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Sample records for iron metabolism limits

  1. Bypasses in intracellular glucose metabolism in iron-limited Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Sasnow, Samantha S; Wei, Hua; Aristilde, Ludmilla

    2016-02-01

    Decreased biomass growth in iron (Fe)-limited Pseudomonas is generally attributed to downregulated expression of Fe-requiring proteins accompanied by an increase in siderophore biosynthesis. Here, we applied a stable isotope-assisted metabolomics approach to explore the underlying carbon metabolism in glucose-grown Pseudomonas putida KT2440. Compared to Fe-replete cells, Fe-limited cells exhibited a sixfold reduction in growth rate but the glucose uptake rate was only halved, implying an imbalance between glucose uptake and biomass growth. This imbalance could not be explained by carbon loss via siderophore production, which accounted for only 10% of the carbon-equivalent glucose uptake. In lieu of the classic glycolytic pathway, the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway in Pseudomonas is the principal route for glucose catabolism following glucose oxidation to gluconate. Remarkably, gluconate secretion represented 44% of the glucose uptake in Fe-limited cells but only 2% in Fe-replete cells. Metabolic (13) C flux analysis and intracellular metabolite levels under Fe limitation indicated a decrease in carbon fluxes through the ED pathway and through Fe-containing metabolic enzymes. The secreted siderophore was found to promote dissolution of Fe-bearing minerals to a greater extent than the high extracellular gluconate. In sum, bypasses in the Fe-limited glucose metabolism were achieved to promote Fe availability via siderophore secretion and to reroute excess carbon influx via enhanced gluconate secretion. PMID:26377487

  2. Cellular iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ponka, P

    1999-03-01

    Iron is essential for oxidation-reduction catalysis and bioenergetics, but unless appropriately shielded, iron plays a key role in the formation of toxic oxygen radicals that can attack all biological molecules. Hence, specialized molecules for the acquisition, transport (transferrin), and storage (ferritin) of iron in a soluble nontoxic form have evolved. Delivery of iron to most cells, probably including those of the kidney, occurs following the binding of transferrin to transferrin receptors on the cell membrane. The transferrin-receptor complexes are then internalized by endocytosis, and iron is released from transferrin by a process involving endosomal acidification. Cellular iron storage and uptake are coordinately regulated post-transcriptionally by cytoplasmic factors, iron-regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP-1 and IRP-2). Under conditions of limited iron supply, IRP binding to iron-responsive elements (present in 5' untranslated region of ferritin mRNA and 3' untranslated region of transferrin receptor mRNA) blocks ferritin mRNA translation and stabilizes transferrin receptor mRNA. The opposite scenario develops when iron in the transit pool is plentiful. Moreover, IRP activities/levels can be affected by various forms of "oxidative stress" and nitric oxide. The kidney also requires iron for metabolic processes, and it is likely that iron deficiency or excess can cause disturbed function of kidney cells. Transferrin receptors are not evenly distributed throughout the kidney, and there is a cortical-to-medullary gradient in heme biosynthesis, with greatest activity in the cortex and least in the medulla. This suggests that there are unique iron/heme metabolism features in some kidney cells, but the specific aspects of iron and heme metabolism in the kidney are yet to be explained.

  3. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since the pioneering research by Shoden in 1953. However, we recently developed a new method for determining ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron by computer-assisted serum ferritin kinetics. Serum ferritin increase or decrease curves were measured in patients with normal storage iron levels (chronic hepatitis C and iron deficiency anemia treated by intravenous iron injection), and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis and transfusion dependent anemia). We thereby confirmed the existence of two iron pathways where iron flows followed the numbered order (1) labile iron, (2) ferritin and (3) hemosiderin in iron deposition and mobilization among many previously proposed but mostly unproven routes. We also demonstrated the increasing and decreasing phases of ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron in iron deposition and mobilization. The author first demonstrated here the change in proportion between pre-existing ferritin iron and new ferritin iron synthesized by removing iron from hemosiderin in the course of iron removal. In addition, the author disclosed the cause of underestimation of storage iron turnover rate which had been reported by previous investigators in estimating storage iron turnover rate of normal subjects. PMID:25741033

  4. Physiology of Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Waldvogel-Abramowski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M.; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary A revolution occurred during the last decade in the comprehension of the physiology as well as in the physiopathology of iron metabolism. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent knowledge that has accumulated, allowing a better comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in iron homeostasis. Iron metabolism is very fine tuned. The free molecule is very toxic; therefore, complex regulatory mechanisms have been developed in mammalian to insure adequate intestinal absorption, transportation, utilization, and elimination. ‘Ironomics’ certainly will be the future of the understanding of genes as well as of the protein-protein interactions involved in iron metabolism. PMID:25053935

  5. Macrophages and Iron Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Soares, Miguel P; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-03-15

    Iron is a transition metal that due to its inherent ability to exchange electrons with a variety of molecules is essential to support life. In mammals, iron exists mostly in the form of heme, enclosed within an organic protoporphyrin ring and functioning primarily as a prosthetic group in proteins. Paradoxically, free iron also has the potential to become cytotoxic when electron exchange with oxygen is unrestricted and catalyzes the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological properties demand that iron metabolism is tightly regulated such that iron is available for core biological functions while preventing its cytotoxic effects. Macrophages play a central role in establishing this delicate balance. Here, we review the impact of macrophages on heme-iron metabolism and, reciprocally, how heme-iron modulates macrophage function.

  6. The effects of iron limitation and cell density on prokaryotic metabolism and gene expression: Excerpts from Fusobacterium necrophorum strain 774 (sheep isolate).

    PubMed

    Antiabong, John F; Ball, Andrew S; Brown, Melissa H

    2015-05-25

    Fusobacterium necrophorum is a Gram-negative obligate anaerobe associated with several diseases in humans and animals. Despite its increasing clinical significance, there is little or no data on the relationship between its metabolism and virulence. Previous studies have shown that bacteria grown under iron-limitation express immunogenic antigens similar to those generated in vivo. Thus, this paper describes the relationship between F. necrophorum subsp. necrophorum (Fnn) metabolism and the expression of the encoded putative virulence factors under iron-restricted conditions. At the midlog phase, iron limitation reduced Fnn growth but the cell density was dependent on the size of the inoculum. Preferential utilization of glucose-1-phosphate, d-mannitol and l-phenylalanine; production of 2-hydroxycaproic acid and termination of dimethyl sulphide production were major Fnn response-factors to iron limitation. Ultimately, iron restriction resulted in an increased ability of Fnn to metabolize diverse carbon sources and in the expression of stress-specific virulence factors. Iron starvation in low Fnn cell density was associated with the up-regulation of haemagglutinin (HA) and leukotoxin (lktA) genes (2.49 and 3.72 fold change respectively). However, Fnn encoded Haemolysin (Hly), yebN homologue (febN) and tonB homologue, were down-regulated (0.15, 0.79 and 0.33, fold changes respectively). Interestingly, cell density appeared to play a regulatory role in the final bacteria cell biomass, induction of a metabolic gene expression and the expression pattern virulence factors in Fnn suggesting the role of a cell density-associated regulatory factor. This report suggest that future studies on differential expression of bacterial genes under altered environmental condition(s) should consider testing the effect of cell concentrations as this is often neglected in such studies. In conclusion, iron restriction induces preferential utilization of carbon sources and altered

  7. Metabolic Remodeling in Iron-deficient Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Philpott, Caroline C.; Leidgens, Sebastien; Frey, Avery G.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells contain dozens, perhaps hundreds, of iron-dependent proteins, which perform critical functions in nearly every major cellular process. Nutritional iron is frequently available to cells in only limited amounts; thus, unicellular and higher eukaryotes have evolved mechanisms to cope with iron scarcity. These mechanisms have been studied at the molecular level in the model eukaryotes Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, as well as in some pathogenic fungi. Each of these fungal species exhibits metabolic adaptations to iron deficiency that serve to reduce the cell’s reliance on iron. However, the regulatory mechanisms that accomplish these adaptations differ greatly between fungal species. PMID:22306284

  8. Iron Metabolism in Hodgkin's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beamish, M. R.; Jones, P. Ashley; Trevett, D.; Evans, I. Howell; Jacobs, A.

    1972-01-01

    An evaluation of iron metabolism has been carried out in 23 untreated patients with Hodgkin's disease and 6 patients with other lymphomata. The reduction in red cell life span is related to the stage of the disease. There is an almost universal impairment of iron release from the reticuloendothelial system with a consequent sideropenia and failure of iron delivery to the bone marrow for erythropoiesis. This defect is found in all stages of the disease and is not related to systemic symptoms. PMID:4567182

  9. A Systems Biology Approach to Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chifman, J.; Laubenbacher, R.; Torti, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    Iron is critical to the survival of almost all living organisms. However, inappropriately low or high levels of iron are detrimental and contribute to a wide range of diseases. Recent advances in the study of iron metabolism have revealed multiple intricate pathways that are essential to the maintenance of iron homeostasis. Further, iron regulation involves processes at several scales, ranging from the subcellular to the organismal. This complexity makes a systems biology approach crucial, with its enabling technology of computational models based on a mathematical description of regulatory systems. Systems biology may represent a new strategy for understanding imbalances in iron metabolism and their underlying causes. PMID:25480643

  10. Iron metabolism and iron supplementation in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Heinz; Evstatiev, Rayko; Kornek, Gabriela; Aapro, Matti; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Fridrik, Michael; Geissler, Dietmar; Geissler, Klaus; Gisslinger, Heinz; Koller, Elisabeth; Kopetzky, Gerhard; Lang, Alois; Rumpold, Holger; Steurer, Michael; Kamali, Houman; Link, Hartmut

    2015-12-01

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency-associated anemia are common complications in cancer patients. Most iron deficient cancer patients present with functional iron deficiency (FID), a status with adequate storage iron, but insufficient iron supply for erythroblasts and other iron dependent tissues. FID is the consequence of the cancer-associated cytokine release, while in absolute iron deficiency iron stores are depleted resulting in similar but often more severe symptoms of insufficient iron supply. Here we present a short review on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, clinical symptoms, and treatment of iron deficiency in cancer patients. Special emphasis is given to intravenous iron supplementation and on the benefits and limitations of different formulations. Based on these considerations and recommendations from current international guidelines we developed recommendations for clinical practice and classified the level of evidence and grade of recommendation according to the principles of evidence-based medicine.

  11. Mammalian iron metabolism and its control by iron regulatory proteins☆

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cole P.; Shen, Lacy; Eisenstein, Richard S.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular iron homeostasis is maintained by iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP1 and IRP2). IRPs bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) located in the untranslated regions of mRNAs encoding protein involved in iron uptake, storage, utilization and export. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in understanding how IRPs are regulated by iron-dependent and iron-independent mechanisms and the pathological consequences of IRP2 deficiency in mice. The identification of novel IREs involved in diverse cellular pathways has revealed that the IRP–IRE network extends to processes other than iron homeostasis. A mechanistic understanding of IRP regulation will likely yield important insights into the basis of disorders of iron metabolism. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. PMID:22610083

  12. The role of ceruloplasmin in iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Roeser, H P; Lee, G R; Nacht, S; Cartwright, G E

    1970-12-01

    The importance of ceruloplasmin in iron metabolism was studied in swine made hypoceruloplasminemic by copper deprivation. When the plasma ceruloplasmin level fell below 1% of normal, cell-to-plasma iron flow became sufficiently impaired to cause hypoferremia, even though total body iron stores were normal. When ceruloplasmin was administered to such animals, plasma iron increased immediately and continued to rise at a rate proportional to the logarithm of the ceruloplasmin dose. The administration of inorganic copper induced increases in plasma iron only after ceruloplasmin appeared in the circulation. Thus, ceruloplasmin appeared to be essential to the normal movement of iron from cells to plasma. Studies designed to define the mechanism of action of ceruloplasmin were based on the in vitro observation that ceruloplasmin behaves as an enzyme (ferroxidase) that catalyzes oxidation of ferrous iron. Retention of injected ferrous iron in the plasma of ceruloplasmin-deficient swine was significantly less than that of ferric iron, reflecting impaired transferrin iron binding. Rat ceruloplasmin, which has little ferroxidase activity, was much less effective than porcine or human ceruloplasmin in inducing increases in plasma iron. These observations suggest that ceruloplasmin acts by virtue of its ferroxidase activity. Eight patients with Wilson's disease were evaluated in order to investigate iron metabolism in a disorder characterized by reduced ceruloplasmin levels. Evidence of iron deficiency was found in six of these, and in five of the six, plasma ceruloplasmin was less than 5% of normal. In comparison, the two patients without evidence of iron deficiency had ceruloplasmin levels of 11 and 18% of normal. It is suggested that iron deficiency tends to occur in those patients with Wilson's disease who have the severest degrees of hypoceruloplasminemia, possibly because of defective transfer of iron from intestinal mucosal cells to plasma.

  13. [Phosphate metabolism and iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Keitaro

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets(ADHR)is caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGF23 that prevent its proteolytic cleavage. Fibroblast growth factor 23(FGF23)is a hormone that inhibits renal phosphate reabsorption and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D biosynthesis. Low iron status plays a role in the pathophysiology of ADHR. Iron deficiency is an environmental trigger that stimulates FGF23 expression and hypophosphatemia in ADHR. It was reported that FGF23 elevation in patients with CKD, who are often iron deficient. In patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, treatment with ferric citrate hydrate resulted in significant reductions in serum phosphate and FGF23.

  14. Genome and low-iron response of an oceanic diatom adapted to chronic iron limitation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biogeochemical elemental cycling is driven by primary production of biomass via phototrophic phytoplankton growth, with 40% of marine productivity being assigned to diatoms. Phytoplankton growth is widely limited by the availability of iron, an essential component of the photosynthetic apparatus. The oceanic diatom Thalassiosira oceanica shows a remarkable tolerance to low-iron conditions and was chosen as a model for deciphering the cellular response upon shortage of this essential micronutrient. Results The combined efforts in genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics reveal an unexpected metabolic flexibility in response to iron availability for T. oceanica CCMP1005. The complex response comprises cellular retrenchment as well as remodeling of bioenergetic pathways, where the abundance of iron-rich photosynthetic proteins is lowered, whereas iron-rich mitochondrial proteins are preserved. As a consequence of iron deprivation, the photosynthetic machinery undergoes a remodeling to adjust the light energy utilization with the overall decrease in photosynthetic electron transfer complexes. Conclusions Beneficial adaptations to low-iron environments include strategies to lower the cellular iron requirements and to enhance iron uptake. A novel contribution enhancing iron economy of phototrophic growth is observed with the iron-regulated substitution of three metal-containing fructose-bisphosphate aldolases involved in metabolic conversion of carbohydrates for enzymes that do not contain metals. Further, our data identify candidate components of a high-affinity iron-uptake system, with several of the involved genes and domains originating from duplication events. A high genomic plasticity, as seen from the fraction of genes acquired through horizontal gene transfer, provides the platform for these complex adaptations to a low-iron world. PMID:22835381

  15. Diversity and Evolutionary History of Iron Metabolism Genes in Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Groussman, Ryan D; Parker, Micaela S; Armbrust, E Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Ferroproteins arose early in Earth's history, prior to the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and the subsequent reduction of bioavailable iron. Today, iron availability limits primary productivity in about 30% of the world's oceans. Diatoms, responsible for nearly half of oceanic primary production, have evolved molecular strategies for coping with variable iron concentrations. Our understanding of the evolutionary breadth of these strategies has been restricted by the limited number of species for which molecular sequence data is available. To uncover the diversity of strategies marine diatoms employ to meet cellular iron demands, we analyzed 367 newly released marine microbial eukaryotic transcriptomes, which include 47 diatom species. We focused on genes encoding proteins previously identified as having a role in iron management: iron uptake (high-affinity ferric reductase, multi-copper oxidase, and Fe(III) permease); iron storage (ferritin); iron-induced protein substitutions (flavodoxin/ferredoxin, and plastocyanin/cytochrome c6) and defense against reactive oxygen species (superoxide dismutases). Homologs encoding the high-affinity iron uptake system components were detected across the four diatom Classes suggesting an ancient origin for this pathway. Ferritin transcripts were also detected in all Classes, revealing a more widespread utilization of ferritin throughout diatoms than previously recognized. Flavodoxin and plastocyanin transcripts indicate possible alternative redox metal strategies. Predicted localization signals for ferredoxin identify multiple examples of gene transfer from the plastid to the nuclear genome. Transcripts encoding four superoxide dismutase metalloforms were detected, including a putative nickel-coordinating isozyme. Taken together, our results suggest that the majority of iron metabolism genes in diatoms appear to be vertically inherited with functional diversity achieved via possible neofunctionalization of paralogs. This

  16. Diversity and Evolutionary History of Iron Metabolism Genes in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Groussman, Ryan D.; Parker, Micaela S.; Armbrust, E. Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Ferroproteins arose early in Earth’s history, prior to the emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis and the subsequent reduction of bioavailable iron. Today, iron availability limits primary productivity in about 30% of the world’s oceans. Diatoms, responsible for nearly half of oceanic primary production, have evolved molecular strategies for coping with variable iron concentrations. Our understanding of the evolutionary breadth of these strategies has been restricted by the limited number of species for which molecular sequence data is available. To uncover the diversity of strategies marine diatoms employ to meet cellular iron demands, we analyzed 367 newly released marine microbial eukaryotic transcriptomes, which include 47 diatom species. We focused on genes encoding proteins previously identified as having a role in iron management: iron uptake (high-affinity ferric reductase, multi-copper oxidase, and Fe(III) permease); iron storage (ferritin); iron-induced protein substitutions (flavodoxin/ferredoxin, and plastocyanin/cytochrome c6) and defense against reactive oxygen species (superoxide dismutases). Homologs encoding the high-affinity iron uptake system components were detected across the four diatom Classes suggesting an ancient origin for this pathway. Ferritin transcripts were also detected in all Classes, revealing a more widespread utilization of ferritin throughout diatoms than previously recognized. Flavodoxin and plastocyanin transcripts indicate possible alternative redox metal strategies. Predicted localization signals for ferredoxin identify multiple examples of gene transfer from the plastid to the nuclear genome. Transcripts encoding four superoxide dismutase metalloforms were detected, including a putative nickel-coordinating isozyme. Taken together, our results suggest that the majority of iron metabolism genes in diatoms appear to be vertically inherited with functional diversity achieved via possible neofunctionalization of paralogs. This

  17. Influence of iron-limited continuous culture on physiology and virulence of Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed

    James, B W; Mauchline, W S; Fitzgeorge, R B; Dennis, P J; Keevil, C W

    1995-11-01

    A virulent strain of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, subgroup Pontiac, was grown in continuous culture at a constant growth rate under iron-replete and iron-limited conditions. Iron limitation was achieved by the removal of ferrous sulfate and hemin from the chemically defined medium. Residual contaminating iron, 0.45 microM, was sufficient to support iron-limited growth. Typical iron-replete cultures metabolized 3.3 microM iron. Serine provided the principal source of carbon and energy for both cultures, although iron-replete cultures also depleted a number of other amino acids. There was a 40% decrease in culture biomass under iron-restricted conditions. Iron limitation did not significantly affect carbohydrate metabolism, with the molar growth yield for carbon (Ycarbon) comparable for both cultures. However, under iron-limited conditions a sixfold increase in Yiron correlated with a significant decrease in the iron content of the biomass, as the culture utilized the available iron more efficiently. Highly pleomorphic iron-replete cultures became uniform cultures of short fine rods when adapted to iron-deficient conditions. In addition to the morphological and physiological changes, iron limitation had a critical effect on culture virulence. The virulence of this strain was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced when the culture was subjected to iron-limited conditions. This phenomenon was reversible, with a significant increase in culture virulence upon reversion to iron-replete conditions. When compared in an in vitro macrophage assay, the number of culturable avirulent iron-limited cells located intracellularly after infection was significantly lower than for the virulent replete and control cultures. These results further support the role of environmental parameters in regulating the virulence of L. pneumophila. PMID:7591051

  18. [Iron metabolism: pathophysiology and biomarkers in elderly population].

    PubMed

    Gavazzi, Gaëtan

    2014-06-01

    Iron deficiency is frequent in elderly population and is responsable for numerous clinical situations. Because of the frequent association of inflammatory diseases, chronic diseases associated with iron loss, diagnosis of iron deficiency is often difficult in elderly population. For the last ten years, new biomarkers of iron physiology lead to better understand physiology and pathophysiology of iron metabolism particularly in iron deficiency. This overview aims to show modifications of iron metabolism with ageing, pathophysiological mecanisms associated with iron deficiency and give a stratification of the use of biomarkers as diagnostic tools differentiating absolute deficiency or functional deficeincy. PMID:25031216

  19. Iron metabolism: a promising target for antibacterial strategies.

    PubMed

    Ballouche, Mathieu; Cornelis, Pierre; Baysse, Christine

    2009-11-01

    In the fight against pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria, development and spreading of resistance to antibiotics is an increasing public health problem. The available antibacterial treatments are becoming less and less effective, making urgent the discovery of new active molecules. One strategy that has been explored to bypass the bacterial adaptation to drugs is to target the iron metabolism of bacteria, since iron is critical for all bacteria to grow. To date, three major ways have been assessed to exploit weaknesses in the bacterial iron metabolism: the "Trojan Horse strategy" which takes advantages of natural iron-uptake systems to deliver antimicrobial compounds inside the cells; the use of iron-antagonists and iron-chelators in order to reduce iron availability and the inhibition of enzymatic steps of iron metabolism via chemical compounds. This review discusses these antibacterial strategies interfering with several levels of the bacterial iron metabolism, with a special emphasis on recently published and/or patented discoveries.

  20. Dietary iron controls circadian hepatic glucose metabolism through heme synthesis.

    PubMed

    Simcox, Judith A; Mitchell, Thomas Creighton; Gao, Yan; Just, Steven F; Cooksey, Robert; Cox, James; Ajioka, Richard; Jones, Deborah; Lee, Soh-Hyun; King, Daniel; Huang, Jingyu; McClain, Donald A

    2015-04-01

    The circadian rhythm of the liver maintains glucose homeostasis, and disruption of this rhythm is associated with type 2 diabetes. Feeding is one factor that sets the circadian clock in peripheral tissues, but relatively little is known about the role of specific dietary components in that regard. We assessed the effects of dietary iron on circadian gluconeogenesis. Dietary iron affects circadian glucose metabolism through heme-mediated regulation of the interaction of nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group d member 1 (Rev-Erbα) with its cosuppressor nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCOR). Loss of regulated heme synthesis was achieved by aminolevulinic acid (ALA) treatment of mice or cultured cells to bypass the rate-limiting enzyme in hepatic heme synthesis, ALA synthase 1 (ALAS1). ALA treatment abolishes differences in hepatic glucose production and in the expression of gluconeogenic enzymes seen with variation of dietary iron. The differences among diets are also lost with inhibition of heme synthesis with isonicotinylhydrazine. Dietary iron modulates levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a transcriptional activator of ALAS1, to affect hepatic heme. Treatment of mice with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine diminishes PGC-1α variation observed among the iron diets, suggesting that iron is acting through reactive oxygen species signaling.

  1. Physiological and Proteomic Analysis of Escherichia coli Iron-Limited Chemostat Growth

    PubMed Central

    Folsom, James Patrick; Parker, Albert E.

    2014-01-01

    Iron bioavailability is a major limiter of bacterial growth in mammalian host tissue and thus represents an important area of study. Escherichia coli K-12 metabolism was studied at four levels of iron limitation in chemostats using physiological and proteomic analyses. The data documented an E. coli acclimation gradient where progressively more severe iron scarcity resulted in a larger percentage of substrate carbon being directed into an overflow metabolism accompanied by a decrease in biomass yield on glucose. Acetate was the primary secreted organic by-product for moderate levels of iron limitation, but as stress increased, the metabolism shifted to secrete primarily lactate (∼70% of catabolized glucose carbon). Proteomic analysis reinforced the physiological data and quantified relative increases in glycolysis enzyme abundance and decreases in tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzyme abundance with increasing iron limitation stress. The combined data indicated that E. coli responds to limiting iron by investing the scarce resource in essential enzymes, at the cost of catabolic efficiency (i.e., downregulating high-ATP-yielding pathways containing enzymes with large iron requirements, like the TCA cycle). Acclimation to iron-limited growth was contrasted experimentally with acclimation to glucose-limited growth to identify both general and nutrient-specific acclimation strategies. While the iron-limited cultures maximized biomass yields on iron and increased expression of iron acquisition strategies, the glucose-limited cultures maximized biomass yields on glucose and increased expression of carbon acquisition strategies. This study quantified ecologically competitive acclimations to nutrient limitations, yielding knowledge essential for understanding medically relevant bacterial responses to host and to developing intervention strategies. PMID:24837288

  2. Effects of Pregnancy and Lactation on Iron Metabolism in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guofen; Liu, Shang-Yuan; Wang, Hui-Jie; Zhang, Tian-Wei; Yu, Peng; Duan, Xiang-Lin; Zhao, Shu-E; Chang, Yan-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    In female, inadequate iron supply is a highly prevalent problem that often leads to iron-deficiency anemia. This study aimed to understand the effects of pregnancy and lactation on iron metabolism. Rats with different days of gestation and lactation were used to determine the variations in iron stores and serum iron level and the changes in expression of iron metabolism-related proteins, including ferritin, ferroportin 1 (FPN1), ceruloplasmin (Cp), divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), and the major iron-regulatory molecule—hepcidin. We found that iron stores decline dramatically at late-pregnancy period, and the low iron store status persists throughout the lactation period. The significantly increased FPN1 level in small intestine facilitates digestive iron absorption, which maintains the serum iron concentration at a near-normal level to meet the increase of iron requirements. Moreover, a significant decrease of hepcidin expression is observed during late-pregnancy and early-lactation stages, suggesting the important regulatory role that hepcidin plays in iron metabolism during pregnancy and lactation. These results are fundamental to the understanding of iron homeostasis during pregnancy and lactation and may provide experimental bases for future studies to identify key molecules expressed during these special periods that regulate the expression of hepcidin, to eventually improve the iron-deficiency status. PMID:26788496

  3. METABOLIC CAPACITY REGULATES IRON HOMEOSTATIS IN ENDOTHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sensitivity of endothelial cells to oxidative stress and the high concentrations of iron in mitochondria led us to test the hypotheses that (1) changes in respiratory capacity alter iron homeostasis, and (2) lack of aerobic metabolism decreases labile iron stores and attenuat...

  4. [Bone and Nutrition. The relationship between iron and phosphate metabolism].

    PubMed

    Takashi, Yuichi; Fukumoto, Seiji

    2015-07-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is an essential hormone for phosphate metabolism. It has been shown that intravenous administration of some iron formulations including saccharated ferric oxide induces hypophosphatemic osteomalacia with high FGF23 levels. On the other hand, iron deficiency promotes FGF23 and induces hypophosphatemia in patients with autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR). While iron and phosphate metabolism is connected, the detailed mechanism of this connection remains to be clarified.

  5. Alginate-Iron Speciation and Its Effect on In Vitro Cellular Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Horniblow, Richard D.; Dowle, Miriam; Iqbal, Tariq H.; Latunde-Dada, Gladys O.; Palmer, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Alginates are a class of biopolymers with known iron binding properties which are routinely used in the fabrication of iron-oxide nanoparticles. In addition, alginates have been implicated in influencing human iron absorption. However, the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles employs non-physiological pH conditions and whether nanoparticle formation in vivo is responsible for influencing cellular iron metabolism is unclear. Thus the aims of this study were to determine how alginate and iron interact at gastric-comparable pH conditions and how this influences iron metabolism. Employing a range of spectroscopic techniques under physiological conditions alginate-iron complexation was confirmed and, in conjunction with aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, nanoparticles were observed. The results infer a nucleation-type model of iron binding whereby alginate is templating the condensation of iron-hydroxide complexes to form iron oxide centred nanoparticles. The interaction of alginate and iron at a cellular level was found to decrease cellular iron acquisition by 37% (p < 0.05) and in combination with confocal microscopy the alginate inhibits cellular iron transport through extracellular iron chelation with the resulting complexes not internalised. These results infer alginate as being useful in the chelation of excess iron, especially in the context of inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer where excess unabsorbed luminal iron is thought to be a driver of disease. PMID:26378798

  6. Mammalian target of rapamycin coordinates iron metabolism with iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme and tristetraprolin.

    PubMed

    Guan, Peng; Wang, Na

    2014-09-01

    Both iron deficiency and excess are relatively common health concerns. Maintaining the body's levels of iron within precise boundaries is critical for cell functions. However, the difference between iron deficiency and overload is often a question of a scant few milligrams of iron. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), an atypical Ser/Thr protein kinase, is attracting significant amounts of interest due to its recently described role in iron homeostasis. Despite extensive study, a complete understanding of mTOR function has remained elusive. mTOR can form two multiprotein complexes that consist of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2. Recent advances clearly demonstrate that mTORC1 can phosphorylate iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme ISCU and affect iron-sulfur clusters assembly. Moreover, mTOR is reported to control iron metabolism through modulation of tristetraprolin expression. It is now well appreciated that the hormonal hepcidin-ferroportin system and the cellular iron-responsive element/iron-regulatory protein regulatory network play important regulatory roles for systemic iron metabolism. Sustained ISCU protein levels enhanced by mTORC1 can inhibit iron-responsive element and iron-regulatory protein binding activities. In this study, hepcidin gene and protein expression in the livers of tristetraprolin knockout mice were dramatically reduced. Here, we highlight and summarize the current understanding of how mTOR pathways serve to modulate iron metabolism and homeostasis as the third iron-regulatory system.

  7. Oral iron treatment has a positive effect on iron metabolism in elite soccer players.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Jesús; Soria, Marisol; González-Haro, Carlos; Ezquerra, Laura; Nieto, José L; Escanero, Jesús F

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of oral iron supplementation on hematological and iron metabolism in elite soccer players. Thirty-five members of the Real Zaragoza SAD soccer team took part in this study: group A (GA, n = 24; Spanish Premier League) took an oral iron supplement of 80 mg day(-1) for 3 weeks, and group B (GB, n = 11; Spanish Third Division League) did not receive any supplementation. In GA, the parameters were measured before and after giving the iron supplements, while in GB, measurements were only made at the time of collecting the second set of data from GA. After supplementation, GA showed an increase in serum iron (SI) (P < 0.05), serum ferritin (Ftn) (P < 0.01), and transferrin saturation (Sat) (P < 0.01) with respect to the basal values. In addition, GA showed higher values of hematocrit (P < 0.01), mean corpuscular volume (P < 0.01), Ftn (P < 0.01), and Sat (P < 0.01) than GB. No significant differences were found in any other parameters. More specifically, a higher percentage of players had Ftn levels above upper limits in GA vs. GB (P < 0.05), and GB had a higher incidence of Ftn below lower limits with respect to subjects in GA (P < 0.01). Further, after treatment, 58.3% of GA had >800 mg of SI, while all players in GB presented levels below the lower limits. In conclusion, iron supplementation with 80 mg·day(-1) for 3 weeks, before the start of the soccer season, can be recommended for elite soccer players.

  8. Oral iron treatment has a positive effect on iron metabolism in elite soccer players.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Jesús; Soria, Marisol; González-Haro, Carlos; Ezquerra, Laura; Nieto, José L; Escanero, Jesús F

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of oral iron supplementation on hematological and iron metabolism in elite soccer players. Thirty-five members of the Real Zaragoza SAD soccer team took part in this study: group A (GA, n = 24; Spanish Premier League) took an oral iron supplement of 80 mg day(-1) for 3 weeks, and group B (GB, n = 11; Spanish Third Division League) did not receive any supplementation. In GA, the parameters were measured before and after giving the iron supplements, while in GB, measurements were only made at the time of collecting the second set of data from GA. After supplementation, GA showed an increase in serum iron (SI) (P < 0.05), serum ferritin (Ftn) (P < 0.01), and transferrin saturation (Sat) (P < 0.01) with respect to the basal values. In addition, GA showed higher values of hematocrit (P < 0.01), mean corpuscular volume (P < 0.01), Ftn (P < 0.01), and Sat (P < 0.01) than GB. No significant differences were found in any other parameters. More specifically, a higher percentage of players had Ftn levels above upper limits in GA vs. GB (P < 0.05), and GB had a higher incidence of Ftn below lower limits with respect to subjects in GA (P < 0.01). Further, after treatment, 58.3% of GA had >800 mg of SI, while all players in GB presented levels below the lower limits. In conclusion, iron supplementation with 80 mg·day(-1) for 3 weeks, before the start of the soccer season, can be recommended for elite soccer players. PMID:20798998

  9. Disorders of Iron Metabolism and Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Bhupesh; Gutiérrez, Orlando M

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulated iron homeostasis plays a central role in the development of anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is a major contributor toward resistance to treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology requires an in-depth understanding of normal iron physiology and regulation. Recent discoveries in the field of iron biology have greatly improved our understanding of the hormonal regulation of iron trafficking in human beings and how its alterations lead to the development of anemia of CKD. In addition, emerging evidence has suggested that iron homeostasis interacts with bone and mineral metabolism on multiple levels, opening up new avenues of investigation into the genesis of disordered iron metabolism in CKD. Building on recent advances in our understanding of normal iron physiology and abnormalities in iron homeostasis in CKD, this review characterizes how anemia related to disordered iron metabolism develops in the setting of CKD. In addition, this review explores our emerging recognition of the connections between iron homeostasis and mineral metabolism and their implications for the management of altered iron status and anemia of CKD.

  10. Disorders of Iron Metabolism and Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Bhupesh; Gutiérrez, Orlando M

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulated iron homeostasis plays a central role in the development of anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is a major contributor toward resistance to treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology requires an in-depth understanding of normal iron physiology and regulation. Recent discoveries in the field of iron biology have greatly improved our understanding of the hormonal regulation of iron trafficking in human beings and how its alterations lead to the development of anemia of CKD. In addition, emerging evidence has suggested that iron homeostasis interacts with bone and mineral metabolism on multiple levels, opening up new avenues of investigation into the genesis of disordered iron metabolism in CKD. Building on recent advances in our understanding of normal iron physiology and abnormalities in iron homeostasis in CKD, this review characterizes how anemia related to disordered iron metabolism develops in the setting of CKD. In addition, this review explores our emerging recognition of the connections between iron homeostasis and mineral metabolism and their implications for the management of altered iron status and anemia of CKD. PMID:27475656

  11. SIRT3 regulates cellular iron metabolism and cancer growth by repressing iron regulatory protein 1.

    PubMed

    Jeong, S M; Lee, J; Finley, L W S; Schmidt, P J; Fleming, M D; Haigis, M C

    2015-04-16

    Iron metabolism is essential for many cellular processes, including oxygen transport, respiration and DNA synthesis, and many cancer cells exhibit dysregulation in iron metabolism. Maintenance of cellular iron homeostasis is regulated by iron regulatory proteins (IRPs), which control the expression of iron-related genes by binding iron-responsive elements (IREs) of target mRNAs. Here, we report that mitochondrial SIRT3 regulates cellular iron metabolism by modulating IRP1 activity. SIRT3 loss increases reactive oxygen species production, leading to elevated IRP1 binding to IREs. As a consequence, IRP1 target genes, such as the transferrin receptor (TfR1), a membrane-associated glycoprotein critical for iron uptake and cell proliferation, are controlled by SIRT3. Importantly, SIRT3 deficiency results in a defect in cellular iron homeostasis. SIRT3 null cells contain high levels of iron and lose iron-dependent TfR1 regulation. Moreover, SIRT3 null mice exhibit higher levels of iron and TfR1 expression in the pancreas. We found that the regulation of iron uptake and TfR1 expression contribute to the tumor-suppressive activity of SIRT3. Indeed, SIRT3 expression is negatively correlated with TfR1 expression in human pancreatic cancers. SIRT3 overexpression decreases TfR1 expression by inhibiting IRP1 and represses proliferation in pancreatic cancer cells. Our data uncover a novel role of SIRT3 in cellular iron metabolism through IRP1 regulation and suggest that SIRT3 functions as a tumor suppressor, in part, by modulating cellular iron metabolism. PMID:24909164

  12. Molecular and Cellular Bases of Iron Metabolism in Humans.

    PubMed

    Milto, I V; Suhodolo, I V; Prokopieva, V D; Klimenteva, T K

    2016-06-01

    Iron is a microelement with the most completely studied biological functions. Its wide dissemination in nature and involvement in key metabolic pathways determine the great importance of this metal for uni- and multicellular organisms. The biological role of iron is characterized by its indispensability in cell respiration and various biochemical processes providing normal functioning of cells and organs of the human body. Iron also plays an important role in the generation of free radicals, which under different conditions can be useful or damaging to biomolecules and cells. In the literature, there are many reviews devoted to iron metabolism and its regulation in pro- and eukaryotes. Significant progress has been achieved recently in understanding molecular bases of iron metabolism. The purpose of this review is to systematize available data on mechanisms of iron assimilation, distribution, and elimination from the human body, as well as on its biological importance and on the major iron-containing proteins. The review summarizes recent ideas about iron metabolism. Special attention is paid to mechanisms of iron absorption in the small intestine and to interrelationships of cellular and extracellular pools of this metal in the human body.

  13. Disorders of iron metabolism. Part 1: molecular basis of iron homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Manuel; García-Erce, José Antonio; Remacha, Angel Francisco

    2011-04-01

    IRON FUNCTIONS: Iron is an essential micronutrient, as it is required for satisfactory erythropoietic function, oxidative metabolism and cellular immune response. IRON PHYSIOLOGY: Absorption of dietary iron (1-2 mg/day) is tightly regulated and just balanced against iron loss because there are no active iron excretory mechanisms. Dietary iron is found in haem (10%) and non-haem (ionic, 90%) forms, and their absorption occurs at the apical surface of duodenal enterocytes via different mechanisms. Iron is exported by ferroportin 1 (the only putative iron exporter) across the basolateral membrane of the enterocyte into the circulation (absorbed iron), where it binds to transferrin and is transported to sites of use and storage. Transferrin-bound iron enters target cells-mainly erythroid cells, but also immune and hepatic cells-via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Senescent erythrocytes are phagocytosed by reticuloendothelial system macrophages, haem is metabolised by haem oxygenase, and the released iron is stored as ferritin. Iron will be later exported from macrophages to transferrin. This internal turnover of iron is essential to meet the requirements of erythropoiesis (20-30 mg/day). As transferrin becomes saturated in iron-overload states, excess iron is transported to the liver, the other main storage organ for iron, carrying the risk of free radical formation and tissue damage. REGULATION OF IRON HOMOEOSTASIS: Hepcidin, synthesised by hepatocytes in response to iron concentrations, inflammation, hypoxia and erythropoiesis, is the main iron-regulatory hormone. It binds ferroportin on enterocytes, macrophages and hepatocytes triggering its internalisation and lysosomal degradation. Inappropriate hepcidin secretion may lead to either iron deficiency or iron overload.

  14. Divergence of iron metabolism in wild Malaysian yeast.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hana N; Mostovoy, Yulia; Hsu, Tiffany Y; Chang, Amanda H; Brem, Rachel B

    2013-12-09

    Comparative genomic studies have reported widespread variation in levels of gene expression within and between species. Using these data to infer organism-level trait divergence has proven to be a key challenge in the field. We have used a wild Malaysian population of S. cerevisiae as a test bed in the search to predict and validate trait differences based on observations of regulatory variation. Malaysian yeast, when cultured in standard medium, activated regulatory programs that protect cells from the toxic effects of high iron. Malaysian yeast also showed a hyperactive regulatory response during culture in the presence of excess iron and had a unique growth defect in conditions of high iron. Molecular validation experiments pinpointed the iron metabolism factors AFT1, CCC1, and YAP5 as contributors to these molecular and cellular phenotypes; in genome-scale sequence analyses, a suite of iron toxicity response genes showed evidence for rapid protein evolution in Malaysian yeast. Our findings support a model in which iron metabolism has diverged in Malaysian yeast as a consequence of a change in selective pressure, with Malaysian alleles shifting the dynamic range of iron response to low-iron concentrations and weakening resistance to extreme iron toxicity. By dissecting the iron scarcity specialist behavior of Malaysian yeast, our work highlights the power of expression divergence as a signpost for biologically and evolutionarily relevant variation at the organismal level. Interpreting the phenotypic relevance of gene expression variation is one of the primary challenges of modern genomics.

  15. New developments and controversies in iron metabolism and iron chelation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2016-03-26

    Iron is essential for all organisms including microbial, cancer and human cells. More than a quarter of the human population is affected by abnormalities of iron metabolism, mainly from iron deficiency and iron overload. Iron also plays an important role in free radical pathology and oxidative damage which is observed in almost all major diseases, cancer and ageing. New developments include the complete treatment of iron overload and reduction of morbidity and mortality in thalassaemia using deferiprone and selected deferiprone/deferoxamine combinations and also the use of the maltol iron complex in the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia. There is also a prospect of using deferiprone as a universal antioxidant in non iron overloaded diseases such as neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, renal, infectious diseases and cancer. New regulatory molecules of iron metabolism such as endogenous and dietary chelating molecules, hepcidin, mitochondrial ferritin and their role in health and disease is under evaluation. Similarly, new mechanisms of iron deposition, removal, distribution and toxicity have been identified using new techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging increasing our understanding of iron metabolic processes and the targeted treatment of related diseases. The uniform distribution of iron in iron overload between organs and within each organ is no longer valid. Several other controversies such as the toxicity impact of non transferrin bound iron vs injected iron, the excess levels of iron in tissues causing toxicity and the role of chelation on iron absorption need further investigation. Commercial interests of pharmaceutical companies and connections to leading journals are playing a crucial role in shaping worldwide medical opinion on drug sales and use but also patients' therapeutic outcome and safety. Major controversies include the selection criteria and risk/benefit assessment in the use of deferasirox in thalassaemia and more so in idiopathic

  16. New developments and controversies in iron metabolism and iron chelation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for all organisms including microbial, cancer and human cells. More than a quarter of the human population is affected by abnormalities of iron metabolism, mainly from iron deficiency and iron overload. Iron also plays an important role in free radical pathology and oxidative damage which is observed in almost all major diseases, cancer and ageing. New developments include the complete treatment of iron overload and reduction of morbidity and mortality in thalassaemia using deferiprone and selected deferiprone/deferoxamine combinations and also the use of the maltol iron complex in the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia. There is also a prospect of using deferiprone as a universal antioxidant in non iron overloaded diseases such as neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, renal, infectious diseases and cancer. New regulatory molecules of iron metabolism such as endogenous and dietary chelating molecules, hepcidin, mitochondrial ferritin and their role in health and disease is under evaluation. Similarly, new mechanisms of iron deposition, removal, distribution and toxicity have been identified using new techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging increasing our understanding of iron metabolic processes and the targeted treatment of related diseases. The uniform distribution of iron in iron overload between organs and within each organ is no longer valid. Several other controversies such as the toxicity impact of non transferrin bound iron vs injected iron, the excess levels of iron in tissues causing toxicity and the role of chelation on iron absorption need further investigation. Commercial interests of pharmaceutical companies and connections to leading journals are playing a crucial role in shaping worldwide medical opinion on drug sales and use but also patients’ therapeutic outcome and safety. Major controversies include the selection criteria and risk/benefit assessment in the use of deferasirox in thalassaemia and more so in idiopathic

  17. New developments and controversies in iron metabolism and iron chelation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2016-03-26

    Iron is essential for all organisms including microbial, cancer and human cells. More than a quarter of the human population is affected by abnormalities of iron metabolism, mainly from iron deficiency and iron overload. Iron also plays an important role in free radical pathology and oxidative damage which is observed in almost all major diseases, cancer and ageing. New developments include the complete treatment of iron overload and reduction of morbidity and mortality in thalassaemia using deferiprone and selected deferiprone/deferoxamine combinations and also the use of the maltol iron complex in the treatment of iron deficiency anaemia. There is also a prospect of using deferiprone as a universal antioxidant in non iron overloaded diseases such as neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, renal, infectious diseases and cancer. New regulatory molecules of iron metabolism such as endogenous and dietary chelating molecules, hepcidin, mitochondrial ferritin and their role in health and disease is under evaluation. Similarly, new mechanisms of iron deposition, removal, distribution and toxicity have been identified using new techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging increasing our understanding of iron metabolic processes and the targeted treatment of related diseases. The uniform distribution of iron in iron overload between organs and within each organ is no longer valid. Several other controversies such as the toxicity impact of non transferrin bound iron vs injected iron, the excess levels of iron in tissues causing toxicity and the role of chelation on iron absorption need further investigation. Commercial interests of pharmaceutical companies and connections to leading journals are playing a crucial role in shaping worldwide medical opinion on drug sales and use but also patients' therapeutic outcome and safety. Major controversies include the selection criteria and risk/benefit assessment in the use of deferasirox in thalassaemia and more so in idiopathic

  18. Oxidative Stress and the Homeodynamics of Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bresgen, Nikolaus; Eckl, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Iron and oxygen share a delicate partnership since both are indispensable for survival, but if the partnership becomes inadequate, this may rapidly terminate life. Virtually all cell components are directly or indirectly affected by cellular iron metabolism, which represents a complex, redox-based machinery that is controlled by, and essential to, metabolic requirements. Under conditions of increased oxidative stress—i.e., enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)—however, this machinery may turn into a potential threat, the continued requirement for iron promoting adverse reactions such as the iron/H2O2-based formation of hydroxyl radicals, which exacerbate the initial pro-oxidant condition. This review will discuss the multifaceted homeodynamics of cellular iron management under normal conditions as well as in the context of oxidative stress. PMID:25970586

  19. Vitamin A deficiency modulates iron metabolism via ineffective erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Marcela S B; Siqueira, Egle M A; Trindade, Luciano S; Arruda, Sandra F

    2014-10-01

    Vitamin A modulates inflammatory status, iron metabolism and erythropoiesis. Given that these factors modulate the expression of the hormone hepcidin (Hamp), we investigated the effect of vitamin A deficiency on molecular biomarkers of iron metabolism, the inflammatory response and the erythropoietic system. Five groups of male Wistar rats were treated: control (AIN-93G), the vitamin A-deficient (VAD) diet, the iron-deficient (FeD) diet, the vitamin A- and iron-deficient (VAFeD) diet or the diet with 12 mg atRA/kg diet replacing all-trans-retinyl palmitate by all-trans retinoic acid (atRA). Vitamin A deficiency reduced serum iron and transferrin saturation levels, increased spleen iron concentrations, reduced hepatic Hamp and kidney erythropoietin messenger RNA (mRNA) levels and up-regulated hepatic and spleen heme oxygenase-1 gene expression while reducing the liver HO-1 specific activity compared with the control. The FeD and VAFeD rats exhibited lower levels of serum iron and transferrin saturation, lower iron concentrations in tissues and lower hepatic Hamp mRNA levels compared with the control. The treatment with atRA resulted in lower serum iron and transferrin concentrations, an increased iron concentration in the liver, a decreased iron concentration in the spleen and in the gut, and decreased hepatic Hamp mRNA levels. In summary, these findings suggest that vitamin A deficiency leads to ineffective erythropoiesis by the down-regulation of renal erythropoietin expression in the kidney, resulting in erythrocyte malformation and the consequent accumulation of the heme group in the spleen. Vitamin A deficiency indirectly modulates systemic iron homeostasis by enhancing erythrophagocytosis of undifferentiated erythrocytes. PMID:24998947

  20. Vitamin A deficiency modulates iron metabolism via ineffective erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Marcela S B; Siqueira, Egle M A; Trindade, Luciano S; Arruda, Sandra F

    2014-10-01

    Vitamin A modulates inflammatory status, iron metabolism and erythropoiesis. Given that these factors modulate the expression of the hormone hepcidin (Hamp), we investigated the effect of vitamin A deficiency on molecular biomarkers of iron metabolism, the inflammatory response and the erythropoietic system. Five groups of male Wistar rats were treated: control (AIN-93G), the vitamin A-deficient (VAD) diet, the iron-deficient (FeD) diet, the vitamin A- and iron-deficient (VAFeD) diet or the diet with 12 mg atRA/kg diet replacing all-trans-retinyl palmitate by all-trans retinoic acid (atRA). Vitamin A deficiency reduced serum iron and transferrin saturation levels, increased spleen iron concentrations, reduced hepatic Hamp and kidney erythropoietin messenger RNA (mRNA) levels and up-regulated hepatic and spleen heme oxygenase-1 gene expression while reducing the liver HO-1 specific activity compared with the control. The FeD and VAFeD rats exhibited lower levels of serum iron and transferrin saturation, lower iron concentrations in tissues and lower hepatic Hamp mRNA levels compared with the control. The treatment with atRA resulted in lower serum iron and transferrin concentrations, an increased iron concentration in the liver, a decreased iron concentration in the spleen and in the gut, and decreased hepatic Hamp mRNA levels. In summary, these findings suggest that vitamin A deficiency leads to ineffective erythropoiesis by the down-regulation of renal erythropoietin expression in the kidney, resulting in erythrocyte malformation and the consequent accumulation of the heme group in the spleen. Vitamin A deficiency indirectly modulates systemic iron homeostasis by enhancing erythrophagocytosis of undifferentiated erythrocytes.

  1. Physiological, biomass elemental composition and proteomic analyses of Escherichia coli ammonium-limited chemostat growth, and comparison with iron- and glucose-limited chemostat growth

    PubMed Central

    Folsom, James Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli physiological, biomass elemental composition and proteome acclimations to ammonium-limited chemostat growth were measured at four levels of nutrient scarcity controlled via chemostat dilution rate. These data were compared with published iron- and glucose-limited growth data collected from the same strain and at the same dilution rates to quantify general and nutrient-specific responses. Severe nutrient scarcity resulted in an overflow metabolism with differing organic byproduct profiles based on limiting nutrient and dilution rate. Ammonium-limited cultures secreted up to 35  % of the metabolized glucose carbon as organic byproducts with acetate representing the largest fraction; in comparison, iron-limited cultures secreted up to 70  % of the metabolized glucose carbon as lactate, and glucose-limited cultures secreted up to 4  % of the metabolized glucose carbon as formate. Biomass elemental composition differed with nutrient limitation; biomass from ammonium-limited cultures had a lower nitrogen content than biomass from either iron- or glucose-limited cultures. Proteomic analysis of central metabolism enzymes revealed that ammonium- and iron-limited cultures had a lower abundance of key tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes and higher abundance of key glycolysis enzymes compared with glucose-limited cultures. The overall results are largely consistent with cellular economics concepts, including metabolic tradeoff theory where the limiting nutrient is invested into essential pathways such as glycolysis instead of higher ATP-yielding, but non-essential, pathways such as the TCA cycle. The data provide a detailed insight into ecologically competitive metabolic strategies selected by evolution, templates for controlling metabolism for bioprocesses and a comprehensive dataset for validating in silico representations of metabolism. PMID:26018546

  2. Appraising the Role of Iron in Brain Aging and Cognition: Promises and Limitations of MRI Methods

    PubMed Central

    Daugherty, Ana M; Raz, Naftali

    2015-01-01

    Age-related increase in frailty is accompanied by a fundamental shift in cellular iron homeostasis. By promoting oxidative stress, the intracellular accumulation of non-heme iron outside of binding complexes contributes to chronic inflammation and interferes with normal brain metabolism. In the absence of direct non-invasive biomarkers of brain oxidative stress, iron accumulation estimated in vivo may serve as its proxy indicator. Hence, developing reliable in vivo measurements of brain iron content via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is of significant interest in human neuroscience. To date, by estimating brain iron content through various MRI methods, significant age differences and age-related increases in iron content of the basal ganglia have been revealed across multiple samples. Less consistent are the findings that pertain to the relationship between elevated brain iron content and systemic indices of vascular and metabolic dysfunction. Only a handful of cross-sectional investigations have linked high iron content in various brain regions and poor performance on assorted cognitive tests. The even fewer longitudinal studies indicate that iron accumulation may precede shrinkage of the basal ganglia and thus predict poor maintenance of cognitive functions. This rapidly developing field will benefit from introduction of higher-field MRI scanners, improvement in iron-sensitive and -specific acquisition sequences and post-processing analytic and computational methods, as well as accumulation of data from long-term longitudinal investigations. This review describes the potential advantages and promises of MRI-based assessment of brain iron, summarizes recent findings and highlights the limitations of the current methodology. PMID:26248580

  3. Appraising the Role of Iron in Brain Aging and Cognition: Promises and Limitations of MRI Methods.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, Ana M; Raz, Naftali

    2015-09-01

    Age-related increase in frailty is accompanied by a fundamental shift in cellular iron homeostasis. By promoting oxidative stress, the intracellular accumulation of non-heme iron outside of binding complexes contributes to chronic inflammation and interferes with normal brain metabolism. In the absence of direct non-invasive biomarkers of brain oxidative stress, iron accumulation estimated in vivo may serve as its proxy indicator. Hence, developing reliable in vivo measurements of brain iron content via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is of significant interest in human neuroscience. To date, by estimating brain iron content through various MRI methods, significant age differences and age-related increases in iron content of the basal ganglia have been revealed across multiple samples. Less consistent are the findings that pertain to the relationship between elevated brain iron content and systemic indices of vascular and metabolic dysfunction. Only a handful of cross-sectional investigations have linked high iron content in various brain regions and poor performance on assorted cognitive tests. The even fewer longitudinal studies indicate that iron accumulation may precede shrinkage of the basal ganglia and thus predict poor maintenance of cognitive functions. This rapidly developing field will benefit from introduction of higher-field MRI scanners, improvement in iron-sensitive and -specific acquisition sequences and post-processing analytic and computational methods, as well as accumulation of data from long-term longitudinal investigations. This review describes the potential advantages and promises of MRI-based assessment of brain iron, summarizes recent findings and highlights the limitations of the current methodology.

  4. Iron uptake and metabolism in pseudomonads.

    PubMed

    Cornelis, Pierre

    2010-05-01

    Pseudomonads are ubiquitous Gram-negative gamma proteobacteria known for their extreme versatility and adaptability. Some are plant pathogens (Pseudomonas syringae) which have to survive on the surface of leaves while others can colonize the rhizosphere or survive in soil (Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida), and one species, Pseudomonas entomophila, is an insect pathogen. The most investigated species, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is known to be an opportunistic pathogen able to infect plants, nematodes, insects, and mammals, including humans. Like for other bacteria, iron is a key nutrient for pseudomonads. The fluorescent pseudomonads produce siderophores, the best known being the fluorescent high-affinity peptidic pyoverdines. Often diverse secondary siderophores of lower affinity are produced as well (pyochelin, pseudomonin, corrugatins and ornicorrugatins, yersiniabactin, and thioquinolobactin). Reflecting their large capacity of adaptation to changing environment and niche colonization, pseudomonads are able to obtain their iron from heme or from siderophores produced by other microorganisms (xenosiderophores) via the expression of outer membrane TonB-dependent receptors. As expected, iron uptake is exquisitely and hierarchically regulated in these bacteria. In this short review, the diversity of siderophores produced, receptors, and finally the way iron homeostasis is regulated in P. aeruginosa, P. syringae, P. putida, and P. fluorescens, will be presented and, when possible, put in relation with the lifestyle and the ecological niche. PMID:20352420

  5. Physiological Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during Exotoxin A Synthesis: Glutamate, Iron Limitation, and Aconitase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, Greg; Mikoryak, Carole Ann; Reitzer, Larry

    1999-01-01

    Glutamate enhances the yield of exotoxin A (ETA), which is induced by iron limitation, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We tested the possibility that glutamate affects growth during iron restriction. We confirmed that iron limitation caused early entry into stationary phase but had no effect on the exponential growth rate. We showed that glutamate, as well as citrate and isocitrate, partially overcame this growth limitation. Glutamate had no effect on toxA (ETA-encoding) transcription, which implies that glutamate primarily increases the number of toxin-producing cells. In contrast, citrate and isocitrate diminished toxA transcription. Since glutamate, citrate, and isocitrate stimulated growth, we suspected a block in the citric acid cycle. Iron limitation reduced the activity of the iron-containing aconitase 12-fold but had no effect on isocitrate dehydrogenase activity, which was assayed as a control. There is a reciprocal relationship between aconitase activity and ETA synthesis, and this correlation does not appear to be coincidental because aconitase-specific effectors affect ETA synthesis. We tested whether a metabolic block is sufficient to induce ETA synthesis, but an aconitase-specific inhibitor diminished ETA production, which argues against this possibility. Finally, we present preliminary evidence that iron limitation may reversibly and posttranslationally inactivate aconitase in vivo. In summary, the environmental factors that stimulate ETA synthesis are related: glutamate bypasses an iron limitation-dependent metabolic block that causes entry into stationary phase. We speculate that one or more of the aconitases in P. aeruginosa may contribute to the control of virulence factor synthesis. PMID:9973331

  6. Precipitated iron: A limit on gettering efficacy in multicrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenning, D. P.; Hofstetter, J.; Bertoni, M. I.; Coletti, G.; Lai, B.; del Cañizo, C.; Buonassisi, T.

    2013-01-01

    A phosphorus diffusion gettering model is used to examine the efficacy of a standard gettering process on interstitial and precipitated iron in multicrystalline silicon. The model predicts a large concentration of precipitated iron remaining after standard gettering for most as-grown iron distributions. Although changes in the precipitated iron distribution are predicted to be small, the simulated post-processing interstitial iron concentration is predicted to depend strongly on the as-grown distribution of precipitates, indicating that precipitates must be considered as internal sources of contamination during processing. To inform and validate the model, the iron distributions before and after a standard phosphorus diffusion step are studied in samples from the bottom, middle, and top of an intentionally Fe-contaminated laboratory ingot. A census of iron-silicide precipitates taken by synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy confirms the presence of a high density of iron-silicide precipitates both before and after phosphorus diffusion. A comparable precipitated iron distribution was measured in a sister wafer after hydrogenation during a firing step. The similar distributions of precipitated iron seen after each step in the solar cell process confirm that the effect of standard gettering on precipitated iron is strongly limited as predicted by simulation. Good agreement between the experimental and simulated data supports the hypothesis that gettering kinetics is governed by not only the total iron concentration but also by the distribution of precipitated iron. Finally, future directions based on the modeling are suggested for the improvement of effective minority carrier lifetime in multicrystalline silicon solar cells.

  7. A Data-constrained Estimate of the Global Ocean Iron Cycle: Budgets, Timescales, and Iron Limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frants, M.; Holzer, M. B.; DeVries, T. J.; Matear, R.

    2014-12-01

    The oceanic iron cycle is estimated by optimizing a simple steady-state model based on a data-assimilated global circulation, with a prescribed optimized phosphorus cycle and a prescribed aeolian source pattern. Key biogeochemical parameters are determined by minimizing a suitably weighted quadratic misfit between the model's dissolved iron concentration and a global data set of sparse measurements. The global dissolved iron inventory is estimated to be (7.1±0.1)×1011 mol Fe, of which (6.9±0.1)×1011 mol Fe is bound to organic ligands and hence bioavailable, while the remainder is "free" iron. The aeolian iron input rate is estimated at (3.3±0.5)×109 mol Fe/year, corresponding to a bulk residence time for bioavailable iron of 215±40 years, comparable to the bulk biological cycling timescale estimated at 246±24 years. Iron limitation is quantified in terms of the difference [Fe∗] between the actual iron concentration and that needed to utilize the available phosphate. The optimized model captures the observed high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions of the ocean as iron-limited regions with [Fe∗]<0. We define an iron age, ΓFe, as the mean time since iron at a given point was last injected from the atmosphere and compute ΓFe using an equivalent linear formulation of the model. In the euphotic zone, ΓFe ranges from a few decades or less in regions of high aeolian input to ˜1800 years in the Southern Ocean. The patterns of ΓFe show that iron is supplied to the Southern Ocean euphotic zone primarily from depth rather than being advected within the thermocline following deposition from continental dust plumes. Because [Fe∗] is negative in the deep southern oceans, upwelling waters maintain Southern Ocean iron limitation.

  8. Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation limits iron transport in anoxic ocean regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Florian; Löscher, Carolin R.; Fiskal, Annika; Sommer, Stefan; Hensen, Christian; Lomnitz, Ulrike; Wuttig, Kathrin; Göttlicher, Jörg; Kossel, Elke; Steininger, Ralph; Canfield, Donald E.

    2016-11-01

    Iron is an essential element for life on Earth and limits primary production in large parts of the ocean. Oxygen-free continental margin sediments represent an important source of bioavailable iron to the ocean, yet little of the iron released from the seabed reaches the productive sea surface. Even in the anoxic water of oxygen minimum zones, where iron solubility should be enhanced, most of the iron is rapidly re-precipitated. To constrain the mechanism(s) of iron removal in anoxic ocean regions we explored the sediment and water in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru. During our sampling campaign the water column featured two distinct redox boundaries separating oxic from nitrate-reducing (i.e., nitrogenous) water and nitrogenous from weakly sulfidic water. The sulfidic water mass in contact with the shelf sediment contained elevated iron concentrations >300 nM. At the boundary between sulfidic and nitrogenous conditions, iron concentrations dropped sharply to <20 nM coincident with a maximum in particulate iron concentration. Within the iron gradient, we found an increased expression of the key functional marker gene for nitrate reduction (narG). Part of this upregulation was related to the activity of known iron-oxidizing bacteria. Collectively, our data suggest that iron oxidation and removal is induced by nitrate-reducing microbes, either enzymatically through anaerobic iron oxidation or by providing nitrite for an abiotic reaction. Given the important role that iron plays in nitrogen fixation, photosynthesis and respiration, nitrate-dependent iron oxidation likely represents a key-link between the marine biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, oxygen and carbon.

  9. The effect of BCG on iron metabolism in the early neonatal period: A controlled trial in Gambian neonates.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Sarah; Jallow, Momodou W; Prentice, Andrew M

    2015-06-12

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination has been reported to protect neonates from non-tuberculous pathogens, but no biological mechanism to explain such effects is known. We hypothesised that BCG produces broad-spectrum anti-microbial protection via a hepcidin-mediated hypoferraemia, limiting iron availability for pathogens. To test this we conducted a trial in 120 Gambian neonates comparing iron status in the first 5-days of life after allocation to: (1) All routine vaccinations at birth (BCG/Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV)/Hepatitis B Vaccine (HBV)); (2) BCG delayed until after the study period (at day 5); and (3) All routine vaccinations delayed until after the study period. Vaccine regime at birth did not significantly impact on any measured parameter of iron metabolism. However, the ability to detect an effect of BCG on iron metabolism may have been limited by short follow-up time and high activation of the inflammatory-iron axis in the study population.

  10. Proteomic Analysis Reveals That Iron Availability Alters the Metabolic Status of the Pathogenic Fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Parente, Ana F. A.; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Borges, Clayton L.; Parente, Juliana A.; Magalhães, Adriana D.; Ricart, Carlos A. O.; Soares, Célia M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a thermodimorphic fungus and the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). The ability of P. brasiliensis to uptake nutrients is fundamental for growth, but a reduction in the availability of iron and other nutrients is a host defense mechanism many pathogenic fungi must overcome. Thus, fungal mechanisms that scavenge iron from host may contribute to P. brasiliensis virulence. In order to better understand how P. brasiliensis adapts to iron starvation in the host we compared the two-dimensional (2D) gel protein profile of yeast cells during iron starvation to that of iron rich condition. Protein spots were selected for comparative analysis based on the protein staining intensity as determined by image analysis. A total of 1752 protein spots were selected for comparison, and a total of 274 out of the 1752 protein spots were determined to have changed significantly in abundance due to iron depletion. Ninety six of the 274 proteins were grouped into the following functional categories; energy, metabolism, cell rescue, virulence, cell cycle, protein synthesis, protein fate, transcription, cellular communication, and cell fate. A correlation between protein and transcript levels was also discovered using quantitative RT-PCR analysis from RNA obtained from P. brasiliensis under iron restricting conditions and from yeast cells isolated from infected mouse spleens. In addition, western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays validated the differential regulation of proteins identified by 2-D gel analysis. We observed an increase in glycolytic pathway protein regulation while tricarboxylic acid cycle, glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycles, and electron transport chain proteins decreased in abundance under iron limiting conditions. These data suggest a remodeling of P. brasiliensis metabolism by prioritizing iron independent pathways. PMID:21829521

  11. Human macrophage hemoglobin-iron metabolism in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Custer, G.; Balcerzak, S.; Rinehart, J.

    1982-01-01

    An entirely in vitro technique was employed to characterize hemoglobin-iron metabolism by human macrophages obtained by culture of blood monocytes and pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Macrophages phagocytized about three times as many erythrocytes as monocytes and six times as many erythrocytes as pulmonary alveolar macrophages. The rate of subsequent release of /sup 59/Fe to the extracellular transferrin pool was two- to fourfold greater for macrophages as compared to the other two cell types. The kinetics of /sup 59/Fe-transferrin release were characterized by a relatively rapid early phase (hours 1-4) followed by a slow phase (hours 4-72) for all three cell types. Intracellular movement of iron was characterized by a rapid shift from hemoglobin to ferritin that was complete with the onset of the slow phase of extracellular release. A transient increase in /sup 59/Fe associated with an intracellular protein eluting with transferrin was also observed within 1 hour after phagocytosis. The process of hemoglobin-iron release to extracellular transferrin was inhibited at 4 degrees C but was unaffected by inhibitory of protein synthesis, glycolysis, microtubule function, and microfilament function. These data emphasize the rapidity of macrophage hemoglobin iron metabolism, provide a model for characterization of this process in vitro, and in general confirm data obtained utilizing in vivo animal models.

  12. Iron metabolism in aerobes: managing ferric iron hydrolysis and ferrous iron autoxidation.

    PubMed

    Kosman, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Aerobes and anaerobes alike express a plethora of essential iron enzymes; in the resting state, the iron atom(s) in these proteins are in the ferrous state. For aerobes, ferric iron is the predominant environmental valence form which, given ferric iron's aqueous chemistry, occurs as 'rust', insoluble, bio-inert polymeric ferric oxide that results from the hydrolysis of [Fe(H(2)O)(6)](3+). Mobilizing this iron requires bio-ferrireduction which in turn requires managing the rapid autoxidation of the resulting Fe(II) which occurs at pH > 6. This review examines the aqueous redox chemistry of iron and the mechanisms evolved in aerobes to suppress the 'rusting out' of Fe(III) and the ROS-generating autoxidation of Fe(II) so as to make this metal ion available as the most ubiquitous prosthetic group in metallobiology. PMID:23264695

  13. A Global Investigation of the Bacillus subtilis Iron-Sparing Response Identifies Major Changes in Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Smaldone, Gregory T.; Revelles, Olga; Gaballa, Ahmed; Sauer, Uwe; Antelmann, Haike

    2012-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis ferric uptake regulator (Fur) protein is the major sensor of cellular iron status. When iron is limiting for growth, derepression of the Fur regulon increases the cellular capacity for iron uptake and mobilizes an iron-sparing response mediated in large part by a small noncoding RNA named FsrA. FsrA functions, in collaboration with three small basic proteins (FbpABC), to repress many “low-priority” iron-containing enzymes. We have used transcriptome analyses to gain insights into the scope of the iron-sparing response and to define subsets of genes dependent for their repression on FsrA, FbpAB, and/or FbpC. Enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, including aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), are major targets of FsrA-mediated repression, and as a consequence, flux through this pathway is significantly decreased in a fur mutant. FsrA also represses the DctP dicarboxylate permease and the iron-sulfur-containing enzyme glutamate synthase (GltAB), which serves as a central link between carbon and nitrogen metabolism. Allele-specific suppression analysis was used to document a direct RNA-RNA interaction between the FsrA small RNA (sRNA) and the gltAB leader region. We further demonstrated that distinct regions of FsrA are required for the translational repression of the GltAB and SDH enzyme complexes. PMID:22389480

  14. Mutational Analysis of a Role for Salicylic Acid in Iron Metabolism of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Adilakshmi, Tadepalli; Ayling, Peter D.; Ratledge, Colin

    2000-01-01

    The role of salicylic acid in iron metabolism was examined in two wild-type strains (mc2155 and NCIMB 8548) and three mutant strains (mc21292 [lacking exochelin], SM3 [lacking iron-dependent repressor protein IdeR] and S99 [a salicylate-requiring auxotroph derived in this study]) of Mycobacterium smegmatis. Synthesis of salicylate in SM3 was derepressed even in the presence of iron, as was synthesis of the siderophores exochelin, mycobactin, and carboxymycobactin. S99 was dependent on salicylate for growth and failed to grow with the three ferrisiderophores, suggesting that salicylate fulfills an additional function(s) other than being a precursor of mycobactin and carboxymycobactin. Salicylic acid at 100 μg/ml repressed the formation of a 29-kDa cell envelope protein (putative exochelin receptor protein) in S99 grown both iron deficiently and iron sufficiently. In contrast, synthesis of this protein was affected only under iron-limited conditions in the parent strain, mc2155, and remained unaltered in SM3, suggesting an interaction between the IdeR protein and salicylate. Thus, salicylate may also function as a signal molecule for recognition of cellular iron status. Growth of all strains and mutants with p-aminosalicylate (PAS) at 100 μg/ml increased salicylate accumulation between three- and eightfold under both iron-limited and iron-sufficient growth conditions and decreased mycobactin accumulation by 40 to 80% but increased carboxymycobactin accumulation by 50 to 55%. Thus, although PAS inhibited salicylate conversion to mycobactin, presumptively by blocking salicylate AMP kinase, PAS also interferes with the additional functions of salicylate, as its effect was heightened in S99 when the salicylate concentration was minimal. PMID:10629169

  15. Limitation of Photosynthesis by Carbon Metabolism 1

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, Mark

    1986-01-01

    It has been investigated how far electron transport or carbon metabolism limit the maximal rates of photosynthesis achieved by spinach leaves in saturating light and CO2. Leaf discs were illuminated with high light until a steady state rate of O2 evolution was attained, and then subjected to a 30 second interruption in low light, to generate an increased demand for the products of electron transport. Upon returning to high light there is a temporary enhancement of photosynthesis which lasts 15 to 30 seconds, and can be up to 50% above the steady state rate of O2 evolution. This temporary enhancement is only found when saturating light intensities are used for the steady state illumination, is increased when low light rather than darkness is used during the interruption, and is maximal following a 30 to 60 seconds interruption in low light. Decreasing the temperature over the 10 to 30°C range led to the transient enhancement becoming larger. The temporary enhancement is associated with an increased ATP/ADP ratio, a decreased level of 3-phosphoglycerate, and increased levels of triose phosphate and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate. Since electron transport can occur at higher rates than in steady state conditions, and generate a higher energy status, it is concluded that leaves have a surplus electron transport capacity in saturating light and CO2. From the alterations of metabolites, it can be calculated that the enhanced O2 evolution must be accompanied by an increased rate of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate regeneration and carboxylation. It is suggested that the capacity for sucrose synthesis ultimately limits the maximal rates of photosynthesis, by restricting the rate at which inorganic phosphate can be recycled to support electron transport and carbon fixation in the chloroplast. PMID:16664953

  16. Role of nitric oxide in cellular iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangwon; Ponka, Prem

    2003-03-01

    Iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) control the synthesis of transferrin receptors (TfR) and ferritin by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs) which are located in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) and the 5' UTR of their respective mRNAs. Cellular iron levels affect binding of IRPs to IREs and consequently expression of TfR and ferritin. Moreover, NO*, a redox species of nitric oxide that interacts primarily with iron, can activate IRP1 RNA-binding activity resulting in an increase in TfR mRNA levels. We have shown that treatment of RAW 264.7 cells (a murine macrophage cell line) with NO+ (nitrosonium ion, which causes S-nitrosylation of thiol groups) resulted in a rapid decrease in RNA-binding of IRP2, followed by IRP2 degradation, and these changes were associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels. Moreover, we demonstrated that stimulation of RAW 264.7 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increased IRP1 binding activity, whereas RNA-binding of IRP2 decreased and was followed by a degradation of this protein. Furthermore, the decrease of IRP2 binding/protein levels was associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels in LPS/IFN-gamma-treated cells, and these changes were prevented by inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase. These results suggest that NO+-mediated degradation of IRP2 plays a major role in iron metabolism during inflammation.

  17. Arsenic release metabolically limited to permanently water-saturated soil in Mekong Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuckey, Jason W.; Schaefer, Michael V.; Kocar, Benjamin D.; Benner, Shawn G.; Fendorf, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Microbial reduction of arsenic-bearing iron oxides in the deltas of South and Southeast Asia produces widespread arsenic-contaminated groundwater. Organic carbon is abundant both at the surface and within aquifers, but the source of organic carbon used by microbes in the reduction and release of arsenic has been debated, as has the wetland type and sedimentary depth where release occurs. Here we present data from fresh-sediment incubations, in situ model sediment incubations and a controlled field experiment with manipulated wetland hydrology and organic carbon inputs. We find that in the minimally disturbed Mekong Delta, arsenic release is limited to near-surface sediments of permanently saturated wetlands where both organic carbon and arsenic-bearing solids are sufficiently reactive for microbial oxidation of organic carbon and reduction of arsenic-bearing iron oxides. In contrast, within the deeper aquifer or seasonally saturated sediments, reductive dissolution of iron oxides is observed only when either more reactive exogenous forms of iron oxides or organic carbon are added, revealing a potential thermodynamic restriction to microbial metabolism. We conclude that microbial arsenic release is limited by the reactivity of arsenic-bearing iron oxides with respect to native organic carbon, but equally limited by organic carbon reactivity with respect to the native arsenic-bearing iron oxides.

  18. Effects of Iron and Nitrogen Limitation on Sulfur Isotope Fractionation during Microbial Sulfate Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Shuhei; Bosak, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing microbes utilize sulfate as an electron acceptor and produce sulfide that is depleted in heavy isotopes of sulfur relative to sulfate. Thus, the distribution of sulfur isotopes in sediments can trace microbial sulfate reduction (MSR), and it also has the potential to reflect the physiology of sulfate-reducing microbes. This study investigates the relationship between the availability of iron and reduced nitrogen and the magnitude of S-isotope fractionation during MSR by a marine sulfate-reducing bacterium, DMSS-1, a Desulfovibrio species, isolated from salt marsh in Cape Cod, MA. Submicromolar levels of iron increase sulfur isotope fractionation by about 50% relative to iron-replete cultures of DMSS-1. Iron-limited cultures also exhibit decreased cytochrome c-to-total protein ratios and cell-specific sulfate reduction rates (csSRR), implying changes in the electron transport chain that couples carbon and sulfur metabolisms. When DMSS-1 fixes nitrogen in ammonium-deficient medium, it also produces larger fractionation, but it occurs at faster csSRRs than in the ammonium-replete control cultures. The energy and reducing power required for nitrogen fixation may be responsible for the reverse trend between S-isotope fractionation and csSRR in this case. Iron deficiency and nitrogen fixation by sulfate-reducing microbes may lead to the large observed S-isotope effects in some euxinic basins and various anoxic sediments. PMID:23001667

  19. Iron deprivation results in a rapid but not sustained increase of the expression of genes involved in iron metabolism and sulfate uptake in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Paolacci, Anna Rita; Celletti, Silvia; Catarcione, Giulio; Hawkesford, Malcolm J; Astolfi, Stefania; Ciaffi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Characterization of the relationship between sulfur and iron in both Strategy I and Strategy II plants, has proven that low sulfur availability often limits plant capability to cope with iron shortage. Here it was investigated whether the adaptation to iron deficiency in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants was associated with an increased root sulfate uptake and translocation capacity, and modified dynamics of total sulfur and thiols accumulation between roots and shoots. Most of the tomato sulfate transporter genes belonging to Groups 1, 2, and 4 were significantly upregulated in iron-deficient roots, as it commonly occurs under S-deficient conditions. The upregulation of the two high affinity sulfate transporter genes, SlST1.1 and SlST1.2, by iron deprivation clearly suggests an increased root capability to take up sulfate. Furthermore, the upregulation of the two low affinity sulfate transporter genes SlST2.1 and SlST4.1 in iron-deficient roots, accompanied by a substantial accumulation of total sulfur and thiols in shoots of iron-starved plants, likely supports an increased root-to-shoot translocation of sulfate. Results suggest that tomato plants exposed to iron-deficiency are able to change sulfur metabolic balance mimicking sulfur starvation responses to meet the increased demand for methionine and its derivatives, allowing them to cope with this stress. PMID:24119307

  20. Mitochondrial mayhem: the mitochondrion as a modulator of iron metabolism and its role in disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Michael Li-Hsuan; Lane, Darius J R; Richardson, Des R

    2011-12-15

    The mitochondrion plays vital roles in various aspects of cellular metabolism, ranging from energy transduction and apoptosis to the synthesis of important molecules such as heme. Mitochondria are also centrally involved in iron metabolism, as exemplified by disruptions in mitochondrial proteins that lead to perturbations in whole-cell iron processing. Recent investigations have identified a host of mitochondrial proteins (e.g., mitochondrial ferritin; mitoferrins 1 and 2; ABCBs 6, 7, and 10; and frataxin) that may play roles in the homeostasis of mitochondrial iron. These mitochondrial proteins appear to participate in one or more processes of iron storage, iron uptake, and heme and iron-sulfur cluster synthesis. In this review, we present and critically discuss the evidence suggesting that the mitochondrion may contribute to the regulation of whole-cell iron metabolism. Further, human diseases that arise from a dysregulation of these mitochondrial molecules reveal the ability of the mitochondrion to communicate with cytosolic iron metabolism to coordinate whole-cell iron processing and to fulfill the high demands of this organelle for iron. This review highlights new advances in understanding iron metabolism in terms of novel molecular players and diseases associated with its dysregulation.

  1. Insights into the Structure and Metabolic Function of Microbes That Shape Pelagic Iron-Rich Aggregates (“Iron Snow”)

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shipeng; Chourey, Karuna; Reiche, Marco; Nietzsche, Sandor; Shah, Manesh B.; Neu, Thomas R.; Hettich, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial ferrous iron [Fe(II)] oxidation leads to the formation of iron-rich macroscopic aggregates (“iron snow”) at the redoxcline in a stratified lignite mine lake in east-central Germany. We aimed to identify the abundant Fe-oxidizing and Fe-reducing microorganisms likely to be involved in the formation and transformation of iron snow present in the redoxcline in two basins of the lake that differ in their pH values. Nucleic acid- and lipid-stained microbial cells of various morphologies detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy were homogeneously distributed in all iron snow samples. The dominant iron mineral appeared to be schwertmannite, with shorter needles in the northern than in the central basin samples. Total bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies ranged from 5.0 × 108 copies g (dry weight)−1 in the acidic central lake basin (pH 3.3) to 4.0 × 1010 copies g (dry weight)−1 in the less acidic (pH 5.9) northern basin. Total RNA-based quantitative PCR assigned up to 61% of metabolically active microbial communities to Fe-oxidizing- and Fe-reducing-related bacteria, indicating that iron metabolism was an important metabolic strategy. Molecular identification of abundant groups suggested that iron snow surfaces were formed by chemoautotrophic iron oxidizers, such as Acidimicrobium, Ferrovum, Acidithiobacillus, Thiobacillus, and Chlorobium, in the redoxcline and were rapidly colonized by heterotrophic iron reducers, such as Acidiphilium, Albidiferax-like, and Geobacter-like groups. Metaproteomics yielded 283 different proteins from northern basin iron snow samples, and protein identification provided a glimpse into some of their in situ metabolic processes, such as primary production (CO2 fixation), respiration, motility, and survival strategies. PMID:23645202

  2. Insights into the structure and metabolic function of microbes that shape pelagic iron-rich aggregates ("iron snow").

    PubMed

    Lu, Shipeng; Chourey, Karuna; Reiche, Marco; Nietzsche, Sandor; Shah, Manesh B; Neu, Thomas R; Hettich, Robert L; Küsel, Kirsten

    2013-07-01

    Microbial ferrous iron [Fe(II)] oxidation leads to the formation of iron-rich macroscopic aggregates ("iron snow") at the redoxcline in a stratified lignite mine lake in east-central Germany. We aimed to identify the abundant Fe-oxidizing and Fe-reducing microorganisms likely to be involved in the formation and transformation of iron snow present in the redoxcline in two basins of the lake that differ in their pH values. Nucleic acid- and lipid-stained microbial cells of various morphologies detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy were homogeneously distributed in all iron snow samples. The dominant iron mineral appeared to be schwertmannite, with shorter needles in the northern than in the central basin samples. Total bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies ranged from 5.0 × 10(8) copies g (dry weight)(-1) in the acidic central lake basin (pH 3.3) to 4.0 × 10(10) copies g (dry weight)(-1) in the less acidic (pH 5.9) northern basin. Total RNA-based quantitative PCR assigned up to 61% of metabolically active microbial communities to Fe-oxidizing- and Fe-reducing-related bacteria, indicating that iron metabolism was an important metabolic strategy. Molecular identification of abundant groups suggested that iron snow surfaces were formed by chemoautotrophic iron oxidizers, such as Acidimicrobium, Ferrovum, Acidithiobacillus, Thiobacillus, and Chlorobium, in the redoxcline and were rapidly colonized by heterotrophic iron reducers, such as Acidiphilium, Albidiferax-like, and Geobacter-like groups. Metaproteomics yielded 283 different proteins from northern basin iron snow samples, and protein identification provided a glimpse into some of their in situ metabolic processes, such as primary production (CO2 fixation), respiration, motility, and survival strategies.

  3. Sleep disorders: A review of the interface between restless legs syndrome and iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Daubian-Nosé, Paulo; Frank, Miriam K; Esteves, Andrea Maculano

    2014-12-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is characterized by unpleasant sensations mainly in the legs. 43% of RLS-associated conditions have also been associated with systemic iron deficiency. The objective of this study was to review in the literature the relationship between iron metabolism and RLS. With an initial search using the keywords combination "Iron Metabolism OR Iron Deficiency AND Restless Legs Syndrome," 145 articles were screened, and 20 articles were selected. Few studies were found for this review in the period of 2001-2014, however, the correlation between RLS and iron was evident. PMID:26483934

  4. Sleep disorders: A review of the interface between restless legs syndrome and iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Daubian-Nosé, Paulo; Frank, Miriam K.; Esteves, Andrea Maculano

    2014-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is characterized by unpleasant sensations mainly in the legs. 43% of RLS-associated conditions have also been associated with systemic iron deficiency. The objective of this study was to review in the literature the relationship between iron metabolism and RLS. With an initial search using the keywords combination “Iron Metabolism OR Iron Deficiency AND Restless Legs Syndrome,” 145 articles were screened, and 20 articles were selected. Few studies were found for this review in the period of 2001–2014, however, the correlation between RLS and iron was evident. PMID:26483934

  5. Like iron in the blood of the people: the requirement for heme trafficking in iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Korolnek, Tamara; Hamza, Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    Heme is an iron-containing porphyrin ring that serves as a prosthetic group in proteins that function in diverse metabolic pathways. Heme is also a major source of bioavailable iron in the human diet. While the synthesis of heme has been well-characterized, the pathways for heme trafficking remain poorly understood. It is likely that heme transport across membranes is highly regulated, as free heme is toxic to cells. This review outlines the requirement for heme delivery to various subcellular compartments as well as possible mechanisms for the mobilization of heme to these compartments. We also discuss how these trafficking pathways might function during physiological events involving inter- and intra-cellular mobilization of heme, including erythropoiesis, erythrophagocytosis, heme absorption in the gut, as well as heme transport pathways supporting embryonic development. Lastly, we aim to question the current dogma that heme, in toto, is not mobilized from one cell or tissue to another, outlining the evidence for these pathways and drawing parallels to other well-accepted paradigms for copper, iron, and cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:24926267

  6. Update on iron metabolism and molecular perspective of common genetic and acquired disorder, hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seongseok; Vincelette, Nicole D

    2015-07-01

    Iron is an essential component of erythropoiesis and its metabolism is tightly regulated by a variety of internal and external cues including iron storage, tissue hypoxia, inflammation and degree of erythropoiesis. There has been remarkable improvement in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of iron metabolism past decades. The classical model of iron metabolism with iron response element/iron response protein (IRE/IRP) is now extended to include hepcidin model. Endogenous and exogenous signals funnel down to hepcidin via wide range of signaling pathways including Janus Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (JAK/STAT3), Bone Morphogenetic Protein/Hemojuvelin/Mothers Against Decapentaplegic Homolog (BMP/HJV/SMAD), and Von Hippel Lindau/Hypoxia-inducible factor/Erythropoietin (VHL/HIF/EPO), then relay to ferroportin, which directly regulates intra- and extracellular iron levels. The successful molecular delineation of iron metabolism further enhanced our understanding of common genetic and acquired disorder, hemochromatosis. The majority of the hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) patients are now shown to have mutations in the genes coding either upstream or downstream proteins of hepcidin, resulting in iron overload. The update on hepcidin centered mechanisms of iron metabolism and their clinical perspective in hemochromatosis will be discussed in this review.

  7. Effect of iron limitation and fur gene inactivation on the transcriptional profile of the strict anaerobe Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Vasileva, Delyana; Janssen, Holger; Hönicke, Daniel; Ehrenreich, Armin; Bahl, Hubert

    2012-07-01

    Iron is a nutrient of critical importance for the strict anaerobe Clostridium acetobutylicum, as it is involved in numerous basic cellular functions and metabolic pathways. A gene encoding a putative ferric uptake regulator (Fur) has been identified in the genome of C. acetobutylicum. In this work, we inactivated the fur gene by using insertional mutagenesis. The resultant mutant showed a slow-growing phenotype and enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress, but essentially no dramatic change in its fermentation pattern. A unique feature of its physiology was the overflowing production of riboflavin. To gain further insights into the role of the Fur protein and the mechanisms for establishment of iron balance in C. acetobutylicum, we characterized and compared the gene-expression profile of the fur mutant and the iron-limitation stimulon of the parental strain. Not surprisingly, a repertoire of iron-transport systems was upregulated in both microarray datasets, suggesting that they are regulated by Fur according to the availability of iron. In addition, iron limitation and inactivation of fur affected the expression of several genes involved in energy metabolism. Among them, two genes, encoding a lactate dehydrogenase and a flavodoxin, were highly induced. In order to support the function of the latter, the ribDBAH operon responsible for riboflavin biosynthesis was also upregulated significantly. Furthermore, the iron-starvation response of C. acetobutylicum involved transcriptional modifications that were not detected in the fur mutant, suggesting that there exist additional mechanisms for adaptation to low-iron environments. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the strict anaerobe C. acetobutylicum senses and responds to availability of iron on multiple levels using a sophisticated system, and that Fur plays an important role in this process.

  8. Iron-induced changes in pyruvate metabolism of Tritrichomonas foetus and involvement of iron in expression of hydrogenosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Vanácová, S; Rasoloson, D; Rázga, J; Hrdý, I; Kulda, J; Tachezy, J

    2001-01-01

    The main function of the hydrogenosome, a typical organelle of trichomonads, is to convert malate or pyruvate to H(2), CO(2) and acetate by a pathway associated with ATP synthesis. This pathway relies on activity of iron-sulfur proteins such as pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), hydrogenase and ferredoxin. To examine the effect of iron availability on proper hydrogenosomal function, the metabolic activity of the hydrogenosome and expression of hydrogenosomal enzymes were compared in Tritrichomonas foetus maintained under iron-rich (150 microM iron nitrilotriacetate) or iron-restricted (180 microM 2,2-dipyridyl) conditions in vitro. The activities of PFOR and hydrogenase, and also production of acetate and H(2), were markedly decreased or absent in iron-restricted trichomonads. Moreover, a decrease in activity of the hydrogenosomal malic enzyme, which is a non-Fe-S protein, was also observed. Impaired function of hydrogenosomes under iron-restricted conditions was compensated for by activation of the cytosolic pathway, mediating conversion of pyruvate to ethanol via acetaldehyde. This metabolic switch was fully reversible. Production of hydrogen by iron-restricted trichomonads was restored to the level of organisms grown under iron-rich conditions within 3 h after addition of 150 microM iron nitrilotriacetate. Protein analysis of purified hydrogenosomes from iron-restricted cells showed decreased levels of proteins corresponding to PFOR, malic enzyme and ferredoxin. Accordingly, these cells displayed decreased steady-state level and synthesis of mRNAs encoding PFOR and hydrogenosomal malic enzyme. These data demonstrate that iron is essential for function of the hydrogenosome, show its involvement in the expression of hydrogenosomal proteins and indicate the presence of iron-dependent control of gene transcription in Tt. foetus. PMID:11160800

  9. New strategies to target iron metabolism for the treatment of beta thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Oikonomidou, Paraskevi Rea; Casu, Carla; Rivella, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    Iron is one of the most abundant elements in the Earth and a fundamental component of enzymes and other proteins that participate in a wide range of biological processes. As the human body has no mechanisms to eliminate the excess of iron, its metabolism needs to be tightly controlled in order to avoid all the sequelae associated with high iron levels. Iron overload is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in beta thalassemia. The master regulator of iron homeostasis, hepcidin, is chronically repressed in this disorder, leading to increased intestinal iron absorption and consequent iron overload. Many groups have focused on obtaining a better understanding of the pathways involved in iron regulation. New molecules have recently been synthesized and used in animal models of dysregulated iron metabolism, demonstrating their ability to target and reduce iron load. Antisense oligonucleotides, as well as lipid nanoparticle-formulated small interfering RNAs and minihepcidins peptides, are novel agents that have already proved to be efficient in modulating iron metabolism in mouse models and are therefore promising candidates for the treatment of patients affected by iron disorders. PMID:26919168

  10. Limits to Success. The Iron Law of Verhulst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunsch, P. L.

    In this chapter we develop the point of view that Verhulst is a major initiator of systems thinking. His logistic equation is a system archetype, i.e. a simple system built with few feedback loops. In the Fifth Discipline [19] Peter Senge calls this particular archetype "Limits to Success". It can also be called the "Iron law of Verhulst", expressing that trees can never grow to heaven. In a deeper analysis this equation illustrates the shifting loop dominance, one of the basic principles of system dynamics. The basic message is that the combination of some few archetypes, like the logistic growth, can afford valuable insight into many complex systems such as the economy, environment, organisations, etc. This fruitful concept is illustrated by a simple model in behavioural finance describing the equity price evolution, and based on the interplay of three main growth archetypes: "Limits to Success", "Tragedy of the Commons", and "Balancing Loop with Delay".

  11. EXPLORING THE LIMITS TO LIGNINS' METABOLIC PLASTICITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Just how far can lignification be pushed with the aim of improving wood processing (and possibly solid wood properties)? We will explore the limits to which the 3 traditional monolignols can be manipulated, but also broaden our scope to begin thinking about how the entire monomer pool for lignificat...

  12. Deciphering Fur transcriptional regulatory network highlights its complex role beyond iron metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; Latif, Haythem; O'Brien, Edward J; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-09-15

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism. However, the full regulatory potential of Fur remains undefined. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the Fur transcriptional regulatory network in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 in response to iron availability using genome-wide measurements. Integrative data analysis reveals that a total of 81 genes in 42 transcription units are directly regulated by three different modes of Fur regulation, including apo- and holo-Fur activation and holo-Fur repression. We show that Fur connects iron transport and utilization enzymes with negative-feedback loop pairs for iron homeostasis. In addition, direct involvement of Fur in the regulation of DNA synthesis, energy metabolism and biofilm development is found. These results show how Fur exhibits a comprehensive regulatory role affecting many fundamental cellular processes linked to iron metabolism in order to coordinate the overall response of E. coli to iron availability.

  13. Deciphering Fur transcriptional regulatory network highlights its complex role beyond iron metabolism in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; Latif, Haythem; O'Brien, Edward J; Szubin, Richard; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-01-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism. However, the full regulatory potential of Fur remains undefined. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the Fur transcriptional regulatory network in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 in response to iron availability using genome-wide measurements. Integrative data analysis reveals that a total of 81 genes in 42 transcription units are directly regulated by three different modes of Fur regulation, including apo- and holo-Fur activation and holo-Fur repression. We show that Fur connects iron transport and utilization enzymes with negative-feedback loop pairs for iron homeostasis. In addition, direct involvement of Fur in the regulation of DNA synthesis, energy metabolism and biofilm development is found. These results show how Fur exhibits a comprehensive regulatory role affecting many fundamental cellular processes linked to iron metabolism in order to coordinate the overall response of E. coli to iron availability. PMID:25222563

  14. Fixing frataxin: ‘ironing out’ the metabolic defect in Friedreich's ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Anzovino, A; Lane, D J R; Huang, M L-H; Richardson, D R

    2014-01-01

    The metabolically active and redox-active mitochondrion appears to play a major role in the cellular metabolism of the transition metal, iron. Frataxin, a mitochondrial matrix protein, has been identified as playing a key role in the iron metabolism of this organelle due to its iron-binding properties and is known to be essential for iron–sulphur cluster formation. However, the precise function of frataxin remains elusive. The decrease in frataxin expression, as seen in the inherited disorder Friedreich's ataxia, markedly alters cellular and mitochondrial iron metabolism in both the mitochondrion and the cell. The resulting dysregulation of iron trafficking damages affects tissues leading to neuro-and cardiodegeneration. This disease underscores the importance of iron homeostasis in the redox-active environment of the mitochondrion and the molecular players involved. Unravelling the mechanisms of altered iron metabolism in Friedreich's ataxia will help elucidate a biochemical function for frataxin. Consequently, this will enable the development of more effective and rationally designed treatments. This review will focus on the emerging function of frataxin in relation to the observed alterations in mitochondrial iron metabolism in Friedreich's ataxia. Tissue-specific alterations due to frataxin loss will also be discussed, as well as current and emerging therapeutic strategies. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24138602

  15. The factors influencing urinary arsenic excretion and metabolism of workers in steel and iron smelting foundry.

    PubMed

    Shuhua, Xi; Qingshan, Sun; Fei, Wang; Shengnan, Liu; Ling, Yan; Lin, Zhang; Yingli, Song; Nan, Yan; Guifan, Sun

    2014-01-01

    In order to evaluate the degree of arsenic (As) exposure and the factors influencing urinary As excretion and metabolism, 192 workers from a steel and iron smelting plant, with different type of work in production such as roller, steel smelting, iron smelting and metallic charge preparation, were recruited. Information about characteristics of each subject was obtained by questionnaire and inorganic As (iAs), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in urine were determined. The results showed that steel smelters had significantly higher concentrations of DMA and total As (TAs) than rollers and metallic charge preparation workers, and iron and steel smelters had a higher value of primary methylation index and lower proportion of the iAs (iAs%) than rollers and metallic charge preparation workers. In steel smelters, urinary As level exceeded the biological exposure index (BEI) limit for urinary As of 35 μg/l by 65.52%, and higher than metallic charge preparation workers (35.14%). The individuals consumed seafood in recent 3 days had a higher TAs than the individuals without seafood consumption. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that different jobs, taken Chinese medicine of bezoar and seafood consumption in recent 3 days were significantly associated with urinary TAs exceeded BEI limit value 35 μg/l. Our results suggest that workers in steel and iron smelting plant had a lower level of As exposure, and seafood consumption and taking Chinese medicine of bezoar also could increase the risk of urinary TAs exceeded BEI limit value.

  16. Cellular hallmarks reveal restricted aerobic metabolism at thermal limits

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Aitana; Busso, Coralie; Gönczy, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    All organisms live within a given thermal range, but little is known about the mechanisms setting the limits of this range. We uncovered cellular features exhibiting signature changes at thermal limits in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. These included changes in embryo size and shape, which were also observed in Caenorhabditis briggsae, indicating evolutionary conservation. We hypothesized that such changes could reflect restricted aerobic capacity at thermal limits. Accordingly, we uncovered that relative respiration in C. elegans embryos decreases at the thermal limits as compared to within the thermal range. Furthermore, by compromising components of the respiratory chain, we demonstrated that the reliance on aerobic metabolism is reduced at thermal limits. Moreover, embryos thus compromised exhibited signature changes in size and shape already within the thermal range. We conclude that restricted aerobic metabolism at the thermal limits contributes to setting the thermal range in a metazoan organism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04810.001 PMID:25929283

  17. Cellular hallmarks reveal restricted aerobic metabolism at thermal limits.

    PubMed

    Neves, Aitana; Busso, Coralie; Gönczy, Pierre

    2015-05-01

    All organisms live within a given thermal range, but little is known about the mechanisms setting the limits of this range. We uncovered cellular features exhibiting signature changes at thermal limits in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. These included changes in embryo size and shape, which were also observed in Caenorhabditis briggsae, indicating evolutionary conservation. We hypothesized that such changes could reflect restricted aerobic capacity at thermal limits. Accordingly, we uncovered that relative respiration in C. elegans embryos decreases at the thermal limits as compared to within the thermal range. Furthermore, by compromising components of the respiratory chain, we demonstrated that the reliance on aerobic metabolism is reduced at thermal limits. Moreover, embryos thus compromised exhibited signature changes in size and shape already within the thermal range. We conclude that restricted aerobic metabolism at the thermal limits contributes to setting the thermal range in a metazoan organism.

  18. Discrete Responses to Limitation for Iron and Manganese in Agrobacterium tumefaciens: Influence on Attachment and Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hibbing, Michael E.; Xu, Jing; Natarajan, Ramya; Buechlein, Aaron M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transition metals such as iron and manganese are crucial trace nutrients for the growth of most bacteria, functioning as catalytic cofactors for many essential enzymes. Dedicated uptake and regulatory systems have evolved to ensure their acquisition for growth, while preventing toxicity. Transcriptomic analysis of the iron- and manganese-responsive regulons of Agrobacterium tumefaciens revealed that there are discrete regulatory networks that respond to changes in iron and manganese levels. Complementing earlier studies, the iron-responsive gene network is quite large and includes many aspects of iron-dependent metabolism and the iron-sparing response. In contrast, the manganese-responsive network is restricted to a limited number of genes, many of which can be linked to transport and utilization of the transition metal. Several of the target genes predicted to drive manganese uptake are required for growth under manganese-limited conditions, and an A. tumefaciens mutant with a manganese transport deficiency is attenuated for plant virulence. Iron and manganese limitation independently inhibit biofilm formation by A. tumefaciens, and several candidate genes that could impact biofilm formation were identified in each regulon. The biofilm-inhibitory effects of iron and manganese do not rely on recognized metal-responsive transcriptional regulators, suggesting alternate mechanisms influencing biofilm formation. However, under low-manganese conditions the dcpA operon is upregulated, encoding a system that controls levels of the cyclic di-GMP second messenger. Mutation of this regulatory pathway dampens the effect of manganese limitation. IMPORTANCE Responses to changes in transition metal levels, such as those of manganese and iron, are important for normal metabolism and growth in bacteria. Our study used global gene expression profiling to understand the response of the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens to changes of transition metal availability

  19. Advantages and disadvantages of the animal models v. in vitro studies in iron metabolism: a review.

    PubMed

    García, Y; Díaz-Castro, J

    2013-10-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world. Special molecules have evolved for iron acquisition, transport and storage in soluble, nontoxic forms. Studies about the effects of iron on health are focused on iron metabolism or nutrition to prevent or treat iron deficiency and anemia. These studies are focused in two main aspects: (1) basic studies to elucidate iron metabolism and (2) nutritional studies to evaluate the efficacy of iron supplementation to prevent or treat iron deficiency and anemia. This paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of the experimental models commonly used as well as the methods that are more used in studies related to iron. In vitro studies have used different parts of the gut. In vivo studies are done in humans and animals such as mice, rats, pigs and monkeys. Iron metabolism is a complex process that includes interactions at the systemic level. In vitro studies, despite physiological differences to humans, are useful to increase knowledge related to this essential micronutrient. Isotopic techniques are the most recommended in studies related to iron, but their high cost and required logistic, making them difficult to use. The depletion-repletion of hemoglobin is a method commonly used in animal studies. Three depletion-repletion techniques are mostly used: hemoglobin regeneration efficiency, relative biological values (RBV) and metabolic balance, which are official methods of the association of official analytical chemists. These techniques are well-validated to be used as studies related to iron and their results can be extrapolated to humans. Knowledge about the main advantages and disadvantages of the in vitro and animal models, and methods used in these studies, could increase confidence of researchers in the experimental results with less costs.

  20. Mitochondrial Iron Metabolism and Its Role in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Maxx P.; Greenamyre, J. Timothy

    2011-01-01

    In addition to their well-established role in providing the cell with ATP, mitochondria are the source of iron-sulfur clusters (ISCs) and heme – prosthetic groups that are utilized by proteins throughout the cell in various critical processes. The post-transcriptional system that mammalian cells use to regulate intracellular iron homeostasis depends, in part, upon the synthesis of ISCs in mitochondria. Thus, proper mitochondrial function is crucial to cellular iron homeostasis. Many neurodegenerative diseases are marked by mitochondrial impairment, brain iron accumulation, and oxidative stress – pathologies that are inter-related. This review discusses the physiological role that mitochondria play in cellular iron homeostasis and, in so doing, attempts to clarify how mitochondrial dysfunction may initiate and/or contribute to iron dysregulation in the context of neurodegenerative disease. We review what is currently known about the entry of iron into mitochondria, the ways in which iron is utilized therein, and how mitochondria are integrated into the system of iron homeostasis in mammalian cells. Lastly, we turn to recent advances in our understanding of iron dysregulation in two neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease), and discuss the use of iron chelation as a potential therapeutic approach to neurodegenerative disease. PMID:20463401

  1. Iron metabolism in Pseudomonas: salicylic acid, a siderophore of Pseudomonas fluorescens CHAO.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J M; Azelvandre, P; Georges, C

    1992-12-01

    Under iron-starvation conditions of growth, Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, a soil isolate involved in phytopathogenic fungi antagonisms, produced, together with pyoverdine, a second iron-chelating compound which was purified and identified by spectroscopy, HPLC and 1H-NMR to be salicylic acid. Mutants unable to synthesize pyoverdine overproduced this compound by a factor of 9-14. The biosynthesis of salicylic acid was under iron control; it was fully inhibited by 5 microM added iron in the growth medium. In contrast, salicylic acid of either bacterial or commercial origin facilitated labeled iron incorporation in iron-starved cells. Based on these two relationships observed with bacterial iron metabolism it is concluded that salicylic acid has a siderophore function for this strain. PMID:1292472

  2. The Effect of Iron Limitation on the Transcriptome and Proteome of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chee Kent; Hassan, Karl A.; Tetu, Sasha G.; Loper, Joyce E.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important micronutrients for bacterial growth is iron, whose bioavailability in soil is limited. Consequently, rhizospheric bacteria such as Pseudomonas fluorescens employ a range of mechanisms to acquire or compete for iron. We investigated the transcriptomic and proteomic effects of iron limitation on P. fluorescens Pf-5 by employing microarray and iTRAQ techniques, respectively. Analysis of this data revealed that genes encoding functions related to iron homeostasis, including pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin biosynthesis, a number of TonB-dependent receptor systems, as well as some inner-membrane transporters, were significantly up-regulated in response to iron limitation. Transcription of a ribosomal protein L36-encoding gene was also highly up-regulated during iron limitation. Certain genes or proteins involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites such as 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG), orfamide A and pyrrolnitrin, as well as a chitinase, were over-expressed under iron-limited conditions. In contrast, we observed that expression of genes involved in hydrogen cyanide production and flagellar biosynthesis were down-regulated in an iron-depleted culture medium. Phenotypic tests revealed that Pf-5 had reduced swarming motility on semi-solid agar in response to iron limitation. Comparison of the transcriptomic data with the proteomic data suggested that iron acquisition is regulated at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. PMID:22723948

  3. The effect of iron limitation on the transcriptome and proteome of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chee Kent; Hassan, Karl A; Tetu, Sasha G; Loper, Joyce E; Paulsen, Ian T

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important micronutrients for bacterial growth is iron, whose bioavailability in soil is limited. Consequently, rhizospheric bacteria such as Pseudomonas fluorescens employ a range of mechanisms to acquire or compete for iron. We investigated the transcriptomic and proteomic effects of iron limitation on P. fluorescens Pf-5 by employing microarray and iTRAQ techniques, respectively. Analysis of this data revealed that genes encoding functions related to iron homeostasis, including pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin biosynthesis, a number of TonB-dependent receptor systems, as well as some inner-membrane transporters, were significantly up-regulated in response to iron limitation. Transcription of a ribosomal protein L36-encoding gene was also highly up-regulated during iron limitation. Certain genes or proteins involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites such as 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG), orfamide A and pyrrolnitrin, as well as a chitinase, were over-expressed under iron-limited conditions. In contrast, we observed that expression of genes involved in hydrogen cyanide production and flagellar biosynthesis were down-regulated in an iron-depleted culture medium. Phenotypic tests revealed that Pf-5 had reduced swarming motility on semi-solid agar in response to iron limitation. Comparison of the transcriptomic data with the proteomic data suggested that iron acquisition is regulated at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. PMID:22723948

  4. Fungal Morphology, Iron Homeostasis, and Lipid Metabolism Regulated by a GATA Transcription Factor in Blastomyces dermatitidis

    PubMed Central

    Marty, Amber J.; Broman, Aimee T.; Zarnowski, Robert; Dwyer, Teigan G.; Bond, Laura M.; Lounes-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa; Fontaine, Joël; Ntambi, James M.; Keleş, Sündüz; Kendziorski, Christina; Gauthier, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    In response to temperature, Blastomyces dermatitidis converts between yeast and mold forms. Knowledge of the mechanism(s) underlying this response to temperature remains limited. In B. dermatitidis, we identified a GATA transcription factor, SREB, important for the transition to mold. Null mutants (SREBΔ) fail to fully complete the conversion to mold and cannot properly regulate siderophore biosynthesis. To capture the transcriptional response regulated by SREB early in the phase transition (0–48 hours), gene expression microarrays were used to compare SREB∆ to an isogenic wild type isolate. Analysis of the time course microarray data demonstrated SREB functioned as a transcriptional regulator at 37°C and 22°C. Bioinformatic and biochemical analyses indicated SREB was involved in diverse biological processes including iron homeostasis, biosynthesis of triacylglycerol and ergosterol, and lipid droplet formation. Integration of microarray data, bioinformatics, and chromatin immunoprecipitation identified a subset of genes directly bound and regulated by SREB in vivo in yeast (37°C) and during the phase transition to mold (22°C). This included genes involved with siderophore biosynthesis and uptake, iron homeostasis, and genes unrelated to iron assimilation. Functional analysis suggested that lipid droplets were actively metabolized during the phase transition and lipid metabolism may contribute to filamentous growth at 22°C. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, RNA interference, and overexpression analyses suggested that SREB was in a negative regulatory circuit with the bZIP transcription factor encoded by HAPX. Both SREB and HAPX affected morphogenesis at 22°C; however, large changes in transcript abundance by gene deletion for SREB or strong overexpression for HAPX were required to alter the phase transition. PMID:26114571

  5. Gene Expression Profiling in Entamoeba histolytica Identifies Key Components in Iron Uptake and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Cuevas, Nora Adriana; Weber, Christian; Hon, Chung-Chau; Guillen, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an ameboid parasite that causes colonic dysentery and liver abscesses in humans. The parasite encounters dramatic changes in iron concentration during its invasion of the host, with relatively low levels in the intestinal lumen and then relatively high levels in the blood and liver. The liver notably contains sources of iron; therefore, the parasite's ability to use these sources might be relevant to its survival in the liver and thus the pathogenesis of liver abscesses. The objective of the present study was to identify factors involved in iron uptake, use and storage in E. histolytica. We compared the respective transcriptomes of E. histolytica trophozoites grown in normal medium (containing around 169 µM iron), low-iron medium (around 123 µM iron), iron-deficient medium (around 91 µM iron), and iron-deficient medium replenished with hemoglobin. The differentially expressed genes included those coding for the ATP-binding cassette transporters and major facilitator transporters (which share homology with bacterial siderophores and heme transporters) and genes involved in heme biosynthesis and degradation. Iron deficiency was associated with increased transcription of genes encoding a subset of cell signaling molecules, some of which have previously been linked to adaptation to the intestinal environment and virulence. The present study is the first to have assessed the transcriptome of E. histolytica grown under various iron concentrations. Our results provide insights into the pathways involved in iron uptake and metabolism in this parasite. PMID:25210888

  6. Gene expression profiling in Entamoeba histolytica identifies key components in iron uptake and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Cuevas, Nora Adriana; Weber, Christian; Hon, Chung-Chau; Guillen, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an ameboid parasite that causes colonic dysentery and liver abscesses in humans. The parasite encounters dramatic changes in iron concentration during its invasion of the host, with relatively low levels in the intestinal lumen and then relatively high levels in the blood and liver. The liver notably contains sources of iron; therefore, the parasite's ability to use these sources might be relevant to its survival in the liver and thus the pathogenesis of liver abscesses. The objective of the present study was to identify factors involved in iron uptake, use and storage in E. histolytica. We compared the respective transcriptomes of E. histolytica trophozoites grown in normal medium (containing around 169 µM iron), low-iron medium (around 123 µM iron), iron-deficient medium (around 91 µM iron), and iron-deficient medium replenished with hemoglobin. The differentially expressed genes included those coding for the ATP-binding cassette transporters and major facilitator transporters (which share homology with bacterial siderophores and heme transporters) and genes involved in heme biosynthesis and degradation. Iron deficiency was associated with increased transcription of genes encoding a subset of cell signaling molecules, some of which have previously been linked to adaptation to the intestinal environment and virulence. The present study is the first to have assessed the transcriptome of E. histolytica grown under various iron concentrations. Our results provide insights into the pathways involved in iron uptake and metabolism in this parasite.

  7. Divergent Responses of Coastal and Oceanic Synechococcus to Iron Limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, K. R.; McIlvin, M.; Post, A.; Saito, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Marine Synechococcus are some of the most diverse and ubiquitous phytoplankton in the ocean, and are major contributors to global primary productivity. Iron (Fe) is a micronutrient required for maintenance of the photosynthetic apparatus that limits productivity in many parts of the ocean. To investigate how marine Synechococcus strains adapt and acclimate to Fe availability, we compared the growth, photophysiology, and protein abundance in two Synechococcus strains over a range of Fe concentrations. Synechococcus strain WH8102, from the permanently stratified southern Sargasso Sea in a region that receives significant dust deposition, had few acclimation strategies under low Fe and showed impaired growth rates and photophysiology as Fe declined. Coastal isolate WH8020, from the dynamic, seasonally variable North Atlantic Ocean, displayed a range of acclimation responses, including changes in Fe acquisition, storage, and photosynthetic electron transport proteins, substitution of flavodoxin for ferredoxin, and modified photophysiology. Each of these acclimation responses occurred at different Fe threshold concentrations over which growth rate remained remarkably stable. This study demonstrates that genomic streamlining in waters with low nitrogen and phosphorus may favor the loss of Fe acclimation genes when the Fe supply is consistent over time, and expands the regions where Fe stress is thought to occur to most coastal environments.

  8. Nanoscale Metallic Iron for Environmental Remediation: Prospects and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Noubactep, Chicgoua; Caré, Sabine; Crane, Richard

    2012-03-01

    The amendment of the subsurface with nanoscale metallic iron particles (nano-Fe(0)) has been discussed in the literature as an efficient in situ technology for groundwater remediation. However, the introduction of this technology was controversial and its efficiency has never been univocally established. This unsatisfying situation has motivated this communication whose objective was a comprehensive discussion of the intrinsic reactivity of nano-Fe(0) based on the contemporary knowledge on the mechanism of contaminant removal by Fe(0) and a mathematical model. It is showed that due to limitations of the mass transfer of nano-Fe(0) to contaminants, available concepts cannot explain the success of nano-Fe(0) injection for in situ groundwater remediation. It is recommended to test the possibility of introducing nano-Fe(0) to initiate the formation of roll-fronts which propagation would induce the reductive transformation of both dissolved and adsorbed contaminants. Within a roll-front, Fe(II) from nano-Fe(0) is the reducing agent for contaminants. Fe(II) is recycled by biotic or abiotic Fe(III) reduction. While the roll-front concept could explain the success of already implemented reaction zones, more research is needed for a science-based recommendation of nano-Fe(0) for subsurface treatment by roll-fronts.

  9. The Crossroads of Iron with Hypoxia and Cellular Metabolism. Implications in the Pathobiology of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Brian B.; Rouault, Tracey C.; Tuder, Rubin M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathologic hallmark of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is pulmonary vascular remodeling, characterized by endothelial cell proliferation, smooth muscle hypertrophy, and perivascular inflammation, ultimately contributing to increased pulmonary arterial pressures. Several recent studies have observed that iron deficiency in patients with various forms of PAH is associated with worsened clinical outcome. Iron plays a key role in many cellular processes regulating the response to hypoxia, oxidative stress, cellular proliferation, and cell metabolism. Given the potential importance of iron supplementation in patients with the disease and the broad cellular functions of iron, we review its role in processes that pertain to PAH. PMID:24988529

  10. IscR of Rhodobacter sphaeroides functions as repressor of genes for iron-sulfur metabolism and represents a new type of iron-sulfur-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Remes, Bernhard; Eisenhardt, Benjamin D; Srinivasan, Vasundara; Klug, Gabriele

    2015-10-01

    IscR proteins are known as transcriptional regulators for Fe-S biogenesis. In the facultatively phototrophic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides IscR is the product of the first gene in the isc-suf operon. A major role of IscR in R. sphaeroides iron-dependent regulation was suggested in a bioinformatic study (Rodionov et al., PLoS Comput Biol 2:e163, 2006), which predicted a binding site in the upstream regions of several iron uptake genes, named Iron-Rhodo-box. Most known IscR proteins have Fe-S clusters featuring (Cys)3 (His)1 ligation. However, IscR proteins from Rhodobacteraceae harbor only a single-Cys residue and it was considered unlikely that they can ligate an Fe-S cluster. In this study, the role of R. sphaeroides IscR as transcriptional regulator and sensor of the Fe-S cluster status of the cell was analyzed. A mutant lacking IscR is more impaired in growth under iron limitation than the wild-type and exhibits significantly increased ROS levels in iron-replete and iron-deplete conditions. Expression studies reveal that R. sphaeroides IscR in its cluster-bound form functions as transcriptional repressor of genes involved in iron metabolism by direct binding to the promoter region of genes preceded by the motif. A total of 110 genes are directly or indirectly affected by IscR. Furthermore, IscR possesses a unique Fe-S cluster ligation scheme with only a single cysteine involved.

  11. Lipocalin 2 alleviates iron toxicity by facilitating hypoferremia of inflammation and limiting catalytic iron generation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xia; Yeoh, Beng San; Saha, Piu; Olvera, Rodrigo Aguilera; Singh, Vishal; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2016-06-01

    Iron is an essential transition metal ion for virtually all aerobic organisms, yet its dysregulation (iron overload or anemia) is a harbinger of many pathologic conditions. Hence, iron homeostasis is tightly regulated to prevent the generation of catalytic iron (CI) which can damage cellular biomolecules. In this study, we investigated the role of iron-binding/trafficking innate immune protein, lipocalin 2 (Lcn2, aka siderocalin) on iron and CI homeostasis using Lcn2 knockout (KO) mice and their WT littermates. Administration of iron either systemically or via dietary intake strikingly upregulated Lcn2 in the serum, urine, feces, and liver of WT mice. However, similarly-treated Lcn2KO mice displayed elevated CI, augmented lipid peroxidation and other indices of organ damage markers, implicating that Lcn2 responses may be protective against iron-induced toxicity. Herein, we also show a negative association between serum Lcn2 and CI in the murine model of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. The inability of DSS-treated Lcn2KO mice to elicit hypoferremic response to acute colitis, implicates the involvement of Lcn2 in iron homeostasis during inflammation. Using bone marrow chimeras, we further show that Lcn2 derived from both immune and non-immune cells participates in CI regulation. Remarkably, exogenous rec-Lcn2 supplementation suppressed CI levels in Lcn2KO serum and urine. Collectively, our results suggest that Lcn2 may facilitate hypoferremia, suppress CI generation and prevent iron-mediated adverse effects. PMID:27007712

  12. Transferrin Receptor 2 Dependent Alterations of Brain Iron Metabolism Affect Anxiety Circuits in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Rosa Maria; Boda, Enrica; Montarolo, Francesca; Boero, Martina; Mezzanotte, Mariarosa; Saglio, Giuseppe; Buffo, Annalisa; Roetto, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    The Transferrin Receptor 2 (Tfr2) modulates systemic iron metabolism through the regulation of iron regulator Hepcidin (Hepc) and Tfr2 inactivation causes systemic iron overload. Based on data demonstrating Tfr2 expression in brain, we analysed Tfr2-KO mice in order to examine the molecular, histological and behavioural consequences of Tfr2 silencing in this tissue. Tfr2 abrogation caused an accumulation of iron in specific districts in the nervous tissue that was not accompanied by a brain Hepc response. Moreover, Tfr2-KO mice presented a selective overactivation of neurons in the limbic circuit and the emergence of an anxious-like behaviour. Furthermore, microglial cells showed a particular sensitivity to iron perturbation. We conclude that Tfr2 is a key regulator of brain iron homeostasis and propose a role for Tfr2 alpha in the regulation of anxiety circuits. PMID:27477597

  13. Transferrin Receptor 2 Dependent Alterations of Brain Iron Metabolism Affect Anxiety Circuits in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Rosa Maria; Boda, Enrica; Montarolo, Francesca; Boero, Martina; Mezzanotte, Mariarosa; Saglio, Giuseppe; Buffo, Annalisa; Roetto, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    The Transferrin Receptor 2 (Tfr2) modulates systemic iron metabolism through the regulation of iron regulator Hepcidin (Hepc) and Tfr2 inactivation causes systemic iron overload. Based on data demonstrating Tfr2 expression in brain, we analysed Tfr2-KO mice in order to examine the molecular, histological and behavioural consequences of Tfr2 silencing in this tissue. Tfr2 abrogation caused an accumulation of iron in specific districts in the nervous tissue that was not accompanied by a brain Hepc response. Moreover, Tfr2-KO mice presented a selective overactivation of neurons in the limbic circuit and the emergence of an anxious-like behaviour. Furthermore, microglial cells showed a particular sensitivity to iron perturbation. We conclude that Tfr2 is a key regulator of brain iron homeostasis and propose a role for Tfr2 alpha in the regulation of anxiety circuits. PMID:27477597

  14. Persistence of iron limitation in the western subarctic Pacific SEEDS II mesoscale fertilization experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Mark L.; Trick, Charles G.; Cochlan, William P.; Beall, Ben

    2009-12-01

    The cumulative evidence from more than a dozen mesoscale iron-enrichment studies in high nitrate low chlorophyll (HNLC) waters demonstrates that iron limitation is widespread and very likely affects atmospheric carbon dioxide and thus global climate. However, the responses of microphytoplankton (>20 μm), predominantly diatoms, vary greatly among these mesoscale experiments even though similar amounts of iron were added, making it difficult to quantitatively incorporate iron effects into global climate models. Nowhere is this difference more dramatic than between the massive bloom observed during Subarctic Pacific Iron Experiment for Ecosystem Dynamics Study (SEEDS) I and the order of magnitude smaller ecosystem response in SEEDS II; two mesocale experiments performed in the same HNLC region of the western subarctic Pacific in different years. Deckboard incubation experiments initiated during the early, middle, and late stages of the 32-day SEEDS II experiment show that while the two iron infusions increased phytoplankton growth, diatoms remained significantly limited by iron availability, despite total dissolved Fe concentrations in the patch being well above the diffusion-limited threshold for rapid diatom growth. This iron limitation was apparent <6 days after the initial iron infusion and was not alleviated by the second, smaller iron infusion. In contrast, smaller phytoplankton (<20 μm) showed a more restricted response to further iron amendments, indicating that their iron nutrition was near optimal. Iron complexed to desferrioximine B, a commonly available siderophore produced by at least one marine bacterium, was poorly available to diatoms throughout the patch evolution, indicating that these diatoms lacked the ability to induce high-affinity iron uptake systems. These results suggest that the strong organic complexation of Fe(III) observed in the SEEDS II-fertilized patch was not compatible with rapid diatom growth. In contrast, iron associated with

  15. Insights into the Structure and Metabolic Function of Microbes That Shape Pelagic Iron-Rich Aggregates ( Iron Snow )

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S; Chourey, Karuna; REICHE, M; Nietzsche, S; Shah, Manesh B; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Kusel, K

    2013-01-01

    Metaproteomics combined with total nucleic acid-based methods aided in deciphering the roles of microorganisms in the formation and transformation of iron-rich macroscopic aggregates (iron snow) formed in the redoxcline of an acidic lignite mine lake. Iron snow had high total bacterial 16S rRNA gene copies, with 2 x 109 copies g (dry wt)-1 in the acidic (pH 3.5) central lake basin and 4 x 1010 copies g (dry wt)-1 in the less acidic (pH 5.5) northern lake basin. Active microbial communities in the central basin were dominated by Alphaproteobacteria (36.6%) and Actinobacteria (21.4%), and by Betaproteobacteria (36.2%) in the northern basin. Microbial Fe-cycling appeared to be the dominant metabolism in the schwertmannite-rich iron snow, because cloning and qPCR assigned up to 61% of active bacteria as Fe-cycling bacteria (FeB). Metaproteomics revealed 70 unique proteins from central basin iron snow and 283 unique proteins from 43 genera from northern basin. Protein identification provided a glimpse into in situ processes, such as primary production, motility, metabolism of acidophilic FeB, and survival strategies of neutrophilic FeB. Expression of carboxysome shell proteins and RubisCO indicated active CO2 fixation by Fe(II) oxidizers. Flagellar proteins from heterotrophs indicated their activity to reach and attach surfaces. Gas vesicle proteins related to CO2-fixing Chlorobium suggested that microbes could influence iron snow sinking. We suggest that iron snow formed by autotrophs in the redoxcline acts as a microbial parachute, since it is colonized by motile heterotrophs during sinking which start to dissolve schwertmannite.

  16. Iron metabolism and the IRE/IRP regulatory system: an update.

    PubMed

    Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2004-03-01

    Cellular iron homeostasis is accomplished by the coordinated regulated expression of the transferrin receptor and ferritin, which mediate iron uptake and storage, respectively. The mechanism is posttranscriptional and involves two cytoplasmic iron regulatory proteins, IRP1 and IRP2. Under conditions of iron starvation, IRPs stabilize the transferrin receptor and inhibit the translation of ferritin mRNAs by binding to "iron responsive elements" (IREs) within their untranslated regions. The IRE/IRP system also controls the expression of additional IRE-containing mRNAs, encoding proteins of iron and energy metabolism. The activities of IRP1 and IRP2 are regulated by distinct posttranslational mechanisms in response to cellular iron levels. Thus, in iron-replete cells, IRP1 assembles a cubane iron-sulfur cluster, which prevents IRE binding, while IRP2 undergoes proteasomal degradation. IRP1 and IRP2 also respond, albeit differentially, to iron-independent signals, such as hydrogen peroxide, hypoxia, or nitric oxide. Basic principles of the IRE/IRP system and recent advances in understanding the regulation and the function of IRP1 and IRP2 are discussed.

  17. Red blood cell and iron metabolism during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight anemia is a widely recognized phenomenon in astronauts. Reduction in circulating red blood cells and plasma volume results in a 10% to 15% decrement in circulatory volume. This effect appears to be a normal physiologic adaptation to weightlessness and results from the removal of newly released blood cells from the circulation. Iron availability increases, and (in the few subjects studied) iron stores increase during long-duration space flight. The consequences of these changes are not fully understood.

  18. [Effect of hepcidin on iron metabolism in athletes].

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Raúl; Garnacho-Castaño, Manuel Vicente; Maté-Muñoz, José Luis

    2014-12-01

    The role of iron in the human body is essential, and athletes must always try to keep an adequate iron status. Hepcidin is proposed as the main hormone responsible for the control of iron reserves in the body, given its ability to induce degradation of ferroportin. The action of hepcidin on ferroportin leads to a decreased dietary iron absorption, as well as to a decrease in macrophages. Several factors such as the iron status, the amount of dietary iron, the inflammation, the hypoxia, the testosterone and the physical exercise have been pointed out as affecting the synthesis of hepcidin. This study has aimed at analysing the researches on hepcidin response to exercise, as well as designing a specific strategy to prevent a potential ferropenic status in athletes. The main findings are an association between exercise at an intensity over 65% VO2max and transient increases in the synthesis of hepcidin, and a possible regulatory effect of intermittent hypoxic stimuli in the early post-exercise recovery. Other factors such as the training volume, sex, kind of exercise or the type of surface where the training takes place do not seem to affect the response of hepcidin to exercise.

  19. Clinical Consequences of New Insights in the Pathophysiology of Disorders of Iron and Heme Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Brittenham, Gary M.; Weiss, Günter; Brissot, Pierre; Lainé, Fabrice; Guillygomarc'h, Anne; Guyader, Dominique; Moirand, Romain; Deugnier, Yves

    2000-01-01

    This review examines the clinical consequences for the practicing hematologist of remarkable new insights into the pathophysiology of disorders of iron and heme metabolism. The familiar proteins of iron transport and storage-transferrin, transferrin receptor, and ferritin-have recently been joined by a host of newly identified proteins that play critical roles in the molecular management of iron homeostasis. These include the iron-regulatory proteins (IRP-1 and -2), HFE (the product of the HFE gene that is mutated in most patients with hereditary hemochromatosis), the divalent metal transporter (DMT1), transferrin receptor 2, ceruloplasmin, hephaestin, the "Stimulator of Fe Transport" (SFT), frataxin, ferroportin 1 and others. The growing appreciation of the roles of these newly identified proteins has fundamental implications for the clinical understanding and laboratory evaluation of iron metabolism and its alterations with iron deficiency, iron overload, infection, and inflammation. In Section I, Dr. Brittenham summarizes current concepts of body and cellular iron supply and storage and reviews new means of evaluating the full range of body iron stores including genetic testing for mutations in the HFE gene, measurement of serum ferritin iron, transferrin receptor, reticulocyte hemoglobin content and measurement of tissue iron by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic susceptometry using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) instrumentation. In Section II, Dr. Weiss discusses the improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying alterations in iron metabolism due to chronic inflammatory disorders. The anemia of chronic disorders remains the most common form of anemia found in hospitalized patients. The network of interactions that link iron metabolism with cellular immune effector functions involving pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, acute phase proteins and oxidative stress is described, with an emphasis on

  20. [Ceruloplasmin, hephaestin and zyklopen: the three multicopper oxidases important for human iron metabolism].

    PubMed

    Wierzbicka, Diana; Gromadzka, Grazyna

    2014-01-01

    Multi-copper oxidases are a group of proteins which demonstrate enzymatic activity and are capable of oxidizing their substrates with the concomitant reduction of dioxygen to two water molecules. For some multi-copper oxidases there has been demonstrated ferroxidase activity which is related to their specific structure characterized by the presence of copper centres and iron-binding sites. Three multi-copper oxidases have been included in this group: ceruloplasmin, hephaestin and zyklopen. Multi-copper oxidases which are expressed in different tissues are capable of oxidizing a wide spectrum of substrates. Multi-copper oxidases are capable of oxidizing a wide spectrum of substrates. Ceruloplasmin exhibits antioxidant activity as well as being involved in many other biological processes. The observations of phenotypic effects of absence or low expression of multi-copper ferroxidase-coding genes suggest that the main role of these proteins is taking part in iron metabolism. The main role of ceruloplasmin in iron turnover is oxidizing Fe2+ into Fe3+, a process which is essential for iron binding to transferrin (the main iron-transporting protein), as well as to ferritin (the main iron-storage protein). The function of hephaestin as ferroxidase is essential for iron binding to apotransferrin in the lamina propria of the intestinal mucosa, a process that is important for further transport of iron to the liver by the portal vein. Available data indicate that zyklopen is responsible for the placental iron transport. The presence of three multi-copper oxidases with ferroxidase activity emphasizes the significance of oxidation for iron metabolism. The distribution of multi-copper ferroxidases in many tissues ensures the proper iron turnover in the body as well as preventing toxic effects related to the presence of Fe2+ ions. These ions contribute to generation of free radicals, including the highly reactive hydroxyl radical, through the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reactions

  1. Neonatal iron deficiency causes abnormal phosphate metabolism by elevating FGF23 in normal and ADHR mice.

    PubMed

    Clinkenbeard, Erica L; Farrow, Emily G; Summers, Lelia J; Cass, Taryn A; Roberts, Jessica L; Bayt, Christine A; Lahm, Tim; Albrecht, Marjorie; Allen, Matthew R; Peacock, Munro; White, Kenneth E

    2014-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) gain of function mutations can lead to autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR) disease onset at birth, or delayed onset following puberty or pregnancy. We previously demonstrated that the combination of iron deficiency and a knock-in R176Q FGF23 mutation in mature mice induced FGF23 expression and hypophosphatemia that paralleled the late-onset ADHR phenotype. Because anemia in pregnancy and in premature infants is common, the goal of this study was to test whether iron deficiency alters phosphate handling in neonatal life. Wild-type (WT) and ADHR female breeder mice were provided control or iron-deficient diets during pregnancy and nursing. Iron-deficient breeders were also made iron replete. Iron-deficient WT and ADHR pups were hypophosphatemic, with ADHR pups having significantly lower serum phosphate (p < 0.01) and widened growth plates. Both genotypes increased bone FGF23 mRNA (>50 fold; p < 0.01). WT and ADHR pups receiving low iron had elevated intact serum FGF23; ADHR mice were affected to a greater degree (p < 0.01). Iron-deficient mice also showed increased Cyp24a1 and reduced Cyp27b1, and low serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D). Iron repletion normalized most abnormalities. Because iron deficiency can induce tissue hypoxia, oxygen deprivation was tested as a regulator of FGF23, and was shown to stimulate FGF23 mRNA in vitro and serum C-terminal FGF23 in normal rats in vivo. These studies demonstrate that FGF23 is modulated by iron status in young WT and ADHR mice and that hypoxia independently controls FGF23 expression in situations of normal iron. Therefore, disturbed iron and oxygen metabolism in neonatal life may have important effects on skeletal function and structure through FGF23 activity on phosphate regulation.

  2. Myocardial iron metabolism in the regulation of cardiovascular diseases in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Sun, Zhidan; Mao, Yuying; Hang, Pengzhou; Jiang, Xing; Sun, Lihua; Zhao, Jinlong; Du, Zhimin

    2010-01-01

    The iron homeostasis plays an important role in cardiac function. To understand how it acts in diabetic and ischemic myocardial injury, we studied the myocardial iron metabolism in diabetic and myocardial ischemic rats. Diabetic rats were induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozocin (STZ) after intragastric administration of a high-fat diet while the ischemic rat hearts were subjected to coronary artery ligation for 0.5, 1, 6, 12 or 24 h, respectively. In STZ-induced diabetic rats, the contents of serum and myocardial iron were found elevated obviously accompany with the decrease of hepatic iron determined by the flame emission atomic absorption spectroscopy. The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), malonaldehyde (MDA) and serum ferritin were increased in diabetic rats. Moreover, protein level of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) was decreased while that for transferrin receptor (TfR) and metal transporter protein 1 (MTP1) was increased. In contrast, no alteration of iron concentration was observed in the ischemic rats. The expression of DMT1, TfR and MTP1 has not changed after infraction. The findings suggested that diabetes mellitus (DM) induced the iron overload in the myocardium, at least in part by up-regulation of TfR. Meanwhile, down-regulation of DMT1 and up-regulation of MTP1 were induced to alleviate the excessive iron in the myocardium. However, myocardial infraction (MI) has not broken the balance of myocardial iron. In conclusion, the iron homeostasis reacts differently in DM and MI. PMID:20511703

  3. [Peculiarities of iron metabolism in patients with Beta - thalassemia at different periods after splenectomy].

    PubMed

    Kadimova, E

    2007-11-01

    Often thalassaemia patients have significant iron stores. The present research has been conducted to estimate a level of the overall store and degree of an iron overload in patients suffering from beta-thalassemia in pre- and post-surgery periods (pre-surgery, and to the second, seventh, fifteenth, and thirtieth days) after splenectomy. Observation was conducted once a year. The observation period was eight years. The analysis of parameters of iron metabolism in patients with beta-thalassemia in the distant period of time after splenectomy showed that the decrease of serum iron level and index of transferrin saturation was unchanged during the first year. The index of serum ferittin was unchanged during two years. SFT value remained reduced within a year; two years after splenectomy this parameter reached a preoperative level. The index of total serum coupling capacity remaind unchanged during the whole period of observation. The research revealed, that splenectomy has a positive effect on iron balance.

  4. The effect of iron limitation on the transcriptome and proteome of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We investigated the transcriptomic and proteomic effects of iron limitation on Pf-5 by employing microarray and iTRAQ techniques, respectively. Analysis of this data revealed that molecular elements involved in iron homeostasis, including the pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin biosynthesis clusters a...

  5. The complex interplay of iron metabolism, reactive oxygen species, and reactive nitrogen species: insights into the potential of various iron therapies to induce oxidative and nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    Koskenkorva-Frank, Taija S; Weiss, Günter; Koppenol, Willem H; Burckhardt, Susanna

    2013-12-01

    Production of minute concentrations of superoxide (O2(*-)) and nitrogen monoxide (nitric oxide, NO*) plays important roles in several aspects of cellular signaling and metabolic regulation. However, in an inflammatory environment, the concentrations of these radicals can drastically increase and the antioxidant defenses may become overwhelmed. Thus, biological damage may occur owing to redox imbalance-a condition called oxidative and/or nitrosative stress. A complex interplay exists between iron metabolism, O2(*-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and NO*. Iron is involved in both the formation and the scavenging of these species. Iron deficiency (anemia) (ID(A)) is associated with oxidative stress, but its role in the induction of nitrosative stress is largely unclear. Moreover, oral as well as intravenous (iv) iron preparations used for the treatment of ID(A) may also induce oxidative and/or nitrosative stress. Oral administration of ferrous salts may lead to high transferrin saturation levels and, thus, formation of non-transferrin-bound iron, a potentially toxic form of iron with a propensity to induce oxidative stress. One of the factors that determine the likelihood of oxidative and nitrosative stress induced upon administration of an iv iron complex is the amount of labile (or weakly-bound) iron present in the complex. Stable dextran-based iron complexes used for iv therapy, although they contain only negligible amounts of labile iron, can induce oxidative and/or nitrosative stress through so far unknown mechanisms. In this review, after summarizing the main features of iron metabolism and its complex interplay with O2(*-), H2O2, NO*, and other more reactive compounds derived from these species, the potential of various iron therapies to induce oxidative and nitrosative stress is discussed and possible underlying mechanisms are proposed. Understanding the mechanisms, by which various iron formulations may induce oxidative and nitrosative stress, will help us

  6. Response of the unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium Crocosphaera watsonii to iron limitation.

    PubMed

    Jacq, Violaine; Ridame, Céline; L'Helguen, Stéphane; Kaczmar, Fanny; Saliot, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is widely suspected as a key controlling factor of N2 fixation due to the high Fe content of nitrogenase and photosynthetic enzymes complex, and to its low concentrations in oceanic surface seawaters. The influence of Fe limitation on the recently discovered unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria (UCYN) is poorly understood despite their biogeochemical importance in the carbon and nitrogen cycles. To address this knowledge gap, we conducted culture experiments on Crocosphaera watsonii WH8501 growing under a range of dissolved Fe concentrations (from 3.3 to 403 nM). Overall, severe Fe limitation led to significant decreases in growth rate (2.6-fold), C, N and chlorophyll a contents per cell (up to 4.1-fold), N2 and CO2 fixation rates per cell (17- and 7-fold) as well as biovolume (2.2-fold). We highlighted a two phased response depending on the degree of limitation: (i) under a moderate Fe limitation, the biovolume of C. watsonii was strongly reduced, allowing the cells to keep sufficient energy to maintain an optimal growth, volume-normalized contents and N2 and CO2 fixation rates; (ii) with increasing Fe deprivation, biovolume remained unchanged but the entire cell metabolism was affected, as shown by a strong decrease in the growth rate, volume-normalized contents and N2 and CO2 fixation rates. The half-saturation constant for growth of C. watsonii with respect to Fe is twice as low as that of the filamentous Trichodesmium indicating a better adaptation of C. watsonii to poor Fe environments than filamentous diazotrophs. The physiological response of C. watsonii to Fe limitation was different from that previously shown on the UCYN Cyanothece sp, suggesting potential differences in Fe requirements and/or Fe acquisition within the UCYN community. These results contribute to a better understanding of how Fe bioavailability can control the activity of UCYN and explain the biogeography of diverse N2 fixers in ocean.

  7. Response of the Unicellular Diazotrophic Cyanobacterium Crocosphaera watsonii to Iron Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Jacq, Violaine; Ridame, Céline; L'Helguen, Stéphane; Kaczmar, Fanny; Saliot, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is widely suspected as a key controlling factor of N2 fixation due to the high Fe content of nitrogenase and photosynthetic enzymes complex, and to its low concentrations in oceanic surface seawaters. The influence of Fe limitation on the recently discovered unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria (UCYN) is poorly understood despite their biogeochemical importance in the carbon and nitrogen cycles. To address this knowledge gap, we conducted culture experiments on Crocosphaera watsonii WH8501 growing under a range of dissolved Fe concentrations (from 3.3 to 403 nM). Overall, severe Fe limitation led to significant decreases in growth rate (2.6-fold), C, N and chlorophyll a contents per cell (up to 4.1-fold), N2 and CO2 fixation rates per cell (17- and 7-fold) as well as biovolume (2.2-fold). We highlighted a two phased response depending on the degree of limitation: (i) under a moderate Fe limitation, the biovolume of C. watsonii was strongly reduced, allowing the cells to keep sufficient energy to maintain an optimal growth, volume-normalized contents and N2 and CO2 fixation rates; (ii) with increasing Fe deprivation, biovolume remained unchanged but the entire cell metabolism was affected, as shown by a strong decrease in the growth rate, volume-normalized contents and N2 and CO2 fixation rates. The half-saturation constant for growth of C. watsonii with respect to Fe is twice as low as that of the filamentous Trichodesmium indicating a better adaptation of C. watsonii to poor Fe environments than filamentous diazotrophs. The physiological response of C. watsonii to Fe limitation was different from that previously shown on the UCYN Cyanothece sp, suggesting potential differences in Fe requirements and/or Fe acquisition within the UCYN community. These results contribute to a better understanding of how Fe bioavailability can control the activity of UCYN and explain the biogeography of diverse N2 fixers in ocean. PMID:24466221

  8. Insights into the pathophysiology of iron metabolism in Pythium insidiosum infections.

    PubMed

    Zanette, R A; Bitencourt, P E R; Alves, S H; Fighera, R A; Flores, M M; Wolkmer, P; Hecktheuer, P A; Thomas, L R; Pereira, P L; Loreto, E S; Santurio, J M

    2013-03-23

    Pythium insidiosum causes life-threatening disease in mammals. Animals with pythiosis usually develop anemia, and most human patients are reported to have thalassemia and the major consequence of thalassemia, iron overload. Therefore, this study evaluated the iron metabolism in rabbits experimentally infected with P. insidiosum. Ten infected rabbits were divided into two groups: one groups received a placebo, and the other was treated with immunotherapy. Five rabbits were used as negative controls. The hematological and biochemical parameters, including the iron profile, were evaluated. Microcytic hypochromic anemia was observed in the infected animals, and this condition was more accentuated in the untreated group. The serum iron level was decreased, whereas the transferrin level was increased, resulting in low saturation. The level of stainable iron in hepatocytes was markedly decreased in the untreated group. A high correlation was observed between the total iron binding capacity and the lesion size, and this correlation likely confirms the affinity of P. insidiosum for iron. The data from this study corroborate the previous implications of iron in the pathogenesis of pythiosis in humans and animals. PMID:23182911

  9. Shotgun proteome analysis of Bordetella pertussis reveals a distinct influence of iron availability on the bacterial metabolism, virulence, and defense response.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Hayes, Jimena; Lamberti, Yanina; Surmann, Kristin; Schmidt, Frank; Völker, Uwe; Rodriguez, Maria Eugenia

    2015-07-01

    One of the mechanisms involved in host immunity is the limitation of iron accessibility to pathogens, which in turn provokes the corresponding physiological adaptation of pathogens. This study reports a gel-free nanoLC-MS/MS-based comparative proteome analysis of Bordetella pertussis grown under iron-excess and iron-depleted conditions. Out of the 926 proteins covered 98 displayed a shift in their abundance in response to low iron availability. Forty-seven of them were found to be increased in level while 58 were found with decreased protein levels under iron starvation. In addition to proteins previously reported to be influenced by iron in B. pertussis, we observed changes in metabolic proteins involved in fatty acid utilization and poly-hydroxybutyrate production. Additionally, many bacterial virulence factors regulated by the BvgAS two-component system were found at decreased levels in response to iron limitation. These results, together with the increased production of proteins potentially involved in oxidative stress resistance, seem to indicate that iron starvation provokes changes in B. pertussis phenotype that might shape host-pathogen interaction.

  10. Investigation of the human pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii under iron limiting conditions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Iron acquisition systems are important virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. To identify these systems in Acinetobacter baumannii, the transcriptomic response of the completely sequenced strain ATCC 17978 under iron limiting conditions was investigated using a genomic microarray that contained probes for all annotated open reading frames. Results Under low iron conditions, transcription levels were more than 2-fold up-regulated for 463 genes, including 95 genes that were up-regulated more than 4-fold. Of particular significance, three siderophore biosynthesis gene clusters, including one novel cluster, were highly up-regulated. Binding sites for the ferric uptake regulator were identified in the promoter regions of many up-regulated genes, suggesting a prominent role for this regulator in the Acinetobacter iron acquisition response. Down-regulation under iron limitation was less dramatic as the transcription of only 202 genes varied more than 2-fold. Various genes involved in motility featured prominently amongst the genes down-regulated when iron was less readily available. Motility assays confirmed that these transcriptional changes are manifested at the phenotypic level. The siderophore biosynthesis gene clusters were further investigated by means of comparative genomic analysis of 10 sequenced Acinetobacter isolates. These analyses revealed important roles for mobile genetic elements in shaping the siderophore meditated iron acquisition mechanisms between different Acinetobacter strains. Conclusions A. baumannii grown under iron limited conditions resulted in major transcriptional changes of not only many iron acquisition related genes, but also genes involved in other processes such as motility. Overall, this study showed that A. baumannii is well adaptable to growth in an environment which has limiting iron availability. PMID:21342532

  11. Orphan nuclear receptor SHP regulates iron metabolism through inhibition of BMP6-mediated hepcidin expression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Don-Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Jung, Yoon Seok; Kim, Ki-Sun; Jeong, Jae-Ho; Lee, Yong-Soo; Yuk, Jae-Min; Oh, Byung-Chul; Choy, Hyon E.; Dooley, Steven; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Lee, Chul-Ho; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Small heterodimer partner (SHP) is a transcriptional corepressor regulating diverse metabolic processes. Here, we show that SHP acts as an intrinsic negative regulator of iron homeostasis. SHP-deficient mice maintained on a high-iron diet showed increased serum hepcidin levels, decreased expression of the iron exporter ferroportin as well as iron accumulation compared to WT mice. Conversely, overexpression of either SHP or AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a metabolic sensor inducing SHP expression, suppressed BMP6-induced hepcidin expression. In addition, an inhibitory effect of AMPK activators metformin and AICAR on BMP6-mediated hepcidin gene expression was significantly attenuated by ablation of SHP expression. Interestingly, SHP physically interacted with SMAD1 and suppressed BMP6-mediated recruitment of the SMAD complex to the hepcidin gene promoter by inhibiting the formation of SMAD1 and SMAD4 complex. Finally, overexpression of SHP and metformin treatment of BMP6 stimulated mice substantially restored hepcidin expression and serum iron to baseline levels. These results reveal a previously unrecognized role for SHP in the transcriptional control of iron homeostasis. PMID:27688041

  12. Iron Metabolism in Field Hockey Players During an Annual Training Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Podgórski, Tomasz; Kryściak, Jakub; Konarski, Jan; Domaszewska, Katarzyna; Durkalec-Michalski, Krzysztof; Strzelczyk, Ryszard; Pawlak, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Post-physical training changes in iron metabolism in the human body often occur. To fully describe these processes, fifteen male Polish National Team field hockey players (age 27.7 ± 5.2 years, body mass 72.8 ± 7.6 kg and body height 177.1 ± 5.7 cm) were examined in three phases of an annual training cycle: preparatory (T1), competitive (T2) and transition (T3). To assess aerobic fitness, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) was evaluated. Based on the iron concentration, the changes in total iron binding capacity (TIBC), unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC) and other selected haematological indicators (haemoglobin, erythrocytes, mean corpuscular haemoglobin - MCH) in iron metabolism were estimated. The average values of maximum oxygen uptake increased from 54.97 ± 3.62 ml·kg−1·min−1 in T1 to 59.93 ± 3.55 ml·kg−1·min−1 in T2 (p<0.05) and then decreased to 56.21 ± 4.56 ml·kg−1·min−1 in T3 (p<0.05). No statistically significant changes in the erythrocyte count were noted. The MCH and haemoglobin concentration decreased between T1 and T2. The maximal exercise test caused a significant (p<0.05) increase in the plasma iron concentration during the competition and transition phases. Progressive but non-significant increases in resting iron concentration, TIBC and UIBC in the analysed annual training cycle were noted. To show global changes in iron metabolism in the human body, it is necessary to determine additional variables, i.e. UIBC, TIBC, haemoglobin, MCH or the erythrocyte count. The direction of changes in iron metabolism depends on both the duration and intensity of the physical activity and the fitness level of the subjects. Dietary intake of iron increases the level of this trace element and prevents anaemia associated with training overloads. PMID:26557195

  13. MYB10 and MYB72 are required for growth under iron-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christine M; Hindt, Maria N; Schmidt, Holger; Clemens, Stephan; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2013-11-01

    Iron is essential for photosynthesis and is often a limiting nutrient for plant productivity. Plants respond to conditions of iron deficiency by increasing transcript abundance of key genes involved in iron homeostasis, but only a few regulators of these genes have been identified. Using genome-wide expression analysis, we searched for transcription factors that are induced within 24 hours after transferring plants to iron-deficient growth conditions. Out of nearly 100 transcription factors shown to be up-regulated, we identified MYB10 and MYB72 as the most highly induced transcription factors. Here, we show that MYB10 and MYB72 are functionally redundant and are required for plant survival in alkaline soil where iron availability is greatly restricted. myb10myb72 double mutants fail to induce transcript accumulation of the nicotianamine synthase gene NAS4. Both myb10myb72 mutants and nas4-1 mutants have reduced iron concentrations, chlorophyll levels, and shoot mass under iron-limiting conditions, indicating that these genes are essential for proper plant growth. The double myb10myb72 mutant also showed nickel and zinc sensitivity, similar to the nas4 mutant. Ectopic expression of NAS4 rescues myb10myb72 plants, suggesting that loss of NAS4 is the primary defect in these plants and emphasizes the importance of nicotianamine, an iron chelator, in iron homeostasis. Overall, our results provide evidence that MYB10 and MYB72 act early in the iron-deficiency regulatory cascade to drive gene expression of NAS4 and are essential for plant survival under iron deficiency. PMID:24278034

  14. Estrogen contributes to regulating iron metabolism through governing ferroportin signaling via an estrogen response element.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yi; Yin, Chunyang; Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shuping; Jiang, Li; Wang, Fudi; Zhao, Meirong; Liu, Sijin

    2015-05-01

    Ferroportin (FPN) is the only known iron exporter in mammalian cells, and is universally expressed in most types of cells. FPN signaling plays a crucial role in maintaining iron homeostasis through governing the level of intracellular iron. Serum iron storage is conversely related with the estrogen level in the female bodies, and women in post-menopause are possibly subjected to iron retention. However, the potential effects of estrogen on iron metabolism are not clearly understood. Here, FPN mRNA transcription in all selected estrogen receptor positive (ER+) cells was significantly reduced upon 17β-estradiol (E2) treatment; and this inhibitory effect could be attenuated by ER antagonist tamoxifen. Likewise, in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), FPN reduction with elevated intracellular iron (reflected by increased ferritin) was observed in response to E2; however, ferritin level barely responded to E2 in FPN-null BMDMs. The observation of inhibition of FPN mRNA expression was not replicated in ER(-) cells upon E2. A functional estrogen response element (ERE) was identified within the promoter of FPN, and this ERE was responsible for the suppressive effect of E2 on FPN expression. Moreover, ovariectomized (OVX) and sham-operated (SHAM) mice were used to further confirm the in vitro finding. The expression of hepatic FPN was induced in OVX mice, compared to that in the SHAM mice. Taken together, our results demonstrated that estrogen is involved in regulating FPN expression through a functional ERE on its promoter, providing additional insights into a vital role of estrogen in iron metabolism.

  15. Metabolomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid indicates iron deficiency compromises cerebral energy metabolism in the infant monkey.

    PubMed

    Rao, Raghavendra; Ennis, Kathleen; Oz, Gulin; Lubach, Gabriele R; Georgieff, Michael K; Coe, Christopher L

    2013-03-01

    Iron deficiency anemia affects many pregnant women and young infants worldwide. The health impact is significant, given iron's known role in many body functions, including oxidative and lipid metabolism, protein synthesis and brain neurochemistry. The following research determined if (1)H NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) could detect the adverse influence of early life iron deficiency on the central nervous system. Using a controlled dietary model in 43 infant primates, distinct differences were found in spectra acquired at 600 MHz from the CSF of anemic monkeys. Three metabolite ratios, citrate/pyruvate, citrate/lactate and pyruvate/glutamine ratios, differed significantly in the iron deficient infant and then normalized following the consumption of dietary iron and improvement of clinical indices of anemia in the heme compartment. This distinctive metabolomic profile associated with anemia in the young infant indicates that CSF can be employed to track the neurological effects of iron deficiency and benefits of iron supplementation.

  16. The Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Iron Redox Metabolism in Hot Spring Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Clair, B. E.; Shock, E.

    2012-12-01

    The oxidation of ferrous iron and the reduction of ferric minerals are widespread sources of metabolic energy for microorganisms in hot spring ecosystems. How these energy sources are used can be determined by combining thermodynamic calculations with kinetic experiments. By measuring concentrations of ferrous iron, total iron, pH, dissolved hydrogen and oxygen, as well as temperature and many other parameters in hot springs at Yellowstone National Park, we can calculate chemical affinities of iron redox reactions, which reveal the maximum amount of energy an organism can derive from the catalysis of a given reaction. Iron redox reactions typically involve protons, and energy yields are greatly affected by pH. The heterotrophic reduction of ferric minerals typically consumes a large stoichiometric number of protons compared to the other components. For example, the reduction of hematite (Fe2O3), to ferrous ions with glucose requires 48 moles of protons per mole of glucose oxidized. Calculations indicate this proton requirement increases the energy yield with decreasing pH. The opposite trend is observed for iron oxidation reactions. The autotrophic oxidation of ferrous iron to hematite releases four protons per mole of hematite formed. As a consequence, the energy yield from this reaction decreases with decreasing pH. How effectively energy sources are tapped depends on the efficiencies of microbial metabolism compared with the rates of abiotic mechanisms for the same redox reactions. Experiments were performed across the pH spectrum on isolated sediments incubated in situ and assayed for biological oxidation and reduction by monitoring changing concentrations of Fe2+. In hot springs with pH values <2, particularly those with large gas flows, abiological reduction is rapid. Biological reduction, nevertheless, occasionally proceeded faster than the abiological rate. The quick abiological reduction rate, combined with the high solubility of ferrous iron, leads to

  17. Phosphate and iron limitation of phytoplankton biomass in Lake Tahoe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, Cecily C.Y.; Kuwabara, J.S.; Pasilis, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    Bioassays were carried out to assess the response of inoculated, single-species diatom populations (Cyclotella meneghiniana and Aulocosiera italica) to additions of synthetic chelators and phosphate. A chemical speciation model along with the field data was also used to predict how trace metal speciation, and hence bioavailability, was affected by the chelator additions. Results suggest that phosphate was limiting to phytoplankton biomass. Other solutes, Fe in particular, may also exert controls on biomass. Nitrate limitation seems less likely, although Fe-limiting conditions may have led to an effective N limitation because algae require Fe to carry out nitrate reduction. -from Authors

  18. Using skin to assess iron accumulation in human metabolic disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinote, I.; Fleming, R.; Silva, R.; Filipe, P.; Silva, J. N.; Veríssimo, A.; Napoleão, P.; Alves, L. C.; Pinheiro, T.

    2006-08-01

    The distribution of Fe in skin was assessed to monitor body Fe status in human hereditary hemochromatosis. The paper reports on data from nine patients with hemochromatosis that were studied along the therapeutic programme. Systemic evaluation of Fe metabolism was carried out by measuring with PIXE technique the Fe concentration in plasma and blood cells, and by determining with biochemical methods the indicators of Fe transport in serum (ferritin and transferrin). The Fe distribution and concentration in skin was assessed by nuclear microscopy and Fe deposits in liver estimated through nuclear magnetic resonance. Elevated Fe concentrations in skin were related to increased plasma Fe (p < 0.004), serum ferritin content (p < 0.01) and Fe deposits in liver (p < 0.004). The relationship of Fe deposits in organs and metabolism markers may help to better understand Fe pools mobilisation and to establish the quality of skin as a marker for the disease progression and therapy efficacy.

  19. Stoichiometry, Metabolism and Nutrient Limitation Across the Periodic Table in Natural Flowing-Water Chemostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. J.; Nifong, R. L.; Kurz, M. J.; Cropper, W. P.; Martin, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Relative supplies of macro and micronutrients (C,N,P, various metals), along with light and water, controls ecosystem metabolism, trophic energy transfer and community structure. Here we test the hypothesis, using measurements from 41 spring-fed rivers in Florida, that tissue stoichiometry indicates autotroph nutrient limitation status. Low variation in discharge, temperature and chemical composition within springs, but large variation across springs creates an ideal setting to assess the relationship between limitation and resource supply. Molar N:P ranges from 0.4 to 90, subjecting autotrophs to dramatically different nutrient supply. Over this gradient, species-specific autotroph tissue C:N:P ratios are strictly homeostatic, and with no evidence that nutrient supply affects species composition. Expanding to include 19 metals and micronutrients revealed autotrophs are more plastic in response to micronutrient variation, particularly for iron and manganese whose supply fluxes are small compared to biotic demand. Using a Droop model modified to reflect springs conditions (benthic production, light limitation, high hydraulic turnover), we show that tissue stoichiometry transitions from homeostatic to plastic with the onset of nutrient limitation, providing a potentially powerful new tool for predicting nutrient limitation and thus eutrophication in flowing waters.

  20. Iron metabolism and oxidative profile of dogs naturally infected by Ehrlichia canis: Acute and subclinical disease.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Nathieli B; Crivellenti, Leandro Z; Borin-Crivellenti, Sofia; Oliveira, Jéssica R; Coelho, Stefanie B; Contin, Catarina M; Tatsch, Etiane; Moresco, Rafael N; Santana, Aureo E; Tonin, Alexandre A; Tinucci-Costa, Mirela; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the oxidant profile and iron metabolism in serum of dogs infected by Ehrlichia canis. Banked sera samples of dogs were divided into two groups: negative control (n = 17) and infected by E. canis on acute (n = 24), and subclinical (n = 18) phases of the disease. The eritrogram, leucogram, and platelet counts were evaluate as well as iron, ferritin, and transferrin levels, latent iron binding capacity (LIBC), and transferrin saturation index (TSI) concentration. In addition, the advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) in sera were also analyzed. Blood samples were examined for the presence of E. canis by PCR techniques. History and clinical signals were recorded for each dog. During the acute phase of the disease, infected animals showed thrombocytopenia and anemia when compared to healthy animals (P < 0.05) as a consequence of lower iron levels. Ferritin and transferrin levels were higher in both phases (acute and subclinical) of the disease. The AOPP and FRAP levels increased in infected animals on the acute phase; however, the opposite occurred in the subclinical phase. We concluded that dogs naturally infected by E. canis showed changes in the iron metabolism and developed an oxidant status in consequence of disease pathophysiology. PMID:26724737

  1. Limiting metabolic rate (thermal work limit) as an index of thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Brake, Derrick J; Bates, Graham P

    2002-03-01

    The development of a rational heat stress index called thermal work limit (TWL) is presented. TWL is defined as the limiting (or maximum) sustainable metabolic rate that euhydrated, acclimatized individuals can maintain in a specific thermal environment, within a safe deep body core temperature (< 38.20 degrees C) and sweat rate (< 1.2 kg/hr(-1)). The index has been developed using published experimental studies of human heat transfer, and established heat and moisture transfer equations through clothing. Clothing parameters can be varied and the protocol can be extended to unacclimatized workers. The index is designed specifically for self-paced workers and does not rely on estimation of actual metabolic rates, a process that is difficult and subject to considerable error. The index has been introduced into several large industrial operations located well inside the tropics, resulting in a substantial and sustained fall in the incidence of heat illness. Guidelines for TWL are proposed along with recommended interventions. TWL has application to professionals from both the human and engineering sciences, as it allows not only thermal strain to be evaluated,. but also the productivity decrement due to heat (seen as a reduced sustainable metabolic rate) and the impact of various strategies such as improved local ventilation or refrigeration to be quantitatively assessed.

  2. Phytoplankton Bloom in Iron Limitation Environment of the Amundsen Polynya, Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Gorbunov, M. Y.; Ha, S. Y.; Kim, H. C.; Lee, S.

    2014-12-01

    We have conducted three times intensive Antarctic cruises in the Amundsen Sea (west Antarctic) in early (2010/2011 and 2013/2014) and late (2011/2012) austral summertime. These cruises were conducted as a Korea Polar Research Institute (KOPRI) Amundsen project. Amundsen polynya is one of the most productive Antarctic coastal polynya, and high chlorophylls (observed and satellite induced) were concentrated in polynya center rather than in the edge of polynya both in early and late summer. To examine phytoplankton dynamics in severely iron limited environment, the phytoplankton physiological parameters were measured by Fluorescence Induction and Relaxation (FIRe) system. In addition, we carried out iron assimilation experiments on board to demonstrate that iron enrichment responses of natural phytoplankton assemblages. Possible implications of iron limitation and controlling factors of phytoplankton growth in this polynya system will be discussed.

  3. Metabolic models to investigate energy limited anaerobic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, J; Premier, G C; Guwy, A J; Dinsdale, R; Kleerebezem, R

    2009-01-01

    Anaerobic wastewater treatment is shifting from a philosophy of solely pollutants removal to a philosophy of combined resource recovery and waste treatment. Simultaneous wastewater treatment with energy recovery in the form of energy rich products, brings renewed interest to non-methanogenic anaerobic bioprocesses such as the anaerobic production of hydrogen, ethanol, solvents, VFAs, bioplastics and even electricity from microbial fuel cells. The existing kinetic-based modelling approaches, widely used in aerobic and methanogenic wastewater treatment processes, do not seem adequate in investigating such energy limited microbial ecosystems. The great diversity of similar microbial species, which share many of the fermentative reaction pathways, makes quantify microbial groups very difficult and causes identifiability problems. A modelling approach based on the consideration of metabolic reaction networks instead of on separated microbial groups is suggested as an alternative to describe anaerobic microbial ecosystems and in particular for the prediction of product formation as a function of environmental conditions imposed. The limited number of existing relevant fermentative pathways in conjunction with the fact that anaerobic reactions proceed very close to thermodynamic equilibrium reduces the complexity of such approach and the degrees of freedom in terms of product formation fluxes. In addition, energy limitation in these anaerobic microbial ecosystems makes plausible that selective forces associated with energy further define the system activity by favouring those conversions/microorganisms which provide the most energy for growth under the conditions imposed. PMID:19809129

  4. Insights into the iron and sulfur energetic metabolism of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans by microarray transcriptome profiling

    SciTech Connect

    R. Quatrini; C. Appia-Ayme; Y. Denis; J. Ratouchniak; F. Veloso; J. Valdes; C. Lefimil; S. Silver; F. Roberto; O. Orellana; F. Denizot; E. Jedlicki; D. Holmes; V. Bonnefoy

    2006-09-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is a well known acidophilic, chemolithoautotrophic, Gram negative, bacterium involved in bioleaching and acid mine drainage. In aerobic conditions, it gains energy mainly from the oxidation of ferrous iron and/or reduced sulfur compounds present in ores. After initial oxidation of the substrate, electrons from ferrous iron or sulfur enter respiratory chains and are transported through several redox proteins to oxygen. However, the oxidation of ferrous iron and reduced sulfur compounds has also to provide electrons for the reduction of NAD(P) that is subsequently required for many metabolic processes including CO2 fixation. To help to unravel the enzymatic pathways and the electron transfer chains involved in these processes, a genome-wide microarray transcript profiling analysis was carried out. Oligonucleotides corresponding to approximately 3000 genes of the A. ferrooxidans type strain ATCC23270 were spotted onto glass-slides and hybridized with cDNA retrotranscribed from RNA extracted from ferrous iron and sulfur grown cells. The genes which are preferentially transcribed in ferrous iron conditions and those preferentially transcribed in sulfur conditions were analyzed. The expression of a substantial number of these genes has been validated by real-time PCR, Northern blot hybridization and/or immunodetection analysis. Our results support and extend certain models of iron and sulfur oxidation and highlight previous observations regarding the possible presence of alternate electron pathways. Our findings also suggest ways in which iron and sulfur oxidation may be co-ordinately regulated. An accompanying paper (Appia-Ayme et al.) describes results pertaining to other metabolic functions.

  5. Seasonally dependent iron limitation of nitrogen fixation in tropical forests of karst landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winbourne, J. B.; Brewer, S.; Houlton, B. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Limestone tropical forests in karst topography are one of the most poorly studied ecosystems on Earth, and has been substantially cleared by human activities throughout much of Central America. This ecosystem is noted for its high level of plant productivity, biomass, endemism and biological diversity compared to nearby neighboring tropical forests on volcanic rock substrates (Brewer et al. 2002). A question remains as to how limestone tropical forests are able to maintain the high nutrient demands of plant photosynthesis and tree biomass growth. Here, we demonstrate that rates of nitrogen (N) fixation are higher in limestone versus volcanic soil substrates, with direct evidence for the emergence of seasonally dependent iron limitation of N fixation in limestone tropical forest. N fixation rates showed a three-fold increase in response to iron additions, especially during the wet season when N demands of the forest trees are highest. In contrast, adjacent forests growing on the more classical acidic volcanic soils showed no response to iron or other nutrient additions. Biologically available pools of iron were exceedingly low in the limestone forest site, consistent with the complexation of iron under high pH conditions. Biological acquisition of iron, as measured by the concentration of iron chelating compounds (i.e. siderophores), provided additional evidence for iron limitation of microbial processes in limestone tropical forests, where concentrations were six times higher than those at the volcanic site. Our results suggest that the functioning of limestone tropical forest is strongly regulated by interactions between iron, soil pH, and N cycling.

  6. Co-limitation by iron, silicate, and light of three Southern Ocean diatom species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, L. J.; Peeken, I.; Lochte, K.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of combined iron, silicate, and light co-limitation was investigated in two Southern Ocean diatom species, Chaetoceros dichaeta and Actinocyclus sp. and one cosmopolitan species, Chaetoceros debilis, all isolated in the Southern Ocean (SO). We found species specific differences in the level of nutrient limitation and its effect on physiological and morphological parameters. Growth of all species tested was clearly co-limited by iron and silicate, reflected in a 4 to 40 times higher increase in cell numbers in the high iron, high silicate treatments compared with the controls. However, the effect of iron and silicate availability on chain length and frustules structures was species specific. Most drastic frustule malformation was found under iron and silicate co-limitation in C. dichaeta while Si limitation caused a strong cell elongation in both Chaetoceros species. Additional a significant increase in chain length was observed in these species under high iron conditions. Therefore, species composition in the SO is likely also indirectly affected by these nutrients via different effects on diatom grazing protection. These morphological changes reflect a potential as biological markers in sediments for the growth history of chain forming species. High light conditions, comparable with light intensities found in the upper 28 m of the SO, showed a negative impact on growth of the endemic species C. dichaeta and Actinocyclus sp. This is in contrast to the assumed light limitation of SO diatoms and indicates an adaptation strategy to the deep mixing and resulting low light conditions in the SO. In contrast to that, the cosmopolitan species C. debilis was not negatively affected by increased light intensity, indicating adaptation to a broader light environment. These results suggest that light limitation of SO phytoplankton due to deep wind mixed layers may play a minor role than hitherto assumed.

  7. Cytochromes and iron sulfur proteins in sulfur metabolism of phototrophic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, U.

    1985-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria provides the bacteria with electrons for photosynthetic electron transport chain and, with energy. Assimilatory sulfate reduction is necessary for the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing cell components. Sulfide, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur are the sulfur compounds most commonly used by phototrophic bacteria as electron donors for anoxygenic photosynthesis. Cytochromes or other electron transfer proteins, like high-potential-iron-sulfur protein (HIPIP) function as electron acceptors or donors for most enzymatic steps during the oxidation pathways of sulfide or thiosulfate. Yet, heme- or siroheme-containing proteins themselves undergo enzymatic activities in sulfur metabolism. Sirohemes comprise a porphyrin-like prosthetic group of sulfate reductase. eenzymatic reactions involve electron transfer. Electron donors or acceptors are necessary for each reaction. Cytochromes and iron sulfur problems, are able to transfer electrons.

  8. Antagonistic control of microbial pathogens under iron limitations by siderophore producing bacteria in a chemostat setup.

    PubMed

    Fgaier, Hedia; Eberl, Hermann J

    2011-03-21

    Certain bacteria develop iron chelation mechanisms that allow them to scavenge dissolved iron from the environment and to make it unavailable to competitors. This is achieved by producing siderophores that bind the iron which is later liberated internally in the cell. Under conditions of iron limitation, siderophore producing bacteria have therefore an antagonistic growth advantage over other species. This has been observed in particular in agricultural and aquacultural systems, as well as in food microbiology. We investigate here the possibility of a probiotic biocontrol strategy to eradicate a well established, often pathogenic, non-chelating population by supplementing the system with generally regarded as safe siderophore producing bacteria. Set in a chemostat setup, our modeling and simulation studies suggest that this is indeed possible in a finite time treatment. PMID:21192949

  9. Leu1 plays a role in iron metabolism and is required for virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Do, Eunsoo; Hu, Guanggan; Caza, Mélissa; Oliveira, Debora; Kronstad, James W.; Jung, Won Hee

    2015-01-01

    Amino acid biosynthetic pathways that are absent in mammals are considered an attractive target for antifungal therapy. Leucine biosynthesis is one such target pathway, consisting of a five-step conversion process starting from the valine precursor 2-keto-isovalerate. Isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (Leu1) is an Fe-S cluster protein that is required for leucine biosynthesis in the model fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans possesses an ortholog of S. cerevisiae Leu1, and our previous transcriptome data showed that the expression of LEU1 is regulated by iron availability. In this study, we characterized the role of Leu1 in iron homeostasis and the virulence of C. neoformans. We found that deletion of LEU1 caused leucine auxotrophy and that Leu1 may play a role in the mitochondrial-cytoplasmic Fe-S cluster balance. Whereas cytoplasmic Fe-S protein levels were not affected, mitochondrial Fe-S proteins were up- regulated in the leu1 mutant, suggesting that Leu1 mainly influences mitochondrial iron metabolism. The leu1 mutant also displayed increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and cell wall/membrane disrupting agents, which may have been caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, the leu1 mutant was deficient in capsule formation and showed attenuated virulence in a mouse inhalation model of cryptococcosis. Overall, our results indicate that Leu1 plays a role in iron metabolism and is required for virulence in C. neoformans. PMID:25554701

  10. Vitamin D, Iron Metabolism, and Diet in Alpinists During a 2-Week High-Altitude Climb.

    PubMed

    Kasprzak, Zbigniew; Śliwicka, Ewa; Hennig, Karol; Pilaczyńska-Szcześniak, Łucja; Huta-Osiecka, Anna; Nowak, Alicja

    2015-09-01

    A defensive mechanism against hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude is erythropoesis. Some authors point to the contribution of vitamin D to the regulation of this process. The aim of the present study was to assess the 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25(OH)D) level and its associations with iron metabolic and inflammatory indices in participants of a 2-week mountaineering expedition. The study sample included 9 alpinists practicing recreational mountain climbing. Every 2 or 3 days they set up a different base between 3200 and 3616 m with the intention of climbing 4000 m peaks in the Mont Blanc massif. Before their departure for the mountains and 2 days after returning to the sea level anthropometric parameters, hematological parameters, serum levels of 25(OH)D and iron metabolic indices were measured in all the participants. The composition of the participants' diet was also evaluated. The comparative analysis showed a significant decrease in body mass, BMI values, total iron, and 25(OH)D concentrations (p<0.05). Also significant increases in unsaturated iron-binding capacity, hematocrit, and C-reactive protein concentrations (p<0.05) were found. It can be concluded that the 2-week climbing expedition contributed to the reduction of 25(OH)D levels and these changes were associated with modulation of immune processes. Moreover, the climbers' diet requires some serious modifications. PMID:26125641

  11. Zebrafish in the sea of mineral (iron, zinc, and copper) metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lu; Xia, Zhidan; Wang, Fudi

    2014-01-01

    Iron, copper, zinc, and eight other minerals are classified as essential trace elements because they present in minute in vivo quantities and are essential for life. Because either excess or insufficient levels of trace elements can be detrimental to life (causing human diseases such as iron-deficiency anemia, hemochromatosis, Menkes syndrome and Wilson's disease), the endogenous levels of trace minerals must be tightly regulated. Many studies have demonstrated the existence of systems that maintain trace element homeostasis, and these systems are highly conserved in multiple species ranging from yeast to mice. As a model for studying trace mineral metabolism, the zebrafish is indispensable to researchers. Several large-scale mutagenesis screens have been performed in zebrafish, and these screens led to the identification of a series of metal transporters and the generation of several mutagenesis lines, providing an in-depth functional analysis at the system level. Moreover, because of their developmental advantages, zebrafish have also been used in mineral metabolism-related chemical screens and toxicology studies. Here, we systematically review the major findings of trace element homeostasis studies using the zebrafish model, with a focus on iron, zinc, copper, selenium, manganese, and iodine. We also provide a homology analysis of trace mineral transporters in fish, mice and humans. Finally, we discuss the evidence that zebrafish is an ideal experimental tool for uncovering novel mechanisms of trace mineral metabolism and for improving approaches to treat mineral imbalance-related diseases. PMID:24639652

  12. A high-fat diet modulates iron metabolism but does not promote liver fibrosis in hemochromatotic Hjv⁻/⁻ mice.

    PubMed

    Padda, Ranjit Singh; Gkouvatsos, Konstantinos; Guido, Maria; Mui, Jeannie; Vali, Hojatollah; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2015-02-15

    Hemojuvelin (Hjv) is a membrane protein that controls body iron metabolism by enhancing signaling to hepcidin. Hjv mutations cause juvenile hemochromatosis, a disease of systemic iron overload. Excessive iron accumulation in the liver progressively leads to inflammation and disease, such as fibrosis, cirrhosis, or hepatocellular cancer. Fatty liver (steatosis) may also progress to inflammation (steatohepatitis) and liver disease, and iron is considered as pathogenic cofactor. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathological implications of parenchymal iron overload due to Hjv ablation in the fatty liver. Wild-type (WT) and Hjv(-/-) mice on C57BL/6 background were fed a standard chow, a high-fat diet (HFD), or a HFD supplemented with 2% carbonyl iron (HFD+Fe) for 12 wk. The animals were analyzed for iron and lipid metabolism. As expected, all Hjv(-/-) mice manifested higher serum and hepatic iron and diminished hepcidin levels compared with WT controls. The HFD reduced iron indexes and promoted liver steatosis in both WT and Hjv(-/-) mice. Notably, steatosis was attenuated in Hjv(-/-) mice on the HFD+Fe regimen. Hjv(-/-) animals gained less body weight and exhibited reduced serum glucose and cholesterol levels. Histological and ultrastructural analysis revealed absence of iron-induced inflammation or liver fibrosis despite early signs of liver injury (expression of α-smooth muscle actin). We conclude that parenchymal hepatic iron overload does not suffice to trigger progression of liver steatosis to steatohepatitis or fibrosis in C57BL/6 mice.

  13. A high-fat diet modulates iron metabolism but does not promote liver fibrosis in hemochromatotic Hjv⁻/⁻ mice.

    PubMed

    Padda, Ranjit Singh; Gkouvatsos, Konstantinos; Guido, Maria; Mui, Jeannie; Vali, Hojatollah; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2015-02-15

    Hemojuvelin (Hjv) is a membrane protein that controls body iron metabolism by enhancing signaling to hepcidin. Hjv mutations cause juvenile hemochromatosis, a disease of systemic iron overload. Excessive iron accumulation in the liver progressively leads to inflammation and disease, such as fibrosis, cirrhosis, or hepatocellular cancer. Fatty liver (steatosis) may also progress to inflammation (steatohepatitis) and liver disease, and iron is considered as pathogenic cofactor. The aim of this study was to investigate the pathological implications of parenchymal iron overload due to Hjv ablation in the fatty liver. Wild-type (WT) and Hjv(-/-) mice on C57BL/6 background were fed a standard chow, a high-fat diet (HFD), or a HFD supplemented with 2% carbonyl iron (HFD+Fe) for 12 wk. The animals were analyzed for iron and lipid metabolism. As expected, all Hjv(-/-) mice manifested higher serum and hepatic iron and diminished hepcidin levels compared with WT controls. The HFD reduced iron indexes and promoted liver steatosis in both WT and Hjv(-/-) mice. Notably, steatosis was attenuated in Hjv(-/-) mice on the HFD+Fe regimen. Hjv(-/-) animals gained less body weight and exhibited reduced serum glucose and cholesterol levels. Histological and ultrastructural analysis revealed absence of iron-induced inflammation or liver fibrosis despite early signs of liver injury (expression of α-smooth muscle actin). We conclude that parenchymal hepatic iron overload does not suffice to trigger progression of liver steatosis to steatohepatitis or fibrosis in C57BL/6 mice. PMID:25501544

  14. A comparison of iron extraction methods for the determination of degree of pyritisation and the recognition of iron-limited pyrite formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiswell, R.; Canfield, D. E.; Berner, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of degree of pyritisation require an estimate of sediment iron which is capable of reaction with dissolved sulphide to form pyrite, either directly or indirectly via iron monosulphide precursors. Three dissolution techniques (buffered dithionite, cold 1 M HCl, boiling 12 M HCl) were examined for their capacity to extract iron from a variety of iron minerals, and iron-bearing sediments, as a function of different extraction times and different grain sizes. All the iron oxides studied are quantitatively extracted by dithionite and boiling HCl (but not by cold HCl). Both HCl techniques extract more iron from silicates than does dithionite but probably about the same amounts as are potentially capable of sulphidation. Modern sediment studies indicate that most sedimentary pyrite is formed rapidly from iron oxides, with smaller amounts formed more slowly from iron silicates (if sufficient geologic time is available). It is therefore recommended that the degree of pyritisation be defined with respect to the dithionite-extractable (mainly iron oxide) pool and/or the boiling HCl-extractable pool (which includes some silicate iron) for the recognition of iron-limited pyritisation.

  15. Mechanisms of increased Trichodesmium fitness under iron and phosphorus co-limitation in the present and future ocean

    PubMed Central

    Walworth, Nathan G.; Fu, Fei-Xue; Webb, Eric A.; Saito, Mak A.; Moran, Dawn; Mcllvin, Matthew R.; Lee, Michael D.; Hutchins, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation by cyanobacteria supplies critical bioavailable nitrogen to marine ecosystems worldwide; however, field and lab data have demonstrated it to be limited by iron, phosphorus and/or CO2. To address unknown future interactions among these factors, we grew the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium for 1 year under Fe/P co-limitation following 7 years of both low and high CO2 selection. Fe/P co-limited cell lines demonstrated a complex cellular response including increased growth rates, broad proteome restructuring and cell size reductions relative to steady-state growth limited by either Fe or P alone. Fe/P co-limitation increased abundance of a protein containing a conserved domain previously implicated in cell size regulation, suggesting a similar role in Trichodesmium. Increased CO2 further induced nutrient-limited proteome shifts in widespread core metabolisms. Our results thus suggest that N2-fixing microbes may be significantly impacted by interactions between elevated CO2 and nutrient limitation, with broad implications for global biogeochemical cycles in the future ocean. PMID:27346420

  16. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    ... cereals and breads. White beans, lentils, spinach, kidney beans, and peas. Nuts and some dried fruits, such as raisins. Iron in food comes in two forms: heme iron and nonheme iron. Nonheme iron is found in plant foods and iron-fortified food products. Meat, seafood, ...

  17. Effect of iron limitation on photosynthesis in a marine diatom

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R.M.; Falkowski, P.G. ); Geider, R.J. )

    1991-12-01

    The response of the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum to Fe deficiency was evaluated in the context of fundamental physiological models of growth and photosynthesis. Fe deficiency induced chlorosis, which decreased Chl a:C ratios and Chl a-specific light-saturated photosynthesis (P{sub m}{sup B}). In contrast to P{sub m}{sup B}, {alpha}{sup B} was slightly increased under Fe deficiency, and photosynthesis in Fe-deficient cells became light-saturated at lower irradiances than in Fe-replete cells grown at the same irradiance. Fe deficiency increased in vivo absorption cross section normalized to Chl a(a{sup *}), but decreased the maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis ({phi}{sub m}). Thus, the product a{sup *} {phi}{sub m}, which equals the Chl a-specific initial slope of the photosynthesis-irradiance curve ({alpha}{sup B}), was less sensitive to Fe limitation than was a{sup *} or {phi}{sub m} alone. Using a pump-and-probe fluorometer, the authors found that Fe deficiency reduced the maximum fluorescence yield ({Delta}{phi}{sub sat}), which is consistent with the reduction in {phi}{sub m}, but increased the absorption cross section of photosystem 2 ({sigma}{sub PS2}). Immunoassays of proteins separated electrophoretically indicated that the reduction in maximum fluorescence yields as accompanied by a reduction in the relative abundance of D1, the photosystem 2 reaction center protein. Light-harvesting chlorophyll proteins (LHCP) and the large and small subunits of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase were not affected by Fe deficiency. Changes in the abundance of D1 relative to LHCP suggest an increase in the fraction of nonfunctional reaction centers under Fe-limited conditions. Fe-deficient cells, growing at <20% of their maximum growth rate, and reduced cellular C, N, and P contents, but maintained C:N:P ratios at the Redfield proportions. These results imply that C:N:P ratios do not provide and unequivocal index of relative growth rate.

  18. The role of iron metabolism as a mediator of macrophage inflammation and lipid handling in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Habib, Anwer; Finn, Aloke V

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential mineral needed for normal physiologic processes. While its function in oxygen transport and other important physiologic processes is well known, less is understood about its role in inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. Existing paradigms suggest iron as a driver of atherosclerosis through its actions as a pro-oxidant capable of causing lipid oxidation and tissue damage. Recently we and others have identified hemoglobin (Hb) derived iron as an important factor in determining macrophage differentiation and function in areas of intraplaque hemorrhage within human atherosclerosis. Hb associated macrophages, M(Hb), are distinct from traditional macrophage foam cells because they do not contain large amounts of lipid or inflammatory cytokines, are characterized by high levels of expression of mannose receptor (CD206) and CD163 in addition to producing anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10. Despite the well-known role of iron as an catalyst capable of producing lipid peroxidation through generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydroxyl radical, we and others have shown that macrophages in areas of intraplaque hemorrhage demonstrate reduced intracellular iron and ROS which triggers production of anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as genes involved in cholesterol efflux. These data suggest that manipulation of macrophage iron itself may be a promising pharmacologic target for atherosclerosis prevention through its effects on macrophage inflammation and lipid metabolism. In this review we will summarize the current understanding of iron as it relates to plaque inflammation and discuss how further exploration of this subject may lead to new therapies for atherosclerosis.

  19. Springs as Model Systems for Aquatic Ecosystems Ecology: Stoichiometry, Metabolism and Nutrient Limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, M. J.; Nifong, R. L.; Kurz, M. J.; Martin, J. B.; Cropper, W. P.; Korhnak, L. V.

    2013-12-01

    Springs have been called nature's chemostats, where low variation in discharge, temperature and chemistry creates a natural laboratory in which to address basic questions about aquatic ecosystems. Ecological stoichiometry posits that patterns of metabolism, trophic energy transfer and community structure arise in response to coupled elemental cycles. In this work we synthesize several recent studies in Florida's iconic springs to explore the overarching hypothesis that stoichiometry can be used to indicate the nutrient limitation status of autotrophs and ecosystem metabolism. Of foremost importance is that the chemically stable conditions observed in springs ensures that autotroph tissue elemental composition, which is thought to vary with environmental supply, is near steady state. Moreover, the elemental ratios of discharging water vary dramatically across our study springs (for example, molar N:P ranges from 0.4:1 to 400:1), subjecting the communities of autotrophs, which are largely conserved across systems, to dramatically different nutrient supply. At the scale of whole ecosystem metabolism, we show that C:N:P ratios are strongly conserved across a wide gradient of environmental supplies, counter to the prediction of stoichiometric plasticity. Moreover, the absence of a relationship between gross primary production and nutrient concentrations or stoichiometry suggests that metabolic homeostasis may be a diagnostic symptom of nutrient saturation. At the scale of individual autotrophs, both submerged vascular plants and filamentous algae, this finding is strongly reinforced, with remarkable within-species tissue C:N:P homeostasis over large gradients, and no statistically significant evidence that gradients in nutrient supply affect autotroph composition. Expanding the suite of elements for which contemporaneous environment and tissue measurements are available to include 19 metals and micronutrients revealed that, while plants were homeostatic across large N

  20. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  1. Presence of acute phase changes in zinc, iron, and copper metabolism in turkey embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Klasing, K.C.; Richards, M.P.; Darcey, S.E.; Laurin, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Acute phase changes in trace mineral metabolism were examined in turkey embryos. An endotoxin injection resulted in increased concentrations of serum copper and liver zinc and decreased concentrations of serum zinc in embryos incubated either in ovo or ex ovo. Changes in zinc and copper metabolism occurred when endotoxin either was injected intramuscularly, into the amnionic fluid, or administered onto the chorioallantoic membrane. Unlike poults, embryos did not respond to an inflammatory challenge with decreased serum iron concentrations. Acute phase changes in embryo serum zinc and copper as well as liver zinc concentrations were similar to those in poults. Increased liver zinc concentrations were associated with increased zinc in metallothionein (MT). An injection of a crude interleukin 1 preparation into embryos resulted in similar increases in hepatic zinc and MT concentrations as an endotoxin injection, suggesting a role for this cytokine in mediating the acute phase changes in embryonic zinc metabolism.

  2. Searching iron sensors in plants by exploring the link among 2′-OG-dependent dioxygenases, the iron deficiency response and metabolic adjustments occurring under iron deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Vigani, Gianpiero; Morandini, Piero; Murgia, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge accumulated on the regulation of iron (Fe) homeostasis, its intracellular trafficking and transport across various cellular compartments and organs in plants; storage proteins, transporters and transcription factors involved in Fe metabolism have been analyzed in detail in recent years. However, the key sensor(s) of cellular plant “Fe status” triggering the long-distance shoot–root signaling and leading to the root Fe deficiency responses is (are) still unknown. Local Fe sensing is also a major task for roots, for adjusting the internal Fe requirements to external Fe availability: how such sensing is achieved and how it leads to metabolic adjustments in case of nutrient shortage, is mostly unknown. Two proteins belonging to the 2′-OG-dependent dioxygenases family accumulate several folds in Fe-deficient Arabidopsis roots. Such proteins require Fe(II) as enzymatic cofactor; one of their subgroups, the HIF-P4H (hypoxia-inducible factor-prolyl 4-hydroxylase), is an effective oxygen sensor in animal cells. We envisage here the possibility that some members of the 2′-OG dioxygenase family may be involved in the Fe deficiency response and in the metabolic adjustments to Fe deficiency or even in sensing Fe, in plant cells. PMID:23755060

  3. Effects of dietary manganese and iron on manganese and iron metabolism during infancy

    SciTech Connect

    Kiehl, H.; Loennerdal, B. )

    1991-03-15

    To derive a better understanding of the metabolism of Mn during infancy, infant formulas with different levels of Mn and Fe were labeled with {sup 54}Mn and {sup 59}Fe and administered orally to suckling rats: control low-Fe formula; control with 100-times Mn; and control with 100-times Fe. Another group received 200 {mu}g MnCl{sub 2} daily during infancy. 12 hr post-dosing, the pattern of {sup 54}Mn distribution in the tissues paralleled that of {sup 59}Fe. An excess of either mineral decreased overall retention but led to higher recoveries of both elements in the proximal intestine and liver. Conversely, these recoveries in pups given Mn from birth were lower than in controls. Analysis of the cytosolic fractions from intestine and liver using FPLC gel filtration demonstrated the impact of the mineral loads on protein profiles. In all cases except the high-Mn dose, dietary manipulations resulted in greater relative levels of a high molecular weight protein with MW similar to ferritin. The high-Mn formula seemed to induce in the hepatocyte a lower MW protein with which most of the {sup 54}Mn and {sup 59}Fe was associated. These results suggest a possible role of Mn as a regulator in the synthesis of cytosolic proteins of the enterocyte and hepatocyte in infants.

  4. Metabolic Strategies in Energy-Limited Microbial Communities in the Anoxic Subsurface (Frasassi Cave System, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, R. L.; Jones, D. S.; Schaperdoth, I.; Steinberg, L.; Macalady, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    Two major sources of energy, light and chemical potential, are available to microorganisms. However, energy is not always abundant and is often a limiting factor in microbial survival and replication. The anoxic, terrestrial subsurface offers a unique opportunity to study microorganisms and their potentially novel metabolic strategies that are relevant for understanding biogeochemistry and biosignatures as related to the non-photosynthetic, energy-limited environments on the modern and ancient Earth and elsewhere in the solar system. Geochemical data collected in a remote stratified lake 600 m below ground surface in the sulfidic Frasassi cave system (Italy) suggest that little redox energy is available for life, consistent with low signal from domain-specific FISH probes. The carbon isotope signatures of biofilms (-33‰) and DIC (-9‰) in the anoxic water suggest in situ production by lithoautotrophs using RuBisCO. 16S rDNA libraries constructed from the biofilm are dominated by diverse sulfate reducing bacteria. The remaining bacterial and archaeal clones affiliate with more than 11 major uncultivated or novel prokaryotic lineages. Diverse dsrAB gene sequences are consistent with high sulfate concentrations and undetectable or extremely low oxygen, nitrate, and iron concentrations. However, the electron donor for sulfate reduction is unclear. Methane is detectable in the anoxic water although no 16S rDNA sequences associated with known methanogens or anaerobic methane oxidizers were retrieved. mcrA gene sequences retrieved from the biofilm by cloning are not related to cultivated methanogens or to known anaerobic methane oxidizers. Non-purgable organic carbon (NPOC) is below detection limits (i.e. <42 μM acetate) suggesting that alternative electron donors or novel metabolisms may be important. A sample collected by cave divers in October 2009 was pyrosequenced at the Pennsylvania State University Genomics Core Facility using Titanium chemistry (454 Life

  5. Predictive modeling of siderphore production by Pseudomonas fluorescens under iron limitation.

    PubMed

    Fgaier, Hedia; Feher, Balazs; McKellar, Robin C; Eberl, Hermann J

    2008-03-21

    Iron is required by many microorganisms for growth. Although it is the most abundant transition metal on earth, its solubility is very low and therefore its bioavailability is poor. To overcome this limitation, many microorganisms have developed iron chelating mechanisms that enable them to bind the metal to organic molecules from which they are later released. In particular, pseudomonads are prominent producers of the chelator pyoverdine that has a high iron binding capability. We present a mathematical model for pyoverdine production by Pseudomonas fluorescens. It is a nonlinear and non-autonomous system of four ordinary differential equations for the dependent variables size of bacterial population, pyoverdine, dissolved iron and chelated iron. The transient adaptation of the average physiological state of the population to the environmental condition is explicitly included in the model formulation. A complete qualitative description of the model solution is given, based on analytical techniques. The model is quantitatively validated against experimental data of pyoverdine and population size. To this end we conduct and discuss a parameter identification study. It is found that the model, if calibrated using pyoverdine data alone is able to predict the population size and vice versa, with some restrictions. Thus the model can be used as an indirect experimental tool. PMID:18191154

  6. Abnormal Brain Iron Metabolism in Irp2 Deficient Mice Is Associated with Mild Neurological and Behavioral Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Zumbrennen-Bullough, Kimberly B.; Becker, Lore; Garrett, Lillian; Hölter, Sabine M.; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Klopstock, Thomas; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Wolf, Eckhard; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Romney, Steven J.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Iron Regulatory Protein 2 (Irp2, Ireb2) is a central regulator of cellular iron homeostasis in vertebrates. Two global knockout mouse models have been generated to explore the role of Irp2 in regulating iron metabolism. While both mouse models show that loss of Irp2 results in microcytic anemia and altered body iron distribution, discrepant results have drawn into question the role of Irp2 in regulating brain iron metabolism. One model shows that aged Irp2 deficient mice develop adult-onset progressive neurodegeneration that is associated with axonal degeneration and loss of Purkinje cells in the central nervous system. These mice show iron deposition in white matter tracts and oligodendrocyte soma throughout the brain. A contrasting model of global Irp2 deficiency shows no overt or pathological signs of neurodegeneration or brain iron accumulation, and display only mild motor coordination and balance deficits when challenged by specific tests. Explanations for conflicting findings in the severity of the clinical phenotype, brain iron accumulation and neuronal degeneration remain unclear. Here, we describe an additional mouse model of global Irp2 deficiency. Our aged Irp2−/− mice show marked iron deposition in white matter and in oligodendrocytes while iron content is significantly reduced in neurons. Ferritin and transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1, Tfrc), expression are increased and decreased, respectively, in the brain from Irp2−/− mice. These mice show impairments in locomotion, exploration, motor coordination/balance and nociception when assessed by neurological and behavioral tests, but lack overt signs of neurodegenerative disease. Ultrastructural studies of specific brain regions show no evidence of neurodegeneration. Our data suggest that Irp2 deficiency dysregulates brain iron metabolism causing cellular dysfunction that ultimately leads to mild neurological, behavioral and nociceptive impairments. PMID:24896637

  7. Abnormal brain iron metabolism in Irp2 deficient mice is associated with mild neurological and behavioral impairments.

    PubMed

    Zumbrennen-Bullough, Kimberly B; Becker, Lore; Garrett, Lillian; Hölter, Sabine M; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Racz, Ildiko; Rathkolb, Birgit; Klopstock, Thomas; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Wolf, Eckhard; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Romney, Steven J; Leibold, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Iron Regulatory Protein 2 (Irp2, Ireb2) is a central regulator of cellular iron homeostasis in vertebrates. Two global knockout mouse models have been generated to explore the role of Irp2 in regulating iron metabolism. While both mouse models show that loss of Irp2 results in microcytic anemia and altered body iron distribution, discrepant results have drawn into question the role of Irp2 in regulating brain iron metabolism. One model shows that aged Irp2 deficient mice develop adult-onset progressive neurodegeneration that is associated with axonal degeneration and loss of Purkinje cells in the central nervous system. These mice show iron deposition in white matter tracts and oligodendrocyte soma throughout the brain. A contrasting model of global Irp2 deficiency shows no overt or pathological signs of neurodegeneration or brain iron accumulation, and display only mild motor coordination and balance deficits when challenged by specific tests. Explanations for conflicting findings in the severity of the clinical phenotype, brain iron accumulation and neuronal degeneration remain unclear. Here, we describe an additional mouse model of global Irp2 deficiency. Our aged Irp2-/- mice show marked iron deposition in white matter and in oligodendrocytes while iron content is significantly reduced in neurons. Ferritin and transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1, Tfrc), expression are increased and decreased, respectively, in the brain from Irp2-/- mice. These mice show impairments in locomotion, exploration, motor coordination/balance and nociception when assessed by neurological and behavioral tests, but lack overt signs of neurodegenerative disease. Ultrastructural studies of specific brain regions show no evidence of neurodegeneration. Our data suggest that Irp2 deficiency dysregulates brain iron metabolism causing cellular dysfunction that ultimately leads to mild neurological, behavioral and nociceptive impairments.

  8. Transcriptional and translational regulatory responses to iron limitation in the globally distributed marine bacterium Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Daniel P.; Kitner, J. B.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Clauss, Therese RW; Lipton, Mary S.; Schwalbach, M. S.; Steindler, L.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Smith, Richard D.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2010-05-05

    Abstract Background: Iron is recognized as an important micronutrient that limits microbial plankton productivity over vast regions of the oceans. We investigated the gene expression responses of Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique cultures to iron limitation in natural seawater media supplemented with a siderophore to chelate iron. Methodology/Principal Findings: Microarray data indicated transcription of the periplasmic iron binding protein sfuC increased by 16-fold, and iron transporter subunits, iron-sulfur center assembly genes, and the putative ferroxidase rubrerythrin transcripts increased to a lesser extent. Quantitative peptide mass spectrometry revealed that sfuC protein abundance increased 27-fold, despite an average decrease of 59% across the global proteome. Two RNA-binding proteins, CspE and CspL, correlated well with iron availability, suggesting that they may contribute to the observed differences between the transcriptome and proteome. Conclusions/Significance: We propose sfuC as a marker gene for indicating iron limitation in marine metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic ecological surveys. The marked proteome reduction was not directly correlated to changes in the transcriptome, implicating post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms as modulators of protein expression. We propose a model in which the RNA-binding activity of cspE and cspL selectively enables protein synthesis of the iron acquisition protein sfuC during transient growth-limiting episodes of iron scarcity.

  9. Iron availability limits the ocean nitrogen inventory stabilizing feedbacks between marine denitrification and nitrogen fixation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, J. Keith; Doney, Scott C.

    2007-06-01

    Recent upward revisions in key sink/source terms for fixed nitrogen (N) in the oceans imply a short residence time and strong negative feedbacks involving denitrification and N fixation to prevent large swings in the ocean N inventory over timescales of a few centuries. We tested the strength of these feedbacks in a global biogeochemical elemental cycling (BEC) ocean model that includes water column denitrification and an explicit N fixing phytoplankton group. In the northern Indian Ocean and over longer timescales in the tropical Atlantic, we find strong stabilizing feedbacks that minimize changes in marine N inventory over timescales of ˜30-200 years. In these regions high atmospheric dust/iron inputs lead to phosphorus limitation of diazotrophs, and thus a tight link between N fixation and surface water N/P ratios. Maintenance of the oxygen minimum zones in these basins depends on N fixation driven export. The stabilizing feedbacks in other regions are significant but weaker owing to iron limitation of the diazotrophs. Thus Fe limitation appears to restrict the ability of N fixation to compensate for changes in denitrification in the current climate, perhaps leading the oceans to lose fixed N. We suggest that iron is the ultimate limiting nutrient leading to nitrogen being the proximate limiting nutrient over wide regions today. Iron stress was at least partially alleviated during more dusty, glacial times, leading to a higher marine N inventory, increased export production, and perhaps widespread phosphorus limitation of the phytoplankton community. The increased efficiency of the biological pump would have contributed to the glacial drawdown in atmospheric CO2.

  10. Iron pentacarbonyl detection limits in the cigarette smoke matrix using FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrish, Milton E.; Plunkett, Susan E.; Harward, Charles N.

    2005-11-01

    Endogenous metals present in tobacco from agricultural practices have been purported to generate metal carbonyls in cigarette smoke. Transition metal catalysts, such as iron oxide, have been investigated for the reduction of carbon monoxide (CO) in cigarette smoke. These studies motivated the development of an analytical method to determine if iron pentacarbonyl [Fe(CO) 5] is present in mainstream smoke from cigarette models having cigarette paper made with iron oxide. An FT-IR puff-by-puff method was developed and the detection limit was determined using two primary reference spectra from different sources to estimate the amount of Fe(CO) 5 present in a high-pressure steel cylinder of CO. We do not detect Fe(CO) 5 in a single 35 mL puff from reference cigarettes or from those cigarette models having cigarette paper made with iron oxide, with a 30-ppbV limit of detection (LOD). Also, it was shown that a filter containing activated carbon would remove Fe(CO) 5.

  11. Anaerobic Sulfur Metabolism Coupled to Dissimilatory Iron Reduction in the Extremophile Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Héctor; Mangold, Stefanie; Denis, Yann; Ñancucheo, Ivan; Esparza, Mario; Johnson, D. Barrie; Bonnefoy, Violaine; Dopson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Gene transcription (microarrays) and protein levels (proteomics) were compared in cultures of the acidophilic chemolithotroph Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans grown on elemental sulfur as the electron donor under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, using either molecular oxygen or ferric iron as the electron acceptor, respectively. No evidence supporting the role of either tetrathionate hydrolase or arsenic reductase in mediating the transfer of electrons to ferric iron (as suggested by previous studies) was obtained. In addition, no novel ferric iron reductase was identified. However, data suggested that sulfur was disproportionated under anaerobic conditions, forming hydrogen sulfide via sulfur reductase and sulfate via heterodisulfide reductase and ATP sulfurylase. Supporting physiological evidence for H2S production came from the observation that soluble Cu2+ included in anaerobically incubated cultures was precipitated (seemingly as CuS). Since H2S reduces ferric iron to ferrous in acidic medium, its production under anaerobic conditions indicates that anaerobic iron reduction is mediated, at least in part, by an indirect mechanism. Evidence was obtained for an alternative model implicating the transfer of electrons from S0 to Fe3+ via a respiratory chain that includes a bc1 complex and a cytochrome c. Central carbon pathways were upregulated under aerobic conditions, correlating with higher growth rates, while many Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle components were upregulated during anaerobic growth, probably as a result of more limited access to carbon dioxide. These results are important for understanding the role of A. ferrooxidans in environmental biogeochemical metal cycling and in industrial bioleaching operations. PMID:23354702

  12. Effect of entF deletion on iron acquisition and erythritol metabolism by Brucella abortus 2308.

    PubMed

    Jain, Neeta; Rodriguez, Araceli C; Kimsawatde, Gade; Seleem, Mohamed N; Boyle, Stephen M; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar

    2011-03-01

    Brucella abortus has been shown to produce two siderophores: 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA) and brucebactin. Previous studies on Brucella have shown that 2,3-DHBA is associated with erythritol utilization and virulence in pregnant ruminants. The biosynthetic pathway and role of brucebactin are not known and the only gene shown to be involved so far is entF. Using cre-lox methodology, an entF mutant was created in wild-type B. abortus 2308. Compared with the wild-type strain, the ΔentF strain showed significant growth inhibition in iron minimal media that became exacerbated in the presence of an iron chelator. For the first time, we have demonstrated the death of the ΔentF strain under iron-limiting conditions in the presence of erythritol. Addition of FeCl(3) restored the growth of the ΔentF strain, suggesting a significant role in iron acquisition. Further, complementation of the ΔentF strain using a plasmid containing an entF gene suggested the absence of any polar effects. In contrast, there was no significant difference in survival and growth between the ΔentF and wild-type strains grown in the murine macrophage cell line J774A.1, suggesting that an alternate iron acquisition pathway is present in Brucella when grown intracellulary.

  13. [Effect of dinitrosyl iron complexes on erythrocyte energy metabolism under thermal trauma conditions].

    PubMed

    Martusevich, A K; Solov'eva, A G; Peretiagin, S P; Vanin, A F

    2014-01-01

    The effect of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC) on the energy metabolism of erythrocytes under combined thermal trauma conditions has been studied on a group of 30 Wistar rats, which was divided into 3 groups: intact (n = 10), control (n = 10), and main (n = 10). Combined thermal trauma (skin burn + thermoinhalation damage) was modeled in animals of the control and main groups. Rats of control group received infusions of sodium chloride solution (n = 10) every day. Rats of the main group obtained infusions of DNIC solution in sodium chloride. Rat blood samples were characterized by the activity of lactate dehydrogenase in direct and reverse reaction, lactate level, and coefficients of the substrate provision and energy reactions balance. It was stated, that DNIC clearly normalized the energy metabolism of erythrocytes beginning with the third day after thermal trauma onset. PMID:24791335

  14. The effects of maternal iron deficiency on infant fibroblast growth factor-23 and mineral metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Braithwaite, V.S.; Prentice, A.; Darboe, M.K.; Prentice, A.M.; Moore, S.E.

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), a phosphate(Phos)-regulating hormone, is abnormally elevated in hypophosphataemic syndromes and an elevated FGF23 is a predictor of mortality in kidney disease. Recent findings suggest iron deficiency as a potential mediator of FGF23 expression and murine studies have shown in utero effects of maternal iron deficiency on offspring FGF23 and phosphate metabolism. Our aim was to investigate the impact of maternal iron status on infant FGF23 and mineral metabolites over the first 2 years of life. Infants born to mothers with normal (NIn = 25,) and low (LIn = 25) iron status during pregnancy, from a mother-infant trial (ISRCTN49285450) in rural Gambia, West Africa, had blood and plasma samples analysed at 12, 24, 52, 78 and 104 weeks (wk) of age. Circulating intact-FGF23 (I-FGF23), Phos, total alkaline phosphatase (TALP) and haemoglobin (Hb) decreased and estimated glomerular filtration rate increased over time [all P ≤ 0.0001)]. C-terminal-FGF23 (C-FGF23) and TALP were significantly higher in LI compared with NI, from 52 wk for C-FGF23 [Beta coefficient (SE) 18.1 (0.04) %, P = 0.04] and from 24 wk for TALP [44.7 (29.6) U/L, P = 0.04]. Infant Hb was the strongest negative predictor of C-FGF23 concentration [− 21% (4%) RU/mL, P ≤ 0.0001], Phos was the strongest positive predictor of I-FGF23 [32.0(3.9) pg/mL, P ≤ 0.0001] and I-FGF23 did not predict C-FGF23 over time [− 0.5% (0.5%), P = 0.3]. In conclusion, this study suggests that poor maternal iron status is associated with a higher infant C-FGF23 and TALP but similar I-FGF23 concentrations in infants and young children. These findings further highlight the likely public health importance of preventing iron deficiency during pregnancy. Whether or not children who are born to iron deficient mothers have persistently high concentrations of these metabolites and are more likely to be at risk of impaired bone development and pre-disposed to rickets

  15. The effects of maternal iron deficiency on infant fibroblast growth factor-23 and mineral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, V S; Prentice, A; Darboe, M K; Prentice, A M; Moore, S E

    2016-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), a phosphate(Phos)-regulating hormone, is abnormally elevated in hypophosphataemic syndromes and an elevated FGF23 is a predictor of mortality in kidney disease. Recent findings suggest iron deficiency as a potential mediator of FGF23 expression and murine studies have shown in utero effects of maternal iron deficiency on offspring FGF23 and phosphate metabolism. Our aim was to investigate the impact of maternal iron status on infant FGF23 and mineral metabolites over the first 2years of life. Infants born to mothers with normal (NIn=25,) and low (LIn=25) iron status during pregnancy, from a mother-infant trial (ISRCTN49285450) in rural Gambia, West Africa, had blood and plasma samples analysed at 12, 24, 52, 78 and 104weeks (wk) of age. Circulating intact-FGF23 (I-FGF23), Phos, total alkaline phosphatase (TALP) and haemoglobin (Hb) decreased and estimated glomerular filtration rate increased over time [all P≤0.0001)]. C-terminal-FGF23 (C-FGF23) and TALP were significantly higher in LI compared with NI, from 52wk for C-FGF23 [Beta coefficient (SE) 18.1 (0.04) %, P=0.04] and from 24wk for TALP [44.7 (29.6) U/L, P=0.04]. Infant Hb was the strongest negative predictor of C-FGF23 concentration [-21% (4%) RU/mL, P≤0.0001], Phos was the strongest positive predictor of I-FGF23 [32.0(3.9) pg/mL, P≤0.0001] and I-FGF23 did not predict C-FGF23 over time [-0.5% (0.5%), P=0.3]. In conclusion, this study suggests that poor maternal iron status is associated with a higher infant C-FGF23 and TALP but similar I-FGF23 concentrations in infants and young children. These findings further highlight the likely public health importance of preventing iron deficiency during pregnancy. Whether or not children who are born to iron deficient mothers have persistently high concentrations of these metabolites and are more likely to be at risk of impaired bone development and pre-disposed to rickets requires further research.

  16. The GEF1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes an integral membrane protein; mutations in which have effects on respiration and iron-limited growth.

    PubMed

    Greene, J R; Brown, N H; DiDomenico, B J; Kaplan, J; Eide, D J

    1993-12-01

    We have isolated a new class of respiration-defective, i.e petite, mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutations in the GEF1 gene cause cells to grow slowly on rich media containing carbon sources utilized by respiration. This phenotype is suppressed by adding high concentrations of iron to the growth medium. Gef1- mutants also fail to grow on a fermentable carbon source, glucose, when iron is reduced to low concentrations in the medium, suggesting that the GEF1 gene is required for efficient metabolism of iron during growth on fermentable as well as respired carbon sources. However, activity of the iron uptake system appears to be unaffected in gef1- mutants. Fe(II) transporter activity and regulation is normal in gef1- mutants. Fe(III) reductase induction during iron-limited growth is disrupted, but this appears to be a secondary effect of growth rate alterations. The wild-type GEF1 gene was cloned and sequenced; it encodes a protein of 779 amino acids, 13 possible transmembrane domains, and significant similarity to chloride channel proteins from fish and mammals, suggesting that GEF1 encodes an integral membrane protein. A gef1- deletion mutation generated in vitro and introduced into wild-type haploid strains by gene transplacement was not lethal. Oxygen consumption by intact gef1- cells and by mitochondrial fractions isolated from gef1- mutants was reduced 25-50% relative to wild type, indicating that mitochondrial function is defective in these mutants. We suggest that GEF1 encodes a transport protein that is involved in intracellular iron metabolism.

  17. Discovering the role of mitochondria in the iron deficiency-induced metabolic responses of plants.

    PubMed

    Vigani, Gianpiero

    2012-01-01

    In plants, iron (Fe) deficiency-induced chlorosis is a major problem, affecting both yield and quality of crops. Plants have evolved multifaceted strategies, such as reductase activity, proton extrusion, and specialised storage proteins, to mobilise Fe from the environment and distribute it within the plant. Because of its fundamental role in plant productivity, several issues concerning Fe homeostasis in plants are currently intensively studied. The activation of Fe uptake reactions requires an overall adaptation of the primary metabolism because these activities need the constant supply of energetic substrates (i.e., NADPH and ATP). Several studies concerning the metabolism of Fe-deficient plants have been conducted, but research focused on mitochondrial implications in adaptive responses to nutritional stress has only begun in recent years. Mitochondria are the energetic centre of the root cell, and they are strongly affected by Fe deficiency. Nevertheless, they display a high level of functional flexibility, which allows them to maintain the viability of the cell. Mitochondria represent a crucial target of studies on plant homeostasis, and it might be of interest to concentrate future research on understanding how mitochondria orchestrate the reprogramming of root cell metabolism under Fe deficiency. In this review, I summarise what it is known about the effect of Fe deficiency on mitochondrial metabolism and morphology. Moreover, I present a detailed view of the possible roles of mitochondria in the development of plant responses to Fe deficiency, integrating old findings with new and discussing new hypotheses for future investigations.

  18. Glutathione revisited: a vital function in iron metabolism and ancillary role in thiol-redox control

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Chitranshu; Igbaria, Aeid; D'Autreaux, Benoît; Planson, Anne-Gaëlle; Junot, Christophe; Godat, Emmanuel; Bachhawat, Anand K; Delaunay-Moisan, Agnès; Toledano, Michel B

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione contributes to thiol-redox control and to extra-mitochondrial iron–sulphur cluster (ISC) maturation. To determine the physiological importance of these functions and sort out those that account for the GSH requirement for viability, we performed a comprehensive analysis of yeast cells depleted of or containing toxic levels of GSH. Both conditions triggered an intense iron starvation-like response and impaired the activity of extra-mitochondrial ISC enzymes but did not impact thiol-redox maintenance, except for high glutathione levels that altered oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. While iron partially rescued the ISC maturation and growth defects of GSH-depleted cells, genetic experiments indicated that unlike thioredoxin, glutathione could not support by itself the thiol-redox duties of the cell. We propose that glutathione is essential by its requirement in ISC assembly, but only serves as a thioredoxin backup in cytosolic thiol-redox maintenance. Glutathione-high physiological levels are thus meant to insulate its cytosolic function in iron metabolism from variations of its concentration during redox stresses, a model challenging the traditional view of it as prime actor in thiol-redox control. PMID:21478822

  19. Influence of high dietary iron as ferrous carbonate and ferrous sulfate on iron metabolism in young calves.

    PubMed

    McGuire, S O; Miller, W J; Gentry, R P; Neathery, M W; Ho, S Y; Blackmon, D M

    1985-10-01

    Twelve intact male Holstein calves averaging 90 kg and 12 wk of age were fed one of three dietary treatments for 28 d. The diets were A) control, B) control plus 1000 ppm iron as ferrous carbonate, and C) control plus 1000 ppm iron as ferrous sulfate monohydrate. Calves were dosed orally on d 15 of the treatment period with 1 mCi of iron-59. Neither source of added iron had a significant effect on weight gains, feed consumption, hemoglobin, packed cell volume, serum total iron, serum total iron-binding capacity, unbound iron-binding capacity, serum copper, tissue copper, fecal dry matter, or a consistent effect on fecal pH. The ferrous carbonate had no significant effect on stable zinc or stable iron in any tissue studied. Calves fed ferrous sulfate had higher average stable iron in most tissues and significantly more in the small intestine. Tissue zinc was lower in spleen and pancreas of ferrous sulfate-fed calves. Both sources of added iron sharply reduced iron-59 in serum, whole blood, and body tissues. The reduction was substantially greater in calves fed the ferrous sulfate iron. Iron in ferrous sulfate had a higher biological availability than that in the ferrous carbonate; however, bioavailability of the ferrous carbonate iron appeared to be substantial and considerably more than that noted in previous studies in which a different source of ferrous carbonate was used. The maximum safe level of dietary iron is materially influenced by the source of iron with a higher tolerance indicated for ferrous carbonated than ferrous sulfate monohydrate.

  20. Non-heme induction of heme oxygenase-1 does not alter cellular iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sheftel, Alex D; Kim, Sangwon F; Ponka, Prem

    2007-04-01

    The catabolism of heme is carried out by members of the heme oxygenase (HO) family. The products of heme catabolism by HO-1 are ferrous iron, biliverdin (subsequently converted to bilirubin), and carbon monoxide. In addition to its function in the recycling of hemoglobin iron, this microsomal enzyme has been shown to protect cells in various stress models. Implicit in the reports of HO-1 cytoprotection to date are its effects on the cellular handling of heme/iron. However, the limited amount of uncommitted heme in non-erythroid cells brings to question the source of substrate for this enzyme in non-hemolytic circumstances. In the present study, HO-1 was induced by either sodium arsenite (reactive oxygen species producer) or hemin or overexpressed in the murine macrophage-like cell line, RAW 264.7. Both of the inducers elicited an increase in active HO-1; however, only hemin exposure caused an increase in the synthesis rate of the iron storage protein, ferritin. This effect of hemin was the direct result of the liberation of iron from heme by HO. Cells stably overexpressing HO-1, although protected from oxidative stress, did not display elevated basal ferritin synthesis. However, these cells did exhibit an increase in ferritin synthesis, compared with untransfected controls, in response to hemin treatment, suggesting that heme levels, and not HO-1, limit cellular heme catabolism. Our results suggest that the protection of cells from oxidative insult afforded by HO-1 is not due to the catabolism of significant amounts of cellular heme as thought previously.

  1. Effects of Iron Limitation on the Degradation of Toluene by Pseudomonas Strains Carrying the TOL (pWWO) Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Dinkla, Inez J. T.; Gabor, Esther M.; Janssen, Dick B.

    2001-01-01

    Most aerobic biodegradation pathways for hydrocarbons involve iron-containing oxygenases. In iron-limited environments, such as the rhizosphere, this may influence the rate of degradation of hydrocarbon pollutants. We investigated the effects of iron limitation on the degradation of toluene by Pseudomonas putida mt2 and the transconjugant rhizosphere bacterium P. putida WCS358(pWWO), both of which contain the pWWO (TOL) plasmid that harbors the genes for toluene degradation. The results of continuous-culture experiments showed that the activity of the upper-pathway toluene monooxygenase decreased but that the activity of benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase was not affected under iron-limited conditions. In contrast, the activities of three meta-pathway (lower-pathway) enzymes were all found to be reduced when iron concentrations were decreased. Additional experiments in which citrate was used as a growth substrate and the pathways were induced with the gratuitous inducer o-xylene showed that expression of the TOL genes increased the iron requirement in both strains. Growth yields were reduced and substrate affinities decreased under iron-limited conditions, suggesting that iron availability can be an important parameter in the oxidative breakdown of hydrocarbons. PMID:11472911

  2. Catalytic function of the mycobacterial binuclear iron monooxygenase in acetone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Nakao, Tomomi; Kino, Kuniki

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium smegmatis strain mc(2)155 and Mycobacterium goodii strain 12523 are able to grow on acetone and use it as a source of carbon and energy. We previously demonstrated by gene deletion analysis that the mimABCD gene cluster, which encodes a binuclear iron monooxygenase, plays an essential role in acetone metabolism in these mycobacteria. In the present study, we determined the catalytic function of MimABCD in acetone metabolism. Whole-cell assays were performed using Escherichia coli cells expressing the MimABCD complex. When the recombinant E. coli cells were incubated with acetone, a product was detected by gas chromatography (GC) analysis. Based on the retention time and the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) spectrum, the reaction product was identified as acetol (hydroxyacetone). The recombinant E. coli cells produced 1.02 mM of acetol from acetone within 24 h. Furthermore, we demonstrated that MimABCD also was able to convert methylethylketone (2-butanone) to 1-hydroxy-2-butanone. Although it has long been known that microorganisms such as mycobacteria metabolize acetone via acetol, this study provides the first biochemical evidence for the existence of a microbial enzyme that catalyses the conversion of acetone to acetol.

  3. An energetic model for oxygen-limited metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Beronio, P.B. Jr. . Amoco Research Center); Tsao, G.T. . Lab. of Renewable Resources Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Microbial production of 2,3-butanediol by Klebsiella oxytoca occurs under conditions of an oxygen limitation. The extent to which substrate is oxidized to 2,3-butanediol and its coproducts, (acetic acid, acetoin, and ethanol) and the relative flow rates of substrate to energetic and biosynthetic pathways are controlled by the degree of oxygen limitation. Two energetic relationships which describe the response to an oxygen limitation have been derived. The first relationship describes the coupling between growth and energy production observed under oxygen-limited conditions. This allows calculation of energetic parameters and modeling of the cell mass and substrate profiles in terms of the degree of oxygen limitation only. The second relationship describes the average degree of oxidation and the rate of the end-product flow. The model has been tested with both batch and continuous culture. During these kinetic studies, two phases of growth have been observed: energy-coupled growth, which was described above; and, energy-uncoupled growth, which arises when the degree of oxygen limitation reaches a critical value. Optimal culture performance with respect to 2,3-butanediol productivity occurs during energy-coupled growth.

  4. Hepcidin and iron metabolism in non-diabetic obese and type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Yin, Hui-qing; Liu, Hao-ling; Xiu, Lei; Peng, Xiao-yu

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes of iron levels and hepatic regulatory molecules expression involved in iron metabolism in non-diabetic obese/type 2 diabetic rat models. Male Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups: control group, non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group (n=20 each). The rats were evaluated physiologically and biochemically. The hepatic histopathological changes were observed using haematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The mRNA expression patterns of hepcidin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and ferroportin (Fpn) in the rat liver in control group, non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. The protein expression patterns of hepcidin in liver of each group were further analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. As compared with control group, the ferritin in non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group was increased significantly (P<0.001). However, there was no significant difference in soluble transferring receptor (sTfR):ferritin ratio among the three groups (P>0.05). The real-time RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting results all revealed that the expression levels of hepcidin in non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group were elevated significantly as compared with those in control group (P<0.001). The expression levels of hepcidin mRNA between non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group showed no significant difference (P>0.05). However, the protein expression levels of hepcidin in type 2 diabetic group were significantly higher than those in non-diabetic obese group (P<0.05). Compared to control group, the expression levels of IL-6 mRNA in non-diabetic obese group and type 2 diabetic group were increased significantly and the expression levels of Fpn mRNA decreased (P<0.05). However, the expression levels of HIF mRNA had no significant difference among three groups. It is suggested that iron metabolism is

  5. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments. PMID:27729845

  6. Iron Limitation of a Springtime Bacterial and Phytoplankton Community in the Ross Sea: Implications for Vitamin B12 Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Erin M.; Saito, Mak A.; Lee, Peter A.; Dunbar, Robert B.; Sedwick, Peter N.; DiTullio, Giacomo R.

    2011-01-01

    The Ross Sea is home to some of the largest phytoplankton blooms in the Southern Ocean. Primary production in this system has previously been shown to be iron limited in the summer and periodically iron and vitamin B12 colimited. In this study, we examined trace metal limitation of biological activity in the Ross Sea in the austral spring and considered possible implications for vitamin B12 nutrition. Bottle incubation experiments demonstrated that iron limited phytoplankton growth in the austral spring while B12, cobalt, and zinc did not. This is the first demonstration of iron limitation in a Phaeocystis antarctica-dominated, early season Ross Sea phytoplankton community. The lack of B12 limitation in this location is consistent with previous Ross Sea studies in the austral summer, wherein vitamin additions did not stimulate P. antarctica growth and B12 was limiting only when bacterial abundance was low. Bottle incubation experiments and a bacterial regrowth experiment also revealed that iron addition directly enhanced bacterial growth. B12 uptake measurements in natural water samples and in an iron fertilized bottle incubation demonstrated that bacteria serve not only as a source for vitamin B12, but also as a significant sink, and that iron additions enhanced B12 uptake rates in phytoplankton but not bacteria. Additionally, vitamin uptake rates did not become saturated upon the addition of up to 95 pM B12. A rapid B12 uptake rate was observed after 13 min, which then decreased to a slower constant uptake rate over the next 52 h. Results from this study highlight the importance of iron availability in limiting early season Ross Sea phytoplankton growth and suggest that rates of vitamin B12 production and consumption may be impacted by iron availability. PMID:21886638

  7. Interactions between isolated hepatocytes and Kupffer cells in iron metabolism: a possible role for ferritin as an iron carrier protein.

    PubMed

    Sibille, J C; Kondo, H; Aisen, P

    1988-01-01

    Like the rat peritoneal macrophage, the isolated Kupffer cell is capable of processing and releasing iron acquired by phagocytosis of immunosensitized homologous red blood cells. When erythrophagocytosis is restrained to levels which do not affect cell viability, about one red cell per macrophage, close to 50% of iron acquired from red cells is released within 24 hr in the form of ferritin. Immunoradiometric assay of the extracellular medium indicates that 160 ng ferritin are released by 10(6) Kupffer cells after 24-hr incubation at 37 degrees C. Iron release is temperature-dependent, the rate at 37 degrees C being nearly 5-fold greater than at 4 degrees C. As estimated by sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation, ferritin released by the erythrophagocytosing Kupffer cell averages 2,400 iron atoms per molecule. When reincubated with isolated hepatocytes, this released ferritin is rapidly taken up by the cells. Via this process, hepatocytes may accumulate more than 160,000 iron atoms per cell per min. Such accumulation is not impeded by the presence of iron-loaded transferrin in the culture medium, but is markedly depressed by rat liver ferritin. In contrast to the conservation of transferrin during its interaction with hepatocytes, the protein shell of the ferritin molecule is rapidly degraded into trichloroacetic acid-soluble fragments. Ferritin-mediated transfer of iron from Kupffer cells to hepatocytes may help explain the resistance of the liver to iron deficiency as well as the liver's susceptibility to iron overload. PMID:3356411

  8. Initial Characterization of Carbon Metabolism in Iron Oxidizing Microbial Communities of Acidic Hot Springs in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuzer, H. W.; Jennings, R. D.; Whitmore, L.; Inskeep, W. P.; Moran, J.

    2012-12-01

    Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park is home to several acidic, sulfidic hot springs. Visual inspection of the springs reveals distinct geochemical regions starting with a sulfur deposition zone followed by a transition to iron oxide deposition downstream. The microbial communities in the iron oxidation zones are dominated by Archaea, including several members that appear to define previously unrecognized taxa. Abiotic iron oxidation rates are very slow at these temperatures (typically ~ 65-70 oC) and pH's (typically ~3). Therefore, the relatively rapid iron oxide deposition rate strongly suggests the process is microbially mediated, and an organism previously isolated from these springs, Metallosphaera yellowstonensis, has been shown to oxide iron in culture. M. yellowstonensis has been observed in the all microbial communities analyzed in the iron oxidizing zones of these springs, though metagenomic profiling suggests it constitutes only ~20% of the community membership. When we began our studies of C flow in the iron-oxidizing community, no C source had been demonstrated. Observed potential carbon sources in the springs include dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, and methane, as well as random inputs of heterotrophic carbon in the forms of insect carcasses, pine needles, and animal scat. The temperatures in the iron oxidation zones are above the photosynthetic upper temperature limit, thus precluding photosynthetic-based autotrophy within the community itself. We are employing geochemical and stable isotope techniques to assess carbon inventories in the system. We have demonstrated that M. yellowstonensis as well as excised samples of iron oxide mat communities can fix CO2, and our estimated isotopic fractionation factor is consistent with the 3-hydroxypropionate 4-hydroxybutyrate pathway. Genes of this pathway have been identified in the M. yellowstonensis genome. We have tentatively identified small amounts of organic compounds

  9. Iron and aluminium oxides containing industrial wastes as adsorbents of heavy metals: Application possibilities and limitations.

    PubMed

    Jacukowicz-Sobala, Irena; Ociński, Daniel; Kociołek-Balawejder, Elżbieta

    2015-07-01

    Industrial wastes with a high iron or aluminium oxide content are produced in huge quantities as by-products of water treatment (water treatment residuals), bauxite processing (red mud) and hard and brown coal burning in power plants (fly ash). Although they vary in their composition, the wastes have one thing in common--a high content of amorphous iron and/or aluminium oxides with a large specific surface area, whereby this group of wastes shows very good adsorbability towards heavy metals, arsenates, selenates, etc. But their physical form makes their utilisation quite difficult, since it is not easy to separate the spent sorbent from the solution and high bed hydraulic resistances occur in dynamic regime processes. Nevertheless, because of the potential benefits of utilising the wastes in industrial effluent treatment, this issue attracts much attention today. This study describes in detail the waste generation processes, the chemical structure of the wastes, their physicochemical properties, and the mechanisms of fixing heavy metals and semimetals on the surface of iron and aluminium oxides. Typical compositions of wastes generated in selected industrial plants are given. A detailed survey of the literature on the adsorption applications of the wastes, including methods of their thermal and chemical activation, as well as regeneration of the spent sorbents, is presented. The existing and potential ways of modifying the physical form of the discussed group of wastes, making it possible to overcome the basic limitation on their practical use, are discussed.

  10. Iron and aluminium oxides containing industrial wastes as adsorbents of heavy metals: Application possibilities and limitations.

    PubMed

    Jacukowicz-Sobala, Irena; Ociński, Daniel; Kociołek-Balawejder, Elżbieta

    2015-07-01

    Industrial wastes with a high iron or aluminium oxide content are produced in huge quantities as by-products of water treatment (water treatment residuals), bauxite processing (red mud) and hard and brown coal burning in power plants (fly ash). Although they vary in their composition, the wastes have one thing in common--a high content of amorphous iron and/or aluminium oxides with a large specific surface area, whereby this group of wastes shows very good adsorbability towards heavy metals, arsenates, selenates, etc. But their physical form makes their utilisation quite difficult, since it is not easy to separate the spent sorbent from the solution and high bed hydraulic resistances occur in dynamic regime processes. Nevertheless, because of the potential benefits of utilising the wastes in industrial effluent treatment, this issue attracts much attention today. This study describes in detail the waste generation processes, the chemical structure of the wastes, their physicochemical properties, and the mechanisms of fixing heavy metals and semimetals on the surface of iron and aluminium oxides. Typical compositions of wastes generated in selected industrial plants are given. A detailed survey of the literature on the adsorption applications of the wastes, including methods of their thermal and chemical activation, as well as regeneration of the spent sorbents, is presented. The existing and potential ways of modifying the physical form of the discussed group of wastes, making it possible to overcome the basic limitation on their practical use, are discussed. PMID:26060197

  11. Knocking down mitochondrial iron transporter (MIT) reprograms primary and secondary metabolism in rice plants.

    PubMed

    Vigani, Gianpiero; Bashir, Khurram; Ishimaru, Yasuhiro; Lehmann, Martin; Casiraghi, Fabio Marco; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Seki, Motoaki; Geigenberger, Peter; Zocchi, Graziano; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2016-03-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient for plant growth and development, and its reduced bioavailability strongly impairs mitochondrial functionality. In this work, the metabolic adjustment in the rice (Oryza sativa) mitochondrial Fe transporter knockdown mutant (mit-2) was analysed. Biochemical characterization of purified mitochondria from rice roots showed alteration in the respiratory chain of mit-2 compared with wild-type (WT) plants. In particular, proteins belonging to the type II alternative NAD(P)H dehydrogenases accumulated strongly in mit-2 plants, indicating that alternative pathways were activated to keep the respiratory chain working. Additionally, large-scale changes in the transcriptome and metabolome were observed in mit-2 rice plants. In particular, a strong alteration (up-/down-regulation) in the expression of genes encoding enzymes of both primary and secondary metabolism was found in mutant plants. This was reflected by changes in the metabolic profiles in both roots and shoots of mit-2 plants. Significant alterations in the levels of amino acids belonging to the aspartic acid-related pathways (aspartic acid, lysine, and threonine in roots, and aspartic acid and ornithine in shoots) were found that are strictly connected to the Krebs cycle. Furthermore, some metabolites (e.g. pyruvic acid, fumaric acid, ornithine, and oligosaccharides of the raffinose family) accumulated only in the shoot of mit-2 plants, indicating possible hypoxic responses. These findings suggest that the induction of local Fe deficiency in the mitochondrial compartment of mit-2 plants differentially affects the transcript as well as the metabolic profiles in root and shoot tissues. PMID:26685186

  12. Characteristics of the Freshwater Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa Grown in Iron-Limited Continuous Culture

    PubMed Central

    Dang, T. C.; Fujii, M.; Rose, A. L.; Bligh, M.

    2012-01-01

    A continuous culturing system (chemostat) made of metal-free materials was successfully developed and used to maintain Fe-limited cultures of Microcystis aeruginosa PCC7806 at nanomolar iron (Fe) concentrations (20 to 50 nM total Fe). EDTA was used to maintain Fe in solution, with bioavailable Fe controlled by absorption of light by the ferric EDTA complex and resultant reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II). A kinetic model describing Fe transformations and biological uptake was applied to determine the biologically available form of Fe (i.e., unchelated ferrous iron) that is produced by photoreductive dissociation of the ferric EDTA complex. Prediction by chemostat theory modified to account for the light-mediated formation of bioavailable Fe rather than total Fe was in good agreement with growth characteristics of M. aeruginosa under Fe limitation. The cellular Fe quota increased with increasing dilution rates in a manner consistent with the Droop theory. Short-term Fe uptake assays using cells maintained at steady state indicated that M. aeruginosa cells vary their maximum Fe uptake rate (ρmax) depending on the degree of Fe stress. The rate of Fe uptake was lower for cells grown under conditions of lower Fe availability (i.e., lower dilution rate), suggesting that cells in the continuous cultures adjusted to Fe limitation by decreasing ρmax while maintaining a constant affinity for Fe. PMID:22210212

  13. Iron metabolism in African American women during the 2nd and 3rd trimester of a high-risk pregnancy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To examine iron metabolism during the 2nd and 3rd trimester in African American women classified as a high-risk pregnancy. Design: Longitudinal. Setting: Large, university-based, urban Midwestern medical center. Participants: Convenience sample of 47 African American women classified a...

  14. Statistical analysis of iron geochemical data suggests limited late Proterozoic oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, Erik A.; Wolock, Charles J.; Morgan, Alex S.; Gill, Benjamin C.; Kunzmann, Marcus; Halverson, Galen P.; MacDonald, Francis A.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Johnston, David T.

    2015-07-01

    Sedimentary rocks deposited across the Proterozoic-Phanerozoic transition record extreme climate fluctuations, a potential rise in atmospheric oxygen or re-organization of the seafloor redox landscape, and the initial diversification of animals. It is widely assumed that the inferred redox change facilitated the observed trends in biodiversity. Establishing this palaeoenvironmental context, however, requires that changes in marine redox structure be tracked by means of geochemical proxies and translated into estimates of atmospheric oxygen. Iron-based proxies are among the most effective tools for tracking the redox chemistry of ancient oceans. These proxies are inherently local, but have global implications when analysed collectively and statistically. Here we analyse about 4,700 iron-speciation measurements from shales 2,300 to 360 million years old. Our statistical analyses suggest that subsurface water masses in mid-Proterozoic oceans were predominantly anoxic and ferruginous (depleted in dissolved oxygen and iron-bearing), but with a tendency towards euxinia (sulfide-bearing) that is not observed in the Neoproterozoic era. Analyses further indicate that early animals did not experience appreciable benthic sulfide stress. Finally, unlike proxies based on redox-sensitive trace-metal abundances, iron geochemical data do not show a statistically significant change in oxygen content through the Ediacaran and Cambrian periods, sharply constraining the magnitude of the end-Proterozoic oxygen increase. Indeed, this re-analysis of trace-metal data is consistent with oxygenation continuing well into the Palaeozoic era. Therefore, if changing redox conditions facilitated animal diversification, it did so through a limited rise in oxygen past critical functional and ecological thresholds, as is seen in modern oxygen minimum zone benthic animal communities.

  15. Statistical analysis of iron geochemical data suggests limited late Proterozoic oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Erik A; Wolock, Charles J; Morgan, Alex S; Gill, Benjamin C; Kunzmann, Marcus; Halverson, Galen P; Macdonald, Francis A; Knoll, Andrew H; Johnston, David T

    2015-07-23

    Sedimentary rocks deposited across the Proterozoic-Phanerozoic transition record extreme climate fluctuations, a potential rise in atmospheric oxygen or re-organization of the seafloor redox landscape, and the initial diversification of animals. It is widely assumed that the inferred redox change facilitated the observed trends in biodiversity. Establishing this palaeoenvironmental context, however, requires that changes in marine redox structure be tracked by means of geochemical proxies and translated into estimates of atmospheric oxygen. Iron-based proxies are among the most effective tools for tracking the redox chemistry of ancient oceans. These proxies are inherently local, but have global implications when analysed collectively and statistically. Here we analyse about 4,700 iron-speciation measurements from shales 2,300 to 360 million years old. Our statistical analyses suggest that subsurface water masses in mid-Proterozoic oceans were predominantly anoxic and ferruginous (depleted in dissolved oxygen and iron-bearing), but with a tendency towards euxinia (sulfide-bearing) that is not observed in the Neoproterozoic era. Analyses further indicate that early animals did not experience appreciable benthic sulfide stress. Finally, unlike proxies based on redox-sensitive trace-metal abundances, iron geochemical data do not show a statistically significant change in oxygen content through the Ediacaran and Cambrian periods, sharply constraining the magnitude of the end-Proterozoic oxygen increase. Indeed, this re-analysis of trace-metal data is consistent with oxygenation continuing well into the Palaeozoic era. Therefore, if changing redox conditions facilitated animal diversification, it did so through a limited rise in oxygen past critical functional and ecological thresholds, as is seen in modern oxygen minimum zone benthic animal communities. PMID:26201598

  16. Statistical analysis of iron geochemical data suggests limited late Proterozoic oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Erik A; Wolock, Charles J; Morgan, Alex S; Gill, Benjamin C; Kunzmann, Marcus; Halverson, Galen P; Macdonald, Francis A; Knoll, Andrew H; Johnston, David T

    2015-07-23

    Sedimentary rocks deposited across the Proterozoic-Phanerozoic transition record extreme climate fluctuations, a potential rise in atmospheric oxygen or re-organization of the seafloor redox landscape, and the initial diversification of animals. It is widely assumed that the inferred redox change facilitated the observed trends in biodiversity. Establishing this palaeoenvironmental context, however, requires that changes in marine redox structure be tracked by means of geochemical proxies and translated into estimates of atmospheric oxygen. Iron-based proxies are among the most effective tools for tracking the redox chemistry of ancient oceans. These proxies are inherently local, but have global implications when analysed collectively and statistically. Here we analyse about 4,700 iron-speciation measurements from shales 2,300 to 360 million years old. Our statistical analyses suggest that subsurface water masses in mid-Proterozoic oceans were predominantly anoxic and ferruginous (depleted in dissolved oxygen and iron-bearing), but with a tendency towards euxinia (sulfide-bearing) that is not observed in the Neoproterozoic era. Analyses further indicate that early animals did not experience appreciable benthic sulfide stress. Finally, unlike proxies based on redox-sensitive trace-metal abundances, iron geochemical data do not show a statistically significant change in oxygen content through the Ediacaran and Cambrian periods, sharply constraining the magnitude of the end-Proterozoic oxygen increase. Indeed, this re-analysis of trace-metal data is consistent with oxygenation continuing well into the Palaeozoic era. Therefore, if changing redox conditions facilitated animal diversification, it did so through a limited rise in oxygen past critical functional and ecological thresholds, as is seen in modern oxygen minimum zone benthic animal communities.

  17. Crosstalk between inflammation, iron metabolism and endothelial function in Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Rita; Napoleão, Patricia; Banha, João; Paixão, Eleonora; Bettencourt, Andreia; da Silva, Berta Martins; Pereira, Dina; Barcelos, Filipe; Teixeira, Ana; Patto, José Vaz; Viegas-Crespo, Ana Maria; Costa, Luciana

    2014-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a rare chronic vasculitis of unclear etiology. It has been suggested that inflammatory response has an important role in BD pathophysiology. Herein, we aimed to study the interplay between inflammation, iron metabolism and endothelial function in BD and search for its putative association with disease activity. Twenty five patients clinically diagnosed with BD were selected and twenty four healthy age-sex matched individuals participated as controls. Results showed an increase of total number of circulating white blood cells and neutrophils, serum transferrin, total iron binding capacity, mieloperoxidase (MPO), ceruloplasmin (Cp), C reactive protein, β2 microglobulin and Cp surface expression in peripheral blood monocytes in BD patients comparatively to healthy individuals (p < 0,05). Of notice, the alterations observed were associated to disease activity status. No significant differences between the two groups were found in serum nitric oxide concentration. The results obtained suggest an important contribution from innate immunity in the pathogenesis of this disease. In particular, surface expression of leukocyte-derived Cp may constitute a new and relevant biomarker to understand BD etiology.

  18. Evidence for a metabolic limitation of survival in hypothermic hamsters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewitt, R. L.; Anderson, G. L.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1972-01-01

    The underlying factors limiting survival in the hypothermic state are studied. Hamsters of both sexes, clipped and unclipped, were inducted into profound hypothermia by the helium cold method until they reached a temperature between 7 and 10 C. It appears that the primary cause of death is failure of respiration due to the depletion of carbohydrate energy supplies and may explain why survival time in hypothermia is shorter than the normal hibernation time of the hamster.

  19. Effects of Radiation and Dietary Iron on Expression of Genes and Proteins Involved in Drug Metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faust, K. M.; Wotring, V. E.

    2014-01-01

    Liver function, especially the rate of metabolic enzyme activities, determines the concentration of circulating drugs and the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand any effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Dietary factors and exposure to radiation are aspects of spaceflight that are potential oxidative stressors and both can be modeled in ground experiments. In this experiment, we examined the effects of high dietary iron and low dose gamma radiation (individually and combined) on the gene expression of enzymes involved in drug metabolism, redox homeostasis, and DNA repair. METHODS All procedures were approved by the JSC Animal Care and Use Committee. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups (n=8); control, high Fe diet (650 mg iron/kg), radiation (fractionated 3 Gy exposure from a Cs- 137 source) and combined high Fe diet + radiation exposure. Animals were euthanized 24h after the last treatment of radiation; livers were removed immediately and flash -frozen in liquid nitrogen. Expression of genes thought to be involved in redox homeostasis, drug metabolism and DNA damage repair was measured by RT-qPCR. Where possible, protein expression of the same genes was measured by western blotting. All data are expressed as % change in expression normalized to reference gene expression; comparisons were then made of each treatment group to the sham exposed/ normal diet control group. Data was considered significant at p< 0

  20. Evolution of metabolic rate in a parasitic wasp: the role of limitation in intrinsic resources.

    PubMed

    Moiroux, Joffrey; Giron, David; Vernon, Philippe; van Baaren, Joan; van Alphen, Jacques J M

    2012-07-01

    Metabolic rate, a physiological trait closely related to fitness traits, is expected to evolve in response to two main environmental variables: (1) climate, low metabolic rates being found in dry and hot regions when comparing populations originating from different climates in a common garden experiment and (2) resource limitations, low metabolic rates being selected when resources are limited. The main goal of this study was to investigate if differences in intrinsic resource limitations may have disrupted the expected evolution of metabolic rate in response to climate in a parasitic wasp. We compared CO(2) production of females from 4 populations of a Drosophila parasitoid, Leptopilina boulardi, as an estimate of their metabolic rate. Two populations from a hot and dry area able to synthesise lipids de novo at adult stage were compared with two populations originating from a mild and humid climate where no lipid accumulation during adult life was observed. These last females are thus more limited in lipids than the first ones. We observed that a high metabolic rate has been selected in hot and dry environments, contrarily to the results of a great majority of studies. We suggest that lipogenesis occurring there may have allowed the selection of a higher metabolic rate, as females are less limited in energetic resources than females from the mild environment. A high metabolic rate may have been selected there as it partly compensates for the long distances that females have to cross to find laying opportunities in distant orchards. We suggest that intrinsic resources should be integrated when investigating geographical variations in metabolism as this factor may disrupt evolution in response to climate.

  1. Cooperation of two mRNA-binding proteins drives metabolic adaptation to iron deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Sergi; Vergara, Sandra V.; Thiele, Dennis J.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Iron (Fe) is an essential co-factor for a wide range of cellular processes. We have previously demonstrated that during Fe-deficiency yeast Cth2 is expressed and promotes degradation of a battery of mRNAs leading to reprogramming of Fe-dependent metabolism and Fe-storage. We report that the Cth2-homologous protein, Cth1, is transiently expressed during Fe-deprivation and participates in the response to Fe-deficiency through the degradation of mRNAs primarily involved in mitochondrially-localized activities including respiration and amino acid biosynthesis. In parallel, wild type but not cth1Δ cth2Δ cells accumulate mRNAs encoding proteins that function in glucose import and storage and store high levels of glycogen. In addition, Fe-deficiency leads to Snf1 phosphorylation, a member of the AMP-activated protein kinase family required for the cellular response to glucose starvation. These studies demonstrate a metabolic reprogramming as a consequence of Fe-starvation that is dependent on the coordinated activities of two mRNA-binding proteins. PMID:18522836

  2. Metabolic depletion inhibits the uptake of nontransferrin-bound iron by K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, J A; Inman, R S; Akompong, T; Yu, J; Wessling-Resnick, M

    1998-12-01

    The effect of metabolic inhibitors on nontransferrin bound iron transport by K562 cells was investigated. Incubation with 1 microM rotenone, 10 microM antimycin, or 0.5 mM 2,4-dinitrophenol effectively reduced ATP levels by approximately 50%. Both the rate and extent of Fe+3 uptake were impaired in ATP-depleted cells, which display a reduced Vmax for uptake. K562 cell ferrireductase activity was also lowered by metabolic inhibitors, suggesting that the apparent energy requirements for transport reside in the reduction of Fe+3 to Fe+2. However, ATP depletion was found to inhibit the rate and extent of Fe+2 uptake as well. Thus, the transbilayer passage of Fe+2 and/or Fe+3 appears to be an energy-requiring process. These features possibly reflect properties of the transport mechanism associated with a recently identified K562 cell transport protein, called SFT for "Stimulator of Fe Transport," since exogenous expression of its activity is also affected by ATP depletion.

  3. Drosophila mitoferrin is essential for male fertility: evidence for a role of mitochondrial iron metabolism during spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mammals and Drosophila melanogaster share some striking similarities in spermatogenesis. Mitochondria in spermatids undergo dramatic morphological changes and syncytial spermatids are stripped from their cytoplasm and then individually wrapped by single membranes in an individualization process. In mammalian and fruit fly testis, components of the mitochondrial iron metabolism are expressed, but so far their function during spermatogenesis is unknown. Here we investigate the role of Drosophila mitoferrin (dmfrn), which is a mitochondrial carrier protein with an established role in the mitochondrial iron metabolism, during spermatogenesis. Results We found that P-element insertions into the 5'-untranslated region of the dmfrn gene cause recessive male sterility, which was rescued by a fluorescently tagged transgenic dmfrn genomic construct (dmfrnvenus). Testes of mutant homozygous dmfrnSH115 flies were either small with unorganized content or contained some partially elongated spermatids, or testes were of normal size but lacked mature sperm. Testis squashes indicated that spermatid elongation was defective and electron micrographs showed mitochondrial defects in elongated spermatids and indicated failed individualization. Using a LacZ reporter and the dmfrnvenus transgene, we found that dmfrn expression in testes was highest in spermatids, coinciding with the stages that showed defects in the mutants. Dmfrn-venus protein accumulated in mitochondrial derivatives of spermatids, where it remained until most of it was stripped off during individualization and disposed of in waste bags. Male sterility in flies with the hypomorph alleles dmfrnBG00456 and dmfrnEY01302 over the deletion Df(3R)ED6277 was increased by dietary iron chelation and suppressed by iron supplementation of the food, while male sterility of dmfrnSH115/Df(3R)ED6277 flies was not affected by food iron levels. Conclusions In this work, we show that mutations in the Drosophila mitoferrin gene

  4. Molecular evidence of iron limitation and availability in the global diazotroph Trichodesmium

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Phoebe Dreux; Moffett, James W; Hynes, Annette M; Webb, Eric A

    2012-01-01

    The activity of the N2-fixing cyanobacterial genus Trichodesmium is critical to the global nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) cycles. Although iron (Fe) has been shown to be an important element limiting the growth and N2 fixation of Trichodesmium, there have been no specific data demonstrating the in situ affect of Fe on Trichodesmium. We surveyed Trichodesmium populations from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans for Fe limitation using a novel quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qRT-PCR) method monitoring the expression of an Fe limitation-induced gene, isiB. Here we report the first molecular evidence of in situ Fe limitation of Trichodesmium N2 fixation, which was evident in samples from the Pacific Ocean, whereas limitation appeared minimal to nonexistent in Atlantic Ocean samples. As our method is Trichodesmium clade specific, we were also able to determine that representatives from the Trichodesmium tenue clade were the most biologically active group of Trichodesmium in the majority of our samples, which speaks to their dominance in open ocean regimes. Furthermore, comparisons of our field expression and chemical data with laboratory studies suggest that the majority of dissolved Fe in the open ocean is available to Trichodesmium colonies regardless of Fe complexation. PMID:22402399

  5. [Relation of iron supply and iron metabolism to infectious diseases and parasitoses and the competence of the immune system].

    PubMed

    Kolb, E

    1988-11-01

    In many infectious diseases and in several parasitoses the iron content in the blood plasma occasionally decreases. By reduction of the saturation of the transferrins with iron the bactericidal effect of the blood plasma is increased. In these cases the iron absorption into the liver is increased and the iron excretion from the reticulohistiocytic system decreased. The oral intake of easily soluble iron compounds which goes far beyond the need repeatedly an enteral increase of germs of Yersinia enterocolitica and a transition into the blood, respectively, was stated. The parenteral administration of Fe-dextran from time to time leads to an enrichment of this compound in macrophages, the performance of phagocytosis of which is thus restricted. The iron deficiency decreases the functional capacity of the immune system. The functional ability of the T- and B-lymphocytes as well as of the macrophages is reduced. The importance of the transferrins, of haemopexin, of haptoglobin and of lactoferrin for the defense of infections is demonstrated.

  6. Effects of interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide on macrophage iron metabolism are mediated by nitric oxide-induced degradation of iron regulatory protein 2.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Ponka, P

    2000-03-01

    Iron regulatory proteins (IRP-1 and IRP-2) control the synthesis of transferrin receptors (TfR) and ferritin by binding to iron-responsive elements, which are located in the 3'-untranslated region and the 5'-untranslated region of their respective mRNAs. Cellular iron levels affect binding of IRPs to iron-responsive elements and consequently expression of TfR and ferritin. Moreover, NO(*), a redox species of nitric oxide that interacts primarily with iron, can activate IRP-1 RNA binding activity resulting in an increase in TfR mRNA levels. Recently we found that treatment of RAW 264.7 cells (a murine macrophage cell line) with NO(+) (nitrosonium ion, which causes S-nitrosylation of thiol groups) resulted in a rapid decrease in RNA binding of IRP-2 followed by IRP-2 degradation, and these changes were associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels (Kim, S., and Ponka, P. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 33035-33042). In this study, we demonstrated that stimulation of RAW 264.7 cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increased IRP-1 binding activity, whereas RNA binding of IRP-2 decreased and was followed by a degradation of this protein. Moreover, the decrease of IRP-2 binding/protein levels was associated with a decrease in TfR mRNA levels in LPS/IFN-gamma-treated cells, and these changes were prevented by inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Furthermore, LPS/IFN-gamma-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells showed increased rates of ferritin synthesis. These results suggest that NO(+)-mediated degradation of IRP-2 plays a major role in iron metabolism during inflammation.

  7. Effective use of tea to limit dietary iron available to starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Seibels, Bob; Lamberski, Nadine; Gregory, Christopher R; Slifka, Kerri; Hagerman, Ann E

    2003-09-01

    Wild-caught starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) were fed an iron-enriched diet, with or without supplemental black tea leaves, to determine whether tea-derived tannins would prevent intestinal iron absorption. Hepatic biopsies were obtained to determine hepatic iron concentrations by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Hepatic iron concentrations increased significantly (P = 0.04) in 21 birds that consumed only the iron-enriched diet for 6 mo but not in the 20 birds that consumed the iron-enriched diet with tea leaf supplementation for the same time period. PMID:14582799

  8. Genetic indicators of iron limitation in wild populations of Thalassiosira oceanica from the northeast Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, P Dreux; Whitney, LeAnn P; Wallace, Joselynn R; Darer, Adam I; Jean-Charles, Samua; Jenkins, Bethany D

    2015-01-01

    Assessing the iron (Fe) nutritional status of natural diatom populations has proven challenging as physiological and molecular responses can differ in diatoms of the same genus. We evaluated expression of genes encoding flavodoxin (FLDA1) and an Fe-starvation induced protein (ISIP3) as indicators of Fe limitation in the marine diatom Thalassiosira oceanica. The specificity of the response to Fe limitation was tested in cultures grown under Fe- and macronutrient-deficient conditions, as well as throughout the diurnal light cycle. Both genes showed a robust and specific response to Fe limitation in laboratory cultures and were detected in small volume samples collected from the northeast Pacific, demonstrating the sensitivity of this method. Overall, FLDA1 and ISIP3 expression was inversely related to Fe concentrations and offered insight into the Fe nutritional health of T. oceanica in the field. As T. oceanica is a species tolerant to low Fe, indications of Fe limitation in T. oceanica populations may serve as a proxy for severe Fe stress in the overall diatom community. At two shallow coastal locations, FLD1A and ISIP3 expression revealed Fe stress in areas where dissolved Fe concentrations were high, demonstrating that this approach may be powerful for identifying regions where Fe supply may not be biologically available. PMID:25333460

  9. Limited proteolysis of myoglobin opens channel in ferrochelatase-globin complex for iron to zinc transmetallation.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, Marcella O; Grossi, Alberto B; Dores-Silva, Paulo R; Borges, Julio C; Cardoso, Daniel R; Skibsted, Leif H

    2016-11-01

    Recombinant ferrochelatase (BsFECH) from Bacillus subtilis expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) was found by UV-visible spectroscopy to bind the model substrate tetraphenylporphyrin-sulfonate, TPPS, with Ka=3.8 10(5)mol/L in aqueous phosphate buffer pH 5.7 at 30°C, and to interact with metmyoglobin with Ka=1.07±0.13 10(5)mol/L at 30°C. The iron/zinc exchange in myoglobin occurring during maturation of Parma hams seems to depend on such substrate binding to BsFECH and was facilitated by limited pepsin proteolysis of myoglobin to open a reaction channel for metal exchange still with BsFECH associated to globin. BsFECH increased rate of zinc insertion in TPPS significantly and showed saturation kinetics with an apparent binding constant of Zn(II) to the [enzyme-TPPS] complex of 1.3 10(4)mol/L and a first-order rate constant of 6.6 10(-1)s(-1) for dissociation of the tertiary complex, a similar pattern was found for zinc/iron transmetallation in myoglobin. PMID:27211675

  10. Limited influence of oxygen on the evolution of chemical diversity in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Yoshitake, Ikumi

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen is thought to promote species and biomolecule diversity. Previous studies have suggested that oxygen expands metabolic networks by acquiring metabolites with different chemical properties (higher hydrophobicity, for example). However, such conclusions are typically based on biased evaluation, and are therefore non-conclusive. Thus, we re-investigated the effect of oxygen on metabolic evolution using a phylogenetic comparative method and metadata analysis to reduce the bias as much as possible. Notably, we found no difference in metabolic network expansion between aerobes and anaerobes when evaluating phylogenetic relationships. Furthermore, we showed that previous studies have overestimated or underestimated the degrees of differences in the chemical properties (e.g., hydrophobicity) between oxic and anoxic metabolites in metabolic networks of unicellular organisms; however, such overestimation was not observed when considering the metabolic networks of multicellular organisms. These findings indicate that the contribution of oxygen to increased chemical diversity in metabolic networks is lower than previously thought; rather, phylogenetic signals and cell-cell communication result in increased chemical diversity. However, this conclusion does not contradict the effect of oxygen on metabolic evolution; instead, it provides a deeper understanding of how oxygen contributes to metabolic evolution despite several limitations in data analysis methods. PMID:24958261

  11. The molecular mechanisms of the metabolism and transport of iron in normal and neoplastic cells.

    PubMed

    Richardson, D R; Ponka, P

    1997-03-14

    Iron uptake by mammalian cells is mediated by the binding of serum Tf to the TfR. Transferrin is then internalized within an endocytotic vesicle by receptor-mediated endocytosis and the Fe released from the protein by a decrease in endosomal pH. Apart from this process, several cell types also have other efficient mechanisms of Fe uptake from Tf that includes a process consistent with non-specific adsorptive pinocytosis and a mechanism that is stimulated by small-Mr Fe complexes. This latter mechanism appears to be initiated by hydroxyl radicals generated by the Fe complexes, and may play a role in Fe overload disease where a significant amount of serum non-Tf-bound Fe exists. Apart from Tf-bound Fe uptake, mammalian cells also possess a number of mechanisms that can transport Fe from small-Mr Fe complexes into the cell. In fact, recent studies have demonstrated that the membrane-bound Tf homologue, MTf, can bind and internalize Fe from 59Fe-citrate. However, the significance of this Fe uptake process and its pathophysiological relevance remain uncertain. Iron derived from Tf or small-Mr complexes is probably transported into mammalian cells in the Fe(II) state. Once Fe passes through the membrane, it then becomes part of the poorly characterized intracellular labile Fe pool. Iron in the labile Fe pool that is not used for immediate requirements is stored within the Fe-storage protein, ferritin. Cellular Fe uptake and storage are coordinately regulated through a feedback control mechanism mediated at the post-transcriptional level by cytoplasmic factors known as IRP1 and IRP2. These proteins bind to stem-loop structures known as IREs on the 3 UTR of the TfR mRNA and 5 UTR of ferritin and erythroid delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase mRNAs. Interestingly, recent work has suggested that the short-lived messenger molecule, NO (or its by-product, peroxynitrite), can affect cellular Fe metabolism via its interaction with IRP1. Moreover, NO can decrease Fe uptake from Tf

  12. Influence of lead on repetitive behavior and dopamine metabolism in a mouse model of iron overload.

    PubMed

    Chang, JuOae; Kueon, Chojin; Kim, Jonghan

    2014-12-01

    Exposures to lead (Pb) are associated with neurological problems including psychiatric disorders and impaired learning and memory. Pb can be absorbed by iron transporters, which are up-regulated in hereditary hemochromatosis, an iron overload disorder in which increased iron deposition in various parenchymal organs promote metal-induced oxidative damage. While dysfunction in HFE (High Fe) gene is the major cause of hemochromatosis, the transport and toxicity of Pb in Hfe-related hemochromatosis are largely unknown. To elucidate the relationship between HFE gene dysfunction and Pb absorption, H67D knock-in Hfe-mutant and wild-type mice were given drinking water containing Pb 1.6 mg/ml ad libitum for 6 weeks and examined for behavioral phenotypes using the nestlet-shredding and marble-burying tests. Latency to nestlet-shredding in Pb-treated wild-type mice was prolonged compared with non-exposed wild-types (p < 0.001), whereas Pb exposure did not alter shredding latency in Hfe-mutant mice. In the marble-burying test, Hfe-mutant mice showed an increased number of marbles buried compared with wild-type mice (p = 0.002), indicating more repetitive behavior upon Hfe mutation. Importantly, Pb-exposed wild-type mice buried more marbles than non-exposed wild-types, whereas the number of marbles buried by Hfe-mutant mice did not change whether or not exposed to Pb. These results suggest that Hfe mutation could normalize Pb-induced behavioral alteration. To explore the mechanism of repetitive behavior caused by Pb, western blot analysis was conducted for proteins involved in brain dopamine metabolism. The levels of tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter increased upon Pb exposure in both genotypes, whereas Hfe-mutant mice displayed down-regulation of the dopamine transporter and dopamine D1 receptor with D2 receptor elevated. Taken together, our data support the idea that both Pb exposure and Hfe mutation increase repetitive behavior in mice and further suggest that

  13. The implications of reduced metabolic rate in resource-limited corals.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Lianne M; Edmunds, Peter J; Muller, Erik B; Nisbet, Roger M

    2016-03-01

    Many organisms exhibit depressed metabolism when resources are limited, a change that makes it possible to balance an energy budget. For symbiotic reef corals, daily cycles of light and periods of intense cloud cover can be chronic causes of food limitation through reduced photosynthesis. Furthermore, coral bleaching is common in present-day reefs, creating a context in which metabolic depression could have beneficial value to corals. In the present study, corals (massive Porites spp.) were exposed to an extreme case of resource limitation by starving them of food and light for 20 days. When resources were limited, the corals depressed area-normalized respiration to 37% of initial rates, and coral biomass declined to 64% of initial amounts, yet the corals continued to produce skeletal mass. However, the declines in biomass cannot account for the declines in area-normalized respiration, as mass-specific respiration declined to 30% of the first recorded time point. Thus, these corals appear to be capable of metabolic depression. It is possible that some coral species are better able to depress metabolic rates than others; such variation could explain differential survival during conditions that limit resources (e.g. shading). Furthermore, we found that maintenance of existing biomass, in part, supports the production of skeletal mass. This association could be explained if maintenance supplies needed energy (e.g. ATP) or inorganic carbon (i.e. CO2) that otherwise limits the production of skeletal mass. Finally, the observed metabolic depression can be explained as a change in pool sizes, and does not require a change in metabolic rules. PMID:26823098

  14. Iron in Infection and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Cassat, James E.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for both humans and pathogenic microbes. Because of its ability to exist in one of two oxidation states, iron is an ideal redox catalyst for diverse cellular processes including respiration and DNA replication. However, the redox potential of iron also contributes to its toxicity, thus iron concentration and distribution must be carefully controlled. Given the absolute requirement for iron by virtually all human pathogens, an important facet of the innate immune system is to limit iron availability to invading microbes in a process termed nutritional immunity. Successful human pathogens must therefore possess mechanisms to circumvent nutritional immunity in order to cause disease. In this review, we discuss regulation of iron metabolism in the setting of infection and delineate strategies used by human pathogens to overcome iron-withholding defenses. PMID:23684303

  15. Iron in infection and immunity.

    PubMed

    Cassat, James E; Skaar, Eric P

    2013-05-15

    Iron is an essential nutrient for both humans and pathogenic microbes. Because of its ability to exist in one of two oxidation states, iron is an ideal redox catalyst for diverse cellular processes including respiration and DNA replication. However, the redox potential of iron also contributes to its toxicity; thus, iron concentration and distribution must be carefully controlled. Given the absolute requirement for iron by virtually all human pathogens, an important facet of the innate immune system is to limit iron availability to invading microbes in a process termed nutritional immunity. Successful human pathogens must therefore possess mechanisms to circumvent nutritional immunity in order to cause disease. In this review, we discuss regulation of iron metabolism in the setting of infection and delineate strategies used by human pathogens to overcome iron-withholding defenses. PMID:23684303

  16. Iron sparing and recycling in a compartmentalized cell

    PubMed Central

    Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on economizing, prioritizing and recycling iron in Chlamydomonas, a reference organism for discovering mechanisms of acclimation to poor iron nutrition in the plant lineage. The metabolic flexibility of Chlamydomonas offers a unique opportunity to distinguish the impact of iron nutrition on photosynthetic vs. respiratory metabolism, and the contribution of sub-cellular compartments to iron storage and mobilization. Mechanisms of iron sparing include down regulation of protein abundance by transcript reduction or protein degradation. Two well studied examples of hierarchical iron allocation are the maintenance of FeSOD in the plastid and heterotrophic metabolism in acetate-grown cells at the expense of photosynthetic metabolism. The latter implicates the existence of a pathway for inter-compartment iron recycling when access to iron becomes limiting. PMID:23962818

  17. Iron excess disturbs metabolic status and relative gonad mass in rats on high fat, fructose, and salt diets.

    PubMed

    Suliburska, Joanna; Bogdański, Paweł; Szulińska, Monika

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the metabolic and physiological changes in rats fed a diet high in fat, fructose, and salt, and with excess iron level. Mineral status was also estimated. Wistar rats were assigned to groups fed either a standard control diet (C) or a diet high in fat, fructose, and salt. The noncontrol diets contained either normal (M) or high level (MFe) of iron. After 6 weeks, the length and weight of the rats were measured, and the animals were euthanized. The kidneys and gonads were collected, and blood samples were taken. Serum levels of insulin, nitric oxide, and iron were measured. The iron, zinc, copper, and calcium concentrations of tissues were determined. It was found that the M diet led to a significant increase in the relative kidney mass of the rats compared with the control group. Among the rats fed the M diet, markedly higher serum level of iron and lower levels of zinc and copper were observed in tissues, while significantly higher calcium levels were found in the gonads. The MFe diet resulted in decreased obesity index, insulin level, and nitric oxide serum concentration in the rats, when compared with both the M and C diets. The high iron level in the modified diet increased the relative mass of the gonads. The excess iron level in the diet disturbed the zinc, copper, and calcium status of tissues. The decrease in insulin and nitric oxide in rats fed the diet high in iron, fat, fructose, and salt was associated with disorders of zinc, copper, and calcium status, as well as with an increase in the relative mass of the gonads.

  18. Higher iron pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.) provides more absorbable iron that is limited by increased polyphenolic content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Our objective was to compare the capacity of iron (Fe) biofortified and standard pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.) to deliver Fe for hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis. Pearl millet is the most widely grown type of millet. It is common primarily in West Africa and the Indian subcontinent, and ...

  19. Transcriptional response of Leptospira interrogans to iron limitation and characterization of a PerR homolog

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leptospira interrogans is the causative agent of leptospirosis, a zoonosis of global significance. Iron is essential for growth of most bacterial species. Since availability of iron is low in the host, pathogens have evolved complex iron acquisition mechanisms to survive and establish infection. In ...

  20. Ceruloplasmin expression by human peripheral blood lymphocytes: a new link between immunity and iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Banha, João; Marques, Liliana; Oliveira, Rita; Martins, Maria de Fátima; Paixão, Eleonora; Pereira, Dina; Malhó, Rui; Penque, Deborah; Costa, Luciana

    2008-02-01

    Ceruloplasmin (CP) is a multicopper oxidase involved in the acute phase reaction to stress. Although the physiological role of CP is uncertain, its role in iron (Fe) homeostasis and protection against free radical-initiated cell injury has been widely documented. Previous studies showed the existence of two molecular isoforms of CP: secreted CP (sCP) and a membrane glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored form of CP (GPI-CP). sCP is produced mainly by the liver and is abundant in human serum whereas GPI-CP is expressed in mammalian astrocytes, rat leptomeningeal cells, and Sertolli cells. Herein, we show using RT-PCR that human peripheral blood lymphocytes (huPBL) constitutively express the transcripts for both CP molecular isoforms previously reported. Also, expression of CP in huPBL is demonstrated by immunofluorescence with confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis using cells isolated from healthy blood donors with normal Fe status. Importantly, the results obtained show that natural killer cells have a significantly higher CP expression compared to all other major lymphocyte subsets. In this context, the involvement of lymphocyte-derived CP on host defense processes via its anti/prooxidant properties is proposed, giving further support for a close functional interaction between the immune system and the Fe metabolism.

  1. Effects of nitrogen monoxide and carbon monoxide on molecular and cellular iron metabolism: mirror-image effector molecules that target iron.

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Ralph N; Ponka, Prem; Richardson, Des R

    2003-01-01

    Many effector functions of nitrogen monoxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) are mediated through their high-affinity for iron (Fe). In this review, the roles of NO and CO are examined in terms of their effects on the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in Fe metabolism. Both NO and CO avidly form complexes with a plethora of Fe-containing molecules. The generation of NO and CO is mediated by the nitric oxide synthase and haem oxygenase (HO) families of enzymes respectively. The effects of NO on Fe metabolism have been well characterized, whereas knowledge of the effects of CO remains within its infancy. In terms of the role of NO in Fe metabolism, one of the best characterized interactions includes its effect on the iron regulatory proteins. These molecules are mRNA-binding proteins that control the expression of the transferrin receptor 1 and ferritin, molecules that are involved in Fe uptake and storage respectively. Apart from this, activated macrophages impart their cytotoxic activity by generating NO, which results in marked Fe mobilization from tumour-cell targets. This deprives the cell of the Fe that is required for DNA synthesis and energy production. Considering that HO degrades haem, resulting in the release of CO, Fe(II) and biliverdin, it is suggested that a CO-Fe complex will form. This may account for the rapid Fe mobilization observed from macrophages after haemoglobin catabolism. Intriguingly, overexpression of HO results in cellular Fe mobilization, suggesting that CO has a similar effect to NO on Fe trafficking. Preliminary evidence suggests that, like NO, CO plays important roles in Fe metabolism. PMID:12423201

  2. Volume dependence of the Grüneisen parameter and maximum compression limit for iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanker, J.; Singh, B. P.; Baghel, H. K.

    2007-01-01

    Relationships for the volume dependence of the Grüneisen parameter γ have been used to discuss the behaviour of solids in the limit of infinite pressure ( P→∞). The model recently developed by Burakovsky and Preston (J. Phys. Chem. Solids 65 (2004) 1581) yields γ∞, q∞ and λ∞, the values of Grüneisen parameter γ and its logarithmic volume derivatives q and λ at P→∞, which are found to have fixed values, same for all the solids studied. On the other hand, the thermodynamics of solids at P→∞ formulated by Stacey (Geophys. J. Int. 143 (2000) 621) reveals that γ∞ and pressure derivative of bulk modulus are different for different materials. The empirical formulation for the volume dependence of γ used by Stacey and Davis (Phys. Earth Planet. Intr. 142 (2004) 137) has been shown to be approximately equivalent to the relationship proposed earlier by Al’tshuler et al. (J. Appl. Mech. Tech. Phys. 28 (1987) 129). The shock-pressure data for iron have been used to discuss the maximum compression limit for iron and to emphasize the invalidity of our recent criterion based on the lattice potential energy (Physica B 364 (2005) 186). The Burakovsky-Preston model based on the Thomas-Fermi approximation ( γ∞=1/2 and =5/3) has been found to be more consistent with the shock-compression data. The constraints γ∞>2/3 and >5/3 developed by Stacey are not in agreement with the strong shock compression limit reported for several materials. It is shown here that the Slater formula for γ which was found by Stacey to assume the status of an identity at P→∞ and used by him to derive the constraints for γ∞ and , is invalid when =5/3 It is also pointed out that γ∞=1/2 is to be preferred over γ∞=2/3 because of the thermodynamic constraint >1+ γ∞ developed by Stacey.

  3. MBD5 regulates iron metabolism via methylation-independent genomic targeting of Fth1 through KAT2A in mice.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yunlong; Wu, Qian; Guo, Xin; Zhang, Zhuzhen; Shen, Yuanyuan; Wang, Fudi

    2014-07-01

    Ferritin plays important roles in iron metabolism and controls iron absorption in the intestine. The ferritin subunits ferritin heavy chain (Fth1) and ferritin light chain (Ftl1) are tightly regulated at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. However, mechanisms of maintaining stable, basal expression of Fth1 are poorly understood. Here, we show that global deletion of Mbd5 in mice induces an iron overload phenotype. Liver and serum iron levels in Mbd5(-/-) mice were 3·2-fold and 1·5-fold higher respectively, than wild-type littermates; moreover, serum ferritin was increased >5-fold in the Mbd5(-/-) mice. Mbd5 encodes a member of the methyl-CpG binding domain family; however, the precise function of this gene is poorly understood. Here, we found that intestinal Fth1 mRNA levels were decreased in Mbd5(-/-) mice. Loss of Fth1 expression in the intestine could lead to iron over-absorption. Furthermore, deleting Mbd5 specifically in the intestine resulted in a phenotype similar to that of conditional deletion of Fth1 mice. An Fth1 promoter-report luciferase assay indicated that overexpression of Mbd5 enhanced Fth1 transcription in a dose-dependent manner. Histone H4 acetylation of the Fth1 promoter was reduced in the intestine of Mbd5(-/-) mice and further analysis showed that histone acetyltransferase KAT2A was essential for MBD5-induced Fth1 transcription.

  4. Bile salts affect expression of Escherichia coli O157:H7 genes for virulence and iron acquisition, and promote growth under iron limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Hamner, Steve; McInnerney, Kate; Williamson, Kerry; Franklin, Michael J; Ford, Timothy E

    2013-01-01

    Bile salts exhibit potent antibacterial properties, acting as detergents to disrupt cell membranes and as DNA-damaging agents. Although bacteria inhabiting the intestinal tract are able to resist bile's antimicrobial effects, relatively little is known about how bile influences virulence of enteric pathogens. Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an important pathogen of humans, capable of causing severe diarrhea and more serious sequelae. In this study, the transcriptome response of E. coli O157:H7 to bile was determined. Bile exposure induced significant changes in mRNA levels of genes related to virulence potential, including a reduction of mRNA for the 41 genes making up the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island. Bile treatment had an unusual effect on mRNA levels for the entire flagella-chemotaxis regulon, resulting in two- to four-fold increases in mRNA levels for genes associated with the flagella hook-basal body structure, but a two-fold decrease for "late" flagella genes associated with the flagella filament, stator motor, and chemotaxis. Bile salts also caused increased mRNA levels for seventeen genes associated with iron scavenging and metabolism, and counteracted the inhibitory effect of the iron chelating agent 2,2'-dipyridyl on growth of E. coli O157:H7. These findings suggest that E. coli O157:H7 may use bile as an environmental signal to adapt to changing conditions associated with the small intestine, including adaptation to an iron-scarce environment.

  5. Differential Role of Ferritins in Iron Metabolism and Virulence of the Plant-Pathogenic Bacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937▿

    PubMed Central

    Boughammoura, Aïda; Matzanke, Berthold F.; Böttger, Lars; Reverchon, Sylvie; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Expert, Dominique; Franza, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    During infection, the phytopathogenic enterobacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi has to cope with iron-limiting conditions and the production of reactive oxygen species by plant cells. Previous studies have shown that a tight control of the bacterial intracellular iron content is necessary for full virulence. The E. chrysanthemi genome possesses two loci that could be devoted to iron storage: the bfr gene, encoding a heme-containing bacterioferritin, and the ftnA gene, coding for a paradigmatic ferritin. To assess the role of these proteins in the physiology of this pathogen, we constructed ferritin-deficient mutants by reverse genetics. Unlike the bfr mutant, the ftnA mutant had increased sensitivity to iron deficiency and to redox stress conditions. Interestingly, the bfr ftnA mutant displayed an intermediate phenotype for sensitivity to these stresses. Whole-cell analysis by Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that the main iron storage protein is FtnA and that there is an increase in the ferrous iron/ferric iron ratio in the ftnA and bfr ftnA mutants. We found that ftnA gene expression is positively controlled by iron and the transcriptional repressor Fur via the small antisense RNA RyhB. bfr gene expression is induced at the stationary phase of growth. The σS transcriptional factor is necessary for this control. Pathogenicity tests showed that FtnA and the Bfr contribute differentially to the virulence of E. chrysanthemi depending on the host, indicating the importance of a perfect control of iron homeostasis in this bacterial species during infection. PMID:18165304

  6. Iron Limitation Modulates Ocean Acidification Effects on Southern Ocean Phytoplankton Communities

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Clara J. M.; Hassler, Christel S.; Payne, Christopher D.; Tortell, Philippe D.; Rost, Björn; Trimborn, Scarlett

    2013-01-01

    The potential interactive effects of iron (Fe) limitation and Ocean Acidification in the Southern Ocean (SO) are largely unknown. Here we present results of a long-term incubation experiment investigating the combined effects of CO2 and Fe availability on natural phytoplankton assemblages from the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. Active Chl a fluorescence measurements revealed that we successfully cultured phytoplankton under both Fe-depleted and Fe-enriched conditions. Fe treatments had significant effects on photosynthetic efficiency (Fv/Fm; 0.3 for Fe-depleted and 0.5 for Fe-enriched conditions), non-photochemical quenching (NPQ), and relative electron transport rates (rETR). pCO2 treatments significantly affected NPQ and rETR, but had no effect on Fv/Fm. Under Fe limitation, increased pCO2 had no influence on C fixation whereas under Fe enrichment, primary production increased with increasing pCO2 levels. These CO2-dependent changes in productivity under Fe-enriched conditions were accompanied by a pronounced taxonomic shift from weakly to heavily silicified diatoms (i.e. from Pseudo-nitzschia sp. to Fragilariopsis sp.). Under Fe-depleted conditions, this functional shift was absent and thinly silicified species dominated all pCO2 treatments (Pseudo-nitzschia sp. and Synedropsis sp. for low and high pCO2, respectively). Our results suggest that Ocean Acidification could increase primary productivity and the abundance of heavily silicified, fast sinking diatoms in Fe-enriched areas, both potentially leading to a stimulation of the biological pump. Over much of the SO, however, Fe limitation could restrict this possible CO2 fertilization effect. PMID:24278207

  7. Iron as a Cofactor That Limits the Promotion of Cyanobacteria in Lakes Across a Tropic Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorichetti, R. J.; Creed, I. F.; Trick, C. G.

    2014-12-01

    The frequency and intensity of cyanobacterial blooms (cyanoblooms) is increasing globally. While cyanoblooms in eutrophic (nutrient-rich) freshwater lakes are expected to persist and worsen with climate change projections, many of the "new" cyanobloom reports pertain to oligotrophic (nutrient-poor) freshwater lakes with no prior history of cyanobloom occurrence. Under the pressures of a changing climate, there exists a critical research need to revisit existing conceptual models and identify cyanobloom regulating factors currently unaccounted for. Iron (Fe) is required in nearly all pathways of cyanobacterial macronutrient use, though its precise role in regulating cyanobacterial biomass across the lake trophic gradient is not fully understood. The hypotheses tested were: (1) cyanobacteria will predominate in lakes when bioavailable Fe concentration is low, and (2) cyanobacteria overcome this Fe limitation in all lakes using the siderophore-based Fe acquisition strategy to scavenge Fe providing a competitive advantage over other phytoplankton. These hypotheses were tested using natural lakes across an oligo-meso-eutrophic gradient across Canada. In all lakes sampled, the relative cyanobacterial biomass was highest at low predicted Fe bioavailability (< 1.0 × 10-19 mol L-1). Within this range of low bioavailable Fe, iron-binding organic ligands were measured. Concentrations of ligands with reactive hydroxamate moieties were positively correlated to cyanobacterial biomass in both the oligotrophic (r2 = 0.77, p < 0.001) and eutrophic (r2 = 0.81, p < 0.001) lakes suggesting a possible low-Fe mediated cellular origin, siderophores. Fe-binding ligands with catecholate-type binding sites were detected in all lakes, although lack of a relationship with cyanobacterial biomass and a significant relationship with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in oligotrophic (r2 = 0.65, p < 0.001) and eutrophic (r2 = 0.65, p < 0.001) lakes may indicate an allochthonous source that is not

  8. A proteome analysis of the response of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa oxyR mutant to iron limitation.

    PubMed

    Vinckx, Tiffany; Wei, Qing; Matthijs, Sandra; Noben, Jean-Paul; Daniels, Ruth; Cornelis, Pierre

    2011-06-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa the response to oxidative stress is orchestrated by the LysR regulator OxyR by activation of the transcription of two catalase genes (katA and katB), of the alkyl-hydroxyperoxidases ahpCF and ahpB. Next to the expected high sensitivity to oxidative stress generated by reactive oxygen species (ROS: H(2)O(2), O(2)(-)), the oxyR mutant shows a defective growth under conditions of iron limitation (Vinckx et al. 2008). Although production and uptake of the siderophore pyoverdine is not affected by the absence of oxyR, the mutant is unable to satisfy its need for iron when grown under iron limiting conditions. In order to get a better insight into the effects caused by iron limitation on the physiological response of the oxyR mutant we decided to compare the proteomes of the wild type and the mutant grown in the iron-poor casamino acids medium (CAA), in CAA plus H(2)O(2), and in CAA plus the strong iron chelator ethylenediamine-N,N'-bis(2-hydroxyphenylacetic acid) (EDDHA). Especially in the presence of hydrogen peroxide the oxyR cells increase the production of stress proteins (Dps and IbpA). The superoxide dismutase SodM is produced in higher amounts in the oxyR mutant grown in CAA plus H(2)O(2). The PchB protein, a isochorismate-pyruvate lyase involved in the siderophore pyochelin biosynthesis is not detectable in the extracts from the oxyR mutant grown in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. When cells were grown in the presence of EDDHA, we observed a reduction of the ferric uptake regulator (Fur), and an increase in the two subunits of the succinyl-CoA synthetase and the fumarase FumC1. PMID:21207115

  9. Divergent responses of Atlantic coastal and oceanic Synechococcus to iron limitation.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Katherine R M; Post, Anton F; McIlvin, Matthew R; Cutter, Gregory A; John, Seth G; Saito, Mak A

    2015-08-11

    Marine Synechococcus are some of the most diverse and ubiquitous phytoplankton, and iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient that limits productivity in many parts of the ocean. To investigate how coastal and oceanic Atlantic Synechococcus strains acclimate to Fe availability, we compared the growth, photophysiology, and quantitative proteomics of two Synechococcus strains from different Fe regimes. Synechococcus strain WH8102, from a region in the southern Sargasso Sea that receives substantial dust deposition, showed impaired growth and photophysiology as Fe declined, yet used few acclimation responses. Coastal WH8020, from the dynamic, seasonally variable New England shelf, displayed a multitiered, hierarchical cascade of acclimation responses with different Fe thresholds. The multitiered response included changes in Fe acquisition, storage, and photosynthetic proteins, substitution of flavodoxin for ferredoxin, and modified photophysiology, all while maintaining remarkably stable growth rates over a range of Fe concentrations. Modulation of two distinct ferric uptake regulator (Fur) proteins that coincided with the multitiered proteome response was found, implying the coastal strain has different regulatory threshold responses to low Fe availability. Low nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availability in the open ocean may favor the loss of Fe response genes when Fe availability is consistent over time, whereas these genes are retained in dynamic environments where Fe availability fluctuates and N and P are more abundant. PMID:26216989

  10. Divergent responses of Atlantic coastal and oceanic Synechococcus to iron limitation

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Katherine R. M.; Post, Anton F.; McIlvin, Matthew R.; Cutter, Gregory A.; John, Seth G.; Saito, Mak A.

    2015-01-01

    Marine Synechococcus are some of the most diverse and ubiquitous phytoplankton, and iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient that limits productivity in many parts of the ocean. To investigate how coastal and oceanic Atlantic Synechococcus strains acclimate to Fe availability, we compared the growth, photophysiology, and quantitative proteomics of two Synechococcus strains from different Fe regimes. Synechococcus strain WH8102, from a region in the southern Sargasso Sea that receives substantial dust deposition, showed impaired growth and photophysiology as Fe declined, yet used few acclimation responses. Coastal WH8020, from the dynamic, seasonally variable New England shelf, displayed a multitiered, hierarchical cascade of acclimation responses with different Fe thresholds. The multitiered response included changes in Fe acquisition, storage, and photosynthetic proteins, substitution of flavodoxin for ferredoxin, and modified photophysiology, all while maintaining remarkably stable growth rates over a range of Fe concentrations. Modulation of two distinct ferric uptake regulator (Fur) proteins that coincided with the multitiered proteome response was found, implying the coastal strain has different regulatory threshold responses to low Fe availability. Low nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availability in the open ocean may favor the loss of Fe response genes when Fe availability is consistent over time, whereas these genes are retained in dynamic environments where Fe availability fluctuates and N and P are more abundant. PMID:26216989

  11. Divergent responses of Atlantic coastal and oceanic Synechococcus to iron limitation.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Katherine R M; Post, Anton F; McIlvin, Matthew R; Cutter, Gregory A; John, Seth G; Saito, Mak A

    2015-08-11

    Marine Synechococcus are some of the most diverse and ubiquitous phytoplankton, and iron (Fe) is an essential micronutrient that limits productivity in many parts of the ocean. To investigate how coastal and oceanic Atlantic Synechococcus strains acclimate to Fe availability, we compared the growth, photophysiology, and quantitative proteomics of two Synechococcus strains from different Fe regimes. Synechococcus strain WH8102, from a region in the southern Sargasso Sea that receives substantial dust deposition, showed impaired growth and photophysiology as Fe declined, yet used few acclimation responses. Coastal WH8020, from the dynamic, seasonally variable New England shelf, displayed a multitiered, hierarchical cascade of acclimation responses with different Fe thresholds. The multitiered response included changes in Fe acquisition, storage, and photosynthetic proteins, substitution of flavodoxin for ferredoxin, and modified photophysiology, all while maintaining remarkably stable growth rates over a range of Fe concentrations. Modulation of two distinct ferric uptake regulator (Fur) proteins that coincided with the multitiered proteome response was found, implying the coastal strain has different regulatory threshold responses to low Fe availability. Low nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) availability in the open ocean may favor the loss of Fe response genes when Fe availability is consistent over time, whereas these genes are retained in dynamic environments where Fe availability fluctuates and N and P are more abundant.

  12. Relation between iron metabolism and antioxidants enzymes and δ-ALA-D activity in rats experimentally infected by Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Nathieli B; Mendes, Ricardo E; Baldissera, Matheus D; Bochi, Guilherme V; Moresco, Rafael N; Leal, Marta L R; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria R C; Christ, Ricardo; Gheller, Larissa; Marques, Éder J; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the iron metabolism in serum, as well as antioxidant enzymes, in addition to the Delta-Aminolevulinic Acid Dehydratase (δ-ALA-D) activity in the liver of rats experimentally infected by Fasciola hepatica. Thirty male adult rats (Wistar) specific pathogen free were divided into four groups: two uninfected group (CTRL 1 and CTRL 2) with five animals each and two infected groups (INF 1 and INF 2) with 10 animals each. Infection was performed orally with 20 metacercariae at day 1. On day 15 (CTRL 1 and INF 1 groups) and 87 PI (CTRL 2 and INF 2 groups) blood and bone marrow were collected and the animals were subsequently euthanized for liver sampling. Blood was allocated in tubes without anticoagulant for serum acquisition to measure iron, transferrin and unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC). δ-ALA-D, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activities were measured in the liver. A decrease in iron, transferrin and UIBC levels was observed in all infected animals compared to control groups (P < 0.05). Furthermore, iron accumulation was observed in bone marrow of infected mice. Infected animals showed an increase in δ-ALA-D activity at 87 post-infection (PI) (INF 2) as well as in SOD activity at days 15 (INF 1) and 87 PI (INF 2). On the other hand, CAT activity was reduced in rats infected by F. hepatica during acute and chronic phase of fasciolosis (INF 1 and INF 2 groups), when moderate (acute) and severe necrosis in the liver histopathology were observed. These results may suggest that oxidative damage to tissues along with antioxidant mechanisms might have taken part in fasciolosis pathogenesis and are also involved in iron deficiency associated to changes in δ-ALA-D activity during chronic phase of disease.

  13. Sequestration efficiency in the iron-limited North Atlantic: Implications for iron supply mode to fertilized blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Moigne, Frédéric A. C.; Moore, C. Mark; Sanders, Richard J.; Villa-Alfageme, Maria; Steigenberger, Sebastian; Achterberg, Eric P.

    2014-07-01

    Estimates of the amount of carbon sequestered in the ocean interior per unit iron (Fe) supplied, as quantified by the sequestration efficiency (Ceffx), vary widely. Such variability in Ceffx has frequently been attributed to estimate uncertainty rather than intrinsic variability. Here we derive new estimates of Ceffx for the subpolar North Atlantic, where Fe stressed conditions have recently been demonstrated. Derived values of Ceffx from across the region, including areas subject to atypical external Fe fertilization events during the year of sample collection (2010), ranged from 17 to 19 kmol C (mol Fe-1). Comparing these estimates with values from other systems, considered in the context of variable bloom durations in the different oceanographic settings, we suggest that apparent variability in Ceffx may be related to the mode of Fe delivery.

  14. An insight into the metabolic responses of ultra-small superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide using metabonomic analysis of biofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jianghua; Liu, Huili; Zhang, Limin; Bhakoo, Kishore; Lu, Lehui

    2010-10-01

    Ultra-small superparamagnetic particles of iron oxides (USPIO) have been developed as intravenous organ/tissue-targeted contrast agents to improve magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vivo. However, their potential toxicity and effects on metabolism have attracted particular attention. In the present study, uncoated and dextran-coated USPIO were investigated by analyzing both rat urine and plasma metabonomes using high-resolution NMR-based metabonomic analysis in combination with multivariate statistical analysis. The wealth of information gathered on the metabolic profiles from rat urine and plasma has revealed subtle metabolic changes in response to USPIO administration. The metabolic changes include the elevation of urinary α-hydroxy-n-valerate, o- and p-HPA, PAG, nicotinate and hippurate accompanied by decreases in the levels of urinary α-ketoglutarate, succinate, citrate, N-methylnicotinamide, NAG, DMA, allantoin and acetate following USPIO administration. The changes associated with USPIO administration included a gradual increase in plasma glucose, N-acetyl glycoprotein, saturated fatty acid, citrate, succinate, acetate, GPC, ketone bodies (β-hydroxybutyrate, acetone and acetoacetate) and individual amino acids, such as phenylalanine, lysine, isoleucine, glycine, glutamine and glutamate and a gradual decrease of myo-inositol, unsaturated fatty acid and triacylglycerol. Hence USPIO administration effects are reflected in changes in a number of metabolic pathways including energy, lipid, glucose and amino acid metabolism. The size- and surface chemistry-dependent metabolic responses and possible toxicity were observed using NMR analysis of biofluids. These changes may be attributed to the disturbances of hepatic, renal and cardiac functions following USPIO administrations. The potential biotoxicity can be derived from metabonomic analysis and serum biochemistry analysis. Metabonomic strategy offers a promising approach for the detection of subtle

  15. An update on the transport and metabolism of iron in Listeria monocytogenes: the role of proteins involved in pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Lechowicz, Justyna; Krawczyk-Balska, Agata

    2015-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive bacterium that causes a rare but severe human disease with high mortality rate. The microorganism is widespread in the natural environment where it shows a saprophytic lifestyle. In the human body it infects many different cell types, where it lives intracellularly, however it may also temporarily live extracellularly. The ability to survive and grow in such diverse niches suggests that this bacterium has a wide range of mechanisms for both the acquisition of various sources of iron and effective management of this microelement. In this review, data about the mechanisms of transport, metabolism and regulation of iron, including recent findings in these areas, are summarized with focus on the importance of these mechanisms for the virulence of L. monocytogenes. These data indicate the key role of haem transport and maintenance of intracellular iron homeostasis for the pathogenesis of L. monocytogenes. Furthermore, some of the proteins involved in iron homeostasis like Fri and FrvA seem to deserve special attention due to their potential use in the development of new therapeutic antilisterial strategies. PMID:25820385

  16. Iron Metabolism Dysregulation and Cognitive Dysfunction in Pediatric Obesity: Is There a Connection?

    PubMed Central

    Grandone, Anna; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Perrone, Laura; Miraglia del Giudice, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and iron deficiency (ID) are two of the most common nutritional disorders in the world. In children both conditions deserve particular attention. Several studies revealed an association between obesity and iron deficiency in children and, in some cases, a reduced response to oral supplementation. The connecting mechanism, however, is not completely known. This review is focused on: (1) iron deficiency in obese children and the role of hepcidin in the connection between body fat and poor iron status; (2) iron status and consequences on health, in particular on cognitive function; (3) cognitive function and obesity; (4) suggestion of a possible link between cognitive dysfunction and ID in pediatric obesity; and implications for therapy and future research. PMID:26561830

  17. Iron Metabolism Dysregulation and Cognitive Dysfunction in Pediatric Obesity: Is There a Connection?

    PubMed

    Grandone, Anna; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Perrone, Laura; Del Giudice, Emanuele Miraglia

    2015-11-06

    Obesity and iron deficiency (ID) are two of the most common nutritional disorders in the world. In children both conditions deserve particular attention. Several studies revealed an association between obesity and iron deficiency in children and, in some cases, a reduced response to oral supplementation. The connecting mechanism, however, is not completely known. This review is focused on: (1) iron deficiency in obese children and the role of hepcidin in the connection between body fat and poor iron status; (2) iron status and consequences on health, in particular on cognitive function; (3) cognitive function and obesity; (4) suggestion of a possible link between cognitive dysfunction and ID in pediatric obesity; and implications for therapy and future research.

  18. Alcanivorax borkumensis produces an extracellular siderophore in iron-limitation condition maintaining the hydrocarbon-degradation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Denaro, R; Crisafi, F; Russo, D; Genovese, M; Messina, E; Genovese, L; Carbone, M; Ciavatta, M L; Ferrer, M; Golyshin, P; Yakimov, M M

    2014-10-01

    Obligate marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria possess genetic and physiological features to use hydrocarbons as sole source of carbon and to compete for the uptake of nutrients in usually nutrient-depleted marine habitats. In the present work we have studied the siderophore-based iron uptake systems in Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 and their functioning during biodegradation of an aliphatic hydrocarbon, tetradecane, under iron limitation conditions. The antiSMASH analysis of SK2 genome revealed the presence of two different putative operons of siderophore synthetases. Search for the predicted core structures indicated that one siderophore is clearly affiliated to the family of complex oligopeptidic siderophores possessing an Orn-Ser-Orn carboxyl motif whereas the second one is likely to belong to the family of SA (salicylic acid)-based siderophores. Analyzing the supernatant of SK2 culture, an extracellular siderophore was identified and its structure was resolved. Thus, along with the recently described membrane-associated amphiphilic tetrapeptidic siderophore amphibactin, strain SK2 additionally produces an extracellular type of iron-chelating molecule with structural similarity to pseudomonins. Comparative Q-PCR analysis of siderophore synthetases demonstrated their significant up-regulation in iron-depleted medium. Different expression patterns were recorded for two operons during the early and late exponential phases of growth, suggesting a different function of these two siderophores under iron-depleted conditions.

  19. Alcanivorax borkumensis produces an extracellular siderophore in iron-limitation condition maintaining the hydrocarbon-degradation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Denaro, R; Crisafi, F; Russo, D; Genovese, M; Messina, E; Genovese, L; Carbone, M; Ciavatta, M L; Ferrer, M; Golyshin, P; Yakimov, M M

    2014-10-01

    Obligate marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria possess genetic and physiological features to use hydrocarbons as sole source of carbon and to compete for the uptake of nutrients in usually nutrient-depleted marine habitats. In the present work we have studied the siderophore-based iron uptake systems in Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 and their functioning during biodegradation of an aliphatic hydrocarbon, tetradecane, under iron limitation conditions. The antiSMASH analysis of SK2 genome revealed the presence of two different putative operons of siderophore synthetases. Search for the predicted core structures indicated that one siderophore is clearly affiliated to the family of complex oligopeptidic siderophores possessing an Orn-Ser-Orn carboxyl motif whereas the second one is likely to belong to the family of SA (salicylic acid)-based siderophores. Analyzing the supernatant of SK2 culture, an extracellular siderophore was identified and its structure was resolved. Thus, along with the recently described membrane-associated amphiphilic tetrapeptidic siderophore amphibactin, strain SK2 additionally produces an extracellular type of iron-chelating molecule with structural similarity to pseudomonins. Comparative Q-PCR analysis of siderophore synthetases demonstrated their significant up-regulation in iron-depleted medium. Different expression patterns were recorded for two operons during the early and late exponential phases of growth, suggesting a different function of these two siderophores under iron-depleted conditions. PMID:25088485

  20. The Association of Multiple Biomarkers of Iron Metabolism and Type 2 Diabetes - the EPIC-InterAct Study

    PubMed Central

    Podmore, Clara; Meidtner, Karina; Schulze, Matthias B; Scott, Robert A; Ramond, Anna; Butterworth, Adam S; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Danesh, John; Arriola, Larraitz; Barricarte, Aurelio; Boeing, Heiner; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cross, Amanda J; Dahm, Christina C; Fagherazzi, Guy; Franks, Paul W; Gavrila, Diana; Grioni, Sara; Gunter, Marc J; Gusto, Gaelle; Jakszyn, Paula; Katzke, Verena; Key, Timothy J; Kühn, Tilman; Mattiello, Amalia; Nilsson, Peter M; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Quirós, J. Ramón; Rolandsson, Olov; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Slimani, Nadia; Sluijs, Ivonne; Spijkerman, Annemieke MW; Tjonneland, Anne; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Feskens, Edith JM; Forouhi, Nita G; Sharp, Stephen J; Riboli, Elio; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Observational studies show an association between ferritin and type 2 diabetes (T2D), suggesting a role of high iron stores for T2D development. However, ferritin is influenced by factors other than iron stores, which is less the case for other biomarkers of iron metabolism. We investigate associations of ferritin, transferrin saturation (TSAT), serum iron and transferrin with T2D incidence, to clarify the role of iron in the pathogenesis of T2D. Research and Design Methods The EPIC-InterAct study includes 12,403 incident T2D cases and a representative sub-cohort of 16,154 individuals from a European cohort with 3.99 million person-years of follow-up. We studied the prospective association of ferritin, TSAT, serum iron and transferrin with incident T2D in 11,052 cases and a random sub-cohort of 15,182 individuals and assessed whether these associations differed by subgroups of the population. Results Higher levels of ferritin and transferrin were associated with a higher risk of T2D [HR in men and women, respectively: 1.07 (95% CI: 1.01; 1.12) and 1.12 (1.05; 1.19) per 100 μg/L higher ferritin level; 1.11 (1.00; 1.24) and 1.22 (1.12; 1.33) per 0.5 g/L higher transferrin level] after adjustment for age, centre, BMI, physical activity, smoking status, education, hsCRP, ALT and GGT. Elevated TSAT (≥45% versus <45%) was associated with a lower risk of T2D in women [0.68 (0.54; 0.86)] but was not statistically significantly associated in men [0.90 (0.75; 1.08)]. Serum iron was not associated with T2D. The association of ferritin with T2D was stronger among leaner individuals (pinteraction<0.01). Conclusions The pattern of association of TSAT and transferrin with T2D suggests that the underlying relationship between iron stores and T2D is more complex than the simple link suggested by the association of ferritin with T2D. PMID:26861925

  1. Anaerobic oxidation of ferrous iron by purple bacteria, a new type of phototrophic metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenreich, A; Widdel, F

    1994-01-01

    Anoxic iron-rich sediment samples that had been stored in the light showed development of brown, rusty patches. Subcultures in defined mineral media with ferrous iron (10 mmol/liter, mostly precipitated as FeCO3) yielded enrichments of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria which used ferrous iron as the sole electron donor for photosynthesis. Two different types of purple bacteria, represented by strains L7 and SW2, were isolated which oxidized colorless ferrous iron under anoxic conditions in the light to brown ferric iron. Strain L7 had rod-shaped, nonmotile cells (1.3 by 2 to 3 microns) which frequently formed gas vesicles. In addition to ferrous iron, strain L7 used H2 + CO2, acetate, pyruvate, and glucose as substrate for phototrophic growth. Strain SW2 had small rod-shaped, nonmotile cells (0.5 by 1 to 1.5 microns). Besides ferrous iron, strain SW2 utilized H2 + CO2, monocarboxylic acids, glucose, and fructose. Neither strain utilized free sulfide; however, both strains grew on black ferrous sulfide (FeS) which was converted to ferric iron and sulfate. Strains L7 and SW2 grown photoheterotrophically without ferrous iron were purple to brownish red and yellowish brown, respectively; absorption spectra revealed peaks characteristic of bacteriochlorophyll a. The closest phototrophic relatives of strains L7 and SW2 so far examined on the basis of 16S rRNA sequences were species of the genera Chromatium (gamma subclass of proteobacteria) and Rhodobacter (alpha subclass), respectively. In mineral medium, the new isolates formed 7.6 g of cell dry mass per mol of Fe(II) oxidized, which is in good agreement with a photoautotrophic utilization of ferrous iron as electron donor for CO2 fixation. Dependence of ferrous iron oxidation on light and CO2 was also demonstrated in dense cell suspensions. In media containing both ferrous iron and an organic substrate (e.g., acetate, glucose), strain L7 utilized ferrous iron and the organic compound simultaneously; in contrast, strain

  2. Influence of Iron Chlorosis on Pigment and Protein Metabolism in Leaves of Nicotiana tabacum L. 1

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, A. S.; Miller, G. W.

    1966-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on Nicotiana tabacum, L. to study the relation in the grana among chlorophylls, carotenoids, and proteins. The effect of iron chlorosis on protein and pigment synthesis was studied at different stages of chlorosis using glycine-U-C14. Pigments were separated by thin layer chromatography. Chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, carotenoid, and protein contents of chloroplasts from chlorotic tissue were less than those of normal tissues. A 25% decrease in protein labeling and a 45% decrease in chlorophyll labeling was noted in deficient tissue compared to normal tissue even before chlorosis was perceptible. Both normal and iron deficient leaf discs which received iron in the incubation medium incorporated higher amounts of radioactive glycine into chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b at all stages of development than their respective counterparts not supplied with iron in the incubation medium. The presence of iron in the incubation medium reduced the amount of glycine incorporated into carotenes and xanthophylls, except where the tissue was severely chlorotic. This may be attributed to active competition for glycine between the iron-dependent- (chlorophyll) and iron-independent-(carotenoid) biosynthetic pathways. Incorporation of glycine into chloroplast pigments was lowest at severe chlorosis, probably due to a reduction in the overall enzyme activity. PMID:16656270

  3. Iron metabolism and resistance to infection by invasive bacteria in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Bozzaro, Salvatore; Buracco, Simona; Peracino, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Dictyostelium cells are forest soil amoebae, which feed on bacteria and proliferate as solitary cells until bacteria are consumed. Starvation triggers a change in life style, forcing cells to gather into aggregates to form multicellular organisms capable of cell differentiation and morphogenesis. As a soil amoeba and a phagocyte that grazes on bacteria as the obligate source of food, Dictyostelium could be a natural host of pathogenic bacteria. Indeed, many pathogens that occasionally infect humans are hosted for most of their time in protozoa or free-living amoebae, where evolution of their virulence traits occurs. Due to these features and its amenability to genetic manipulation, Dictyostelium has become a valuable model organism for studying strategies of both the host to resist infection and the pathogen to escape the defense mechanisms. Similarly to higher eukaryotes, iron homeostasis is crucial for Dictyostelium resistance to invasive bacteria. Iron is essential for Dictyostelium, as both iron deficiency or overload inhibit cell growth. The Dictyostelium genome shares with mammals many genes regulating iron homeostasis. Iron transporters of the Nramp (Slc11A) family are represented with two genes, encoding Nramp1 and Nramp2. Like the mammalian ortholog, Nramp1 is recruited to phagosomes and macropinosomes, whereas Nramp2 is a membrane protein of the contractile vacuole network, which regulates osmolarity. Nramp1 and Nramp2 localization in distinct compartments suggests that both proteins synergistically regulate iron homeostasis. Rather than by absorption via membrane transporters, iron is likely gained by degradation of ingested bacteria and efflux via Nramp1 from phagosomes to the cytosol. Nramp gene disruption increases Dictyostelium sensitivity to infection, enhancing intracellular growth of Legionella or Mycobacteria. Generation of mutants in other "iron genes" will help identify genes essential for iron homeostasis and resistance to pathogens.

  4. Iron metabolism and resistance to infection by invasive bacteria in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Bozzaro, Salvatore; Buracco, Simona; Peracino, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Dictyostelium cells are forest soil amoebae, which feed on bacteria and proliferate as solitary cells until bacteria are consumed. Starvation triggers a change in life style, forcing cells to gather into aggregates to form multicellular organisms capable of cell differentiation and morphogenesis. As a soil amoeba and a phagocyte that grazes on bacteria as the obligate source of food, Dictyostelium could be a natural host of pathogenic bacteria. Indeed, many pathogens that occasionally infect humans are hosted for most of their time in protozoa or free-living amoebae, where evolution of their virulence traits occurs. Due to these features and its amenability to genetic manipulation, Dictyostelium has become a valuable model organism for studying strategies of both the host to resist infection and the pathogen to escape the defense mechanisms. Similarly to higher eukaryotes, iron homeostasis is crucial for Dictyostelium resistance to invasive bacteria. Iron is essential for Dictyostelium, as both iron deficiency or overload inhibit cell growth. The Dictyostelium genome shares with mammals many genes regulating iron homeostasis. Iron transporters of the Nramp (Slc11A) family are represented with two genes, encoding Nramp1 and Nramp2. Like the mammalian ortholog, Nramp1 is recruited to phagosomes and macropinosomes, whereas Nramp2 is a membrane protein of the contractile vacuole network, which regulates osmolarity. Nramp1 and Nramp2 localization in distinct compartments suggests that both proteins synergistically regulate iron homeostasis. Rather than by absorption via membrane transporters, iron is likely gained by degradation of ingested bacteria and efflux via Nramp1 from phagosomes to the cytosol. Nramp gene disruption increases Dictyostelium sensitivity to infection, enhancing intracellular growth of Legionella or Mycobacteria. Generation of mutants in other “iron genes” will help identify genes essential for iron homeostasis and resistance to pathogens. PMID

  5. Body iron stores and glucose intolerance in premenopausal women: role of hyperandrogenism, insulin resistance, and genomic variants related to inflammation, oxidative stress, and iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, M Angeles; Luque-Ramírez, Manuel; San-Millán, José L; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F

    2009-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Increased serum ferritin levels and iron stores may be involved in the development of abnormal glucose tolerance in women presenting with obesity and/or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). We aimed to study the determinants of serum ferritin levels in premenopausal women among indexes of insulin resistance, adiposity, hyperandrogenism, and genotypes pertaining to inflammation, oxidative stress, and iron metabolism. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 257 premenopausal women, classified depending on the presence or absence of PCOS, obesity, and/or abnormal glucose tolerance, underwent a complete metabolic evaluation, serum ferritin, haptoglobin, and C-reactive protein (CRP) measurements, and genotyping for proinflammatory and prooxidant variants and mutations in the HFE gene. RESULTS Serum ferritin concentrations were increased in women presenting with PCOS and/or abnormal glucose tolerance, independent of obesity. A stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis (R(2) = 0.18, P < 0.0001) retained menstrual dysfunction (beta = 0.14, P = 0.035), free testosterone (beta = 0.14, P = 0.052), insulin sensitivity index (beta = -0.12, P = 0.012), the His63Asp variant in HFE (beta = 0.16, P = 0.008), and abnormal glucose tolerance (beta = 0.15, P = 0.015) as significant predictors of the logarithm of ferritin levels, whereas CRP, haptoglobin, waist-to-hip ratio, or variants in the TNFalpha, TNFRSF1B, IL6, IL6ST, IL6Ralpha, PON1, and HFE Cys282Tyr mutation exerted no influence. CONCLUSIONS Androgen excess (partly because of hyperandrogenemia and partly because of menstrual dysfunction), insulin resistance, abnormal glucose tolerance, and the HFE His63Asp variant correlate with ferritin levels in premenopausal women.

  6. Dysregulated iron metabolism in the choroid plexus in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Jeanelle; Steward, Craig; Rueckert, Flora; Widdison, Matt; Coffman, Robert; Afjei, Atiyeh; Noctor, Stephen C; Hagerman, Randi; Hagerman, Paul; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2015-02-19

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disorder associated with premutation alleles of the FMR1 gene that is characterized by progressive action tremor, gait ataxia, and cognitive decline. Recent studies of mitochondrial dysfunction in FXTAS have suggested that iron dysregulation may be one component of disease pathogenesis. We tested the hypothesis that iron dysregulation is part of the pathogenic process in FXTAS. We analyzed postmortem choroid plexus from FXTAS and control subjects, and found that in FXTAS iron accumulated in the stroma, transferrin levels were decreased in the epithelial cells, and transferrin receptor 1 distribution was shifted from the basolateral membrane (control) to a predominantly intracellular location (FXTAS). In addition, ferroportin and ceruloplasmin were markedly decreased within the epithelial cells. These alterations have implications not only for understanding the pathophysiology of FXTAS, but also for the development of new clinical treatments that may incorporate selective iron chelation.

  7. The Metabolic Status Drives Acclimation of Iron Deficiency Responses in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as Revealed by Proteomics Based Hierarchical Clustering and Reverse Genetics*

    PubMed Central

    Höhner, Ricarda; Barth, Johannes; Magneschi, Leonardo; Jaeger, Daniel; Niehues, Anna; Bald, Till; Grossman, Arthur; Fufezan, Christian; Hippler, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Iron is a crucial cofactor in numerous redox-active proteins operating in bioenergetic pathways including respiration and photosynthesis. Cellular iron management is essential to sustain sufficient energy production and minimize oxidative stress. To produce energy for cell growth, the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii possesses the metabolic flexibility to use light and/or carbon sources such as acetate. To investigate the interplay between the iron-deficiency response and growth requirements under distinct trophic conditions, we took a quantitative proteomics approach coupled to innovative hierarchical clustering using different “distance-linkage combinations” and random noise injection. Protein co-expression analyses of the combined data sets revealed insights into cellular responses governing acclimation to iron deprivation and regulation associated with photosynthesis dependent growth. Photoautotrophic growth requirements as well as the iron deficiency induced specific metabolic enzymes and stress related proteins, and yet differences in the set of induced enzymes, proteases, and redox-related polypeptides were evident, implying the establishment of distinct response networks under the different conditions. Moreover, our data clearly support the notion that the iron deficiency response includes a hierarchy for iron allocation within organelles in C. reinhardtii. Importantly, deletion of a bifunctional alcohol and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ADH1), which is induced under low iron based on the proteomic data, attenuates the remodeling of the photosynthetic machinery in response to iron deficiency, and at the same time stimulates expression of stress-related proteins such as NDA2, LHCSR3, and PGRL1. This finding provides evidence that the coordinated regulation of bioenergetics pathways and iron deficiency response is sensitive to the cellular and chloroplast metabolic and/or redox status, consistent with systems approach data. PMID:23820728

  8. THE EFFECT OF IRON LIMITATION ON THE PHOTOPHYSIOLOGY OF PHAEOCYSTIS ANTARCTICA (PRYMNESIOPHYCEAE) AND FRAGILARIOPSIS CYLINDRUS (BACILLARIOPHYCEAE) UNDER DYNAMIC IRRADIANCE(1).

    PubMed

    Alderkamp, Anne-Carlijn; Kulk, Gemma; Buma, Anita G J; Visser, Ronald J W; Van Dijken, Gert L; Mills, Matthew M; Arrigo, Kevin R

    2012-02-01

    The effects of iron limitation on photoacclimation to dynamic irradiance were studied in Phaeocystis antarctica G. Karst. and Fragilariopsis cylindrus (Grunow) W. Krieg. in terms of growth rate, photosynthetic parameters, pigment composition, and fluorescence characteristics. Under dynamic light conditions mimicking vertical mixing below the euphotic zone, P. antarctica displayed higher growth rates than F. cylindrus both under iron (Fe)-replete and Fe-limiting conditions. Both species showed xanthophyll de-epoxidation that was accompanied by low levels of nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) during the irradiance maximum of the light cycle. The potential for NPQ at light levels corresponding to full sunlight was substantial in both species and increased under Fe limitation in F. cylindrus. Although the decline in Fv /Fm under Fe limitation was similar in both species, the accompanying decrease in the maximum rate of photosynthesis and growth rate was much stronger in F. cylindrus. Analysis of the electron transport rates through PSII and on to carbon (C) fixation revealed a large potential for photoprotective cyclic electron transport (CET) in F. cylindrus, particularly under Fe limitation. Probably, CET aided the photoprotection in F. cylindrus, but it also reduced photosynthetic efficiency at higher light intensities. P. antarctica, on the other hand, was able to efficiently use electrons flowing through PSII for C fixation at all light levels, particularly under Fe limitation. Thus, Fe limitation enhanced the photophysiological differences between P. antarctica and diatoms, supporting field observations where P. antarctica is found to dominate deeply mixed water columns, whereas diatoms dominate shallower mixed layers.

  9. Testosterone alters iron metabolism and stimulates red blood cell production independently of dihydrotestosterone

    PubMed Central

    Beggs, Luke A.; Yarrow, Joshua F.; Conover, Christine F.; Meuleman, John R.; Beck, Darren T.; Morrow, Matthew; Zou, Baiming; Shuster, Jonathan J.

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone (T) stimulates erythropoiesis and regulates iron homeostasis. However, it remains unknown whether the (type II) 5α-reduction of T to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) mediates these androgenic effects, as it does in some other tissues. Our purpose was to determine whether inhibition of type II 5α-reductase (via finasteride) alters red blood cell (RBC) production and serum markers of iron homeostasis subsequent to testosterone-enanthate (TE) administration in older hypogonadal men. Sixty men aged ≥60 yr with serum T <300 ng/dl or bioavailable T <70 ng/dl received treatment with TE (125 mg/wk) vs. vehicle paired with finasteride (5 mg/day) vs. placebo using a 2 × 2 factorial design. Over the course of 12 mo, TE increased RBC count 9%, hematocrit 4%, and hemoglobin 8% while suppressing serum hepcidin 57% (P < 0.001 for all measurements). Most of the aforementioned changes occurred in the first 3 mo of treatment, and finasteride coadministration did not significantly alter any of these effects. TE also reduced serum ferritin 32% (P = 0.002) within 3 mo of treatment initiation without altering iron, transferrin, or transferrin saturation. We conclude that TE stimulates erythropoiesis and alters iron homeostasis independently of the type II 5α-reductase enzyme. These results demonstrate that elevated DHT is not required for androgen-mediated erythropoiesis or for alterations in iron homeostasis that would appear to support iron incorporation into RBCs. PMID:25074984

  10. Role of a Fur homolog in iron metabolism in Nitrosomonas europaea

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In response to environmental iron concentrations, many bacteria coordinately regulate transcription of genes involved in iron acquisition via the ferric uptake regulation (Fur) system. The genome of Nitrosomonas europaea, an ammonia-oxidizing bacterium, carries three genes (NE0616, NE0730 and NE1722) encoding proteins belonging to Fur family. Results Of the three N. europaea fur homologs, only the Fur homolog encoded by gene NE0616 complemented the Escherichia coli H1780 fur mutant. A N. europaea fur:kanP mutant strain was created by insertion of kanamycin-resistance cassette in the promoter region of NE0616 fur homolog. The total cellular iron contents of the fur:kanP mutant strain increased by 1.5-fold compared to wild type when grown in Fe-replete media. Relative to the wild type, the fur:kanP mutant exhibited increased sensitivity to iron at or above 500 μM concentrations. Unlike the wild type, the fur:kanP mutant was capable of utilizing iron-bound ferrioxamine without any lag phase and showed over expression of several outer membrane TonB-dependent receptor proteins irrespective of Fe availability. Conclusions Our studies have clearly indicated a role in Fe regulation by the Fur protein encoded by N. europaea NE0616 gene. Additional studies are required to fully delineate role of this fur homolog. PMID:21338516

  11. Acidithiobacillus ferriphilus sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic iron- and sulfur-metabolizing extreme acidophile.

    PubMed

    Falagán, Carmen; Johnson, D Barrie

    2016-01-01

    The genus Acidithiobacillus includes three species that conserve energy from the oxidation of ferrous iron, as well as reduced sulfur, to support their growth. Previous work, based on multi-locus sequence analysis, identified a fourth group of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing acidithiobacilli as a potential distinct species. Eleven strains of 'Group IV' acidithiobacilli, isolated from different global locations, have been studied. These were all shown to be obligate chemolithotrophs, growing aerobically by coupling the oxidation of ferrous iron or reduced sulfur (but not hydrogen) to molecular oxygen, or anaerobically by the oxidation of reduced sulfur coupled to ferric iron reduction. All strains were mesophilic, although some were also psychrotolerant. Strain variation was also noted in terms of tolerance to extremely low pH and to elevated concentrations of transition metals. One strain was noted to display far greater tolerance to chloride than reported for other iron-oxidizing acidithiobacilli. All of the strains were able to catalyse the oxidative dissolution of pyrite and, on the basis of some of the combined traits of some of the strains examined, it is proposed that these may have niche roles in commercial mineral bioprocessing operations, such as for low temperature bioleaching of polysulfide ores in brackish waters. The name Acidithiobacillus ferriphilus sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate the strains described, with the type strain being M20T ( = DSM 100412T = JCM 30830T).

  12. Acidithiobacillus ferriphilus sp. nov., a facultatively anaerobic iron- and sulfur-metabolizing extreme acidophile.

    PubMed

    Falagán, Carmen; Johnson, D Barrie

    2016-01-01

    The genus Acidithiobacillus includes three species that conserve energy from the oxidation of ferrous iron, as well as reduced sulfur, to support their growth. Previous work, based on multi-locus sequence analysis, identified a fourth group of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing acidithiobacilli as a potential distinct species. Eleven strains of 'Group IV' acidithiobacilli, isolated from different global locations, have been studied. These were all shown to be obligate chemolithotrophs, growing aerobically by coupling the oxidation of ferrous iron or reduced sulfur (but not hydrogen) to molecular oxygen, or anaerobically by the oxidation of reduced sulfur coupled to ferric iron reduction. All strains were mesophilic, although some were also psychrotolerant. Strain variation was also noted in terms of tolerance to extremely low pH and to elevated concentrations of transition metals. One strain was noted to display far greater tolerance to chloride than reported for other iron-oxidizing acidithiobacilli. All of the strains were able to catalyse the oxidative dissolution of pyrite and, on the basis of some of the combined traits of some of the strains examined, it is proposed that these may have niche roles in commercial mineral bioprocessing operations, such as for low temperature bioleaching of polysulfide ores in brackish waters. The name Acidithiobacillus ferriphilus sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate the strains described, with the type strain being M20T ( = DSM 100412T = JCM 30830T). PMID:26498321

  13. Iron dextran increases hepatic oxidative stress and alters expression of genes related to lipid metabolism contributing to hyperlipidaemia in murine model.

    PubMed

    Silva, Maísa; da Costa Guerra, Joyce Ferreira; Sampaio, Ana Flávia Santos; de Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Pedrosa, Maria Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of iron dextran on lipid metabolism and to determine the involvement of oxidative stress. Fischer rats were divided into two groups: the standard group (S), which was fed the AIN-93M diet, and the standard plus iron group (SI), which was fed the same diet but also received iron dextran injections. Serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were higher in the SI group than in the S group. Iron dextran was associated with decreased mRNA levels of pparα, and its downstream gene cpt1a, which is involved in lipid oxidation. Iron dextran also increased mRNA levels of apoB-100, MTP, and L-FABP indicating alterations in lipid secretion. Carbonyl protein and TBARS were consistently higher in the liver of the iron-treated rats. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was found between oxidative stress products, lfabp expression, and iron stores. In addition, a negative correlation was found between pparα expression, TBARS, carbonyl protein, and iron stores. In conclusion, our results suggest that the increase observed in the transport of lipids in the bloodstream and the decreased fatty acid oxidation in rats, which was promoted by iron dextran, might be attributed to increased oxidative stress. PMID:25685776

  14. Changes in metabolic profile, iron and ferritin levels during the treatment of metastatic renal cancer - A new potential biomarker?

    PubMed

    Golčić, Marin; Petković, Marija

    2016-09-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) develops in approximately 33% of all renal cancer patients. First line treatment of mRCC includes drugs such as sunitinib, temsirolimus and pazopanib, with overall survival now reaching up to 43,6months in patients with favorable-risk metastatic disease. Several side-effects in mRCC treatment, such as hypothyroidism, can be used as positive prognostic factors and indicate good response to therapy. Hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia independent of hypothyroidism are reported as side-effects in temsirolimus treatment and recently in sunitinib treatment, but the exact mechanism and significance of the changes remains elusive. Most likely, metabolic changes are caused by inhibition of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), a positive target of tumor growth suppression, but also a regulator of iron homeostasis. There are no clinical studies reporting changes in iron and ferritin levels during mRCC biotherapy, but we hypothesize that inhibition of mTOR will also affect iron and ferritin levels. If both lipid and iron changes correlate, there is a high possibility that both changes are primarily caused by mTOR inhibition and the level of change should correlate with the inhibition of mTOR pathway and hence the efficacy of targeted treatment. We lastly hypothesize that mRCC biotherapy causes hypercholesterolemia with a possibly improved cholesterol profile due to increase HDL/LDL ratio, so statins might not have a role as supplementary treatment, whereas a sharp rise in triglyceride levels seems to be the primary target for additional therapy. PMID:27515221

  15. Crassulacean acid metabolism under severe light limitation: a matter of plasticity in the shadows?

    PubMed

    Ceusters, Johan; Borland, Anne M; Godts, Christof; Londers, Elsje; Croonenborghs, Sarah; Van Goethem, Davina; De Proft, Maurice P

    2011-01-01

    Despite the increased energetic costs of CAM compared with C(3) photosynthesis, it is hypothesized that the inherent photosynthetic plasticity of CAM allows successful acclimation to light-limiting conditions. The present work sought to determine if CAM presented any constraints to short and longer term acclimation to light limitation and to establish if and how metabolic and photosynthetic plasticity in the deployment of the four phases of CAM might facilitate acclimation to conditions of deep shade. Measurements of leaf gas exchange, organic acids, starch and soluble sugar (glucose, fructose, and sucrose) contents were made in the leaves of the constitutive CAM bromeliad Aechmea 'Maya' over a three month period under severe light limitation. A. 'Maya' was not particularly tolerant of severe light limitation in the short term. A complete absence of net CO(2) uptake and fluctuations in key metabolites (i.e. malate, starch or soluble sugars) indicated a dampened metabolism whilst cell death in the most photosynthetically active leaves was attributed to an over-acidification of the cytoplasm. However, in the longer term, plasticity in the use of the different phases of gas exchange and different storage carbohydrate pools, i.e. a switch from starch to sucrose as the major carbohydrate source, ensured a positive carbon balance for this CAM species under extremely low levels of irradiance. As such, co-ordinated plasticity in the use of C(3) and C(4) carboxylases and different carbohydrate pools together with an increase in the abundance of light-harvesting complexes, appear to underpin the adaptive radiation of the energetically costly CAM pathway within light-limiting environments such as wet cloud forests and shaded understoreys of tropical forests.

  16. Examination of metabolic responses to phosphorus limitation via proteomic analyses in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Tian-Ya; Yang, Zhi-Kai; Zheng, Jian-Wei; Xie, Ying; Li, Da-Wei; Murugan, Shanmugaraj Bala; Yang, Wei-Dong; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Li, Hong-Ye

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient for the survival of marine phytoplankton. In the present study, phytoplankton response to phosphorus limitation was studied by proteomic profiling in diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum in both cellular and molecular levels. A total of 42 non-redundant proteins were identified, among which 8 proteins were found to be upregulated and 34 proteins were downregulated. The results also showed that the proteins associated with inorganic phosphate uptake were downregulated, whereas the proteins involved in organic phosphorus uptake such as alkaline phosphatase were upregulated. The proteins involved in metabolic responses such as protein degradation, lipid accumulation and photorespiration were upregulated whereas energy metabolism, photosynthesis, amino acid and nucleic acid metabolism tend to be downregulated. Overall our results showed the changes in protein levels of P. tricornutum during phosphorus stress. This study preludes for understanding the role of phosphorous in marine biogeochemical cycles and phytoplankton response to phosphorous scarcity in ocean. It also provides insight into the succession of phytoplankton community, providing scientific basis for elucidating the mechanism of algal blooms. PMID:26020491

  17. Examination of metabolic responses to phosphorus limitation via proteomic analyses in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Feng, Tian-Ya; Yang, Zhi-Kai; Zheng, Jian-Wei; Xie, Ying; Li, Da-Wei; Murugan, Shanmugaraj Bala; Yang, Wei-Dong; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Li, Hong-Ye

    2015-05-28

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential macronutrient for the survival of marine phytoplankton. In the present study, phytoplankton response to phosphorus limitation was studied by proteomic profiling in diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum in both cellular and molecular levels. A total of 42 non-redundant proteins were identified, among which 8 proteins were found to be upregulated and 34 proteins were downregulated. The results also showed that the proteins associated with inorganic phosphate uptake were downregulated, whereas the proteins involved in organic phosphorus uptake such as alkaline phosphatase were upregulated. The proteins involved in metabolic responses such as protein degradation, lipid accumulation and photorespiration were upregulated whereas energy metabolism, photosynthesis, amino acid and nucleic acid metabolism tend to be downregulated. Overall our results showed the changes in protein levels of P. tricornutum during phosphorus stress. This study preludes for understanding the role of phosphorous in marine biogeochemical cycles and phytoplankton response to phosphorous scarcity in ocean. It also provides insight into the succession of phytoplankton community, providing scientific basis for elucidating the mechanism of algal blooms.

  18. Early breast cancer screening using iron/iron oxide-based nanoplatforms with sub-femtomolar limits of detection.

    PubMed

    Udukala, Dinusha N; Wang, Hongwang; Wendel, Sebastian O; Malalasekera, Aruni P; Samarakoon, Thilani N; Yapa, Asanka S; Abayaweera, Gayani; Basel, Matthew T; Maynez, Pamela; Ortega, Raquel; Toledo, Yubisela; Bossmann, Leonie; Robinson, Colette; Janik, Katharine E; Koper, Olga B; Li, Ping; Motamedi, Massoud; Higgins, Daniel A; Gadbury, Gary; Zhu, Gaohong; Troyer, Deryl L; Bossmann, Stefan H

    2016-01-01

    Proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue serine proteases, and cathepsins (CTS) exhibit numerous functions in tumor biology. Solid tumors are characterized by changes in protease expression levels by tumor and surrounding tissue. Therefore, monitoring protease levels in tissue samples and liquid biopsies is a vital strategy for early cancer detection. Water-dispersable Fe/Fe3O4-core/shell based nanoplatforms for protease detection are capable of detecting protease activity down to sub-femtomolar limits of detection. They feature one dye (tetrakis(carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (TCPP)) that is tethered to the central nanoparticle by means of a protease-cleavable consensus sequence and a second dye (Cy 5.5) that is directly linked. Based on the protease activities of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), MMPs 1, 2, 3, 7, 9, and 13, as well as CTS B and L, human breast cancer can be detected at stage I by means of a simple serum test. By monitoring CTS B and L stage 0 detection may be achieved. This initial study, comprised of 46 breast cancer patients and 20 apparently healthy human subjects, demonstrates the feasibility of protease-activity-based liquid biopsies for early cancer diagnosis.

  19. The lysine biosynthetic enzyme Lys4 influences iron metabolism, mitochondrial function and virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Do, Eunsoo; Park, Minji; Hu, Guanggan; Caza, Mélissa; Kronstad, James W; Jung, Won Hee

    2016-09-01

    The lysine biosynthesis pathway via α-aminoadipate in fungi is considered an attractive target for antifungal drugs due to its absence in mammalian hosts. The iron-sulfur cluster-containing enzyme homoaconitase converts homocitrate to homoisocitrate in the lysine biosynthetic pathway, and is encoded by LYS4 in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we identified the ortholog of LYS4 in the human fungal pathogen, Cryptococcus neoformans, and found that LYS4 expression is regulated by iron levels and by the iron-related transcription factors Hap3 and HapX. Deletion of the LYS4 gene resulted in lysine auxotrophy suggesting that Lys4 is essential for lysine biosynthesis. Our study also revealed that lysine uptake was mediated by two amino acid permeases, Aap2 and Aap3, and influenced by nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). Furthermore, the lys4 mutant showed increased sensitivity to oxidative stress, agents that challenge cell wall/membrane integrity, and azole antifungal drugs. We showed that these phenotypes were due in part to impaired mitochondrial function as a result of LYS4 deletion, which we propose disrupts iron homeostasis in the organelle. The combination of defects are consistent with our observation that the lys4 mutant was attenuated virulence in a mouse inhalation model of cryptococcosis. PMID:27353379

  20. Diurnal variation in the coupling of photosynthetic electron transport and carbon fixation in iron-limited phytoplankton in the NE subarctic Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuback, Nina; Flecken, Mirkko; Maldonado, Maria T.; Tortell, Philippe D.

    2016-02-01

    Active chlorophyll a fluorescence approaches, including fast repetition rate fluorometry (FRRF), have the potential to provide estimates of phytoplankton primary productivity at an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. FRRF-derived productivity rates are based on estimates of charge separation in reaction center II (ETRRCII), which must be converted into ecologically relevant units of carbon fixation. Understanding sources of variability in the coupling of ETRRCII and carbon fixation provides physiological insight into phytoplankton photosynthesis and is critical for the application of FRRF as a primary productivity measurement tool. In the present study, we simultaneously measured phytoplankton carbon fixation and ETRRCII in the iron-limited NE subarctic Pacific over the course of a diurnal cycle. We show that rates of ETRRCII are closely tied to the diurnal cycle in light availability, whereas rates of carbon fixation appear to be influenced by endogenous changes in metabolic energy allocation under iron-limited conditions. Unsynchronized diurnal oscillations of the two rates led to 3.5-fold changes in the conversion factor between ETRRCII and carbon fixation (Kc / nPSII). Consequently, diurnal variability in phytoplankton carbon fixation cannot be adequately captured with FRRF approaches if a constant conversion factor is applied. Utilizing several auxiliary photophysiological measurements, we observed that a high conversion factor is associated with conditions of excess light and correlates with the increased expression of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) in the pigment antenna, as derived from FRRF measurements. The observed correlation between NPQ and Kc / nPSII requires further validation but has the potential to improve estimates of phytoplankton carbon fixation rates from FRRF measurements alone.

  1. Diurnal variation in the coupling of photosynthetic electron transport and carbon fixation in iron-limited phytoplankton in the NE subarctic Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuback, N.; Flecken, M.; Maldonado, M. T.; Tortell, P. D.

    2015-10-01

    Active chlorophyll a fluorescence approaches, including fast repetition rate fluorometry (FRRF), have the potential to provide estimates of phytoplankton primary productivity at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. FRRF-derived productivity rates are based on estimates of charge separation at PSII (ETRRCII), which must be converted into ecologically relevant units of carbon fixation. Understanding sources of variability in the coupling of ETRRCII and carbon fixation provides physiological insight into phytoplankton photosynthesis, and is critical for the application of FRRF as a primary productivity measurement tool. In the present study, we simultaneously measured phytoplankton carbon fixation and ETRRCII in the iron-limited NE subarctic Pacific, over the course of a diurnal cycle. We show that rates of ETRRCII are closely tied to the diurnal cycle in light availability, whereas rates of carbon fixation appear to be influenced by endogenous changes in metabolic energy allocation under iron-limited conditions. Unsynchronized diurnal oscillations of the two rates led to 3.5 fold changes in the conversion factor coupling ETRRCII and carbon fixation (Φe:C / nPSII). Consequently, diurnal variability in phytoplankton carbon fixation cannot be adequately captured with FRRF approaches if a constant conversion factor is applied. Utilizing several auxiliary photophysiological measurements, we observed that a high conversion factor is associated with conditions of excess light, and correlates with the expression of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) in the pigment antenna, as derived from FRRF measurements. The observed correlation between NPQ and the conversion factor Φe:C / nPSII has the potential to improve estimates of phytoplankton carbon fixation rates from FRRF measurements alone.

  2. Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α Controls Iron Metabolism and Regulates Transferrin Receptor 2 in Mouse Liver*

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Shunsuke; Ogawa, Masayuki; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Mizui, Yumiko; Sasaki, Shota; Fujimura, Takafumi; Takizawa, Masayuki; Ariga, Nagayuki; Ozaki, Hiroaki; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Inoue, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential element in biological systems, but excess iron promotes the formation of reactive oxygen species, resulting in cellular toxicity. Several iron-related genes are highly expressed in the liver, a tissue in which hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) plays a critical role in controlling gene expression. Therefore, the role of hepatic HNF4α in iron homeostasis was examined using liver-specific HNF4α-null mice (Hnf4aΔH mice). Hnf4aΔH mice exhibit hypoferremia and a significant change in hepatic gene expression. Notably, the expression of transferrin receptor 2 (Tfr2) mRNA was markedly decreased in Hnf4aΔH mice. Promoter analysis of the Tfr2 gene showed that the basal promoter was located at a GC-rich region upstream of the transcription start site, a region that can be transactivated in an HNF4α-independent manner. HNF4α-dependent expression of Tfr2 was mediated by a proximal promoter containing two HNF4α-binding sites located between the transcription start site and the translation start site. Both the GC-rich region of the basal promoter and the HNF4α-binding sites were required for maximal transactivation. Moreover, siRNA knockdown of HNF4α suppressed TFR2 expression in human HCC cells. These results suggest that Tfr2 is a novel target gene for HNF4α, and hepatic HNF4α plays a critical role in iron homeostasis. PMID:26527688

  3. Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 4α Controls Iron Metabolism and Regulates Transferrin Receptor 2 in Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Shunsuke; Ogawa, Masayuki; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Mizui, Yumiko; Sasaki, Shota; Fujimura, Takafumi; Takizawa, Masayuki; Ariga, Nagayuki; Ozaki, Hiroaki; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Gonzalez, Frank J; Inoue, Yusuke

    2015-12-25

    Iron is an essential element in biological systems, but excess iron promotes the formation of reactive oxygen species, resulting in cellular toxicity. Several iron-related genes are highly expressed in the liver, a tissue in which hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) plays a critical role in controlling gene expression. Therefore, the role of hepatic HNF4α in iron homeostasis was examined using liver-specific HNF4α-null mice (Hnf4a(ΔH) mice). Hnf4a(ΔH) mice exhibit hypoferremia and a significant change in hepatic gene expression. Notably, the expression of transferrin receptor 2 (Tfr2) mRNA was markedly decreased in Hnf4a(ΔH) mice. Promoter analysis of the Tfr2 gene showed that the basal promoter was located at a GC-rich region upstream of the transcription start site, a region that can be transactivated in an HNF4α-independent manner. HNF4α-dependent expression of Tfr2 was mediated by a proximal promoter containing two HNF4α-binding sites located between the transcription start site and the translation start site. Both the GC-rich region of the basal promoter and the HNF4α-binding sites were required for maximal transactivation. Moreover, siRNA knockdown of HNF4α suppressed TFR2 expression in human HCC cells. These results suggest that Tfr2 is a novel target gene for HNF4α, and hepatic HNF4α plays a critical role in iron homeostasis.

  4. Hepcidin and Iron Metabolism in Pregnancy: Correlation with Smoking and Birth Weight and Length.

    PubMed

    Chełchowska, Magdalena; Ambroszkiewicz, Jadwiga; Gajewska, Joanna; Jabłońska-Głąb, Ewa; Maciejewski, Tomasz M; Ołtarzewski, Mariusz

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the effect of tobacco smoking on iron homeostasis and the possible association between hepcidin and the neonatal birth weight and length, concentrations of serum hepcidin and selected iron markers were measured in 81 healthy pregnant women (41 smokers and 40 nonsmokers). The smoking mothers had significantly lower concentrations of serum hepcidin (p < 0.001), iron (p < 0.001), and hemoglobin (p < 0.05), but higher erythropoietin (p < 0.05) levels compared with non-smoking pregnant women. Logistic regression analysis showed the highest negative impact of the number of cigarettes smoked per day (β = -0.46; p < 0.01) and positive impact of ferritin level (β = 0.47; p < 0.001) on serum hepcidin concentration. The birth weight and the body length of smoking mothers' infants were significantly lower than in tobacco abstinent group (p < 0.001). In multiple regression analysis, birth body weight (β = 0.56; p < 0.001) and length (β = 0.50; p < 0.001) were significantly related to maternal hepcidin values. Tobacco smoking affected hepcidin level in serum of pregnant women in a dose-dependent manner. Low concentrations of iron and hemoglobin in maternal serum coexisting with high level of erythropoietin suggest that smoking could lead to subclinical iron deficiency and chronic hypoxia not only in mothers but also in fetus. Low serum hepcidin concentration in smoking pregnant women might be associated with lower fetal birth weight and length. PMID:26785641

  5. Oral administration of iron-saturated bovine lactoferrin–loaded ceramic nanocapsules for breast cancer therapy and influence on iron and calcium metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mahidhara, Ganesh; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-01-01

    We determined the anticancer efficacy and internalization mechanism of our polymeric–ceramic nanoparticle system (calcium phosphate nanocores, enclosed in biodegradable polymers chitosan and alginate nanocapsules/nanocarriers [ACSC NCs]) loaded with iron-saturated bovine lactoferrin (Fe-bLf) in a breast cancer xenograft model. ACSC-Fe-bLf NCs with an overall size of 322±27.2 nm were synthesized. In vitro internalization and anticancer efficacy were evaluated in the MDA-MB-231 cells using multicellular tumor spheroids, CyQUANT and MTT assays. These NCs were orally delivered in a breast cancer xenograft mice model, and their internalization, cytotoxicity, biodistribution, and anticancer efficacy were evaluated. Chitosan-coated calcium phosphate Fe-bLf NCs effectively (59%, P≤0.005) internalized in a 1-hour period using clathrin-mediated endocytosis (P≤0.05) and energy-mediated pathways (P≤0.05) for internalization; 3.3 mg/mL of ACSC-Fe-bLf NCs completely disintegrated (~130-fold reduction, P≤0.0005) the tumor spheroids in 72 hours and 96 hours. The IC50 values determined for ACSC-Fe-bLf NCs were 1.69 mg/mL at 10 hours and 1.62 mg/mL after 20 hours. We found that Fe-bLf-NCs effectively (P≤0.05) decreased the tumor size (4.8-fold) compared to the void NCs diet and prevented tumor recurrence when compared to intraperitoneal injection of Taxol and Doxorubicin. Receptor gene expression and micro-RNA analysis confirmed upregulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and transferrin receptor (liver, intestine, and brain). Several micro-RNAs responsible for iron metabolism upregulated with NCs were identified. Taken together, orally delivered Fe-bLf NCs offer enhanced antitumor activity in breast cancer by internalizing via low-density lipoprotein receptor and transferrin receptor and regulating the micro-RNA expression. These NCs also restored the body iron and calcium levels and increased the hematologic counts. PMID:26124661

  6. Multiple phase transitions in Pauli-limited iron-based superconductors.

    PubMed

    Ptok, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    Specific heat measurements have been successfully used to probe unconventional superconducting phases in one-band heavy-fermion and organic superconductors. We extend the method to study successive phase transitions in multi-band materials such as iron-based superconductors. The signatures are multiple peaks in the specific heat, at low temperatures and high magnetic field, which can lead to the experimental verification of unconventional superconducting states with non-zero total momentum. PMID:26569450

  7. Iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  8. Metabolic flexibility of the Fe(II)-oxidizing phototropic strain Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE1 and its potential role in microbial iron cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, C.; Oswald, K.; Melton, E. D.; Kappler, A.

    2012-04-01

    The biogeochemical conversion of iron(II) and iron(III) is widespread in many aquatic and terrestrial environments. In the anoxic regime of soils and sediments the conversion and alternation of the iron redox state is predominantly run by microorganisms that are thought to gain life-sustaining energy by the oxidation and/or reduction of ferrous/ferric components. The spatial arrangement of microbial iron(II) oxidation and iron(III) reduction is largely controlled by the availability of the required electron acceptor and electron donor, as well as the essential source of energy (i.e. light or chemical energy). The physico-chemical patterns of many microbial environments undergo dynamic variations (i.e. diurnal and seasonal changes) as a function of natural external forces (i.e. seasonality, storm events, algae blooms) which strongly affects the local budget of organic carbon and nutrients, as well as the day light penetration. Such fluctuations force microorganisms either to follow the flow of substrate or to switch their metabolism to alternative electron acceptors and/or donors. Different photoferrotrophic bacteria have been shown to be able to grow either on organic (heterotrophic) or inorganic (autotrophic) substrates while exploiting light as their energy source. Within the frame of this study the preference for organic substrates (lactate and acetate) and/or ferrous iron (in simultaneous presence) for photo(ferro)trophic growth of Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE1 has been investigated in detail. Rates of iron oxidation, acetate/lactate consumption and growth have been followed over time as a function of different lactate to acetate to iron(II) ratios. Additional experiments have been designed to evaluate the potential of Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE1 to contribute to the redox cycling of iron. TIE1 has been grown in a batch set-up in which the iron(III)-reducing strain Shewanella oneidensis MR1 has been incubated at different ferrihydrite concentrations in

  9. New insights into the human body iron metabolism analyzed by a Petri net based approach.

    PubMed

    Sackmann, Andrea; Formanowicz, Dorota; Formanowicz, Piotr; Blazewicz, Jacek

    2009-04-01

    Iron homeostasis is one of the most important biochemical processes in the human body. Despite this fact, the process is not fully understood and until recently only rough descriptions of parts of the process could be found in the literature. Here, an extension of the recently published formal model of the main part of the process is presented. This extension consists in including all known mechanisms of hepcidin regulation. Hepcidin is a hormone synthesized in the liver which is mainly responsible for an inhibition of iron absorption in the small intestine during an inflammatory process. The model is expressed in the language of Petri net theory which allows for its relatively easy analysis and simulation.

  10. Effect of saccharated ferric oxide and iron dextran on the metabolism of phosphorus in rats.

    PubMed

    Sanai, Toru; Oochi, Nobuaki; Okada, Mitsuo; Imamura, Kenzaburo; Okuda, Seiya; Iida, Mitsuo

    2005-07-01

    As a means of investigating the physiologic damage to and histologic deterioration of the kidney caused by saccharated ferric oxide (SFO) and iron dextran (ID), we administered these substances intraperitoneally to rats. The rats were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 rats ( n = 7) were given SFO, 28 mg/kg for 9 days and 20 mg/kg for 19 days. Group 2 rats ( n = 5) were given ID, 28 mg/kg for 9 days and 20 mg/kg for 19 days. Group 3 rats (control, n = 9) were given normal saline solution. After 28 days, serum calcium, total protein, and albumin concentrations were significantly lower in the SFO group than in the ID group. Serum phosphorus concentrations were significantly lower in the SFO group than in the control group. Serum iron concentrations were significantly higher in the ID group than in the SFO group or the control, and the fractional excretion of sodium was significantly lower in the ID group than in the control group. The percent tubular reabsorption of phosphorus was significantly greater in the ID group than in the SFO group or the control group, and the theoretical threshold concentration of phosphorus was also significantly lower in the SFO group than in the ID or the control group. Histologic examination of the kidney after treatment revealed neither iron in the tubules nor any structural damage to the tubules. ID was not found to induce hypophosphatemia, whereas SFO did. We believe that the cause of such hypophosphatemia is impaired tubular reabsorption.

  11. Role of secondary metabolites in the interaction between Pseudomonas fluorescens and soil microorganisms under iron-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Deveau, Aurélie; Gross, Harald; Palin, Béatrice; Mehnaz, Samina; Schnepf, Max; Leblond, Pierre; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Aigle, Bertrand

    2016-08-01

    Microorganisms can be versatile in their interactions with each other, being variously beneficial, neutral or antagonistic in their effect. Although this versatility has been observed among many microorganisms and in many environments, little is known regarding the mechanisms leading to these changes in behavior. In the present work, we analyzed the mechanism by which the soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8 shifts from stimulating the growth of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor S238N to killing the fungus. We show that among the three secondary metabolites produced by the bacterial strain-the siderophores enantio-pyochelin and pyoverdine, and the biosurfactant viscosin-the siderophores are mainly responsible for the antagonistic activity of the bacterium under iron-limited conditions. While the bacterial strain continues to produce beneficial factors, their effects are overridden by the action of their siderophores. This antagonistic activity of the strain P. fluorescens BBC6R8 in iron-depleted environments is not restricted to its influence on L. bicolor, since it was also seen to inhibit the growth of the actinomycete Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877. We show that the strain P. fluorescens BBc6R8 uses different strategies to acquire iron, depending on certain biotic and abiotic factors. PMID:27199346

  12. Microbial communities from different subsystems in biological heap leaching system play different roles in iron and sulfur metabolisms.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yunhua; Liu, Xueduan; Ma, Liyuan; Liang, Yili; Niu, Jiaojiao; Gu, Yabing; Zhang, Xian; Hao, Xiaodong; Dong, Weiling; She, Siyuan; Yin, Huaqun

    2016-08-01

    The microbial communities are important for minerals decomposition in biological heap leaching system. However, the differentiation and relationship of composition and function of microbial communities between leaching heap (LH) and leaching solution (LS) are still unclear. In this study, 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to assess the microbial communities from the two subsystems in ZiJinShan copper mine (Fujian province, China). Results of PCoA and dissimilarity test showed that microbial communities in LH samples were significantly different from those in LS samples. The dominant genera of LH was Acidithiobacillus (57.2 ∼ 87.9 %), while Leptospirillum (48.6 ∼ 73.7 %) was predominant in LS. Environmental parameters (especially pH) were the major factors to influence the composition and structure of microbial community by analysis of Mantel tests. Results of functional test showed that microbial communities in LH utilized sodium thiosulfate more quickly and utilized ferrous sulfate more slowly than those in LS, which further indicated that the most sulfur-oxidizing processes of bioleaching took place in LH and the most iron-oxidizing processes were in LS. Further study found that microbial communities in LH had stronger pyrite leaching ability, and iron extraction efficiency was significantly positively correlated with Acidithiobacillus (dominated in LH), which suggested that higher abundance ratio of sulfur-oxidizing microbes might in favor of minerals decomposition. Finally, a conceptual model was designed through the above results to better exhibit the sulfur and iron metabolism in bioleaching systems. PMID:27094188

  13. Development of a Quantitative SRM-Based Proteomics Method to Study Iron Metabolism of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Vuorijoki, Linda; Isojärvi, Janne; Kallio, Pauli; Kouvonen, Petri; Aro, Eva-Mari; Corthals, Garry L; Jones, Patrik R; Muth-Pawlak, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (S. 6803) is a well-established model species in oxygenic photosynthesis research and a potential host for biotechnological applications. Despite recent advances in genome sequencing and microarray techniques applied in systems biology, quantitative proteomics approaches with corresponding accuracy and depth are scarce for S. 6803. In this study, we developed a protocol to screen changes in the expression of 106 proteins representing central metabolic pathways in S. 6803 with a targeted mass spectrometry method, selected reaction monitoring (SRM). We evaluated the response to the exposure of both short- and long-term iron deprivation. The experimental setup enabled the relative quantification of 96 proteins, with 87 and 92 proteins showing adjusted p-values <0.01 under short- and long-term iron deficiency, respectively. The high sensitivity of the SRM method for S. 6803 was demonstrated by providing quantitative data for altogether 64 proteins that previously could not be detected with the classical data-dependent MS approach under similar conditions. This highlights the effectiveness of SRM for quantification and extends the analytical capability to low-abundance proteins in unfractionated samples of S. 6803. The SRM assays and other generated information are now publicly available via PASSEL and Panorama.

  14. Development of a Quantitative SRM-Based Proteomics Method to Study Iron Metabolism of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Vuorijoki, Linda; Isojärvi, Janne; Kallio, Pauli; Kouvonen, Petri; Aro, Eva-Mari; Corthals, Garry L; Jones, Patrik R; Muth-Pawlak, Dorota

    2016-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (S. 6803) is a well-established model species in oxygenic photosynthesis research and a potential host for biotechnological applications. Despite recent advances in genome sequencing and microarray techniques applied in systems biology, quantitative proteomics approaches with corresponding accuracy and depth are scarce for S. 6803. In this study, we developed a protocol to screen changes in the expression of 106 proteins representing central metabolic pathways in S. 6803 with a targeted mass spectrometry method, selected reaction monitoring (SRM). We evaluated the response to the exposure of both short- and long-term iron deprivation. The experimental setup enabled the relative quantification of 96 proteins, with 87 and 92 proteins showing adjusted p-values <0.01 under short- and long-term iron deficiency, respectively. The high sensitivity of the SRM method for S. 6803 was demonstrated by providing quantitative data for altogether 64 proteins that previously could not be detected with the classical data-dependent MS approach under similar conditions. This highlights the effectiveness of SRM for quantification and extends the analytical capability to low-abundance proteins in unfractionated samples of S. 6803. The SRM assays and other generated information are now publicly available via PASSEL and Panorama. PMID:26652789

  15. Transport and metabolism of fumaric acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae in aerobic glucose-limited chemostat culture.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mihir V; van Mastrigt, Oscar; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M

    2016-04-01

    Currently, research is being focused on the industrial-scale production of fumaric acid and other relevant organic acids from renewable feedstocks via fermentation, preferably at low pH for better product recovery. However, at low pH a large fraction of the extracellular acid is present in the undissociated form, which is lipophilic and can diffuse into the cell. There have been no studies done on the impact of high extracellular concentrations of fumaric acid under aerobic conditions in S. cerevisiae, which is a relevant issue to study for industrial-scale production. In this work we studied the uptake and metabolism of fumaric acid in S. cerevisiae in glucose-limited chemostat cultures at a cultivation pH of 3.0 (pH < pK). Steady states were achieved with different extracellular levels of fumaric acid, obtained by adding different amounts of fumaric acid to the feed medium. The experiments were carried out with the wild-type S. cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-7D and an engineered S. cerevisiae ADIS 244 expressing a heterologous dicarboxylic acid transporter (DCT-02) from Aspergillus niger, to examine whether it would be capable of exporting fumaric acid. We observed that fumaric acid entered the cells most likely via passive diffusion of the undissociated form. Approximately two-thirds of the fumaric acid in the feed was metabolized together with glucose. From metabolic flux analysis, an increased ATP dissipation was observed only at high intracellular concentrations of fumarate, possibly due to the export of fumarate via an ABC transporter. The implications of our results for the industrial-scale production of fumaric acid are discussed. PMID:26683700

  16. Partitioning the metabolic scope: the importance of anaerobic metabolism and implications for the oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Ejbye-Ernst, Rasmus; Michaelsen, Thomas Y.; Tirsgaard, Bjørn; Wilson, Jonathan M.; Jensen, Lasse F.; Steffensen, John F.; Pertoldi, Cino; Aarestrup, Kim; Svendsen, Jon C.

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing climate change is predicted to affect the distribution and abundance of aquatic ectotherms owing to increasing constraints on organismal physiology, in particular involving the metabolic scope (MS) available for performance and fitness. The oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) hypothesis prescribes MS as an overarching benchmark for fitness-related performance and assumes that any anaerobic contribution within the MS is insignificant. The MS is typically derived from respirometry by subtracting standard metabolic rate from the maximal metabolic rate; however, the methodology rarely accounts for anaerobic metabolism within the MS. Using gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), this study tested for trade-offs (i) between aerobic and anaerobic components of locomotor performance; and (ii) between the corresponding components of the MS. Data collection involved measuring oxygen consumption rate at increasing swimming speeds, using the gait transition from steady to unsteady (burst-assisted) swimming to detect the onset of anaerobic metabolism. Results provided evidence of the locomotor performance trade-off, but only in S. aurata. In contrast, both species revealed significant negative correlations between aerobic and anaerobic components of the MS, indicating a trade-off where both components of the MS cannot be optimized simultaneously. Importantly, the fraction of the MS influenced by anaerobic metabolism was on average 24.3 and 26.1% in S. aurata and P. reticulata, respectively. These data highlight the importance of taking anaerobic metabolism into account when assessing effects of environmental variation on the MS, because the fraction where anaerobic metabolism occurs is a poor indicator of sustainable aerobic performance. Our results suggest that without accounting for anaerobic metabolism within the MS, studies involving the OCLTT hypothesis could overestimate the metabolic scope available for

  17. Partitioning the metabolic scope: the importance of anaerobic metabolism and implications for the oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Ejbye-Ernst, Rasmus; Michaelsen, Thomas Y; Tirsgaard, Bjørn; Wilson, Jonathan M; Jensen, Lasse F; Steffensen, John F; Pertoldi, Cino; Aarestrup, Kim; Svendsen, Jon C

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing climate change is predicted to affect the distribution and abundance of aquatic ectotherms owing to increasing constraints on organismal physiology, in particular involving the metabolic scope (MS) available for performance and fitness. The oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) hypothesis prescribes MS as an overarching benchmark for fitness-related performance and assumes that any anaerobic contribution within the MS is insignificant. The MS is typically derived from respirometry by subtracting standard metabolic rate from the maximal metabolic rate; however, the methodology rarely accounts for anaerobic metabolism within the MS. Using gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), this study tested for trade-offs (i) between aerobic and anaerobic components of locomotor performance; and (ii) between the corresponding components of the MS. Data collection involved measuring oxygen consumption rate at increasing swimming speeds, using the gait transition from steady to unsteady (burst-assisted) swimming to detect the onset of anaerobic metabolism. Results provided evidence of the locomotor performance trade-off, but only in S. aurata. In contrast, both species revealed significant negative correlations between aerobic and anaerobic components of the MS, indicating a trade-off where both components of the MS cannot be optimized simultaneously. Importantly, the fraction of the MS influenced by anaerobic metabolism was on average 24.3 and 26.1% in S. aurata and P. reticulata, respectively. These data highlight the importance of taking anaerobic metabolism into account when assessing effects of environmental variation on the MS, because the fraction where anaerobic metabolism occurs is a poor indicator of sustainable aerobic performance. Our results suggest that without accounting for anaerobic metabolism within the MS, studies involving the OCLTT hypothesis could overestimate the metabolic scope available for

  18. Changes in the proteomic and metabolic profiles of Beta vulgaris root tips in response to iron deficiency and resupply

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plants grown under iron deficiency show different morphological, biochemical and physiological changes. These changes include, among others, the elicitation of different strategies to improve the acquisition of Fe from the rhizosphere, the adjustment of Fe homeostasis processes and a reorganization of carbohydrate metabolism. The application of modern techniques that allow the simultaneous and untargeted analysis of multiple proteins and metabolites can provide insight into multiple processes taking place in plants under Fe deficiency. The objective of this study was to characterize the changes induced in the root tip proteome and metabolome of sugar beet plants in response to Fe deficiency and resupply. Results Root tip extract proteome maps were obtained by 2-D isoelectric focusing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and approximately 140 spots were detected. Iron deficiency resulted in changes in the relative amounts of 61 polypeptides, and 22 of them were identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Metabolites in root tip extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-MS, and more than 300 metabolites were resolved. Out of 77 identified metabolites, 26 changed significantly with Fe deficiency. Iron deficiency induced increases in the relative amounts of proteins and metabolites associated to glycolysis, tri-carboxylic acid cycle and anaerobic respiration, confirming previous studies. Furthermore, a protein not present in Fe-sufficient roots, dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine (DMRL) synthase, was present in high amounts in root tips from Fe-deficient sugar beet plants and gene transcript levels were higher in Fe-deficient root tips. Also, a marked increase in the relative amounts of the raffinose family of oligosaccharides (RFOs) was observed in Fe-deficient plants, and a further increase in these compounds occurred upon short term Fe resupply. Conclusions The increases in DMRL synthase and in RFO sugars were the major changes induced by Fe deficiency and resupply

  19. Ecological dynamics in the subarctic Pacific, a possibly iron-limited ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.B.; Wheeler, P.A. ); Frost, B.W. ); Landry, M.R. ); Welschmeyer, N. ); Powell, T.M. )

    1991-12-01

    It has been suggested that production in offshore waters of the subarctic Pacific is limited by availability of dissolved Fe. Although that is not yet adequately established, the functional consequences of the limitation (if it exists) can be characterized from the results of the SUbarctic Pacific Ecosystem Research (SUPER) program. Fe limitation, or something like it, establishes a phytoplankton community dominated by very small cells. These plants are not limited by Fe availability. Rather, their production is limited by their stock and available illumination. Stock is set by microzooplankton grazers with rapid population growth rates and, thus, rapid response to increases in phytoplankton abundance. Micrograzers provide efficient recycling of nitrogen as NH{sub 4}, and the ready availability of NH{sub 4} sharply limits the annual utilization of NO{sub 3}. Persistently high NO{sub 3} concentrations result. Other possibly Fe-limited, oceanic ecosystems with persistently high, near-surface nutrients require similar, detailed analysis of ecosystem function.

  20. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC is activated by catecholamines and iron and regulates genes encoding proteins associated with anaerobic respiration and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Weigel, W A; Demuth, D R; Torres-Escobar, A; Juárez-Rodríguez, M D

    2015-10-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC regulates its own expression and is essential for biofilm growth and virulence. However, the signal that activates the QseC sensor has not been identified and the qseBC regulon has not been defined. In this study, we show that QseC is activated by catecholamine hormones and iron but not by either component alone. Activation of QseC requires an EYRDD motif in the periplasmic domain of the sensor and site-specific mutations in EYRDD or the deletion of the periplasmic domain inhibits catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of the ygiW-qseBC operon. Catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of transcription also requires interaction of the QseB response regulator with its binding site in the ygiW-qseBC promoter. Whole genome microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles of A. actinomycetemcomitans grown in a chemically defined medium with and without catecholamine and iron supplementation. Approximately 11.5% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genome was differentially expressed by at least two-fold upon exposure to catecholamines and iron. The expression of ferritin was strongly induced, suggesting that intracellular iron storage capacity is increased upon QseBC activation. Consistent with this, genes encoding iron binding and transport proteins were down-regulated by QseBC. Strikingly, 57% of the QseBC up-regulated genes (56/99) encode proteins associated with anaerobic metabolism and respiration. Most of these up-regulated genes were recently reported to be induced during in vivo growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results suggest that detection of catecholamines and iron by QseBC may alter the cellular metabolism of A. actinomycetemcomitans for increased fitness and growth in an anaerobic host environment.

  1. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC is activated by catecholamines and iron and regulates genes encoding proteins associated with anaerobic respiration and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, WA; Demuth, DR; Torres-Escobar, A; Juárez-Rodríguez, MD

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans QseBC regulates its own expression and is essential for biofilm growth and virulence. However, the signal that activates the QseC sensor has not been identified and the qseBC regulon has not been defined. In this study, we show that QseC is activated by catecholamine hormones and iron but not by either component alone. Activation of QseC requires an EYRDD motif in the periplasmic domain of the sensor and site-specific mutations in EYRDD or the deletion of the periplasmic domain inhibits catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of the ygiW-qseBC operon. Catecholamine/iron-dependent induction of transcription also requires interaction of the QseB response regulator with its binding site in the ygiW-qseBC promoter. Whole genome microarrays were used to compare gene expression profiles of A. actinomycetemcomitans grown in a chemically defined medium with and without catecholamine and iron supplementation. Approximately 11.5% of the A. actinomycetemcomitans genome was differentially expressed by at least two-fold upon exposure to catecholamines and iron. The expression of ferritin was strongly induced, suggesting that intracellular iron storage capacity is increased upon QseBC activation. Consistent with this, genes encoding iron binding and transport proteins were down-regulated by QseBC. Strikingly, 57% of the QseBC up-regulated genes (56/99) encode proteins associated with anaerobic metabolism and respiration. Most of these up-regulated genes were recently reported to be induced during in vivo growth of A. actinomycetemcomitans. These results suggest that detection of catecholamines and iron by QseBC may alter the cellular metabolism of A. actinomycetemcomitans for increased fitness and growth in an anaerobic host environment. PMID:25923132

  2. Iron-Induced Changes in the Proteome of Trichomonas vaginalis Hydrogenosomes

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Neritza Campo; Horváthová, Lenka; Jedelský, Petr L.; Šedinová, Miroslava; Rada, Petr; Marcinčiková, Michaela; Hrdý, Ivan; Tachezy, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Iron plays a crucial role in metabolism as a key component of catalytic and redox cofactors, such as heme or iron-sulfur clusters in enzymes and electron-transporting or regulatory proteins. Limitation of iron availability by the host is also one of the mechanisms involved in immunity. Pathogens must regulate their protein expression according to the iron concentration in their environment and optimize their metabolic pathways in cases of limitation through the availability of respective cofactors. Trichomonas vaginalis, a sexually transmitted pathogen of humans, requires high iron levels for optimal growth. It is an anaerobe that possesses hydrogenosomes, mitochondrion-related organelles that harbor pathways of energy metabolism and iron-sulfur cluster assembly. We analyzed the proteomes of hydrogenosomes obtained from cells cultivated under iron-rich and iron-deficient conditions employing two-dimensional peptide separation combining IEF and nano-HPLC with quantitative MALDI-MS/MS. We identified 179 proteins, of which 58 were differentially expressed. Iron deficiency led to the upregulation of proteins involved in iron-sulfur cluster assembly and the downregulation of enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism. Interestingly, iron affected the expression of only some of multiple protein paralogues, whereas the expression of others was iron independent. This finding indicates a stringent regulation of differentially expressed multiple gene copies in response to changes in the availability of exogenous iron. PMID:23741475

  3. Advantages of low pH and limited oxygenation in arsenite removal from water by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Klas, Sivan; Kirk, Donald W

    2013-05-15

    The removal of toxic arsenic species from contaminated waters by zero-valent iron (ZVI) has drawn considerable attention in recent years. In this approach, arsenic ions are mainly removed by adsorption to the iron corrosion products. Reduction to zero-valent arsenic on the ZVI surface is possible in the absence of competing oxidants and can reduce arsenic mobility and sludge formation. However, associated removal rates are relatively low. In the current study, simultaneous high reduction and removal rates of arsenite (H3AsO3), the more toxic and mobile environmentally occurring arsenic species, was demonstrated by reacting it with ZVI under limited aeration and relatively low pH. 90% of the removed arsenic was attached to the ZVI particles and 60% of which was in the elemental state. Under the same non-acidic conditions, only 40-60% of the removed arsenic was attached to the ZVI with no change in arsenic oxidation state. Under anaerobic conditions, reduction occurred but total arsenic removal rate was significantly lower and ZVI demand was higher. The effective arsenite removal under acidic oxygen-limited conditions was explained by formation of Fe(II)-solid intermediate on the ZVI surface that provided high surface area and reducing power. PMID:23500792

  4. Iron limitation in natural populations of phytoplankton in the eastern North Atlantic Ocean: (IRONAGES III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldhuis, M.; Timmermans, K.; Laan, P.; de Baar, H.

    2003-04-01

    During the IRONAGES III cruise (3--31 October 2002) the "dust" hypothesis (iron from above) on natural phytoplankton communities in the North Atlantic Ocean was studied in the field and in short-term incubation experiments. Throughout the whole area the chlorophyll concentration was very low in the surface waters (<0.1 μg/l), and almost entirely dominated by (>95%) picophytoplankton. Flow cytometric analysis showed a numerical dominance of Prochlorocccus, Synechococcus but low number of pico-eukaryotes. These three groups differed significant in viability as examined by an assay to test the cell membrane integrity. Both prokaryotes showed the highest percentage of viable cells (>90%), whereas the fraction of viable cell in the eukaryote fraction was usually less than 60%. Incubation experiments showed no significant effect of iron addition, present in the dust, in short term incubations experiments (48 h) as compared to the control (natural Fediss concentration was ca. 0.2 nM). Cell numbers, cell sizes and pigmentation, but also cell viability remained within the range typical observed in the surveyed area and the daily dynamics in cell abundance as a result of synchronized growth. During long-term incubations cell numbers of the eukaryotes showed a lag-phase of 96 hours before gradually increasing. At the same time, a higher percentage of cell remained viable. Subsamples kept in prolonged darkness showed a rapid decline in cell numbers of mainly Prochlorococcus, mainly due to minute grazers (ca. 3 μm). The growth rate of the Prochlorophytes was estimated to be ca. 0.6 /d. In contrast Synechococcus and the eukaryotes fraction were far less susceptible to grazing or continuous darkness. Cell number declined only slightly but cells remained also more viable. The observed absence of significant changes in the phytoplankton community structure and cell dynamics suggest little or no effect on a short-term base (<48 h) due to a iron fertilization. A major shift towards

  5. Sexual development of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is induced by zinc or iron limitation through Ecl1 family genes.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Hokuto; Ishida, Maiko; Naito, Chikako; Murakami, Hiroshi; Aiba, Hirofumi

    2015-02-01

    Ecl1 family genes (ecl1 (+), ecl2 (+), and ecl3 (+)) have been identified as extenders of the chronological lifespan in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we found that the triple-deletion mutant (∆ecl1/2/3) had a defect in sexual development after entry into the stationary phase, although the mutant essentially showed normal mating and sporulation under nitrogen starvation or carbon limitation. In this study, we showed that limitation of zinc or iron can be a signal for sexual development of S. pombe cells grown in Edinburgh minimal medium until the stationary phase and that Ecl1 family genes are important for this process. Because the ∆ecl1/2/3 mutant diminishes the zinc depletion-dependent gene expression, Ecl1 family proteins may function as zinc sensors in the process of sexual development.

  6. Metabolic and diffusional limitations of photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Elias; Morales, Alejandro; Harbinson, Jeremy; Heuvelink, Ep; Prinzenberg, Aina E.; Marcelis, Leo F. M.

    2016-01-01

    A better understanding of the metabolic and diffusional limitations of photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance can help identify targets for improving crop yields. We used different genotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana to characterise the importance of Rubisco activase (Rca), stomatal conductance (gs), non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence (NPQ) and sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) on photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance. Leaf gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured in leaves exposed to stepwise increases and decreases in irradiance. rwt43, which has a constitutively active Rubisco enzyme in different irradiance intensities (except in darkness), showed faster increases than the wildtype, Colombia-0, in photosynthesis rates after step increases in irradiance. rca-2, having decreased Rca concentration, showed lower rates of increase. In aba2-1, high gs increased the rate of change after stepwise irradiance increases, while in C24, low gs tended to decrease it. Differences in rates of change between Colombia-0 and plants with low levels of NPQ (npq1-2, npq4-1) or SPS (spsa1) were negligible. In Colombia-0, the regulation of Rubisco activation and of gs were therefore limiting for photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance, while levels of NPQ or SPS were not. This suggests Rca and gs as targets for improvement of photosynthesis of plants in fluctuating irradiance. PMID:27502328

  7. Interferon gamma-activated human monocytes downregulate transferrin receptors and inhibit the intracellular multiplication of Legionella pneumophila by limiting the availability of iron.

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, T F; Horwitz, M A

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated the role of iron in the intracellular biology of Legionella pneumophila in human monocytes and in the effector arm of cell-mediated immune defense against this intracellular bacterial pathogen. To determine if L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication is iron dependent, we studied the effect of the iron chelator deferoxamine on L. pneumophila infection of monocytes. Deferoxamine at 15 microM completely inhibited L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication. The inhibitory effect of deferoxamine was reversed with equimolar iron-saturated transferrin but not apotransferrin. To examine the potential role of iron in monocyte activation, we investigated the influence of iron-saturated transferrin on L. pneumophila multiplication in IFN gamma-activated monocytes. Iron transferrin, but not apotransferrin, neutralized the capacity of activated monocytes to inhibit L. pneumophila multiplication. To explore a potential mechanism by which activated monocytes might limit the availability of intracellular iron, we examined transferrin receptor expression on nonactivated and activated monocytes cultured in vitro for 5 d. By fluorescence-activated flow cytometry, activated monocytes exhibited markedly fewer transferrin receptors than nonactivated monocytes. By Scatchard analysis of 125I-transferrin binding to monocytes, nonactivated monocytes had 38,300 +/- 12,700 (mean +/- SE) transferrin binding sites, whereas activated monocytes had 10,300 +/- 1,600, a reduction of 73%. Activated and nonactivated monocytes had a similar mean Kd (1.8 +/- 0.2 nM). This study demonstrates that (a) L. pneumophila intracellular multiplication is iron dependent; (b) activated monocytes inhibit L. pneumophila multiplication by limiting the availability of intracellular iron; and (c) transferrin receptors are downregulated on IFN gamma-activated monocytes. Images PMID:2496141

  8. Slc11a1 limits intracellular growth of Salmonella enterica sv. Typhimurium by promoting macrophage immune effector functions and impairing bacterial iron acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Nairz, Manfred; Fritsche, Gernot; Crouch, Marie-Laure V.; Barton, Howard C.; Fang, Ferric C.; Weiss, Günter

    2009-01-01

    The natural-resistance associated macrophage protein 1, Slc11a1, is a phagolysosomal transporter for protons and divalent ions including iron, that confers host protection against diverse intracellular pathogens including Salmonella. We investigated and compared the regulation of iron homeostasis and immune function in RAW264.7 murine phagocytes stably transfected with non-functional Slc11a1 and functional Slc11a1 controls in response to an infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium). We report that macrophages lacking functional Slc11a1 displayed an increased expression of transferrin receptor 1, resulting in enhanced acquisition of transferrin-bound iron. In contrast, cellular iron release mediated via ferroportin 1 was significantly lower in Salmonella-infected Slc11a1-negative macrophages in comparison to phagocytes bearing Slc11a1. Lack of Slc11a1 led to intracellular persistence of S. Typhimurium within macrophages which was paralleled by a reduced formation of nitric oxide, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 in Slc11a1-negative macrophages following Salmonella infection, whereas interleukin-10 production was increased. Moreover, Slc11a1-negative phagocytes exhibited higher cellular iron content, resulting in increased iron acquisition by intracellular Salmonella. Our observations indicate a bifunctional role for Slc11a1 within phagocytes. Slc11a restricts iron availability, which firstly augments pro-inflammatory macrophage effector functions and secondly concomitantly limits microbial iron access. PMID:19500110

  9. Limit on the Electron Electric Dipole Moment in Gadolinium-Iron Garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Heidenreich, B.J.; Elliott, O.T.; Charney, N.D.; Virgien, K.A.; Bridges, A.W.; McKeon, M.A.; Peck, S.K.; Krause, D. Jr.; Gordon, J.E.; Hunter, L.R.; Lamoreaux, S.K.

    2005-12-16

    A new method for the detection of the electron electric dipole moment (EDM) using a solid is described. The method involves the measurement of a voltage induced across the solid by the alignment of the sample's magnetic dipoles in an applied magnetic field, H. A first application of the method to GdIG has resulted in a limit on the electron EDM of 5x10{sup -24}e cm, which is a factor of 40 below the limit obtained from the only previous solid-state EDM experiment. The result is limited by the imperfect discrimination of an unexpectedly large voltage that is even upon the reversal of the sample magnetization.

  10. Metabolic Catastrophe in Mice Lacking Transferrin Receptor in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Tomasa; Laothamatas, Indira; Koves, Timothy R.; Soderblom, Erik J.; Bryan, Miles; Moseley, M. Arthur; Muoio, Deborah M.; Andrews, Nancy C.

    2015-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (Tfr1) is ubiquitously expressed, but its roles in non-hematopoietic cells are incompletely understood. We used a tissue-specific conditional knockout strategy to ask whether skeletal muscle required Tfr1 for iron uptake. We found that iron assimilation via Tfr1 was critical for skeletal muscle metabolism, and that iron deficiency in muscle led to dramatic changes, not only in muscle, but also in adipose tissue and liver. Inactivation of Tfr1 incapacitated normal energy production in muscle, leading to growth arrest and a muted attempt to switch to fatty acid β oxidation, using up fat stores. Starvation signals stimulated gluconeogenesis in the liver, but amino acid substrates became limiting and hypoglycemia ensued. Surprisingly, the liver was also iron deficient, and production of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin was depressed. Our observations reveal a complex interaction between iron homeostasis and metabolism that has implications for metabolic and iron disorders. PMID:26870796

  11. Metabolic Catastrophe in Mice Lacking Transferrin Receptor in Muscle.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Tomasa; Laothamatas, Indira; Koves, Timothy R; Soderblom, Erik J; Bryan, Miles; Moseley, M Arthur; Muoio, Deborah M; Andrews, Nancy C

    2015-11-01

    Transferrin receptor (Tfr1) is ubiquitously expressed, but its roles in non-hematopoietic cells are incompletely understood. We used a tissue-specific conditional knockout strategy to ask whether skeletal muscle required Tfr1 for iron uptake. We found that iron assimilation via Tfr1 was critical for skeletal muscle metabolism, and that iron deficiency in muscle led to dramatic changes, not only in muscle, but also in adipose tissue and liver. Inactivation of Tfr1 incapacitated normal energy production in muscle, leading to growth arrest and a muted attempt to switch to fatty acid β oxidation, using up fat stores. Starvation signals stimulated gluconeogenesis in the liver, but amino acid substrates became limiting and hypoglycemia ensued. Surprisingly, the liver was also iron deficient, and production of the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin was depressed. Our observations reveal a complex interaction between iron homeostasis and metabolism that has implications for metabolic and iron disorders.

  12. Integration of Genome-Scale Metabolic Nodels of Iron-Reducing Bacteria With Subsurface Flow and Geochemical Reactive Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheibe, T. D.; Mahadevan, R.; Fang, Y.; Garg, S.; Long, P. E.; Lovley, D. M.

    2008-12-01

    Several field and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that the growth and activity of iron-reducing bacteria can be stimulated in many subsurface environments by amendment of groundwater with a soluble electron donor. Under strong iron-reducing conditions, these organisms mediate reactions that can impact a wide range of subsurface contaminants including chlorinated hydrocarbons, metals, and radionuclides. Therefore there is strong interest in in-situ bioremediation as a potential technology for cleanup of contaminated aquifers. To evaluate and design bioremediation systems, as well as to evaluate the viability of monitored natural attenuation as an alternative, quantitative models of biogeochemically reactive transport are needed. To date, most such models represent microbial activity in terms of kinetic rate (e.g., Monod- type) formulations. Such models do not account for fundamental changes in microbial functionality (such as utilization of alternative respiratory pathways) that occur as the result of spatial and temporal variations in the geochemical environment experienced by microorganisms. Constraint-based genome-scale in silico models of microbial metabolism present an alternative to simplified rate formulations that provide flexibility to account for changes in microbial function in response to local geochemical conditions. We have developed and applied a methodology for coupling a constraint-based in silico model of Geobacter sulfurreducens with a conventional model of groundwater flow, transport, and geochemical reaction. Two uses of the in silico model are tested: 1) incorporation of modified microbial growth yield coefficients based on the in silico model, and 2) variation of reaction rates in a reactive transport model based on in silico modeling of a range of local geochemical conditions. Preliminary results from this integrated model will be presented.

  13. Disposition of a flow-limited drug (lidocaine) and a metabolic capacity-limited drug (theophylline) in liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Colli, A; Buccino, G; Cocciolo, M; Parravicini, R; Scaltrini, G

    1988-12-01

    The plasma clearance after oral administration of a completely absorbed drug that is metabolized by the liver depends on its intrinsic clearance. In cirrhosis the bioavailability of a flow-dependent drug increases because of both portosystemic shunting and hepatocyte dysfunction. A drug with a high extraction ratio, lidocaine, and a drug with a low extraction ratio, theophylline, were administered to 27 patients with cirrhosis and 16 control subjects. We found a significant impairment of both theophylline clearance (p less than 0.001) and lidocaine clearance (p less than 0.001) and an increase in the lidocaine peak concentration (p less than 0.001). The three parameters were significantly correlated with each other. The impairment of theophylline metabolism did not correlate with other indexes of disease severity, whereas lidocaine clearance was lower and lidocaine peak level higher in patients with decompensated cirrhosis and evidence of portal hypertension. Thus impairment in lidocaine disposition, which reflects both hepatocyte dysfunction and portosystemic shunting, correlated closer with the severity of liver disease than did theophylline metabolism.

  14. Zinc, iron and calcium are major limiting nutrients in the complementary diets of rural Kenyan children.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Elaine; Chege, Peter; Kimiywe, Judith; Wiesmann, Doris; Hotz, Christine

    2015-12-01

    Poor quality infant and young child (IYC) diets contribute to chronic under-nutrition. To design effective IYC nutrition interventions, an understanding of the extent to which realistic food-based strategies can improve dietary adequacy is required. We collected 24-h dietary recalls from children 6-23 months of age (n = 401) in two rural agro-ecological zones of Kenya to assess the nutrient adequacy of their diets. Linear programming analysis (LPA) was used to identify realistic food-based recommendations (FBRs) and to determine the extent to which they could ensure intake adequacy for 12 nutrients. Mean nutrient densities of the IYC diets were below the desired level for four to nine of the 10 nutrients analysed, depending on the age group. Mean dietary diversity scores ranged from 2.1 ± 1.0 among children 6-8 months old in Kitui County to 3.7 ± 1.1 food groups among children 12-23 months old in Vihiga County. LPA confirmed that dietary adequacy for iron, zinc and calcium will be difficult to ensure using only local foods as consumed. FBRs for breastfed children that promote the daily consumption of cows'/goats' milk (added to porridges), fortified cereals, green leafy vegetables, legumes, and meat, fish or eggs, 3-5 times per week can ensure dietary adequacy for nine and seven of 12 nutrients for children 6-11 and 12-23 months old, respectively. For these rural Kenyan children, even though dietary adequacy could be improved via realistic changes in habitual food consumption practices, alternative interventions are needed to ensure dietary adequacy at the population level.

  15. Zinc, iron and calcium are major limiting nutrients in the complementary diets of rural Kenyan children.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Elaine; Chege, Peter; Kimiywe, Judith; Wiesmann, Doris; Hotz, Christine

    2015-12-01

    Poor quality infant and young child (IYC) diets contribute to chronic under-nutrition. To design effective IYC nutrition interventions, an understanding of the extent to which realistic food-based strategies can improve dietary adequacy is required. We collected 24-h dietary recalls from children 6-23 months of age (n = 401) in two rural agro-ecological zones of Kenya to assess the nutrient adequacy of their diets. Linear programming analysis (LPA) was used to identify realistic food-based recommendations (FBRs) and to determine the extent to which they could ensure intake adequacy for 12 nutrients. Mean nutrient densities of the IYC diets were below the desired level for four to nine of the 10 nutrients analysed, depending on the age group. Mean dietary diversity scores ranged from 2.1 ± 1.0 among children 6-8 months old in Kitui County to 3.7 ± 1.1 food groups among children 12-23 months old in Vihiga County. LPA confirmed that dietary adequacy for iron, zinc and calcium will be difficult to ensure using only local foods as consumed. FBRs for breastfed children that promote the daily consumption of cows'/goats' milk (added to porridges), fortified cereals, green leafy vegetables, legumes, and meat, fish or eggs, 3-5 times per week can ensure dietary adequacy for nine and seven of 12 nutrients for children 6-11 and 12-23 months old, respectively. For these rural Kenyan children, even though dietary adequacy could be improved via realistic changes in habitual food consumption practices, alternative interventions are needed to ensure dietary adequacy at the population level. PMID:26778799

  16. Adsorbed polymer and NOM limits adhesion and toxicity of nano scale zerovalent iron to E. coli.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqiang; Greden, Karl; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Gregory, Kelvin B; Lowry, Gregory V

    2010-05-01

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) is used for groundwater remediation. Freshly synthesized bare, i.e. uncoated NZVI is bactericidal at low mg/L concentration, but the impact of surface modifiers and aging (partial oxidation) on its bactericidal properties have not been determined. Here we assess the effect that adsorbed synthetic polymers and natural organic matter (NOM) and aging (partial oxidation) have on the bactericidal properties of NZVI to the gram-negative bacterium, Escherichia coli. Exposure to 100 mg/L of bare NZVI with 28% Fe(0) content resulted in a 2.2-log inactivation after 10 min and a 5.2-log inactivation after 60 min. Adsorbed poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS), poly(aspartate) (PAP), or NOM on NZVI with the same Fe(0) content significantly decreased its toxicity, causing less than 0.2-log inactivation after 60 min. TEM images and heteroaggregation studies indicate that bare NZVI adheres significantly to cells and that the adsorbed polyelectrolyte or NOM prevents adhesion, thereby decreasing NZVI toxicity. The 1.8-log inactivation observed for bare NZVI with 7% Fe(0) content was lower than the 5.2-log inactivation using NZVI with 28% Fe(0) after 1 h; however, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) after 24 h was 5 mg/L regardless of Fe(0) content. The MIC of PSS, PAP, and NOM coated NZVI were much higher: 500 mg/L, 100 mg/L, and 100 mg/L, respectively. But the MIC was much lower than the typical injection concentration used in remediation (10 g/L). Complete oxidation of Fe(0) in NZVI under aerobic conditions eliminated its bactericidal effects. This study indicates that polyelectrolyte coatings and NOM will mitigate the toxicity of NZVI for exposure concentrations below 0.1 to 0.5 g/L depending on the coating and that aged NZVI without Fe(0) is relatively benign to bacteria.

  17. Acinetobacter baumannii Coordinates Urea Metabolism with Metal Import To Resist Host-Mediated Metal Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Juttukonda, Lillian J.; Chazin, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During infection, bacterial pathogens must adapt to a nutrient metal-limited environment that is imposed by the host. The innate immune protein calprotectin inhibits bacterial growth in vitro by chelating the divalent metal ions zinc (Zn2+, Zn) and manganese (Mn2+, Mn), but pathogenic bacteria are able to cause disease in the presence of this antimicrobial protein in vivo. One such pathogen is Acinetobacter baumannii, a Gram-negative bacterium that causes pneumonia and bloodstream infections that can be complicated by resistance to multiple antibiotics. A. baumannii inhibition by calprotectin is dependent on calprotectin Mn binding, but the mechanisms employed by A. baumannii to overcome Mn limitation have not been identified. This work demonstrates that A. baumannii coordinates transcription of an NRAMP family Mn transporter and a urea carboxylase to resist the antimicrobial activities of calprotectin. This NRAMP family transporter facilitates Mn accumulation and growth of A. baumannii in the presence of calprotectin. A. baumannii is found to utilize urea as a sole nitrogen source, and urea utilization requires the urea carboxylase encoded in an operon with the NRAMP family transporter. Moreover, urea carboxylase activity is essential for calprotectin resistance in A. baumannii. Finally, evidence is provided that this system combats calprotectin in vivo, as deletion of the transporter impairs A. baumannii fitness in a mouse model of pneumonia, and this fitness defect is modulated by the presence of calprotectin. These findings reveal that A. baumannii has evolved mechanisms to subvert host-mediated metal sequestration and they uncover a connection between metal starvation and metabolic stress. PMID:27677795

  18. Metabolic determinants of cancer cell sensitivity to glucose limitation and biguanides.

    PubMed

    Birsoy, Kıvanç; Possemato, Richard; Lorbeer, Franziska K; Bayraktar, Erol C; Thiru, Prathapan; Yucel, Burcu; Wang, Tim; Chen, Walter W; Clish, Clary B; Sabatini, David M

    2014-04-01

    As the concentrations of highly consumed nutrients, particularly glucose, are generally lower in tumours than in normal tissues, cancer cells must adapt their metabolism to the tumour microenvironment. A better understanding of these adaptations might reveal cancer cell liabilities that can be exploited for therapeutic benefit. Here we developed a continuous-flow culture apparatus (Nutrostat) for maintaining proliferating cells in low-nutrient media for long periods of time, and used it to undertake competitive proliferation assays on a pooled collection of barcoded cancer cell lines cultured in low-glucose conditions. Sensitivity to low glucose varies amongst cell lines, and an RNA interference (RNAi) screen pinpointed mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) as the major pathway required for optimal proliferation in low glucose. We found that cell lines most sensitive to low glucose are defective in the OXPHOS upregulation that is normally caused by glucose limitation as a result of either mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in complex I genes or impaired glucose utilization. These defects predict sensitivity to biguanides, antidiabetic drugs that inhibit OXPHOS, when cancer cells are grown in low glucose or as tumour xenografts. Notably, the biguanide sensitivity of cancer cells with mtDNA mutations was reversed by ectopic expression of yeast NDI1, a ubiquinone oxidoreductase that allows bypass of complex I function. Thus, we conclude that mtDNA mutations and impaired glucose utilization are potential biomarkers for identifying tumours with increased sensitivity to OXPHOS inhibitors.

  19. Metabolic determinants of cancer cell sensitivity to glucose limitation and biguanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birsoy, Kıvanç; Possemato, Richard; Lorbeer, Franziska K.; Bayraktar, Erol C.; Thiru, Prathapan; Yucel, Burcu; Wang, Tim; Chen, Walter W.; Clish, Clary B.; Sabatini, David M.

    2014-04-01

    As the concentrations of highly consumed nutrients, particularly glucose, are generally lower in tumours than in normal tissues, cancer cells must adapt their metabolism to the tumour microenvironment. A better understanding of these adaptations might reveal cancer cell liabilities that can be exploited for therapeutic benefit. Here we developed a continuous-flow culture apparatus (Nutrostat) for maintaining proliferating cells in low-nutrient media for long periods of time, and used it to undertake competitive proliferation assays on a pooled collection of barcoded cancer cell lines cultured in low-glucose conditions. Sensitivity to low glucose varies amongst cell lines, and an RNA interference (RNAi) screen pinpointed mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) as the major pathway required for optimal proliferation in low glucose. We found that cell lines most sensitive to low glucose are defective in the OXPHOS upregulation that is normally caused by glucose limitation as a result of either mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in complex I genes or impaired glucose utilization. These defects predict sensitivity to biguanides, antidiabetic drugs that inhibit OXPHOS, when cancer cells are grown in low glucose or as tumour xenografts. Notably, the biguanide sensitivity of cancer cells with mtDNA mutations was reversed by ectopic expression of yeast NDI1, a ubiquinone oxidoreductase that allows bypass of complex I function. Thus, we conclude that mtDNA mutations and impaired glucose utilization are potential biomarkers for identifying tumours with increased sensitivity to OXPHOS inhibitors.

  20. Metabolic Rate Limits the Effect of Sperm Competition on Mammalian Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    delBarco-Trillo, Javier; Tourmente, Maximiliano; Roldan, Eduardo R. S.

    2013-01-01

    Sperm competition leads to increased sperm production in many taxa. This response may result from increases in testes size, changes in testicular architecture or changes in the kinetics of spermatogenesis, but the impact of each one of these processes on sperm production has not been studied in an integrated manner. Furthermore, such response may be limited in species with low mass-specific metabolic rate (MSMR), i.e., large-bodied species, because they cannot process energy and resources efficiently enough both at the organismic and cellular levels. Here we compare 99 mammalian species and show that higher levels of sperm competition correlated with a) higher proportions of seminiferous tubules, b) shorter seminiferous epithelium cycle lengths (SECL) which reduce the time required to produce sperm, and c) higher efficiencies of Sertoli cells (involved in sperm maturation). These responses to sperm competition, in turn, result in higher daily sperm production, more sperm stored in the epididymides, and more sperm in the ejaculate. However, the two processes that require processing resources at faster rates (SECL and efficiency of Sertoli cells) only respond to sperm competition in species with high MSMR. Thus, increases in sperm production with intense sperm competition occur via a complex network of mechanisms, but some are constrained by MSMR. PMID:24069461

  1. Exercise hyperthermia as a factor limiting physical performance - Temperature effect on muscle metabolism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlowski, S.; Brzezinska, Z.; Kruk, B.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of trunk cooling on the muscle contents of ATP, ADP, AMP, creatine phosphate (CrP), and creatine, as well as of glycogen, some glycolytic intermediates, pyruvate, and lactate were assessed in 11 fasted dogs exercised at 20 C on treadmill to exhaustion. Without cooling, dogs were able to run 57 min, and their rectal (Tre) and muscle (Tm) temperatures increased to 41.8 and 43.0 C, respectively. Cooling with ice packs prolonged the ability to run by 45 percent, and resulted in lower Tre (by 1.1 C) and Tm (by 1.2 C). Depletion of muscle content of total high-energy phosphates (ATP + CrP) and glycogen, and increases in contents of AMP, pyruvate, and lactate were lower in cooled dogs than in non-cooled dogs. The muscle content of lactiate correlated positively with TM. These results indicate that hypothermia accelerates glycolysis, and shifts the equilibrium between high- and low-energy phosphates in favor of the latter. The adverse effect of hypothermia on muscle metabolism may be relevant to the limitation of endurance.

  2. Targeting tissue-specific metabolic signaling pathways in aging: the promise and limitations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fang; Liu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    It has been well established that most of the age-related diseases such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and atherosclerosis are all closely related to metabolic dysfunction. On the other hand, interventions on metabolism such as calorie restriction or genetic manipulations of key metabolic signaling pathways such as the insulin and mTOR signaling pathways slow down the aging process and improve healthy aging. These findings raise an important question as to whether improving energy homeostasis by targeting certain metabolic signaling pathways in specific tissues could be an effective anti-aging strategy. With a more comprehensive understanding of the tissue-specific roles of distinct metabolic signaling pathways controlling energy homeostasis and the cross-talks between these pathways during aging may lead to the development of more effective therapeutic interventions not only for metabolic dysfunction but also for aging.

  3. Microbial Metabolism Shifts Towards an Adverse Profile with Supplementary Iron in the TIM-2 In vitro Model of the Human Colon

    PubMed Central

    Kortman, Guus A. M.; Dutilh, Bas E.; Maathuis, Annet J. H.; Engelke, Udo F.; Boekhorst, Jos; Keegan, Kevin P.; Nielsen, Fiona G. G.; Betley, Jason; Weir, Jacqueline C.; Kingsbury, Zoya; Kluijtmans, Leo A. J.; Swinkels, Dorine W.; Venema, Koen; Tjalsma, Harold

    2016-01-01

    Oral iron administration in African children can increase the risk for infections. However, it remains unclear to what extent supplementary iron affects the intestinal microbiome. We here explored the impact of iron preparations on microbial growth and metabolism in the well-controlled TNO's in vitro model of the large intestine (TIM-2). The model was inoculated with a human microbiota, without supplementary iron, or with 50 or 250 μmol/L ferrous sulfate, 50 or 250 μmol/L ferric citrate, or 50 μmol/L hemin. High resolution responses of the microbiota were examined by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing, microarray analysis, and metagenomic sequencing. The metabolome was assessed by fatty acid quantification, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Cultured intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells were used to assess fecal water toxicity. Microbiome analysis showed, among others, that supplementary iron induced decreased levels of Bifidobacteriaceae and Lactobacillaceae, while it caused higher levels of Roseburia and Prevotella. Metagenomic analyses showed an enrichment of microbial motility-chemotaxis systems, while the metabolome markedly changed from a saccharolytic to a proteolytic profile in response to iron. Branched chain fatty acids and ammonia levels increased significantly, in particular with ferrous sulfate. Importantly, the metabolite-containing effluent from iron-rich conditions showed increased cytotoxicity to Caco-2 cells. Our explorations indicate that in the absence of host influences, iron induces a more hostile environment characterized by a reduction of microbes that are generally beneficial, and increased levels of bacterial metabolites that can impair the barrier function of a cultured intestinal epithelial monolayer. PMID:26779139

  4. Microbial Metabolism Shifts Towards an Adverse Profile with Supplementary Iron in the TIM-2 In vitro Model of the Human Colon

    DOE PAGES

    Kortman, Guus A. M.; Dutilh, Bas E.; Maathuis, Annet J. H.; Engelke, Udo F.; Boekhorst, Jos; Keegan, Kevin P.; Nielsen, Fiona G. G.; Betley, Jason; Weir, Jacqueline C.; Kingsbury, Zoya; et al

    2016-01-06

    Oral iron administration in African children can increase the risk for infections. However, it remains unclear to what extent supplementary iron affects the intestinal microbiome. We here explored the impact of iron preparations on microbial growth and metabolism in the well-controlled TNO's in vitro model of the large intestine (TIM-2). The model was inoculated with a human microbiota, without supplementary iron, or with 50 or 250 μmol/L ferrous sulfate, 50 or 250 μmol/L ferric citrate, or 50 μmol/L hemin. High resolution responses of the microbiota were examined by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing, microarray analysis, and metagenomic sequencing. The metabolome was assessedmore » by fatty acid quantification, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Cultured intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells were used to assess fecal water toxicity. Microbiome analysis showed, among others, that supplementary iron induced decreased levels of Bifidobacteriaceae and Lactobacillaceae, while it caused higher levels of Roseburia and Prevotella. Metagenomic analyses showed an enrichment of microbial motility-chemotaxis systems, while the metabolome markedly changed from a saccharolytic to a proteolytic profile in response to iron. Branched chain fatty acids and ammonia levels increased significantly, in particular with ferrous sulfate. Importantly, the metabolite-containing effluent from iron-rich conditions showed increased cytotoxicity to Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, our explorations indicate that in the absence of host influences, iron induces a more hostile environment characterized by a reduction of microbes that are generally beneficial, and increased levels of bacterial metabolites that can impair the barrier function of a cultured intestinal epithelial monolayer.« less

  5. Aconitase post-translational modification as a key in linkage between Krebs cycle, iron homeostasis, redox signaling, and metabolism of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, Oleh V; Piroddi, Marta; Galli, Francesco; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2014-01-01

    Aconitase, an enzyme possessing an iron-sulfur cluster that is sensitive to oxidation, is involved in the regulation of cellular metabolism. There are two isoenzymes of aconitase (Aco)--mitochondrial (mAco) and cytosolic (cAco) ones. The primary role of mAdco is believed to be to control cellular ATP production via regulation of intermediate flux in the Krebs cycle. The cytosolic Aco in its reduced form operates as an enzyme, whereas in the oxidized form it is involved in the control of iron homeostasis as iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a central role in regulation of Aco functions. Catalytic Aco activity is regulated by reversible oxidation of [4Fe-4S]²⁺ cluster and cysteine residues, so redox-dependent posttranslational modifications (PTMs) have gained increasing consideration as regards possible regulatory effects. These include modifications of cysteine residues by oxidation, nitrosylation and thiolation, as well as Tyr nitration and oxidation of Lys residues to carbonyls. Redox-independent PTMs such as phosphorylation and transamination also have been described. In the presence of a sustained ROS flux, redox-dependent PTMs may lead to enzyme damage and cell stress by impaired energy and iron metabolism. Aconitase has been identified as a protein that undergoes oxidative modification and inactivation in aging and certain oxidative stress-related disorders. Here we describe possible mechanisms of involvement of the two aconitase isoforms, cAco and mAco, in the control of cell metabolism and iron homeostasis, balancing the regulatory, and damaging effects of ROS.

  6. Co-precipitation of phosphate and iron limits mitochondrial phosphate availability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking the yeast frataxin homologue (YFH1).

    PubMed

    Seguin, Alexandra; Santos, Renata; Pain, Debkumar; Dancis, Andrew; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Lesuisse, Emmanuel

    2011-02-25

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking the yeast frataxin homologue (Δyfh1) accumulate iron in the mitochondria in the form of nanoparticles of ferric phosphate. The phosphate content of Δyfh1 mitochondria was higher than that of wild-type mitochondria, but the proportion of mitochondrial phosphate that was soluble was much lower in Δyfh1 cells. The rates of phosphate and iron uptake in vitro by isolated mitochondria were higher for Δyfh1 than wild-type mitochondria, and a significant proportion of the phosphate and iron rapidly became insoluble in the mitochondrial matrix, suggesting co-precipitation of these species after oxidation of iron by oxygen. Increasing the amount of phosphate in the medium decreased the amount of iron accumulated by Δyfh1 cells and improved their growth in an iron-dependent manner, and this effect was mostly transcriptional. Overexpressing the major mitochondrial phosphate carrier, MIR1, slightly increased the concentration of soluble mitochondrial phosphate and significantly improved various mitochondrial functions (cytochromes, [Fe-S] clusters, and respiration) in Δyfh1 cells. We conclude that in Δyfh1 cells, soluble phosphate is limiting, due to its co-precipitation with iron.

  7. Iron metabolism in obesity: how interaction between homoeostatic mechanisms can interfere with their original purpose. Part I: underlying homoeostatic mechanisms of energy storage and iron metabolisms and their interaction.

    PubMed

    Becker, Christiane; Orozco, Mónica; Solomons, Noel W; Schümann, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Adipose tissue plasticity mediated by inflammation is an important evolutionary achievement to survive seasonal climate changes. It permits to store excessive calories and to release them if required, using inflammatory cells to remove the debris. This process is regulated by a complex interaction of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6), adipokines (adiponectin, apelin, liptin), adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin) and transcription factors (NF-κB, HIF-1α). Iron mediates electron transfer as an essential component of e.g. myeloperoxidase, hemoglobin, cytochrome C and ribonucleotide reductase. Conversely, unbound iron can catalyze oxidation of lipids, proteins, and DNA. To balance the essential with the potentially toxic function requires an efficient iron homoeostasis. This is mediated by hepcidin's interaction with the iron-exporter ferroportin, to adapt intestinal iron absorption and body iron-sequestration to changes in demand. In addition, the interaction of iron-responsive elements (IRE) and iron-responsive proteins (IRP), the IRE/IRP-mechanism, regulates cellular iron homoeostasis. Obesity-induced inflammation interacts with both these mechanisms and disturbs iron availability by impairing its absorption, and by sequestering it in the reticuloendothelial system. Both mechanisms lead to anemia and reduce physical fitness which, in a vicious cycle, can support the development of pathological obesity. Thus, interaction between these two sets of beneficial regulatory mechanisms can become detrimental in situations of ample calorie supply.

  8. Pushing product formation to its limit: metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for L-leucine overproduction.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Michael; Haas, Sabine; Klaffl, Simon; Polen, Tino; Eggeling, Lothar; van Ooyen, Jan; Bott, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Using metabolic engineering, an efficient L-leucine production strain of Corynebacterium glutamicum was developed. In the wild type of C. glutamicum, the leuA-encoded 2-isopropylmalate synthase (IPMS) is inhibited by low L-leucine concentrations with a K(i) of 0.4 mM. We identified a feedback-resistant IMPS variant, which carries two amino acid exchanges (R529H, G532D). The corresponding leuA(fbr) gene devoid of the attenuator region and under control of a strong promoter was integrated in one, two or three copies into the genome and combined with additional genomic modifications aimed at increasing L-leucine production. These modifications involved (i) deletion of the gene encoding the repressor LtbR to increase expression of leuBCD, (ii) deletion of the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator IolR to increase glucose uptake, (iii) reduction of citrate synthase activity to increase precursor supply, and (iv) introduction of a gene encoding a feedback-resistant acetohydroxyacid synthase. The production performance of the resulting strains was characterized in bioreactor cultivations. Under fed-batch conditions, the best producer strain accumulated L-leucine to levels exceeding the solubility limit of about 24 g/l. The molar product yield was 0.30 mol L-leucine per mol glucose and the volumetric productivity was 4.3 mmol l⁻¹ h⁻¹. These values were obtained in a defined minimal medium with a prototrophic and plasmid-free strain, making this process highly interesting for industrial application. PMID:24333966

  9. The ColRS system of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae is required for virulence and growth in iron-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Subramoni, Sujatha; Pandey, Alok; Vishnu Priya, M R; Patel, Hitendra Kumar; Sonti, Ramesh V

    2012-09-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the causal agent of bacterial blight of rice, produces siderophores only under iron-limiting conditions. We screened 15 400 mTn5-induced mutants of X. oryzae pv. oryzae and isolated 27 mutants that produced siderophores even under iron-replete conditions. We found that the mTn5 insertions in 25 of these mutants were in or close to six genes. Mutants with insertions in five of these genes [colS, XOO1806 (a conserved hypothetical protein), acnB, prpR and prpB] exhibited a deficiency for growth on iron-limiting medium and a decrease in virulence. Insertions in a sixth gene, XOO0007 (a conserved hypothetical protein), were found to affect the ability to grow on iron-limiting medium, but did not affect the virulence. Targeted gene disruptants for colR (encoding the predicted cognate regulatory protein for ColS) also exhibited a deficiency for growth on iron-limiting medium and a decrease in virulence. colR and colS mutants were defective in the elicitation of hypersensitive response symptoms on the nonhost tomato. In addition, colR and colS mutants induced a rice basal defence response, suggesting that they are compromised in the suppression of host innate immunity. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that a functional ColRS system is required for the optimal expression of several genes encoding components of the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) of X. oryzae pv. oryzae. Our results demonstrate the role of several novel genes, including colR/colS, in the promotion of growth on iron-limiting medium and the virulence of X. oryzae pv. oryzae.

  10. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Principles of Anatomy and Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John H Wiley and Sons; 2013: ...

  11. Thick-shelled, grazer-protected diatoms decouple ocean carbon and silicon cycles in the iron-limited Antarctic Circumpolar Current

    PubMed Central

    Assmy, Philipp; Smetacek, Victor; Montresor, Marina; Klaas, Christine; Henjes, Joachim; Strass, Volker H.; Arrieta, Jesús M.; Bathmann, Ulrich; Berg, Gry M.; Breitbarth, Eike; Cisewski, Boris; Friedrichs, Lars; Fuchs, Nike; Herndl, Gerhard J.; Jansen, Sandra; Krägefsky, Sören; Latasa, Mikel; Peeken, Ilka; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Scharek, Renate; Schüller, Susanne E.; Steigenberger, Sebastian; Webb, Adrian; Wolf-Gladrow, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms of the iron-replete continental margins and North Atlantic are key exporters of organic carbon. In contrast, diatoms of the iron-limited Antarctic Circumpolar Current sequester silicon, but comparatively little carbon, in the underlying deep ocean and sediments. Because the Southern Ocean is the major hub of oceanic nutrient distribution, selective silicon sequestration there limits diatom blooms elsewhere and consequently the biotic carbon sequestration potential of the entire ocean. We investigated this paradox in an in situ iron fertilization experiment by comparing accumulation and sinking of diatom populations inside and outside the iron-fertilized patch over 5 wk. A bloom comprising various thin- and thick-shelled diatom species developed inside the patch despite the presence of large grazer populations. After the third week, most of the thinner-shelled diatom species underwent mass mortality, formed large, mucous aggregates, and sank out en masse (carbon sinkers). In contrast, thicker-shelled species, in particular Fragilariopsis kerguelensis, persisted in the surface layers, sank mainly empty shells continuously, and reduced silicate concentrations to similar levels both inside and outside the patch (silica sinkers). These patterns imply that thick-shelled, hence grazer-protected, diatom species evolved in response to heavy copepod grazing pressure in the presence of an abundant silicate supply. The ecology of these silica-sinking species decouples silicon and carbon cycles in the iron-limited Southern Ocean, whereas carbon-sinking species, when stimulated by iron fertilization, export more carbon per silicon. Our results suggest that large-scale iron fertilization of the silicate-rich Southern Ocean will not change silicon sequestration but will add carbon to the sinking silica flux. PMID:24248337

  12. Metabolome analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana roots identifies a key metabolic pathway for iron acquisition.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Holger; Günther, Carmen; Weber, Michael; Spörlein, Cornelia; Loscher, Sebastian; Böttcher, Christoph; Schobert, Rainer; Clemens, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Fe deficiency compromises both human health and plant productivity. Thus, it is important to understand plant Fe acquisition strategies for the development of crop plants which are more Fe-efficient under Fe-limited conditions, such as alkaline soils, and have higher Fe density in their edible tissues. Root secretion of phenolic compounds has long been hypothesized to be a component of the reduction strategy of Fe acquisition in non-graminaceous plants. We therefore subjected roots of Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown under Fe-replete and Fe-deplete conditions to comprehensive metabolome analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ultra-pressure liquid chromatography electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Scopoletin and other coumarins were found among the metabolites showing the strongest response to two different Fe-limited conditions, the cultivation in Fe-free medium and in medium with an alkaline pH. A coumarin biosynthesis mutant defective in ortho-hydroxylation of cinnamic acids was unable to grow on alkaline soil in the absence of Fe fertilization. Co-cultivation with wild-type plants partially rescued the Fe deficiency phenotype indicating a contribution of extracellular coumarins to Fe solubilization. Indeed, coumarins were detected in root exudates of wild-type plants. Direct infusion mass spectrometry as well as UV/vis spectroscopy indicated that coumarins are acting both as reductants of Fe(III) and as ligands of Fe(II). PMID:25058345

  13. Metabolome Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Roots Identifies a Key Metabolic Pathway for Iron Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Holger; Günther, Carmen; Weber, Michael; Spörlein, Cornelia; Loscher, Sebastian; Böttcher, Christoph; Schobert, Rainer; Clemens, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Fe deficiency compromises both human health and plant productivity. Thus, it is important to understand plant Fe acquisition strategies for the development of crop plants which are more Fe-efficient under Fe-limited conditions, such as alkaline soils, and have higher Fe density in their edible tissues. Root secretion of phenolic compounds has long been hypothesized to be a component of the reduction strategy of Fe acquisition in non-graminaceous plants. We therefore subjected roots of Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown under Fe-replete and Fe-deplete conditions to comprehensive metabolome analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ultra-pressure liquid chromatography electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Scopoletin and other coumarins were found among the metabolites showing the strongest response to two different Fe-limited conditions, the cultivation in Fe-free medium and in medium with an alkaline pH. A coumarin biosynthesis mutant defective in ortho-hydroxylation of cinnamic acids was unable to grow on alkaline soil in the absence of Fe fertilization. Co-cultivation with wild-type plants partially rescued the Fe deficiency phenotype indicating a contribution of extracellular coumarins to Fe solubilization. Indeed, coumarins were detected in root exudates of wild-type plants. Direct infusion mass spectrometry as well as UV/vis spectroscopy indicated that coumarins are acting both as reductants of Fe(III) and as ligands of Fe(II). PMID:25058345

  14. A role for tetrahydrofolates in the metabolism of iron-sulfur clusters in all domains of life.

    PubMed

    Waller, Jeffrey C; Alvarez, Sophie; Naponelli, Valeria; Lara-Nuñez, Aurora; Blaby, Ian K; Da Silva, Vanessa; Ziemak, Michael J; Vickers, Tim J; Beverley, Stephen M; Edison, Arthur S; Rocca, James R; Gregory, Jesse F; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Hanson, Andrew D

    2010-06-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe/S) cluster enzymes are crucial to life. Their assembly requires a suite of proteins, some of which are specific for particular subsets of Fe/S enzymes. One such protein is yeast Iba57p, which aconitase and certain radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes require for activity. Iba57p homologs occur in all domains of life; they belong to the COG0354 protein family and are structurally similar to various folate-dependent enzymes. We therefore investigated the possible relationship between folates and Fe/S cluster enzymes using the Escherichia coli Iba57p homolog, YgfZ. NMR analysis confirmed that purified YgfZ showed stereoselective folate binding. Inactivating ygfZ reduced the activities of the Fe/S tRNA modification enzyme MiaB and certain other Fe/S enzymes, although not aconitase. When successive steps in folate biosynthesis were ablated, folE (lacking pterins and folates) and folP (lacking folates) mutants mimicked the ygfZ mutant in having low MiaB activities, whereas folE thyA mutants supplemented with 5-formyltetrahydrofolate (lacking pterins and depleted in dihydrofolate) and gcvP glyA mutants (lacking one-carbon tetrahydrofolates) had intermediate MiaB activities. These data indicate that YgfZ requires a folate, most probably tetrahydrofolate. Importantly, the ygfZ mutant was hypersensitive to oxidative stress and grew poorly on minimal media. COG0354 genes of bacterial, archaeal, fungal, protistan, animal, or plant origin complemented one or both of these growth phenotypes as well as the MiaB activity phenotype. Comparative genomic analysis indicated widespread functional associations between COG0354 proteins and Fe/S cluster metabolism. Thus COG0354 proteins have an ancient, conserved, folate-dependent function in the activity of certain Fe/S cluster enzymes. PMID:20489182

  15. Iron-Nutrient Interactions within Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Schoffman, Hanan; Lis, Hagar; Shaked, Yeala; Keren, Nir

    2016-01-01

    Iron limits photosynthetic activity in up to one third of the world's oceans and in many fresh water environments. When studying the effects of Fe limitation on phytoplankton or their adaptation to low Fe environments, we must take into account the numerous cellular processes within which this micronutrient plays a central role. Due to its flexible redox chemistry, Fe is indispensable in enzymatic catalysis and electron transfer reactions and is therefore closely linked to the acquisition, assimilation and utilization of essential resources. Iron limitation will therefore influence a wide range of metabolic pathways within phytoplankton, most prominently photosynthesis. In this review, we map out four well-studied interactions between Fe and essential resources: nitrogen, manganese, copper and light. Data was compiled from both field and laboratory studies to shed light on larger scale questions such as the connection between metabolic pathways and ambient iron levels and the biogeographical distribution of phytoplankton species.

  16. Iron-Nutrient Interactions within Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Schoffman, Hanan; Lis, Hagar; Shaked, Yeala; Keren, Nir

    2016-01-01

    Iron limits photosynthetic activity in up to one third of the world's oceans and in many fresh water environments. When studying the effects of Fe limitation on phytoplankton or their adaptation to low Fe environments, we must take into account the numerous cellular processes within which this micronutrient plays a central role. Due to its flexible redox chemistry, Fe is indispensable in enzymatic catalysis and electron transfer reactions and is therefore closely linked to the acquisition, assimilation and utilization of essential resources. Iron limitation will therefore influence a wide range of metabolic pathways within phytoplankton, most prominently photosynthesis. In this review, we map out four well-studied interactions between Fe and essential resources: nitrogen, manganese, copper and light. Data was compiled from both field and laboratory studies to shed light on larger scale questions such as the connection between metabolic pathways and ambient iron levels and the biogeographical distribution of phytoplankton species. PMID:27588022

  17. Metabolic restructuring during energy-limited states: insights from Artemia franciscana embryos and other animals.

    PubMed

    Hand, Steven C; Menze, Michael A; Borcar, Apu; Patil, Yuvraj; Covi, Joseph A; Reynolds, Julie A; Toner, Mehmet

    2011-05-01

    Many life history stages of animals that experience environmental insults enter developmental arrested states that are characterized by reduced cellular proliferation, with or without a concurrent reduction in overall metabolism. In the case of the most profound metabolic arrest reported in invertebrates, i.e., anaerobic quiescence in Artemia franciscana embryos, acidification of the intracellular milieu is a major factor governing catabolic and anabolic downregulation. Release of ions from intracellular compartments is the source for approximately 50% of the proton equivalents needed for the 1.5 unit acidification that is observed. Recovery from the metabolic arrest requires re-sequestration of the protons with a vacuolar-type ATPase (V-ATPase). The remarkable facet of this mechanism is the ability of embryonic cells to survive the dissipation of intracellular ion gradients. Across many diapause-like states, the metabolic reduction and subsequent matching of energy demand is accomplished by shifting energy metabolism from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. Molecular pathways that are activated to induce these resilient hypometabolic states include stimulation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and insulin signaling via suite of daf (dauer formation) genes for diapause-like states in nematodes and insects. Contributing factors for other metabolically depressed states involve hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and downregulation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Metabolic similarities between natural states of stasis and some cancer phenotypes are noteworthy. Reduction of flux through oxidative phosphorylation helps prevent cell death in certain cancer types, similar to the way it increases viability of dauer stages in Caenorhabditis elegans. Mechanisms that underlie natural stasis are being used to pre-condition mammalian cells prior to cell biostabilization and storage.

  18. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  19. Hepatic cell lines for drug hepatotoxicity testing: limitations and strategies to upgrade their metabolic competence by gene engineering.

    PubMed

    Donato, M Teresa; Jover, Ramiro; Gómez-Lechón, M José

    2013-11-01

    One key issue in the pharmaceutical development of new compounds is knowledge on metabolism, the enzymes involved and the potential hepatotoxicity of a drug. Primary cultured hepatocytes are a valuable in vitro model for drug metabolism studies. However, human hepatocytes show phenotypic instability and have restricted accessibility and high batch-to-batch functional variability, which seriously complicates their use in routine testing. Therefore, several liver-derived cell models have been developed for drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity screening to circumvent these drawbacks. Hepatoma cell lines offer important advantages, availability, an unlimited life span and a stable phenotype, thus rendering them suitable models for such studies. However, currently available human hepatoma cell lines are not a good alternative to cultured hepatocytes as they show very limited expression for most drug-metabolising enzymes. Other approaches have been developed to generate immortalised hepatic cells with metabolic competence (use of plasmids encoding immortalising genes to transform human hepatocytes, cell lines obtained from transgenic animals, hepatocytomes or hydrid cells). Recombinant models heterologously expressing cytochrome P450 enzymes in hepatoma cells have also been generated, and are widely used in drug metabolism and toxicity evaluations. In recent years, new approaches to up-regulate the expression of drug-biotransformation enzymes in human cell lines (i.e., transfection with the expression vectors encoding key hepatic transcription factors) have also been investigated. This paper reviews the features of liver-derived cell lines, their suitability for drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity studies, and the state-of-the-art strategies pursued to generate metabolically competent hepatic cell lines.

  20. Adaptation of Bacillus subtilis carbon core metabolism to simultaneous nutrient limitation and osmotic challenge: a multi-omics perspective.

    PubMed

    Kohlstedt, Michael; Sappa, Praveen K; Meyer, Hanna; Maaß, Sandra; Zaprasis, Adrienne; Hoffmann, Tamara; Becker, Judith; Steil, Leif; Hecker, Michael; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Lalk, Michael; Mäder, Ulrike; Stülke, Jörg; Bremer, Erhard; Völker, Uwe; Wittmann, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis encounters nutrient limitations and osmotic stress in its natural soil ecosystem. To ensure survival and sustain growth, highly integrated adaptive responses are required. Here, we investigated the system-wide response of B. subtilis to different, simultaneously imposed stresses. To address the anticipated complexity of the cellular response networks, we combined chemostat experiments under conditions of carbon limitation, salt stress and osmoprotection with multi-omics analyses of the transcriptome, proteome, metabolome and fluxome. Surprisingly, the flux through central carbon and energy metabolism is very robust under all conditions studied. The key to achieve this robustness is the adjustment of the biocatalytic machinery to compensate for solvent-induced impairment of enzymatic activities during osmotic stress. Specifically, increased production of several enzymes of central carbon metabolism compensates for their reduced activity in the presence of high salt. A major response of the cell during osmotic stress is the production of the compatible solute proline. This is achieved through the concerted adjustment of multiple reactions around the 2-oxoglutarate node, which drives metabolism towards the proline precursor glutamate. The fine-tuning of the transcriptional and metabolic networks involves functional modules that overarch the individual pathways.

  1. Limiter

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, Samuel A.; Hosea, Joel C.; Timberlake, John R.

    1986-01-01

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face accommodates the various power scrape-off distances .lambda..sub.p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V.sub..parallel., of the impacting particles. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution.

  2. Overexpression of mitochondrial ferritin causes cytosolic iron depletion and changes cellular iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Nie, Guangjun; Sheftel, Alex D; Kim, Sangwon F; Ponka, Prem

    2005-03-01

    Cytosolic ferritin sequesters and stores iron and, consequently, protects cells against iron-mediated free radical damage. However, the function of the newly discovered mitochondrial ferritin (MtFt) is unknown. To examine the role of MtFt in cellular iron metabolism, we established a cell line that stably overexpresses mouse MtFt under the control of a tetracycline-responsive promoter. The overexpression of MtFt caused a dose-dependent iron deficiency in the cytosol that was revealed by increased RNA-binding activity of iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) along with an increase in transferrin receptor levels and decrease in cytosolic ferritin. Consequently, the induction of MtFt resulted in a dramatic increase in cellular iron uptake from transferrin, most of which was incorporated into MtFt. The induction of MtFt caused a shift of iron from cytosolic ferritin to MtFt. In addition, iron inserted into MtFt was less available for chelation than that in cytosolic ferritin and the expression of MtFt was associated with decreased mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitase activities, the latter being consistent with the increase in IRP-binding activity. In conclusion, our results indicate that overexpression of MtFt causes a dramatic change in intracellular iron homeostasis and that shunting iron to MtFt likely limits its availability for active iron proteins.

  3. Melatonin exerts a more potent effect than S-adenosyl-l-methionine against iron metabolism disturbances, oxidative stress and tissue injury induced by obstructive jaundice in rats.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R; Túnez, Isaac; Herencia, Carmen; Ranchal, Isidora; González, Raúl; Ramírez, Luz M; Arjona, Alvaro; Barcos, Montserrat; Espejo, Isabel; Cruz, Adolfo; Montilla, Pedro; Padillo, Francisco J; Muntané, Jordi

    2008-07-30

    Melatonin and S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAMe) prevent oxidative stress and tissue dysfunction in obstructive jaundice (OJ). Lipid peroxidation is exacerbated in the presence of trace amounts of iron (Fe). The study investigated the regulation by melatonin and SAMe the induction of oxidative stress, iron metabolism disturbances and tissue injury in an experimental model of OJ. Different parameters of lipid peroxidation, antioxidant status, tissue injury and Fe metabolism were determined in liver and blood. OJ induced Fe accumulation in liver, and increased transferrin (Tf) saturation and loosely bound Fe content in blood. Melatonin, and SAMe at lesser extent, enhanced protein Tf content in liver and blood, that reduced loosely bound Fe content in blood. Melatonin and SAMe did not affect ferritin (FT) and Tf mRNA expression, but reduced Tf receptor (TfR) mRNA expression in liver. In conclusion, the effect of melatonin and SAMe on Fe metabolism may be included in the beneficial properties of these agents on lipid peroxidation and tissue injury induced by OJ.

  4. Setting an upper limit on the myoglobin iron(IV)hydroxide pK(a): insight into axial ligand tuning in heme protein catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yosca, Timothy H; Behan, Rachel K; Krest, Courtney M; Onderko, Elizabeth L; Langston, Matthew C; Green, Michael T

    2014-06-25

    To provide insight into the iron(IV)hydroxide pK(a) of histidine ligated heme proteins, we have probed the active site of myoglobin compound II over the pH range of 3.9-9.5, using EXAFS, Mössbauer, and resonance Raman spectroscopies. We find no indication of ferryl protonation over this pH range, allowing us to set an upper limit of 2.7 on the iron(IV)hydroxide pK(a) in myoglobin. Together with the recent determination of an iron(IV)hydroxide pK(a) ∼ 12 in the thiolate-ligated heme enzyme cytochrome P450, this result provides insight into Nature's ability to tune catalytic function through its choice of axial ligand.

  5. Tropical forest soil microbial communities couple iron and carbon biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Dubinsky, E.A.; Silver, W.L.; Firestone, M.K.

    2009-10-15

    We report that iron-reducing bacteria are primary mediators of anaerobic carbon oxidation in upland tropical soils spanning a rainfall gradient (3500 - 5000 mm yr-1) in northeast Puerto Rico. The abundant rainfall and high net primary productivity of these tropical forests provide optimal soil habitat for iron-reducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria. Spatially and temporally dynamic redox conditions make iron-transforming microbial communities central to the belowground carbon cycle in these wet tropical forests. The exceedingly high abundance of iron-reducing bacteria (up to 1.2 x 10{sup 9} cells per gram soil) indicated that they possess extensive metabolic capacity to catalyze the reduction of iron minerals. In soils from the higher rainfall sites, measured rates of ferric iron reduction could account for up to 44 % of organic carbon oxidation. Iron reducers appeared to compete with methanogens when labile carbon availability was limited. We found large numbers of bacteria that oxidize reduced iron at sites with high rates of iron reduction and large numbers of iron-reducers. the coexistence of large populations of ironreducing and iron-oxidizing bacteria is evidence for rapid iron cycling between its reduced and oxidized states, and suggests that mutualistic interactions among these bacteria ultimately fuel organic carbon oxidation and inhibit CH4 production in these upland tropical forests.

  6. A comparison of mitochondria from Torulopsis utilis grown in continous culture with glycerol, iron, ammonium, magnesium or phosphate as the growth-limiting nutrient

    PubMed Central

    Light, P. Ann; Garland, P. B.

    1971-01-01

    1. Mitochondria prepared from Torulopsis utilis grown in a chemostat with iron-limited growth were found to lack energy conservation but not electron flow in that segment of the respiratory chain leading from intramitochondrial NADH to the cytochromes [i.e. the site 1 segment (Lehninger, 1964)]. 2. Site 1 energy conservation was present in mitochondria prepared from cells grown under conditions of limitation by glycerol, ammonium and magnesium. Phosphate-limited growth resulted in mitochondrial preparations without respiratory control. 3. Mitochondria from cells grown under conditions of iron limitation were insensitive to the respiratory inhibitor piericidin A, whereas sensitivity was present in mitochondria prepared from glycerol-, ammonium-, magnesium- or phosphate-limited cells. 4. These observations are considered to provide indirect evidence for a role of non-haem iron in the mechanism of energy conservation and also piericidin A sensitivity in T. utilis mitochondria. 5. A readily constructed and inexpensive pH-measuring and -controlling circuit is described for use with continuous-culture apparatus. PMID:4331254

  7. Influence of the availability of iron during hypoxia on the genes associated with apoptotic activity and local iron metabolism in rat H9C2 cardiomyocytes and L6G8C5 skeletal myocytes.

    PubMed

    Dziegala, Magdalena; Kasztura, Monika; Kobak, Kamil; Bania, Jacek; Banasiak, Waldemar; Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A

    2016-10-01

    The differential availability of iron during hypoxia is presumed to affect the functioning of cardiac and skeletal myocytes. Rat H9C2 cardiomyocytes and L6G8C5 myocytes were cultured for 48 h in normoxic or hypoxic conditions at the optimal, reduced or increased iron concentration. The mRNA expression levels of markers of apoptosis [B‑cell lymphoma‑2 (Bcl2; inhibition) and Bcl‑2‑activated X protein (Bax; induction)], atrophy (Atrogin), glycolysis (pyruvate kinase 2; PKM2) and iron metabolism [transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1; iron importer), ferroportin 1 (FPN1; iron exporter), ferritin heavy chain (FTH; iron storage protein) and hepcidin (HAMP; iron regulator)] were determined using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and cell viability was measured using an tetrazolium reduction assay. Cardiomyocytes and myocytes, when exposed to hypoxia, demonstrated an increased Bax/Bcl‑2 gene expression ratio (P<0.05). Additional deferoxamine (DFO) treatment resulted in further increases in Bax/Bcl‑2 in each cell type (P<0.001 each) and this was associated with the 15% loss in viability. The analogous alterations were observed in both cell types upon ammonium ferric citrate (AFC) treatment during hypoxia; however, the increased Bax/Bcl‑2 ratio and associated viability loss was lower compared with that in case of DFO treatment (P<0.05 each). Under hypoxic conditions, myocytes demonstrated an increased expression of PKM2 (P<0.01). Additional DFO treatment caused an increase in the mRNA expression levels of PKM2 and Atrogin‑1 (P<0.001 and P<0.05, respectively), whereas AFC treatment caused an increased mRNA expression of PKM2 (P<0.01) and accompanied decreased mRNA expression of Atrogin‑1 (P<0.05). The expression augmentation of PKM2 during hypoxia was greater upon low iron compared with that of ferric salt treatment (P<0.01). Both cell types upon DFO during hypoxia demonstrated the increased expression of TfR1

  8. Influence of the availability of iron during hypoxia on the genes associated with apoptotic activity and local iron metabolism in rat H9C2 cardiomyocytes and L6G8C5 skeletal myocytes.

    PubMed

    Dziegala, Magdalena; Kasztura, Monika; Kobak, Kamil; Bania, Jacek; Banasiak, Waldemar; Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A

    2016-10-01

    The differential availability of iron during hypoxia is presumed to affect the functioning of cardiac and skeletal myocytes. Rat H9C2 cardiomyocytes and L6G8C5 myocytes were cultured for 48 h in normoxic or hypoxic conditions at the optimal, reduced or increased iron concentration. The mRNA expression levels of markers of apoptosis [B‑cell lymphoma‑2 (Bcl2; inhibition) and Bcl‑2‑activated X protein (Bax; induction)], atrophy (Atrogin), glycolysis (pyruvate kinase 2; PKM2) and iron metabolism [transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1; iron importer), ferroportin 1 (FPN1; iron exporter), ferritin heavy chain (FTH; iron storage protein) and hepcidin (HAMP; iron regulator)] were determined using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and cell viability was measured using an tetrazolium reduction assay. Cardiomyocytes and myocytes, when exposed to hypoxia, demonstrated an increased Bax/Bcl‑2 gene expression ratio (P<0.05). Additional deferoxamine (DFO) treatment resulted in further increases in Bax/Bcl‑2 in each cell type (P<0.001 each) and this was associated with the 15% loss in viability. The analogous alterations were observed in both cell types upon ammonium ferric citrate (AFC) treatment during hypoxia; however, the increased Bax/Bcl‑2 ratio and associated viability loss was lower compared with that in case of DFO treatment (P<0.05 each). Under hypoxic conditions, myocytes demonstrated an increased expression of PKM2 (P<0.01). Additional DFO treatment caused an increase in the mRNA expression levels of PKM2 and Atrogin‑1 (P<0.001 and P<0.05, respectively), whereas AFC treatment caused an increased mRNA expression of PKM2 (P<0.01) and accompanied decreased mRNA expression of Atrogin‑1 (P<0.05). The expression augmentation of PKM2 during hypoxia was greater upon low iron compared with that of ferric salt treatment (P<0.01). Both cell types upon DFO during hypoxia demonstrated the increased expression of TfR1

  9. Classification and genetic features of neonatal haemochromatosis: a study of 27 affected pedigrees and molecular analysis of genes implicated in iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, A.; Lunt, P.; Rodrigues, F.; Berry, P; Flynn, D.; McKiernan, P.; Kelly, D.; Mieli-Vergani, G.; Cox, T.

    2001-01-01

    Neonatal haemochromatosis (NH) is a severe and newly recognised syndrome of uncertain aetiology, characterised by congenital cirrhosis or fulminant hepatitis and widespread tissue iron deposition. NH occurs in the context of maternal disease including viral infection, as a complication of metabolic disease in the fetus, and sporadically or recurrently, without overt cause, in sibs. Although an underlying genetic basis for NH has been suspected, no test is available for predictive analysis in at risk pregnancies.
  As a first step towards an understanding of the putative genetic basis for neonatal haemochromatosis, we have conducted a systematic study of the mode of transmission of this disorder in a total of 40 infants born to 27 families. We have moreover carried out a molecular analysis of candidate genes (β2-microglobulin, HFE, and haem oxygenases 1 and 2) implicated in iron metabolism. No pathogenic mutations in these genes were identified that segregate consistently with the disease phenotype in multiplex pedigrees. However, excluding four pedigrees with clear evidence of maternal infection associated with NH, a pedigree showing transmission of maternal antinuclear factor and ribonucleoprotein antibodies to the affected infants, and two families with possible matrilineal inheritance of disease in maternal half sibs, a large subgroup of the affected pedigrees point to the inheritance of an autosomal recessive trait. This included 14 pedigrees with affected and unaffected infants and a single pedigree where all four affected infants were the sole offspring of consanguineous but otherwise healthy parents.
  We thus report three distinct patterns of disease transmission in neonatal haemochromatosis. In the differentiation of a large subgroup showing transmission of disease in a manner suggesting autosomal recessive inheritance, we also provide the basis for further genome wide studies to define chromosomal determinants of iron storage disease in the

  10. Metabolic responses of CHO cells to limitation of key amino acids.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Tiago M; Carinhas, Nuno; Barreiro, Laura C; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M; Teixeira, Ana P

    2014-10-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the predominant host for production of therapeutic glycoproteins. In particular, the glutamine-synthetase (GS) expression system has been widely used in the biopharmaceutical industry for efficient selection of high-yielding clones. However, much remains unclear on how metabolic wiring affects culture performance. For instance, asparagine and serine have been observed to be the largest nitrogen sources taken up by GS-CHO cells, but their roles in biosynthesis and energy generation are poorly understood. In this work, a comprehensive profiling of extracellular metabolites coupled with an analysis of intracellular label distributions after 1-(13) C-pyruvate supplementation were used to trace metabolic rearrangements in different scenarios of asparagine and serine availability. The absence of asparagine in the medium caused growth arrest, and was associated with a dramatic increase in pyruvate uptake, a higher ratio of pyruvate carboxylation to dehydrogenation and an inability for de novo asparagine synthesis. The release of ammonia and amino acids such as aspartate, glutamate, and alanine were deeply impacted. This confirms asparagine to be essential for these GS-CHO cells as the main source of intracellular nitrogen as well as having an important anaplerotic role in TCA cycle activity. In turn, serine unavailability also negatively affected culture growth while triggering its de novo synthesis, confirmed by label incorporation coming from pyruvate, and reduced glycine and formate secretion congruent with its role as a precursor in the metabolism of one-carbon units. Overall, these results unfold important insights into GS-CHO cells metabolism that lay a clearer basis for fine-tuning bioprocess optimization.

  11. The physiology of long-distance migration: extending the limits of endurance metabolism.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jean-Michel

    2009-03-01

    Long-distance migrants have evolved specific adaptations that make their athletic records possible. Unique mechanisms explaining their amazing capacity for endurance exercise have now been uncovered, particularly with respect to energy storage, mobilization, transport and utilization. Birds are champions of migration because flying offers a key compromise: it allows more rapid movement than swimming, but has a lower cost of transport than running. High efficiency for muscle contraction, pointed wings, low wingloading, travelling in V-formations, storing fuel as energy-dense lipids and atrophy of non-essential organs are some of their strategies to decrease the cost of transport. The ability to process lipids rapidly also emerges as a crucial component of the migrant phenotype. High lipid fluxes are made possible by lipoprotein shuttles and fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) that accelerate lipid transport and by upgrading the metabolic machinery for lipolysis and lipid oxidation. Preparation for long flights can include natural doping on n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) from unique invertebrate diets. Muscle performance is improved by restructuring membrane phospholipids and by activating key genes of lipid metabolism through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). The physiological secret to long migrations does not depend on a single ;magic' adaptation but on the integration of multiple adjustments in morphology, biomechanics, behavior, nutrition and metabolism. Research on the physiology of migrants improves the fundamental knowledge of exercise biology, but it also has important implications for wildlife conservation, treating obesity and improving the performance of human athletes.

  12. The physiology of long-distance migration: extending the limits of endurance metabolism.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jean-Michel

    2009-03-01

    Long-distance migrants have evolved specific adaptations that make their athletic records possible. Unique mechanisms explaining their amazing capacity for endurance exercise have now been uncovered, particularly with respect to energy storage, mobilization, transport and utilization. Birds are champions of migration because flying offers a key compromise: it allows more rapid movement than swimming, but has a lower cost of transport than running. High efficiency for muscle contraction, pointed wings, low wingloading, travelling in V-formations, storing fuel as energy-dense lipids and atrophy of non-essential organs are some of their strategies to decrease the cost of transport. The ability to process lipids rapidly also emerges as a crucial component of the migrant phenotype. High lipid fluxes are made possible by lipoprotein shuttles and fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) that accelerate lipid transport and by upgrading the metabolic machinery for lipolysis and lipid oxidation. Preparation for long flights can include natural doping on n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) from unique invertebrate diets. Muscle performance is improved by restructuring membrane phospholipids and by activating key genes of lipid metabolism through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). The physiological secret to long migrations does not depend on a single ;magic' adaptation but on the integration of multiple adjustments in morphology, biomechanics, behavior, nutrition and metabolism. Research on the physiology of migrants improves the fundamental knowledge of exercise biology, but it also has important implications for wildlife conservation, treating obesity and improving the performance of human athletes. PMID:19218508

  13. Altered somatotroph feedback regulation improves metabolic efficiency and limits adipose deposition in male mice.

    PubMed

    Romero, Christopher J; Wolfe, Andrew; Law, Yi Ying; Costelloe, ChenChen Z; Miller, Ryan; Wondisford, Fredric; Radovick, Sally

    2016-04-01

    Several transgenic mouse models with disruption in the growth hormone (GH) axis support the role of GH in augmenting metabolic homeostasis. Specifically, interest has focused on GH's lipolytic properties and ability to affect adipose deposition. Furthermore, both GH and insulin growth factor 1 (IGF-1) may also play a direct or indirect role in adipose development. The somatotroph insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor knockout (SIGFRKO) mouse with only a modest increase in serum GH and IGF-1 demonstrates less adipose tissue than controls. In order to characterize the metabolic phenotype of SIGFRKO mice, histologic analysis of fat depots confirmed a smaller average diameter of adipocytes in the SIGFRKO mice compared to controls. These changes were accompanied by an increase in lipolytic gene expression in fat depots. Indirect calorimetry performed on 6-8week old male mice and again at 25weeks of age demonstrated that SIGFRKO mice, at both ages, had a higher VO2 and increased energy expenditure when compared with controls. The calculated respiratory exchange ratio (RER) was lower in the younger SIGFRKO mice compared to controls. No differences in food consumption or in either ambulatory or total activity were seen between SIGFRKO and control mice in either age group. These studies highlight the role of GH in adipose deposition and its influence on the expression of lipolytic genes resulting in an altered metabolic state, thus providing a mechanism for the decrease in weight gain seen in the SIGFRKO mouse model.

  14. Bacterial persistence is an active σS stress response to metabolic flux limitation.

    PubMed

    Radzikowski, Jakub Leszek; Vedelaar, Silke; Siegel, David; Ortega, Álvaro Dario; Schmidt, Alexander; Heinemann, Matthias

    2016-09-21

    While persisters are a health threat due to their transient antibiotic tolerance, little is known about their phenotype and what actually causes persistence. Using a new method for persister generation and high-throughput methods, we comprehensively mapped the molecular phenotype of Escherichia coli during the entry and in the state of persistence in nutrient-rich conditions. The persister proteome is characterized by σ(S)-mediated stress response and a shift to catabolism, a proteome that starved cells tried to but could not reach due to absence of a carbon and energy source. Metabolism of persisters is geared toward energy production, with depleted metabolite pools. We developed and experimentally verified a model, in which persistence is established through a system-level feedback: Strong perturbations of metabolic homeostasis cause metabolic fluxes to collapse, prohibiting adjustments toward restoring homeostasis. This vicious cycle is stabilized and modulated by high ppGpp levels, toxin/anti-toxin systems, and the σ(S)-mediated stress response. Our system-level model consistently integrates past findings with our new data, thereby providing an important basis for future research on persisters.

  15. Nectar resource limitation affects butterfly flight performance and metabolism differently in intensive and extensive agricultural landscapes.

    PubMed

    Lebeau, Julie; Wesselingh, Renate A; Van Dyck, Hans

    2016-05-11

    Flight is an essential biological ability of many insects, but is energetically costly. Environments under rapid human-induced change are characterized by habitat fragmentation and may impose constraints on the energy income budget of organisms. This may, in turn, affect locomotor performance and willingness to fly. We tested flight performance and metabolic rates in meadow brown butterflies (Maniola jurtina) of two contrasted agricultural landscapes: intensively managed, nectar-poor (IL) versus extensively managed, nectar-rich landscapes (EL). Young female adults were submitted to four nectar treatments (i.e. nectar quality and quantity) in outdoor flight cages. IL individuals had better flight capacities in a flight mill and had lower resting metabolic rates (RMR) than EL individuals, except under the severest treatment. Under this treatment, RMR increased in IL individuals, but decreased in EL individuals; flight performance was maintained by IL individuals, but dropped by a factor 2.5 in EL individuals. IL individuals had more canalized (i.e. less plastic) responses relative to the nectar treatments than EL individuals. Our results show significant intraspecific variation in the locomotor and metabolic response of a butterfly to different energy income regimes relative to the landscape of origin. Ecophysiological studies help to improve our mechanistic understanding of the eco-evolutionary impact of anthropogenic environments on rare and widespread species. PMID:27147100

  16. Nectar resource limitation affects butterfly flight performance and metabolism differently in intensive and extensive agricultural landscapes.

    PubMed

    Lebeau, Julie; Wesselingh, Renate A; Van Dyck, Hans

    2016-05-11

    Flight is an essential biological ability of many insects, but is energetically costly. Environments under rapid human-induced change are characterized by habitat fragmentation and may impose constraints on the energy income budget of organisms. This may, in turn, affect locomotor performance and willingness to fly. We tested flight performance and metabolic rates in meadow brown butterflies (Maniola jurtina) of two contrasted agricultural landscapes: intensively managed, nectar-poor (IL) versus extensively managed, nectar-rich landscapes (EL). Young female adults were submitted to four nectar treatments (i.e. nectar quality and quantity) in outdoor flight cages. IL individuals had better flight capacities in a flight mill and had lower resting metabolic rates (RMR) than EL individuals, except under the severest treatment. Under this treatment, RMR increased in IL individuals, but decreased in EL individuals; flight performance was maintained by IL individuals, but dropped by a factor 2.5 in EL individuals. IL individuals had more canalized (i.e. less plastic) responses relative to the nectar treatments than EL individuals. Our results show significant intraspecific variation in the locomotor and metabolic response of a butterfly to different energy income regimes relative to the landscape of origin. Ecophysiological studies help to improve our mechanistic understanding of the eco-evolutionary impact of anthropogenic environments on rare and widespread species.

  17. Bacterial persistence is an active σS stress response to metabolic flux limitation.

    PubMed

    Radzikowski, Jakub Leszek; Vedelaar, Silke; Siegel, David; Ortega, Álvaro Dario; Schmidt, Alexander; Heinemann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    While persisters are a health threat due to their transient antibiotic tolerance, little is known about their phenotype and what actually causes persistence. Using a new method for persister generation and high-throughput methods, we comprehensively mapped the molecular phenotype of Escherichia coli during the entry and in the state of persistence in nutrient-rich conditions. The persister proteome is characterized by σ(S)-mediated stress response and a shift to catabolism, a proteome that starved cells tried to but could not reach due to absence of a carbon and energy source. Metabolism of persisters is geared toward energy production, with depleted metabolite pools. We developed and experimentally verified a model, in which persistence is established through a system-level feedback: Strong perturbations of metabolic homeostasis cause metabolic fluxes to collapse, prohibiting adjustments toward restoring homeostasis. This vicious cycle is stabilized and modulated by high ppGpp levels, toxin/anti-toxin systems, and the σ(S)-mediated stress response. Our system-level model consistently integrates past findings with our new data, thereby providing an important basis for future research on persisters. PMID:27655400

  18. Pathogenic Mechanisms Underlying Iron Deficiency and Iron Overload: New Insights for Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    van Velden, DP; van Rensburg, SJ; Erasmus, R

    2009-01-01

    Iron uptake, utilisation, release and storage occur at the gene level. Individuals with variant forms of genes involved in iron metabolism may have different requirements for iron and are likely to respond differently to the same amount of iron in the diet, a concept termed nutrigenetics. Iron deficiency, iron overload and the anemia of inflammation are the commonest iron-related disorders. While at least four types of hereditary iron overload have been identified to date, our knowledge of the genetic basis and consequences of inherited iron deficiency remain limited. The importance of genetic risk factors in relation to iron overload was highlighted with the identification of the HFE gene in 1996. Deleterious mutations in this gene account for 80-90% of inherited iron overload and are associated with loss of iron homeostasis, alterations in inflammatory responses, oxidative stress and in its most severe form, the disorder hereditary haemochromatosis (HH). Elucidation of the genetic basis of HH has led to rapid clinical benefit through drastic reduction in liver biopsies performed as part of the diagnostic work-up of affected patients. Today, detection of a genetic predisposition in the presence of high serum ferritin and transferrin saturation levels is usually sufficient to diagnose HH, thereby addressing the potential danger of inherited iron overload which starts with the same symptoms as iron deficiency, namely chronic fatigue. This review provides the scientific back-up for application of pathology supported genetic testing, a new test concept that is well placed for optimizing clinical benefit to patients with regard to iron status.

  19. Competing for Iron: Duplication and Amplification of the isd Locus in Staphylococcus lugdunensis HKU09-01 Provides a Competitive Advantage to Overcome Nutritional Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Heilbronner, Simon; Brozyna, Jeremy R.; Heinrichs, David E.; Skaar, Eric P.; Peschel, Andreas; Foster, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase negative bacterial pathogen that is particularly associated with severe cases of infectious endocarditis. Unique amongst the coagulase-negative staphylococci, S. lugdunensis harbors an iron regulated surface determinant locus (isd). This locus facilitates the acquisition of heme as a source of nutrient iron during infection and allows iron limitation caused by “nutritional immunity” to be overcome. The isd locus is duplicated in S. lugdunensis HKU09-01 and we show here that the duplication is intrinsically unstable and undergoes accordion-like amplification and segregation leading to extensive isd copy number variation. Amplification of the locus increased the level of expression of Isd proteins and improved binding of hemoglobin to the cell surface of S. lugdunensis. Furthermore, Isd overexpression provided an advantage when strains were competing for a limited amount of hemoglobin as the sole source of iron. Gene duplications and amplifications (GDA) are events of fundamental importance for bacterial evolution and are frequently associated with antibiotic resistance in many species. As such, GDAs are regarded as evolutionary adaptions to novel selective pressures in hostile environments pointing towards a special importance of isd for S. lugdunensis. For the first time we show an example of a GDA that involves a virulence factor of a Gram-positive pathogen and link the GDA directly to a competitive advantage when the bacteria were struggling with selective pressures mimicking “nutritional immunity”. PMID:27575058

  20. Competing for Iron: Duplication and Amplification of the isd Locus in Staphylococcus lugdunensis HKU09-01 Provides a Competitive Advantage to Overcome Nutritional Limitation.

    PubMed

    Heilbronner, Simon; Monk, Ian R; Brozyna, Jeremy R; Heinrichs, David E; Skaar, Eric P; Peschel, Andreas; Foster, Timothy J

    2016-08-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase negative bacterial pathogen that is particularly associated with severe cases of infectious endocarditis. Unique amongst the coagulase-negative staphylococci, S. lugdunensis harbors an iron regulated surface determinant locus (isd). This locus facilitates the acquisition of heme as a source of nutrient iron during infection and allows iron limitation caused by "nutritional immunity" to be overcome. The isd locus is duplicated in S. lugdunensis HKU09-01 and we show here that the duplication is intrinsically unstable and undergoes accordion-like amplification and segregation leading to extensive isd copy number variation. Amplification of the locus increased the level of expression of Isd proteins and improved binding of hemoglobin to the cell surface of S. lugdunensis. Furthermore, Isd overexpression provided an advantage when strains were competing for a limited amount of hemoglobin as the sole source of iron. Gene duplications and amplifications (GDA) are events of fundamental importance for bacterial evolution and are frequently associated with antibiotic resistance in many species. As such, GDAs are regarded as evolutionary adaptions to novel selective pressures in hostile environments pointing towards a special importance of isd for S. lugdunensis. For the first time we show an example of a GDA that involves a virulence factor of a Gram-positive pathogen and link the GDA directly to a competitive advantage when the bacteria were struggling with selective pressures mimicking "nutritional immunity". PMID:27575058

  1. A comparative meta-analysis of maximal aerobic metabolism of vertebrates: implications for respiratory and cardiovascular limits to gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Stanley S; Hancock, Thomas V; Hedrick, Michael S

    2013-02-01

    Maximal aerobic metabolic rates (MMR) in vertebrates are supported by increased conductive and diffusive fluxes of O(2) from the environment to the mitochondria necessitating concomitant increases in CO(2) efflux. A question that has received much attention has been which step, respiratory or cardiovascular, provides the principal rate limitation to gas flux at MMR? Limitation analyses have principally focused on O(2) fluxes, though the excess capacity of the lung for O(2) ventilation and diffusion remains unexplained except as a safety factor. Analyses of MMR normally rely upon allometry and temperature to define these factors, but cannot account for much of the variation and often have narrow phylogenetic breadth. The unique aspect of our comparative approach was to use an interclass meta-analysis to examine cardio-respiratory variables during the increase from resting metabolic rate to MMR among vertebrates from fish to mammals, independent of allometry and phylogeny. Common patterns at MMR indicate universal principles governing O(2) and CO(2) transport in vertebrate cardiovascular and respiratory systems, despite the varied modes of activities (swimming, running, flying), different cardio-respiratory architecture, and vastly different rates of metabolism (endothermy vs. ectothermy). Our meta-analysis supports previous studies indicating a cardiovascular limit to maximal O(2) transport and also implicates a respiratory system limit to maximal CO(2) efflux, especially in ectotherms. Thus, natural selection would operate on the respiratory system to enhance maximal CO(2) excretion and the cardiovascular system to enhance maximal O(2) uptake. This provides a possible evolutionary explanation for the conundrum of why the respiratory system appears functionally over-designed from an O(2) perspective, a unique insight from previous work focused solely on O(2) fluxes. The results suggest a common gas transport blueprint, or Bauplan, in the vertebrate clade. PMID

  2. A comparative meta-analysis of maximal aerobic metabolism of vertebrates: implications for respiratory and cardiovascular limits to gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Stanley S; Hancock, Thomas V; Hedrick, Michael S

    2013-02-01

    Maximal aerobic metabolic rates (MMR) in vertebrates are supported by increased conductive and diffusive fluxes of O(2) from the environment to the mitochondria necessitating concomitant increases in CO(2) efflux. A question that has received much attention has been which step, respiratory or cardiovascular, provides the principal rate limitation to gas flux at MMR? Limitation analyses have principally focused on O(2) fluxes, though the excess capacity of the lung for O(2) ventilation and diffusion remains unexplained except as a safety factor. Analyses of MMR normally rely upon allometry and temperature to define these factors, but cannot account for much of the variation and often have narrow phylogenetic breadth. The unique aspect of our comparative approach was to use an interclass meta-analysis to examine cardio-respiratory variables during the increase from resting metabolic rate to MMR among vertebrates from fish to mammals, independent of allometry and phylogeny. Common patterns at MMR indicate universal principles governing O(2) and CO(2) transport in vertebrate cardiovascular and respiratory systems, despite the varied modes of activities (swimming, running, flying), different cardio-respiratory architecture, and vastly different rates of metabolism (endothermy vs. ectothermy). Our meta-analysis supports previous studies indicating a cardiovascular limit to maximal O(2) transport and also implicates a respiratory system limit to maximal CO(2) efflux, especially in ectotherms. Thus, natural selection would operate on the respiratory system to enhance maximal CO(2) excretion and the cardiovascular system to enhance maximal O(2) uptake. This provides a possible evolutionary explanation for the conundrum of why the respiratory system appears functionally over-designed from an O(2) perspective, a unique insight from previous work focused solely on O(2) fluxes. The results suggest a common gas transport blueprint, or Bauplan, in the vertebrate clade.

  3. Main components of iron metabolism in microbial systems — Analyzed by in vivo Mössbauer spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzanke, B. F.; Bill, E.; Trautwein, A. X.

    1992-04-01

    Two major intracellular iron components (Fe2+ and Fe3+) are detectable in a large variety of microbes grown in low-iron media supplemented with siderophores indicating their widespread occurrence within the microbial world. Isolation of the two species from E. coli revealed that the ferrous component corresponds to a protein exhibiting a molecular mass of 15kDa and the ferric component to a protein of 17kDa. Growth of a Gram positive Staphylococcus in an iron-rich medium did not yield typical bacterioferritin-like features suggesting that this organism may exhibit a strategy not requiring bacterioferritin to cope with high iron levels in the growth medium.

  4. Iron-Responsive Bacterial Small RNAs: Variations on a Theme

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Erin R.

    2013-01-01

    For most living organisms, iron is both essential and potentially toxic, making the precise maintenance of iron homeostasis necessary for survival. To manage this paradox, bacteria regulate the acquisition, utilization, and storage of iron in response to its availability. The iron-dependent ferric uptake repressor (Fur) often mediates this iron-responsive regulation, by both direct and indirect mechanisms. In 2002, Masse and Gottesman identified a novel target of Fur-mediated regulation in Escherichia coli: a gene encoding a small regulatory RNA (sRNA) termed RyhB. Under conditions of iron-limitation, RyhB is produced and functions to regulate the expression of several target genes encoding iron-utilizing enzymes, iron acquisition systems, and iron storage factors. This pivotal finding provided the missing link between environmental iron-limitation and previously observed decreases in certain iron-dependent metabolic pathways, a phenomenon now referred to as an “iron-sparing” response. The discovery of RyhB opened the door to the rapidly expanding field of bacterial iron-regulated sRNAs, which continue to be identified and described in numerous bacterial species. Most striking are findings that the impact of iron-responsive sRNA regulation often extends beyond iron homeostasis, particularly with regard to production of virulence-associated factors by pathogenic bacteria. This review discusses trends in the collective body of work on iron-regulated sRNAs, highlighting both the regulatory mechanisms they utilize to control target gene expression and the impact of this regulation on basic processes controlling bacterial physiology and virulence. PMID:23340911

  5. Uses and limitations of the XTT assay in studies of Candida growth and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, D M; Balkis, M; Chandra, J; Mukherjee, P K; Ghannoum, M A

    2003-01-01

    Colorimetric tetrazolium assays are used increasingly in studies of fungi, often in the absence of standardization or correlation with other methods. We examined species- and strain-related tetrazolium metabolism in Candida albicans and Candida parapsilosis by using XTT [2,3-bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide] and WST-8 [2-(2-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)-3-(4-nitrophenyl)-5-(2,4-disulphonyl)-2H-tetrazolium] and found marked variations. Also, significant signal was often missed in the absence of dimethyl sulfoxide extraction.

  6. Icariin regulates systemic iron metabolism by increasing hepatic hepcidin expression through Stat3 and Smad1/5/8 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Miao; Liu, Jing; Guo, Wenli; Liu, Xin; Liu, Sijin; Yin, Huijun

    2016-05-01

    Systemic iron homeostasis is strictly controlled under normal conditions to ensure a balance between the absorption, utilization, storage and recycling of iron. The hepcidin-ferroportin (FPN) axis is of critical importance in the maintenance of iron homeostasis. Hepcidin deficiency gives rise to enhanced dietary iron absorption, as well as to increased iron release from macrophages, and this in turn results in iron accumulation in the plasma and organs, and is associated with a range of tissue pathologies. Low hepcidin levels have been demonstrated in most forms of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH), as well as in β-thalassemia. Therapies that increase hepcidin concentrations may potentially play a role in the treatment of these iron overload-related diseases. To date, natural compounds have not been extensively investigated for this purpose, to the best of our knowledge. Thus, in the present study, we screened natural compounds that have the potential to regulate hepcidin expression. By performing hepcidin promoter-luciferase assay, RT-qPCR and animal experiments, we demonstrated that icariin and berberine were potent stimulators of hepcidin transcription. Mechanistic experiments indicated that icariin and berberine increased hepcidin expression by activating the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) and Smad1/5/8 signaling pathways. The induction of hepcidin was confirmed in mice following icariin administration, coupled with associated changes in serum and tissue iron concentrations. In support of these findings, the icariin analogues, epimedin A, B and C, also increased hepatic hepcidin expression. However, these changes were not observed in hepcidin-deficient [Hamp1-/- or Hamp1‑knockout (KO)] mice following icariin administration, thereby verifying hepatic hepcidin as the target of icariin. Although berberine exhibited a robust capacity to promote hepcidin expression in vitro, it failed to alter hepcidin expression in mice. Taken together

  7. Metabolic assessment prior to total pancreatectomy and islet autotransplant: utility, limitations and potential.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, R; Beilman, G J; Dunn, T B; Pruett, T L; Chinnakotla, S C; Radosevich, D M; Robertson, R P; Ptacek, P; Balamurugan, A N; Wilhelm, J J; Hering, B J; Sutherland, D E R; Moran, A; Bellin, M D

    2013-10-01

    Islet autotransplant (IAT) may ameliorate postsurgical diabetes following total pancreatectomy (TP), but outcomes are dependent upon islet mass, which is unknown prior to pancreatectomy. We evaluated whether preoperative metabolic testing could predict islet isolation outcomes and thus improve assessment of TPIAT candidates. We examined the relationship between measures from frequent sample IV glucose tolerance tests (FSIVGTT) and mixed meal tolerance tests (MMTT) and islet mass in 60 adult patients, with multivariate logistic regression modeling to identify predictors of islet mass ≥2500 IEQ/kg. The acute C-peptide response to glucose (ACRglu) and disposition index from FSIVGTT correlated modestly with the islet equivalents per kilogram body weight (IEQ/kg). Fasting and MMTT glucose levels and HbA1c correlated inversely with IEQ/kg (r values -0.33 to -0.40, p ≤ 0.05). In multivariate logistic regression modeling, normal fasting glucose (<100 mg/dL) and stimulated C-peptide on MMTT ≥4 ng/mL were associated with greater odds of receiving an islet mass ≥2500 IEQ/kg (OR 0.93 for fasting glucose, CI 0.87-1.0; OR 7.9 for C-peptide, CI 1.75-35.6). In conclusion, parameters obtained from FSIVGTT correlate modestly with islet isolation outcomes. Stimulated C-peptide ≥4 ng/mL on MMTT conveyed eight times the odds of receiving ≥2500 IEQ/kg, a threshold associated with reasonable metabolic control postoperatively.

  8. Macrophage iron homeostasis and polarization in the context of cancer.

    PubMed

    Jung, Michaela; Mertens, Christina; Brüne, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    Macrophages are central in regulating iron homeostasis, which is tightly linked to their versatile role during innate immunity. They sequester iron by phagocytosis of senescent erythrocytes and represent a major source of available iron in the body. Macrophage iron homeostasis is coupled to the functional heterogeneity and plasticity of these cells, with their extreme roles during inflammation, immune modulation, and resolution of inflammation. It is now appreciated that the macrophage polarization process dictates expression profiles of genes involved in iron metabolism. Therefore, macrophages have evolved a multitude of mechanisms to sequester, transport, store, and release iron. A new, enigmatic protein entering the iron scene and affecting the macrophage phenotype is lipocalin-2. Iron sequestration in macrophages depletes the microenvironment, thereby limiting extracellular pathogen or tumor growth, while fostering inflammation. In contrast, iron release from macrophages contributes to bystander cell proliferation, which is important for tissue regeneration and repair. This dichotomy is also reflected by the dual role of lipocalin-2 in macrophages. Unfortunately, the iron release macrophage phenotype is also a characteristic of tumor-associated macrophages and stimulates tumor cell survival and growth. Iron sequestration versus its release is now appreciated to be associated with the macrophage polarization program and can be used to explain a number of biological functions attributed to distinct macrophage phenotypes. Here we discuss macrophage iron homeostasis with a special focus on lipocalin-2 related to the formation and function of tumor-associated macrophages.

  9. Genome Analysis of the Biotechnologically Relevant Acidophilic Iron Oxidising Strain JA12 Indicates Phylogenetic and Metabolic Diversity within the Novel Genus “Ferrovum”

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Sophie R.; Poehlein, Anja; Tischler, Judith S.; González, Carolina; Ossandon, Francisco J.; Daniel, Rolf; Holmes, David S.; Schlömann, Michael; Mühling, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Members of the genus “Ferrovum” are ubiquitously distributed in acid mine drainage (AMD) waters which are characterised by their high metal and sulfate loads. So far isolation and microbiological characterisation have only been successful for the designated type strain “Ferrovum myxofaciens” P3G. Thus, knowledge about physiological characteristics and the phylogeny of the genus “Ferrovum” is extremely scarce. Objective In order to access the wider genetic pool of the genus “Ferrovum” we sequenced the genome of a “Ferrovum”-containing mixed culture and successfully assembled the almost complete genome sequence of the novel “Ferrovum” strain JA12. Phylogeny and Lifestyle The genome-based phylogenetic analysis indicates that strain JA12 and the type strain represent two distinct “Ferrovum” species. “Ferrovum” strain JA12 is characterised by an unusually small genome in comparison to the type strain and other iron oxidising bacteria. The prediction of nutrient assimilation pathways suggests that “Ferrovum” strain JA12 maintains a chemolithoautotrophic lifestyle utilising carbon dioxide and bicarbonate, ammonium and urea, sulfate, phosphate and ferrous iron as carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorous and energy sources, respectively. Unique Metabolic Features The potential utilisation of urea by “Ferrovum” strain JA12 is moreover remarkable since it may furthermore represent a strategy among extreme acidophiles to cope with the acidic environment. Unlike other acidophilic chemolithoautotrophs “Ferrovum” strain JA12 exhibits a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle, a metabolic feature shared with the closer related neutrophilic iron oxidisers among the Betaproteobacteria including Sideroxydans lithotrophicus and Thiobacillus denitrificans. Furthermore, the absence of characteristic redox proteins involved in iron oxidation in the well-studied acidophiles Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (rusticyanin) and Acidithiobacillus

  10. Iron economy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Glaesener, Anne G.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.

    2013-01-01

    While research on iron nutrition in plants has largely focused on iron-uptake pathways, photosynthetic microbes such as the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii provide excellent experimental systems for understanding iron metabolism at the subcellular level. Several paradigms in iron homeostasis have been established in this alga, including photosystem remodeling in the chloroplast and preferential retention of some pathways and key iron-dependent proteins in response to suboptimal iron supply. This review presents our current understanding of iron homeostasis in Chlamydomonas, with specific attention on characterized responses to changes in iron supply, like iron-deficiency. An overview of frequently used methods for the investigation of iron-responsive gene expression, physiology and metabolism is also provided, including preparation of media, the effect of cell size, cell density and strain choice on quantitative measurements and methods for the determination of metal content and assessing the effect of iron supply on photosynthetic performance. PMID:24032036

  11. Inter-relationships of MnO 2 precipitation, siderophore-Mn (III) complex formation, siderophore degradation, and iron limitation in Mn (II)-oxidizing bacterial cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Dorothy L.; Morita, Takami; Mozafarzadeh, Mylene L.; Verity, Rebecca; McCarthy, James K.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2007-12-01

    To examine the pathways that form Mn (III) and Mn (IV) in the Mn (II)-oxidizing bacterial strains Pseudomonas putida GB-1 and MnB1, and to test whether the siderophore pyoverdine (PVD) inhibits Mn (IV)O 2 formation, cultures were subjected to various protocols at known concentrations of iron and PVD. Depending on growth conditions, P. putida produced one of two oxidized Mn species - either soluble PVD-Mn (III) complex or insoluble Mn (IV)O 2 minerals - but not both simultaneously. PVD-Mn (III) was present, and MnO 2 precipitation was inhibited, both in iron-limited cultures that had synthesized 26-50 μM PVD and in iron-replete (non-PVD-producing) cultures that were supplemented with 10-550 μM purified PVD. PVD-Mn (III) arose by predominantly ligand-mediated air oxidation of Mn (II) in the presence of PVD, based on the following evidence: (a) yields and rates of this reaction were similar in sterile media and in cultures, and (b) GB-1 mutants deficient in enzymatic Mn oxidation produced PVD-Mn (III) as efficiently as wild type. Only wild type, however, could degrade PVD-Mn (III), a process linked to the production of both MnO 2 and an altered PVD with absorbance and fluorescence spectra markedly different from those of either PVD or PVD-Mn (III). Two conditions, the presence of bioavailable iron and the absence of PVD at concentrations exceeding those of Mn, both had to be satisfied for MnO 2 to appear. These results suggest that P. putida cultures produce soluble Mn (III) or MnO 2 by different and mutually inhibitory pathways: enzymatic catalysis yielding MnO 2 under iron sufficiency or PVD-promoted oxidation yielding PVD-Mn (III) under iron limitation. Since PVD-producing Pseudomonas species are environmentally prevalent Mn oxidizers, these data predict influences of iron (via PVD-Mn (III) versus MnO 2) on the global oxidation/reduction cycling of various pollutants, recalcitrant organic matter, and elements such as C, S, N, Cr, U, and Mn.

  12. Downregulation of the Werner syndrome protein induces a metabolic shift that compromises redox homeostasis and limits proliferation of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Baomin; Iglesias-Pedraz, Juan Manuel; Chen, Leng-Ying; Yin, Fei; Cadenas, Enrique; Reddy, Sita; Comai, Lucio

    2014-04-01

    The Werner syndrome protein (WRN) is a nuclear protein required for cell growth and proliferation. Loss-of-function mutations in the Werner syndrome gene are associated with the premature onset of age-related diseases. How loss of WRN limits cell proliferation and induces replicative senescence is poorly understood. Here, we show that WRN depletion leads to a striking metabolic shift that coordinately weakens the pathways that generate reducing equivalents for detoxification of reactive oxygen species and increases mitochondrial respiration. In cancer cells, this metabolic shift counteracts the Warburg effect, a defining characteristic of many malignant cells, resulting in altered redox balance and accumulation of oxidative DNA damage that inhibits cell proliferation and induces a senescence-like phenotype. Consistent with these findings, supplementation with antioxidant rescues at least in part cell proliferation and decreases senescence in WRN-knockdown cancer cells. These results demonstrate that WRN plays a critical role in cancer cell proliferation by contributing to the Warburg effect and preventing metabolic stress.

  13. Nitric oxide induces hypoxia ischemic injury in the neonatal brain via the disruption of neuronal iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing; Harris, Valerie A; Rafikov, Ruslan; Sun, Xutong; Kumar, Sanjiv; Black, Stephen M

    2015-12-01

    We have recently shown that increased hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation is involved in hypoxia-ischemia (HI)-mediated neonatal brain injury. H2O2 can react with free iron to form the hydroxyl radical, through Fenton Chemistry. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine if there was a role for the hydroxyl radical in neonatal HI brain injury and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Our data demonstrate that HI increases the deposition of free iron and hydroxyl radical formation, in both P7 hippocampal slice cultures exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), and the neonatal rat exposed to HI. Both these processes were found to be nitric oxide (NO) dependent. Further analysis demonstrated that the NO-dependent increase in iron deposition was mediated through increased transferrin receptor expression and a decrease in ferritin expression. This was correlated with a reduction in aconitase activity. Both NO inhibition and iron scavenging, using deferoxamine administration, reduced hydroxyl radical levels and neuronal cell death. In conclusion, our results suggest that increased NO generation leads to neuronal cell death during neonatal HI, at least in part, by altering iron homeostasis and hydroxyl radical generation.

  14. Mechanisms of mammalian iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pantopoulos, Kostas; Porwal, Suheel Kumar; Tartakoff, Alan; Devireddy, L

    2012-07-24

    Iron is vital for almost all organisms because of its ability to donate and accept electrons with relative ease. It serves as a cofactor for many proteins and enzymes necessary for oxygen and energy metabolism, as well as for several other essential processes. Mammalian cells utilize multiple mechanisms to acquire iron. Disruption of iron homeostasis is associated with various human diseases: iron deficiency resulting from defects in the acquisition or distribution of the metal causes anemia, whereas iron surfeit resulting from excessive iron absorption or defective utilization causes abnormal tissue iron deposition, leading to oxidative damage. Mammals utilize distinct mechanisms to regulate iron homeostasis at the systemic and cellular levels. These involve the hormone hepcidin and iron regulatory proteins, which collectively ensure iron balance. This review outlines recent advances in iron regulatory pathways as well as in mechanisms underlying intracellular iron trafficking, an important but less studied area of mammalian iron homeostasis.

  15. Limited uptake, translocation and enhanced metabolic degradation contribute to glyphosate tolerance in Mucuna pruriens var. utilis plants.

    PubMed

    Rojano-Delgado, Antonia María; Cruz-Hipolito, Hugo; De Prado, Rafael; Luque de Castro, María Dolores; Franco, Antonio Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Velvet bean (Mucuna pruriens, Fabaceae) plants exhibits an innate, very high resistance (i.e., tolerance) to glyphosate similar to that of plants which have acquired resistance to this herbicide as a trait. We analyzed the uptake of [(14)C]-glyphosate by leaves and its translocation to meristematic tissues, and used scanning electron micrographs to further analyze the cuticle and 3D capillary electrophoresis to investigate a putative metabolism capable of degrading the herbicide. Velvet bean exhibited limited uptake of glyphosate and impaired translocation of the compound to meristematic tissues. Also, for the first time in a higher plant, two concurrent pathways capable of degrading glyphosate to AMPA, Pi, glyoxylate, sarcosine and formaldehyde as end products were identified. Based on the results, the innate tolerance of velvet bean to glyphosate is possibly a result of the combined action of the previous three traits, namely: limited uptake, impaired translocation and enhanced degradation. PMID:22015254

  16. [INFLUENCE OF THE REGULAR INTAKE OF FERMENTED MILK PRODUCTS ENRICHED BY MICRONUTRIENTS ON SOME INDICES OF IRON METABOLISM IN ADOLESCENTS INVOLVED IN SPORTS].

    PubMed

    Turchaninov, D V; Bovarskaya, L A; Bogdashin, I V; Bagrova, L V; Gotwald, A R; Kozubenko, O V

    2015-01-01

    There was performed an experimental study of the influence of regular intake offermented milk enriched by products "Bifidin" and "Prolacta" on indices of iron metabolism in adolescents of 12-17 years, involved in sports (n = 94). In all study participants there was made double blood test (every 60 days), there were determined the levels of hemoglobin, serum iron, serum ferritin, C-reactive protein. The intervention in the main group (n = 68) was in daily intake offermented milk product in a volume of 200 ml (1 Cup) in addition to the normal diet within 2 months, including 35 cases who had used the bioproduct "Bifidin" and 33 persons- bioproduct "Prolacta". The control group was consisted of 26 persons from the adolescents engaged in the same sections, but not taking additional fermented milk drinks. The average values of all studied indices in adolescent athletes of the main and control groups before and after the intervention were consistent with reference values. Latent iron deficiency was detected in 23.4 ± 4.4% of adolescents involved in sports. At the second point of the research in two months of intake of enriched dairy products in the main group there was noticed the gain in levels of serum iron, ferritin, and the decline of the concentration of C-reactive protein. The results of the study allow us to consider enriched dairy products "Bifidin" and "Prolacta" as one of the components of complex measures of prophylaxis of hypovitaminosis and microelementoses in adolescents who are actively involved in sports.

  17. [INFLUENCE OF THE REGULAR INTAKE OF FERMENTED MILK PRODUCTS ENRICHED BY MICRONUTRIENTS ON SOME INDICES OF IRON METABOLISM IN ADOLESCENTS INVOLVED IN SPORTS].

    PubMed

    Turchaninov, D V; Bovarskaya, L A; Bogdashin, I V; Bagrova, L V; Gotwald, A R; Kozubenko, O V

    2015-01-01

    There was performed an experimental study of the influence of regular intake offermented milk enriched by products "Bifidin" and "Prolacta" on indices of iron metabolism in adolescents of 12-17 years, involved in sports (n = 94). In all study participants there was made double blood test (every 60 days), there were determined the levels of hemoglobin, serum iron, serum ferritin, C-reactive protein. The intervention in the main group (n = 68) was in daily intake offermented milk product in a volume of 200 ml (1 Cup) in addition to the normal diet within 2 months, including 35 cases who had used the bioproduct "Bifidin" and 33 persons- bioproduct "Prolacta". The control group was consisted of 26 persons from the adolescents engaged in the same sections, but not taking additional fermented milk drinks. The average values of all studied indices in adolescent athletes of the main and control groups before and after the intervention were consistent with reference values. Latent iron deficiency was detected in 23.4 ± 4.4% of adolescents involved in sports. At the second point of the research in two months of intake of enriched dairy products in the main group there was noticed the gain in levels of serum iron, ferritin, and the decline of the concentration of C-reactive protein. The results of the study allow us to consider enriched dairy products "Bifidin" and "Prolacta" as one of the components of complex measures of prophylaxis of hypovitaminosis and microelementoses in adolescents who are actively involved in sports. PMID:27029177

  18. IRON IN MULTIPLE MYELOMA

    PubMed Central

    VanderWall, Kristina; Daniels-Wells, Tracy R; Penichet, Manuel; Lichtenstein, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a non-curable B cell malignancy in which iron metabolism plays an important role. Patients with this disorder almost universally suffer from a clinically significant anemia, which is often symptomatic, and which is due to impaired iron utilization. Recent studies indicate that the proximal cause of dysregulated iron metabolism and anemia in these patients is cytokine-induced upregulation of hepcidin expression. Malignant myeloma cells are dependent on an increased influx of iron and therapeutic efforts are being made to target this requirement. The studies detailing the characteristics and biochemical abnormalities in iron metabolism causing anemia and the initial attempts to target iron therapeutically are described in this review. PMID:23879589

  19. Iron concentration limits growth rate and the expression of virulence factors in hrp-inducing minimal medium with Pseudomonas syringae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although chemically-defined media have been developed and widely used to study the expression of virulence factors in the model plant pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, it has been difficult to link specific medium components to the induction response. Using a chemostat system, we found that iron is th...

  20. Biosynthetic and iron metabolism is regulated by thiol proteome changes dependent on glutaredoxin-2 and mitochondrial peroxiredoxin-1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Brian; Padilla, C Alicia; Pedrajas, José Rafael; Bárcena, José Antonio

    2011-04-29

    Redoxins are involved in maintenance of thiol redox homeostasis, but their exact sites of action are only partly known. We have applied a combined redox proteomics and transcriptomics experimental strategy to discover specific functions of two interacting redoxins: dually localized glutaredoxin 2 (Grx2p) and mitochondrial peroxiredoxin 1 (Prx1p). We have identified 139 proteins showing differential postranslational thiol redox modifications when the cells do not express Grx2p, Prx1p, or both and have mapped the precise cysteines involved in each case. Some of these modifications constitute functional switches that affect metabolic and signaling pathways as the primary effect, leading to gene transcription remodeling as the secondary adaptive effect as demonstrated by a parallel high throughput gene expression analysis. The results suggest that in the absence of Grx2p, the metabolic flow toward nucleotide and aromatic amino acid biosynthesis is slowed down by redox modification of the key enzymes Rpe1p (D-ribulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase), Tkl1p (transketolase) and Aro4p (3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase). The glycolytic mainstream is then diverted toward carbohydrate storage by induction of trehalose and glycogen biosynthesis genes. Porphyrin biosynthesis may also be compromised by inactivation of the redox-sensitive cytosolic enzymes Hem12p (uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase) and Sam1p (S-adenosyl methionine synthetase) and a battery of respiratory genes sensitive to low heme levels are induced. Genes of the Aft1p-dependent iron regulon were induced specifically in the absence of Prx1p despite optimal mitochondrial Fe-S biogenesis, suggesting dysfunction of the mitochondria to the cytosol signaling pathway. Strikingly, requirement of Grx2p for these events places dithiolic Grx2 in the framework of iron metabolism.

  1. Induction of hypoxic root metabolism results from physical limitations in O 2 bioavailability in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, J.; Liu, G.; Monje, O.; Stutte, G. W.; Porterfield, D. M.

    2004-01-01

    Numerous spaceflight experiments have noted changes in the roots that are consistent with hypoxia in the rootzone. These observations include general ultrastructure analysis and biochemical measurements to direct measurements of stress specific enzymes. In experiments that have monitored alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the data shows this hypoxically responsive gene is induced and is associated with increased ADH activity in microgravity. These changes in ADH could be induced either by spaceflight hypoxia resulting from inhibition of gravity mediated O 2 transport, or by a non-specific stress response due to inhibition of gravisensing. We tested these hypotheses in a series of two experiments. The objective of the first experiment was to determine if physical changes in gravity-mediated O 2 transport can be directly measured, while the second series of experiments tested whether disruption of gravisensing can induce a non-specific ADH response. To directly measure O 2 bioavailability as a function of gravity, we designed a sensor that mimics metabolic oxygen consumption in the rhizosphere. Because of these criteria, the sensor is sensitive to any changes in root O 2 bioavailability that may occur in microgravity. In a KC-135 experiment, the sensor was implanted in a moist granular clay media and exposed to microgravity during parabolic flight. The resulting data indicated that root O 2 bioavailability decreased in phase with gravity. In experiments that tested for non-specific induction of ADH, we compared the response of transgenic Arabidopsis plants (ADH promoted GUS marker gene) exposed to clinostat, control, and waterlogged conditions. The plants were grown on agar slats in a growth chamber before being exposed to the experimental treatments. The plants were stained for GUS activity localization, and subjected to biochemical tests for ADH, and GUS enzyme activity. These tests showed that the waterlogging treatment induced significant increases in GUS and ADH

  2. Transferrin Saturation: A Body Iron Biomarker.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, M E; Sharif, M U; Stack, A G

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for several metabolic pathways and physiological processes. The maintenance of iron homeostasis within the human body requires a dynamic and highly sophisticated interplay of several proteins, as states of iron deficiency or excess are both potentially deleterious to health. Among these is plasma transferrin, which is central to iron metabolism not only through iron transport between body tissues in a soluble nontoxic form but also through its protective scavenger role in sequestering free toxic iron. The transferrin saturation (TSAT), an index that takes into account both plasma iron and its main transport protein, is considered an important biochemical marker of body iron status. Its increasing use in many health systems is due to the increased availability of measurement methods, such as calorimetry, turbidimetry, nephelometry, and immunochemistry to estimate its value. However, despite its frequent use in clinical practice to detect states of iron deficiency or iron overload, careful attention should be paid to the inherent limitations of the test especially in certain settings such as inflammation in order to avoid misinterpretation and erroneous conclusions. Beyond its usual clinical use, an emerging body of evidence has linked TSAT levels to major clinical outcomes such as cardiovascular mortality. This has the potential to extend the utility of TSAT index to risk stratification and prognostication. However, most of the current evidence is mainly driven by observational studies where the risk of residual confounding cannot be fully eliminated. Indeed, future efforts are required to fully explore this capability in well-designed clinical trials or prospective large-scale cohorts.

  3. Molecular control of vertebrate iron homeostasis by iron regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wallander, Michelle L.; Leibold, Elizabeth A.; Eisenstein, Richard S.

    2008-01-01

    Both deficiencies and excesses of iron represent major public health problems throughout the world. Understanding the cellular and organismal processes controlling iron homeostasis is critical for identifying iron-related diseases and in advancing the clinical treatments for such disorders of iron metabolism. Iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) 1 and 2 are key regulators of vertebrate iron metabolism. These RNA binding proteins post-transcriptionally control the stability or translation of mRNAs encoding proteins involved in iron homeostasis thereby controlling the uptake, utilization, storage or export of iron. Recent evidence provides insight into how IRPs selectively control the translation or stability of target mRNAs, how IRP RNA binding activity is controlled by iron-dependent and iron-independent effectors, and the pathological consequences of dysregulation of the IRP system. PMID:16872694

  4. Signatures of nitrogen limitation in the elemental composition of the proteins involved in the metabolic apparatus.

    PubMed

    Acquisti, Claudia; Kumar, Sudhir; Elser, James J

    2009-07-22

    Nitrogen (N) is a fundamental component of nucleotides and amino acids and is often a limiting nutrient in natural ecosystems. Thus, study of the N content of biomolecules may establish important connections between ecology and genomics. However, while significant differences in the elemental composition of whole organisms are well documented, how the flux of nutrients in the cell has shaped the evolution of different cellular processes remains poorly understood. By examining the elemental composition of major functional classes of proteins in four multicellular eukaryotic model organisms, we find that the catabolic machinery shows substantially lower N content than the anabolic machinery and the rest of the proteome. This pattern suggests that ecological selection for N conservation specifically targets cellular components that are highly expressed in response to nutrient limitation. We propose that the RNA component of the anabolic machineries is the mechanistic force driving the elemental imbalance we found, and that RNA functions as an intracellular nutrient reservoir that is degraded and recycled during starvation periods. A comparison of the elemental composition of the anabolic and catabolic machineries in species that have experienced different levels of N limitation in their evolutionary history (animals versus plants) suggests that selection for N conservation has preferentially targeted the catabolic machineries of plants, resulting in a lower N content of the proteins involved in their catabolic processes. These findings link the composition of major cellular components to the environmental factors that trigger the activation of those components, suggesting that resource availability has constrained the atomic composition and the molecular architecture of the biotic processes that enable cells to respond to reduced nutrient availability.

  5. Iron status of vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Craig, W J

    1994-05-01

    An appropriately planned well-balanced vegetarian diet is compatible with an adequate iron status. Although the iron stores of vegetarians may be reduced, the incidence of iron-deficiency anemia in vegetarians is not significantly different from that in omnivores. Restrictive vegetarian diets (eg, macrobiotic) are associated with more widespread iron-deficiency anemia. Western vegetarians who consume a variety of foods have a better iron status than do those in developing countries who consume a limited diet based on unleavened, unrefined cereals. Whereas phytates, polyphenolics, and other plant constituents found in vegetarian diets inhibit nonheme-iron absorption, vitamin C, citric acid, and other organic acids facilitate nonheme-iron absorption.

  6. Paracoccidioides spp. ferrous and ferric iron assimilation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bailão, Elisa Flávia L. C.; Lima, Patrícia de Sousa; Silva-Bailão, Mirelle G.; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Fernandes, Gabriel da Rocha; Kosman, Daniel J.; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for almost all organisms, including fungi. Usually, fungi can uptake iron through receptor-mediated internalization of a siderophore or heme, and/or reductive iron assimilation (RIA). Traditionally, the RIA pathway consists of ferric reductases (Fres), ferroxidase (Fet3) and a high-affinity iron permease (Ftr1). Paracoccidioides spp. genomes do not present an Ftr1 homolog. However, this fungus expresses zinc regulated transporter homologs (Zrts), members of the ZIP family of membrane transporters that are able in some organisms to transport zinc and iron. A 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC)-overlay assay indicates that both Pb01 and Pb18 express a ferric reductase activity; however, 59Fe uptake assays indicate that only in Pb18 is this activity coupled to a reductase-dependent iron uptake pathway. In addition, Zrts are up-regulated in iron deprivation, as indicated by RNAseq and qRT-PCR using Pb01 transcripts. RNAseq strategy also demonstrated that transcripts related to siderophore uptake and biosynthesis are up-regulated in iron-deprived condition. The data suggest that the fungus could use both a non-classical RIA, comprising ferric reductases and Fe/Zn permeases (Zrts), and siderophore uptake pathways under iron-limited conditions. The study of iron metabolism reveals novel surface molecules that could function as accessible targets for drugs to block iron uptake and, consequently, inhibit pathogen's proliferation. PMID:26441843

  7. Iron competition in fungus-plant interactions

    PubMed Central

    López-Berges, Manuel S.; Turrà, David; Capilla, Javier; Schafferer, Lukas; Matthijs, Sandra; Jöchl, Christoph; Cornelis, Pierre; Guarro, Josep; Haas, Hubertus; Di Pietro, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Soilborne fungal pathogens are highly persistent and provoke important crop losses. During saprophytic and infectious stages in the soil, these organisms face situations of nutrient limitation and lack of essential elements, such as iron. We investigated the role of the bZIP transcription factor HapX as a central regulator of iron homeostasis and virulence in the vascular wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum. This root-infecting plant pathogen attacks more than hundred different crops and is an emerging human opportunistic invader. Although iron uptake remains unaffected in a strain lacking HapX, de-repression of genes implicated in iron-consuming processes such as respiration, amino acid metabolism, TCA cycle and heme biosynthesis lead to severely impaired growth under iron-limiting conditions. HapX is required for full virulence of F. oxysporum in tomato plants and essential for infection in immunodepressed mice. Virulence attenuation of the ΔhapX strain on tomato plants is more pronounced by co-inoculation of roots with the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas putida KT2440, but not with a mutant deficient in siderophores production. These results demonstrate that HapX is required for iron competition of F. oxysporum in the tomato rhizosphere and establish a conserved role for HapX-mediated iron homeostasis in fungal infection of plants and mammals. PMID:23299422

  8. Metabolic modeling of spatial heterogeneity of biofilms in microbial fuel cells reveals substrate limitations in electrical current generation.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, Nadeera; Franks, Ashley; Nevin, Kelly P; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan

    2014-10-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been proposed as an alternative energy resource for the conversion of organic compounds to electricity. In an MFC, microorganisms such as Geobacter sulfurreducens form an anode-associated biofilm that can completely oxidize organic matter (electron donor) to carbon dioxide with direct electron transfer to the anode (electron acceptor). Mathematical models are useful in analyzing biofilm processes; however, existing models rely on Nernst-Monod type expressions, and evaluate extracellular processes separated from the intracellular metabolism of the microorganism. Thus, models that combine both extracellular and intracellular components, while addressing spatial heterogeneity, are essential for improved representation of biofilm processes. The goal of this work is to develop a model that integrates genome-scale metabolic models with the model of biofilm environment. This integrated model shows the variations of electrical current production and biofilm thickness under the presence/absence of NH4 in the bulk solution, and under varying maintenance energy demands. Further, sensitivity analysis suggested that conductivity is not limiting electrical current generation and that increasing cell density can lead to enhanced current generation. In addition, the modeling results also highlight instances such as the transformation into respiring cells, where the mechanism of electrical current generation during biofilm development is not yet clearly understood.

  9. Switching between apparently redundant iron-uptake mechanisms benefits bacteria in changeable environments

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Zoé; Ross-Gillespie, Adin; Kümmerli, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria often possess multiple siderophore-based iron uptake systems for scavenging this vital resource from their environment. However, some siderophores seem redundant, because they have limited iron-binding efficiency and are seldom expressed under iron limitation. Here, we investigate the conundrum of why selection does not eliminate this apparent redundancy. We focus on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium that can produce two siderophores—the highly efficient but metabolically expensive pyoverdine, and the inefficient but metabolically cheap pyochelin. We found that the bacteria possess molecular mechanisms to phenotypically switch from mainly producing pyoverdine under severe iron limitation to mainly producing pyochelin when iron is only moderately limited. We further show that strains exclusively producing pyochelin grew significantly better than strains exclusively producing pyoverdine under moderate iron limitation, whereas the inverse was seen under severe iron limitation. This suggests that pyochelin is not redundant, but that switching between siderophore strategies might be beneficial to trade off efficiencies versus costs of siderophores. Indeed, simulations parameterized from our data confirmed that strains retaining the capacity to switch between siderophores significantly outcompeted strains defective for one or the other siderophore under fluctuating iron availabilities. Finally, we discuss how siderophore switching can be viewed as a form of collective decision-making, whereby a coordinated shift in behaviour at the group level emerges as a result of positive and negative feedback loops operating among individuals at the local scale. PMID:23760867

  10. Switching between apparently redundant iron-uptake mechanisms benefits bacteria in changeable environments.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Zoé; Ross-Gillespie, Adin; Kümmerli, Rolf

    2013-08-01

    Bacteria often possess multiple siderophore-based iron uptake systems for scavenging this vital resource from their environment. However, some siderophores seem redundant, because they have limited iron-binding efficiency and are seldom expressed under iron limitation. Here, we investigate the conundrum of why selection does not eliminate this apparent redundancy. We focus on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium that can produce two siderophores-the highly efficient but metabolically expensive pyoverdine, and the inefficient but metabolically cheap pyochelin. We found that the bacteria possess molecular mechanisms to phenotypically switch from mainly producing pyoverdine under severe iron limitation to mainly producing pyochelin when iron is only moderately limited. We further show that strains exclusively producing pyochelin grew significantly better than strains exclusively producing pyoverdine under moderate iron limitation, whereas the inverse was seen under severe iron limitation. This suggests that pyochelin is not redundant, but that switching between siderophore strategies might be beneficial to trade off efficiencies versus costs of siderophores. Indeed, simulations parameterized from our data confirmed that strains retaining the capacity to switch between siderophores significantly outcompeted strains defective for one or the other siderophore under fluctuating iron availabilities. Finally, we discuss how siderophore switching can be viewed as a form of collective decision-making, whereby a coordinated shift in behaviour at the group level emerges as a result of positive and negative feedback loops operating among individuals at the local scale. PMID:23760867

  11. Growth of Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 on gaseous n-alkanes: new metabolic insights and transcriptional analysis of two soluble di-iron monooxygenase genes

    PubMed Central

    Cappelletti, Martina; Presentato, Alessandro; Milazzo, Giorgio; Turner, Raymond J.; Fedi, Stefano; Frascari, Dario; Zannoni, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain BCP1 was initially isolated for its ability to grow on gaseous n-alkanes, which act as inducers for the co-metabolic degradation of low-chlorinated compounds. Here, both molecular and metabolic features of BCP1 cells grown on gaseous and short-chain n-alkanes (up to n-heptane) were examined in detail. We show that propane metabolism generated terminal and sub-terminal oxidation products such as 1- and 2-propanol, whereas 1-butanol was the only terminal oxidation product detected from n-butane metabolism. Two gene clusters, prmABCD and smoABCD—coding for Soluble Di-Iron Monooxgenases (SDIMOs) involved in gaseous n-alkanes oxidation—were detected in the BCP1 genome. By means of Reverse Transcriptase-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis, a set of substrates inducing the expression of the sdimo genes in BCP1 were assessed as well as their transcriptional repression in the presence of sugars, organic acids, or during the cell growth on rich medium (Luria–Bertani broth). The transcriptional start sites of both the sdimo gene clusters were identified by means of primer extension experiments. Finally, proteomic studies revealed changes in the protein pattern induced by growth on gaseous- (n-butane) and/or liquid (n-hexane) short-chain n-alkanes as compared to growth on succinate. Among the differently expressed protein spots, two chaperonins and an isocytrate lyase were identified along with oxidoreductases involved in oxidation reactions downstream of the initial monooxygenase reaction step. PMID:26029173

  12. Variation in an Iron Metabolism Gene Moderates the Association Between Blood Lead Levels and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children

    PubMed Central

    Nigg, Joel T.; Elmore, Alexis L.; Natarajan, Neil; Friderici, Karen H.; Nikolas, Molly A.

    2016-01-01

    Although attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a heritable neurodevelopmental condition, there is also considerable scientific and public interest in environmental modulators of its etiology. Exposure to neurotoxins is one potential source of perturbation of neural, and hence psychological, development. Exposure to lead in particular has been widely investigated and is correlated with neurodevelopmental outcomes, including ADHD. To investigate whether this effect is likely to be causal, we used a Mendelian randomization design with a functional gene variant. In a case-control study, we examined the association between ADHD symptoms in children and blood lead level as moderated by variants in the hemochromatosis (HFE) gene. The HFE gene regulates iron uptake and secondarily modulates lead metabolism. Statistical moderation was observed: The magnitude of the association of blood lead with symptoms of ADHD was altered by functional HFE genotype, which is consistent with a causal hypothesis. PMID:26710823

  13. Pyruvate and lactate metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under fermentation, oxygen limitation, and fumarate respiration conditions.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Geydebrekht, Oleg V; Hill, Eric A; Reed, Jennifer L; Konopka, Allan E; Beliaev, Alexander S; Fredrickson, Jim K

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that derives energy by coupling organic matter oxidation to the reduction of a wide range of electron acceptors. Here, we quantitatively assessed the lactate and pyruvate metabolism of MR-1 under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor-limited growth on lactate with O(2), lactate with fumarate, and pyruvate fermentation. The latter does not support growth but provides energy for cell survival. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of that needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensable for growth, the respiration of fumarate does not contribute significantly to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions, S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, whereby the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle did not contribute significantly. Pyruvate dehydrogenase was not involved in lactate metabolism under conditions of O(2) limitation but was required for anaerobic growth, likely by supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. The results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination of substrate-level phosphorylation and respiration, where pyruvate serves as an electron donor and an electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by a recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H-independent d-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). The results further indicate that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by the generation of proton motive force.

  14. Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under Fermentation, Oxygen Limitation, and Fumarate Respiration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Hill, Eric A.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that derives energy by coupling organic matter oxidation to the reduction of wide range of electron acceptors. Here, we quantitatively assessed lactate and pyruvate metabolism of MR-1 under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor limited growth on lactate with O2; lactate with fumarate; and pyruvate fermentation. The latter does not support growth but provides energy for cell survival. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of that needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensible for growth, respiration of fumarate does not contribute significantly to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, whereby the TCA cycle did not contribute significantly. Pyruvate dehydrogenase was not involved in lactate metabolism under O2 limitation but was required for anaerobic growth likely by supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. The results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination of substrate-level phosphorylation and respiration, where pyruvate serves as electron donor and electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H independent D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). The results further indicate that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by proton motive force generation.

  15. Pyruvate and Lactate Metabolism by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under Fermentation, Oxygen Limitation, and Fumarate Respiration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Hill, Eric A.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Konopka, Allan; Beliaev, Alex S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-12-30

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe growing by coupling organic matter oxidation to reduction of wide range of electron acceptors. Here we quantitatively assessed lactate and pyruvate metabolism of these bacteria under three distinct conditions: electron acceptor limited growth on lactate with O2 and fumarate, and pyruvate fermentation, which does not sustain growth but allows cells to survive for prolonged period. Using physiological and genetic approaches combined with flux balance analysis, we showed that the proportion of ATP produced by substrate-level phosphorylation varied from 33% to 72.5% of all ATP needed for growth depending on the electron acceptor nature and availability. While being indispensible for growth, respiration of fumarate does not contribute much to ATP generation and likely serves to remove formate, a product of pyruvate formate-lyase-catalyzed pyruvate disproportionation. Under both tested respiratory conditions S. oneidensis MR-1 carried out incomplete substrate oxidation, and TCA cycle did not contribute significantly to substrate oxidation. Pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction was not involved in lactate metabolism under O2 limitation, however was important for anaerobic growth probably supplying reducing equivalents for biosynthesis. Unexpectedly, obtained results suggest that pyruvate fermentation by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells represents a combination between substrate-level phosphorylation and a respiratory process, where pyruvate serves as electron donor and electron acceptor. Pyruvate reduction to lactate at the expense of formate oxidation is catalyzed by recently described new type of oxidative NAD(P)H independent D-lactate dehydrogenase (Dld-II). Based on involved enzymes localization we hypothesize that pyruvate reduction coupled to formate oxidation may be accompanied by proton motive force generation.

  16. Metabolic Regulation of “Ca. Methylacidiphilum Fumariolicum” SolV Cells Grown Under Different Nitrogen and Oxygen Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Khadem, Ahmad F.; Pol, Arjan; Wieczorek, Adam S.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Aerobic methanotrophic bacteria can use methane as their sole energy source. The discovery of “Ca. Methylacidiphilum fumariolicum” strain SolV and other verrucomicrobial methanotrophs has revealed that the ability of bacteria to oxidize CH4 is much more diverse than has previously been assumed in terms of ecology, phylogeny, and physiology. A remarkable characteristic of the methane-oxidizing Verrucomicrobia is their extremely acidophilic phenotype, growing even below pH 1. In this study we used RNA-Seq to analyze the metabolic regulation of “Ca. M. fumariolicum” SolV cells growing at μmax in batch culture or under nitrogen fixing or oxygen limited conditions in chemostats, all at pH 2. The analysis showed that two of the three pmoCAB operons each encoding particulate methane monoxygenases were differentially expressed, probably regulated by the available oxygen. The hydrogen produced during N2 fixation is apparently recycled as demonstrated by the upregulation of the genes encoding a Ni/Fe-dependent hydrogenase. These hydrogenase genes were also upregulated under low oxygen conditions. Handling of nitrosative stress was shown by the expression of the nitric oxide reductase encoding genes norB and norC under all conditions tested, the upregulation of nitrite reductase nirK under oxygen limitation and of hydroxylamine oxidoreductase hao in the presence of ammonium. Unraveling the gene regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism helps to understand the underlying physiological adaptations of strain SolV in view of the harsh conditions of its natural ecosystem. PMID:22848206

  17. Effects of oxygen limitation on sugar metabolism in yeasts: a continuous-culture study of the Kluyver effect.

    PubMed

    Weusthuis, R A; Visser, W; Pronk, J T; Scheffers, W A; van Dijken, J P

    1994-04-01

    Growth and metabolite formation were studied in oxygen-limited chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CBS 8066 and Candida utilis CBS 621 growing on glucose or maltose at a dilution rate of 0.1 h-1. With either glucose or maltose S. cerevisiae could be grown under dual limitation of oxygen and sugar. Respiration and alcoholic fermentation occurred simultaneously and the catabolite fluxes through these processes were dependent on the magnitude of the oxygen feed. C. utilis could also be grown under dual limitation of glucose and oxygen. However, at very low oxygen feed rates (i.e. below 4 mmol l-1 h-1) growth was limited by oxygen only, as indicated by the high residual glucose concentration in the culture. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, C. utilis could not be grown anaerobically at a dilution rate of 0.1 h-1. With C. utilis absence of oxygen resulted in wash-out, despite the presence of ergosterol and Tween-80 in the growth medium. The behaviour of C. utilis with respect to maltose utilization in oxygen-limited cultures was remarkable: alcoholic fermentation did not occur and the amount of maltose metabolized was dependent on the oxygen supply. Oxygen-limited cultures of C. utilis growing on maltose always contained high residual sugar concentrations. These observations throw new light on the so-called Kluyver effect. Apparently, maltose is a non-fermentable sugar for C. utilis CBS 621, despite the fact that it can serve as a substrate for growth of this facultatively fermentative yeast. This is not due to the absence of key enzymes of alcoholic fermentation. Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase were present at high levels in maltose-utilizing cells of C. utilis grown under oxygen limitation. It is concluded that the Kluyver effect, in C. utilis growing on maltose, results from a regulatory mechanism that prevents the sugar from being fermented. Oxygen is not a key factor in this phenomenon since under oxygen limitation alcoholic fermentation of

  18. Iron limitation in the Western Interior Seaway during the Late Cretaceous OAE 3 and its role in phosphorus recycling and enhanced organic matter preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessin, Allyson; Sheldon, Nathan D.; Hendy, Ingrid; Chappaz, Anthony

    2016-09-01

    The sedimentary record of the Coniacian-Santonian Oceanic Anoxic Event 3 (OAE 3) in the North American Western Interior Seaway is characterized by a prolonged period of enhanced organic carbon (OC) burial. This study investigates the role of Fe in enhancing organic matter preservation and maintaining elevated primary productivity to sustain black shale deposition within the Coniacian-Santonian-aged Niobrara Formation in the USGS #1 Portland core. Iron speciation results indicate the development of a reactive Fe limitation coeval with reduced bioturbation and increased organic matter preservation, suggesting that decreased sulfide buffering by reactive Fe may have promoted enhanced organic matter preservation at the onset of OAE 3. An Fe limitation would also provide a feedback mechanism to sustain elevated primary productivity through enhanced phosphorus recycling. Additionally our results demonstrate inconsistencies between Fe-based and trace metal redox reconstructions. Iron indices from the Portland core indicate a single stepwise change, whereas the trace metal redox proxies indicate fluctuating redox conditions during and after OAE 3. Using Fe speciation to reconstruct past redox conditions may be complicated by a number of factors, including Fe sequestration in diagenetic carbonate phases and efficient sedimentary pyrite formation in a system with limited Fe supply and high levels of export production.

  19. Effect of chronic ethanol ingestion on the metabolism of copper, iron, manganese, selenium, and zinc in an animal model of alcoholic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Bogden, J.D.; Al-Rabiai, S.; Gilani, S.H.

    1984-01-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy (AC) is one of the diseases caused by alcohol abuse, and there has been considerable debate about the possibility that nutritional factors may be important in the etiology of AC. In addition, there is evidence that ethanol may affect the metabolism of trace elements. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if chronic ethanol administration produces changes in the metabolism of the essential metals copper, iron, manganese, zinc, and selenium using an animal model of AC. Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups; an ad libitum control group (AL), a pair-fed control group (PF), and an ethanol-dosed group (ETOH). The latter group received gradually increasing concentrations (5-25%) of ethanol in the drinking water for 15 wk. Food intake was monitored and urine and feces collected for a 4-d period during the study to determine ethanol effects on trace-element balance. Growth of both the PF and ETOH animals was inhibited. Ethanol produced substantial increases in liver manganese and decreases in liver copper and zinc. Metal concentrations in heart and concentrations in other tissues studied (spleen, testes, brain, bone, kidney, and muscle) did not differ significantly among the groups, except for testes selenium and kidney zinc. Reduced food intake and ethanol ingestion were associated with a reduced percentage of ingested selenium excreted in the urine. Deficiencies of copper, iron, manganese, selenium, and zinc in myocardial tissue are not likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of AC in the rat. 38 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  20. Changes in Iron Metabolism and Oxidative Status in STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats Treated with Bis(maltolato) Oxovanadium (IV) as an Antidiabetic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-González, Cristina; López-Chaves, Carlos; Trenzado, Cristina E.; Aranda, Pilar; López-Jurado, María; Gómez-Aracena, Jorge; Montes-Bayón, María; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo; Llopis, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The role of vanadium as a micronutrient and hypoglycaemic agent has yet to be fully clarified. The present study was undertaken to investigate changes in the metabolism of iron and in antioxidant defences of diabetic STZ rats following treatment with vanadium. Four groups were examined: control; diabetic; diabetic treated with 1 mgV/day; and Diabetic treated with 3 mgV/day. The vanadium was supplied in drinking water as bis(maltolato) oxovanadium (IV) (BMOV). The experiment had a duration of five weeks. Iron was measured in food, faeces, urine, serum, muscle, kidney, liver, spleen, and femur. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, NAD(P)H: quinone-oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) activity, and protein carbonyl group levels in the liver were determined. In the diabetic rats, higher levels of Fe absorbed, Fe content in kidney, muscle, and femur, and NQO1 activity were recorded, together with decreased catalase activity, in comparison with the control rats. In the rats treated with 3 mgV/day, there was a significant decrease in fasting glycaemia, Fe content in the liver, spleen, and heart, catalase activity, and levels of protein carbonyl groups in comparison with the diabetic group. In conclusion BMOV was a dose-dependent hypoglycaemic agent. Treatment with 3 mgV/day provoked increased Fe deposits in the tissues, which promoted a protein oxidative damage in the liver. PMID:24511298

  1. A systematic analysis reveals an essential role for high-affinity iron uptake system, haemolysin and CFEM domain-containing protein in iron homoeostasis and virulence in Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Vivek Kumar; Suneetha, Korivi Jyothiraj; Kaur, Rupinder

    2014-10-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all living organisms and human pathogens employ a battery of factors to scavenge iron from the high-affinity iron-binding host proteins. In the present study, we have elucidated, via a candidate gene approach, major iron acquisition and homoeostatic mechanisms operational in an opportunistic human fungal pathogen Candida glabrata. Phenotypic, biochemical and molecular analysis of a set of 13 C. glabrata strains, deleted for proteins potentially implicated in iron metabolism, revealed that the high-affinity reductive iron uptake system is required for utilization of alternate carbon sources and for growth under both in vitro iron-limiting and in vivo conditions. Furthermore, we show for the first time that the cysteine-rich CFEM (common in fungal extracellular membranes) domain-containing cell wall structural protein, CgCcw14, and a putative haemolysin, CgMam3, are essential for maintenance of intracellular iron content, adherence to epithelial cells and virulence. Consistent with their roles in iron homoeostasis, mitochondrial aconitase activity was lower and higher in mutants disrupted for high-affinity iron transport, and haemolysin respectively. Additionally, we present evidence that the mitochondrial frataxin, CgYfh1, is pivotal to iron metabolism. Besides yielding insights into major in vitro and in vivo iron acquisition strategies, our findings establish high-affinity iron uptake mechanisms as critical virulence determinants in C. glabrata.

  2. Diffusion limitations and metabolic factors associated with inhibition and recovery of photosynthesis following cold stress in Elymus nutans Griseb.

    PubMed

    Fu, Juanjuan; Gates, Roger N; Xu, Yuefei; Hu, Tianming

    2016-10-01

    attributed to reduced diffusion limitations and rapid recuperation of metabolic factors. PMID:27533848

  3. Fermi Surfaces of Iron-Pnictide High-Tc Superconductors from the Limit of Local Magnetic Moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, Miguel; Sacramento, Pedro; Rodriguez, Jose

    2012-02-01

    We study a 2-orbital t-J model for an isolated square lattice of iron atoms, which stack up to form an iron-pnictide high-Tc superconductor. The two orbitals in question are the degenerate d±= 3d(x±iy)z ones, which maximize the Hund's Rule coupling. First-neighbor and second-neighbor hopping (t) and Heisenberg exchange (J) are included. A Schwinger-boson-slave-fermion mean-field analysis yields a hidden half metal state in which holes hop through a d+d- spin background without much hopping across orbitals. This state is characterized by an inner and an outer Fermi surface pocket centered at the γ point. The Fermi surface pockets resemble those predicted by band structure calculations that include all five 3d orbitals. By sweeping the Hund's coupling, we also identify a quantum-critical point (QCP) where zero-energy spin-wave excitations exist at the momenta associated with commensurate spin-density-wave (cSDW) order. These low-energy spin-waves result in nested Fermi-surface pockets centered at cSDW momenta. Exact diagonalization of one hole in the 2-orbital t-J model over a 4x4 square lattice yields low-energy spectra that are consistent with the nested Fermi surfaces that are predicted to exist at the QCP.

  4. Erwinia chrysanthemi Iron Metabolism: the Unexpected Implication of the Inner Membrane Platform within the Type II Secretion System▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Douet, Vanessa; Expert, Dominique; Barras, Frédéric; Py, Béatrice

    2009-01-01

    The type II secretion (T2S) system is an essential device for Erwinia chrysanthemi virulence. Previously, we reported the key role of the OutF protein in forming, along with OutELM, an inner membrane platform in the Out T2S system. Here, we report that OutF copurified with five proteins identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight analysis as AcsD, TogA, SecA, Tsp, and DegP. The AcsD protein was known to be involved in the biosynthesis of achromobactin, which is a siderophore important for E. chrysanthemi virulence. The yeast two-hybrid system allowed us to gain further evidence for the OutF-AcsD interaction. Moreover, we showed that lack of OutF produced a pleiotropic phenotype: (i) altered production of the two siderophores of E. chrysanthemi, achromobactin and chrysobactin; (ii) hypersensitivity to streptonigrin, an iron-activated antibiotic; (iii) increased sensitivity to oxidative stress; and (iv) absence of the FbpA-like iron-binding protein in the periplasmic fraction. Interestingly, outE and outL mutants also exhibited similar phenotypes, but, outD and outJ mutants did not. Moreover, using the yeast two-hybrid system, several interactions were shown to occur between components of the T2S system inner membrane platform (OutEFL) and proteins involved in achromobactin production (AcsABCDE). The OutL-AcsD interaction was also demonstrated by Ni2+ affinity chromatography. These results fully confirm our previous view that the T2S machinery is made up of three discrete blocks. The OutEFLM-forming platform is proposed to be instrumental in two different processes essential for virulence, protein secretion and iron homeostasis. PMID:18978048

  5. Microorganisms pumping iron: anaerobic microbial iron oxidation and reduction.

    PubMed

    Weber, Karrie A; Achenbach, Laurie A; Coates, John D

    2006-10-01

    Iron (Fe) has long been a recognized physiological requirement for life, yet for many microorganisms that persist in water, soils and sediments, its role extends well beyond that of a nutritional necessity. Fe(II) can function as an electron source for iron-oxidizing microorganisms under both oxic and anoxic conditions and Fe(III) can function as a terminal electron acceptor under anoxic conditions for iron-reducing microorganisms. Given that iron is the fourth most abundant element in the Earth's crust, iron redox reactions have the potential to support substantial microbial populations in soil and sedimentary environments. As such, biological iron apportionment has been described as one of the most ancient forms of microbial metabolism on Earth, and as a conceivable extraterrestrial metabolism on other iron-mineral-rich planets such as Mars. Furthermore, the metabolic versatility of the microorganisms involved in these reactions has resulted in the development of biotechnological applications to remediate contaminated environments and harvest energy.

  6. Mice Overexpressing Both Non-Mutated Human SOD1 and Mutated SOD1G93A Genes: A Competent Experimental Model for Studying Iron Metabolism in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gajowiak, Anna; Styś, Agnieszka; Starzyński, Rafał R.; Bednarz, Aleksandra; Lenartowicz, Małgorzata; Staroń, Robert; Lipiński, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by degeneration and loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord, brainstem and motor cortex. Up to 10% of ALS cases are inherited (familial, fALS) and associated with mutations, frequently in the superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene. Rodent transgenic models of ALS are often used to elucidate a complex pathogenesis of this disease. Of importance, both ALS patients and animals carrying mutated human SOD1 gene show symptoms of oxidative stress and iron metabolism misregulation. The aim of our study was to characterize changes in iron metabolism in one of the most commonly used models of ALS – transgenic mice overexpressing human mutated SOD1G93A gene. We analyzed the expression of iron-related genes in asymptomatic, 2-month-old and symptomatic, 4-month-old SOD1G93A mice. In parallel, respective age-matched mice overexpressing human non-mutated SOD1 transgene and control mice were analyzed. We demonstrate that the overexpression of both SOD1 and SOD1G93A genes account for a substantial increase in SOD1 protein levels and activity in selected tissues and that not all the changes in iron metabolism genes expression are specific for the overexpression of the mutated form of SOD1. PMID:26778957

  7. The importance of the proportion of heme/nonheme iron in the diet to minimize the interference with calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium metabolism on recovery from nutritional ferropenic anemia.

    PubMed

    Lisbona, F; Reyes-Andrada, M D; López-Aliaga, I; Barrionuevo, M; Alférez, M J; Campos, M S

    1999-05-01

    The digestive utilization of Fe and its nutritive interaction with Ca, P, and Mg were studied in rats with nutritional ferropenic anemia. The diet contained 80% ferric citrate and 20% heme iron (80/20 diet). The weight gain, digestive utilization of Fe, and regeneration efficiency of hemoglobin and seric Fe were higher in iron-deficient rats (ID) fed the 80/20 diet than in iron-deficient rats fed the 50/50 diet (Campos et al., 1996). The phospho-calcic metabolism, which is adversely affected in ferropenic anemia, returned to normal values when iron was added to the diet. The digestive utilization of Mg, which fell with the 50/50 diet (Campos et al., 1996), returned to normal values when the ferropenic anemia was reversed with the 80/20 diet. In a state of iron deficiency, certain parameters related to the glucose and lipid metabolism are affected; the glucose and triglycerides values return to a normal range with the 80/20 diet.

  8. Iron Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... detect and help diagnose iron deficiency or iron overload. In people with anemia , these tests can help ... also be ordered when iron deficiency or iron overload is suspected. Early iron deficiency often goes unnoticed. ...

  9. Constraints on microbial biogeography in Guaymas Basin hydrothermal sediments: energetic limits, thermal stress, and upward compression of metabolic zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mckay, L. J.; Klokman, V.; Teske, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    Subsurface hydrothermal temperatures and flow cause upward compression of geochemical and metabolic zones in Guaymas Basin seafloor sediments. The Guaymas hydrothermal system can be viewed as an accessible seafloor analog to deep, geothermally heated sedimentary microbial ecosystems. Using push core samples collected by the Alvin submersible (Cruises AT15-40 and 56 in 2008 and 2009) we are investigating thermal limits and substrate concentration ranges and their influence on microbial biogeography. Hydrothermally active sediments at Guaymas Basin host a wide range of shallow subsurface temperatures: from 3°C to 200°C in the upper 45 centimeters. A combination of extreme temperatures and compressed geochemical zonation limits the depth range of microbial colonization in Guaymas sediments. Microbial abundance is relatively high in Guaymas surface sediments, peaking around 10^10 cells/ml and decreasing to below detection at very hot temperatures. Our data describe how the biogeography of physiological modes—in particular anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) —is shaped by localized physicochemical conditions in Guaymas Basin hydrothermal sediments. Microbial oxidation changes the δ13C signature of porewater methane (CH4) from its baseline value of -43‰ (Welhan, 1988; Pearson et al., 2005) towards heavier values within a temperature window up to ca. 80°C; at higher temperatures, no CH4 oxidation imprint can be detected. δ13C values for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) indicate that bacterial remineralization of organic carbon may occur up to 100°C. 13C depleted DIC correlates well with 13C enriched CH4 in situ pinpointing zones of AOM between, for example, 20 and 40 cm below seafloor and 30°C and 50°C. 16S rDNA clone libraries support these suggested zones with the regular occurrence of (AN)aerobic (ME)thanotrophic Archaea. Given its high temperature tolerance, AOM can occur widely in the geothermally and hydrothermally heated subsurface.

  10. Systems biology and metabolic modelling unveils limitations to polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation in sugarcane leaves; lessons for C4 engineering.

    PubMed

    McQualter, Richard B; Bellasio, Chandra; Gebbie, Leigh K; Petrasovits, Lars A; Palfreyman, Robin W; Hodson, Mark P; Plan, Manuel R; Blackman, Deborah M; Brumbley, Stevens M; Nielsen, Lars K

    2016-02-01

    In planta production of the bioplastic polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is one important way in which plant biotechnology can address environmental problems and emerging issues related to peak oil. However, high biomass C4 plants such as maize, switch grass and sugarcane develop adverse phenotypes including stunting, chlorosis and reduced biomass as PHB levels in leaves increase. In this study, we explore limitations to PHB accumulation in sugarcane chloroplasts using a systems biology approach, coupled with a metabolic model of C4 photosynthesis. Decreased assimilation was evident in high PHB-producing sugarcane plants, which also showed a dramatic decrease in sucrose and starch content of leaves. A subtle decrease in the C/N ratio was found which was not associated with a decrease in total protein content. An increase in amino acids used for nitrogen recapture was also observed. Based on the accumulation of substrates of ATP-dependent reactions, we hypothesized ATP starvation in bundle sheath chloroplasts. This was supported by mRNA differential expression patterns. The disruption in ATP supply in bundle sheath cells appears to be linked to the physical presence of the PHB polymer which may disrupt photosynthesis by scattering photosynthetically active radiation and/or physically disrupting thylakoid membranes.

  11. Deuterium isotope effects on toluene metabolism. Product release as a rate-limiting step in cytochrome P-450 catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, K.H.; Hanzlik, R.P.

    1989-04-28

    Liver microsomes from phenobarbital-induced rats oxidize toluene to a mixture of benzyl alcohol plus o-, m- and p-cresol (ca. 69:31). Stepwise deuteration of the methyl group causes stepwise decreases in the yield of benzyl alcohol relative to cresols (ca. 24:76 for toluene-d3). For benzyl alcohol formation from toluene-d3 DV = 1.92 and D(V/K) = 3.53. Surprisingly, however, stepwise deuteration induces stepwise increases in total oxidation, giving rise to an inverse isotope effect overall (DV = 0.67 for toluene-d3). Throughout the series (i.e. d0, d1, d2, d3) the ratios of cresol isomers remain constant. These results are interpreted in terms of product release for benzyl alcohol being slower than release of cresols (or their epoxide precursors), and slow enough to be partially rate-limiting in turnover. Thus metabolic switching to cresol formation causes a net acceleration of turnover.

  12. Systems biology and metabolic modelling unveils limitations to polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation in sugarcane leaves; lessons for C4 engineering.

    PubMed

    McQualter, Richard B; Bellasio, Chandra; Gebbie, Leigh K; Petrasovits, Lars A; Palfreyman, Robin W; Hodson, Mark P; Plan, Manuel R; Blackman, Deborah M; Brumbley, Stevens M; Nielsen, Lars K

    2016-02-01

    In planta production of the bioplastic polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is one important way in which plant biotechnology can address environmental problems and emerging issues related to peak oil. However, high biomass C4 plants such as maize, switch grass and sugarcane develop adverse phenotypes including stunting, chlorosis and reduced biomass as PHB levels in leaves increase. In this study, we explore limitations to PHB accumulation in sugarcane chloroplasts using a systems biology approach, coupled with a metabolic model of C4 photosynthesis. Decreased assimilation was evident in high PHB-producing sugarcane plants, which also showed a dramatic decrease in sucrose and starch content of leaves. A subtle decrease in the C/N ratio was found which was not associated with a decrease in total protein content. An increase in amino acids used for nitrogen recapture was also observed. Based on the accumulation of substrates of ATP-dependent reactions, we hypothesized ATP starvation in bundle sheath chloroplasts. This was supported by mRNA differential expression patterns. The disruption in ATP supply in bundle sheath cells appears to be linked to the physical presence of the PHB polymer which may disrupt photosynthesis by scattering photosynthetically active radiation and/or physically disrupting thylakoid membranes. PMID:26015295

  13. Associations among Erythroferrone and Biomarkers of Erythropoiesis and Iron Metabolism, and Treatment with Long-Term Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents in Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Hirokazu; Kobayashi, Yasuna; Onuma, Shoko; Shibagaki, Keigo; Yuza, Toshitaka; Hirao, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Toshinori; Tomosugi, Naohisa; Shibata, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to identify associations between erythroferrone (ERFE), a regulator of hepcidin 25, and biomarkers of erythropoiesis and iron metabolism. We also aimed to determine the effects of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA), continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) and darbepoetin-α (DA) on ERFE production in patients on hemodialysis (HD). Methods Blood samples were obtained from 59 patients before HD sessions on day 0 (baseline). Twenty patients who were injected with either CERA (N = 10) or DA (N = 10) at the end of the dialysis week (day 0), who had ferritin ≥ 100 ng/mL and/or transferrin saturation ≥ 20%, and hemoglobin > 9 g/dL were selected from among the 59 patients. Blood was sampled serially before HD sessions on days 3, 5, 7 from patients on DA and on the same days plus day 14 from those on CERA. Results Levels of ERFE correlated inversely with those of hepcidin 25 and ferritin, and positively with those of soluble transferrin receptor. The hepcidin 25: ERFE ratio and hepcidin 25 levels positively correlated with ferritin levels. Levels of ERFE significantly increased from day 3 of treatment with DA and CERA and decreased by days 7 and 14, respectively. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents concomitantly decreased levels of hepcidin 25 as those of ERFE increased. Conclusion We identified a novel association between ESA and ERFE in patients on HD. Both DA and CERA increased levels of ERFE that regulated hepcidin 25 and led to iron mobilization from body stores during erythropoiesis. PMID:26978524

  14. The cotyledon cell wall and intracellular matrix are factors that limit iron bioavailability of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Glahn, Raymond P; Tako, Elad; Cichy, Karen; Wiesinger, Jason

    2016-07-13

    Strategies that enhance the Fe bioavailability of the bean are of keen interest to nutritionists, bean breeders and growers. In beans, the cotyledons contain 75-80% of the total seed Fe, most of which appears to be located within the cotyledon cells. The cotyledon cell walls are known to be resistant to digestion in the stomach and the upper small intestine. Therefore, given the above and the general belief that the primary site for human Fe absorption is the upper small intestine, the present study was designed to determine if the cotyledon cell walls represent a barrier to Fe absorption from the bean. To do so, we utilized high pressure to rupture bean cotyledon cells. The iron bioavailability of cooked bean samples was assessed using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell culture model. Microscopy analyses confirmed that the cotyledon cell walls are highly resistant to pepsin, the low pH of the stomach, and the pancreatic enzymes, indicating that the walls are a barrier to Fe absorption from the bean. Relatively high intracellular pressure (>4000 psi) was required to initiate cell wall rupture. Surprisingly, the lysis of cotyledon cells did not result in a consistent or strong enhancement of bioavailable Fe, suggesting that the liberated intracellular starch and protein influenced the Fe bioavailability by creating a matrix that inhibited the exchange of Fe with the cell transport mechanism. Such observations warrant further pursuit in vivo as the confirmation of these effects would reshape strategies to enhance Fe absorption from beans. PMID:27326892

  15. Effects of an iron-light co-limitation on the elemental composition (Si, C, N) of the marine diatoms Thalassiosira oceanica and Ditylum brightwellii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucciarelli, E.; Pondaven, P.; Sarthou, G.

    2010-02-01

    We examined the effect of iron (Fe) and Fe-light (Fe-L) co-limitation on cellular silica (BSi), carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in two marine diatoms, the small oceanic diatom Thalassiosira oceanica and the large coastal species Ditylum brightwellii. We showed that C and N per cell tend to decrease with increasing Fe limitation (i.e. decreasing growth rate), both under high light (HL) and low light (LL). We observed an increase (T. oceanica, LL), no change (T. oceanica, HL) and a decrease (D. brightwellii, HL and LL) in BSi per cell with increasing degree of limitation. The comparison with literature data showed that the trend in C and N per cell for other Fe limited diatoms was similar to ours. Interspecific differences in C and N quotas of Fe limited diatoms observed in the literature seem thus to be mostly due to variations in cell volume. On the contrary, there was no global trend in BSi per cell or per cell volume, which suggests that other interspecific differences than Fe-induced variations in cell volume influence the degree of silicification. The relative variations in C:N, Si:C and Si:N versus the relative variation in specific growth rate (i.e. μ:μmax) followed the same patterns for T. oceanica and D. brightwellii, whatever the irradiance level. However, the variations of C:N under Fe limitation reported in the literature for other diatoms are contrasted, which may thus be more related to growth conditions than to interspecific differences. As observed in other studies, Si:C and Si:N ratios increased by more than 2-fold between 100% and 40% of μmax. Under more severe limitation (HL and LL), we observed for the first time a decrease in these ratios. These results may have important biogeochemical implications on the understanding and the modelling of the oceanic biogeochemical cycles, e.g. carbon and silica export.

  16. Cellular responses associated with ROS production and cell fate decision in early stress response to iron limitation in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chun-Shan; Liang, Jun-Rong; Lin, Qun; Li, Caixia; Bowler, Chris; Anderson, Donald M; Wang, Peng; Wang, Xin-Wei; Gao, Ya-Hui

    2014-12-01

    Investigation of how diatoms cope with the rapid fluctuations in iron bioavailability in marine environments may facilitate a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying their ecological success, in particular their ability to proliferate rapidly during favorable conditions. In this study, using in vivo biochemical markers and whole-cell iTRAQ-based proteomics analysis, we explored the cellular responses associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cell fate decision during the early response to Fe limitation in the centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Fe limitation caused a significant decrease in Photosystem (PS) II photosynthetic efficiency, damage to the photosynthetic electron transport chain in PS I, and blockage of the respiratory chain in complexes III and IV, which could all result in excess ROS accumulation. The increase in ROS likely triggered programmed cell death (PCD) in some of the Fe-limited cells through synthesis of a series of proteins involved in the delicate balance between pro-survival and pro-PCD factors. The results provide molecular-level insights into the major strategies that may be employed by T. pseudonana in response to Fe-limitation: the reduction of cell population density through PCD to reduce competition for available Fe, the reallocation of intracellular nitrogen and Fe to ensure survival, and an increase in expression of antioxidant and anti-PCD proteins to cope with stress.

  17. Cellular Responses Associated with ROS Production and Cell Fate Decision in Early Stress Response to Iron Limitation in the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of how diatoms cope with the rapid fluctuations in iron bioavailability in marine environments may facilitate a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying their ecological success, in particular their ability to proliferate rapidly during favorable conditions. In this study, using in vivo biochemical markers and whole-cell iTRAQ-based proteomics analysis, we explored the cellular responses associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cell fate decision during the early response to Fe limitation in the centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Fe limitation caused a significant decrease in Photosystem (PS) II photosynthetic efficiency, damage to the photosynthetic electron transport chain in PS I, and blockage of the respiratory chain in complexes III and IV, which could all result in excess ROS accumulation. The increase in ROS likely triggered programmed cell death (PCD) in some of the Fe-limited cells through synthesis of a series of proteins involved in the delicate balance between pro-survival and pro-PCD factors. The results provide molecular-level insights into the major strategies that may be employed by T. pseudonana in response to Fe-limitation: the reduction of cell population density through PCD to reduce competition for available Fe, the reallocation of intracellular nitrogen and Fe to ensure survival, and an increase in expression of antioxidant and anti-PCD proteins to cope with stress. PMID:25372880

  18. Quercetin inhibits intestinal iron absorption and ferroportin transporter expression in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lesjak, Marija; Hoque, Rukshana; Balesaria, Sara; Skinner, Vernon; Debnam, Edward S; Srai, Surjit K S; Sharp, Paul A

    2014-01-01

    Balancing systemic iron levels within narrow limits is critical for maintaining human health. There are no known pathways to eliminate excess iron from the body and therefore iron homeostasis is maintained by modifying dietary absorption so that it matches daily obligatory losses. Several dietary factors can modify iron absorption. Polyphenols are plentiful in human diet and many compounds, including quercetin--the most abundant dietary polyphenol--are potent iron chelators. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute and longer-term effects of quercetin on intestinal iron metabolism. Acute exposure of rat duodenal mucosa to quercetin increased apical iron uptake but decreased subsequent basolateral iron efflux into the circulation. Quercetin binds iron between its 3-hydroxyl and 4-carbonyl groups and methylation of the 3-hydroxyl group negated both the increase in apical uptake and the inhibition of basolateral iron release, suggesting that the acute effects of quercetin on iron transport were due to iron chelation. In longer-term studies, rats were administered quercetin by a single gavage and iron transporter expression measured 18 h later. Duodenal FPN expression was decreased in quercetin-treated rats. This effect was recapitulated in Caco-2 cells exposed to quercetin for 18 h. Reporter assays in Caco-2 cells indicated that repression of FPN by quercetin was not a transcriptional event but might be mediated by miRNA interaction with the FPN 3'UTR. Our study highlights a novel mechanism for the regulation of iron bioavailability by dietary polyphenols. Potentially, diets rich in polyphenols might be beneficial for patients groups at risk of iron loading by limiting the rate of intestinal iron absorption. PMID:25058155

  19. Quercetin Inhibits Intestinal Iron Absorption and Ferroportin Transporter Expression In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Balesaria, Sara; Skinner, Vernon; Debnam, Edward S.; Srai, Surjit K. S.; Sharp, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Balancing systemic iron levels within narrow limits is critical for maintaining human health. There are no known pathways to eliminate excess iron from the body and therefore iron homeostasis is maintained by modifying dietary absorption so that it matches daily obligatory losses. Several dietary factors can modify iron absorption. Polyphenols are plentiful in human diet and many compounds, including quercetin – the most abundant dietary polyphenol – are potent iron chelators. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute and longer-term effects of quercetin on intestinal iron metabolism. Acute exposure of rat duodenal mucosa to quercetin increased apical iron uptake but decreased subsequent basolateral iron efflux into the circulation. Quercetin binds iron between its 3-hydroxyl and 4-carbonyl groups and methylation of the 3-hydroxyl group negated both the increase in apical uptake and the inhibition of basolateral iron release, suggesting that the acute effects of quercetin on iron transport were due to iron chelation. In longer-term studies, rats were administered quercetin by a single gavage and iron transporter expression measured 18 h later. Duodenal FPN expression was decreased in quercetin-treated rats. This effect was recapitulated in Caco-2 cells exposed to quercetin for 18 h. Reporter assays in Caco-2 cells indicated that repression of FPN by quercetin was not a transcriptional event but might be mediated by miRNA interaction with the FPN 3′UTR. Our study highlights a novel mechanism for the regulation of iron bioavailability by dietary polyphenols. Potentially, diets rich in polyphenols might be beneficial for patients groups at risk of iron loading by limiting the rate of intestinal iron absorption. PMID:25058155

  20. Effects of an iron-light co-limitation on the elemental composition (Si, C, N) of the marine diatoms Thalassiosira oceanica and Ditylum brightwellii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucciarelli, E.; Pondaven, P.; Sarthou, G.

    2009-07-01

    We examined the effect of iron (Fe) and Fe-light (Fe-L) co-limitation on cellular silica (BSi), carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in two marine diatom species, Thalassiosira oceanica and Ditylum brightwellii. We showed that C and N per cell tend to decrease with increasing Fe and Fe-L co-limitation (i.e. decreasing growth rate). We observed an increase (T. oceanica, Fe-L co-limitation), no change (T. oceanica, Fe limitation) and a decrease (D. brightwellii, Fe and Fe-L limitations) in BSi per cell with increasing degree of limitation. When comparing our results to literature data, we noted that the trend in C and N per cell for other Fe limited diatoms was similar to ours. However there was no global trend in BSi, which suggests interspecific differences. The relative variations in C:N, Si:C and Si:N versus the relative variation in specific growth rate (i.e. μ:μmax) followed the same patterns for both species under Fe and Fe-L co-limitation. The variations of C:N under Fe limitation reported in the literature for other diatoms are contrasted, which may thus be more related to growth conditions than to interspecific differences. Si:C and Si:N ratios increased by more than 2-fold between 100% and 40% of μmax. Under more severe limitation (Fe or Fe-L), these ratios tend to decrease. To asses the field significance of our results, we compared them to those of artificial Fe fertilisation experiments. This comparison showed that Si:N increased between 100% and ~40% of μmax, but decreased between 40% and 20% of μmax, and increased again below 20% of μmax. Between ~15% and 30% of μmax, Si:N was even lower than under non limiting conditions. These results may have important biogeochemical implications on the understanding and the modeling of the oceanic biogeochemical cycles, e.g. carbon export.

  1. Metabolism of supplemental iron (Fe) by hepatocytes (HC), kupffer cells (KC) and endothelial cells (EC) in neonatal pig liver

    SciTech Connect

    Caperna, T.J.; Failla, M.L.

    1986-03-05

    Newborn pigs rapidly develop anemia unless treated with supplemental Fe. The authors have developed methods to isolate and culture the predominant cell types in porcine liver to investigate cellular distribution and metabolism of Fe supplements. One-day (d) old piglets were injected with Fe-dextran (50 mg Fe/kg) and liver cells were isolated from treated and age-matched control piglets 1, 5, and 10 d later. The concentration (..mu..g/mg cell protein) of Fe increased 62-, 54-, and 5-fold over controls in KC, EC, and HC, respectively, 1 d after Fe injection. Thereafter, accumulated Fe was mobilized from all 3 cell types. By 10 d HC mobilized > 85% of accumulated Fe, while Fe levels in KC and EC from treated pigs were at least 15-fold higher than control levels. In vitro studies confirmed the greater capacity of KC and EC to accumulate colloidal Fe compared to HC. The concentration of ferritin (Ft) to liver cells from control pigs was below 0.3 ..mu..g/mg cell protein. After treatment, Ft levels peaked in HC and KC on d 1 at 5.0 and 15.6 ..mu..g/mg cell protein, but in EC on d 5 at 13.3 ..mu..g/mg. Ferritin Fe represented 9% of total Fe in KC and EC at all times after treatment, but as much as 48% in HC at 1 d. Continued investigation of hepatic cellular metabolism of supplemental Fe provides a useful model for investigating the treatment of human neonatal anemia.

  2. Benefits and harms of iron supplementation in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient children.

    PubMed

    Domellöf, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Due to high iron requirements, young children are at risk for iron deficiency anemia. Iron supplements are therefore often recommended, especially since iron deficiency anemia in children is associated with poor neurodevelopment. However, in contrast to most other nutrients, excess iron cannot be excreted by the human body and it has recently been suggested that excessive iron supplementation of young children may have adverse effects on growth, risk of infections, and even on cognitive development. Recent studies support that iron supplements are beneficial in iron-deficient children but there is a risk of adverse effects in those who are iron replete. In populations with a low prevalence of iron deficiency, general supplementation should therefore be avoided. Iron-fortified foods can still be generally recommended since they seem to be safer than medicinal iron supplements, but the level of iron fortification should be limited. General iron supplementation is recommended in areas with a high prevalence of iron deficiency, with the exception of malarious areas where a cautious supplementation approach needs to be adopted, based either on screening or a combination of iron supplements and infection control measures. More studies are urgently needed to better determine the risks and benefits of iron supplementation and iron-fortified foods given to iron-deficient and iron-sufficient children.

  3. Uses and limitations of serum ferritin, magnetic resonance imaging T2 and T2* in the diagnosis of iron overload and in the ferrikinetics of normalization of the iron stores in thalassemia using the International Committee on Chelation deferiprone/deferoxamine combination protocol.

    PubMed

    Kolnagou, Anita; Yazman, Dilek; Economides, Charalambos; Eracleous, Eleni; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2009-01-01

    Excess cardiac iron deposition leads to congestive cardiac failure and accounts for more than 70% of deaths in thalassemia major patients. In three separate studies involving 145 thalassemia patients, serum ferritin and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) relaxation times T2 and T2* have been compared for assessing iron load levels during chelation treatment. In two studies, variable levels of cardiac iron load have been detected by T2 and T2* in patients treated with deferoxamine (DFO), which, however, were unrelated to serum ferritin. In most cases, similar range levels from normal to severe cardiac iron load could be identified by both the T2 and T2* methods. However, in a few cases there were substantial differences in the levels detected between the two methods. In the third study, the ferrikinetics of the normalization of the iron stores during the International Committee on Chelation (ICOC) deferiprone (L1)/DFO combination protocol was followed up using T2 and T2* and serum ferritin. Iron deposits were found not to be proportionally distributed between the liver and the heart or uniformly distributed within each organ. Iron mobilization in each patient varied and iron deposits in each organ were cleared at different rates. Despite some limitations, the application of the MRI relaxation times T2 and T2* offers the best diagnostic methods for iron overload estimations in most organs and especially the heart. These MRI methods and serum ferritin could also be used for the ferrikinetics of iron mobilization and removal during chelation therapy and the normalization of the iron stores during the ICOC L1/DFO combination protocol. There is a need to standardize the two MRI relaxation times T2 and T2* methods and identify the factors causing the differences between them.

  4. Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation: update on pathogenic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Sonia; Finazzi, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Perturbation of iron distribution is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, but the comprehension of the metal role in the development and progression of such disorders is still very limited. The combination of more powerful brain imaging techniques and faster genomic DNA sequencing procedures has allowed the description of a set of genetic disorders characterized by a constant and often early accumulation of iron in specific brain regions and the identification of the associated genes; these disorders are now collectively included in the category of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). So far 10 different genetic forms have been described but this number is likely to increase in short time. Two forms are linked to mutations in genes directly involved in iron metabolism: neuroferritinopathy, associated to mutations in the FTL gene and aceruloplasminemia, where the ceruloplasmin gene product is defective. In the other forms the connection with iron metabolism is not evident at all and the genetic data let infer the involvement of other pathways: Pank2, Pla2G6, C19orf12, COASY, and FA2H genes seem to be related to lipid metabolism and to mitochondria functioning, WDR45 and ATP13A2 genes are implicated in lysosomal and autophagosome activity, while the C2orf37 gene encodes a nucleolar protein of unknown function. There is much hope in the scientific community that the study of the NBIA forms may provide important insight as to the link between brain iron metabolism and neurodegenerative mechanisms and eventually pave the way for new therapeutic avenues also for the more common neurodegenerative disorders. In this work, we will review the most recent findings in the molecular mechanisms underlining the most common forms of NBIA and analyze their possible link with brain iron metabolism. PMID:24847269

  5. Mitochondrial and plastidial COG0354 proteins have folate-dependent functions in iron-sulphur cluster metabolism.

    PubMed

    Waller, Jeffrey C; Ellens, Kenneth W; Alvarez, Sophie; Loizeau, Karen; Ravanel, Stéphane; Hanson, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    COG0354 proteins have been implicated in synthesis or repair of iron/sulfur (Fe/S) clusters in all domains of life, and those of bacteria, animals, and protists have been shown to require a tetrahydrofolate to function. Two COG0354 proteins were identified in Arabidopsis and many other plants, one (At4g12130) related to those of α-proteobacteria and predicted to be mitochondrial, the other (At1g60990) related to those of cyanobacteria and predicted to be plastidial. Grasses and poplar appear to lack the latter. The predicted subcellular locations of the Arabidopsis proteins were validated by in vitro import assays with purified pea organelles and by targeting assays in Arabidopsis and tobacco protoplasts using green fluorescent protein fusions. The At4g12130 protein was shown to be expressed mainly in flowers, siliques, and seeds, whereas the At1g60990 protein was expressed mainly in young leaves. The folate dependence of both Arabidopsis proteins was established by functional complementation of an Escherichia coli COG0354 (ygfZ) deletant; both plant genes restored in vivo activity of the Fe/S enzyme MiaB but restoration was abrogated when folates were eliminated by deleting folP. Insertional inactivation of At4g12130 was embryo lethal; this phenotype was reversed by genetic complementation of the mutant. These data establish that COG0354 proteins have a folate-dependent function in mitochondria and plastids, and that the mitochondrial protein is essential. That plants retain mitochondrial and plastidial COG0354 proteins with distinct phylogenetic origins emphasizes how deeply the extant Fe/S cluster assembly machinery still reflects the ancient endosymbioses that gave rise to plants.

  6. Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of bone-seeking superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents for imaging bone metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Panahifar, Arash; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Doschak, Michael R

    2013-06-12

    In this article, we report the synthesis and in vitro evaluation of a new class of nonionizing bone-targeting contrast agents based on bisphosphonate-conjugated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), for use in imaging of bone turnover with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Similar to bone-targeting (99m)Technetium medronate, our novel contrast agent uses bisphosphonates to impart bone-seeking properties, but replaces the former radioisotope with nonionizing SPIONs which enables their subsequent detection using MRI. Our reported method is relatively simple, quick and cost-effective and results in BP-SPIONs with a final nanoparticle size of 17 nm under electron microscopy technique (i.e., TEM). In-vitro binding studies of our novel bone tracer have shown selective binding affinity (around 65%) for hydroxyapatite, the principal mineral of bone. Bone-targeting SPIONs offer the potential for use as nonionizing MRI contrast agents capable of imaging dynamic bone turnover, for use in the diagnosis and monitoring of metabolic bone diseases and related bone pathology.

  7. The metabolic, locomotor and sex-dependent effects of elevated temperature on Trinidadian guppies: limited capacity for acclimation.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Nicolas J; Breckels, Ross D; Neff, Bryan D

    2012-10-01

    Global warming poses a threat to many ectothermic organisms because of the harmful effects that elevated temperatures can have on resting metabolic rate (RMR) and body size. This study evaluated the thermal sensitivity of Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata) by describing the effects of developmental temperature on mass, burst speed and RMR, and investigated whether these tropical fish can developmentally acclimate to their thermal conditions. These traits were measured following exposure to one of three treatments: 70 days at 23, 25, 28 or 30°C (acclimated groups); 6 h at 23, 28 or 30°C following 70 days at 25°C (unacclimated groups); or 6 h at 25°C following 70 days in another 25°C tank (control group). Body mass was lower in warmer temperatures, particularly amongst females and individuals reared at 30°C. The burst speed of fish acclimated to each temperature did not differ and was marginally higher than that of unacclimated fish, indicative of complete compensation. Conversely, acclimated and unacclimated fish did not differ in their RMR at each temperature. Amongst the acclimated groups, RMR was significantly higher at 30°C, indicating that guppies may become thermally limited at this temperature as a result of less energy being available for growth, reproduction and locomotion. Like other tropical ectotherms, guppies appear to be unable to adjust their RMR through physiological acclimation and may consequently be susceptible to rising temperatures. Also, because larger females have higher fecundity, our data suggest that fecundity will be reduced in a warmer climate, potentially decreasing the viability of guppy populations.

  8. Limitation of thiamine pyrophosphate supply to growing Escherichia coli switches metabolism to efficient D-lactate formation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Kangming; Niu, Dandan; Liu, Xiaoguang; Prior, Bernard A; Zhou, Li; Lu, Fuping; Singh, Suren; Wang, Zhengxiang

    2016-01-01

    Efficient production of D-lactate by engineered Escherichia coli entails balancing cell growth and product synthesis. To develop a metabolic switch to implement a desirable transition from cell growth to product fermentation, a thiamine auxotroph B0013-080A was constructed in a highly efficient D-lactate producer E. coli strain B0013-070. This was achieved by inactivation of thiE, a gene encoding a thiamine phosphate synthase for biosynthesis of thiamine monophosphate. The resultant mutant B0013-080A failed to grow on the medium in the absence of thiamine yet growth was restored when exogenous thiamine was provided. A linear relationship between cell mass formation and amount of thiamine supplemented was mathematically determined in a shake flask experiment and confirmed in a 7-L bioreactor system. This calculation revealed that ∼ 95-96 thiamine molecules per cell were required to satisfy cell growth. This relationship was employed to develop a novel fermentation process for D-lactate production by using thiamine as a limiting condition. A D-lactate productivity of 4.11 g · L(-1) · h(-1) from glycerol under microaerobic condition and 3.66 g · L(-1) · h(-1) from glucose under anaerobic condition was achieved which is 19.1% and 10.2% higher respectively than the parental strain. These results revealed a convenient and reliable method to control cell growth and improve D-lactate fermentation. This control strategy could be applied to other biotechnological processes that require optimal allocation of carbon between cell growth and product formation.

  9. Differential Nutrient Limitation of Soil Microbial Biomass and Metabolic Quotients (qCO2): Is There a Biological Stoichiometry of Soil Microbes?

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Wyatt H.; Richardson, Curtis J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Variation in microbial metabolism poses one of the greatest current uncertainties in models of global carbon cycling, and is particularly poorly understood in soils. Biological Stoichiometry theory describes biochemical mechanisms linking metabolic rates with variation in the elemental composition of cells and organisms, and has been widely observed in animals, plants, and plankton. However, this theory has not been widely tested in microbes, which are considered to have fixed ratios of major elements in soils. Methodology/Principal Findings To determine whether Biological Stoichiometry underlies patterns of soil microbial metabolism, we compiled published data on microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) pools in soils spanning the global range of climate, vegetation, and land use types. We compared element ratios in microbial biomass pools to the metabolic quotient qCO2 (respiration per unit biomass), where soil C mineralization was simultaneously measured in controlled incubations. Although microbial C, N, and P stoichiometry appeared to follow somewhat constrained allometric relationships at the global scale, we found significant variation in the C∶N∶P ratios of soil microbes across land use and habitat types, and size-dependent scaling of microbial C∶N and C∶P (but not N∶P) ratios. Microbial stoichiometry and metabolic quotients were also weakly correlated as suggested by Biological Stoichiometry theory. Importantly, we found that while soil microbial biomass appeared constrained by soil N availability, microbial metabolic rates (qCO2) were most strongly associated with inorganic P availability. Conclusions/Significance Our findings appear consistent with the model of cellular metabolism described by Biological Stoichiometry theory, where biomass is limited by N needed to build proteins, but rates of protein synthesis are limited by the high P demands of ribosomes. Incorporation of these physiological processes may

  10. Iron and the liver.

    PubMed

    Pietrangelo, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Humans have evolved to retain iron in the body and are exposed to a high risk of iron overload and iron-related toxicity. Excess iron in the blood, in the absence of increased erythropoietic needs, can saturate the buffering capacity of serum transferrin and result in non-transferrin-bound highly reactive forms of iron that can cause damage, as well as promote fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis in the parenchymatous organs. A number of hereditary or acquired diseases are associated with systemic or local iron deposition or iron misdistribution in organs or cells. Two of these, the HFE- and non-HFE hemochromatosis syndromes represent the paradigms of genetic iron overload. They share common clinical features and the same pathogenic basis, in particular, a lack of synthesis or activity of hepcidin, the iron hormone. Before hepcidin was discovered, the liver was simply regarded as the main site of iron storage and, as such, the main target of iron toxicity. Now, as the main source of hepcidin, it appears that the loss of the hepcidin-producing liver mass or genetic and acquired factors that repress hepcidin synthesis in the liver may also lead to iron overload. Usually, there is low-grade excess iron which, through oxidative stress, is sufficient to worsen the course of the underlying liver disease or other chronic diseases that are apparently unrelated to iron, such as chronic metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. In the future, modulation of hepcidin synthesis and activity or hepcidin hormone-replacing strategies may become therapeutic options to cure iron-related disorders.

  11. Polyphenolic compounds appear to limit the nutritional benefit of biofortified higher iron black bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Our objective was to determine if a biofortified variety of black bean can provide more bioavailable-iron (Fe) than a standard variety. Two lines of black beans (Phaseolus-vulgaris L.), a standard (DOR500; 59μg Fe/g) and biofortified (MIB465; 88μg Fe/g) were used. The DOR500 is a common commercial variety, and the MIB465 is a line developed for higher-Fe content. Given the high prevalence of Fe-deficiency anemia worldwide, it is important to determine if Fe-biofortified black beans can provide more absorbable-Fe. Methods Black bean based diets were formulated to meet the nutrient requirements for the broiler (Gallus-gallus) except for Fe (dietary Fe-concentrations were 39.4±0.2 and 52.9±0.9 mg/kg diet, standard vs. biofortified, respectively). Birds (n=14) were fed the diets for 6-weeks. Hemoglobin-(Hb), liver-ferritin and Fe-related transporter/enzyme gene-expression were measured. Hemoglobin-maintenance-efficiency and total-body-Hb-Fe values were used to estimate Fe-bioavailability. Results Hemoglobin-maintenance-efficiency values were higher (P<0.05) in the group consuming the standard-Fe beans on days 14, 21 and 28; indicating a compensatory response to lower dietary-Fe. Final total-Hb-Fe body content was higher in the biofortified vs. the standard group (26.6±0.9 and 24.4±0.8 mg, respectively; P<0.05). There were no differences in liver-ferritin or in expression of DMT-1, Dcyt-B, and ferroportin. In-vitro Fe-bioavailability assessment indicated very low Fe-bioavailability from both diets and between the two bean varieties (P>0.05). Such extremely-low in-vitro Fe-bioavailability measurement is indicative of the presence of high levels of polyphenolic-compounds that may inhibit Fe-absorption. High levels of these compounds would be expected in the black bean seed-coats. Conclusions The parameters of Fe-status measured in this study indicate that only a minor increase in absorbable-Fe was achieved with the higher-Fe beans. The results also raise

  12. The limitations of applying zero-valent iron technology in contaminants sequestration and the corresponding countermeasures: the development in zero-valent iron technology in the last two decades (1994-2014).

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiaohong; Sun, Yuankui; Qin, Hejie; Li, Jinxiang; Lo, Irene M C; He, Di; Dong, Haoran

    2015-05-15

    Over the past 20 years, zero-valent iron (ZVI) has been extensively applied for the remediation/treatment of groundwater and wastewater contaminated with various organic and inorganic pollutants. Based on the intrinsic properties of ZVI and the reactions that occur in the process of contaminants sequestration by ZVI, this review summarizes the limitations of ZVI technology and the countermeasures developed in the past two decades (1994-2014). The major limitations of ZVI include low reactivity due to its intrinsic passive layer, narrow working pH, reactivity loss with time due to the precipitation of metal hydroxides and metal carbonates, low selectivity for the target contaminant especially under oxic conditions, limited efficacy for treatment of some refractory contaminants and passivity of ZVI arising from certain contaminants. The countermeasures can be divided into seven categories: pretreatment of pristine ZVI to remove passive layer, fabrication of nano-sized ZVI to increase the surface area, synthesis of ZVI-based bimetals taking advantage of the catalytic ability of the noble metal, employing physical methods to enhance the performance of ZVI, coupling ZVI with other adsorptive materials and chemically enhanced ZVI technology, as well as methods to recover the reactivity of aged ZVI. The key to improving the rate of contaminants removal by ZVI and broadening the applicable pH range is to enhance ZVI corrosion and to enhance the mass transfer of the reactants including oxygen and H(+) to the ZVI surface. The characteristics of the ideal technology are proposed and the future research needs for ZVI technology are suggested accordingly.

  13. Combined deficiency of iron and (n-3) fatty acids in male rats disrupts brain monoamine metabolism and produces greater memory deficits than iron deficiency or (n-3) fatty acid deficiency alone.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Jeannine; Smuts, Cornelius M; Malan, Linda; Arnold, Myrtha; Yee, Benjamin K; Bianco, Laura E; Boekschoten, Mark V; Müller, Michael; Langhans, Wolfgang; Hurrell, Richard F; Zimmermann, Michael B

    2012-08-01

    Deficiencies of iron (Fe) (ID) and (n-3) fatty acids (FA) [(n-3)FAD] may impair brain development and function through shared mechanisms. However, little is known about the potential interactions between these 2 common deficiencies. We studied the effects of ID and (n-3)FAD, alone and in combination, on brain monoamine pathways (by measuring monoamines and related gene expression) and spatial working and reference memory (by Morris water maze testing). Using a 2 × 2 design, male rats were fed an ID, (n-3)FAD, ID+(n-3)FAD, or control diet for 5 wk postweaning (postnatal d 21-56) after (n-3)FAD had been induced over 2 generations. The (n-3)FAD and ID diets decreased brain (n-3) FA by 70-76% and Fe by 20-32%, respectively. ID and (n-3)FAD significantly increased dopamine (DA) concentrations in the olfactory bulb (OB) and striatum, with an additive 1- to 2-fold increase in ID+(n-3)FAD rats compared with controls (P < 0.05). ID decreased serotonin (5-HT) levels in OB, with a significant decrease in ID+(n-3)FAD rats. Furthermore, norepinephrine concentrations were increased 2-fold in the frontal cortex (FC) of (n-3)FAD rats (P < 0.05). Dopa decarboxylase was downregulated in the hippocampus of ID and ID+(n-3)FAD rats (fold-change = -1.33; P < 0.05). ID and (n-3)FAD significantly impaired working memory performance and the impairment positively correlated with DA concentrations in FC (r = 0.39; P = 0.026). Reference memory was impaired in the ID+(n-3)FAD rats (P < 0.05) and was negatively associated with 5-HT in FC (r = -0.42; P = 0.018). These results suggest that the combined deficiencies of Fe and (n-3) FA disrupt brain monoamine metabolism and produce greater deficits in reference memory than ID or (n-3)FAD alone.

  14. Iron, radiation, and cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, R G; Kalkwarf, D R

    1990-01-01

    Increased iron content of cells and tissue may increase the risk of cancer. In particular, high available iron status may increase the risk of a radiation-induced cancer. There are two possible mechanisms for this effect: iron can catalyze the production of oxygen radicals, and it may be a limiting nutrient to the growth and development of a transformed cell in vivo. Given the high available iron content of the western diet and the fact that the world is changing to the western model, it is important to determine if high iron increases the risk of cancer. PMID:2269234

  15. Iron isotopes in an Archean ocean analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busigny, Vincent; Planavsky, Noah J.; Jézéquel, Didier; Crowe, Sean; Louvat, Pascale; Moureau, Julien; Viollier, Eric; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2014-05-01

    Iron isotopes have been extensively used to trace the history of microbial metabolisms and the redox evolution of the oceans. Archean sedimentary rocks display greater variability in iron isotope ratios and more markedly negative values than those deposited in the Proterozoic and Phanerozoic. This increased variability has been linked to changes in either water column iron cycling or the extent of benthic microbial iron reduction through time. We tested these contrasting scenarios through a detailed study of anoxic and ferruginous Lac Pavin (France), which can serve as a modern analogue of the Archean ocean. A depth-profile in the water column of Lac Pavin shows a remarkable increase in dissolved Fe concentration (0.1-1200 μM) and δ56Fe values (-2.14‰ to +0.31‰) across the oxic-anoxic boundary to the lake bottom. The largest Fe isotope variability is found at the redox boundary and is related to partial oxidation of dissolved ferrous iron, leaving the residual Fe enriched in light isotopes. The analysis of four sediment cores collected along a lateral profile (one in the oxic layer, one at the redox boundary, one in the anoxic zone, and one at the bottom of the lake) indicates that bulk sediments, porewaters, and reactive Fe mostly have δ56Fe values near 0.0 ± 0.2‰, similar to detrital iron. In contrast, pyrite δ56Fe values in sub-chemocline cores (60, 65, and 92 m) are highly variable and show significant deviations from the detrital iron isotope composition (δ56Fepyrite between -1.51‰ and +0.09‰; average -0.93‰). Importantly, the pyrite δ56Fe values mirror the δ56Fe of dissolved iron at the redox boundary—where near quantitative sulfate and sulfide drawdown occurs—suggesting limited iron isotope fractionation during iron sulfide formation. This finding has important implications for the Archean environment. Specifically, this work suggests that in a ferruginous system, most of the Fe isotope variability observed in sedimentary pyrites can

  16. Iron Chelation

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron overload and need treatment. What is iron overload? Iron chelation therapy is used when you have ... may want to perform: How quickly does iron overload happen? This is different for each person. It ...

  17. Shared and distinct mechanisms of iron acquisition by bacterial and fungal pathogens of humans

    PubMed Central

    Caza, Mélissa; Kronstad, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is the most abundant transition metal in the human body and its bioavailability is stringently controlled. In particular, iron is tightly bound to host proteins such as transferrin to maintain homeostasis, to limit potential damage caused by iron toxicity under physiological conditions and to restrict access by pathogens. Therefore, iron acquisition during infection of a human host is a challenge that must be surmounted by every successful pathogenic microorganism. Iron is essential for bacterial and fungal physiological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, metabolism, and energy generation via respiration. Hence, pathogenic bacteria and fungi have developed sophisticated strategies to gain access to iron from host sources. Indeed, siderophore production and transport, iron acquisition from heme and host iron-containing proteins such as hemoglobin and transferrin, and reduction of ferric to ferrous iron with subsequent transport are all strategies found in bacterial and fungal pathogens of humans. This review focuses on a comparison of these strategies between bacterial and fungal pathogens in the context of virulence and the iron limitation that occurs in the human body as a mechanism of innate nutritional defense. PMID:24312900

  18. From whole body to cellular models of hepatic triglyceride metabolism: man has got to know his limitations.

    PubMed

    Green, Charlotte J; Pramfalk, Camilla; Morten, Karl J; Hodson, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    The liver is a main metabolic organ in the human body and carries out a vital role in lipid metabolism. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver diseases, encompassing a spectrum of conditions from simple fatty liver (hepatic steatosis) through to cirrhosis. Although obesity is a known risk factor for hepatic steatosis, it remains unclear what factor(s) is/are responsible for the primary event leading to retention of intrahepatocellular fat. Studying hepatic processes and the etiology and progression of disease in vivo in humans is challenging, not least as NAFLD may take years to develop. We present here a review of experimental models and approaches that have been used to assess liver triglyceride metabolism and discuss their usefulness in helping to understand the aetiology and development of NAFLD.

  19. From whole body to cellular models of hepatic triglyceride metabolism: man has got to know his limitations

    PubMed Central

    Green, Charlotte J.; Pramfalk, Camilla; Morten, Karl J.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a main metabolic organ in the human body and carries out a vital role in lipid metabolism. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver diseases, encompassing a spectrum of conditions from simple fatty liver (hepatic steatosis) through to cirrhosis. Although obesity is a known risk factor for hepatic steatosis, it remains unclear what factor(s) is/are responsible for the primary event leading to retention of intrahepatocellular fat. Studying hepatic processes and the etiology and progression of disease in vivo in humans is challenging, not least as NAFLD may take years to develop. We present here a review of experimental models and approaches that have been used to assess liver triglyceride metabolism and discuss their usefulness in helping to understand the aetiology and development of NAFLD. PMID:25352434

  20. On the Lower Limit of Chondrule Cooling Rates: The Significance of Iron Loss in Dynamic Crystallization Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paque, Julie M.; Connolly, Harold C., Jr.; Lofgren, Gary E.

    1998-01-01

    It is unlikely that the presence of chondrules, and thus their formation, within the protoplanetary nebula would be predicted if it were not for their ubiquitous presence in most chondritic meteorites. The study of these enigmatic, igneous objects has a direct influence on how meteoritic and solar system researchers model the processes operating and the materials present within our protoplanetary nebula. Key to understanding chondrule formation is a determination of constraints on their thermal histories. The three important variables in this history are their peak melting temperatures, the duration of their melting at peak temperatures, and the rate at which these object cool. Although these three variables are interdependent, it is cooling rate that provides the most powerful constraint. Cooling rate has a direct affect on the development of both crystal morphology and the elemental distributions within these grains. To date, experiments have indicated that chondrule cooling rates are in the range of 10's to 100's of degrees per hour for porphyritic chondrules (the most abundant type). The cooling rate for radial and barred chondrules is thought to be more rapid. To generate these cooling rates (rapid relative to the cooling of the nebula as a whole, but slow compared to simple black body radiation) the environment of chondrule formation must have been localized, and the abundance of solid materials must have been greatly enhanced above a gas of solar composition. Thus accurate determinations of chondrule cooling rates is critical in understanding both their formation and the nebular environment in which they formed. In a quest to more accurately determine the lower limit on cooling rates and to determine in more detail the effects of Fe loss from a molten sample to Pt wire loops, Weinbruch et al. have explored this issue experimentally and reevaluated the findings of Radomsky and Hewins in light of their new results. The basic conclusions of their paper are an

  1. Iron response regulator protein IrrB in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 helps control the iron/oxygen balance, oxidative stress tolerance, and magnetosome formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Meiwen; Wang, Xu; Guan, Guohua; Li, Ying; Peng, Youliang; Li, Jilun

    2015-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are capable of forming nanosized, membrane-enclosed magnetosomes under iron-rich and oxygen-limited conditions. The complete genomic sequence of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 has been analyzed and found to contain five fur homologue genes whose protein products are predicted to be involved in iron homeostasis and the response to oxidative stress. Of these, only the MGMSRv2_3149 gene (irrB) was significantly downregulated under high-iron and low-oxygen conditions, during the transition of cell growth from the logarithmic to the stationary phase. The encoded protein, IrrB, containing the conserved HHH motif, was identified as an iron response regulator (Irr) protein belonging to the Fur superfamily. To investigate the function of IrrB, we constructed an irrB deletion mutant (ΔirrB). The levels of cell growth and magnetosome formation were lower in the ΔirrB strain than in the wild type (WT) under both high-iron and low-iron conditions. The ΔirrB strain also showed lower levels of iron uptake and H2O2 tolerance than the WT. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that the irrB mutation reduced the expression of numerous genes involved in iron transport, iron storage, heme biosynthesis, and Fe-S cluster assembly. Transcription studies of the other fur homologue genes in the ΔirrB strain indicated complementary functions of the Fur proteins in MSR-1. IrrB appears to be directly responsible for iron metabolism and homeostasis and to be indirectly involved in magnetosome formation. We propose two IrrB-regulated networks (under high- and low-iron conditions) in MSR-1 cells that control the balance of iron and oxygen metabolism and account for the coexistence of five Fur homologues. PMID:26386052

  2. Iron Response Regulator Protein IrrB in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 Helps Control the Iron/Oxygen Balance, Oxidative Stress Tolerance, and Magnetosome Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Meiwen; Wang, Xu; Guan, Guohua; Peng, Youliang; Li, Jilun

    2015-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are capable of forming nanosized, membrane-enclosed magnetosomes under iron-rich and oxygen-limited conditions. The complete genomic sequence of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense strain MSR-1 has been analyzed and found to contain five fur homologue genes whose protein products are predicted to be involved in iron homeostasis and the response to oxidative stress. Of these, only the MGMSRv2_3149 gene (irrB) was significantly downregulated under high-iron and low-oxygen conditions, during the transition of cell growth from the logarithmic to the stationary phase. The encoded protein, IrrB, containing the conserved HHH motif, was identified as an iron response regulator (Irr) protein belonging to the Fur superfamily. To investigate the function of IrrB, we constructed an irrB deletion mutant (ΔirrB). The levels of cell growth and magnetosome formation were lower in the ΔirrB strain than in the wild type (WT) under both high-iron and low-iron conditions. The ΔirrB strain also showed lower levels of iron uptake and H2O2 tolerance than the WT. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that the irrB mutation reduced the expression of numerous genes involved in iron transport, iron storage, heme biosynthesis, and Fe-S cluster assembly. Transcription studies of the other fur homologue genes in the ΔirrB strain indicated complementary functions of the Fur proteins in MSR-1. IrrB appears to be directly responsible for iron metabolism and homeostasis and to be indirectly involved in magnetosome formation. We propose two IrrB-regulated networks (under high- and low-iron conditions) in MSR-1 cells that control the balance of iron and oxygen metabolism and account for the coexistence of five Fur homologues. PMID:26386052

  3. Encapsulation of Iron and Other Micronutrients for Food Fortification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Michael B.; Windhab, Erich J.

    Iodine, vitamin A and iron deficiencies are important global public health problems, particularly for preschool children and pregnant women in low-income countries (World Health Organization 2000). These deficiencies are mainly due to monotonous, poor-quality diets that do not meet nutrient requirements. In countries where existing food supplies and/or limited access fail to provide adequate levels of these nutrients in the diet, food fortification is a promising approach. Co-fortification of foods with iron, iodine and vitamin A may be advantageous due to beneficial interactions of these micronutrients in metabolism. Studies in animals and humans have shown that iron deficiency anemia (IDA) impairs thyroid metabolism (Zimmermann et al. 2000a, 2000b; Hess et al. 2002a, 2002b). Vitamin A deficiency may exacerbate anemia through impairment of iron metabolism (Semba and Bloem 2002). Vitamin A, together with iodine, may reduce thyroid hyperstimulation and risk for goiter (Zimmermann et al. 2007). These micronutrient interactions strongly argue for multiple micronutrient fortification. However, food fortification with iron is not straightforward.

  4. Metabolic expenditures of lunge feeding rorquals across scale: implications for the evolution of filter feeding and the limits to maximum body size.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Jean; Goldbogen, Jeremy A; Shadwick, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    Bulk-filter feeding is an energetically efficient strategy for resource acquisition and assimilation, and facilitates the maintenance of extreme body size as exemplified by baleen whales (Mysticeti) and multiple lineages of bony and cartilaginous fishes. Among mysticetes, rorqual whales (Balaenopteridae) exhibit an intermittent ram filter feeding mode, lunge feeding, which requires the abandonment of body-streamlining in favor of a high-drag, mouth-open configuration aimed at engulfing a very large amount of prey-laden water. Particularly while lunge feeding on krill (the most widespread prey preference among rorquals), the effort required during engulfment involve short bouts of high-intensity muscle activity that demand high metabolic output. We used computational modeling together with morphological and kinematic data on humpback (Megaptera noveaangliae), fin (Balaenoptera physalus), blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and minke (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) whales to estimate engulfment power output in comparison with standard metrics of metabolic rate. The simulations reveal that engulfment metabolism increases across the full body size of the larger rorqual species to nearly 50 times the basal metabolic rate of terrestrial mammals of the same body mass. Moreover, they suggest that the metabolism of the largest body sizes runs with significant oxygen deficits during mouth opening, namely, 20% over maximum VO2 at the size of the largest blue whales, thus requiring significant contributions from anaerobic catabolism during a lunge and significant recovery after a lunge. Our analyses show that engulfment metabolism is also significantly lower for smaller adults, typically one-tenth to one-half VO2|max. These results not only point to a physiological limit on maximum body size in this lineage, but also have major implications for the ontogeny of extant rorquals as well as the evolutionary pathways used by ancestral toothed whales to transition from hunting individual prey

  5. Metabolic Expenditures of Lunge Feeding Rorquals Across Scale: Implications for the Evolution of Filter Feeding and the Limits to Maximum Body Size

    PubMed Central

    Potvin, Jean; Goldbogen, Jeremy A.; Shadwick, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Bulk-filter feeding is an energetically efficient strategy for resource acquisition and assimilation, and facilitates the maintenance of extreme body size as exemplified by baleen whales (Mysticeti) and multiple lineages of bony and cartilaginous fishes. Among mysticetes, rorqual whales (Balaenopteridae) exhibit an intermittent ram filter feeding mode, lunge feeding, which requires the abandonment of body-streamlining in favor of a high-drag, mouth-open configuration aimed at engulfing a very large amount of prey-laden water. Particularly while lunge feeding on krill (the most widespread prey preference among rorquals), the effort required during engulfment involve short bouts of high-intensity muscle activity that demand high metabolic output. We used computational modeling together with morphological and kinematic data on humpback (Megaptera noveaangliae), fin (Balaenoptera physalus), blue (Balaenoptera musculus) and minke (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) whales to estimate engulfment power output in comparison with standard metrics of metabolic rate. The simulations reveal that engulfment metabolism increases across the full body size of the larger rorqual species to nearly 50 times the basal metabolic rate of terrestrial mammals of the same body mass. Moreover, they suggest that the metabolism of the largest body sizes runs with significant oxygen deficits during mouth opening, namely, 20% over maximum at the size of the largest blue whales, thus requiring significant contributions from anaerobic catabolism during a lunge and significant recovery after a lunge. Our analyses show that engulfment metabolism is also significantly lower for smaller adults, typically one-tenth to one-half . These results not only point to a physiological limit on maximum body size in this lineage, but also have major implications for the ontogeny of extant rorquals as well as the evolutionary pathways used by ancestral toothed whales to transition from hunting individual prey items to

  6. Exogenous Classic Phytohormones Have Limited Regulatory Effects on Fructan and Primary Carbohydrate Metabolism in Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.)

    PubMed Central

    Gasperl, Anna; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Fructans are polymers of fructose and one of the main constituents of water-soluble carbohydrates in forage grasses and cereal crops of temperate climates. Fructans are involved in cold and drought resistance, regrowth following defoliation and early spring growth, seed filling, have beneficial effects on human health and are used for industrial processes. Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) serves as model species to study fructan metabolism. Fructan metabolism is under the control of both synthesis by fructosyltransferases (FTs) and breakdown through fructan exohydrolases (FEHs). The accumulation of fructans can be triggered by high sucrose levels and abiotic stress conditions such as drought and cold stress. However, detailed studies on the mechanisms involved in the regulation of fructan metabolism are scarce. Since different phytohormones, especially abscisic acid (ABA), are known to play an important role in abiotic stress responses, the possible short term regulation of the enzymes involved in fructan metabolism by the five classical phytohormones was investigated. Therefore, the activities of enzymes involved in fructan synthesis and breakdown, the expression levels for the corresponding genes and levels for water-soluble carbohydrates were determined following pulse treatments with ABA, auxin (AUX), ethylene (ET), gibberellic acid (GA), or kinetin (KIN). The most pronounced fast effects were a transient increase of FT activities by AUX, KIN, ABA, and ET, while minor effects were evident for 1-FEH activity with an increased activity in response to KIN and a decrease by GA. Fructan and sucrose levels were not affected. This observed discrepancy demonstrates the importance of determining enzyme activities to obtain insight into the physiological traits and ultimately the plant phenotype. The comparative analyses of activities for seven key enzymes of primary carbohydrate metabolism revealed no co-regulation between enzymes of the fructan and sucrose pool

  7. Exogenous Classic Phytohormones Have Limited Regulatory Effects on Fructan and Primary Carbohydrate Metabolism in Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.).

    PubMed

    Gasperl, Anna; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Fructans are polymers of fructose and one of the main constituents of water-soluble carbohydrates in forage grasses and cereal crops of temperate climates. Fructans are involved in cold and drought resistance, regrowth following defoliation and early spring growth, seed filling, have beneficial effects on human health and are used for industrial processes. Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) serves as model species to study fructan metabolism. Fructan metabolism is under the control of both synthesis by fructosyltransferases (FTs) and breakdown through fructan exohydrolases (FEHs). The accumulation of fructans can be triggered by high sucrose levels and abiotic stress conditions such as drought and cold stress. However, detailed studies on the mechanisms involved in the regulation of fructan metabolism are scarce. Since different phytohormones, especially abscisic acid (ABA), are known to play an important role in abiotic stress responses, the possible short term regulation of the enzymes involved in fructan metabolism by the five classical phytohormones was investigated. Therefore, the activities of enzymes involved in fructan synthesis and breakdown, the expression levels for the corresponding genes and levels for water-soluble carbohydrates were determined following pulse treatments with ABA, auxin (AUX), ethylene (ET), gibberellic acid (GA), or kinetin (KIN). The most pronounced fast effects were a transient increase of FT activities by AUX, KIN, ABA, and ET, while minor effects were evident for 1-FEH activity with an increased activity in response to KIN and a decrease by GA. Fructan and sucrose levels were not affected. This observed discrepancy demonstrates the importance of determining enzyme activities to obtain insight into the physiological traits and ultimately the plant phenotype. The comparative analyses of activities for seven key enzymes of primary carbohydrate metabolism revealed no co-regulation between enzymes of the fructan and sucrose pool

  8. Exogenous Classic Phytohormones Have Limited Regulatory Effects on Fructan and Primary Carbohydrate Metabolism in Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.).

    PubMed

    Gasperl, Anna; Morvan-Bertrand, Annette; Prud'homme, Marie-Pascale; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Fructans are polymers of fructose and one of the main constituents of water-soluble carbohydrates in forage grasses and cereal crops of temperate climates. Fructans are involved in cold and drought resistance, regrowth following defoliation and early spring growth, seed filling, have beneficial effects on human health and are used for industrial processes. Perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) serves as model species to study fructan metabolism. Fructan metabolism is under the control of both synthesis by fructosyltransferases (FTs) and breakdown through fructan exohydrolases (FEHs). The accumulation of fructans can be triggered by high sucrose levels and abiotic stress conditions such as drought and cold stress. However, detailed studies on the mechanisms involved in the regulation of fructan metabolism are scarce. Since different phytohormones, especially abscisic acid (ABA), are known to play an important role in abiotic stress responses, the possible short term regulation of the enzymes involved in fructan metabolism by the five classical phytohormones was investigated. Therefore, the activities of enzymes involved in fructan synthesis and breakdown, the expression levels for the corresponding genes and levels for water-soluble carbohydrates were determined following pulse treatments with ABA, auxin (AUX), ethylene (ET), gibberellic acid (GA), or kinetin (KIN). The most pronounced fast effects were a transient increase of FT activities by AUX, KIN, ABA, and ET, while minor effects were evident for 1-FEH activity with an increased activity in response to KIN and a decrease by GA. Fructan and sucrose levels were not affected. This observed discrepancy demonstrates the importance of determining enzyme activities to obtain insight into the physiological traits and ultimately the plant phenotype. The comparative analyses of activities for seven key enzymes of primary carbohydrate metabolism revealed no co-regulation between enzymes of the fructan and sucrose pool.

  9. The pupylation machinery is involved in iron homeostasis by targeting the iron storage protein ferritin.

    PubMed

    Küberl, Andreas; Polen, Tino; Bott, Michael

    2016-04-26

    The balance of sufficient iron supply and avoidance of iron toxicity by iron homeostasis is a prerequisite for cellular metabolism and growth. Here we provide evidence that, in Actinobacteria, pupylation plays a crucial role in this process. Pupylation is a posttranslational modification in which the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup is covalently attached to a lysine residue in target proteins, thus resembling ubiquitination in eukaryotes. Pupylated proteins are recognized and unfolded by a dedicated AAA+ ATPase (Mycobacterium proteasomal AAA+ ATPase; ATPase forming ring-shaped complexes). In Mycobacteria, degradation of pupylated proteins by the proteasome serves as a protection mechanism against several stress conditions. Other bacterial genera capable of pupylation such as Corynebacterium lack a proteasome, and the fate of pupylated proteins is unknown. We discovered that Corynebacterium glutamicum mutants lacking components of the pupylation machinery show a strong growth defect under iron limitation, which was caused by the absence of pupylation and unfolding of the iron storage protein ferritin. Genetic and biochemical data support a model in which the pupylation machinery is responsible for iron release from ferritin independent of degradation. PMID:27078093

  10. The pupylation machinery is involved in iron homeostasis by targeting the iron storage protein ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Küberl, Andreas; Polen, Tino; Bott, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The balance of sufficient iron supply and avoidance of iron toxicity by iron homeostasis is a prerequisite for cellular metabolism and growth. Here we provide evidence that, in Actinobacteria, pupylation plays a crucial role in this process. Pupylation is a posttranslational modification in which the prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein Pup is covalently attached to a lysine residue in target proteins, thus resembling ubiquitination in eukaryotes. Pupylated proteins are recognized and unfolded by a dedicated AAA+ ATPase (Mycobacterium proteasomal AAA+ ATPase; ATPase forming ring-shaped complexes). In Mycobacteria, degradation of pupylated proteins by the proteasome serves as a protection mechanism against several stress conditions. Other bacterial genera capable of pupylation such as Corynebacterium lack a proteasome, and the fate of pupylated proteins is unknown. We discovered that Corynebacterium glutamicum mutants lacking components of the pupylation machinery show a strong growth defect under iron limitation, which was caused by the absence of pupylation and unfolding of the iron storage protein ferritin. Genetic and biochemical data support a model in which the pupylation machinery is responsible for iron release from ferritin independent of degradation. PMID:27078093

  11. Kinetic Modeling of Arsenic Cycling by a Freshwater Cyanobacterium as Influenced by N:P Ratios: A Potential Biologic Control in an Iron-Limited Drainage Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markley, C. T.; Herbert, B. E.

    2004-12-01

    Elevated As levels are common in South Texas surface waters, where As is derived from the natural weathering of geogenic sources and a byproduct of historical uranium mining. The impacted surface waters of the Nueces River drainage basin supply Lake Corpus Christi (LCC), a major drinking water reservoir for the Corpus Christi area. The soils and sediments of the Nueces River drainage basin generally have low levels of reactive iron (average concentration of 2780 mg/kg), limiting the control of iron oxyhydroxides on As geochemistry and bioavailability. Given these conditions, biologic cycling of As may have a large influence on As fate and transport in LCC. Sediment cores from LCC show evidence for cyanobacterial blooms after reservoir formation based upon stable isotopes, total organic matter and specific elemental correlations. While algae have been shown to accumulate and reduce inorganic As(V), few studies have reported biologic cycling of As by cyanobacteria. Therefore, As(V) uptake, accumulation, reduction, and excretion in a 1.0 μ M As(V) solution by the freshwater cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120, was measured over time as a function of low, middle and high N:P ratios (1.2, 12, 120) to determine nutrient effects on As cycling by the cyanobacterium. Total As(V) reduction was observed in all three conditions upon completion of the ten-day experiment. Maximum As(V) reduction rates ranged from (0.013 mmol g C-1 day-1) in the low N:P solution to (0.398 mmol g C-1 day-1) in the high N:P solution. Increased cell biomass in the low N:P ratio solution compensated for the low maximum reduction rate to allow total As(V) reduction. Kinetic equations commonly used to model algal-nutrient interactions were utilized in modeling the current data. The Michaelis-Menten enzyme saturation equation modified with a competitive inhibition term adequately modeled As(III) excretion in the high and middle N:P ratio test conditions. The low N:P test condition further

  12. Relationship between indices of iron status and coronary risk factors including diabetes and the metabolic syndrome in Saudi subjects without overt coronary disease.

    PubMed

    Alissa, Eman M; Ahmed, Waqar H; Al-Ama, Nabeel; Ferns, Gordon A A

    2007-01-01

    There have been inconsistent reports on the relationship between iron status and coronary artery diseases (CAD), and little data on this relationship in non-Caucasian populations. We assessed dietary iron by questionnaire and measured serum iron and ferritin levels in 270 Saudi male subjects without established CAD, 130 of whom were angiogram negative. Serum lipid profile, glucose, high sensitivity-C reactive protein (hs-CRP), serum soluble intercellular adhesion molecules-1 (sICAM-1), and caeruloplasmin were measured in all subjects. The angiogram negative patients, had lower serum ferritin (p<0.05) and iron (p<0.0001) levels than the 140 subjects without reported cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Serum iron correlated with serum triglycerides (p<0.0001) and total cholesterol (p<0.05) levels for this latter group and the groups combined. Serum ferritin correlated with serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol in the combined group (p<0.05), and was correlated with blood glucose and serum LDL-cholesterol (p<0.05) in the subjects without reported CVD. After adjustment for confounding variables, serum iron levels remained a significant correlate with total calorie intake and serum triglycerides. Serum ferritin also correlated significantly with cholesterol intake and fasting serum total cholesterol. Dietary iron was significantly related to dietary cholesterol and fiber, age, smoking habits, and serum total cholesterol level. Hence, indices of iron status were related to several coronary risk factors in the Saudi population.

  13. Increased iron supplied through Fet3p results in replicative life span extension of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under conditions requiring respiratory metabolism.

    PubMed

    Botta, Gabriela; Turn, Christina S; Quintyne, Nicholas J; Kirchman, Paul A

    2011-10-01

    We have previously shown that copper supplementation extends the replicative life span of Saccharomyces cerevisiae when grown under conditions forcing cells to respire. We now show that copper's effect on life span is through Fet3p, a copper containing enzyme responsible for high affinity transport of iron into yeast cells. Life span extensions can also be obtained by supplementing the growth medium with 1mM ferric chloride. Extension by high iron levels is still dependent on the presence of Fet3p. Life span extension by iron or copper requires growth on media containing glycerol as the sole carbon source, which forces yeast to respire. Yeast grown on glucose containing media supplemented with iron show no extension of life span. The iron associated with cells grown in media supplemented with copper or iron is 1.4-1.8 times that of cells grown without copper or iron supplementation. As with copper supplementation, iron supplementation partially rescues the life span of superoxide dismutase mutants. Cells grown with copper supplementation display decreased production of superoxide as measured by dihydroethidium staining.

  14. Modulation of cellular iron metabolism by hydrogen peroxide. Effects of H2O2 on the expression and function of iron-responsive element-containing mRNAs in B6 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Caltagirone, A; Weiss, G; Pantopoulos, K

    2001-06-01

    Cellular iron uptake and storage are coordinately controlled by binding of iron-regulatory proteins (IRP), IRP1 and IRP2, to iron-responsive elements (IREs) within the mRNAs encoding transferrin receptor (TfR) and ferritin. Under conditions of iron starvation, both IRP1 and IRP2 bind with high affinity to cognate IREs, thus stabilizing TfR and inhibiting translation of ferritin mRNAs. The IRE/IRP regulatory system receives additional input by oxidative stress in the form of H(2)O(2) that leads to rapid activation of IRP1. Here we show that treating murine B6 fibroblasts with a pulse of 100 microm H(2)O(2) for 1 h is sufficient to alter critical parameters of iron homeostasis in a time-dependent manner. First, this stimulus inhibits ferritin synthesis for at least 8 h, leading to a significant (50%) reduction of cellular ferritin content. Second, treatment with H(2)O(2) induces a approximately 4-fold increase in TfR mRNA levels within 2-6 h, and subsequent accumulation of newly synthesized protein after 4 h. This is associated with a profound increase in the cell surface expression of TfR, enhanced binding to fluorescein-tagged transferrin, and stimulation of transferrin-mediated iron uptake into cells. Under these conditions, no significant alterations are observed in the levels of mitochondrial aconitase and the Divalent Metal Transporter DMT1, although both are encoded by two as yet lesser characterized IRE-containing mRNAs. Finally, H(2)O(2)-treated cells display an increased capacity to sequester (59)Fe in ferritin, despite a reduction in the ferritin pool, which results in a rearrangement of (59)Fe intracellular distribution. Our data suggest that H(2)O(2) regulates cellular iron acquisition and intracellular iron distribution by both IRP1-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

  15. Iron status in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Fairweather-Tait, Susan J; Wawer, Anna A; Gillings, Rachel; Jennings, Amy; Myint, Phyo K

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is prevalent in older age, particularly after the age of 80. Serum ferritin concentrations also decline, although there is no evidence to suggest that changes in iron stores are an inevitable consequence of ageing. Chronic inflammation is a common condition in older people, making the measurement of iron status difficult, and it is likely that elevated levels of circulating hepcidin are responsible for changes in iron metabolism that result in systemic iron depletion. Other contributory factors are poor diet and some medications, such as aspirin. Anaemia in older age has undesirable health outcomes, including increased susceptibility to falling and depression. However, there are concerns about possible adverse effects of iron supplements, either in relation to pro-inflammatory effects in the gut or inappropriate tissue iron deposition. Brain iron levels are increased with age-related degenerative diseases, but it is not known if this is the cause or a consequence of the disease, and genetic factors are likely to play a role. In order to maintain body iron within the normal range a personalised approach is required, taking into account all of the factors that may affect iron metabolism and the available strategies for preventing iron deficiency or overload.

  16. Overexpression of the MRI Reporter Genes Ferritin and Transferrin Receptor Affect Iron Homeostasis and Produce Limited Contrast in Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sofia M.; Moss, Diana; Williams, Steve R.; Murray, Patricia; Taylor, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Imaging technologies that allow the non-invasive monitoring of stem cells in vivo play a vital role in cell-based regenerative therapies. Recently, much interest has been generated in reporter genes that enable simultaneous monitoring of the anatomical location and viability of cells using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we investigate the efficacy of ferritin heavy chain-1 (Fth1) and transferrin receptor-1 (TfR1) as reporters for tracking mesenchymal stem cells. The overexpression of TfR1 was well tolerated by the cells but Fth1 was found to affect the cell’s iron homeostasis, leading to phenotypic changes in the absence of iron supplementation and an upregulation in transcript and protein levels of the cell’s endogenous transferrin receptor. Neither the sole overexpression of Fth1 nor TfR1 resulted in significant increases in intracellular iron content, although significant differences were seen when the two reporter genes were used in combination, in the presence of high concentrations of iron. The supplementation of the culture medium with iron sources was a more efficient means to obtain contrast than the use of reporter genes, where high levels of intracellular iron were reflected in transverse (T2) relaxation. The feasibility of imaging iron-supplemented cells by MRI is shown using a 3R-compliant chick embryo model. PMID:26184159

  17. Iron biomineralization of brain tissue and neurodegenerative disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylova (Mikhailova), Albina

    The brain is an organ with a high concentration of iron in specific areas, particularly in the globus pallidus, the substantia nigra, and the red nucleus. In certain pathological states, such as iron overload disease and neurodegenerative disorders, a disturbed iron metabolism can lead to increased accumulation of iron not only in these areas, but also in the brain regions that are typically low in iron content. Recent studies of the physical and magnetic properties of metalloproteins, and in particular the discovery of biogenic magnetite in human brain tissue, have raised new questions about the role of biogenic iron formations in living organisms. Further investigations revealed the presence of magnetite-like crystalline structures in human ferritin, and indicated that released ferritin iron might act as promoter of oxidative damage to tissue, therefore contributing to pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. The purpose of this work was to examine the elemental composition and structure of iron deposits in normal brain tissue as well as tissue affected by neurodegenerative disorders. Employing the methods of X-ray microfocus fluorescence mapping, X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (XAFS), and light and electron microscopic examinations allows one to obtain qualitative as well as quantitative data with respect to the cellular distribution and chemical state of iron at levels not detected previously. The described tissue preparation technique allows not only satisfactory XAS iron elemental imaging in situ but also multimodal examination with light and electron microscopes of the same samples. The developed protocol has assured consistent and reproducible results on relatively large sections of flat-embedded tissue. The resulting tissue samples were adequate for XAS examination as well as sufficiently well-preserved for future microscopy studies

  18. Metabolic erosion primarily through mutation accumulation, and not tradeoffs, drives limited evolution of substrate specificity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Leiby, Nicholas; Marx, Christopher J

    2014-02-01

    Evolutionary adaptation to a constant environment is often accompanied by specialization and a reduction of fitness in other environments. We assayed the ability of the Lenski Escherichia coli populations to grow on a range of carbon sources after 50,000 generations of adaptation on glucose. Using direct measurements of growth rates, we demonstrated that declines in performance were much less widespread than suggested by previous results from Biolog assays of cellular respiration. Surprisingly, there were many performance increases on a variety of substrates. In addition to the now famous example of citrate, we observed several other novel gains of function for organic acids that the ancestral strain only marginally utilized. Quantitative growth data also showed that strains with a higher mutation rate exhibited significantly more declines, suggesting that most metabolic erosion was driven by mutation accumulation and not by physiological tradeoffs. These reductions in growth by mutator strains were ameliorated by growth at lower temperature, consistent with the hypothesis that this metabolic erosion is largely caused by destabilizing mutations to the associated enzymes. We further hypothesized that reductions in growth rate would be greatest for substrates used most differently from glucose, and we used flux balance analysis to formulate this question quantitatively. To our surprise, we found no significant relationship between decreases in growth and dissimilarity to glucose metabolism. Taken as a whole, these data suggest that in a single resource environment, specialization does not mainly result as an inevitable consequence of adaptive tradeoffs, but rather due to the gradual accumulation of disabling mutations in unused portions of the genome. PMID:24558347

  19. Heme, iron, and the mitochondrial decay of ageing.

    PubMed

    Atamna, Hani

    2004-07-01

    Heme, the major functional form of iron, is synthesized in the mitochondria. Although disturbed heme metabolism causes mitochondrial decay, oxidative stress, and iron accumulation, all of which are hallmarks of ageing, heme has been little studied in nutritional deficiency, in ageing, or age-related disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Biosynthesis of heme requires Vitamin B(6), riboflavin, biotin, pantothenic acid, and lipoic acid and the minerals zinc, iron, and copper, micronutrients are essential for the production of succinyl-CoA, the precursor for porphyrins, by the TCA (Krebs) cycle. Only a small fraction of the porphyrins synthesized from succinyl-CoA are converted to heme, the rest are excreted out of the body together with the degradation products of heme (e.g. bilirubin). Therefore, the heme biosynthetic pathway causes a net loss of succinyl-CoA from the TCA cycle. The mitochondrial pool of succinyl-CoA may limit heme biosynthesis in deficiencies for micronutrients (e.g. iron or biotin deficiency). Ageing and AD are also associated with hypometabolism, increase in heme oxygenase-1, loss of complex IV, and iron accumulation. Heme is a common denominator for all these changes, suggesting that heme metabolism maybe altered in age-related disorders. Heme can also be a prooxidant: it converts less reactive oxidants to highly reactive free radicals. Free heme has high affinity for different cell structures (protein, membranes, and DNA), triggering site-directed oxidative damage. This review discusses heme metabolism as related to metabolic changes seen in ageing and age-related disorders and highlights the possible role in iron deficiency.

  20. Nutritional iron deficiency: the role of oral iron supplementation.

    PubMed

    Lachowicz, J I; Nurchi, V M; Fanni, D; Gerosa, C; Peana, M; Zoroddu, M A

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency represents a relevant health problem mainly in developing countries. Children and pregnant women represent the main target of this disease, and the low amount of bio-available iron mostly depends on plant-based diets. Iron deficiency may have serious consequences, with severe impairment of the immune function leading to infectious diseases. The brain development in embryos and fetuses during gestation can be greatly affected by iron deficiency of the mother with heavy outcomes on the cognition status of children. A better understanding of molecular pathways involved in iron absorption and metabolism are the basis for new strategies for developing a therapy for iron deficiency. Different therapeutic strategies are summarized, and iron fortification appears the best tool.

  1. Blood withdrawal affects iron store dynamics in primates with consequences on monoaminergic system function.

    PubMed

    Hyacinthe, C; De Deurwaerdere, P; Thiollier, T; Li, Q; Bezard, E; Ghorayeb, I

    2015-04-01

    Iron homeostasis is essential for the integrity of brain monoaminergic functions and its deregulation might be involved in neurological movement disorders such as the restless legs syndrome (RLS). Although iron metabolism breakdown concomitantly appears with monoaminergic system dysfunction in iron-deficient rodents and in RLS patients, the direct consequences of peripheral iron deficiency in the central nervous system (CNS) of non-human primates have received little attention. Here, we evaluated the peripheral iron-depletion impact on brain monoamine levels in macaque monkeys. After documenting circadian variations of iron and iron-related proteins (hemoglobin, ferritin and transferrin) in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of normal macaques, repeated blood withdrawals (RBW) were used to reduce peripheral iron-related parameter levels. Decreased serum iron levels were paradoxically associated with increased CSF iron concentrations. Despite limited consequences on tissue monoamine contents (dopamine - DA, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid - DOPAC, homovanillic acid, L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine - L-DOPA, 5-8 hydroxytryptamine - 5-HT, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid - 5-HIAA and noradrenaline) measured with post-mortem chromatography, we found distinct and region-dependent relationships of these tissue concentrations with CSF iron and/or serum iron and/or blood hemoglobin. Additionally, striatal extracellular DA, DOPAC and 5-HIAA levels evaluated by in vivo microdialysis showed a substantial increase, suggesting an overall increase in both DA and 5-HT tones. Finally, a trending increase in general locomotor activity, measured by actimetry, was observed in the most serum iron-depleted macaques. Taken together, our data are compatible with an increase in nigrostriatal DAergic function in the event of iron deficiency and point to a specific alteration of the 5-HT/DA interaction in the CNS that is possibly involved in the etiology of RLS. PMID:25662508

  2. Iron Binding Modulates Candidacidal Properties of Salivary Histatin 5

    PubMed Central

    Puri, S.; Li, R.; Ruszaj, D.; Tati, S.

    2015-01-01

    Salivary protein histatin 5 (Hst 5) is fungicidal toward Candida albicans, the causative agent of oropharyngeal candidiasis. However, its activity in saliva is compromised by salivary protease-mediated degradation and interaction with salivary salts. Hst 5 has also been shown to bind various metals in saliva—namely, Zn, Cu, and Ni. Surprisingly, interactions of Hst 5 with Fe have not been studied, although iron is one of the most abundant metals present in saliva. Using circular dichroism, we show that Hst 5 can bind up to 10 equivalents of iron as measured by loss of its alpha-helical secondary structure that is normally observed for it in trifluoroethylene. A significant decrease in the candidacidal ability of Hst 5 was observed upon iron binding, with increasing iron concentrations being inversely proportional to Hst 5 killing activity. Binding assays showed that the decrease in killing was likely a result of reduced binding (10-fold reduction) of Fe–Hst 5 to C. albicans cells. Protease stability analysis showed that Fe–Hst 5 was completely resistant to trypsin digestion. In contrast, zinc binding had limited effects on Hst 5 fungicidal activity or protease susceptibility. RNA sequencing results identified changes in iron uptake genes in Hst 5–treated C. albicans cells. Our findings thus suggest that consequences of Hst 5 binding iron not only affect candidacidal ability and proteolyic stability of Hst 5, but may also contribute to a novel killing mechanism involving interference with cellular iron metabolism. PMID:25365968

  3. Loss of the oxidative stress regulator OxyR in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 impairs growth under iron-limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Vinckx, Tiffany; Matthijs, Sandra; Cornelis, Pierre

    2008-11-01

    Pyoverdine is the main siderophore secreted by fluorescent pseudomonads to scavenge iron in the extracellular environment. Iron uptake, however, needs to be tightly regulated, because free iron stimulates the formation of highly toxic oxygen derivatives. In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the transcriptional regulator OxyR plays a key role in the upregulation of defense mechanisms against oxidative stress as it stimulates the expression of the antioxidant genes katB, ahpB and ahpCF after contact with oxidative stress-generating agents. Inactivation of the oxyR gene in Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400 and in P. aeruginosa PAO1 impairs pyoverdine-mediated iron uptake. The pyoverdine utilization defect can be restored by complementation with the oxyR gene of P. aeruginosa, as well as by adding catalase. Growth of the oxyR mutant in low- or high-iron media is also impaired at a low, but not at a high inoculum density. Uptake of radioactive (59)Fe pyoverdine is, however, not affected by the oxyR mutation, nor is the transcription of the fpvA gene encoding the ferripyoverdine receptor, suggesting that the defect lies in the inability to remove iron from the ferrisiderophore. PMID:19054085

  4. The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Iron Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Geisser, Peter; Burckhardt, Susanna

    2011-01-01

    Standard approaches are not appropriate when assessing pharmacokinetics of iron supplements due to the ubiquity of endogenous iron, its compartmentalized sites of action, and the complexity of the iron metabolism. The primary site of action of iron is the erythrocyte, and, in contrast to conventional drugs, no drug-receptor interaction takes place. Notably, the process of erythropoiesis, i.e., formation of new erythrocytes, takes 3–4 weeks. Accordingly, serum iron concentration and area under the curve (AUC) are clinically irrelevant for assessing iron utilization. Iron can be administered intravenously in the form of polynuclear iron(III)-hydroxide complexes with carbohydrate ligands or orally as iron(II) (ferrous) salts or iron(III) (ferric) complexes. Several approaches have been employed to study the pharmacodynamics of iron after oral administration. Quantification of iron uptake from radiolabeled preparations by the whole body or the erythrocytes is optimal, but alternatively total iron transfer can be calculated based on known elimination rates and the intrinsic reactivity of individual preparations. Degradation kinetics, and thus the safety, of parenteral iron preparations are directly related to the molecular weight and the stability of the complex. High oral iron doses or rapid release of iron from intravenous iron preparations can saturate the iron transport system, resulting in oxidative stress with adverse clinical and subclinical consequences. Appropriate pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics analyses will greatly assist our understanding of the likely contribution of novel preparations to the management of anemia. PMID:24310424

  5. Effects of iron deficiency on iron binding and internalization into acidic vacuoles in Dunaliella salina.

    PubMed

    Paz, Yakov; Shimoni, Eyal; Weiss, Meira; Pick, Uri

    2007-07-01

    Uptake of iron in the halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina is mediated by a transferrin-like protein (TTf), which binds and internalizes Fe(3+) ions. Recently, we found that iron deficiency induces a large enhancement of iron binding, which is associated with accumulation of three other plasma membrane proteins that associate with TTf. In this study, we characterized the kinetic properties of iron binding and internalization and identified the site of iron internalization. Iron deficiency induces a 4-fold increase in Fe binding, but only 50% enhancement in the rate of iron uptake and also increases the affinity for iron and bicarbonate, a coligand for iron binding. These results indicate that iron deprivation leads to accumulation and modification of iron-binding sites. Iron uptake in iron-sufficient cells is preceded by an apparent time lag, resulting from prebound iron, which can be eliminated by unloading iron-binding sites. Iron is tightly bound to surface-exposed sites and hardly exchanges with medium iron. All bound iron is subsequently internalized. Accumulation of iron inhibits further iron binding and internalization. The vacuolar inhibitor bafilomycin inhibits iron uptake and internalization. Internalized iron was localized by electron microscopy within vacuolar structures that were identified as acidic vacuoles. Iron internalization is accompanied by endocytosis of surface proteins into these acidic vacuoles. A novel kinetic mechanism for iron uptake is proposed, which includes two pools of bound/compartmentalized iron separated by a rate-limiting internalization stage. The major parameter that is modulated by iron deficiency is the iron-binding capacity. We propose that excessive iron binding in iron-deficient cells serves as a temporary reservoir for iron that is subsequently internalized. This mechanism is particularly suitable for organisms that are exposed to large fluctuations in iron availability. PMID:17513481

  6. Early Life Stress Induced by Limited Nesting Material Produces Metabolic Resilience in Response to a High-Fat and High-Sugar Diet in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Maniam, Jayanthi; Antoniadis, Christopher P.; Wang, Kristy W.; Morris, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental conditions experienced in early life can profoundly influence long-term metabolic health, but the additive impact of poor nutrition is poorly understood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that early life stress (ELS) induced by limited nesting material (LN) combined with high-fat and high-sugar diet (HFHS) post-weaning would worsen diet-related metabolic risk. Sprague-Dawley male rats were exposed to LN, postnatal days 2–9, and at weaning (3 weeks), siblings were given unlimited access to chow or HFHS resulting in (Con-Chow, Con-HFHS, LN-Chow, and LN-HFHS, n = 11–15/group). Glucose and insulin tolerance were tested and rats were killed at 13 weeks. LN rats weighed less at weaning but were not different to control at 13 weeks; HFHS diet led to similar increases in body weight. LN-chow rats had improved glucose and insulin tolerance relative to Con-Chow, whereas LN-HFHS improved insulin sensitivity versus Con-HFHS, associated with increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator-1-alpha (Pgc-1α) mRNA in muscle. No effect of LN on plasma or liver triglycerides was observed, and hepatic gluconeogenic regulatory genes were unaltered. In summary, this study demonstrates that ELS induced by LN conferred some metabolic protection against insulin and/or glucose intolerance in a diet-dependent manner during adulthood. PMID:26441828

  7. Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) have greater blood volumes, higher diving metabolic rates and a longer aerobic dive limit when nutritionally stressed.

    PubMed

    Gerlinsky, Carling D; Trites, Andrew W; Rosen, David A S

    2014-03-01

    Marine mammal foraging behaviour inherently depends on diving ability. Declining populations of Steller sea lions may be facing nutritional stress that could affect their diving ability through changes in body composition or metabolism. Our objective was to determine whether nutritional stress (restricted food intake resulting in a 10% decrease in body mass) altered the calculated aerobic dive limit (cADL) of four captive sea lions diving in the open ocean, and how this related to changes in observed dive behaviour. We measured diving metabolic rate (DMR), blood O2 stores, body composition and dive behaviour prior to and while under nutritional restriction. We found that nutritionally stressed sea lions increased the duration of their single long dives, and the proportion of time they spent at the surface during a cycle of four dives. Nutritionally stressed sea lions lost both lipid and lean mass, resulting in potentially lower muscle O2 stores. However, total body O2 stores increased due to rises in blood O2 stores associated with having higher blood volumes. Nutritionally stressed sea lions also had higher mass-specific metabolic rates. The greater rise in O2 stores relative to the increase in mass-specific DMR resulted in the sea lions having a longer cADL when nutritionally stressed. We conclude that there was no negative effect of nutritional stress on the diving ability of sea lions. However, nutritional stress did lower foraging efficiency and require more foraging time to meet energy requirements due to increases in diving metabolic rates and surface recovery times.

  8. Growth and metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in chemostat cultures under carbon-, nitrogen-, or carbon- and nitrogen-limiting conditions.

    PubMed

    Larsson, C; von Stockar, U; Marison, I; Gustafsson, L

    1993-08-01

    Aerobic chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were performed under carbon-, nitrogen-, and dual carbon- and nitrogen-limiting conditions. The glucose concentration was kept constant, whereas the ammonium concentration was varied among different experiments and different dilution rates. It was found that both glucose and ammonium were consumed at the maximal possible rate, i.e., the feed rate, over a range of medium C/N ratios and dilution rates. To a small extent, this was due to a changing biomass composition, but much more important was the ability of uncoupling between anabolic biomass formation and catabolic energy substrate consumption. When ammonium started to limit the amount of biomass formed and hence the anabolic flow of glucose, this was totally or at least partly compensated for by an increased catabolic glucose consumption. The primary response when glucose was present in excess of the minimum requirements for biomass production was an increased rate of respiration. The calculated specific oxygen consumption rate, at D = 0.07 h-1, was more than doubled when an additional nitrogen limitation was imposed on the cells compared with that during single glucose limitation. However, the maximum respiratory capacity decreased with decreasing nitrogen concentration. The saturation level of the specific oxygen consumption rate decreased from 5.5 to 6.0 mmol/g/h under single glucose limitation to about 4.0 mmol/g/h at the lowest nitrogen concentration tested. The combined result of this was that the critical dilution rate, i.e., onset of fermentation, was as low as 0.10 h-1 during growth in a medium with a low nitrogen concentration compared with 0.20 h-1 obtained under single glucose limitation.

  9. Metabolism and epigenetics in the nervous system: Creating cellular fitness and resistance to neuronal death in neurological conditions via modulation of oxygen-, iron-, and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases.

    PubMed

    Karuppagounder, Saravanan S; Kumar, Amit; Shao, Diana S; Zille, Marietta; Bourassa, Megan W; Caulfield, Joseph T; Alim, Ishraq; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2015-12-01

    Modern definitions of epigenetics incorporate models for transient but biologically important changes in gene expression that are unrelated to DNA code but responsive to environmental changes such as injury-induced stress. In this scheme, changes in oxygen levels (hypoxia) and/or metabolic co-factors (iron deficiency or diminished 2-oxoglutarate levels) are transduced into broad genetic programs that return the cell and the organism to a homeostatic set point. Over the past two decades, exciting studies have identified a superfamily of iron-, oxygen-, and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that sit in the nucleus as modulators of transcription factor stability, co-activator function, histone demethylases, and DNA demethylases. These studies have provided a concrete molecular scheme for how changes in metabolism observed in a host of neurological conditions, including stroke, traumatic brain injury, and Alzheimer's disease, could be transduced into adaptive gene expression to protect the nervous system. We will discuss these enzymes in this short review, focusing primarily on the ten eleven translocation (TET) DNA demethylases, the jumonji (JmJc) histone demethylases, and the oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes (HIF PHDs). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection. PMID:26232572

  10. Metabolites related to gut bacterial metabolism, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha activation, and insulin sensitivity are associated with physical function in functionally-limited older adults.

    PubMed

    Lustgarten, Michael S; Price, Lori L; Chalé, Angela; Fielding, Roger A

    2014-10-01

    Identification of mechanisms underlying physical function will be important for addressing the growing challenge that health care will face with physical disablement in the expanding aging population. Therefore, the goals of the current study were to use metabolic profiling to provide insight into biologic mechanisms that may underlie physical function by examining the association between baseline and the 6-month change in serum mass spectrometry-obtained amino acids, fatty acids, and acylcarnitines with baseline and the 6-month change in muscle strength (leg press one repetition maximum divided by total lean mass, LP/Lean), lower extremity function [short physical performance battery (SPPB)], and mobility (400 m gait speed, 400-m), in response to 6 months of a combined resistance exercise and nutritional supplementation (whey protein or placebo) intervention in functionally-limited older adults (SPPB ≤ 10; 70-85 years, N = 73). Metabolites related to gut bacterial metabolism (cinnamoylglycine, phenol sulfate, p-cresol sulfate, 3-indoxyl sulfate, serotonin, N-methylproline, hydrocinnamate, dimethylglycine, trans-urocanate, valerate) that are altered in response to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-α) activation (α-hydroxyisocaproate, α-hydroxyisovalerate, 2-hydroxy-3-methylvalerate, indolelactate, serotonin, 2-hydroxypalmitate, glutarylcarnitine, isobutyrylcarnitine, cinnamoylglycine) and that are related to insulin sensitivity (monounsaturated fatty acids: 5-dodecenoate, myristoleate, palmitoleate; γ-glutamylamino acids: γ-glutamylglutamine, γ-glutamylalanine, γ-glutamylmethionine, γ-glutamyltyrosine; branched-chain amino acids: leucine, isoleucine, valine) were associated with function at baseline, with the 6-month change in function or were identified in backward elimination regression predictive models. Collectively, these data suggest that gut microbial metabolism, PPAR-α activation, and insulin sensitivity may be involved in

  11. Severe malnutrition and metabolic complications of HIV-infected children in the antiretroviral era: clinical care and management in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Musoke, Philippa M; Fergusson, Pamela

    2011-12-01

    More than 2 million children globally are living with HIV infection and >90% of these reside in sub-Saharan Africa. Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) remains a major problem for HIV-infected children who live in resource-limited settings (RLS), and SAM is an important risk factor for mortality. SAM in HIV-infected children is associated with complications including electrolyte disorders, micronutrient deficiencies, and severe infections, which contribute to the high mortality. Access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has significantly improved the survival of HIV-infected children, although the response to ART of children with SAM remains undocumented in the literature. Immune and virologic responses to ART in RLS are similar to those of infected children in resource-rich settings, but delays in initiation of therapy have led to a high early mortality. Antiretroviral drug toxicities have been described in children who receive therapy and may affect their quality of life and long-term survival. Metabolic complications of ART include lipodystrophy, dyslipidemia, lactic acidosis, insulin resistance, and osteopenia. These complications have been well described in adults and children from developed countries, but data from RLS are limited, and these complications may be compounded by SAM. In this article we review the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and complications of SAM in HIV-infected children and the metabolic complications of HIV-infected children in the era of ART, and discuss future research priorities for RLS.

  12. Brain iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moos, Torben

    2002-11-01

    deficiency altered the cellular content of these proteins so that transferrin receptors were higher and ferritin lower. The transport of iron from brain to blood was addressed in the last part of the thesis. It was found that in the case of iron and transferrin, there is no evidence showing other significant routes of transport from the brain extracellular fluid into the blood than drainage to the ventricular system followed by export to the blood via the arachnoid villi. The turnover of transferrin in the CSF was found to be very high. For reasons mentioned above, transferrin of the CSF is of little significance for transport and cellular delivery of iron to transferrin receptor-expressing neurons. Instead, transferrin of the CSF probably plays a significant role for neutralization and export to the blood of metals, including iron. Once appearing in blood, transferrin of the CSF was degraded at the same rate as intravenously injected transferrin, which indicates that the transferrin of CSF is not altered to an extent that changes its catabolism during the passage from CSF to blood plasma. The metabolism of iron in the developing brain was found to differ markedly when compared to that of the adult brain. A developing regulated transfer of iron to the brain was reflected morphologically by a higher content of transferrin receptors and non-heme iron in endothelial cells of the developing rat brain than in the adult. Neurons had a very low level of transferrin receptors. After about 20 days of age, iron transport into the brain decreased rapidly, and transferrin receptors appeared on neurons. Iron and transferrin injected into the ventricular system of the developing brain were much more widely distributed in the brain parenchyma than in the adult brain. This high accumulation of substances injected into the ventricles in young animals is probably due to the lower rate of production and turnover of CSF, which will increase the time available for diffusion of proteins into the

  13. Studies on iron metabolism in sickle cell anaemia, sickle cell haemoglobin C disease, and haemoglobin C disease using a large volume liquid scintillation counter

    PubMed Central

    Ringelhann, Bela; Konotey-Ahulu, Felix; Dodu, Silas R. A.

    1970-01-01

    Iron absorption as measured by a faecal recovery method in young adult males living in a tropical zone was high, even in the absence of anaemia. There was an inverse relation between the iron absorption and the packed cell volume. The highest absorption was found in sickle cell anaemia patients, where the packed cell volume is the lowest. The incorporation of iron was also the fastest and greatest in this group. In the controls the iron absorbed accumulated in the marrow and the spleen on the first day; in the sickle cell anaemia group the spleen has an insignificant role in iron storage. The growing radioactivity in the liver parallels that of the heart in the group of sickle cell anaemia patients; however, it remains low in the spleen in the same group, implying a diminution of splenic blood flow.