumin diet (LI-A, 4.0 mg Fe/100 g, n = 7), those with an egg yolk-supplemented diet (LI-Y, 4.0 mg Fe/100 g, n = 6), and the rest with a casein diet (LI-C, 4.0 mg Fe/100 g, n = 6). In the LI-Y group, recovery of the hematocrit, hemoglobin, transferrin saturation level and the hepatic iron content were delayed compared to the other groups (p < 0.01, 0.01, 0.01, and 0.05, respectively), resulting in no recovery from IDA at the end of the experimental period. There were no significant differences in blood parameters in the LI-W and LI-A groups compared to the control group. The hepatic iron content of the LI-W and LI-A groups was higher than that of the LI-C group (p < 0.05). We found that egg white protein was useful for recovery from IDA and one of the efficacious components was ovalbumin, while egg yolk protein delayed recovery of IDA. This study demonstrates, therefore, that bioavailability of dietary iron varies depending on the source of dietary protein. PMID:26083113

  11. Significance of endoscopy in asymptomatic premenopausal women with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Il; Ryu, Seung Ho; Oh, Suk Joong; Yoo, Tae Woo; Kim, Hong Ju; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sung, In Kyung; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik

    2006-12-01

    There is, currently, no consensus with regard to the role of endoscopy in the etiologic investigation of asymptomatic pemenopausal women suffering from iron deficiency anemia (IDA). We conducted a retrospective case-control study to evaluate the contribution of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and colonoscopy to the etiologic diagnosis of a group of asymptomatic premenopausal women suffering from IDA. One hundred eight consecutive asymptomatic premenopausal women who fulfilled our entry criteria were included in our patient group between January 1998 and December 2004. One hundred thirty-five age-matched asymptomatic premenopausal women without anemia who had undergone EGD and colonoscopy for medical checkups were included in the control group. Clinically relevant lesions were detected in 7 of 108 (6.5%) of the patients and in 8 of 135 (5.9%) of the controls. There were no differences with regard to the frequency of clinically relevant lesions between the two groups (P > 0.05). Concomitant upper and lower GI lesions were not detected in any patients. In the upper GI tract, the only lesion found to be potentially causative of IDA anemia was a severe erosive gastritis, which was found in both the patient and the control groups. A source consistent with chronic bleeding was detected in the lower GI tract in 6 (5.6%) of the patients and 7 (5.2%) of the controls. Bleeding hemorrhoids represented the most frequently detected lesions in both the patient and control groups. Only one case of colon cancer was detected in the patient group. As IDA in the premenopausal women could not be attributed consistently to GI blood loss in this study, prospective studies should be conducted to validate our findings and to identify which subgroup of asymptomatic premenopausal women would benefit from a diagnostic endoscopic evaluation.

  12. Iron fortification of whole wheat flour reduces iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia and increases body iron stores in Indian school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Muthayya, Sumithra; Thankachan, Prashanth; Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Amalrajan, Vani; Thomas, Tinku; Lubree, Himangi; Agarwal, Dhiraj; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Hurrell, Richard F; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Kurpad, Anura V

    2012-11-01

    Wheat is the primary staple food for nearly one-third of the world's population. NaFeEDTA is the only iron (Fe) compound suitable for fortifying high extraction flours. We tested the hypothesis that NaFeEDTA-fortified, whole wheat flour reduces Fe deficiency (ID) and improves body Fe stores (BIS) and cognitive performance in Indian children. In a randomized, double-blind, controlled, school feeding trial, 6- to 15-y-old, Fe-depleted children (n = 401) were randomly assigned to either a daily wheat-based lunch meal fortified with 6 mg of Fe as NaFeEDTA or an otherwise identical unfortified control meal. Hemoglobin (Hb) and Fe status were measured at baseline, 3.5 mo, and 7 mo. Cognitive performance was evaluated at baseline and 7 mo in children (n = 170) at one of the study sites. After 7 mo, the prevalence of ID and ID anemia in the treatment group significantly decreased from 62 to 21% and 18 to 9%, respectively. There was a time x treatment interaction for Hb, serum ferritin, transferrin receptor, zinc protoporphyrin, and BIS (all P < 0.0001). Changes in BIS differed between the groups; it increased in the treatment group (0.04 ± 0.04 mmol/kg body weight) and decreased in the control group (-0.02 ± 0.04 mmol/kg body weight) (P < 0.0001). In sensory tests, NaFeEDTA-fortified flour could not be differentiated from unfortified flour. There were no significant differences in cognitive performance tests between the groups. NaFeEDTA-fortified wheat flour markedly improved BIS and reduced ID in Fe-depleted children. It may be recommended for wider use in national school feeding programs.

  13. A case of anemia caused by combined vitamin B12 and iron deficiency manifesting as short stature and delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Song, Seung Min; Bae, Keun Wook; Yoon, Hoi-Soo; Im, Ho Joon; Seo, Jong-Jin

    2010-05-01

    Anemia caused by vitamin B12 deficiency resulting from inadequate dietary intake is rare in children in the modern era because of improvements in nutritional status. However, such anemia can be caused by decreased ingestion or impaired absorption and/or utilization of vitamin B12. We report the case of an 18-year-old man with short stature, prepubertal sexual maturation, exertional dyspnea, and severe anemia with a hemoglobin level of 3.3 g/dL. He had a history of small bowel resection from 50 cm below the Treitz ligament to 5 cm above the ileocecal valve necessitated by midgut volvulus in the neonatal period. Laboratory tests showed deficiencies of both vitamin B12 and iron. A bone marrow examination revealed dyserythropoiesis and low levels of hemosiderin particles, and a cytogenetic study disclosed a normal karyotype. After treatment with parenteral vitamin B12 and elemental iron, both anemia and growth showed gradual improvement. This is a rare case that presented with short stature and delayed puberty caused by nutritional deficiency anemia in Korea.

  14. [Prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in a group of pre-school and school children, living in conditions of poverty].

    PubMed

    Winocur, Daniel; Ceriani Cernadas, José M; Imach, Eduardo; Otasso, Juan C; Morales, Patricia; Gards, Armando

    2004-01-01

    Iron deficiency is common during the first years of life. Yet, there is a paucity of data on scholar children. Our main objective was to estimate the prevalence of ferropenic anemia in children 3 to 12 years of age living under conditions of poverty. A total of 323 children were included, 171 attended to a day care institution (group A) and 152 were from the same community but not attended in the day care institution (group B). Hemoglobin (Hb), medium corpuscular volume (MCV) and serum ferritin (SF) were measured in all children. In those with Hb < or = 11 g/dl and/or MCV < or = 73 fl and/or SF < or = 15 microg/l, transferrin saturation (TS) and soluble transferrin receptors (sTR) were also measured. Iron deficiency was defined as SF < or = 15 mg/l and ferropenic anemia was defined as Hb < or = 11 g/dl or MCV < or = 73 fl with sTR > or = 38 mmol/l and SF < or = 10 microg/l or TS < or = 10%. There were no differences between the groups regarding age, weight, height, education, gender and housing conditions. Mean hemoglobin level was 12.6 g/dl (group A: 12.4 g/dl vs. group B: 12.7 g/dl; p=0.012), and mean SF was 45 mg/l, without significant differences between groups. Prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was 2.5% (8/323) and iron deficiency was 4.4% (14/317), without significant differences between groups. These results persisted after controlling for confounding variables. In this group of children living under conditions of poverty in Argentina, iron deficiency anemia was uncommon. We attribute this phenomenon to local affordability of some inexpensive cuts of red meat.

  15. High prevalence of anemia with lack of iron deficiency among women in rural Bangladesh: a role for thalassemia and iron in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Rebecca D; Shamim, Abu Ahmed; Ali, Hasmot; Labrique, Alain B; Schulze, Kerry; Christian, Parul; West, Keith P

    2012-01-01

    Iron deficiency was absent in a recent population assessment of rural Bangladeshi women exhibiting anemia (57%), suggesting other causes of low hemoglobin. We assessed the relative influence on anemia of thalassemia, groundwater arsenic and iron, and diet among women of reproductive age living in rural Bangladesh. Women (n=207) sampled from a previous antenatal nutrient intervention trial in rural Bangladesh were visited during two seasons in 2008. Collected data included 7-day dietary and 24-hour drinking water intake recalls, 7-day morbidity recall, anthropometry, and drinking water arsenic and iron concentrations. Capillary blood was analyzed for iron (plasma ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor), inflammation (C-reactive protein) and thalassemia (β thalassemia and Hb E) status. In stratified, adjusted analyses, only parity was associated with anemia (odds ratio, OR (95% CI): 11.34 (1.94, 66.15)) for those with thalassemia (28% prevalent). In contrast, groundwater iron intake (>30 mg/d, 0.48 (0.24, 0.96)) and wasting (2.32 (1.17, 4.62)) were associated with anemia among those without thalassemia. Elevated groundwater arsenic (>50 μg/L, 12% of tubewells) and a diverse diet were unrelated to anemia regardless of thalassemia diagnosis (p>0.70 and >0.47, respectively). Among women in this typical rural Bangladeshi area, the prevalence of thalassemia was high and, unlike iron deficiency which was absent most likely due to high iron intake from groundwater, contributed to the risk of anemia. In such settings, the influence of environmental sources of iron and the role of thalassemias in contributing to anemia at the population level may be underappreciated.

  16. Response of Iron Deficiency Anemia to Intravenous Iron Sucrose in Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of intravenous iron sucrose (IS) in iron deficient children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in remission. METHODS: Electronic medical records at a university based pediatric children's hospital were searched for patients in age range 0 to 18 years with diagnosis of IBD and treatment with IS over a 1-year period. Response to IS treatment was assessed by posttreatment changes in ferritin, hemoglobin (Hb), and mean corpuscular volume (MCV). Patients with recorded symptoms of active disease were excluded from analysis of treatment response. RESULTS: Twelve patients were identified by the search criteria, 10 with Crohn's disease (CD), 2 with ulcerative colitis (UC). Data represent 8 patients in remission, 7 with CD and 1 with UC, who received a total of 34 IS infusions. Iron sucrose was administered in cycles of 2 infusions, 2.5 to 3.5 mg/kg/dose (maximum 200 mg), 1 week apart. Mean ferritin increased from 21.4 ± 9.2 to 52.9 ± 10.1 ng/mL (p = 0.0005), Hb from 10.9 ± 0.4 to 11.3 ± 0.3 g/dL (p = 0.02), and MCV from 76.9 ± 2 to 79.4 ± 2 fl (p = 0.006). Iron sucrose treatment normalized ferritin in 6 of 7, Hb in 2 of 8, and MCV in 2 of 5 patients with low pretreatment levels. No adverse effects were recorded. CONCLUSIONS: Two IS infusions of 2.5 to 3.5 mg/kg/dose (maximum 200 mg), given 1 week apart normalized ferritin levels in most pediatric IBD patients in remission without adverse effects. Further studies are needed to determine optimal dosing schedules. PMID:27199624

  17. Social Costs of Iron Deficiency Anemia in 6–59-Month-Old Children in India

    PubMed Central

    Plessow, Rafael; Arora, Narendra Kumar; Brunner, Beatrice; Tzogiou, Christina; Eichler, Klaus; Brügger, Urs; Wieser, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inadequate nutrition has a severe impact on health in India. According to the WHO, iron deficiency is the single most important nutritional risk factor in India, accounting for more than 3% of all disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost. We estimate the social costs of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in 6–59-month-old children in India in terms of intangible costs and production losses. Materials and Methods We build a health economic model estimating the life-time costs of a birth cohort suffering from IDA between the ages of 6 and 59 months. The model is stratified by 2 age groups (6–23 and 24–59-months), 2 geographical areas (urban and rural), 10 socio-economic strata and 3 degrees of severity of IDA (mild, moderate and severe). Prevalence of anemia is calculated with the last available National Family Health Survey. Information on the health consequences of IDA is extracted from the literature. Results IDA prevalence is 49.5% in 6–23-month-old and 39.9% in 24–58-month-old children. Children living in poor households in rural areas are particularly affected but prevalence is high even in wealthy urban households. The estimated yearly costs of IDA in 6–59-month-old children amount to intangible costs of 8.3 m DALYs and production losses of 24,001 m USD, equal to 1.3% of gross domestic product. Previous calculations have considerably underestimated the intangible costs of IDA as the improved WHO methodology leads to a threefold increase of DALYs due to IDA. Conclusion Despite years of iron supplementation programs and substantial economic growth, IDA remains a crucial public health issue in India and an obstacle to the economic advancement of the poor. Young children are especially vulnerable due to the irreversible effects of IDA on cognitive development. Our research may contribute to the design of new effective interventions aiming to reduce IDA in early childhood. PMID:26313356

  18. Glutaredoxin 5 deficiency causes sideroblastic anemia by specifically impairing heme biosynthesis and depleting cytosolic iron in human erythroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hong; Jeong, Suh Young; Ghosh, Manik C.; Kovtunovych, Gennadiy; Silvestri, Laura; Ortillo, Danilo; Uchida, Naoya; Tisdale, John; Camaschella, Clara; Rouault, Tracey A.

    2010-01-01

    Glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5) deficiency has previously been identified as a cause of anemia in a zebrafish model and of sideroblastic anemia in a human patient. Here we report that GLRX5 is essential for iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis and the maintenance of normal mitochondrial and cytosolic iron homeostasis in human cells. GLRX5, a mitochondrial protein that is highly expressed in erythroid cells, can homodimerize and assemble [2Fe-2S] in vitro. In GLRX5-deficient cells, [Fe-S] cluster biosynthesis was impaired, the iron-responsive element–binding (IRE-binding) activity of iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) was activated, and increased IRP2 levels, indicative of relative cytosolic iron depletion, were observed together with mitochondrial iron overload. Rescue of patient fibroblasts with the WT GLRX5 gene by transfection or viral transduction reversed a slow growth phenotype, reversed the mitochondrial iron overload, and increased aconitase activity. Decreased aminolevulinate δ, synthase 2 (ALAS2) levels attributable to IRP-mediated translational repression were observed in erythroid cells in which GLRX5 expression had been downregulated using siRNA along with marked reduction in ferrochelatase levels and increased ferroportin expression. Erythroblasts express both IRP-repressible ALAS2 and non-IRP–repressible ferroportin 1b. The unique combination of IRP targets likely accounts for the tissue-specific phenotype of human GLRX5 deficiency. PMID:20364084

  19. Distinguishing anemia and iron deficiency of heart failure: signal for severity of disease or unmet therapeutic need?

    PubMed

    Beavers, Craig J; Alburikan, Khalid A; Rodgers, Jo E; Dunn, Steven P; Reed, Brent N

    2014-07-01

    Despite advances in the management of heart failure (HF), quality of life and other outcomes remain suboptimal for many patients. Anemia and iron deficiency are comorbidities associated with adverse outcomes, although their pathophysiology in the setting of HF is not entirely understood. Anemia and iron deficiency may exist independently and may be a consequence of the systemic inflammatory state characterized by chronic HF. However, it is unclear whether serum hemoglobin concentrations and other hematologic parameters serve as markers for the severity of disease or represent novel therapeutic targets. Research in this area has focused primarily on therapies known to be effective for these conditions in other chronic disease states with similar pathophysiologic features (e.g., end-stage renal disease). Despite its many practical advantages, minimal evidence exists to support the use of oral iron supplementation in this setting. In contrast, intravenous iron has been the subject of several recent investigations, demonstrating improvements in both surrogate and clinical end points, although benefits seem to be the most substantial in patients with concomitant anemia. Erythropoietin-stimulating agents demonstrated early promise in retrospective analyses and small prospective trials, but their benefit was outweighed by a lack of improvement in clinical outcomes and an excess number of thromboembolic events in the largest trial of patients with anemia and HF to date. For acute symptomatic anemia, blood transfusion may be considered, although few trials have included patients with HF, and caution must be exerted in those who are hemodynamically unstable. Based on the currently available evidence, treatment of iron deficiency appears to confer benefit in patients with HF, whereas strategies aimed at improving hemoglobin alone do not. Included is a review of the pathophysiology of these conditions in the setting of HF, clinical trials evaluating pharmacologic therapy, and

  20. The role of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients with gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Koduru, Pramoda; Abraham, Bincy P.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common form of nutritional anemia worldwide. Iron plays a pivotal role in vital functioning of almost every organ system. IDA affects both physical and psychological functioning of humans. Oral iron is considered as first-line therapy for the treatment of IDA due to low cost, good safety profile and ease of administration. However, the absorption of oral iron is affected by several factors and incidence of gastrointestinal side effects can lead to lack of adherence to therapy as well as poor efficacy. This has led to the emergence of intravenous iron therapy which is clearly superior to oral iron with higher increment of hemoglobin levels and rapid replenishment of iron stores. Ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) is a novel non-dextran intravenous iron form which has been approved for use in patients with iron deficiency who have had inadequate response to oral iron therapy, intolerance to oral iron, or nondialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease. The safety and efficacy of using FCM for the treatment of IDA has been demonstrated in several clinical trials. One dose can provide a large amount of iron and has a very short infusion time. It should be considered as first-line therapy in patients with active inflammation like inflammatory bowel disease when gastrointestinal absorption of oral iron may be compromised. It should also be given to patients who have inadequate response to oral iron therapy. It has been shown to be noninferior to other intravenous iron formulations with a good safety profile and produced fewer anaphylactic reactions. PMID:26770269

  1. Role of autoimmune gastritis, Helicobacter pylori and celiac disease in refractory or unexplained iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Hershko, Chaim; Hoffbrand, A Victor; Keret, Dan; Souroujon, Moshe; Maschler, Itzhak; Monselise, Yehudit; Lahad, Amnon

    2005-05-01

    Conventional endoscopic and radiographic methods fail to identify a probable source of gastrointestinal blood loss in about one third of males and post-menopausal females and in most women of reproductive age with iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Such patients, as well as subjects refractory to oral iron treatment, are often referred for hematologic evaluation. Patient clinic, screened for non-bleeding gastrointestinal conditions including celiac disease (antiendomysial antibodies), autoimmune atrophic gastritis (hypergastrinemia with strongly positive antiparietal cell antibodies) and H. pylori infection (IgG antibodies confirmed by urease breath test). The mean age of all subjects was 39+/-18 years, and 119 of 150 were females. We identified 8 new cases of adult celiac disease (5%). Forty IDA patients (27%) had autoimmune atrophic gastritis of whom 22 had low serum vitamin B12 levels. H. pylori infection was the only finding in 29 patients (19%), but was a common co-existing finding in 77 (51%) of the entire group. Refractoriness to oral iron treatment was found in 100% of patients with celiac disease, 71% with autoimmune atrophic gastritis, 68% with H. pylori infection, but only 11% of subjects with no detected underlying abnormality. H. pylori eradication in previously refractory IDA patients in combination with continued oral iron therapy resulted in a significant increase in hemoglobin from 9.4+/-1.5 (mean +/- 1SD) before, to 13.5+/-1.2 g/ dL (p<0.001 by paired t test) within 3 to 6 months. The recognition that autoimmune atrophic gastritis and H. pylori infection may have a significant role in the development of unexplained or refractory IDA in a high proportion of patients should have a strong impact on our daily practice of diagnosing and managing IDA.

  2. Implications of iron deficiency/anemia on the classification of diabetes using HbA1c

    PubMed Central

    Attard, S M; Herring, A H; Wang, H; Howard, A-G; Thompson, A L; Adair, L S; Mayer-Davis, E J; Gordon-Larsen, P

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Nonglycemic factors like iron deficiency (ID) or anemia may interfere with classification of diabetes and prediabetes using hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). However, few population-based studies of diabetes in areas with endemic ID/anemia have been conducted. We aimed to determine how mutually exclusive categories of ID alone, anemia alone and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) were each associated with prediabetes and diabetes prevalence using fasting blood glucose (FBG) versus HbA1c in a population-based study of adults with endemic ID/anemia. Subjects/Methods: We used data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey, a longitudinal, population-based study across 228 communities within nine provinces of China. This analysis included 7308 adults seen in the 2009 survey aged 18–75 years. We used descriptive and covariate-adjusted models to examine relative risk of prediabetes and diabetes using FBG alone, HbA1c alone, HbA1c and FBG, or neither (normoglycemia) by anemia alone, ID alone, IDA or normal iron/hemoglobin. Results: Approximately 65% of individuals with diabetes in our sample were concordantly classified with diabetes using both FBG and HbA1c, while 35% had a discordant diabetes classification: they were classified using either FBG or HbA1c, but not both. Fewer participants with ID alone versus normal iron/hemoglobin were classified with diabetes using HbA1c only. From covariate-adjusted, multinomial regression analyses, the adjusted prevalence of prediabetes using HbA1c only was 22% for men with anemia alone, but 13% for men with normal iron/hemoglobin. In contrast, the predicted prevalence of prediabetes using HbA1c only was 8% for women with ID alone, compared with 13% for women with normal iron/hemoglobin. Conclusions: These findings suggest potential misclassification of diabetes using HbA1c in areas of endemic ID/anemia. Estimating diabetes prevalence using HbA1c may result in under-diagnosis in women with ID and over-diagnosis in men with

  3. Burden of Iron Deficiency Anemia in a Bariatric Surgery Population in the United States.

    PubMed

    Knight, Tyler; D'Sylva, Lynell; Moore, Brad; Barish, Charles F

    2015-10-01

    Obesity is a serious condition affecting more than 35% of adults in the United States. In obese individuals for whom other weight control methods have been ineffective, bariatric surgery is a safe and effective method of weight control. An estimated 150,000 to 160,000 bariatric surgeries are performed in the United States yearly. Iron deficiency anemia is common in patients after bariatric surgery, with incidence rates up to 49%, and may be due to malabsorption of nutrients.  To (a) compare the medical resource utilization (MRU)- both medical care and treatment resources-and associated costs in a sample of commercially insured adult bariatric surgery patients with and without iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and (b) describe anti-anemia treatment patterns in those bariatric surgery patients diagnosed with IDA. Using Truven Health MarketScan claims data, bariatric surgery patients were identified by the ICD-9-CM and CPT procedure codes for bariatric surgery and classified by surgery and IDA diagnosis within 2 years of initial surgery. Intravenous (IV) iron treatment was determined by HCPCS codes, prescription oral iron by NDC numbers, and blood transfusions by CPT and ICD-9-CM codes. Clinical, MRU, and economic outcomes for all-cause health services were compared between IDA and non-IDA patients. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using logistic regression, controlling for demographic and clinical characteristics on outcomes of complications and hospitalization. Of the 24,344 bariatric surgery patients analyzed, 11.6% received an IDA diagnosis 2 years after surgery (average days to diagnosis = 279). Most IDA patients (78.5%) received a test for iron in the post-index period; only 9.1% received IV iron treatment, with iron dextran (3.8%) and iron sucrose (3.4%) being the most common (average days to IV iron treatment = 403 days). Prescription oral iron was found in 4.9% of all IDA patients (average days to oral iron treatment

  4. Effect of Severe Maternal Iron Deficiency Anemia on Neonatal Platelet Indices.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sriparna; Kumar, Naveen; Srivastava, Ragini; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of maternal iron deficiency anemia (IDA) on fetal thrombopoiesis. In this prospective observational study, maternal and cord blood iron status parameters (serum iron, serum ferritin, total iron-binding capacity, and transferrin saturation), and platelet indices, such as, absolute platelet count (APC), mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW) and plateletcrit, were estimated in a convenient sample of 142 mothers with IDA (hemoglobin <11 g/dl and serum ferritin <12 ng/ml) and an equal number of healthy non-anemic (hemoglobin ≥11 g/dl) mothers, who delivered singleton live neonates at term gestation. Mothers with antenatal thrombocytopenia, infections, inflammatory conditions, pregnancy-induced hypertension and neonates with perinatal asphyxia, sepsis and congenital malformations were excluded. For statistical analysis, the IDA group was further subdivided into mild-to-moderate (hemoglobin 7-10.9 g/dl) and severe (hemoglobin <7 g/dl) anemia. Cord blood APC and PDW were comparable between non-anemic and mild-to-moderate anemic mothers (242,550 ± 54,320/μL vs. 235,260 ± 34,620/μL for APC and 16.2 ± 1.4 vs. 16.4 ± 1.8 fl for PDW, respectively), but in severe IDA group, cord blood APC and PDW were significantly lower (74,520 ± 12,380/μL and 17.8 ± 2.1 fl, respectively, p < 0.001). MPV and plateletcrit were comparable. None of the study neonates had a platelet count <30,000/μL or showed any evidence of clinical bleeding. Neonates born to mothers with severe IDA had moderate thrombocytopenia with increased PDW, though no change was observed in MPV and plateletcrit. Further studies should be carried out to identify the cause and consequences of this observation.

  5. [Prevalence and determinants of anemia in young children in French-speaking Africa. Role of iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    Diouf, S; Folquet, M; Mbofung, K; Ndiaye, O; Brou, K; Dupont, C; N'dri, D; Vuillerod, M; Azaïs-Braesco, V; Tetanye, E

    2015-11-01

    Anemia and iron deficiency are major public health issues worldwide and particularly in Africa. Reliable information about their prevalence and associated factors is required to allow for effective actions. In this study, we used data from recent (2006-2012) large population health surveys, carried out in 11 French-speaking African countries (Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Congo Brazzaville, Ivory Coast, Gabon, Guinea, Mali, Niger, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Senegal). Hemoglobin (Hb) was assessed and demographic and health-related parameters were obtained from nation-representative samples of children aged 6-59 months. Anemia (Hb<11g/dL) was found in 72.4% of the children (60.2-87.8%), with no gender difference but a slightly lower incidence in older children (62% at age 4-5 years versus 85% at age 9 months), especially for the more severe forms (2.1% versus 8.7%, respectively). Anemia was only slightly but significantly affected by location (75.5% in rural areas versus 67.3% in towns), income (79.8% in lower quintile of income versus 62.3% in higher quintile), or maternal education (74.1% in children from non-educated mothers versus 62.4% in children whose mothers had secondary education). Nearly 50% of women of child-bearing age had anemia. In the countries that report this information, less than 50% (17-65%) of children consumed iron-rich foods regularly and only 12% (7.4-20.5%) received iron supplementation. Infection and parasitism are known to affect some markers of iron status, because of the inflammatory reaction, thereby making the diagnosis of iron deficiency difficult. In the study countries, acute respiratory diseases and diarrhea affected 6.2 and 15.6% of children aged between 6 and 59 months, respectively; their distribution according to age and location is very different from the one of anemia, which is also the case for the distribution of malaria. It is thus likely that a large part of the anemia observed in young children is due to iron

  6. The Study of HFE Genotypes and Its Expression Effect on Iron Status of Iranian Haemochromatosis, Iron Deficiency Anemia Patients, Iron-Taker and Non Iron-Taker Controls.

    PubMed

    Beiranvand, Elham; Abediankenari, Saeid; Rostamian, Mosayeb; Beiranvand, Behnoush; Naazeri, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    The role of HFE gene mutations or its expression in regulation of iron metabolism of hereditary haemochromatosis (HH) patients is remained controversial. Therefore here the correlation between two common HFE genotype (p.C282Y, p.H63D) and HFE gene expression with iron status in HH, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and healthy Iranian participants was studied. For this purpose genotype determination was done by polymerase chain reaction--restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Real-Time PCR was applied for evaluation of HFE gene expression. Biochemical parameters and iron consumption were also assessed. Homozygote p.H63D mutation was seen in all HH patients and p.C282Y was not observed in any member of the population. A significant correlation was observed between serum ferritin (SF) level and gender or age of HH patients. p.H63D homozygote was seen to be able to significantly increase SF and transferrin saturation (TS) level without affecting on liver function. Our results also showed that iron consumption affects on TS level increasing. HFE gene expression level of IDA patients was significantly higher than other groups. Also the HFE gene expression was negatively correlated with TS. Finally, the main result of our study showed that loss of HFE function in HH is not derived from its gene expression inhibition and much higher HFE gene expression might lead to IDA. However we propose repeating of the study for more approval of our finding.

  7. Outcome of endoscopy-negative iron deficiency anemia in patients above 65: A longitudinal multicenter cohort.

    PubMed

    Clere-Jehl, Raphaël; Sauleau, Erik; Ciuca, Stefan; Schaeffer, Mickael; Lopes, Amanda; Goichot, Bernard; Vogel, Thomas; Kaltenbach, Georges; Bouvard, Eric; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Sereni, Daniel; Andres, Emmanuel; Bourgarit, Anne

    2016-11-01

    After the age of 65 years, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) requires the elimination of digestive neoplasia and is explored with upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. However, such explorations are negative in 14% to 37% of patients. To further evaluate this issue, we evaluated the outcomes of patients aged over 65 years with endoscopy-negative IDA.We retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of in-patients over the age of 65 years with IDA (hemoglobin <12 g/dL and ferritin <70 μg/L) who had negative complete upper and lower GI endoscopies in 7 tertiary medical hospitals. Death, the persistence of anemia, further investigations, and the final diagnosis for IDA were analyzed after at least 12 months by calling the patients' general practitioners and using hospital records.Between 2004 and 2011, 69 patients (74% women) with a median age of 78 (interquartile range (IQR) 75-82) years and hemoglobin and ferritin levels of 8.4 (IQR 6.8-9.9) g/dL and 14 (IQR 8-27) μg/L, respectively, had endoscopy-negative IDA, and 73% of these patients received daily antithrombotics. After a follow-up of 41 ± 22 months, 23 (33%) of the patients were dead; 5 deaths were linked with the IDA, and 45 (65%) patients had persistent anemia, which was significantly associated with death (P = 0.007). Further investigations were performed in 45 patients; 64% of the second-look GI endoscopies led to significant changes in treatment compared with 25% for the capsule endoscopies. Conventional diagnoses of IDA were ultimately established for 19 (27%) patients and included 3 cancer patients. Among the 50 other patients, 40 (58%) had antithrombotics.In endoscopy-negative IDA over the age of 65 years, further investigations should be reserved for patients with persistent anemia, and second-look GI endoscopy should be favored. If the results of these investigations are negative, the role of antithrombotics should be considered.

  8. Outcome of endoscopy-negative iron deficiency anemia in patients above 65

    PubMed Central

    Clere-Jehl, Raphaël; Sauleau, Erik; Ciuca, Stefan; Schaeffer, Mickael; Lopes, Amanda; Goichot, Bernard; Vogel, Thomas; Kaltenbach, Georges; Bouvard, Eric; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Sereni, Daniel; Andres, Emmanuel; Bourgarit, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract After the age of 65 years, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) requires the elimination of digestive neoplasia and is explored with upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. However, such explorations are negative in 14% to 37% of patients. To further evaluate this issue, we evaluated the outcomes of patients aged over 65 years with endoscopy-negative IDA. We retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of in-patients over the age of 65 years with IDA (hemoglobin <12 g/dL and ferritin <70 μg/L) who had negative complete upper and lower GI endoscopies in 7 tertiary medical hospitals. Death, the persistence of anemia, further investigations, and the final diagnosis for IDA were analyzed after at least 12 months by calling the patients’ general practitioners and using hospital records. Between 2004 and 2011, 69 patients (74% women) with a median age of 78 (interquartile range (IQR) 75–82) years and hemoglobin and ferritin levels of 8.4 (IQR 6.8–9.9) g/dL and 14 (IQR 8–27) μg/L, respectively, had endoscopy-negative IDA, and 73% of these patients received daily antithrombotics. After a follow-up of 41 ± 22 months, 23 (33%) of the patients were dead; 5 deaths were linked with the IDA, and 45 (65%) patients had persistent anemia, which was significantly associated with death (P = 0.007). Further investigations were performed in 45 patients; 64% of the second-look GI endoscopies led to significant changes in treatment compared with 25% for the capsule endoscopies. Conventional diagnoses of IDA were ultimately established for 19 (27%) patients and included 3 cancer patients. Among the 50 other patients, 40 (58%) had antithrombotics. In endoscopy-negative IDA over the age of 65 years, further investigations should be reserved for patients with persistent anemia, and second-look GI endoscopy should be favored. If the results of these investigations are negative, the role of antithrombotics should be considered. PMID:27893668

  9. A micronutrient-fortified beverage prevents iron deficiency, reduces anemia and improves the hemoglobin concentration of pregnant Tanzanian women.

    PubMed

    Makola, Diklar; Ash, Deborah M; Tatala, Simon R; Latham, Michael C; Ndossi, Godwin; Mehansho, Haile

    2003-05-01

    Maternal malnutrition continues to be a major contributor to adverse reproductive outcomes in developing countries, despite longstanding efforts to fortify foods or to distribute medicinal supplements to pregnant women. The objective of this study was to test the effect of a micronutrient-fortified beverage containing 11 micronutrients (iron, iodine, zinc, vitamin A, vitamin C, niacin, riboflavin, folate, vitamin B-12, vitamin B-6 and vitamin E) on the hemoglobin, iron and vitamin A status of pregnant women in Tanzania. A group of 259 pregnant women with gestational ages of 8 to 34 wk were enrolled in a randomized double-blind controlled trial in which study women received 8 wk of supplementation. Hemoglobin, ferritin and dried blood spot retinol were measured at baseline and at the end of the supplementation period. The supplement resulted in a 4.16 g/L increase in hemoglobin concentration and a 3 micro g/L increase in ferritin and reduced the risk of anemia and iron deficiency anemia by 51 and 56%, respectively. The risk of iron deficiency was reduced by 70% among those who had iron deficiency at baseline and by 92% among those who had adequate stores. The micronutrient-fortified beverage may be a useful and convenient preventative measure, one that could help improve the nutritional status of women both before and during pregnancy and thereby help avoid some of the potential maternal and fetal consequences of micronutrient deficiencies.

  10. Endoscopic investigation in non-iron deficiency anemia: a cost to the health system without patient benefit.

    PubMed

    Mogilevski, Tamara; Smith, Rebecca; Johnson, Douglas; Charles, Patrick G P; Churilov, Leonid; Vaughan, Rhys; Ma, Ronald; Testro, Adam

    2016-02-01

    The indication for endoscopy to investigate anemia of causes other than iron deficiency is not clear. Increasing numbers of endoscopic procedures for anemia raises concerns about costs to the health system, waiting times, and patient safety. The primary aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic yield of endoscopy in patients referred to undergo investigation for anemia. Secondary aims were to identify additional factors enabling the risk stratification of those likely to benefit from endoscopic investigation, and to undertake a cost analysis of performing endoscopy in this group of patients. We performed a retrospective review of endoscopy referrals for the investigation of anemia over a 12-month period at a single center. The patients were divided into three groups: those who had true iron deficiency anemia (IDA), tissue iron deficiency without anemia (TIDWA), or anemia of other cause (AOC). Outcome measures included finding a lesion responsible for the anemia and a significant change of management as a result of endoscopy. A costing analysis was performed with an activity-based costing method. We identified 283 patients who underwent endoscopy to investigate anemia. A likely cause of anemia was found in 31 of 150 patients with IDA (21 %) and 0 patients in the other categories (P < 0.001). A change of management was observed in 35 patients with IDA (23 %), 1 of 14 patients with TIDWA (7.14 %), and 8 of 119 patients with AOC (6.7 %) (P < 0.001). The cost of a single colonoscopy or gastroscopy was approximated to be $ 2209. Endoscopic investigation for non-IDA comes at a significant cost to our institution, equating to a minimum of $ 293 797 per annum in extra costs, and does not result in a change of management in the majority of patients. No additional factors could be established to identify patients who might be more likely to benefit from endoscopic investigation. The endoscopic investigation of non-IDA should be minimized.

  11. Endoscopic investigation in non-iron deficiency anemia: a cost to the health system without patient benefit

    PubMed Central

    Mogilevski, Tamara; Smith, Rebecca; Johnson, Douglas; Charles, Patrick G. P.; Churilov, Leonid; Vaughan, Rhys; Ma, Ronald; Testro, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: The indication for endoscopy to investigate anemia of causes other than iron deficiency is not clear. Increasing numbers of endoscopic procedures for anemia raises concerns about costs to the health system, waiting times, and patient safety. The primary aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic yield of endoscopy in patients referred to undergo investigation for anemia. Secondary aims were to identify additional factors enabling the risk stratification of those likely to benefit from endoscopic investigation, and to undertake a cost analysis of performing endoscopy in this group of patients. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of endoscopy referrals for the investigation of anemia over a 12-month period at a single center. The patients were divided into three groups: those who had true iron deficiency anemia (IDA), tissue iron deficiency without anemia (TIDWA), or anemia of other cause (AOC). Outcome measures included finding a lesion responsible for the anemia and a significant change of management as a result of endoscopy. A costing analysis was performed with an activity-based costing method. Results: We identified 283 patients who underwent endoscopy to investigate anemia. A likely cause of anemia was found in 31 of 150 patients with IDA (21 %) and 0 patients in the other categories (P < 0.001). A change of management was observed in 35 patients with IDA (23 %), 1 of 14 patients with TIDWA (7.14 %), and 8 of 119 patients with AOC (6.7 %) (P < 0.001). The cost of a single colonoscopy or gastroscopy was approximated to be $ 2209. Conclusions: Endoscopic investigation for non-IDA comes at a significant cost to our institution, equating to a minimum of $ 293 797 per annum in extra costs, and does not result in a change of management in the majority of patients. No additional factors could be established to identify patients who might be more likely to benefit from endoscopic investigation. The endoscopic

  12. The impact of systematic dietary counseling during the first year of life on prevalence rates of anemia and iron deficiency at 12-16 months.

    PubMed

    Bortolini, Gisele Ane; Vitolo, Márcia Regina

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the impact that a program based on maternal dietary counseling covering breastfeeding and healthy complementary feeding had on the prevalence of iron deficiency, anemia and iron deficiency anemia in children aged 12 to 16 months. Newborn infants were randomized at birth to an intervention or a control group. Mothers in the intervention group received home visits during the children's first year of life on a monthly basis up to 6 months, and at 8, 10 and 12 months. The mothers in the control group received visits for data collection when children reached 6 and 12 months. All children were visited at ages between 12 and 16 months and 24-hour dietary recalls and hemoglobin and ferritin tests were conducted. There was no evidence that the intervention had an effect on anemia incidence, which was 66.5% in the intervention group and 61.8% in the control group. There was also no evidence of any difference between the groups in the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia or of iron deficiency. However, a higher percentage of children in the intervention group were exclusively breastfed at 4 and 6 months, and breastfed at 6 and 12 months. Intervention group children also consumed more meat and were fed diets with better iron bioavailability and consumed less cow's milk and calcium than children from the control group. This intervention had no effect on the prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency or iron deficiency anemia. Clinical trial registry identification number: NCT00629629.

  13. Impact of fortification of flours with iron to reduce the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency among schoolchildren in Caracas, Venezuela: a follow-up.

    PubMed

    Layrisse, Miguel; García-Casal, María Nieves; Méndez-Castellano, Hernán; Jiménez, Maritza; Henry, Olavarría; Chávez, José E; González, Eglis

    2002-12-01

    In Venezuela, a severe economic crisis starting in 1983 provoked a progressive reduction in the quantity and quality of food consumed by people from the low socioeconomic strata of the population. This situation resulted in a continuous increase in the prevalence of iron deficiency in the 1980s and 1990s. In 1993, an iron-fortification program was started, in which precooked corn and white wheat flours were enriched with iron, vitamin A, thiamine, niacin, and riboflavin. White wheat flour was enriched with the same nutrients, except for vitamin A. In 1996 we published the results of the impact of fortification of precooked corn and white wheat flours on the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in the population. A survey carried out in Caracas in 307 children aged 7, 11, and 15 years showed that the prevalence of iron deficiency measured by serum ferritin concentration dropped from 37% in 1992 to 16% in 1994, only one year after the iron-fortification program began. The prevalence of anemia, as measured by the hemoglobin concentration, diminished from 19% to 10% during the same period. This article reports the results of three other surveys carried out in 1997, 1998, and 1999 on children of the same age and socioeconomic groups that were evaluated in 1990, 1992, and 1994. There were no significant differences in anemia or iron deficiency among the last three surveys. The prevalence results from the last seven years seem to indicate that, after a dramatic reduction in 1994, iron deficiency tended to stabilize, while the prevalence of anemia increased to the same level found in 1992, before the fortification program started.

  14. High-Iron Consumption Impairs Growth and Causes Copper-Deficiency Anemia in Weanling Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung-Heun; Doguer, Caglar; Wang, Xiaoyu; Flores, Shireen R.; Collins, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Iron-copper interactions were described decades ago; however, molecular mechanisms linking the two essential minerals remain largely undefined. Investigations in humans and other mammals noted that copper levels increase in the intestinal mucosa, liver and blood during iron deficiency, tissues all important for iron homeostasis. The current study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that dietary copper influences iron homeostasis during iron deficiency and iron overload. We thus fed weanling, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6-11/group) AIN-93G-based diets containing high (~8800 ppm), adequate (~80) or low (~11) iron in combination with high (~183), adequate (~8) or low (~0.9) copper for 5 weeks. Subsequently, the iron- and copper-related phenotype of the rats was assessed. Rats fed the low-iron diets grew slower than controls, with changes in dietary copper not further influencing growth. Unexpectedly, however, high-iron (HFe) feeding also impaired growth. Furthermore, consumption of the HFe diet caused cardiac hypertrophy, anemia, low serum and tissue copper levels and decreased circulating ceruloplasmin activity. Intriguingly, these physiologic perturbations were prevented by adding extra copper to the HFe diet. Furthermore, higher copper levels in the HFe diet increased serum nonheme iron concentration and transferrin saturation, exacerbated hepatic nonheme iron loading and attenuated splenic nonheme iron accumulation. Moreover, serum erythropoietin levels, and splenic erythroferrone and hepatic hepcidin mRNA levels were altered by the dietary treatments in unanticipated ways, providing insight into how iron and copper influence expression of these hormones. We conclude that high-iron feeding of weanling rats causes systemic copper deficiency, and further, that copper influences the iron-overload phenotype. PMID:27537180

  15. Iron deficiency anemia as initial presentation of a non-small cell lung carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Linsen, Philip V.M.; Linsen, Victor M.J.; Buunk, Gerba; Arnold, Dorothee E.; Aerts, Joachim G.J.V.

    2015-01-01

    Duodenal metastases secondary to lung cancer are very rare and most of the time asymptomatic. When symptomatic they usually present with bowel obstruction or perforation. We here describe the case of a 68 year-old man with a solitary metastasis in the duodenum from a non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). The patient presented with reduced exercise tolerance and iron deficiency anemia without clinical gastrointestinal blood loss. Further investigation showed a tumor in the left upper lung lobe and a duodenal metastasis for which he received chemotherapy. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case report of iron deficiency anemia as initial presentation of a duodenal metastasis from a NSCLC. PMID:26744672

  16. Iron Deficiency and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Children With First Attack of Seizure and on Healthy Control Group: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    FALLAH, Razieh; TIRANDAZI, Behnaz; FERDOSIAN, Farzad; FADAVI, Nafiseh

    2014-01-01

    Objective Seizures are the most common pediatric neurologic problem. Research of the association between iron deficiency and seizures has shown conflicting results. This study evaluates iron status of children with a first seizure attack (febrile seizure (FS) or first unprovoked afebrile seizure (FUS) and healthy control group. Materials & Methods In a cross sectional case control study, iron status of 6–60 month year old admitted children with first seizure to Shahid Sadoughi Hospital from August 2011–December 2012 were evaluated and compared with healthy control children that were referred to primary health care center of Azadshar, Yazd, Iran. Results 150 children were compared in three equal (FS, afebrile seizure, and control) groups. Hemoglobin levels in FUS (11.39 ± 1.07 g/dl) and FS (11.46 ± 1.18 g/dl) were lower than the control group (11.9 ± 0.89 g/dl) group. Serum iron levels in FS (38.52 ± 11.38 μg/dL) and FUS (42.68 ± 14.76 μg/dL) were lower than the control group (54.32 ± 13.46 μg/dL). Serum ferritin level in FUS (46.21 ± 27.63 ng/mL) and FS (48.91 ± 22.96 ng/ mL) was lower than the control group (75.13 ± 35.57 ng/mL). Iron deficiency (48% in FS, 44% in FUS and 28% in control group) and iron deficiency anemia (26% in FUS, 22% in FS, and 10% in healthy children) was more frequent in children with seizures. Conclusion Iron status should be evaluated in children with a first attack of febrile or afebrile seizures. PMID:25143769

  17. Association between Ischemic Stroke and Iron-Deficiency Anemia: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yen-Liang; Hung, Shih-Han; Ling, Wells; Lin, Herng-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Background Very little is known about the relationship between non-sickle cell anemia and stroke. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) with stroke based on a nationwide coverage database in Taiwan. Methods The case-control study subjects were obtained from the Taiwanese Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. We included 51,093 subjects with stroke as cases and randomly selected 153,279 controls (3 controls per case) in this study.Separate conditional logistic regression analyses were used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) for having been previously diagnosed with IDA between cases and controls.We further analyzed the association between stroke and IDA by stroke subtype. Results Results showed that 3,685 study subjects (1.81%) had been diagnosed with IDA prior to the index date; of those subjects, 1,268 (2.48%) were cases and 2,417 (1.58%) were controls (p<0.001). Conditional logistic regression shows that the OR of having previously received an IDA diagnosis among cases was 1.49 (95% CI: 1.39~1.60; p < 0.01) that of controls after adjusting for monthly income, geographic region, hypertension, diabetes, coronary heart disease, atrial fibrillation, heart failure, hyperlipidemia, tobacco use disorder, and alcohol abuse/alcohol dependency syndrome. Furthermore, the adjusted OR of prior IDA for cases with ischemic stroke was found to be 1.45 (95% CI: 1.34~1.58) compared to controls. However, we did not find any significant relationship between IDA and subarachnoid/intracerebral hemorrhage even adjusting for other confounding factors (OR=1.17, 95% CI=0.97~1.40). Conclusion There is a significant association between prior IDA and ischemic stroke. PMID:24349404

  18. Micronutrient supplementation adherence and influence on the prevalences of anemia and iron, zinc and vitamin A deficiencies in preemies with a corrected age of six months

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Brunnella Alcantara Chagas; Lima, Luciana Moreira; Moreira, Maria Elisabeth Lopes; Priore, Silvia Eloiza; Henriques, Bruno David; Carlos, Carla Fernanda Lisboa Valente; Sabino, Jusceli Souza Nogueira; do Carmo Castro Franceschini, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze adherence to the recommended iron, zinc and multivitamin supplementation guidelines for preemies, the factors associated with this adherence, and the influence of adherence on the occurrence of anemia and iron, zinc and vitamin A deficiencies. METHODS: This prospective cohort study followed 58 preemies born in 2014 until they reached six months corrected age. The preemies were followed at a referral secondary health service and represented 63.7% of the preterm infants born that year. Outcomes of interest included high or low adherence to iron, zinc and multivitamin supplementation guidelines; prevalence of anemia; and prevalences of iron, zinc, and vitamin A deficiencies. The prevalence ratios were calculated by Poisson regression. RESULTS: Thirty-eight (65.5%) preemies presented high adherence to micronutrient supplementation guidelines. At six months of corrected age, no preemie had vitamin A deficiency. The prevalences of anemia, iron deficiency and zinc deficiency were higher in the low-adherence group but also concerning in the high-adherence group. Preemies with low adherence to micronutrient supplementation guidelines were 2.5 times more likely to develop anemia and 3.1 times more likely to develop zinc deficiency. Low maternal education level increased the likelihood of nonadherence to all three supplements by 2.2 times. CONCLUSIONS: Low maternal education level was independently associated with low adherence to iron, zinc and vitamin A supplementation guidelines in preemies, which impacted the prevalences of anemia and iron and zinc deficiencies at six months of corrected age. PMID:27626474

  19. Copper Deficiency Leads to Anemia, Duodenal Hypoxia, Upregulation of HIF-2α and Altered Expression of Iron Absorption Genes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Matak, Pavle; Zumerle, Sara; Mastrogiannaki, Maria; El Balkhi, Souleiman; Delga, Stephanie; Mathieu, Jacques R. R.; Canonne-Hergaux, François; Poupon, Joel; Sharp, Paul A.; Vaulont, Sophie; Peyssonnaux, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron and copper are essential trace metals, actively absorbed from the proximal gut in a regulated fashion. Depletion of either metal can lead to anemia. In the gut, copper deficiency can affect iron absorption through modulating the activity of hephaestin - a multi-copper oxidase required for optimal iron export from enterocytes. How systemic copper status regulates iron absorption is unknown. Mice were subjected to a nutritional copper deficiency-induced anemia regime from birth and injected with copper sulphate intraperitoneally to correct the anemia. Copper deficiency resulted in anemia, increased duodenal hypoxia and Hypoxia inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α) levels, a regulator of iron absorption. HIF-2α upregulation in copper deficiency appeared to be independent of duodenal iron or copper levels and correlated with the expression of iron transporters (Ferroportin - Fpn, Divalent Metal transporter – Dmt1) and ferric reductase – Dcytb. Alleviation of copper-dependent anemia with intraperitoneal copper injection resulted in down regulation of HIF-2α-regulated iron absorption genes in the gut. Our work identifies HIF-2α as an important regulator of iron transport machinery in copper deficiency. PMID:23555700

  20. Prevalence and Relationships of Iron Deficiency Anemia with Blood Cadmium and Vitamin D Levels in Korean Women.

    PubMed

    Suh, Young Ju; Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Dae Hyung; Yi, Hyeon Gyu; Lee, Moon Hee; Kim, Chul Soo; Nah, Jeung Weon; Kim, Soon Ki

    2016-01-01

    Anemia, iron deficiency (ID), and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are common disorders. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of anemia, ID, and IDA in Korean females. We examined the associations between IDA, heavy metals in blood, vitamin D level and nutritional intakes. The study was performed using on data collected from 10,169 women (aged ≥ 10 yr), including 1,232 with anemia, 2,030 with ID, and 690 with IDA during the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V; 2010-2012). Prevalence and 95% confidence intervals were calculated, and path analysis was performed to identify a multivariate regression model incorporating IDA, heavy metals in blood, vitamin D level, and nutritional intakes. The overall prevalence of anemia, ID and IDA was 12.4%, 23.11%, and 7.7%, respectively. ID and IDA were more prevalent among adolescents (aged 15-18 yr; 36.5% for ID; 10.7% for IDA) and women aged 19-49 yr (32.7% for ID; 11.3% for IDA). The proposed path model showed that IDA was associated with an elevated cadmium level after adjusting for age and body mass index (β=0.46, P<0.001). Vitamin D levels were found to affect IDA negatively (β=-0.002, P<0.001). This study shows that the prevalence of anemia, ID, and IDA are relatively high in late adolescents and women of reproductive age. Path analysis showed that depressed vitamin D levels increase the risk of IDA, and that IDA increases cadmium concentrations in blood. Our findings indicate that systematic health surveillance systems including educational campaigns and well-balanced nutrition are needed to control anemia, ID, and IDA.

  1. Prevalence and Relationships of Iron Deficiency Anemia with Blood Cadmium and Vitamin D Levels in Korean Women

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Anemia, iron deficiency (ID), and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are common disorders. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of anemia, ID, and IDA in Korean females. We examined the associations between IDA, heavy metals in blood, vitamin D level and nutritional intakes. The study was performed using on data collected from 10,169 women (aged ≥10 yr), including 1,232 with anemia, 2,030 with ID, and 690 with IDA during the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES V; 2010-2012). Prevalence and 95% confidence intervals were calculated, and path analysis was performed to identify a multivariate regression model incorporating IDA, heavy metals in blood, vitamin D level, and nutritional intakes. The overall prevalence of anemia, ID and IDA was 12.4%, 23.11%, and 7.7%, respectively. ID and IDA were more prevalent among adolescents (aged 15-18 yr; 36.5% for ID; 10.7% for IDA) and women aged 19-49 yr (32.7% for ID; 11.3% for IDA). The proposed path model showed that IDA was associated with an elevated cadmium level after adjusting for age and body mass index (β=0.46, P<0.001). Vitamin D levels were found to affect IDA negatively (β=-0.002, P<0.001). This study shows that the prevalence of anemia, ID, and IDA are relatively high in late adolescents and women of reproductive age. Path analysis showed that depressed vitamin D levels increase the risk of IDA, and that IDA increases cadmium concentrations in blood. Our findings indicate that systematic health surveillance systems including educational campaigns and well-balanced nutrition are needed to control anemia, ID, and IDA. PMID:26770034

  2. [Fortification of fluid milk for the prevention and treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children under 4 years of age].

    PubMed

    Torres, M A; Lobo, N F; Sato, K; Queiroz, S de S

    1996-08-01

    The effectiveness of the use of chelate amino acid iron fortified fluid milk in the treatment of iron deficiency in children under four years of age was studied. The 269 children included in this trial received 1 liter/day of fluid milk fortified with 3 mg of chelate amino acid iron and were evaluated at six monthly intervals. At the beginning of the study 62.3% of the children presented anemia. After 6 months, this percentage had decreased to 41.8% and at the end of one year to 26.4%. The greatest decreases occurred in the groups comprising the subjects who were of 12 to 23 months of age and those under one year of age. Among the children who presented initial hemoglobin levels under 9.5 g/dl, 59.3% were free of anemia after one year of follow-up. Of those presenting initial hemoglobin levels between 9.5 and 10.9 g/dl, 66.7% recovered from their anemia. There was also greater hematological improvement in the children that ingested over 750 ml/day of fortified milk in those families that did not share the supply of supplement among their other members and in those families that had only one child under five years of age. These findings led to the conclusion that the fortification of fluid milk is a viable and effective method for the treatment of iron deficiency in pre-school children.

  3. Gastrointestinal symptoms are closely associated with depression in iron deficiency anemia: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Pamuk, Gulsum Emel; Uyanik, Mehmet Sevki; Top, Mehmet Serif; Tapan, Umit; Ak, Recep; Uyanik, Vesile

    2015-01-01

    Until now, very few studies evaluated the association between gastrointestinal and psychiatric symptoms in iron deficiency anemia (IDA). The study investigated the frequency of functional dyspepsia (FD) in IDA patients and determined its association with depression and somatization. The study was conducted at the Hematology Department of Trakya University Medical Faculty, which is a tertiary referral center in northwestern Turkey. It was a case-control study. A total of 125 consecutive IDA patients and 57 healthy control subjects were included. Patients and controls were questioned about the severity of their gastrointestinal system (GIS)-related symptoms and the presence of constipation and associated symptoms using a visual analog scale. In addition, IDA patients were administered a validated depression scale (Beck Depression Inventory, BDI) and somatization symptoms checklist. IDA patients had more frequent self-reported constipation compared with controls (56% vs 22.8%, P < .001). The mean scores of bloating, dyspepsia, and constipation-related quality of life (QoL) disturbance were significantly higher in the IDA group than in the control group (all P values.

  4. A Rare Case of Stroke Secondary to Iron Deficiency Anemia in a Young Female Patient

    PubMed Central

    Gopalratnam, Kavitha; Sena, Kanaga; Gupta, Manisha

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic strokes occur when there is a sudden obstruction of an artery supplying blood flow to an area of the brain, leading to a focal neurological deficit. Strokes can be thrombotic or embolic in etiology and are associated with underlying conditions such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. Possible etiologies of strokes include cardioembolic disease, hematologic disorders, connective tissue disorders, and substance abuse or can be cryptogenic. Most stroke cases are seen in patients over 65 years of age. However, about one-fourth of strokes occur in young adults. Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) has been described as a known cause for strokes in children, but very few case reports describe this association in adults. We describe a 20-year-old female who presented with sudden onset left side weakness. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain demonstrated ischemic infarctions. Patient was also found to be severely anemic. Patient had a thorough work-up including Magnetic Resonance Angiography (MRA) of the brain, echocardiogram, and an extensive screen for thrombophilia disorders. This, however, did not demonstrate a clear etiology. As it has been suggested that IDA is a potential cause for stroke, it is possible the stroke in this young patient was attributable to severe IDA. PMID:28348599

  5. Is iron-deficiency anemia associated with migraine? Is there a role for anxiety and depression?

    PubMed

    Pamuk, Gülsüm Emel; Top, Mehmet Şerif; Uyanık, Mehmet Şevki; Köker, Hilal; Akker, Mustafa; Ak, Recep; Yürekli, Ömer Atalay; Çelik, Yahya

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we determined the frequency of migraine headache in iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) patients and whether it was related to anxiety, depression, and somatization. We included 127 consecutive IDA patients into the study. All patients were asked validated questions about headache and migraine face-to-face. They were administered validated questionnaires for anxiety-depression The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and somatization. The quality of life (QoL) disturbance associated with headache was marked on a 0-10 VAS. Of all IDA patients, 79.5 % defined headache at any time of their life. In addition, 36.2 % of all IDA patients defined the criteria for migraine. IDA patients with migraine were more frequently smokers and had significantly lower hemoglobin and mean corpuscular volume values (p values < 0.05). The IDA group with migraine had significantly higher mean anxiety score (p = 0.046) and headache-related QoL disturbance score (p = 0.021) than the IDA group without migraine. Migraine patients with aura had lower hemoglobin values (p = 0.02), higher depression scores (p = 0.005), and higher migraine-related QoL disturbance scores than others. IDA patients have a high frequency of migraine headache. The presence of anxiety and depression have great influence on the presence of migraine in IDA patients.

  6. [IRON-DEFICIENCY ANEMIA AS A FACTOR OF DEVELOPMENT OF ASTHENIA SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Muldaeva, G; Rukaber, N; Arystan, L; Haydargalieva, L; Kenzhetaeva, Z

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the frequency and degree of severity of asthenic syndrome (AS) and estimation of physical health of women with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) and without it. 30 women were inspected with the set diagnosis of IDA and 20 nearly were healthy. All participants were assessed according objective status. AS was determined by the scale of estimation of asthenia - Scale Asthenic Conditions (SAC) of LD Malkova, the scale of subjective evaluation of asthenia (MFI-20). Level of somatic health was appraised by methodology of LG Apanasenko. As a result of research it was found that in 100% of women with IDA , which more often occurs with expressed hypoxic syndrome, that aggravates a process of AS. The severity of AS directly depends on the degree of IDA. The presence of IDA contributes to decreased physical activity of patients because of progressive weakness and fatigue. The level of physical health is rated as "low" due to low reserve capacity of the cardiorespiratory system and power qualities. In the control group, incidence of AS is significantly lower (40-55%) and the degree of severity in most cases is weak and moderate. The obtained data allow to make the conclusion that the medicines for correction of AS must be necessarily included in therapy of IDA.

  7. Comparison of discriminative indices for iron deficiency anemia and β thalassemia trait in a Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Matos, Januária Fonseca; Dusse, Luci Maria Sant'Ana; Stubbert, Rachel Versiani Bressane; Ferreira, Mônica Ribeiro; Coura-Vital, Wendel; Fernandes, Ana Paula Salles Moura; de Faria, José Roberto; Borges, Karina Braga Gomes; Carvalho, Maria das Graças

    2013-05-01

    To discriminate iron deficiency anemia (IDA) from β thalassemia trait (βTT), several indices obtained from modern blood count analyzers have been reported. Discrimination power of seven indices to differentiate between IDA and βTT, such as Green and King Index (GKI), RDW Index (RDWI), Srivastava Index (SRI), Mentzer Index (MI), Shine and Lal Index (SLI), Ehsani Index (EI), and Sirdah Index (SI), were evaluated. These indices were applied on 47 patients with βTT and on 289 patients with IDA, as confirmed by gold standard tests. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, efficiency, area under receiver-operating characteristics curve (AUC), and Youden's Index (YI) were calculated. GKI and RDWI showed the highest reliability, as they had the largest AUCs (0.919, 0.912, respectively) and Youden's Index (70.4, 74.6, respectively). Conversely, SLI presented a less satisfactory performance (AUC = 0.786 and YI = 6.6). Data taken together suggest the superiority of GKI and RDWI to discriminate between IDA and βTT.

  8. Does Helicobacter pylori infection play a role in iron deficiency anemia? A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xin-Hua; Huang, Xiao-Lu; Xiong, Ping; Zhu, Cui-Ying; Huang, You-Liang; Lu, Lun-Gen; Sun, Xu; Rong, Lan; Zhong, Liang; Sun, Da-Yu; Lin, Hai; Cai, Ming-Ci; Chen, Zhi-Wei; Hu, Bing; Wu, Lian-Ming; Jiang, Yi-Bin; Yan, Wei-Li

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To perform a meta-analysis of observational studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA). METHODS: A defined search strategy was used to search Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, Clinical Trials, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Premedline and Healthstar. Odds ratio (OR) was used to evaluate observational epidemiology studies, and weighted mean difference (WMD) was used to demonstrate the difference between control and intervention groups. RESULTS: Fifteen observational studies and 5 RCTs were identified and used for calculation. The pooled OR for observational studies was 2.22 (95% CI: 1.52-3.24, P < 0.0001). The WMD for hemoglobin (HB) was 4.06 g/L (95% CI: -2.57-10.69, P = 0.01), and the WMD for serum ferritin (SF) was 9.47 μg/L (95% CI: -0.50-19.43, P < 0.0001). Results were heterogeneous for all comparisons. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis on observational studies suggests an association between H. pylori and IDA. In RCTs, eradication of H. pylori can improve HB and SF levels but not significantly. PMID:20143469

  9. Combined cobalamin and iron deficiency anemia: a diagnostic approach using a model based on age and homocysteine assessment.

    PubMed

    Remacha, Angel F; Sardà, M P; Canals, C; Queraltò, J M; Zapico, E; Remacha, J; Carrascosa, C

    2013-04-01

    Macrocytosis, the hallmark of cobalamin/folate deficiency anemia, is frequently absent. Clinicians have to be aware of coexisting conditions that can mask the macrocytosis expression of megaloblastic anemia, especially iron deficiency. The objective of this work was to investigate the degree of overlap between iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and cobalamin deficiency and to develop a predictive model for differentiating IDA from combined deficiency. A prospective case and control study was carried out to investigate vitamin B12 and folate status in iron deficiency anemia. A total of 658 patients were recruited, 41 of whom (6.2 %) were excluded. The remaining 617 subjects consisted of 130 controls and 487 with IDA. Low vitamin B12 (LB12) was considered when serum vitamin B12 was ≤200 pmol/L. High serum homocysteine (Hcy) was defined by Hcy >17 μM/L. A multivariate analysis (including a logistic regression) was performed to develop a diagnostic model. Low vitamin B12 levels were found in 17.8 % of IDA subjects. Ten out of 11 subjects (91 %) with IDA and serum vitamin B12 (B12) ≤100 pmol/L showed vitamin B12 deficiency. Moreover, vitamin B12 deficiency was demonstrated in 48 % of cases with IDA and B12 between 101 and 150 pmol/L and in 40 % with IDA and B12 between 151 and 200 pmol/, respectively. As a result of multivariate logistic analysis, neutrophil counts and age predicted subjects with vitamin B12 ≤200 and Hcy >17 μmol/L, [Formula: see text]. Using the age of 60 as a cutoff, sensitivity was 91 % (39 out of the 43 patients with vitamin B12 deficiency and IDA were identified). In summary, low vitamin B12 was found in 18 % of patients with IDA. Vitamin B12 deficiency was demonstrated in many patients with LB12 and IDA. Age over 60 years was used to separate patients with combined deficiency (sensitivity 91 %). Therefore, for a diagnostic purpose, serum vitamin B12 should be evaluated in IDA patients over 60 years. This diagnostic model needs to

  10. Effects of wheat flour fortified with different iron fortificants on iron status and anemia prevalence in iron deficient anemic students in Northern China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Huang, Jian; Li, Wenxian; Wang, Lijuan; Wang, Anxu; Huo, Junsheng; Chen, Junshi; Chen, Chunming

    2007-01-01

    To compare the effects of wheat flours fortified with NaFeEDTA, FeSO4 and elemental iron (electrolytic iron), in improving iron status in anemic students. Four hundreds anemic students (11 to 18 years old) were divided into four groups and given wheat flour fortified with different iron fortificants at different concentrations: control group (no added iron); NaFeEDTA group (20 mg Fe/kg); FeSO4 group (30 mg Fe/kg); and elemental iron group (60 mg Fe/kg). The trial lasted for 6 months and the following parameters were examined every 2 months: whole blood hemoglobin, free erythrocyte protoporphyrin, serum ferritin, serum iron, total iron binding capacity and transferrin receptor. The flour consumption in the 4 groups was 300-400 g/person/day, accounted for 70% of total cereal consumption in the diets. There were no significant differences in flour consumption among the 4 groups. Blood hemoglobin level increased in all the 3 intervened groups, but the increment in the NaFeEDTA group was significantly higher and earlier than the other 2 groups; and only 1% of the subjected remained anemic at the end of the trial in the NaFeEDTA group, while 40% and 60% of the subjects in the FeSO4 and electrolytic iron group remained anemic, respectively. The order of improvements in free erythrocyte protoporphyrin, serum ferritin and transferring receptor levels were: NaFeEDTA > FeSO4 > electrolytic iron. No significant changes were found in the control group on all the tested parameters during the trial. The results indicated that even NaFeEDTA was added at a lower level, it has better effects than FeSO4 and elemental iron on controlling iron deficiency anemia and improving iron status in anemic children; while elemental iron was the least effective.

  11. Iron-deficiency anemia in infancy and poorer cognitive inhibitory control at age 10 years

    PubMed Central

    ALGARÍN, CECILIA; NELSON, CHARLES A; PEIRANO, PATRICIO; WESTERLUND, ALISSA; REYES, SUSSANNE; LOZOFF, BETSY

    2013-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to assess the effects of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) in infancy on executive functioning at age 10 years, specifically inhibitory control on the Go/No-Go task. We predicted that children who had IDA in infancy would show poorer inhibitory control. Method We assessed cognitive inhibitory control in 132 Chilean children (mean [SD] age 10y 0mo [1mo]): 69 children had IDA in infancy (45 males, 24 females) and 63 comparison children who did not have IDA (26 males, 37 females). Participants performed the Go/No-Go task with event-related potentials. Group differences in behavioral (accuracy, reaction time) and electrophysiological outcomes (N2 and P300 components) were analyzed using repeated-measures analyses of variance. N2 and P300 are interpreted to reflect attention and resource allocation respectively. Results Relative to comparison participants, children who had IDA in infancy showed slower reaction time (mean [SE], 528.7ms [14.2] vs 485.0ms [15.0], 95% confidence interval [CI] for difference between groups 0.9–86.5); lower accuracy (95.4% [0.5] vs 96.9% [0.6], 95% CI −3.0 to −0.1); longer latency to N2 peak (378.9ms [4.9] vs 356.9ms [5.0], 95% CI 7.5–36.6); and smaller P300 amplitude (4.5μV [0.8] vs 7.6μV [0.9], 95% CI–5.5 to −0.5). Interpretation IDA in infancy was associated with slower reaction times and poorer inhibitory control 8 to 9 years after iron therapy. These findings are consistent with the long-lasting effects of early IDA on myelination and/or prefrontal–striatal circuits where dopamine is the major neurotransmitter. PMID:23464736

  12. Diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia using density-based fractionation of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hennek, Jonathan W; Kumar, Ashok A; Wiltschko, Alex B; Patton, Matthew R; Lee, Si Yi Ryan; Brugnara, Carlo; Adams, Ryan P; Whitesides, George M

    2016-10-05

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a nutritional disorder that impacts over one billion people worldwide; it may cause permanent cognitive impairment in children, fatigue in adults, and suboptimal outcomes in pregnancy. IDA can be diagnosed by detection of red blood cells (RBCs) that are characteristically small (microcytic) and deficient in hemoglobin (hypochromic), typically by examining the results of a complete blood count performed by a hematology analyzer. These instruments are expensive, not portable, and require trained personnel; they are, therefore, unavailable in many low-resource settings. This paper describes a low-cost and rapid method to diagnose IDA using aqueous multiphase systems (AMPS)-thermodynamically stable mixtures of biocompatible polymers and salt that spontaneously form discrete layers having sharp steps in density. AMPS are preloaded into a microhematocrit tube and used with a drop of blood from a fingerstick. After only two minutes in a low-cost centrifuge, the tests (n = 152) were read by eye with a sensitivity of 84% (72-93%) and a specificity of 78% (68-86%), corresponding to an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.89. The AMPS test outperforms diagnosis by hemoglobin alone (AUC = 0.73) and is comparable to methods used in clinics like reticulocyte hemoglobin concentration (AUC = 0.91). Standard machine learning tools were used to analyze images of the resulting tests captured by a standard desktop scanner to 1) slightly improve diagnosis of IDA-sensitivity of 90% (83-96%) and a specificity of 77% (64-87%), and 2) predict several important red blood cell parameters, such as mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. These results suggest that the use of AMPS combined with machine learning provides an approach to developing point-of-care hematology.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of the defective hepcidin inhibition in TMPRSS6 mutations associated with iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Laura; Guillem, Flavia; Pagani, Alessia; Nai, Antonella; Oudin, Claire; Silva, Muriel; Toutain, Fabienne; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Beaumont, Carole; Camaschella, Clara; Grandchamp, Bernard

    2009-05-28

    Matriptase-2 is a transmembrane serine protease that negatively regulates hepcidin expression by cleaving membrane-bound hemojuvelin. Matriptase-2 has a complex ectodomain, including a C-terminal serine protease domain and its activation requires an autocatalytic cleavage. Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported in several patients with iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia. Here we describe a patient with 2 missense mutations in the second class A low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLRA) domain. Functional studies of these 2 mutations and of a previously reported mutation in the second C1r/C1s, urchin embryonic growth factor and bone morphogenetic protein 1 (CUB) domain were performed. Transfection of mutant cDNAs showed that membrane targeting of the 2 LDLRA mutants was impaired, with Golgi retention of the variants. The activating cleavage was absent for the LDLRA mutants and reduced for the CUB mutant. All 3 mutated proteins were still able to physically interact with hemojuvelin but only partially repressed hepcidin expression compared with wild-type matriptase-2. Our results underline the importance of LDLRA and CUB domains of matriptase-2.

  14. Ferrous bisglycinate 25 mg iron is as effective as ferrous sulfate 50 mg iron in the prophylaxis of iron deficiency and anemia during pregnancy in a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Milman, Nils; Jønsson, Lisbeth; Dyre, Pernille; Pedersen, Palle Lyngsie; Larsen, Lise Grupe

    2014-03-01

    To compare the effects of oral ferrous bisglycinate 25 mg iron/day vs. ferrous sulfate 50 mg iron/day in the prevention of iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in pregnant women. Randomized, double-blind, intention-to-treat study. Antenatal care clinic. 80 healthy ethnic Danish pregnant women. Women were allocated to ferrous bisglycinate 25 mg elemental iron (Aminojern®) (n=40) or ferrous sulfate 50 mg elemental iron (n=40) from 15 to 19 weeks of gestation to delivery. Hematological status (hemoglobin, red blood cell indices) and iron status (plasma iron, plasma transferrin, plasma transferrin saturation, plasma ferritin) were measured at 15-19 weeks (baseline), 27-28 weeks and 36-37 weeks of gestation. Occurrence of ID (ferritin <15 μg/L) and IDA (ferritin <12 μg/L and hemoglobin <110 g/L). At inclusion, there were no significant differences between the bisglycinate and sulfate group concerning hematological status and iron status. The frequencies of ID and IDA were low and not significantly different in the two iron groups. The frequency of gastrointestinal complaints was lower in the bisglycinate than in the sulfate group (P=0.001). Newborns weight was slightly higher in the bisglycinate vs. the sulfate group (3601±517 g vs. 3395±426 g, P=0.09). In the prevention of ID and IDA, ferrous bisglycinate was not inferior to ferrous sulfate. Ferrous bisglycinate in a low dose of 25 mg iron/day appears to be adequate to prevent IDA in more than 95% of Danish women during pregnancy and postpartum.

  15. Tissue iron deficiency without anemia impairs adaptation in endurance capacity after aerobic training in previously untrained women.

    PubMed

    Brownlie, Thomas; Utermohlen, Virginia; Hinton, Pamela S; Haas, Jere D

    2004-03-01

    We previously showed that iron supplementation significantly improves iron status and maximal work capacity in previously untrained, marginally iron-deficient women with a baseline serum transferrin receptor concentration > 8.0 mg/L. However, the effect of transferrin receptor status on adaptation in endurance capacity after aerobic training in these subjects has not been fully explored. Our objective was to examine the effect of baseline serum transferrin receptor status on adaptations in endurance capacity. Forty-one untrained, iron-depleted, nonanemic women were randomly assigned to receive either 100 mg FeSO(4) or a placebo for 6 wk in a double-blind trial. All subjects trained on cycle ergometers 5 d/wk for the last 4 wk of the study. Endurance capacity was assessed at baseline and after treatment by using a 15-km time trial conducted on a cycle ergometer. Significant treatment effects were observed for time to complete the 15-km time trial, work rate, and percentage of maximal oxygen uptake in subjects with a baseline serum transferrin receptor concentration > 8.0 mg/L. No significant treatment effects were observed in subjects with a normal baseline transferrin receptor concentration. Our findings suggest that, in the presence of overt tissue iron deficiency, iron deficiency without anemia impairs adaptation in endurance capacity after aerobic training in previously untrained women. This impairment can be corrected with iron supplementation.

  16. Iron deficiency anemia is not a rare problem among women of reproductive ages in Ethiopia: a community based cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Haidar, Jemal A; Pobocik, Rebecca S

    2009-01-01

    Background In Ethiopia, the existence of iron deficiency anemia is controversial despite the fact that Ethiopia is one of the least developed in Africa with a high burden of nutrient deficiencies. Methods The first large nutrition study of a representative sample of women in Ethiopia was conducted from June to July 2005 and a systematically selected sub-sample of 970 of these subjects, 15 to 49 years old, were used in this analysis of nutritional anemia. Hemoglobin was measured from capillary blood using a portable HemoCue photometer. For serum ferritin, venous blood from antecubital veins was measured by an automated Elecsys 1020 using commercial kits. Diets were assessed via simplified food frequency questionnaire. The association of anemia to demographic and health variables was tested by chi-square and a stepwise backward logistic regression model was applied to test the significant associations observed in chi square tests. Results Mean hemoglobin ± SD was 11.5 ± 2.1 g/dL with a 29.4% prevalence of anemia. Mean serum ferritin was 58 ± 41.1 ug/L with a 32.1% prevalence of iron deficiency. The overall prevalence rate of iron deficiency anemia was 18.0%. Prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency, and iron deficiency anemia was highest among those 31-49 years old (p < 0.05). Intake of vegetables less than once a day and meat less than once a week was common and was associated with increased anemia (p = 0.001). Although the prevalence of anemia was slightly higher among women with parasitic infestation the difference was not significant (p = 0.9). Nonetheless, anemia was significantly higher in women with history of illness and the association was retained even when the variable was adjusted for its confounding effect in the logistic regression models (AOR = 0.3; 95%CI = 0.17 to 0.5) signifying that the most probable causes of anemia is nutrition related and to some extent chronic illnesses. Conclusion Moderate nutritional anemia in the form of iron deficiency

  17. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Iron Deficiency Anemia and Iron Depletion During Pregnancy: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Gomes da Costa, Ana; Vargas, Sara; Clode, Nuno; M Graça, Luís

    2016-09-01

    Introdução: A anemia e a carência de ferro são problemas de saúde globais e são mais frequentes em grávidas, mulheres em idade reprodutiva e crianças. O objetivo deste trabalho consistiu na avaliação da prevalência de anemia ferropénica e dos fatores de risco associados à ferropénia, na primeira metade da gravidez, numa amostra da população portuguesa. Material e Métodos: Estudo prospetivo, conduzido num hospital terciário, que incluiu grávidas até à 20ª semana de gestação. Foram coletados dados demográficos, relativos à gravidez e foram determinados os níveis séricos de hemoglobina e de ferritina no sangue materno. Recorreu-se à análise de regressão logística de variáveis múltiplas para identificar potenciais fatores de risco para ferropénia. Resultados: Foram incluídas 201 grávidas, das quais cinco (2,49%) tinham anemia. Para além disso, 77 grávidas (38,3%) tinham carência de ferro e 22 (10,9%) apresentaram ferropénia grave. A idade materna foi o único fator de risco identificado. O odds ratio foi de 12,99 (95% IC 2,41 - 70,0) para grávidas com idade inferior a 20 anos e de 2,09 (95% IC 1,05 - 4,14), para grávidas com idade superior a 30 anos. Discussão e Conclusão: Na nossa amostra, a prevalência de anemia na primeira metade da gravidez foi inferior à reportada noutros estudos. No entanto, mais de 30% das grávidas apresentaram carência de ferro. A idade materna foi o único fator de risco identificado.

  18. Potential Contribution of Iron Deficiency and Multiple Factors to Anemia Among 6- to 72-Month-Old Children in the Kokang Area of Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ai; Gao, Hongchong; Li, Bo; Yu, Kai; Win, Naing Naing; Zhang, Yumei; Wang, Peiyu

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of anemia among children in Myanmar has been reported to be among the highest in the world. This study was conducted to determine 1) the prevalence of anemia in preschool children and 2) risk factors associated with anemia. A total of 138 children aged from 6 to 72 months were recruited through cluster sampling from six villages in Kokang. Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, blood trace elements, and anthropometric indicators were measured. Feces samples were collected to examine for the presence of ascarid eggs. The overall prevalence of anemia in children was 61.6%, including 10.9% with severe anemia. Meanwhile, high prevalence of stunting (40.0%), underweight (22.4%), wasting (6.3%), and small head circumference (6.7%) was found. Children with anemia were more prone to stunting. Children with severe anemia and moderate anemia had significantly lower blood iron and zinc levels than children without anemia (P < 0.001 and P = 0.007). The prevalence of ascarid infection was 64.9%; however, it was not associated with anemia. Drinking spring water was positively associated with anemia (odds ratio [OR] = 6.368). This study demonstrated that anemia is an important public health problem among children from the Kokang area. Iron deficiency and drinking spring water may be the important causes of anemia among children. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  19. Potential Contribution of Iron Deficiency and Multiple Factors to Anemia among 6- to 72-Month-Old Children in the Kokang Area of Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ai; Gao, Hongchong; Li, Bo; Yu, Kai; Win, Naing Naing; Zhang, Yumei; Wang, Peiyu

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of anemia among children in Myanmar has been reported to be among the highest in the world. This study was conducted to determine 1) the prevalence of anemia in preschool children and 2) risk factors associated with anemia. A total of 138 children aged from 6 to 72 months were recruited through cluster sampling from six villages in Kokang. Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, blood trace elements, and anthropometric indicators were measured. Feces samples were collected to examine for the presence of ascarid eggs. The overall prevalence of anemia in children was 61.6%, including 10.9% with severe anemia. Meanwhile, high prevalence of stunting (40.0%), underweight (22.4%), wasting (6.3%), and small head circumference (6.7%) was found. Children with anemia were more prone to stunting. Children with severe anemia and moderate anemia had significantly lower blood iron and zinc levels than children without anemia (P < 0.001 and P = 0.007). The prevalence of ascarid infection was 64.9%; however, it was not associated with anemia. Drinking spring water was positively associated with anemia (odds ratio [OR] = 6.368). This study demonstrated that anemia is an important public health problem among children from the Kokang area. Iron deficiency and drinking spring water may be the important causes of anemia among children. PMID:26195457

  20. Risk of Cancer in Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yu-Wen; Hu, Li-Yu; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Teng, Chung-Jen; Kuan, Ai-Seon; Chen, San-Chi; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the risk of cancer among patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) by using a nationwide population-based data set. Method Patients newly diagnosed with IDA and without antecedent cancer between 2000 and 2010 were recruited from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of cancer types among patients with IDA were calculated. Results Patients with IDA exhibited an increased overall cancer risk (SIR: 2.15). Subgroup analysis showed that patients of both sexes and in all age groups had an increased SIR. After we excluded patients diagnosed with cancer within the first and first 5 years of IDA diagnosis, the SIRs remained significantly elevated at 1.43 and 1.30, respectively. In addition, the risks of pancreatic (SIR: 2.31), kidney (SIR: 2.23), liver (SIR: 1.94), and bladder cancers (SIR: 1.74) remained significantly increased after exclusion of patients diagnosed with cancer within 5 years after IDA diagnosis. Conclusion The overall cancer risk was significantly elevated among patients with IDA. After we excluded patients diagnosed with IDA and cancer within 1 and 5 years, the SIRs remained significantly elevated compared with those of the general population. The increased risk of cancer was not confined to gastrointestinal cancer when the SIRs of pancreatic, kidney, liver, and bladder cancers significantly increased after exclusion of patients diagnosed with IDA and cancer within the first 5 years. This finding may be caused by immune activities altered by IDA. Further study is necessary to determine the association between IDA and cancer risk. PMID:25781632

  1. [Diagnostic yield of video capsule endoscopy in premenopausal women with iron-deficiency anemia].

    PubMed

    Garrido Durán, Carmen; Iyo Miyashiro, Eduardo; Páez Cumpa, Claudia; Khorrami Minaei, Sam; Erimeiku Barahona, Alicia; Llompart Rigo, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines recommend video capsule endoscopy (VCE) studies in patients with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) after conventional upper and lower endoscopies but there is a need for studies demonstrating the diagnostic yield, clinical impact, and cost in some patient subgroups. 1.To determine the diagnostic yield of VCE in premenopausal women with IDA compared with that in men and postmenopausal women. 2. To identify the presence of VCE predictors in premenopausal women. 3. To estimate the cost-clinical impact relationship associated with VCE in this indication. We retrospectively analyzed 408 patients who underwent VCE. Patients with IDA were enrolled (premenopausal, postmenopausal women, and men), with previous normal work-up by conventional endoscopies. A total of 249 patients were enrolled: 131 women (52.6%), of which 51 were premenopausal and 80 were post-menopausal, and 118 men. The mean age was 60.7±16 years. The diagnostic yield of VCE for the diagnosis of IDA was 44.6% (95% CI 39.9 - 50.8). Diagnostic yield was 50.8% vs 38.9% in men vs women (p=0.05) and was 55% vs 13.7% in postmenopausal vs premenopausal women (p<0.001). No predictors of small bowel lesions were found in premenopausal women. The most common findings in the postmenopausal group were angioectasias (70.5%) and erosions (57.1%) in the premenopausal group. The cost in premenopausal women was 44.727€ and 86.3% of the procedures had no clinical impact. The diagnostic yield of VCE is low in the etiological study of IDA in premenopausal women and there is no cost-effectiveness in relation to clinical impact. No predictors of small bowel lesions were found in this group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  2. Erythrocyte Membrane Fatty Acid Composition in Premenopausal Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Mehmet; Elmastas, Mahfuz; Ozcicek, Fatih; Yilmaz, Necmettin

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is one of the most common nutritional disorders in the world. In the present study, we evaluated erythrocyte membrane fatty acid composition in premenopausal patients with IDA. Blood samples of 102 premenopausal women and 88 healthy control subjects were collected. After the erythrocytes were separated from the blood samples, the membrane lipids were carefully extracted, and the various membrane fatty acids were measured by gas chromatography (GC). Statistical analyses were performed with the SPSS software program. We used blood ferritin concentration <15 ng/mL as cut-off for the diagnosis of IDA. The five most abundant individual fatty acids obtained were palmitic acid (16:0), oleic acid (18:1, n-9c), linoleic acid (18:2, n-6c), stearic acid (18:0), and erucic acid (C22:1, n-9c). These compounds constituted about 87% of the total membrane fatty acids in patients with IDA, and 79% of the total membrane fatty acids in the control group. Compared with control subjects, case patients had higher percentages of palmitic acid (29.9% case versus 25.3% control), oleic acid (16.8% case versus 15.1% control), and stearic acid (13.5% case versus 10.5% control), and lower percentages of erucic acid (11.5% case versus 13.6% control) and linoleic acid (15.2% case versus 15.4% control) in their erythrocyte membranes. In conclusion, the total-erythrocyte-membrane saturated fatty acid (SFA) composition in premenopausal women with IDA was found to be higher than that in the control group; however, the total-erythrocyte-membrane unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) composition in premenopausal women with IDA was found to be lower than that in the control group. The differences in these values were statistically significant.

  3. Influence of laser and LED irradiation on mast cells of cutaneous wounds of rats with iron deficiency anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becher Rosa, Cristiane; Oliveira Sampaio, Susana C. P.; Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; Ferreira, Maria F. L.; Zanini, Fátima A. A.; Santos, Jean N.; Cangussú, Maria Cristina T.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

    2011-03-01

    This work aimed to study histologically the effect of Laser or LED phototherapy on mast cells on cutaneous wounds of rats with iron deficiency. 18 rats were used and fed with special peleted iron-free diet. An excisional wound was created on the dorsum of each animal which were divided into: Group I - Control with anemia + no treatment; Group II - Anemia + Laser; Group III - Anemia + LED; Group IV - Healthy + no treatment; Group V - Healthy + Laser; Group VI - Healthy + LED. Irradiation was performed using a diode Laser (λ660nm, 40mW, CW, total dose of 10J/cm2, 4X2.5J/cm2) or a RED-LED ( λ700nm, 15mW, CW, total dose of 10J/cm2). Histological specimens were routinely processed, cut and stained with toluidine blue and mast cell counts performed. No significant statistic difference was found between groups as to the number of degranulated, non-degradulated or total mast cells. Greater mean values were found for degranulated mast cells in the Anemia + LED. LED irradiation on healthy specimens resulted in a smaller number of degranulated mast cells. Our results leads to conclude that there are no significant differences in the number of mast cells seven days after irradiation following Laser or LED phototherapy.

  4. Iron deficiency anemia among Jewish and Arab infants at 6 and 12 months of age in Hadera, Israel.

    PubMed

    Lavon, B; Tulchinsky, T H; Preger, M; Said, R; Kaufman, S

    1985-02-01

    Infants attending six Family Health Centers of the Israel Ministry of Health in various Jewish and Arab localities in the Hadera subdistrict were examined for hemoglobin levels at 6 and 12 months of age. The prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin less than 11 g/dl) among Jewish infants rose from a total of 44.7 to 60% from 6 to 12 months. For the Arab infants, the prevalence of anemia increased from a total of 43.7% at 6 months to 71.0% at 12. The prevalence of severe anemia (less than 10 g/dl) for the Jewish infants rose from 4.5 to 13.1% and for the Arab infants from 7.7 to 19.6%. Of the Jewish infants with a hemoglobin level less than 10 g/dl at 6 months, 50% were still less than 10 g/dl at 12 months. Of the Arab infants less than 10 g/dl at 6 months, 36.4% were still at that level at 12 months. The lack of routine iron supplementation as a preventive procedure and the routine use of cow's milk for infant feeding are the probable causes of this high prevalence of iron deficiency anemia.

  5. [Prevalence of iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    Dupont, C

    2017-05-01

    Studies of prévalence in iron deficiency separate iron depletion (defined as decreased blood ferritin) and iron deficiency anemia (defined as blood decrease in both ferritin and hemoglobin). In Europe, most studies are outdated. Prevalence of iron depletion varies from 7 to 18 % and 24 to 36% in toddlers and adolescents, respectively. Prevalence of iron deficiency anemia varies from 2 to 8.5% and 7 to 10% in toddlers and adolescents. In French speaking African countries, Demography Health Surveys show that 80% of children aged 0 to 2 years are anemic, severely for 5 to 9% of them. © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. Tous droits réservés.

  6. Comparison between once weekly, twice weekly, and daily oral iron therapy in Jordanian children suffering from iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Hawamdeh, Hasan M; Rawashdeh, Mohammad; Aughsteen, Adib Abdulahad

    2013-02-01

    The efficacy of daily versus twice weekly and once weekly oral iron therapy was analyzed to optimize a protocol for treatment of IDM among Jordanian children. One hundred and forty-eight children aged between 6 and 60 months with Hb estimate less than 11 gm/dl were screened. They were randomly divided into three regimens of oral iron therapy for a period of 12 weeks; a group was supplemented with a single weekly dose of iron; a second group received two doses weekly; and a third group had a daily dose of iron. Hb was assayed 3 and 12 weeks after therapy, while ferritin was assayed after 12 weeks of treatment. A significant rise in Hb concentration was observed which was most significant 12 weeks after treatment. Iron supplementation after 3 weeks was similar in all treated groups, and no significant difference in Hb concentration among the three groups was noticed. By the end of the third week, the anemia had respectively resolved by 18, 11.8 and 23.4% in the daily, twice weekly, and once weekly groups. On the other hand, the percentage of recovery of anemia respectively was 78, 90.2 and 74.5% at the end of 12 weeks of iron therapy. Hb recovery percentage was comparable in the three treated groups, and no significant difference was reported between them either at 3 or at 12 weeks of therapy. Ferritin levels in the daily and twice weekly treated groups were similar after 12 weeks of iron therapy and were significantly higher than the ferritin levels of weekly treated group. Although the anemia in the three treated groups was resolved after 3 and 12 weeks of oral iron therapy, we conclude that the regimen of two doses per week is the most effective in resolving anemia with less cost and fewer side effects.

  7. Single Cavernous Hemangioma of the Small Bowel Diagnosed by Using Capsule Endoscopy in a Child with Chronic Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Soo Jin; Hwang, Geol; Kang, Hyun Sik; Song, Hyun Joo; Chang, Weon Young; Maeng, Young Hee

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas of the gastrointestinal tract are extremely rare. In particular, the diagnosis of small bowel hemangiomas is very difficult in children. A 13-year-old boy presented at the outpatient clinic with dizziness and fatigue. The patient was previously diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia at 3 years of age and had been treated with iron supplements continuously and pure red cell transfusion intermittently. Laboratory tests indicated that the patient currently had iron-deficiency anemia. There was no evidence of gross bleeding, such as hematemesis or bloody stool. Laboratory findings indicated no bleeding tendency. Gastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy results were negative. To obtain a definitive diagnosis, the patient underwent capsule endoscopy. A purplish stalked mass was found in the jejunum, and the mass was excised successfully. We report of a 13-year-old boy who presented with severe and recurrent iron-deficiency anemia caused by a cavernous hemangioma in the small bowel without symptoms of gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26240811

  8. Antioxidant activity of a Lachnum YM226 melanin-iron complex and its influence on cytokine production in mice with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Song, Sheng; Yang, Liu; Ye, Ming; Chen, Xue; Shi, Fang; Shaikh, Farnaz

    2016-03-01

    The present study aims to investigate the protective effects of an orally administered Lachnum YM226 melanin-iron complex (LM-Fe) against iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in mice. The IDA mouse model was established by feeding mice with iron-deficient food. Different doses of LM-Fe were given to the anaemic mice via intragastric administration, with FeCl3 and FeSO4 used as positive controls. After the iron supplement administration, it was observed that LM-Fe could significantly improve the decreased haemoglobin (Hb) level, and normalize the serum iron (SI) level, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) and serum ferritin (SF) of the anaemic mice in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, treatment with LM-Fe significantly increased the antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxidase dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in plasma to normal or better. Furthermore, the levels of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were obviously decreased in the LM-Fe supplemented groups compared with the model group, while the level of interleukin-2 (IL-2) was significantly increased. In conclusion, LM-Fe was efficient at ameliorating the anemia symptoms, improving the activities of antioxidant enzymes and adjusting the immune dysfunction of anaemic mice. Thus, these results demonstrated that LM-Fe might be exploited as an efficient and multifunctional iron supplement.

  9. [Prevalence of iron-deficient anemia in rural pregnant women in Valldolid, Yucatan, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Vera Gamboa, Ligia; Quintal Duarte, Rommel; González Martínez, Pedro; Castillo Gumersindo, Vázquez

    2009-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia among rural pregnant women in Valladolid, Yucatan, Mexico. A descriptive study was carried out from March to May 2006. A clinical-epidemiological survey, a complete blood count test and a ferritin test were applied to a non-random sample conformed by 51 rural pregnant women. Thirty five point two percent of the 51 pregnant women studied presented anaemia, which was more frequent during the second and third trimester, 25.6% of which were adolescents. Abnormal iron profile was found in 41% of the women, 30% (9/51) presented iron-deficiency anaemia which was more frequent in the third trimester. The women with iron-deficiency anaemia had had an average of four pregnancies. No significant difference was found between multiparity and anaemia (square Chi, p = 9.29). The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia was 17.64% in this group, more frequent during the third trimester. The hematological alterations were more frequent in multipara women. In a quarter of the sample, pregnancy occurred during adolescence; two events that need greater amounts of iron. The creation of nutritional programs since childhood and the incorporation of ferritin in prenatal care is fundamental for the adequate development and security of both mother and child.

  10. Efficacy and safety of oral iron(III) polymaltose complex versus ferrous sulfate in pregnant women with iron-deficiency anemia: a multicenter, randomized, controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Ricardo; Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Romero, Juan Diego; Monterrosa, Beatriz; Frer, Cristina; Macagno, Eugenia; Breymann, Christian

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of iron(III) polymaltose complex (Maltofer(®)) versus ferrous sulfate in iron-deficient pregnant women using recommended doses. An exploratory, open-label, randomized, controlled, multicenter study was undertaken in 80 pregnant women with iron-deficiency anemia (hemoglobin ≤ 10.5 g/dL, serum ferritin ≤ 15 ng/mL and mean corpuscular volume < 80 fL). Patients were randomized 1:1 to oral iron(III) polymaltose complex or ferrous sulfate (each 100 mg iron twice daily) for 90 days. The primary endpoint, change in hemoglobin from baseline to days 60 and 90, did not differ significantly between treatment groups. The mean (SD) change to day 90 was 2.16 (0.67) g/dL in the iron(III) polymaltose complex group and 1.93 (0.97) g/dL in the ferrous sulfate group (n.s). Mean serum ferritin at day 90 was 179 (38) ng/mL and 157 (34) ng/mL with iron(III) polymaltose complex and ferrous sulfate, respectively (p = 0.014). Adverse events were significantly less frequent in the iron(III) polymaltose group, occurring in 12/41 (29.3%) patients, than in the ferrous sulfate group (22/39 [56.4%]) (p = 0.015). Oral iron(III) polymaltose complex offers at least equivalent efficacy and a superior safety profile compared to ferrous sulfate for the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia during pregnancy.

  11. [Analysis on the iron deficiency and the rate of anemia of 3-11 year old children in 7 cities and 2 countryside in China].

    PubMed

    Ma, Defu; Zhang, Yumei; You, Lili; Tuo, Ya; Sheng, Qinghai; Wang, Peiyu

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the status of iron deficiency and the rate of anemia of 3 - 11 year-old children in Chinese cities and countryside and explore the possible related influencing factors. The multistage stratified cluster random sampling was used to select one kindergarten and one primary school in seven cities (Beijing, Shenyang, Suzhou, Zhengzhou, Chengdu, Lenzhou and Guangzhou) and two countryside randomly in Hebei Province one bottom class, middle class, top class in one kindergarten and one second grade and fifth grade in one primary school were selected randomly. All of the healthful students of these classes were investigated and the element iron and the parameters of red blood cell were detected. 1863 students in 7 cities and 2 countryside were investigated in the research. The incidence of iron deficiency of different ages had statistical significance and with the age increasing, the incidence showed a decreasing trend. The incidences of iron deficiency were 47.1% and 38.2% in 3 -4 year-old children and 4 - 5 year-old children, respectively. The incidence of anemia of different ages had statistical significance. The incidences of anemia of 3 - 4 year-old children and 4 -5 year-old children were significantly higher than those of 5 - 6 year-old children. The incidences of anemia were 4.0% and 7.1% in 3 - 4 year-old children and 4 -5 year-old children, respectively. No statistical significance for different sex of the same age was found for iron deficiency and anemia incidence. The incidence (12%) of anemia of the children in countryside area was significantly higher than those in first-tier cities and second-tier cities. The status of iron deficiency and the rate of anemia of 3 - 11 year-old children in Chinese cities and countryside were improved recently, but still serious. It should be paid more attention to the children with lower serum iron content and the children in rural areas.

  12. Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hemolytic Anemia Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases Iron Deficiency Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Vitamin Deficiency Anemia ( ... Hemolytic Anemia Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases Iron Deficiency Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Vitamin Deficiency Anemia ...

  13. High prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in infants attending a well-baby clinic in northwestern Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Hawsawi, Zakaria M. Al; Al-Rehali, Sami A.; Mahros, Amani M.; Al-Sisi, Ali M.; Al-Harbi, Khalid D.; Yousef, Ahmed M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in infants aged 6-24 months attending the well-baby clinic in primary health care centers (PHCCs). Methods: This cross-sectional epidemiological study was conducted in the Northwestern region of Saudi Arabia from April 2013 to January 2014 in 5 randomly selected PHCCs. The sample size comprised 500 infants, with 100 infants screened from each PHC. Blood samples were obtained for estimation of hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels. Results: Out of 500 infants, 246 (49%) cases had IDA with a mean age of 15.4 ± 6.5 months, with 130 (53%) males, and 116 (47%) females (p=0367). Out of 274 Saudi infants, 126 (51%) cases were diagnosed as IDA. Conclusion: Iron deficiency anemia is very common in Saudi infants aged 6-24 months. A national program directed for primary prevention and early discovery of IDA in Saudi infants is recommended at PHCCs system. Iron supplementation is to be given at early infancy with universal screening of hemoglobin and ferritin estimation to all infants at 12 months of age. PMID:26318463

  14. Hepcidin-Induced Iron Deficiency Is Related to Transient Anemia and Hypoferremia in Kawasaki Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying-Hsien; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Huang, Fu-Chen; Yu, Hong-Ren; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Yang, Ya-Ling; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Li, Sung-Chou; Kuo, Hsing-Chun

    2016-05-12

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a type of systemic vasculitis that primarily affects children under the age of five years old. For sufferers of KD, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been found to successfully diminish the occurrence of coronary artery lesions. Anemia is commonly found in KD patients, and we have shown that in appropriately elevated hepcidin levels are related to decreased hemoglobin levels in these patients. In this study, we investigated the time period of anemia and iron metabolism during different stages of KD. A total of 100 patients with KD and 20 control subjects were enrolled in this study for red blood cell and hemoglobin analysis. Furthermore, plasma, urine hepcidin, and plasma IL-6 levels were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 20 KD patients and controls. Changes in hemoglobin, plasma iron levels, and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) were also measured in patients with KD. Hemoglobin, iron levels, and TIBC were lower (p < 0.001, p = 0.009, and p < 0.001, respectively) while plasma IL-6 and hepcidin levels (both p < 0.001) were higher in patients with KD than in the controls prior to IVIG administration. Moreover, plasma hepcidin levels were positively and significantly correlated with urine hepcidin levels (p < 0.001) prior to IVIG administration. After IVIG treatment, plasma hepcidin and hemoglobin levels significantly decreased (both p < 0.001). Of particular note was a subsequent gradual increase in hemoglobin levels during the three weeks after IVIG treatment; nevertheless, the hemoglobin levels stayed lower in KD patients than in the controls (p = 0.045). These findings provide a longitudinal study of hemoglobin changes and among the first evidence that hepcidin induces transient anemia and hypoferremia during KD's acute inflammatory phase.

  15. Hepcidin-Induced Iron Deficiency Is Related to Transient Anemia and Hypoferremia in Kawasaki Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Hsien; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Huang, Fu-Chen; Yu, Hong-Ren; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Yang, Ya-Ling; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Li, Sung-Chou; Kuo, Hsing-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a type of systemic vasculitis that primarily affects children under the age of five years old. For sufferers of KD, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been found to successfully diminish the occurrence of coronary artery lesions. Anemia is commonly found in KD patients, and we have shown that in appropriately elevated hepcidin levels are related to decreased hemoglobin levels in these patients. In this study, we investigated the time period of anemia and iron metabolism during different stages of KD. A total of 100 patients with KD and 20 control subjects were enrolled in this study for red blood cell and hemoglobin analysis. Furthermore, plasma, urine hepcidin, and plasma IL-6 levels were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 20 KD patients and controls. Changes in hemoglobin, plasma iron levels, and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) were also measured in patients with KD. Hemoglobin, iron levels, and TIBC were lower (p < 0.001, p = 0.009, and p < 0.001, respectively) while plasma IL-6 and hepcidin levels (both p < 0.001) were higher in patients with KD than in the controls prior to IVIG administration. Moreover, plasma hepcidin levels were positively and significantly correlated with urine hepcidin levels (p < 0.001) prior to IVIG administration. After IVIG treatment, plasma hepcidin and hemoglobin levels significantly decreased (both p < 0.001). Of particular note was a subsequent gradual increase in hemoglobin levels during the three weeks after IVIG treatment; nevertheless, the hemoglobin levels stayed lower in KD patients than in the controls (p = 0.045). These findings provide a longitudinal study of hemoglobin changes and among the first evidence that hepcidin induces transient anemia and hypoferremia during KD’s acute inflammatory phase. PMID:27187366

  16. Prevalence of anemia, iron, folic acid and vitamin B12 deficiency in two Bari Indian communities from western Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Diez-Ewald, M; Torres-Guerra, E; Layrisse, M; Leets, I; Vizcaíno, G; Arteaga-Vizcaíno, M

    1997-12-01

    The hematological status of 406 Bari indians from two communities was studied. One hundred and seventy nine individuals were from Campo Rosario a village located in a low arid plain south to the Perijá mountain range and 287 were from Saimadoyi, a fertile valley in the heart of the mountain. Anemia was found in 54% and 31% of the people from Campo Rosario and Saimadoyi respectively. Low serum iron was present in 28% of the population in both communities while low serum ferritin levels were encountered in 20% of the population from Campo Rosario and 5% of the people from Saimadoyi. A high prevalence of serum folate and vitamin B12 deficiency (91% and 64% respectively) was found in Campo Rosario, in contrast only 5% of the population from Saimadoyi had low folate and none were vitamin B12 deficient. While there was a positive significant correlation between hemoglobin and serum iron concentrations (r = 0.517, p < 0.001), no significative correlation was found between the other parameters studied. The high prevalence of anemia and nutrient deficiency among the Bari indians, can be attributed to inadequate diets and the varied diseases encountered in the population.

  17. The Cardiomyopathy of Iron Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Nikita; Rich, Michael W.; Gayomali, Charina

    2006-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia can have deleterious effects on the heart. Herein, we describe the effects of iron deficiency on the heart as corroborated with electrocardiography, radiology, echocardiography, and cardiac catheterization. We review the pathophysiology, clinical features, and management of iron-deficiency–induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:17041692

  18. Effects of iron deficiency anemia and its treatment on fibroblast growth factor 23 and phosphate homeostasis in women.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Myles; Koch, Todd A; Bregman, David B

    2013-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is an osteocyte-derived hormone that regulates phosphate and vitamin D homeostasis. Through unknown mechanisms, certain intravenous iron preparations induce acute, reversible increases in circulating FGF23 levels that lower serum phosphate in association with inappropriately low levels of calcitriol, similar to genetic diseases of primary FGF23 excess. In contrast, studies in wild-type mice suggest that iron deficiency stimulates fgf23 transcription but does not result in hypophosphatemia because FGF23 is cleaved within osteocytes by an unknown catabolic system. We tested the association of iron deficiency anemia with C-terminal FGF23 (cFGF23) and intact FGF23 (iFGF23) levels in 55 women with a history of heavy uterine bleeding, and assessed the longitudinal biochemical response over 35 days to equivalent doses of randomly-assigned, intravenous elemental iron in the form of ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) or iron dextran. Iron deficiency was associated with markedly elevated cFGF23 (807.8 ± 123.9 relative units [RU]/mL) but normal iFGF23 (28.5 ± 1.1 pg/mL) levels at baseline. Within 24 hours of iron administration, cFGF23 levels fell by approximately 80% in both groups. In contrast, iFGF23 transiently increased in the FCM group alone, and was followed by a transient, asymptomatic reduction in serum phosphate <2.0 mg/dL in 10 women in the FCM group compared to none in the iron dextran group. Reduced serum phosphate was accompanied by increased urinary fractional excretion of phosphate, decreased calcitriol levels, and increased parathyroid hormone levels. These findings suggest that iron deficiency increases cFGF23 levels, and that certain iron preparations temporarily increase iFGF23 levels. We propose that intravenous iron lowers cFGF23 in humans by reducing fgf23 transcription as it does in mice, whereas carbohydrate moieties in certain iron preparations may simultaneously inhibit FGF23 degradation in osteocytes

  19. Association Between the Presence of Iron Deficiency Anemia and Hemoglobin A1c in Korean Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jae W.; Ku, Cheol R.; Noh, Jung H.; Ko, Kyung S.; Rhee, Byoung D.; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have investigated the clinical effect of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) on the use of the Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) as a screening parameter for diabetes or prediabetes. We investigated the association between IDA and HbA1c levels in Korean adults. Among the 11,472 adults (≥19 years of age) who participated in the 2011–2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (a cross-sectional and nationally representative survey conducted by the Korean Center for Disease Control for Health Statistics), 807 patients with diabetes currently taking anti-diabetes medications were excluded from this study. We compared the weighted HbA1c levels and weighted proportion (%) of HbA1c levels of ≥5.7%, ≥6.1%, and ≥6.5% according to the range of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels and the presence of IDA. Among 10,665 participants (weighted n = 35,229,108), the prevalence of anemia and IDA was 7.3% and 4.3%, respectively. The HbA1c levels were higher in participants with IDA (5.70% ± 0.02%) than in normal participants (5.59% ± 0.01%; P < 0.001), whereas there was no significant difference in FPG levels. In participants with an FPG level of <100 mg/dL and 100 to 125 mg/dL, the weighted HbA1c level was higher in those with IDA (5.59% ± 0.02% and 6.00% ± 0.05%) than in normal participants (5.44% ± 0.01% and 5.82% ± 0.01%) after adjusting for confounders such as age, sex, FPG level, heavy alcohol drinking, waist circumference, and smoking status as well as after exclusion of an estimated glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 (P < 0.001, <0.01). The weighted proportions (%) of an HbA1c level of ≥5.7% and ≥6.1% were also higher in participants with IDA than in normal participants (P < 0.001, <0.05). However, the weighted HbA1c levels in individuals with an FPG level ≥126 mg/dL and a weighted proportion (%) of an HbA1c level of ≥6.5% showed no significant differences according to

  20. Correction of anemia and iron deficiency in vegetarians by administration of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D C; Mathur, R

    1995-10-01

    Twenty-eight strict vegetarians were given 500 mg ascorbic acid twice daily after lunch and dinner for two months. Hemoglobin and certain iron status parameters were measured before and after the treatment. Ascorbate treatment increased mean hemoglobin by 8%, serum iron by 17% and transferrin saturation by 23% and decreased total iron binding capacity by 7%. All these changes were statistically significant. The rise in serum ferritin was 12%. The serum protein or copper level did not indicate their dietary deficiency, while initial serum ascorbate level were low which rose by 60% on therapy. It is concluded that ascorbate supplementation is a better method of improving hematologic and iron status than iron salt administration.

  1. Hemodynamic response to treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pulmonary arterial hypertension: longitudinal insights from an implantable hemodynamic monitor

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite new therapeutic options, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains a progressive disease associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. As such, additional strategies for monitoring and adjunctive management of this disease are important. A 59-year-old woman with scleroderma-associated PAH received an implantable hemodynamic monitor (IHM) as part of a research protocol at our institution. Pulmonary artery pressures, heart rate, and cardiac output (sensor-based algorithm) were measured on a daily basis, and parameters of right ventricular (RV) performance and afterload were calculated. At the time of IHM implant, the patient had functional class III symptoms, was receiving triple-drug therapy, and had normal hemoglobin levels. Four months after implant, and with further optimization of prostacyclin therapy, she had improvement in her symptoms. However, shortly thereafter, while the patient was receiving stable drug therapy, her case regressed with worsening symptoms, and the patient received a new diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia. Oral iron supplementation resulted in normalization of hemoglobin levels and improvement in the patient’s iron profile. A gradual and sustained reduction in pulmonary pressures was noted after initiation of oral iron accompanied by increased RV performance and favorable reduction in RV afterload. The patient had significant symptomatic improvement. Iron deficiency is an underappreciated yet easily treatable risk factor in PAH. Use of IHM in this case longitudinally illustrates the optimization of pulmonary hemodynamics and RV afterload in tandem with clinical improvement achieved by a simple therapy. PMID:28090307

  2. Hemodynamic response to treatment of iron deficiency anemia in pulmonary arterial hypertension: longitudinal insights from an implantable hemodynamic monitor.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Muddassir; Agarwal, Richa; Raina, Amresh; Correa-Jaque, Priscilla; Benza, Raymond L

    2016-12-01

    Despite new therapeutic options, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains a progressive disease associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. As such, additional strategies for monitoring and adjunctive management of this disease are important. A 59-year-old woman with scleroderma-associated PAH received an implantable hemodynamic monitor (IHM) as part of a research protocol at our institution. Pulmonary artery pressures, heart rate, and cardiac output (sensor-based algorithm) were measured on a daily basis, and parameters of right ventricular (RV) performance and afterload were calculated. At the time of IHM implant, the patient had functional class III symptoms, was receiving triple-drug therapy, and had normal hemoglobin levels. Four months after implant, and with further optimization of prostacyclin therapy, she had improvement in her symptoms. However, shortly thereafter, while the patient was receiving stable drug therapy, her case regressed with worsening symptoms, and the patient received a new diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia. Oral iron supplementation resulted in normalization of hemoglobin levels and improvement in the patient's iron profile. A gradual and sustained reduction in pulmonary pressures was noted after initiation of oral iron accompanied by increased RV performance and favorable reduction in RV afterload. The patient had significant symptomatic improvement. Iron deficiency is an underappreciated yet easily treatable risk factor in PAH. Use of IHM in this case longitudinally illustrates the optimization of pulmonary hemodynamics and RV afterload in tandem with clinical improvement achieved by a simple therapy.

  3. SCIENTIFIC PAPER PRESENTATION DURING CONCURRENT INTEREST SESSION. Community Health Nursing (Speciality). Iron-deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Kala, K

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is the most common form of malnutrition in the world. The global prevalence of anaemia mainly in South East Asia is 65.5 percent, in India 56 percent among adolescent girls. A study conducted to assess the effectiveness of structured teaching programme on knowledge and attitude of adolescent girls in prevention of iron and folic acid deficiency anaemia at a selected corporation school. It adopted one group pre-test post-test design with 60 samples selected by employing stratified random sampling technique. The study revealed that during pre-test 90 percent of them had inadequate knowledge and 65 percent of them had unfavourable attitude towards iron and folic acid deficiency anaemia. After the structured teaching programme the knowledge and attitude was improved (73% had adequate knowledge and 79% had most favourable attitude). Overall the structured teaching programme was found effective in improving the knowledge and attitude of adolescent girls in prevention of iron and folic acid deficiency anaemia.

  4. Platelet function alterations and their relation to P-selectin (CD62P) expression in children with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Zuhal K; Orhan, Mehmet F; Büyükavcı, Mustafa

    2011-03-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) may cause platelet aggregation dysfunction and this can be reversed by iron therapy. On the other hand, it has been reported that the platelet fractions carrying the platelet activation markers, CD62P and CD63, are increased in thalassemic patients and there is a significant correlation between the increased levels of soluble P-selectin and free iron in sickle cell disease. This study was performed to investigate the alterations of platelet functions and whether iron deficiency results in diminished expression of activation marker (P-selectin; CD62P) leading to platelet aggregation dysfunction in children with IDA. Hemoglobin, erythrocyte indices (mean erythrocyte volume and red blood cell distribution width), serum levels of iron, transferrin and ferritin, platelet aggregation tests (with ADP, collagen, and ristocetin), PFA-100 closure time, and CD62P expression were evaluated in fasting blood samples of 22 children with IDA and 20 children without anemia. CD62P expression was detected by flow cytometry in normal and 5 μmol/l ADP-activated platelets. Mean closure times were longer in the patient group than control. In platelet aggregation tests, mean values of maximum aggregation times by ristocetin, ADP, and collagen were also more prolonged in patient group. Ristocetin-induced maximum aggregation rates (amplitude) were significantly higher in patients. However, ADP and collagen induction did not produce the same effect. CD62P expressions were significantly higher on activated platelets of the patient group, although they were similar in both groups before activation by ADP. These findings suggest that platelet aggregation and adhesion have been delayed in children with IDA; however, platelet function abnormalities are not associated with CD62P expression on platelet surface.

  5. [IS THERE A WAY TO REDUCE IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA RATES IN THE SECOND YEAR OF LIFE OF BEDOUIN CHILDREN IN THE NEGEV?

    PubMed

    Kerub, Orly; Vardi, Hillel; Knyazer, Boris; Bilenko, Natalya

    2017-03-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most common worldwide nutritional deficiency contributing to childhood morbidity and mortality. According to the official health policy in Israel, providing iron for all babies from the age of 4 months to the age of one year old is recommended. This policy also recommends providing iron supplementation for an additional 6 months for toddlers (who are one year old) with anemia (hemoglobin<11mg/dl). Despite this policy, there is still a high rate of anemia in the Negev's two year old children, especially in the Bedouin population. Assessment of the intervention program to reduce iron deficiency anemia rates, that provides iron supplementation to Bedouin toddlers with no anemia, from the age of 1 year to 18 months and maternal knowledge about the prevention of anemia. Type of Research: Community intervention trial study. Population study: A total of 251 toddlers aged one year old with no anemia from 6 recognized and unrecognized Bedouin villages. Intervention group: 250 toddlers who received iron supplementation; Prophylactic dosage (15 mg per day) for 6 months from the age of 1 year. Control group: 101 toddlers who did not receive iron supplementation. The hemoglobin (Hb) level was measured before and after the intervention for both groups. At the beginning of the study, at the age of one year there was no difference between the two groups in the average Hb level (11.8±0.5mg/dl). After the intervention of 6 months, an Hb decrease was observed in both groups: 11.5±0.8 mg/dl compared to 11.0±1.0 mg/dl in the intervention group and in the control group (p<0.001), respectively. At the study endpoint the rates of anemia in the intervention group were lower compared to the control group: 40.6% and 15.3% (p<0.001), respectively. A positive correlation was found between the toddlers Hb level and the amount of iron supplementation received through the study. Providing iron supplementation, from the age of 1 year for 6 months reduces the anemia

  6. Erythrocyte zincprotoporphyrin (ZPP) in subjects with heterozygote beta-thalassemia, acquired non-microcytic anemias and iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Cocuzza, S; Avola, G

    1984-11-30

    The authors examine the utility of zinc protoporphyrin level in blood (ZPP) as diagnostic test for some anemias with different etiology. Our results show that the observed ZPP rise both in sideropenic anemia and lead poisoning, is related to TIBC increase. This relation demonstrates that both in these anemias a close correlation exists with disorders of iron metabolism. Furthermore such a correlation is not seen in thalassemic trait and in acquired non microcotic anemias.

  7. Mild maternal iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy and lactation in guinea pigs causes abnormal auditory function in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Jougleux, Jean-Luc; Rioux, France M; Church, Michael W; Fiset, Sylvain; Surette, Marc E

    2011-07-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) anemia (IDA) adversely affects different aspects of the nervous system such as myelinogenesis, neurotransmitters synthesis, brain myelin composition, and brain fatty acid and eicosanoid metabolism. Infant neurophysiological outcome in response to maternal IDA is underexplored, especially mild to moderate maternal IDA. Furthermore, most human research has focused on childhood ID rather than prenatal or neonatal ID. Thus, our study evaluated the consequences of mild maternal IDA during pregnancy and lactation on the offsprings' auditory function using the auditory brainstem response (ABR). This technique provides objective measures of auditory acuity, neural transmission times along the peripheral and brainstem portions of the auditory pathway, and postnatal brain maturation. Female guinea pigs (n = 10/group) were fed an iron sufficient diet (ISD) or an iron deficient diet (IDD) (144 and 11.7 mg iron/kg) during their acclimation, gestation, and lactation periods. From postnatal d (PNd) 9 onward, the ISD was given to all weaned offspring. ABR were collected from the offspring on PNd24 using a broad range of stimulus intensities in response to 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 kHz tone pips. IDA siblings (n = 4), [corrected] compared with the IS siblings (n = 5), had significantly elevated ABR thresholds (hearing loss) in response to all tone pips. These physiological disturbances were primarily due to a sensorineural hearing loss, as revealed by the ABR's latency-intensity curves. These results indicate that mild maternal IDA during gestation and lactation altered the hearing and nervous system development of the young offspring.

  8. [Powdered milk enriched with iron and ascorbic acid as an intervention measure for treating iron deficiency anemia in children seen at a Basic Health Care Unit].

    PubMed

    Torres, M A; Sato, K; Juliano, Y; Queiroz, S de S

    1996-06-01

    This study was undertaken to verify the influence of the use of iron and Vitamin C fortified powdered whole milk on the hemoglobin levels of 238 children, aged 6 to 18 months, seen at a Basic Health Care Unit in the State of São Paulo. The powdered milk was fortified with 9 mg of iron (ferrous sulfate) and 65 mg of Vitamin C for each 100 g of powder. 4 kg/month were distributed to children under one year and 2 kg/month to those over one year of age. Clinical, anthropometric and hematological (hemoglobin level measurements) evaluations were performed at the onset of the study and at three month intervals after the beginning of the supplementation. At the end of the trial, there was still enough milk available to extend the intervention for a group of 39 children who had presented the worst evolution in the first six months. At the onset of the study, 72.6% of the children presented anemia. After 3 and 6 months, these percentages had decreased to 38.9% and 18.5%, respectively. Among the children that were followed-up for 9 months, their were only 2.5% who presented anemia at the end of the intervention. The highest prevalences were found in the 6 to 12 months age group and the best results in the 10 to 18 month group. There was intrafamilial dilution of the milk in 30.7% of the cases. With or without intrafamilial milk sharing, there were significant decreases in anemia occurrences with no differences between the two groups. The use of fortified milk did not affect the children nutritional condition. This study permitted the conclusion that the fortification of foodstuffs, besides being the method of election for the prevention of iron deficiency, is an excellent alternative for the treatment of and recovery from iron deficient anemia in children under two years of age.

  9. Functional and clinical impact of novel TMPRSS6 variants in iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia patients and genotype-phenotype studies.

    PubMed

    De Falco, Luigia; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Morán, Erica; Oudin, Claire; Rausa, Marco; Bruno, Mariasole; Aranda, Jessica; Argiles, Bienvenida; Yenicesu, Idil; Falcon-Rodriguez, Maria; Yilmaz-Keskin, Ebru; Kocak, Ulker; Beaumont, Carole; Camaschella, Clara; Iolascon, Achille; Grandchamp, Bernard; Sanchez, Mayka

    2014-11-01

    Iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA) is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by hypochromic microcytic anemia, low transferrin saturation, and inappropriate high levels of the iron hormone hepcidin. The disease is caused by variants in the transmembrane protease serine 6 (TMPRSS6) gene that encodes the type II serine protease matriptase-2, a negative regulator of hepcidin transcription. Sequencing analysis of the TMPRSS6 gene in 21 new IRIDA patients from 16 families with different ethnic origin reveal 17 novel mutations, including the most frequent mutation in Southern Italy (p.W590R). Eight missense mutations were analyzed in vitro. All but the p.T287N variant impair matriptase-2 autoproteotylic activation, decrease the ability to cleave membrane HJV and inhibit the HJV-dependent hepcidin activation. Genotype-phenotype studies in IRIDA patients have been so far limited due to the relatively low number of described patients. Our genotype-phenotype correlation analysis demonstrates that patients carrying two nonsense mutations present a more severe anemia and microcytosis and higher hepcidin levels than the other patients. We confirm that TMPRSS6 mutations are spread along the gene and that mechanistically they fully or partially abrogate hepcidin inhibition. Genotyping IRIDA patients help in predicting IRIDA severity and may be useful for predicting response to iron treatment. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  10. Mild maternal iron deficiency anemia induces DPOAE suppression and cochlear hair cell apoptosis by caspase activation in young guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Hao, Shuai; Zhao, Yue; Ren, Yahao; Yang, Jun; Sun, Xiance; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) anemia (IDA) alters auditory neural normal development in the mammalian cochlea. Previous results suggest that mild maternal IDA during pregnancy and lactation altered the hearing and nervous system development of the young offspring, but the mechanisms underlying the association are incompletely understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of apoptosis in the development of sensory hair cells following mild maternal IDA during pregnancy and lactation. We established a maternal anemia model in female guinea pigs by using a mild iron deficient diet. The offspring were weaned on postnatal day (PND) 9 and then was given the iron sufficient diet. Maternal blood samples were collected on gestational day (GD) 21, GD 42, GD 63 and PND 9, serum level of iron (SI) or hemoglobin (Hb) was measured. Blood samples of pups were collected on PND 9 for SI measurement. On PND 24, pups were examined the distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) task, and then the cochleae were harvested for assessment of apoptosis by immunohistochemistry of cysteine-aspartic acid proteases 3/9 (caspase-3/9) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay, and by double immunofluorescence for the colocalization of TUNEL and caspase-3. Blood samples of pups were collected on PND 24 for SI and Hb measurements. Here we show that mild maternal IDA during pregnancy and lactation resulted in hearing impairment, decreased hair cell number, caspase-3/9 activation and increased apoptotic cell number of young guinea pigs. These results indicate a key role for apoptosis in inhibition of hair cell development, caused by mild maternal IDA during pregnancy and lactation.

  11. Update of nutrient-deficiency anemia in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Andrès, Emmanuel; Federici, Laure; Serraj, Khalid; Kaltenbach, Georges

    2008-11-01

    Anemia, defined as a hemoglobin level < 13 g/dL in men and < 12 g/dL in women, is an important healthcare concern among the elderly. Nutrient-deficiency anemia represents one third of all anemias in elderly patients. About two thirds of nutrient-deficiency anemia is associated with iron deficiency and most of those cases are the result of chronic blood loss from gastrointestinal lesions. The remaining cases of nutrient-deficiency anemia are usually associated with vitamin B12, most frequently related to food-cobalamin malabsorption, and/or folate deficiency and are easily treated (nutrient-deficiency replacement).

  12. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Adult Onset Still's Disease with a Serum Ferritin of 26,387 μg/L.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sheetal; Monemian, Seyed; Khalid, Ayesha; Dosik, Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Serum ferritin rises in the anemia of chronic inflammation reflecting increased iron storage and other changes mediated by inflammation. When iron deficiency coexists, the ferritin may not always decline into the subnormal range. We describe the rare interaction of iron deficiency with the extreme hyperferritinemia characteristic of adult onset Still's disease. The combination has clinical relevance and allows deductions about the presence of serum ferritin at 26,387 μg/L despite obvious iron depletion. The diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia was delayed and became fully obvious when her Still's disease remitted and serum ferritin decreased to 6.5 μg/L. The coexistence of iron deficiency should be considered when evaluating a patient with anemia of chronic inflammation even when the ferritin level is elevated several hundredfold. Further insights on ferritin metabolism in Still's disease are suggested by the likelihood that the patient's massive hyperferritinemia in the acute phase of Still's disease was almost entirely of the iron-free apoferritin form.

  13. Appropriateness of the study of iron deficiency anemia prior to referral for small bowel evaluation at a tertiary center

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Jaime Pereira; Pinho, Rolando; Silva, Joana; Ponte, Ana; Sousa, Mafalda; Silva, João Carlos; Carvalho, João

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the adequacy of the study of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in real life practice prior to referral to a gastroenterology department for small bowel evaluation. METHODS All consecutive patients referred to a gastroenterology department for small bowel investigation due to iron deficiency anemia, between January 2013 and December 2015 were included. Both patients referred from general practitioners or directly from different hospital departments were selected. Relevant clinical information regarding prior anemia workup was retrospectively collected from medical records. An appropriate pre-referral study was considered the execution of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) investigation, colonoscopy with quality standards (recent, total and with adequate preparation) and celiac disease (CD) screening (through serologic testing and/or histopathological investigation). RESULTS A total of 77 patients (58.4% female, mean age 67.1 ± 16.7 years) were included. Most (53.2%) patients were referred from general practitioners, 41.6% from other hospital specialties and 5.2% directly from the emergency department. The mean pre-referral hemoglobin concentration was 8.8 ± 2.0 g/dL and the majority of anemias had microcytic (71.4%) and hypochromic (72.7%) characteristics. 77.9% of patients presented with an incomplete pre-referral study: EGD in 97.4%, with H. pylori investigation in 58.3%, colonoscopy with quality criteria in 63.6%, and CD screening in 24.7%. Patients with an appropriate study at the time of referral were younger (48.7 ± 17.7 vs 72.3 ± 12.3 years, P < 0.001). Small bowel evaluation was ultimately undertaken in 72.7% of patients, with a more frequent evaluation in patients with a quality colonoscopy at referral (78.6% vs 23.8%); P < 0.001 (OR = 11.7, 95%CI: 3.6-38.6). The most common diagnosis regarded as the likely cause of IDA was small bowel angioectasia (18.2%) but additional causes were also found in the upper

  14. Assessment of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches of Helicobacter pylori-associated iron deficiency and anemia in children with dyspeptic symptoms.

    PubMed

    El-Aziz Awad, Mohiee El-Deen; Amin, Saleh Mohamed; Abdou, Saied Mohamed

    2014-12-01

    This study assessed the diagnostic approaches of Helicobacter pylori (IP)-associated iron deficiency (ID) and anemia (IDA) in children with dyspeptic symptoms and evaluated the effect of simultaneous anti-H. pylori (anti-HIP) therapy and oral iron in comparison with each of anti? HP therapy and oral iron therapy alone, on iron status as assessed by serum soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) level. Two hundreds children with dyspeptic symptoms were subjected to clinical evaluation, stool examination, CBC, biochemical assays for serum iron parameters and measurements of serum IgG antibodies to HP and serum sTfR level by ELISA. Sixty children were found to have HP. associated ID or IDA and were randomly divided into 3 groups (20 children each). GA received 2-week anti-HP therapy plus 90-day oral iron, and GB received 2-week anti-HP therapy alone whereas group C received 90-day oral iron alone. Re-evaluation of the 3 groups was performed after 3 months of treatment initiation by repeat CBC and serum sTfR level. Children (45%) were HP-seropositive. The mean values of serum sTfR were significantly higher in HP-positive group and in HP-positive children with IDA than in HP-negative group and in HP-negative children with IDA although no significant differences were noted in hematologic variables and iron parameters between the corresponding groups and children. As regard treatment groups, there were significant improvements in the mean values of indices of IDA status (HIb, MCH, MCV, sTfR) and ID status (sTtRi) at 3 months of treatment initiation compared with their baseline values after. anti-HP triple therapy either with oral iron or without oral iron whereas the control children who were treated with oral iron alone showed insignificant changes despite oral iron administration. The improvements in these parameters were significantly greater in groups of children who received anti-HP therapy either combined with iron or alone, where compared with those who did not receive

  15. The usefulness of soluble transferrin receptor in the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia in children

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Se Hoon; Kim, Dong Sup; Yu, Seung Taek; Shin, Sae Ron

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) is a truncated extracellular form of the membrane transferrin receptor produced by proteolysis. Concentrations of serum sTfR are related to iron status and erythropoiesis in the body. We investigated whether serum sTfR levels can aid in diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in children. Methods Ninety-eight patients with IDA were enrolled and were classified according to age at diagnosis. Group 1 comprised 78 children, aged 6-59 months, and group 2 comprised 20 adolescents, aged 12-16 years. Results In group 1, patients' serum sTfR levels correlated negatively with mean corpuscular volume; hemoglobin (Hb), ferritin, and serum iron levels; and transferrin saturation and positively with total iron binding capacity (TIBC) and red cell distribution width. In group 2, patients' serum sTfR levels did not correlate with ferritin levels and TIBC, but had a significant relationship with other iron indices. Hb and serum sTfR levels had a significant inverse relationship in both groups; however, in group 1, there was no correlation between Hb and serum ferritin levels. In 30 patients of group 1, serum sTfR levels were significantly decreased with an increase in Hb levels after iron supplementation for 1 month. Conclusion Serum sTfR levels significantly correlated with other diagnostic iron parameters of IDA and inversely correlated with an increase in Hb levels following iron supplementation. Therefore, serum sTfR levels can be a useful marker for the diagnosis and treatment of IDA in children. PMID:25729394

  16. Living with Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Send a ... Lead poisoning in children has been linked to iron-deficiency anemia . Teenagers also are at risk for anemia, ...

  17. How Is Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Send a ... as to the cause of your anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia , for example, red blood cells usually are ...

  18. Prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in chronic diarrhoea and celiac disease - a western UP experience.

    PubMed

    Sherwani, Rana K; Alam, Seema; Akhtar, Kafil; Abid, Bushra; Rahman, Khaliqur; Mehdi, Riaz

    2008-03-01

    To study the prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia in chronic diarrhoea and celiac disease. Cases included 45 children between 1-12 years with chronic diarrhoea, who underwent investigations like haemogram with GBP, RBC indices, serum iron and TIBC. After a course of antibiotic therapy for 6 weeks with iron and folic acid with no improvement noted within 2 weeks, they were subjected to duodenal biopsy. If biopsy showed features of celiac disease, then anti-endomysial antibody test was performed to substantiate the diagnosis. 30 cases (66.7%) were males and 15 (33.3%) females. 8 cases (17.8%) had watery diarrhoea, 20 (44.4%) semiformed and 17 (37.8%) had watery and semiformed diarrhoea. Bloody diarrhoea was present in 5 (11.1%) and abdominal distension in 21 cases (46.7%). Pallor seen in all the cases. The mean age of the cases was 55 ± 1.5 months and mean duration of diarrhoea was 18 ± 1.4 months. Mean haemoglobin observed was 8.1 ± 1.6 gm%. MCV, MCH and MCHC were 79.1 ± 8.6 fl, 26.9 ± 3 pg and 29.6 ± 2.3 g/dl respectively. Mean serum iron was 32.1 ± 1.2 g/ dl and TIBC was 432 ± 3.2 g/ dl. On peripheral smear, 28 cases (82.4%) showed microcytic hypochromic anaemia. 26 cases showed evidence of celiac disease on duodenal biopsy. Anti endomysial antibody (AEA) test was positive in 15 of the 19 celiac cases on which performed. Mean duration of diarrhoea (23.5 months) was significantly more in celiacs as compared to non-celiacs (11.6 months). Better awareness of the clinical profile and early detection of celiac disease would help detection and management of iron deficiency anaemia associated with celiac disease.

  19. Determinants of Iron Deficiency Anemia in a Cohort of Children Aged 6-71 Months Living in the Northeast of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Francisca Helena Calheiros; da Silva, Camilo Adalton Mariano; Bonomo, Élido; Teixeira, Romero Alves; Pereira, Cíntia Aparecida de Jesus; dos Santos, Karina Benatti; Fausto, Maria Arlene; Negrão-Correa, Deborah Aparecida; Lamounier, Joel Alves; Carneiro, Mariângela

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is one of the most common nutritional disorders worldwide. The aim was to identify the prevalence and incidence of anemia in children and to identify predictors of this condition, including intestinal parasites, social, nutritional and environmental factors, and comorbidities. A population-based cohort study was conducted in a sample of 414 children aged 6-71 months living in Novo Cruzeiro in the Minas Gerais State. Data were collected in 2008 and 2009 by interview and included socio-economic and demographic information about the children and their families. Blood samples were collected for testing of hemoglobin, ferritin and C-reactive protein. Anthropometric measurements and parasitological analyses of fecal samples were performed. To identify risk factors associated with anemia multivariate analyses were performed using the generalized estimating equations (GEE). In 2008 and 2009, respectively, the prevalence rates of anemia were 35.9% (95%CI 31.2-40.8) and 9.8% (95%CI 7.2-12.9), the prevalence rates of iron deficiency were 18.4% (95%CI 14.7-22.6) and 21.8% (95%CI 17.8-26.2), and the incidence rates of anemia and iron deficiency were 3.2% and 21.8%. The following risk factors associated with anemia were: iron deficiency (OR = 3.2; 95%CI 2.0-.5.3), parasitic infections (OR = 1.9; 95%CI 1.2-2.8), being of risk of or being a low length/height-for-age (OR = 2.1; 95%CI 1.4-3.2), and lower retinol intake (OR = 1.7; 95%CI 1.1-2.7), adjusted over time. Nutritional factors, parasitic infections and chronic malnutrition were identified as risk factors for anemia. These factors can be verified in a chronic process and have been classically described as risk factors for these conditions.

  20. Genetic Hemoglobin Disorders, Infection, and Deficiencies of Iron and Vitamin A Determine Anemia in Young Cambodian Children123

    PubMed Central

    George, Joby; Yiannakis, Miriam; Main, Barbara; Devenish, Robyn; Anderson, Courtney; An, Ung Sam; Williams, Sheila M.; Gibson, Rosalind S.

    2012-01-01

    In Cambodia, many factors may complicate the detection of iron deficiency. In a cross-sectional survey, we assessed the role of genetic hemoglobin (Hb) disorders, iron deficiency, vitamin A deficiency, infections, and other factors on Hb in young Cambodian children. Data on sociodemographic status, morbidity, and growth were collected from children (n = 3124) aged 6 to 59 mo selected from 3 rural provinces and Phnom Penh municipality. Blood samples were collected (n = 2695) for complete blood count, Hb type (by DNA analysis), ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), retinol-binding protein (RBP), C-reactive protein, and α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP). Genetic Hb disorders, anemia, and vitamin A deficiency were more common in rural than in urban provinces (P < 0.001): 60.0 vs. 40.0%, 58.2 vs. 32.7%, and 7.4 vs. 3.1%, respectively. Major determinants of Hb were age group, Hb type, ferritin, sTfR, RBP, AGP >1.0 g/L (P < 0.001), and rural setting (P < 0.05). Age group, Hb type, RBP, elevated AGP, and rural setting also influenced ferritin and sTfR (P < 0.02). Multiple factors affected anemia status, including the following: age groups 6–11.99 mo (OR: 6.1; 95% CI: 4.3, 8.7) and 12–23.99 mo (OR: 2.7; 95% CI: 2.1, 3.6); Hb type, notably Hb EE (OR: 18.5; 95% CI: 8.5, 40.4); low ferritin (OR: 3.2; 95% CI: 2.2, 4.7); elevated AGP (OR: 1.4; 95% CI: 1.2,1.7); rural setting (OR: 2.3; 95% CI: 1.7, 3.1); low RBP (OR: 3.6; 95% CI: 2.2, 5.9); and elevated sTfR (OR: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.7, 2.7). In Cambodia, where a high prevalence of genetic Hb disorders exists, ferritin and sTfR are of limited use for assessing the prevalence of iron deficiency. New low-cost methods for detecting genetic Hb disorders are urgently required. PMID:22378325

  1. Ferumoxytol: a new intravenous iron preparation for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Michael H

    2010-01-01

    Ferumoxytol is an intravenous iron preparation for treatment of the anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is a carbohydrate-coated, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle. Because little free iron is present in the preparation, doses of 510 mg have been administered safely in as little as 17 seconds. Two prospective, randomized studies compared two doses of ferumoxytol 510 mg given in 5 +/- 3 days with 3 weeks of oral iron 200 mg/day (as ferrous fumarate) in anemic patients with CKD. One study enrolled 304 patients with stages 1-5 CKD (predialysis), and the other study enrolled 230 patients with stage 5D CKD (undergoing hemodialysis). In both studies, a greater increase in hemoglobin level from baseline to end of study (day 35) was noted in patients who received ferumoxytol compared with those who received oral iron (mean +/- SD 0.82 +/- 1.24 vs 0.16 +/- 1.02 g/dl in patients with stages 1-5 CKD and 1.02 +/- 1.13 vs 0.46 +/- 1.06 g/dl in patients with stage 5D CKD, p<0.001). A greater proportion of both predialysis and hemodialysis patients who received ferumoxytol had hemoglobin level increases from baseline of 1 g/dl or more compared with those who received oral iron (p<0.001). In a prospective, double-blind, crossover study of more than 700 patients with CKD stages 1-5D that compared the safety of ferumoxytol with normal saline injection, the rates of treatment-related adverse events were 5.2% and 4.5%, respectively. Serious treatment-related adverse events were seen in one patient in each treatment group. The most common adverse events with ferumoxytol occurred at the injection site (bruising, pain, swelling, erythema). Dizziness, nausea, pruritus, headache, and fatigue occurred in less than 2% of patients receiving ferumoxytol, with a similar frequency noted after administration of normal saline. In short-term studies, intravenous ferumoxytol was safely and rapidly administered, and was more effective than oral iron therapy in increasing hemoglobin

  2. HbA1c and Glycated Albumin Levels Are High in Gastrectomized Subjects with Iron-Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Inada, Shinya; Koga, Masafumi

    2017-01-01

    We report that glycated albumin (GA) is higher relative to HbA1c in non-diabetic, gastrectomized subjects without anemia, and thus is a sign of oxyhyperglycemia. It is known that gastrectomized subjects are prone to iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), and that the HbA1c levels of subjects with IDA are falsely high. In the present study, the HbA1c and GA levels of gastrectomized subjects with IDA were compared with gastrectomized subjects without anemia. Seven non-diabetic gastrectomized subjects with IDA were enrolled in the present study. Twenty-eight non-diabetic gastrectomized subjects without anemia matched with the subjects with IDA in terms of age, gender, and body mass index were used as the controls. Although there were no significant differences in fasting plasma glucose and OGTT 2-hour plasma glucose (2-h PG) between the two groups, the HbA1c and GA levels in gastrectomized subjects with IDA were significantly higher than the controls. For all of the gastrectomized subjects (n=35), ferritin exhibited a significant negative correlation with HbA1c and GA, and a significant positive correlation with 2-h PG. In addition, the HbA1c and GA levels exhibited a significant negative correlation with the mean corpuscular hemoglobin and hemoglobin. The HbA1c and GA levels in gastrectomized subjects with IDA were significantly higher than those in controls. The high GA levels are attributed to a tendency in which patients with total gastrectomy, who are prone to IDA, are susceptible to postprandial hyperglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia, which in turn leads to large fluctuations in plasma glucose.

  3. Effect of Low-Dose Ferrous Sulfate vs Iron Polysaccharide Complex on Hemoglobin Concentration in Young Children With Nutritional Iron-Deficiency Anemia: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jacquelyn M; Buchanan, George R; Adix, Leah; Zhang, Song; Gao, Ang; McCavit, Timothy L

    2017-06-13

    Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) affects millions of persons worldwide, and is associated with impaired neurodevelopment in infants and children. Ferrous sulfate is the most commonly prescribed oral iron despite iron polysaccharide complex possibly being better tolerated. To compare the effect of ferrous sulfate with iron polysaccharide complex on hemoglobin concentration in infants and children with nutritional IDA. Double-blind, superiority randomized clinical trial of infants and children aged 9 to 48 months with nutritional IDA (assessed by history and laboratory criteria) that was conducted in an outpatient hematology clinic at a US tertiary care hospital from September 2013 through November 2015; 12-week follow-up ended in January 2016. Three mg/kg of elemental iron once daily as either ferrous sulfate drops or iron polysaccharide complex drops for 12 weeks. Primary outcome was change in hemoglobin over 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes included complete resolution of IDA (defined as hemoglobin concentration >11 g/dL, mean corpuscular volume >70 fL, reticulocyte hemoglobin equivalent >25 pg, serum ferritin level >15 ng/mL, and total iron-binding capacity <425 μg/dL at the 12-week visit), changes in serum ferritin level and total iron-binding capacity, adverse effects. Of 80 randomized infants and children (median age, 22 months; 55% male; 61% Hispanic white; 40 per group), 59 completed the trial (28 [70%] in ferrous sulfate group; 31 [78%] in iron polysaccharide complex group). From baseline to 12 weeks, mean hemoglobin increased from 7.9 to 11.9 g/dL (ferrous sulfate group) vs 7.7 to 11.1 g/dL (iron complex group), a greater difference of 1.0 g/dL (95% CI, 0.4 to 1.6 g/dL; P < .001) with ferrous sulfate (based on a linear mixed model). Proportion with a complete resolution of IDA was higher in the ferrous sulfate group (29% vs 6%; P = .04). Median serum ferritin level increased from 3.0 to 15.6 ng/mL (ferrous sulfate) vs 2.0 to 7.5 ng/mL (iron complex) over

  4. Iron deficiency and anemia control for infants and young children in malaria-endemic areas: a call to action and consensus among the research community123

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Kimberly B.; Neufeld, Lynnette M.

    2012-01-01

    WHO recommendations on iron supplementation for infants and young children in malaria-endemic areas changed dramatically from universal to targeted supplementation for iron-deficient children only, after a trial in a high malaria transmission area showed an increased risk of hospital admission and mortality among iron-replete children following iron and folic acid supplementation. Since this time, there has been much debate and little agreement among the nutrition research community on how to move forward, and country policy and program decision makers have been left with incomplete guidance on how to address young child iron deficiency and anemia in their countries. The focus of a recent symposium during the American Society for Nutrition annual meeting, held in Washington, DC, in April 2011, was on exploring options for addressing iron deficiency and anemia among infants and young children in malaria-endemic areas, now, with safe, effective, and feasible interventions that provide iron. Papers based on the invited presentations are included in this supplement. The first paper is a review of the relationship between iron and malaria. The second is an analysis of theoretical and practical considerations regarding the targeted approach of providing iron and includes results from field testing noninvasive screening devices. This is followed by a review of the safety of universal provision of iron through home-fortification products in malaria-endemic areas. The final papers provide a call to action by highlighting pending research issues (fourth paper) and feasible strategies to move programs forward (fifth paper). PMID:22797991

  5. [Activity of heme synthesis enzymes in the bone marrow cells of rats with alimentary iron-deficient anemia].

    PubMed

    Inoiatova, F Kh; Oripov, N N

    2004-12-01

    An intensification of aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-synthase on the day of experiment and its tend to its further gradual inhibition noted to be in the bone marrow cells of rats with alimentary iron-deficient anemia (IDA). An activity of porfobilinogen (PB)-synthase was increasing in all the terms of the trial, that of ferrochelatase--on the day 10, and it was inhibited later on. Such changes in an activity of heme synthesis key enzymes result in an accumulation of intermittent products. An increase in MDA level, an inhibition of antioxidant defense enzymes found to be in all the terms of trial, SOD--in all the terms of studies, catalase--in late terms.

  6. Bed bugs reproductive life cycle in the clothes of a patient suffering from Alzheimer’s disease results in iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sabou, Marcela; Gallo Imperiale, Delphine; Andrès, Emmanuel; Abou-Bacar, Ahmed; Foeglé, Jacinthe; Lavigne, Thierry; Kaltenbach, Georges; Candolfi, Ermanno

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of an 82-year-old patient, hospitalized for malaise. Her clothes were infested by numerous insects and the entomological analysis identified them as being Cimex lectularius (bed bugs). The history of the patient highlighted severe cognitive impairment. The biological assessment initially showed a profound microcytic, aregenerative, iron deficiency anemia. A vitamin B12 deficiency due to pernicious anemia (positive intrinsic factor antibodies) was also highlighted, but this was not enough to explain the anemia without macrocytosis. Laboratory tests, endoscopy and a CT scan eliminated a tumor etiology responsible for occult bleeding. The patient had a mild itchy rash which was linked to the massive colonization by the bed bugs. The C. lectularius bite is most often considered benign because it is not a vector of infectious agents. Far from trivial, a massive human colonization by bed bugs may cause such a hematic depletion that severe microcytic anemia may result. PMID:23673315

  7. The association between subjective assessment of menstrual bleeding and measures of iron deficiency anemia in premenopausal African-American women: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Lia A; Ghant, Marissa S; Andrade, Carolina; Recht, Hannah; Marsh, Erica E

    2016-08-15

    Both iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are common in the United States with a prevalence amongst women of 12 % and 4 % respectively. These numbers are even higher in African-American women (AAW) and are often a result of heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB). The primary objective of this study was to determine if perceived assessment of menstrual bleeding was associated with objective and subjective measures of anemia in AAW. Quantitative cross-sectional pilot study with surveys and venipuncture. 44 premenopausal AAW (mean age 37.9 years ± 9. 4) participated in the study. Iron deficiency was present in 68.2 % of the participants and 18.2 % were anemic. Almost half of the participants reported that their menses were heavy or very heavy, and there was a relationship between perceived heaviness of menstrual flow and anemia (P = 0.021). Of the individuals who reported that their menses were heavy or very heavy, 35.0 % were anemic. AAW who reported heavy or very heavy menses had significantly lower hemoglobin (P = 0.015), hematocrit (P = 0.003), and ferritin (P = 0.012) levels, as well as more general (P = 0.006) and menses-associated symptoms of anemia (P = 0.015) than those who reported normal or light menses. This pilot study of premenopausal AAW found that a significant percentage of women who report HMB are not only iron deficient, but also anemic. AAW should be educated on the consequences of HMB and counseled to seek care with a women's health provider when they perceive HMB. More importantly, providers should be aware that when AAW report HMB, evaluation for iron deficiency and anemia are essential.

  8. Discriminant indices for distinguishing thalassemia and iron deficiency in patients with microcytic anemia: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Johannes J M L; Urrechaga, Eloísa; Aguirre, Urko

    2015-11-01

    More than 40 mathematical indices have been proposed in the hematological literature for discriminating between iron deficiency anemia and thalassemia trait in subjects with microcytic red blood cells (RBCs). None of these discriminant indices is 100% sensitive and specific and also the ranking of the discriminant indices is not consistent. Therefore, we decided to conduct the first meta-analysis of the most frequently used discriminant indices. An extensive literature search yielded 99 articles dealing with 12 indices that were investigated five or more times. For each discriminant index we calculated the diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) and summary ROC analysis was done for comparing the performance of the indices. The ratio of microcytic to hypochromic RBCs (M/H ratio) showed the best performance, DOR=100.8. This was significantly higher than that of all other indices investigated. The RBC index scored second (DOR=47.0), closely followed by the Sirdah index (DOR=46.7) and the Ehsani index (DOR=44.7). Subsequently, there was a group of four indices with intermediate and three with lower DOR. The lowest performance (DOR=6.8) was found for the RDW (Bessman index). Overall, the indices performed better for adults than for children. The M/H ratio outperformed all other discriminant indices for discriminating between iron deficiency anemia and thalassemia trait. Although its sensitivity and specificity are not high enough for making a definitive diagnosis, it is certainly of value for identifying those subjects with microcytic RBC in whom diagnostic tests for confirming thalassemia are indicated.

  9. Interactive effects of dietary fat/carbohydrate ratio and body mass index on iron deficiency anemia among Taiwanese women.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jung-Su; Chen, Yi-Chun; Owaga, Eddy; Palupi, Khairizka Citra; Pan, Wen-Harn; Bai, Chyi-Huey

    2014-09-24

    Whether being overweight or obese is associated with increased risk of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) remains controversial. We evaluated the dietary intakes and risk for IDA in relation to body mass index (BMI). One thousand two hundred and seventy-four females aged ≥ 19 years, enrolled in the third Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan (NAHSIT) 2005-2008, were selected. Half of the women were either overweight (24.0%) or obese (25.3%). The overall prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency and IDA among adult women was 19.5%, 8.6% and 6.2%. BMI showed a protective effect on IDA: overweight (odds ratio, OR: 0.365 (0.181-0.736)) and obese (OR: 0.480 (0.259-0.891)) when compared with normal weight. Univariate analysis identified increased IDA risk for overweight/obese women who consumed higher dietary fat but lower carbohydrate (CHO) (OR: 10.119 (1.267-80.79)). No such relationship was found in IDA women with normal weight (OR: 0.375 (0.036-4.022)). Analysis of interaction(s) showed individuals within the highest BMI tertile (T3) had the lowest risk for IDA and the risk increased with increasing tertile groups of fat/CHO ratio; OR 0.381 (0.144-1.008; p = 0.051), 0.370 (0.133-1.026; p = 0.056) and 0.748 (0.314-1.783; p = 0.513); for T1, T2 and T3, respectively. In conclusion, a protective effect of BMI on IDA may be attenuated in women who had increased fat/CHO ratio.

  10. Trichuris dysentery syndrome: a common cause of chronic iron deficiency anemia in adults in an endemic area (with videos).

    PubMed

    Khuroo, Mohammad S; Khuroo, Mehnaaz S; Khuroo, Naira S

    2010-01-01

    There are few published reports of Trichuris dysentery syndrome (TDS) in children. The disease has not been reported in adults. To report the clinical, colonoscopic, and histologic findings of TDS in adults in an endemic area. Case series. Tertiary gastroenterology center. Eighty-four consecutive adult patients with chronic iron deficiency anemia over a 3-year period were investigated. Ten patients had severe Trichuris trichiura infection and received a diagnosis of TDS. Colonoscopy and colonic biopsies. Patients received anthelmintic treatment, and their response was assessed. Ten patients with TDS were studied, including 8 female and 2 male patients with a mean (+/- standard deviation) age of 43 (+/- 15.5) years (range 15-65 years) and a hemoglobin level (+/- standard deviation) of 6.0 +/- 1.5 g/dL (range 4-8 g/dL); the duration (+/- standard deviation) of disease was 2.1 +/- 1.1 years (range 1.5-8.5 years). None of the patients had growth retardation, malnutrition, or immunodeficiency. Abdominal symptoms included abdominal pain, diarrhea, and hematochezia in 1 patient. Nine other patients had no abdominal symptoms. Colonoscopy revealed actively motile T. trichiura worms in large numbers in the right colon in 7 patients, in the ileum in 1, in the left colon in 1, and worms carpeting of the whole colonic mucosa in 1. Associated mucosal changes included petechial lesions, blotchy mucosal hemorrhages, and active mucosal oozing. Biopsy of the colon revealed worm segments with a thick outer cuticle. The posterior segment of the worm contained gravid uterus with numerous characteristic T. trichiura eggs. There was paucity of associated mucosal changes in most of the sections. Similar studies in other e