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Sample records for iron nitrates

  1. Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation limits iron transport in anoxic ocean regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Florian; Löscher, Carolin R.; Fiskal, Annika; Sommer, Stefan; Hensen, Christian; Lomnitz, Ulrike; Wuttig, Kathrin; Göttlicher, Jörg; Kossel, Elke; Steininger, Ralph; Canfield, Donald E.

    2016-11-01

    Iron is an essential element for life on Earth and limits primary production in large parts of the ocean. Oxygen-free continental margin sediments represent an important source of bioavailable iron to the ocean, yet little of the iron released from the seabed reaches the productive sea surface. Even in the anoxic water of oxygen minimum zones, where iron solubility should be enhanced, most of the iron is rapidly re-precipitated. To constrain the mechanism(s) of iron removal in anoxic ocean regions we explored the sediment and water in the oxygen minimum zone off Peru. During our sampling campaign the water column featured two distinct redox boundaries separating oxic from nitrate-reducing (i.e., nitrogenous) water and nitrogenous from weakly sulfidic water. The sulfidic water mass in contact with the shelf sediment contained elevated iron concentrations >300 nM. At the boundary between sulfidic and nitrogenous conditions, iron concentrations dropped sharply to <20 nM coincident with a maximum in particulate iron concentration. Within the iron gradient, we found an increased expression of the key functional marker gene for nitrate reduction (narG). Part of this upregulation was related to the activity of known iron-oxidizing bacteria. Collectively, our data suggest that iron oxidation and removal is induced by nitrate-reducing microbes, either enzymatically through anaerobic iron oxidation or by providing nitrite for an abiotic reaction. Given the important role that iron plays in nitrogen fixation, photosynthesis and respiration, nitrate-dependent iron oxidation likely represents a key-link between the marine biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen, oxygen and carbon.

  2. Coupled acidification and ultrasound with iron enhances nitrate reduction.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yih-Jin; Chou, Feng-Chih; Cheng, Tsung-Chieh

    2009-04-30

    Contaminated soils, especially when pollutant concentrations are high, pose potentially serious threats to surface and groundwater quality, when there are spills, discharges, or leaking storage tanks. For in situ remediation of nitrate in groundwater, the use of zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) is suggested. The formation of passivating scales on Fe(0) over time may limit the long-term reduction potential of Fe(0). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ultrasound and pH on the destruction of passive oxide film. Batch tests were conducted in a specially designed protocol using ultrasound, and changing iron (commercial iron powder of micro-scale grain size) loading and pH. The results showed deactivation of the degradation process by Fe(0) with combined ultrasound/iron system and with ultrasound alone. However, the degradation rate increases with decrease in pH. The degradation rate was 45% for pH 2 and 20% for pH 4. The combination of iron, acidification, and ultrasound showed excellent degradation efficiency, and the degradation rate was 99%. Acidification could destroy passive oxide film and activate iron, thus, hastening the reaction between Fe(0) and nitrate. Ultrasound was helpful in destroying or preventing the formation of passive oxide film under acidification. PMID:18722711

  3. Coupled acidification and ultrasound with iron enhances nitrate reduction.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yih-Jin; Chou, Feng-Chih; Cheng, Tsung-Chieh

    2009-04-30

    Contaminated soils, especially when pollutant concentrations are high, pose potentially serious threats to surface and groundwater quality, when there are spills, discharges, or leaking storage tanks. For in situ remediation of nitrate in groundwater, the use of zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) is suggested. The formation of passivating scales on Fe(0) over time may limit the long-term reduction potential of Fe(0). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ultrasound and pH on the destruction of passive oxide film. Batch tests were conducted in a specially designed protocol using ultrasound, and changing iron (commercial iron powder of micro-scale grain size) loading and pH. The results showed deactivation of the degradation process by Fe(0) with combined ultrasound/iron system and with ultrasound alone. However, the degradation rate increases with decrease in pH. The degradation rate was 45% for pH 2 and 20% for pH 4. The combination of iron, acidification, and ultrasound showed excellent degradation efficiency, and the degradation rate was 99%. Acidification could destroy passive oxide film and activate iron, thus, hastening the reaction between Fe(0) and nitrate. Ultrasound was helpful in destroying or preventing the formation of passive oxide film under acidification.

  4. Role of humic substances in promoting autotrophic growth in nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kanaparthi, Dheeraj; Conrad, Ralf

    2015-05-01

    Nitrate-dependent iron oxidation was discovered in 1996 and has been reported from various environments ever since. To date, despite the widespread nature of this process, all attempts to cultivate chemolithoautotrophic nitrate-dependent iron oxidizers have been unsuccessful. The present study was focused on understanding the influence of natural chelating agents of iron, like humic substances, on the culturability, activity, and enumeration, of these microorganisms. Pure culture studies conducted with Thiobacillus denitrificans showed a constant increase in cell mass with a corresponding nitrate-dependent iron oxidation activity only when Fe(II) was provided together with humic substances, compared to no growth in control incubations without humic substances. The presence of a relatively strong chelating agent, such as EDTA, inhibited the growth of Thiobacillus denitrificans. It was concluded that complex formation between humic substances and iron was required for chemolithoautotrophic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation. Most probable number enumerations showed that numbers of chemolithoautotrophic nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing bacteria were one to three orders of magnitude higher in the presence of humic substances compared to media without. Similar results were obtained when potential nitrate-dependent iron oxidation activity was determined in soil samples. In summary, this study showed that humic substances significantly enhanced the growth and activity of autotrophic nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing microorganisms, probably by chelation of iron.

  5. Arsenic, nitrate, iron, and hardness in ground water, Chena Ridge vicinity, Fairbanks, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krumhardt, Andrea P.

    1979-01-01

    The report presents all data on hardness, iron, nitrate and arsenic in well water in the Chena Ridge area of Fairbanks, Alaska, through June 1979. Concentrations range as follows: arsenic - 0 to 28 micrograms per liter; nitrate - 0 to 20 milligrams per liter; iron - 0 to 18 milligrams per liter and hardness - 72 to 1,400 milligrams per liter. Values at the upper ends of the ranges for iron and nitrate exceed limits recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency for public water supplies. A map of the area showing the location of sampled wells and a table of chemical analysis are included. (Kosco-USGS)

  6. [Synchronous treatment of heavy metal ions and nitrate by zero-valent iron].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Hao, Zhi-Wei; Liu, Wen-Li; Xu, Xin-Hua

    2009-03-15

    The wastewater which contains bivalent copper and nitrate, bivalent nickel and nitrate, hexavalent chromium and nitrate were simultaneously treated by the zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) system to investigate the feasibility of using Fe(0) for the remediation of contaminated groundwater. The experimental results indicate that nitrate has no obvious effect on the removal of heavy metals, and different heavy metal has different impacts on the removal of nitrate. Bivalent copper accelerates the nitrate removal percentage and the reaction rate. 50 mg x L(-1) bivalent copper made the nitrate removal percentage in 120 min increase from 38.2% to 95.0%, meanwhile made k(obs) of the nitrate reduction increase from 0.004 3 to 0.033 9 min(-1). And the more the concentrations of bivalent copper are, the higher the nitrate removal percentage and the reaction rate are. And it is the bivalent copper that makes the apparent activation energy of the nitrate reduction by Fe(0) decrease from 40.8 k x mol(-1) to 21.1 kJ x mol(-1), which leads to the increase of the reaction rate. When Fe(0) simultaneously treats the wastewater containing bivalent nickel and nitrate, they have no obvious effects on each other. When Fe(0) simultaneously treats the wastewater containing hexavalent chromium and nitrate, the results show the nitrate concentration remains unchanged, and prove that hexavalent chromium decreases the nitrate removal speed.

  7. Iron availability, nitrate uptake, and exportable new production in the subarctic Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banse, Karl

    1991-01-01

    Rates of nitrate uptake in bioassays from the open Gulf of Alaska by Martin et al. (1989) are reinterpreted. During the exponential phase of phytoplankton growth, iron addition affected the rate of nitrate uptake significantly at only one of the three stations (position of the former ocean weather station "Papa"); results from one station (northern) are not interpretable. Appreciable nitrate uptake and algal growth in all controls during the first few days appears to have consumed a few to several times as much dissolved iron as was found initially; this suggests high solubilization (regeneration) rates or uptake of iron moities other than iron measured as dissolved. Exponential increases of biomass at demonstrated reduced grazing made the iron demand in the controls outrun the supply after the first few days, in contrast to the iron treatments. It is suggested that in the field, grazing normally seems to prevent the phytoplankton from reaching concentrations that reduce the iron (and nitrate) to levels that depress division rates drastically. It is unclear whether the flourishing of medium-sized diatoms in the assays reflects removal of iron limitation on division rates of these rare species or exclusion of grazers from the containers. Although nitrate uptake may be equated with new production, the export to depth of new organic material (and hence of CO2) is not predictable from assays in small (liter) containers, especially so because the role of the large grazers on the size composition of the phytoplankton and the production of large sinking particles is not evaluated.

  8. In vitro and in vivo biological activities of iron chelators and gallium nitrate against Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    de Léséleuc, Louis; Harris, Greg; KuoLee, Rhonda; Chen, Wangxue

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the ability of compounds interfering with iron metabolism to inhibit the growth of Acinetobacter baumannii. Iron restriction with transferrin or 2,2-bipyridyl significantly inhibited A. baumannii growth in vitro. Gallium nitrate alone was moderately effective at reducing A. baumannii growth but became bacteriostatic in the presence of serum or transferrin. More importantly, gallium nitrate treatment reduced lung bacterial burdens in mice. The use of gallium-based therapies shows promise for the control of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii.

  9. NITRATE REDUCTION BY ZEROVALENT IRON: EFFECTS OF FORMATE, OXALATE, CITRATE, CHLORIDE, SULFATE, BORATE, AND PHOSPHATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have shown that zerovalent iron (Fe0) may potentially be used as a chemical medium in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for nitrate remediation in groundwater; however, the effects of commonly found organic and inorganic ligands in soil and sediments on nitrate re...

  10. Ammonium nitrate and iron nutrition effects on some nitrogen assimilation enzymes and metabolites in Spirulina platensis.

    PubMed

    Esen, Merve; Ozturk Urek, Raziye

    2015-01-01

    The effect of various concentrations of ammonium nitrate (5-60 mM), an economical nitrogen source, on the growth, nitrate-ammonium uptake rates, production of some pigments and metabolites, and some nitrogen assimilation enzymes such as nitrate reductase (NR), nitrite reductase (NiR), glutamine synthetase (GS), and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) in Spirulina platensis (Gamont) Geitler was investigated. Ten millimolars of ammonium nitrate stimulated the growth, production of pigments and the other metabolites, and enzyme activities, whereas 30 and 60 mM ammonium nitrate caused inhibition. In the presence of 10 mM ammonium nitrate, different concentrations of iron were tried in the growth media of S. platensis. After achieving the best growth, levels of metabolite and pigment production, and enzyme activities in the presence of 10 mM ammonium nitrate as a nitrogen source, different iron concentrations (10-100 µM) were tried in the growth medium of S. platensis. The highest growth, pigment and metabolite levels, and enzyme activities were determined in the medium containing 50 µM iron and 10 mM ammonium nitrate. In this optimum condition, the highest dry biomass level, chlorophyll a, and pyruvate contents were obtained as 55.42 ± 3.8 mg mL(-1) , 93.114 ± 7.9 µg g(-1) , and 212.5 ± 18.7 µg g(-1) , respectively. The highest NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities were 67.16 ± 5.1, 777.92 ± 52, 0.141 ± 0.01, and 44.45 ± 3.6, respectively. Additionally, 10 mM ammonium nitrate is an economical and efficient nitrogen source for nitrogen assimilation of S. platensis, and 50 µM iron is optimum for the growth of S. platensis. PMID:25425155

  11. Remediation of Nitrate-contaminated Groundwater by a Mixture of Iron and Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guoxin; Liu, Fei; Jin, Aifang; Qin, Xiaopeng

    2010-11-01

    Nitrate contamination in groundwater has become a major environmental and health problem worldwide. The aim of the present study is to remediate groundwater contaminated by nitrate and develop potential reactive materials to be used in PRBs (Permeable Reactive Barriers). A new approach was proposed for abiotic groundwater remediation by reactive materials of iron chips and granular activated carbon particles. Batch tests were conducted and remediation mechanisms were discussed. The results show that nitrate decreases from 86.31 to 33.79 mgṡL-1 under the conditions of near neutral pH and reaction time of 1h. The combination of iron chips and activated carbon particles is cost-effective and suitable for further use as denitrification media in PRBs. Nitrogen species don't change significantly with the further increase in reaction time (>1 h). The iron-activated carbon-water-nitrate system tends to be steady-state. Small amounts of ammonium and nitrite (0.033-0.039 and 0.14-3.54 mgṡL-1, respectively) appear at reaction time from 0 h to 5 h. There is no substantial accumulation of nitrogen products in the system. The removal rate of nitrate only reaches 16.11% by sole iron chips at reaction time of 5 h, while 63.57% by the mixture of iron chips and activated carbon particles. There is significantly synergistic and promotive effect of mixing the two different types of materials on nitrate treatment. Fe/C ratio (1/1.5-1/2.5) doesn't cause dramatically different residual nitrate concentrations (24.09-26.70 mgṡL-1). Nitrate can't be limitlessly decreased with decreasing Fe/C ratio. The concomitant occurrences of chemical reduction, galvanic cell reaction, electrophoretic accumulation, chemical coagulation, and physical adsorption are all responsible for the overall nitrate removal by iron allied with activated carbon. To accurately quantify various nitrogen species, further studies on adsorption mechanisms of nitrite and nitrate are needed.

  12. Selective decomposition of aqueous nitrate into nitrogen using iron deposited bimetals.

    PubMed

    Liou, Ya Hsuan; Lin, Chin Jung; Weng, Shih Chi; Ou, Hsin Hung; Lo, Shang Lien

    2009-04-01

    In the case of the reduction of nitrate in groundwater, the problem is how to convert nitrate [N(+V)] selectively to nontoxic dinitrogen [N(O)] and not to completely reduced ammonia [N(-III)]. Unfortunately, near 100% of the total nitrogen in nitrate is reductively converted to ammonia using naked zerovalent iron (ZVI) thus far reported. In this study, deposition of noble metals (Pt, Pd, and Au) and Cu on iron surface to offer favorable pathways for nitrate reduction was fabricated using either the complete mixing orthe successive method with spontaneous redox reactions. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy/energy disperse X-ray spectroscopy, and electrochemical analysis. The formation of N2 from the reduction of nitrate was confirmed by residual gas analyzer coupled to a high vacuum system. Based on the experimental results, the ZVI deposited Pd and Cu closely is suggested to promote the abstraction of oxygen from NOx by adsorbed atomic hydrogen on the Cu surface, and enhance N2 formation on the Pd surface. An optimum N2 selectivity of approximately 30% obtained in the alkaline solution containing nitrate using 0.3 wt.% Pd-0.5 wt% Cu/Fe is evident. For groundwater treatment, iron deposited Pd and Cu could facilitate the development of a process requiring neither a massive addition of chemicals nor complex equipment.

  13. Effects of nitrate on the treatment of lead contaminated groundwater by nanoscale zerovalent iron.

    PubMed

    Su, Yiming; Adeleye, Adeyemi S; Zhou, Xuefei; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhang, Weixian; Keller, Arturo A; Zhang, Yalei

    2014-09-15

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) is efficient for removing Pb(2+) and nitrate from water. However, the influence of nitrate, a common groundwater anion, on Pb(2+) removal by nZVI is not well understood. In this study, we showed that under excess Fe(0) conditions (molar ratio of Fe(0)/nitrate>4), Pb(2+) ions were immobilized more quickly (<5 min) than in nitrate-free systems (∼ 15 min) due to increasing pH. With nitrate in excess (molar ratio of Fe(0)/nitrate<4), nitrate stimulated the formation of crystal PbxFe3-xO4 (ferrite), which provided additional Pb(2+) removal. However, ∼ 7% of immobilized Pb(2+) ions were released into aqueous phase within 2h due to ferrite deformation. Oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) values below -600 mV correlated with excess Fe(0) conditions (complete Pb(2+) immobilization), while ORP values ≥-475 mV characterized excess nitrate conditions (ferrite process and Pb(2+) release occurrence). This study indicates that ORP monitoring is important for proper management of nZVI-based remediation in the subsurface to avoid lead remobilization in the presence of nitrate.

  14. Transformation of Nitrate and Toluene in Groundwater by Sulfur Modified Iron(SMI-III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W.; Park, S.; Lim, J.; Hong, U.; Kwon, S.; Kim, Y.

    2009-12-01

    In Korea, nitrate and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene isomers (BTEX) are frequently detected together as ground water contaminants. Therefore, a system simultaneously treating both nitrate (inorganic compound) and BTEX (organic compounds) is required to utilize groundwater as a water resource. In this study, we investigated the efficiency of Sulfur Modified Iron (SMI-III) in treating both nitrate and BTEX contaminated groundwater. Based on XRD (X-Ray Diffraction) analysis, the SMI-III is mainly composed of Fe3O4, S, and Fe. A series of column tests were conducted at three different empty bed contact times (EBCTs) for each compound. During the experiments, removal efficiency for both nitrate and toluene were linearly correlated with EBCT, suggesting that SMI-III have an ability to transform both nitrate and toluene. The concentration of SO42- and oxidation/reduction potential (ORP) were also measured. After exposed to nitrate contaminated groundwater, the composition of SMI-III was changed to Fe2O3, Fe3O4, Fe, and Fe0.95S1.05. The trends of effluent sulfate concentrations were inversely correlated with effluent nitrate concentrations, while the trends of ORP values, having the minimum values of -480 mV, were highly correlated with effluent nitrate concentrations. XRD analysis before and after exposed to nitrate contaminated groundwater, sulfate production, and nitrite detection as a reductive transformation by-product of nitrate suggest that nitrate is reductively transformed by SMI-III. Interestingly, in the toluene experiments, the trends of ORP values were inversely correlated with effluent toluene concentrations, suggesting that probably degrade through oxidation reaction. Consequently, nitrate and toluene probably degrade through reduction and oxidation reaction, respectively and SMI-III could serve as both electron donor and acceptor.

  15. Effects of nitrate addition and iron speciation on trace element transfer in coastal food webs under phosphate and iron enrichment.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Xing; Liu, Feng-Jiao; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Zuo, Yue-Gang; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2013-06-01

    Coastal organisms are often exposed to both iron enrichment and eutrophication. Trace elements transfer in coastal food webs are critical for marine life and therefore influence coastal ecosystem function and the global carbon cycle. However, how these exposures affect algal element uptake and the subsequent element transfer to marine copepods (Tigriopus japonicus) is unknown. Here we investigated the effects of nitrate addition and iron speciation (Fe (OH)3 or EDTA-Fe) on the biological uptake of Cu, Zn, and Se under phosphate and iron enrichment, using Thalassiosira weissflogii, Skeletonema costatum, and Chlorella vulgaris as model marine algae. Algal element adsorption/absorption generally increased with increasing macronutrient concentrations. Algal element assimilation efficiencies depended on iron speciation and marine algae species. Element assimilation efficiencies of copepods were significantly correlated to the intracellular element concentrations in algal cells. Element uptake and transfer were controlled by eutrophication, iron speciation, and algal species in coastal food webs.

  16. Effects of nitrate addition and iron speciation on trace element transfer in coastal food webs under phosphate and iron enrichment.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Xing; Liu, Feng-Jiao; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Zuo, Yue-Gang; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2013-06-01

    Coastal organisms are often exposed to both iron enrichment and eutrophication. Trace elements transfer in coastal food webs are critical for marine life and therefore influence coastal ecosystem function and the global carbon cycle. However, how these exposures affect algal element uptake and the subsequent element transfer to marine copepods (Tigriopus japonicus) is unknown. Here we investigated the effects of nitrate addition and iron speciation (Fe (OH)3 or EDTA-Fe) on the biological uptake of Cu, Zn, and Se under phosphate and iron enrichment, using Thalassiosira weissflogii, Skeletonema costatum, and Chlorella vulgaris as model marine algae. Algal element adsorption/absorption generally increased with increasing macronutrient concentrations. Algal element assimilation efficiencies depended on iron speciation and marine algae species. Element assimilation efficiencies of copepods were significantly correlated to the intracellular element concentrations in algal cells. Element uptake and transfer were controlled by eutrophication, iron speciation, and algal species in coastal food webs. PMID:23332676

  17. SOLVENT FREE OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING IRON (III) NITRATE NONAHYDRATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of alcohols have been conducted with metal nitrate reagents on various mineral supports such as clay, silica and zeolite etc. To circumvent the limitations of these supported reagents namely their preparation using solvents and short shelf-life, we explored the use of i...

  18. Anomalous electrical signals associated with microbial activity: Results from Iron and Nitrate-Reducing Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, R. B.; Zheng, Q.; Flynn, P.; Singha, K.; Brantley, S.

    2008-12-01

    Three flow-through columns outfitted with Ag/AgCl electrodes were constructed to test the effects of different microbial processes on the geophysical measurements of self potential (SP), bulk electrical conductivity (σ b), and induced polarization (IP). The columns were filled with sieved, Fe-bearing subsurface sediment from the Delmarva Peninsula near Oyster, VA, inoculated (9:1 ratio) with a freshly-collected, shallow subsurface sediment from a wetland floodplain (Dorn Creek) near Madison, WI. Each of the columns was fed anoxic and sterile PIPES buffered artificial groundwater (PBAGW) containing different concentrations of acetate and nitrate. The medium fed to Column 1 (nitrate-reducing) was amended with 100 μM acetate and 2 mM nitrate. Column 2 (iron-reducing) was run with PBAGW containing 1.0 mM acetate and 0 mM nitrate. Column 3 (alternating redox state) was operated under conditions designed to alternately stimulate nitrate-reducing and iron-reducing populations to provide conditions, i.e., the presence of both nitrate and microbially-produced Fe(II), that would allow growth of nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing populations. We operated Column 3 with a cycling strategy of 14-18 days of high C medium (1 mM acetate and 100 μ M nitrate) followed by 14-18 days of low C medium (100 μ M acetate and 2 mM nitrate). Effluent chemistry (NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, acetate, and Fe2+) was sampled daily for four months so as to be concurrent with the electrical measurements. We observed chemical evidence of iron reduction (dissolved [Fe(II)] = 0.2mM) in the effluent from the iron reduction and alternating redox columns. Chemical depletion of NO3- ([NO3-] ranged from 1 to 0.02mM), the production of NO2-, and possible production of NH4+ (0.2 mM) was observed in the nitrate reducing column as well as the alternating redox column. All three columns displayed loss of acetate as microbial activity progressed. σ b remained constant in the alternating redox column (~0.15 S

  19. Arsenic, nitrate, iron, and hardness in ground water, Fairbanks area, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Paula R.; Wilcox, D.E.; Morgan, W.D.; Merto, Josephine; McFadden, Ruth

    1979-01-01

    Well water with concentrations of arsenic and nitrate exceeding U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards occurs sporadically throughout the hills north of Fairbanks, Alaska. The arsenic contamination has not been correlated with placer or other mining activity. The high levels of nitrate do not generally appear related to septic waste contamination. Few wells in the Fairbanks area yield water with low concentrations of iron or low hardness. Iron concentrations are consistently greater than 3 mg/L on the flood plain. In the uplands, concentrations of both iron and hardness are lowest near the ridgetops and increase downslope. The report includes a map of the area showing the location of sampled wells and a table of chemical analysis. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. Evidence for equilibrium iron isotope fractionation by nitrate-reducing iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kappler, A; Johnson, C M; Crosby, H A; Beard, B L; Newman, D K

    2010-05-10

    Iron isotope fractionations produced during chemical and biological Fe(II) oxidation are sensitive to the proportions and nature of dissolved and solid-phase Fe species present, as well as the extent of isotopic exchange between precipitates and aqueous Fe. Iron isotopes therefore potentially constrain the mechanisms and pathways of Fe redox transformations in modern and ancient environments. In the present study, we followed in batch experiments Fe isotope fractionations between Fe(II)(aq) and Fe(III) oxide/hydroxide precipitates produced by the Fe(III) mineral encrusting, nitrate-reducing, Fe(II)-oxidizing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1. Isotopic fractionation in (56)Fe/(54)Fe approached that expected for equilibrium conditions, assuming an equilibrium Δ(56)Fe(Fe(OH)3 - Fe(II)aq) fractionation factor of +3.0 ‰. Previous studies have shown that Fe(II) oxidation by this Acidovorax strain occurs in the periplasm, and we propose that Fe isotope equilibrium is maintained through redox cycling via coupled electron and atom exchange between Fe(II)(aq) and Fe(III) precipitates in the contained environment of the periplasm. In addition to the apparent equilibrium isotopic fractionation, these experiments also record the kinetic effects of initial rapid oxidation, and possible phase transformations of the Fe(III) precipitates. Attainment of Fe isotope equilibrium between Fe(III) oxide/hydroxide precipitates and Fe(II)(aq) by neutrophilic, Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria or through abiologic Fe(II)(aq) oxidation is generally not expected or observed, because the poor solubility of their metabolic product, i.e. Fe(III), usually leads to rapid precipitation of Fe(III) minerals, and hence expression of a kinetic fractionation upon precipitation; in the absence of redox cycling between Fe(II)(aq) and precipitate, kinetic isotope fractionations are likely to be retained. These results highlight the distinct Fe isotope fractionations that are produced by different pathways of

  1. Nanosized iron based permeable reactive barriers for nitrate removal - Systematic review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, Rui; Castro, Ana C. Meira; Santos Baptista, João; Fiúza, António

    2016-08-01

    It is unquestionable that an effective decision concerning the usage of a certain environmental clean-up technology should be conveniently supported. Significant amount of scientific work focussing on the reduction of nitrate concentration in drinking water by both metallic iron and nanomaterials and their usage in permeable reactive barriers has been worldwide published over the last two decades. This work aims to present in a systematic review of the most relevant research done on the removal of nitrate from groundwater using nanosized iron based permeable reactive barriers. The research was based on scientific papers published between 2004 and June 2014. It was performed using 16 combinations of keywords in 34 databases, according to PRISMA statement guidelines. Independent reviewers validated the selection criteria. From the 4161 records filtered, 45 met the selection criteria and were selected to be included in this review. This study's outcomes show that the permeable reactive barriers are, indeed, a suitable technology for denitrification and with good performance record but the long-term impact of the use of nanosized zero valent iron in this remediation process, in both on the environment and on the human health, is far to be conveniently known. As a consequence, further work is required on this matter, so that nanosized iron based permeable reactive barriers for the removal of nitrate from drinking water can be genuinely considered an eco-efficient technology.

  2. Reduction of trichloroethylene and nitrate by zero-valent iron with peat.

    PubMed

    Min, Jee-Eun; Kim, Meejeong; Pardue, John H; Park, Jae-Woo

    2008-02-01

    The feasibility of using zero-valent iron (ZVI) and peat mixture as in situ barriers for contaminated sediments and groundwater was investigated. Trichloroethylene (TCE) and nitrate (NO(3)(-)), redox sensitive contaminants were reduced by ZVI and peat soil mixture under anaerobic condition. Peat was used to support the sorption of TCE, microbial activity for biodegradation of TCE and denitrification while TCE and nitrate were reduced by ZVI. Decreases in TCE concentrations were mainly due to ZVI, while peat supported denitrifying microbes and further affected the sorption of TCE. Due to the competition of electrons, nitrate reduction was inhibited by TCE, while TCE reduction was not affected by nitrate. From the results of peat and sterilized peat, it can be concluded that peat was involved in both dechlorination and denitrification but biological reduction of TCE was negligible compared to that of nitrate. The results from hydrogen and methane gas analyses confirmed that hydrogen utilization by microbes and methanogenic process had occurred in the ZVI-peat system. Even though effect of the peat on TCE reduction were quantitatively small, ZVI and peat contributed to the removal of TCE and nitrate independently. The 16S rRNA analysis revealed that viable bacterial diversity was narrow and the most frequently observed genera were Bacillus and Staphylococcus spp.

  3. Effect of common ions on nitrate removal by zero-valent iron from alkaline soil.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cilai; Zhang, Zengqiang; Sun, Xining

    2012-09-15

    Zero-valent iron (Fe(0))-based permeable reactive barrier (PRB) technology has been proved to be effective for soil and groundwater nitrate remediation under acidic or near neutral conditions. But few studies have been reported about it and the effects of coexistent ions under alkaline conditions. In this study, nitrate reduction by Fe(0) was evaluated via batch tests in the presence of alkaline soil and common cation (Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Cu(2+)) and anion (citrate, oxalate, acetate, SO(4)(2-), PO(4)(3-), Cl(-) and HCO(3)(-)). The results showed that cation significantly enhanced nitrate reduction with an order of Fe(3+)>Fe(2+)>Cu(2+) due to providing Fe(2+) directly or indirectly. Most anions enhanced nitrate reduction, but PO(4)(3-) behaved inhibition. The promotion decreased in the order of citrate>acetate>SO(4)(2-)>Cl(-)≈HCO(3)(-)≈oxalate≫PO(4)(3-). Ammonium was the major final product from nitrate reduction by Fe(0), while a little nitrite accumulated in the beginning of reaction. The nitrogen recovery in liquid and gas phase was only 56-78% after reaction due to ammonium adsorption onto soil. The solution pH and electric conductivity (EC) varied depending on the specific ion added. The results implied that PRB based Fe(0) is a potential approach for in situ remediation of soil and groundwater nitrate contamination in the alkaline conditions.

  4. Kinetics of the chemical reduction of nitrate by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Maroto, J M; García-Herruzo, F; García-Rubio, A; Gómez-Lahoz, C; Vereda-Alonso, C

    2009-02-01

    The use of reactive barriers is one of the preferred remediation technologies for the remediation of groundwater contamination. An adequate design of these barriers requires the understanding of the kinetics of the reaction between the target contaminant and the solid phase in the barrier. A study of the kinetics between metallic iron and aqueous nitrate is presented in this paper. Published literature regarding this reaction indicates that researchers are far from a consensus about the mechanism of this reaction. This paper presents the results obtained from experiments performed at different constant pH values and iron dosages, together with a mathematical analysis of the kinetic results. We have found that an Eley-Rideal kinetic model yields a good explanation of the relatively complicated dependence between rate of nitrate reduction and the pH value of the solution.

  5. Nitrate reduction by zerovalent iron: effects of formate, oxalate, citrate, chloride, sulfate, borate, and phosphate.

    PubMed

    Su, Chunming; Puls, Robert W

    2004-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that zerovalent iron (Fe0) may potentially be used as a chemical medium in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) for groundwater nitrate remediation; however, the effects of commonly found organic and inorganic ligands in soil and sediments on nitrate reduction by Fe0 have not been well understood. A 25.0 mL nitrate solution of 20.0 mg of N L(-1) (1.43 mM nitrate) was reacted with 1.00 g of Peerless Fe0 at 200 rpm on a rotational shaker at 23 degrees C for up to 120 h in the presence of each of the organic acids (3.0 mM formic, 1.5 mM oxalic, and 1.0 mM citric acids) and inorganic acids (3.0 mM HCl, 1.5 mM H2SO4, 3.0 mM H3BO3, and 1.5 mM H3PO4). These acids provided an initial dissociable H+ concentration of 3.0 mM available for nitrate reduction reactions under conditions of final pH < 9.3. Nitrate reduction rates (pseudo-first-order) increased in the order: H3PO4 < citric acid < H3BO3 < oxalic acid < H2SO4 < formic acid < HCl, ranging from 0.00278 to 0.0913 h(-1), corresponding to surface area normalized rates ranging from 0.126 to 4.15 h(-1) m(-2) mL. Correlation analysis showed a negative linear relationship between the nitrate reduction rates for the ligands and the conditional stability constants for the soluble complexes of the ligands with Fe2+ (R2 = 0.701) or Fe3+ (R2 = 0.918) ions. This sequence of reactivity corresponds also to surface adsorption and complexation of the three organic ligands to iron oxides, which increase in the order formate < oxalate < citrate. The results are also consistent with the sequence of strength of surface complexation of the inorganic ligands to iron oxides, which increases in the order: chloride < sulfate < borate < phosphate. The blockage of reactive sites on the surface of Fe0 and its corrosion products by specific adsorption of the inner-sphere complex forming ligands (oxalate, citrate, sulfate, borate, and phosphate) may be responsible for the decreased nitrate reduction by Fe0 relative to the

  6. Mesophilic, Circumneutral Anaerobic Iron Oxidation as a Remediation Mechanism for Radionuclides, Nitrate and Perchlorate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, S.; Thrash, J. C.; Coates, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Iron oxidation is a novel anaerobic metabolism where microorganisms obtain reducing equivalents from the oxidization of Fe(II) and assimilate carbon from organic carbon compounds or CO2. Recent evidence indicates that in combination with the activity of dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, anaerobic microbial Fe(II) oxidation can also contribute to the global iron redox cycle. Studies have also proved that Fe(II)- oxidation is ubiquitous in diverse environments and produce a broad range of insoluble iron forms as end products. These biogenic Fe(III)-oxides and mixed valence Fe minerals have a very high adsorption capacity of heavy metals and radionuclides. Adsorption and immobilization by these biogenic Fe phases produced at circumneutral pH, is now considered a very effective mode of remediation of radionuclides like Uranium, especially under variable redox conditions. By coupling soluble and insoluble Fe(II) oxidation with nitrate and perchlorate as terminal electron acceptors in-situ, anaerobic Fe-oxidation can also be used for environmental cleanup of Fe through Fe-mineral precipitation, as well as nitrate and perchlorate through reduction. Coupling of Fe as the sole electron and energy source to the reduction of perchlorate or nitrate boosts the metabolism without building up biomass hence also taking care of biofouling. To understand the mechanisms by which microorganisms can grow at circumneutral pH by mesophilic, anaerobic iron oxidation and the ability of microorganisms to reduce nitrate and perchlorate coupled to iron oxidation recent work in our lab involved the physiological characterization of Dechlorospirillum strain VDY which was capable of anaerobic iron-oxidation with either nitrate or perchlorate serving as terminal electron acceptor. Under non-growth conditions, VDY oxidized 3mM Fe(II) coupled to nitrate reduction, and 2mM Fe(II) coupled to perchlorate reduction, in 24 hours. It contained a copy of the RuBisCO cbbM subunit gene which was

  7. Evaluation on the Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron Based Microbial Denitrification for Nitrate Removal from Groundwater

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lai; Liu, Yiwen; Gao, Shu-Hong; Chen, Xueming; Xin, Pei; Dai, Xiaohu; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale zero valent iron (NZVI) based microbial denitrification has been demonstrated to be a promising technology for nitrate removal from groundwater. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to evaluate the performance of this new technology and to provide insights into the chemical and microbial interactions in the system in terms of nitrate reduction, ammonium accumulation and hydrogen turnover. The developed model integrates NZVI-based abiotic reduction of nitrate, NZVI corrosion for hydrogen production and hydrogen-based microbial denitrification and satisfactorily describes all of the nitrate and ammonium dynamics from two systems with highly different conditions. The high NZVI corrosion rate revealed by the model indicates the high reaction rate of NZVI with water due to their large specific surface area and high surface reactivity, leading to an effective microbial nitrate reduction by utilizing the produced hydrogen. The simulation results further suggest a NZVI dosing strategy (3–6 mmol/L in temperature range of 30–40 °C, 6–10 mmol/L in temperature range of 15–30 °C and 10–14 mmol/L in temperature range of 5–15 °C) during groundwater remediation to make sure a low ammonium yield and a high nitrogen removal efficiency. PMID:26199053

  8. Evaluation on the Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron Based Microbial Denitrification for Nitrate Removal from Groundwater.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lai; Liu, Yiwen; Gao, Shu-Hong; Chen, Xueming; Xin, Pei; Dai, Xiaohu; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale zero valent iron (NZVI) based microbial denitrification has been demonstrated to be a promising technology for nitrate removal from groundwater. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to evaluate the performance of this new technology and to provide insights into the chemical and microbial interactions in the system in terms of nitrate reduction, ammonium accumulation and hydrogen turnover. The developed model integrates NZVI-based abiotic reduction of nitrate, NZVI corrosion for hydrogen production and hydrogen-based microbial denitrification and satisfactorily describes all of the nitrate and ammonium dynamics from two systems with highly different conditions. The high NZVI corrosion rate revealed by the model indicates the high reaction rate of NZVI with water due to their large specific surface area and high surface reactivity, leading to an effective microbial nitrate reduction by utilizing the produced hydrogen. The simulation results further suggest a NZVI dosing strategy (3-6 mmol/L in temperature range of 30-40 °C, 6-10 mmol/L in temperature range of 15-30 °C and 10-14 mmol/L in temperature range of 5-15 °C) during groundwater remediation to make sure a low ammonium yield and a high nitrogen removal efficiency. PMID:26199053

  9. Evaluation on the Nanoscale Zero Valent Iron Based Microbial Denitrification for Nitrate Removal from Groundwater.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lai; Liu, Yiwen; Gao, Shu-Hong; Chen, Xueming; Xin, Pei; Dai, Xiaohu; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-07-22

    Nanoscale zero valent iron (NZVI) based microbial denitrification has been demonstrated to be a promising technology for nitrate removal from groundwater. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to evaluate the performance of this new technology and to provide insights into the chemical and microbial interactions in the system in terms of nitrate reduction, ammonium accumulation and hydrogen turnover. The developed model integrates NZVI-based abiotic reduction of nitrate, NZVI corrosion for hydrogen production and hydrogen-based microbial denitrification and satisfactorily describes all of the nitrate and ammonium dynamics from two systems with highly different conditions. The high NZVI corrosion rate revealed by the model indicates the high reaction rate of NZVI with water due to their large specific surface area and high surface reactivity, leading to an effective microbial nitrate reduction by utilizing the produced hydrogen. The simulation results further suggest a NZVI dosing strategy (3-6 mmol/L in temperature range of 30-40 °C, 6-10 mmol/L in temperature range of 15-30 °C and 10-14 mmol/L in temperature range of 5-15 °C) during groundwater remediation to make sure a low ammonium yield and a high nitrogen removal efficiency.

  10. [Simultaneous Biotransformation of Ammonium and Nitrate via Zero-Valent Iron on Anaerobic Conditions].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Huang, Yong; Yuan, Yi; Liu, Xin; Li, Xiang; Shen, Jie; Yang, Peng-bing

    2015-12-01

    Zero-valent iron (ZVI) was used to improve the biological autotrophic denitrification process between nitrate and ammonia by anaerobic ammonia oxidation ( ANAMMOX) bacteria. With the addition of ZVI, the biological autotrophic denitrification process could be reacted in the influent condition of pH was 7-8, at 35°C ±0.5°C, the concentration of ammonia was 50-100 mg · L⁻¹ and the concentration of nitrate was 50-100 mg · L⁻¹. The highest conversion rate could be reached to 17.2 mg · (L·h) ⁻¹. With the change of reaction time and the molar ratio of nitrate and ammonia in influent, the final molar conversion ratio of nitrate and ammonia in effluent fluctuated between 1.2-3. 5. The result showed that this autotrophic denitrification process was not belonged to elementary reaction. The mechanism of this autotrophic denitrification process could be summarized that with the reduction of ZVI, the nitrate could be reduced to nitrite. Hereafter, the ANAMMOX process reacted between the nitrite and ammonia. PMID:27011992

  11. Toward a mechanistic understanding of anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation: balancing electron uptake and detoxification.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Hans K; Clark, Iain C; Melnyk, Ryan A; Coates, John D

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of Fe(II) by subsurface microorganisms is an important part of biogeochemical cycling in the environment, but the biochemical mechanisms used to couple iron oxidation to nitrate respiration are not well understood. Based on our own work and the evidence available in the literature, we propose a mechanistic model for anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation. We suggest that anaerobic iron-oxidizing microorganisms likely exist along a continuum including: (1) bacteria that inadvertently oxidize Fe(II) by abiotic or biotic reactions with enzymes or chemical intermediates in their metabolic pathways (e.g., denitrification) and suffer from toxicity or energetic penalty, (2) Fe(II) tolerant bacteria that gain little or no growth benefit from iron oxidation but can manage the toxic reactions, and (3) bacteria that efficiently accept electrons from Fe(II) to gain a growth advantage while preventing or mitigating the toxic reactions. Predictions of the proposed model are highlighted and experimental approaches are discussed. PMID:22363331

  12. Effects of Coating Materials and Mineral Additives on Nitrate Reduction by Zerovalent Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. H.; Jeong, H. Y.; Lee, S.; Kang, N.; Choi, H. J.; Park, M.

    2015-12-01

    In efforts to facilitate nitrate removal, a variety of coating materials and mineral additives were assessed for their effects on the nitrate reduction by zerovalent iron (ZVI). Coated ZVIs were prepared by reacting Fe particles with Cr(III), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), and S(-II) solutions under anoxic conditions, with the resultant materials named Cr/Fe, Co/Fe, Ni/Fe, Cu/Fe, and FeS/Fe, respectively. The mineral additives used, synthesized or purchased, included goethite, magnetite, and hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). Kinetic experiments were performed using air-tight serum vials containing 1.0 g Fe (uncoated or coated forms) in 15 mL of 100 mg NO3×N/L solutions with pH buffered at 7.0. To monitor the reaction progress, the solution phase was analyzed for NO3-, NO2-, and NH4+ on an ion chromatography, while the headspace was analyzed for H2, N2, and O2 on a gas chromatography. By uncoated Fe, ca. 60% of nitrate was reductively transformed for 3.6 h, with NH4+ being the predominant product. Compared with uncoated one, Cr/Fe, Co/Fe, and Cu/Fe showed faster removal rates of nitrate. The observed reactivity enhancement was thought to result from additional reduction of nitrate by H atoms adsorbed on the surface of Cr, Co, or Cu metal. In contrast, both Ni/Fe and FeS/Fe showed slower removal of nitrate than uncoated Fe. In both cases, the coating, which highly disfavors the adsorption of nitrate, would form on the Fe surface. When goethite, HFO, and magnetite were amended, the nitrate reduction by Fe was significantly increased, with the effect being most evident with HFO. Although not capable of reducing nitrate, the mineral additives would serve as crystal nuclei for the corrosion products of Fe, thus making the development of passivation layers on the Fe surface less. In the future, we will perform a kinetic modeling of the experimental data to assess the relative contribution of multiple reaction paths in the nitrate reduction by Fe.

  13. Reduction of nitrate by resin-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Park, Heesu; Park, Yong-Min; Yoo, Kyoung-Min; Lee, Sang-Hyup

    2009-01-01

    For environmental remediation of a contaminated groundwater, the use of nanosized zero-valent iron (nZVI) represents one of the latest innovative technologies. However, nZVI gets easily agglomerated due to its colloidal characteristics and has limited applications. To overcome this drawback, nZVI was immobilized on a supporting material. In this study, nZVI was formed and bound to ion-exchange resin spheres at the same time through the borohydride reduction of an iron salt. The pore structures and physical characteristics of the supported nZVI were investigated and its reactivity was measured using nitrate. The degradation of nitrate appeared to be a pseudo first-order reaction with the observed reaction rate constant of 0.425 h(-1) without pH control. The reduction process continued but at a much lower rate with a rate constant of 0.044 h(-1). When the simulated groundwater was used to assess the effects of coexisting ions, the rate constant was 0.078 h(-1) and it also reduced to 0.0021 h(-1) in later phase. The major limitation of ZVI use for nitrate reduction is ammonium production. By using a support material with ion-exchange capacity, this problem can be solved. The ammonium was not detected in our batch tests.

  14. REMOVAL OF ADDED NITRATE IN THE SINGLE, BINARY, AND TERNARY SYSTEMS OF COTTON BURR COMPOST, ZEROVALENT IRON, AND SEDIMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR GROUNDWATER NITRATE REMEDIATION USING PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent research has shown that carbonaceous solid materials and zerovalent iron (Fe0) may potentially be used as media in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to degrade groundwater nitrate via heterotrophic denitrification in the solid carbon system, and via abiotic reduction and ...

  15. Nitrate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nitrate ; CASRN 14797 - 55 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  16. Nitrate removal by entrapped zero-valent iron nanoparticles in calcium alginate.

    PubMed

    Krajangpan, Sita; Bermudez, Juan J Elorza; Bezbaruah, Achintya N; Chisholm, Bret J; Khan, Eakalak

    2008-01-01

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) were successfully entrapped in calcium alginate beads. The potential use of this technique in environmental remediation using nitrate as a model contaminant was investigated. Kinetics of nitrate degradation using bare nZVI (approximately 35 nm dia) and entrapped nZVI were compared. Calcium alginate beads show promise as the entrapment medium for nZVI for possible use in permeable reactive barriers for groundwater remediation. Based on scanning electron microscopy images it can be inferred that the alginate gel cluster acts as a bridge that binds the nZVI particles together. Kinetic experiments with 100, 60, and 20 mg NO3--N L(-1) indicate that 50-73% nitrate-N removal was achieved with entrapped nZVI as compared to 55-73% with bare nZVI over a 2 h period. The controls ran simultaneously show little or no NO3--N removal. Statistical analysis indicates that there was no significant difference between the reaction rates of bare and entrapped nZVI. The authors have shown for the first time that nZVI can be effectively entrapped in Ca-alginate beads and no significant decrease in the reactivity of nZVI toward the model contaminant (nitrate here) was observed after the entrapment.

  17. Enumeration and Detection of Anaerobic Ferrous Iron-Oxidizing, Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria from Diverse European Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Kristina L.; Buchholz-Cleven, Berit E. E.

    1998-01-01

    Anaerobic, nitrate-dependent microbial oxidation of ferrous iron was recently recognized as a new type of metabolism. In order to study the occurrence of three novel groups of ferrous iron-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing bacteria (represented by strains BrG1, BrG2, and BrG3), 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were developed. In pure-culture experiments, these probes were shown to be suitable for fluorescent in situ hybridization, as well as for hybridization analysis of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) patterns. However, neither enumeration by in situ hybridization nor detection by the DGGE-hybridization approach was feasible with sediment samples. Therefore, the DGGE-hybridization approach was combined with microbiological methods. Freshwater sediment samples from different European locations were used for enrichment cultures and most-probable-number (MPN) determinations. Bacteria with the ability to oxidize ferrous iron under nitrate-reducing conditions were detected in all of the sediment samples investigated. At least one of the previously described types of bacteria was detected in each enrichment culture. MPN studies showed that sediments contained from 1 × 105 to 5 × 108 ferrous iron-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing bacteria per g (dry weight) of sediment, which accounted for at most 0.8% of the nitrate-reducing bacteria growing with acetate. Type BrG1, BrG2, and BrG3 bacteria accounted for an even smaller fraction (0.2% or less) of the ferrous iron-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing community. The DGGE patterns of MPN cultures suggested that more organisms than those isolated thus far are able to oxidize ferrous iron with nitrate. A comparison showed that among the anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria, organisms that have the ability to oxidize ferrous iron also account for only a minor fraction of the population. PMID:9835573

  18. Mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction via micro-electrolysis at the powdered zero-valent iron/activated carbon interface.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinghuan; Song, Guangyu; Liu, Jianyong; Qian, Guangren; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2014-12-01

    Nitrate reduction by zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) powder always works well only at controlled pH lower than 4 due to the formation of iron (hydr)oxides on its surface. Fe(0) powder combined with activated carbon (AC), i.e., Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis system, was first introduced to enhance nitrate reduction in aqueous solution. Comparative study was carried out to investigate nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC system and Fe(0) under near-neutral conditions, showing that the Fe(0)/AC system successfully reduced nitrate even at initial pH 6 with the reduction efficiency of up to 73%, whereas for Fe(0) only ∼10%. The effect of Fe(0) to AC mass ratio on nitrate reduction efficiency was examined. Easier nitrate reduction was achieved with more contact between Fe(0) and AC as the result of decreasing Fe(0) to AC mass ratio. Ferrous ion and oxidation-reduction potential were measured to understand the mechanism of enhanced nitrate reduction by Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis. The results suggest that a relative potential difference drives much more electrons from Fe(0) to AC, thus generating adsorbed atomic hydrogen which makes it possible for nitrate to be reduced at near-neural pH. Fe(0)/AC micro-electrolysis thus presents a great potential for practical application in nitrate wastewater treatment without excessive pH adjustment. PMID:25217726

  19. Phenol Nitration Induced by an {Fe(NO)2}10 Dinitrosyl Iron Complex

    SciTech Connect

    N Tran; H Kalyvas; K Skodje; T Hayashi; P Moenne-Loccoz; P Callan; J Shearer; L Kirschenbaum; E Kim

    2011-12-31

    Cellular dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNICs) have long been considered NO carriers. Although other physiological roles of DNICs have been postulated, their chemical functionality outside of NO transfer has not been demonstrated thus far. Here we report the unprecedented dioxygen reactivity of a N-bound {l_brace}Fe(NO){sub 2}{r_brace}{sup 10} DNIC, [Fe(TMEDA)(NO){sub 2}] (1). In the presence of O{sub 2}, 1 becomes a nitrating agent that converts 2,4,-di-tert-butylphenol to 2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-nitrophenol via formation of a putative iron-peroxynitrite [Fe(TMEDA)(NO)(ONOO)] (2) that is stable below -80 C. Iron K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy on 2 supports a five-coordinated metal center with a bound peroxynitrite in a cyclic bidentate fashion. The peroxynitrite ligand of 2 readily decays at increased temperature or under illumination. These results suggest that DNICs could have multiple physiological or deleterious roles, including that of cellular nitrating agents.

  20. Fine Iron Aerosols Are Internally Mixed with Nitrate in the Urban European Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Dall'Osto, Manuel; Beddows, D C S; Harrison, Roy M; Onat, Burcu

    2016-04-19

    Atmospheric iron aerosol is a bioavailable essential nutrient playing a role in oceanic productivity. Using aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS), the particle size (0.3-1.5 μm), chemical composition and mixing state of Fe-containing particles collected at two European urban sites (London and Barcelona) were characterized. Out of the six particle types accounting for the entire Fe-aerosol population, that arising from long-range transport (LRT) of fine Fe-containing particles (Fe-LRT, 54-82% across the two sites) was predominant. This particle type was found to be internally mixed with nitrate and not with sulfate, and likely mostly associated with urban traffic activities. This is in profound contrast with previous studies carried out in Asia, where the majority of iron-containing particles are mixed with sulfate and are of coal combustion origin. Other minor fine iron aerosol sources included mineral dust (8-11%), traffic brake wear material (1-17%), shipping/oil (1-6%), biomass combustion (4-13%) and vegetative debris (1-3%). Overall, relative to anthropogenic Asian Fe-sulfate dust, anthropogenic European dust internally mixed with additional key nutrients such as nitrate is likely to play a different role in ocean global biogeochemical cycles. PMID:27002272

  1. Influence of zero-valent iron nanoparticles on nitrate removal by Paracoccus sp.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Li, Shibin; Chen, Zuliang; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2014-08-01

    Nitrate contamination in drinking water is a major threat to public health. This study investigated the efficiency of denitrification of aqueous solutions in the co-presence of synthesized nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI; diameter: 20-80 nm) and a previously isolated Paracoccus sp. strain YF1. Various influencing factors were studied, such as oxygen, pH, temperature, and anaerobic corrosion products (Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and Fe3O4). With slight toxicity to the strain, nZVI promoted denitrification efficiency by providing additional electron sources under aerobic conditions. For example, 50 mg L(-1) nZVI increased the nitrate removal efficiency from 66.9% to 85.2%. However, a high concentration of nZVI could lead to increased production of Fe(2+), a toxic ion which could compromise the removal efficiency. Kinetic studies suggest that denitrification by both free cells, and nZVI-amended cells fitted well to the zero-order model. Temperature and pH are the major factors affecting nitrate removal and cell growth, with or without the presence of nZVI. In this study, nitrate removal and cell growth increased in the pH range of 6.5-8.0, and temperature range of 25-35 °C. These conditions favor the growth of the strain, which dominated denitrification in all scenarios involved. As for anaerobic corrosion products, compared with Fe(2+) and Fe(3+), Fe3O4 promoted denitrification by serving as an electron donor. Finally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed attachments of nZVI on the surface of the cell, and the formation of iron oxides. This study indicated that, as an electron donor source with minimal cellular toxicity, nZVI could be used to promote denitrification efficiency under biotic conditions. PMID:24630453

  2. Iron Corrosion Induced by Nonhydrogenotrophic Nitrate-Reducing Prolixibacter sp. Strain MIC1-1

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kimio; Wakai, Satoshi; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Ohkuma, Moriya; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2014-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of metallic materials imposes a heavy economic burden. The mechanism of MIC of metallic iron (Fe0) under anaerobic conditions is usually explained as the consumption of cathodic hydrogen by hydrogenotrophic microorganisms that accelerates anodic Fe0 oxidation. In this study, we describe Fe0 corrosion induced by a nonhydrogenotrophic nitrate-reducing bacterium called MIC1-1, which was isolated from a crude-oil sample collected at an oil well in Akita, Japan. This strain requires specific electron donor-acceptor combinations and an organic carbon source to grow. For example, the strain grew anaerobically on nitrate as a sole electron acceptor with pyruvate as a carbon source and Fe0 as the sole electron donor. In addition, ferrous ion and l-cysteine served as electron donors, whereas molecular hydrogen did not. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain MIC1-1 was a member of the genus Prolixibacter in the order Bacteroidales. Thus, Prolixibacter sp. strain MIC1-1 is the first Fe0-corroding representative belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. Under anaerobic conditions, Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 corroded Fe0 concomitantly with nitrate reduction, and the amount of iron dissolved by the strain was six times higher than that in an aseptic control. Scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that microscopic crystals of FePO4 developed on the surface of the Fe0 foils, and a layer of FeCO3 covered the FePO4 crystals. We propose that cells of Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 accept electrons directly from Fe0 to reduce nitrate. PMID:25548048

  3. Iron corrosion induced by nonhydrogenotrophic nitrate-reducing Prolixibacter sp. strain MIC1-1.

    PubMed

    Iino, Takao; Ito, Kimio; Wakai, Satoshi; Tsurumaru, Hirohito; Ohkuma, Moriya; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2015-03-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of metallic materials imposes a heavy economic burden. The mechanism of MIC of metallic iron (Fe(0)) under anaerobic conditions is usually explained as the consumption of cathodic hydrogen by hydrogenotrophic microorganisms that accelerates anodic Fe(0) oxidation. In this study, we describe Fe(0) corrosion induced by a nonhydrogenotrophic nitrate-reducing bacterium called MIC1-1, which was isolated from a crude-oil sample collected at an oil well in Akita, Japan. This strain requires specific electron donor-acceptor combinations and an organic carbon source to grow. For example, the strain grew anaerobically on nitrate as a sole electron acceptor with pyruvate as a carbon source and Fe(0) as the sole electron donor. In addition, ferrous ion and l-cysteine served as electron donors, whereas molecular hydrogen did not. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain MIC1-1 was a member of the genus Prolixibacter in the order Bacteroidales. Thus, Prolixibacter sp. strain MIC1-1 is the first Fe(0)-corroding representative belonging to the phylum Bacteroidetes. Under anaerobic conditions, Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 corroded Fe(0) concomitantly with nitrate reduction, and the amount of iron dissolved by the strain was six times higher than that in an aseptic control. Scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that microscopic crystals of FePO4 developed on the surface of the Fe(0) foils, and a layer of FeCO3 covered the FePO4 crystals. We propose that cells of Prolixibacter sp. MIC1-1 accept electrons directly from Fe(0) to reduce nitrate.

  4. Development of an iron nitrate resistant injector valve for the Space Shuttle orbiter primary thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichmann, Horst; Marquardt, Kaiser; Goforth, Alyssa

    1993-01-01

    Design of a direct-acting valve (DAV) for a primary thruster which is fully interchangeable with a thruster equipped with pilot-operated valves is described. The DAV is based on a bellows to isolate propellants form the actuator for maximum resistance to iron nitrate and other contamination and to select optimum materials for the actuator. It provides improved seal performance under all operating conditions and insensitivity to pressure transients. As compared with the existing pilot-operated valve, the DAV design is much simpler, consists of fewer parts, and will be lower in cost.

  5. Analysis of flow decay potential on Galileo. [oxidizer flow rate reduction by iron nitrate precipitates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, T. W.; Frisbee, R. H.; Yavrouian, A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The risks posed to the NASA's Galileo spacecraft by the oxidizer flow decay during its extended mission to Jupiter is discussed. The Galileo spacecraft will use nitrogen tetroxide (NTO)/monomethyl hydrazine bipropellant system with one large engine thrust-rated at a nominal 400 N, and 12 smaller engines each thrust-rated at a nominal 10 N. These smaller thrusters, because of their small valve inlet filters and small injector ports, are especially vulnerable to clogging by iron nitrate precipitates formed by NTO-wetted stainless steel components. To quantify the corrosion rates and solubility levels which will be seen during the Galileo mission, corrosion and solubility testing experiments were performed with simulated Galileo materials, propellants, and environments. The results show the potential benefits of propellant sieving in terms of iron and water impurity reduction.

  6. Modeling pitting corrosion of iron exposed to alkaline solutions containing nitrate and nitrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lifeng

    2001-07-01

    Pitting corrosion could be extremely serious for dilute high-level radioactive waste stored or processed in carbon steel tanks at the Savannah River Site. In these solutions, nitrate is an aggressive ion with respect to pitting of carbon steel while nitrite can be used as an inhibitor. Excessive additions of nitrite increase the risk of generating unstable nitrogen compounds during waste processing, and insufficient additions of nitrite could increase the risk of corrosion-induced failure. Thus there are strong incentives to obtain a fundamental understanding of the role of nitrite in pitting corrosion prevention with these solution chemistries. In this dissertation, both a 1-D and a 2-D model are used to study the pitting mechanism as a function of nitrite/nitrate ratios. The 1-D model used BAND(J) to test a reaction mechanism for the passivation behavior by comparing the predicted Open Circuit Potential (OCP) with OCP data from experiments at different NO2-/NO3- ratio. The model predictions are compared with Cyclic Potentiodynamic Polarization (CPP) experiments. A 2-D model was developed for the propagation of a pit in iron by writing subroutines for finite element software of GAMBIT and FIDAP. Geometrically distributed anodic and cathodic reactions are assumed. The results show three partial explanations describing the inhibition influence of nitrite to iron corrosion: the competing reduction reaction of nitrate to nitrite, the formation of Fe(OH)+, and the function of the porous film. The current distributions and the effect of porosity of the film on pH are also explained. The calculation results also show that rate of pit growth decreases as the pit diameter increases until it reaches a constant value. The profile of the local current density on the pit wall is parabolic for small pits and it changes to a linear distribution for large pits. The model predicts that addition of nitrite will decrease the production of ferrous ions and those can prevent iron from

  7. Anoxic nitrate reduction coupled with iron oxidation and attenuation of dissolved arsenic and phosphate in a sand and gravel aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Richard L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Repert, Deborah A.; Bohlke, J.K.

    2017-01-01

    weeks. Additionally, Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing microbial enrichment cultures were obtained from aquifer sediments. Growth experiments with the cultures sequentially produced nitrite and nitrous oxide from nitrate while simultaneously oxidizing Fe(II). Field and culture results suggest that nitrogen oxide reduction and Fe(II) oxidation in the aquifer are a complex interaction of coupled biotic and abiotic reactions. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that anoxic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation can occur in groundwater; that it could control iron speciation; and that the process can impact the mobility of other chemical species (e.g., phosphate and arsenic) not directly involved in the oxidation–reduction reaction.

  8. The role of magnetite nanoparticles in the reduction of nitrate in groundwater by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Cho, Dong-Wan; Song, Hocheol; Schwartz, Franklin W; Kim, Bokseong; Jeon, Byong-Hun

    2015-04-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were used as an additive material in a zero-valent iron (Fe0) reaction to reduce nitrate in groundwater and its effects on nitrate removal were investigated. The addition of nano-sized magnetite (NMT) to Fe0 reactor markedly increased nitrate reduction, with the rate proportionally increasing with NMT loading. Field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed that NMT aggregates were evenly distributed and attached on the Fe0 surface due to their magnetic properties. The rate enhancement effect of NMT is presumed to arise from its role as a corrosion promoter for Fe0 corrosion as well as an electron mediator that facilitated electron transport from Fe0 to adsorbed nitrate. Nitrate reduction by Fe0 in the presence of NMT proceeded much faster in groundwater (GW) than in de-ionized water. The enhanced reduction of nitrate in GW was attributed to the adsorption or formation of surface complex by the cationic components in GW, i.e., Ca2+ and Mg2+, in the Fe0-H2O interface that promoted electrostatic attraction of nitrate to the reaction sites. Moreover, the addition of NMT imparted superior longevity to Fe0, enabling completion of four nitrate reduction cycles, which otherwise would have been inactivated during the first cycle without an addition of NMT. The results demonstrate the potential applicability of a Fe0/NMT system in the treatment of nitrate-contaminated GW.

  9. Arsenic removal from geothermal waters with zero-valent iron--effect of temperature, phosphate and nitrate.

    PubMed

    Tyruvola, Konstantina; Nikolaidis, Nikolaus P; Veranis, Nikolaus; Kallithrakas-Kontos, Nikolaso; Koulouridakis, Pavlos E

    2006-07-01

    Field column studies and laboratory batch experiments were conducted in order to assess the performance of zero-valent iron in removing arsenic from geothermal waters in agricultural regions where phosphates and nitrates were present. A field pilot study demonstrated that iron filings could remove arsenic, phosphate and nitrate from water. In addition, batch studies were performed to evaluate the effect of temperature, phosphate and nitrate on As(III) and As(V) removal rates. All batch experiments were conducted at three temperatures (20, 30 and 40 degrees C). Pseudo-first-order reaction rate constants were calculated for As(III), As(V), phosphate, nitrate and ammonia for all temperatures. As(V) exhibited greater removal rates than As(III). The presence of phosphate and nitrate decreased the rates of arsenic removal. The temperature of the water played a dominant role on the kinetics of arsenic, phosphate and nitrate removal. Nitrate reduction resulted in the formation of nitrite and ammonia. In addition, the activation energy, Eact, and the constant temperature coefficient, theta were determined for each removal process.

  10. Removal of added nitrate in the single, binary, and ternary systems of cotton burr compost, zerovalent iron, and sediment: Implications for groundwater nitrate remediation using permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Su, Chunming; Puls, Robert W

    2007-04-01

    Recent research has shown that carbonaceous solid materials and zerovalent iron (Fe(0)) may potentially be used as media in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to degrade groundwater nitrate via heterotrophic denitrification in the solid carbon system, and via abiotic reduction and autotrophic denitrification in the Fe(0) system. Questions arise as whether the more expensive Fe(0) is more effective than the less expensive carbonaceous solid materials for groundwater nitrate remediation, and whether there is any synergistic effect of mixing the two different types of materials. We carried out batch tests to study the nature and rates of removal of added nitrate in the suspensions of single, binary, and ternary systems of cotton burr compost, Peerless Fe(0), and a sediment low in organic carbon. Cotton burr compost acted as both organic carbon source and supporting material for the growth of indigenous denitrifiers. Batch tests showed that cotton burr compost alone removed added nitrate at a greater rate than did Peerless Fe(0) alone on an equal mass basis with a pseudo-first-order rate constant k=0.0830+/-0.0031 h(-1) for cotton burr compost and a k=0.00223+/-0.00022 h(-1) for Peerless Fe(0); cotton burr compost also removed added nitrate at a faster rate than did cotton burr compost mixed with Peerless Fe(0) and/or the sediment. Furthermore, there was no substantial accumulation of ammonium ions in the cotton burr compost system, in contrast to the systems containing Peerless Fe(0) in which ammonium ions persisted as major products of nitrate reduction. It is concluded that cotton burr compost alone may be used as an excellent denitrification medium in a PRB for groundwater nitrate removal. Further study is needed to evaluate performance of its field applications. PMID:17257645

  11. Removal of added nitrate in the single, binary, and ternary systems of cotton burr compost, zerovalent iron, and sediment: Implications for groundwater nitrate remediation using permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Su, Chunming; Puls, Robert W

    2007-04-01

    Recent research has shown that carbonaceous solid materials and zerovalent iron (Fe(0)) may potentially be used as media in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to degrade groundwater nitrate via heterotrophic denitrification in the solid carbon system, and via abiotic reduction and autotrophic denitrification in the Fe(0) system. Questions arise as whether the more expensive Fe(0) is more effective than the less expensive carbonaceous solid materials for groundwater nitrate remediation, and whether there is any synergistic effect of mixing the two different types of materials. We carried out batch tests to study the nature and rates of removal of added nitrate in the suspensions of single, binary, and ternary systems of cotton burr compost, Peerless Fe(0), and a sediment low in organic carbon. Cotton burr compost acted as both organic carbon source and supporting material for the growth of indigenous denitrifiers. Batch tests showed that cotton burr compost alone removed added nitrate at a greater rate than did Peerless Fe(0) alone on an equal mass basis with a pseudo-first-order rate constant k=0.0830+/-0.0031 h(-1) for cotton burr compost and a k=0.00223+/-0.00022 h(-1) for Peerless Fe(0); cotton burr compost also removed added nitrate at a faster rate than did cotton burr compost mixed with Peerless Fe(0) and/or the sediment. Furthermore, there was no substantial accumulation of ammonium ions in the cotton burr compost system, in contrast to the systems containing Peerless Fe(0) in which ammonium ions persisted as major products of nitrate reduction. It is concluded that cotton burr compost alone may be used as an excellent denitrification medium in a PRB for groundwater nitrate removal. Further study is needed to evaluate performance of its field applications.

  12. The removal of nitrate by nanoscale iron particles produced using the sodium borohydride method.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyoung-Chan; Park, Sung Hoon; Ahn, Ho-Geun; Chung, Minchul; Kim, Byungwhan; Kim, Sun-Jae; Seo, Seong-Gyu; Jung, Sang-Chul

    2011-02-01

    This study was conducted to investigate removal of nitrate by nanoscale zero-valent iron (ZVI) particles in aqueous solution. ZVI particles was produced from wasted acid that is by-products of a pickling line at a steel work. The reaction activity of ZVI particles was evaluated through decomposition experiments of NO3-N aqueous solution. Addition of a larger amount of ZVI particles resulted in a higher decomposition rate. ZVI particles showed higher decomposition efficiencies than commercially purchased ZVI particles at all pH values. Both ZVIs showed a higher decomposition rate at a lower pH. Virtually no decomposition reaction was observed at pH of 4 or higher for purchased ZVI. The ZVI particles produced directly from wasted acid by the sodium borohydride method were not easy to handle because they were very small (10-200 nm) and were oxidized easily in the air. PMID:21456267

  13. Inhibition of bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron by lead nitrate in sulfate-rich systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Hongmei; Gong, Linfeng; Cravotta, Charles A.; Yang, Xiaofen; Tuovinen, Olli H.; Dong, Hailiang; Fu, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) by Pb(NO3)2 was investigated with a mixed culture of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The culture was incubated at 30 °C in ferrous-sulfate medium amended with 0–24.2 mM Pb(II) added as Pb(NO3)2. Anglesite (PbSO4) precipitated immediately upon Pb addition and was the only solid phase detected in the abiotic controls. Both anglesite and jarosite (KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6) were detected in inoculated cultures. Precipitation of anglesite maintained dissolved Pb concentrations at 16.9–17.6 μM regardless of the concentrations of Pb(NO3)2 added. Fe(II) oxidation was suppressed by 24.2 mM Pb(NO3)2 addition even when anglesite was removed before inoculation. Experiments with 0–48 mM KNO3 demonstrated that bacterial Fe(II) oxidation decreased as nitrate concentration increased. Therefore, inhibition of Fe(II) oxidation at 24.2 mM Pb(NO3)2 addition resulted from nitrate toxicity instead of Pb addition. Geochemical modeling that considered the initial precipitation of anglesite to equilibrium followed by progressive oxidation of Fe(II) and the precipitation of jarosite and an amorphous iron hydroxide phase, without allowing plumbojarosite to precipitate were consistent with the experimental time-series data on Fe(II) oxidation under biotic conditions. Anglesite precipitation in mine tailings and other sulfate-rich systems maintains dissolved Pb concentrations below the toxicity threshold of A. ferrooxidans.

  14. Long-term Fate of Arsenic under the Oxidation of Ferrous Iron by Nitrate.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Prommer, H.; Siade, A. J.; Chillrud, S. N.; Mailloux, B. J.; Bostick, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    In situ precipitation of iron (Fe) minerals can be an effective means of remediating groundwater arsenic (As) contamination. Among different Fe minerals, magnetite is promising as a host-mineral for As in situ immobilization in that it is stable under a wide range of geochemical conditions, including Fe(III) reducing conditions under which As are often mobilized. Our previous laboratory studies suggest that the formation of nanoparticulate magnetite can be achieved by the oxidation of ferrous Fe with nitrate. Magnetite can incorporate As into its structure during formation, in which case desorption and As(V) reduction are less likely. Nanoparticulate magnetite, once formed, can also immobilize As by surface adsorption, and thus serve as a reactive filter when contaminated groundwater migrates through the treatment zone. In this study, a reactive transport model is develop for the magnetite based As immobilization strategy. The initial numerical model development was guided by experimental data and hypothesized processes from the laboratory one-dimensional column studies. Our modeling results suggest that the ratio between Fe(II) and nitrate in the injectant regulates the extent and distribution of magnetite and ferrihydrite formation, and thus regulates the long-term potential of As immobilization. Based on these results, two-dimensional field-scale model scenarios were developed to predict and compare the impact of chemical and operational parameters on the efficiency of the remediation technology. The modeling results, which suggest that long-term groundwater As removal is feasible, favor scenarios that rely on the chromatographic mixing of Fe(II) and nitrate after injection. This study highlights the importance of combining laboratory studies and reactive transport modeling for elucidating the complex hydro-biogeochemical processes that control the fate of As and for up-scaling of the technology.

  15. The effect of granular ferric hydroxide amendment on the reduction of nitrate in groundwater by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Song, Hocheol; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Chon, Chul-Min; Kim, Yongje; Nam, In-Hyun; Schwartz, Franklin W; Cho, Dong-Wan

    2013-11-01

    The feasibility of using granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) with zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) for its potential utility in enhancing nitrate reduction was investigated. The addition of 10gL(-1) GFH to 25gL(-1) Fe(0) significantly enhanced nitrate removal, resulting in 93% removal of 52.2mg-NL(-1) in 36-h as compared to 23% removal with Fe(0) alone. Surface analyses of the reacted Fe(0)/GFH revealed the presence of magnetite on the Fe(0) surface, which probably served as an electron mediator for nitrate reduction. Addition of GFH to Fe(0) also resulted in lower solution pH compared to Fe(0). The rate enhancing effect of GFH on nitrate reduction was attributed to the combined effects of magnetite formation and pH buffering by GFH. GFH amendment (100gL(-1)) significantly increased reduction capacity and longevity of Fe(0) to complete several nitrate reduction cycles before inactivation, giving a total nitrate removal of 205mg-NL(-1), while unamended Fe(0) gave only 20mg-NL(-1) before inactivation during the first reduction cycle. The overall result demonstrated the potential utility of Fe(0)/GFH system that may be developed into a viable technology for removal of nitrate from groundwater.

  16. Arsenic, nitrate, iron, and hardness in ground water, Chena Hot Springs Road, Steele Creek Road, and Gilmore Trail areas, (T.1N., R.1E., FM), Fairbanks, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krumhardt, Andrea P.

    1982-01-01

    This report presents all data on arsenic, nitrate, iron, and hardness in well water in the Chena Hot Springs Road, Steele Creek Road, and Gilmore Trail area of Fairbanks, Alaska, collected through October 1981. Concentrations range as follows: arsenic - 0 to 5,100 micrograms per liter; nitrate - 0 to 53 milligrams per liter; iron - 0 to 50 milligrams per liter, and hardness - 12 to 1,000 milligrams per liter. The percentage of samples exceeding limits set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are as follows: arsenic - 13%; nitrate - 14%, and iron - 80%. (USGS)

  17. Inhibition or promotion of biodegradation of nitrate by Paracoccus sp. in the presence of nanoscale zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chenghong; Xu, Xuping; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravendra; Chen, Zuliang

    2015-10-15

    To investigate the effect of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) on the growth of Paracoccus sp. strain and biodenitrification under aerobic conditions, specific factors were studied, pH, concentration of nitrate, Fe (II) and carbon dioxide. Low concentration of nZVI (50mg/L) promoted both cell growth and biodegradation of nitrate which rose from 69.91% to 76.16%, while nitrate removal fell to 67.10% in the presence of high nZVI concentration (1000 mg/L). This may be attributed to the ions produced in nZVI corrosion being used as an electron source for the biodegradation of nitrate. However, the excess uptake of Fe (II) causes oxidative damage to the cells. To confirm this, nitrate was completely removed after 20 h when 100mg/L Fe (II) was added to the solution, which is much faster than the control (86.05%, without adding Fe (II)). However, nitrate removal reached only 45.64% after 20 h, with low cell density (OD 600=0.62) in the presence of 300 mg/L Fe (II). Characterization techniques indicated that nZVI adhered to microorganism cell membranes. These findings confirmed that nZVI could affect the activity of the strain and consequently change the biodenitrification. PMID:26047857

  18. Iron availability, nitrate uptake, and exportable new production in the subarctic Pacific. [phytoplankton population growth support and atmospheric CO2 removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banse, Karl

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a critique of experimental data and papers by Martin et al. (1989, 1990), who suggested that the phytoplankton growth is iron-limited and that, small additions of iron to large subarctic ocean areas might be a way of removing significant amounts of atmospheric CO2 by increasing phytoplancton growth. Data are presented to show that, in the summer of 1987, the phytoplankton assemblage as a whole was not iron limited, as measured by the bulk removal of nitrate or by the increase of chlorophyll. It is suggested that grazing normally prevents the phytoplankton from reaching concentrations that reduce the iron (and nitrate) to levels that depress division rates drastically.

  19. Direct nitration and azidation of aliphatic carbons by an iron-dependent halogenase

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-chen; Layne, Andrew P; Miles, Linde A; Krebs, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Iron-dependent halogenases employ cis-halo-Fe(IV)-oxo (haloferryl) complexes to functionalize unactivated aliphatic carbon centers, a capability elusive to synthetic chemists. Halogenation requires (1) coordination of a halide anion (Cl− or Br−) to the enzyme's Fe(II) cofactor; (2) coupled activation of O2 and decarboxylation of α-ketoglutarate to generate the haloferryl intermediate; (3) abstraction of hydrogen (H•) from the substrate by the ferryl oxo group; and (4) transfer of the cis halogen as Cl• or Br• to the substrate radical. This enzymatic solution to an unsolved chemical challenge is potentially generalizable to installation of other functional groups, provided that the corresponding anions can support the four requisite steps. We show here that the wild-type halogenase SyrB2 can indeed direct aliphatic nitration and azidation reactions by the same chemical logic. The discovery and enhancement by mutagenesis of these previously unknown reaction types suggests unrecognized or untapped versatility in ferryl-mediated enzymatic C–H-bond activation. PMID:24463698

  20. Arsenic, nitrate, iron, and hardness, in ground water, Goldstream Road, Yankovich Road, and Murphy Dome Road areas (T.1 N, R.2 W, FM), Fairbanks, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopkins, Gary C.; Maxwell, Kevin F.

    1985-01-01

    Arsenic, nitrate, iron, and hardness in well water are concerns of homeowners and planners in the Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska. Arsenic and nitrate in water may affect human health. Iron and hardness can be aesthetically objectionable, impair plumbing systems, and discolor plumbing fixtures. This report is a compilation of the arsenic, nitrate, iron, and hardness data collected through February 1983 in the Goldstream Road, Murphy Dome Road, and Yankovich-Miller Hill Road areas of Fairbanks. Within these areas, concentrations of arsenic ranged from 0 to 1600 micrograms per liter, nitrate (as nitrogen) ranged from 0 to 78 milligrams per liter, iron ranged from 0 to 46 milligrams per liter, and hardness (as calcium carbonate) ranged from 34 to 1220 milligrams per liter. (USGS)

  1. Simultaneous removal of nitrate, hydrogen peroxide and phosphate in semiconductor acidic wastewater by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Hiroyuki; Tokumura, Masahiro; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    The zero-valent iron (ZVI) wastewater treatment has been applied to simultaneous removal of nitrate, hydrogen peroxide and phosphate in semiconductor acidic wastewaters. The simultaneous removal occurs by the reactions performed due to the sequential transformation of ZVI under the acidic condition. Fortunately the solution pH of semiconductor acidic wastewaters is low which is effective for the sequential transformation of ZVI. Firstly the reduction of nitrate is taken place by electrons generated by the corrosion of ZVI under acidic conditions. Secondly the ferrous ion generated by the corrosion of ZVI reacts with hydrogen peroxide and generates ·OH radical (Fenton reaction). The Fenton reaction consists of the degradation of hydrogen peroxide and the generation of ferric ion. Finally phosphate precipitates out with iron ions. In the simultaneous removal process, 1.6 mM nitrate, 9.0 mM hydrogen peroxide and 1.0 mM phosphate were completely removed by ZVI within 100, 15 and 15 min, respectively. The synergy among the reactions for the removal of nitrate, hydrogen peroxide and phosphate was found. In the individual pollutant removal experiment, the removal of phosphate by ZVI was limited to 80% after 300 min. Its removal rate was considerably improved in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and the complete removal of phosphate was achieved after 15 min.

  2. Long-term trends in dissolved iron and DOC concentration linked to nitrate depletion in riparian soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musolff, Andreas; Selle, Benny; Fleckenstein, Jan H.; Oosterwoud, Marieke R.; Tittel, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    The instream concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are rising in many catchments of the northern hemisphere. Elevated concentrations of DOC, mainly in the form of colored humic components, increase efforts and costs of drinking water purification. In this study, we evaluated a long-term dataset of 110 catchments draining into German drinking water reservoirs in order to assess sources of DOC and drivers of a potential long-term change. The average DOC concentrations across the wide range of different catchments were found to be well explained by the catchment's topographic wetness index. Higher wetness indices were connected to higher average DOC concentrations, which implies that catchments with shallow topography and pronounced riparian wetlands mobilize more DOC. Overall, 37% of the investigated catchments showed a significant long-term increase in DOC concentrations, while 22% exhibited significant negative trends. Moreover, we found that increasing trends in DOC were positively correlated to trends in dissolved iron concentrations at pH≤6 due to remobilization of DOC previously sorbed to iron minerals. Both, increasing trends in DOC and dissolve iron were found to be connected to decreasing trends and low concentrations of nitrate (below ~6 mg/L). This was especially observed in forested catchments where atmospheric N-depositions were the major source for nitrate availability. In these catchments, we also found long-term increases of phosphate concentrations. Therefore, we argue that dissolved iron, DOC and phosphate were jointly released under iron-reducing conditions when nitrate as a competing electron acceptor was too low in concentrations to prevent the microbial iron reduction. In contrast, we could not explain the observed increasing trends in DOC, iron and phosphate concentrations by the long-term trends of pH, sulfate or precipitation. Altogether this study gives strong evidence that both, source and long-term increases in DOC are

  3. Microbial Iron(II) Oxidation in Littoral Freshwater Lake Sediment: The Potential for Competition between Phototrophic vs. Nitrate-Reducing Iron(II)-Oxidizers

    PubMed Central

    Melton, E. D.; Schmidt, C.; Kappler, A.

    2012-01-01

    The distribution of neutrophilic microbial iron oxidation is mainly determined by local gradients of oxygen, light, nitrate and ferrous iron. In the anoxic top part of littoral freshwater lake sediment, nitrate-reducing and phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizers compete for the same e− donor; reduced iron. It is not yet understood how these microbes co-exist in the sediment and what role they play in the Fe cycle. We show that both metabolic types of anaerobic Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms are present in the same sediment layer directly beneath the oxic-anoxic sediment interface. The photoferrotrophic most probable number counted 3.4·105 cells·g−1 and the autotrophic and mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers totaled 1.8·104 and 4.5·104 cells·g−1 dry weight sediment, respectively. To distinguish between the two microbial Fe(II) oxidation processes and assess their individual contribution to the sedimentary Fe cycle, littoral lake sediment was incubated in microcosm experiments. Nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria exhibited a higher maximum Fe(II) oxidation rate per cell, in both pure cultures and microcosms, than photoferrotrophs. In microcosms, photoferrotrophs instantly started oxidizing Fe(II), whilst nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers showed a significant lag-phase during which they probably use organics as e− donor before initiating Fe(II) oxidation. This suggests that they will be outcompeted by phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizers during optimal light conditions; as phototrophs deplete Fe(II) before nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers start Fe(II) oxidation. Thus, the co-existence of the two anaerobic Fe(II)-oxidizers may be possible due to a niche space separation in time by the day-night cycle, where nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers oxidize Fe(II) during darkness and phototrophs play a dominant role in Fe(II) oxidation during daylight. Furthermore, metabolic flexibility of Fe(II)-oxidizing microbes may play a paramount role in the

  4. The role of clay minerals in the reduction of nitrate in groundwater by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Cho, Dong-Wan; Chon, Chul-Min; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Kim, Yongje; Khan, Moonis Ali; Song, Hocheol

    2010-10-01

    Bench-scale batch experiments were performed to investigate the feasibility of using different types of clay minerals (bentonite, fuller's earth, and biotite) with zero-valent iron for their potential utility in enhancing nitrate reduction and ammonium control. Kinetics experiments performed with deionized water (DW) and groundwater (GW) revealed nitrate reduction by Fe(0) proceeded at significantly faster rate in GW than in DW, and such a difference was attributed to the formation of green rust in GW. The amendment of the minerals at the dose of 25 g L(-1) in Fe(0) reaction in GW resulted in approximately 41%, 43%, and 33% more removal of nitrate in 64 h reaction for bentonite, fuller's earth, and biotite, respectively, compared to Fe(0) alone reaction. The presumed role of the minerals in the rate enhancement was to provide sites for the formation of surface bound green rust. Bentonite and fuller's earth also effectively removed ammonium produced from nitrate reduction by adsorption, with the removal efficiencies significantly increased with the increase in mineral dose above 5:1 Fe(0) to mineral mass ratio. Such a removal of ammonium was not observed for biotite, presumably due to its lack of swelling property. Equilibrium adsorption experiments indicated bentonite and fuller's earth had maximum ammonium adsorption capacity of 5.6 and 2.1 mg g(-1), respectively. PMID:20797759

  5. The role of clay minerals in the reduction of nitrate in groundwater by zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Cho, Dong-Wan; Chon, Chul-Min; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Kim, Yongje; Khan, Moonis Ali; Song, Hocheol

    2010-10-01

    Bench-scale batch experiments were performed to investigate the feasibility of using different types of clay minerals (bentonite, fuller's earth, and biotite) with zero-valent iron for their potential utility in enhancing nitrate reduction and ammonium control. Kinetics experiments performed with deionized water (DW) and groundwater (GW) revealed nitrate reduction by Fe(0) proceeded at significantly faster rate in GW than in DW, and such a difference was attributed to the formation of green rust in GW. The amendment of the minerals at the dose of 25 g L(-1) in Fe(0) reaction in GW resulted in approximately 41%, 43%, and 33% more removal of nitrate in 64 h reaction for bentonite, fuller's earth, and biotite, respectively, compared to Fe(0) alone reaction. The presumed role of the minerals in the rate enhancement was to provide sites for the formation of surface bound green rust. Bentonite and fuller's earth also effectively removed ammonium produced from nitrate reduction by adsorption, with the removal efficiencies significantly increased with the increase in mineral dose above 5:1 Fe(0) to mineral mass ratio. Such a removal of ammonium was not observed for biotite, presumably due to its lack of swelling property. Equilibrium adsorption experiments indicated bentonite and fuller's earth had maximum ammonium adsorption capacity of 5.6 and 2.1 mg g(-1), respectively.

  6. Nitration of Solvent-exposed Tyrosine 74 on Cytochrome c Triggers Heme Iron-Methionine 80 Bond Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Abriata, Luciano A.; Cassina, Adriana; Tórtora, Verónica; Marín, Mónica; Souza, José M.; Castro, Laura; Vila, Alejandro J.; Radi, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Cytochrome c, a mitochondrial electron transfer protein containing a hexacoordinated heme, is involved in other physiologically relevant events, such as the triggering of apoptosis, and the activation of a peroxidatic activity. The latter occurs secondary to interactions with cardiolipin and/or post-translational modifications, including tyrosine nitration by peroxynitrite and other nitric oxide-derived oxidants. The gain of peroxidatic activity in nitrated cytochrome c has been related to a heme site transition in the physiological pH region, which normally occurs at alkaline pH in the native protein. Herein, we report a spectroscopic characterization of two nitrated variants of horse heart cytochrome c by using optical spectroscopy studies and NMR. Highly pure nitrated cytochrome c species modified at solvent-exposed Tyr-74 or Tyr-97 were generated after treatment with a flux of peroxynitrite, separated, purified by preparative high pressure liquid chromatography, and characterized by mass spectrometry-based peptide mapping. It is shown that nitration of Tyr-74 elicits an early alkaline transition with a pKa = 7.2, resulting in the displacement of the sixth and axial iron ligand Met-80 and replacement by a weaker Lys ligand to yield an alternative low spin conformation. Based on the study of site-specific Tyr to Phe mutants in the four conserved Tyr residues, we also show that this transition is not due to deprotonation of nitro-Tyr-74, but instead we propose a destabilizing steric effect of the nitro group in the mobile Ω-loop of cytochrome c, which is transmitted to the iron center via the nearby Tyr-67. The key role of Tyr-67 in promoting the transition through interactions with Met-80 was further substantiated in the Y67F mutant. These results therefore provide new insights into how a remote post-translational modification in cytochrome c such as tyrosine nitration triggers profound structural changes in the heme ligation and microenvironment and impacts in

  7. Nitrate reduction, sulfate reduction, and sedimentary iron isotope evolution during the Cenomanian-Turonian oceanic anoxic event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkyns, Hugh C.; Matthews, Alan; Tsikos, Harilaos; Erel, Yigal

    2007-09-01

    Organic carbon-rich shales from localities in England, Italy, and Morocco, which formed during the Cenomanian-Turonian oceanic anoxic event (OAE), have been examined for their total organic carbon (TOC) values together with their carbon, nitrogen, and iron isotope ratios. Carbon isotope stratigraphy (δ13Corg and δ13Ccarb) allows accurate recognition of the strata that record the oceanic anoxic event, in some cases allowing characterization of isotopic species before, during, and after the OAE. Within the black shales formed during the OAE, relatively heavy nitrogen isotope ratios, which correlate positively with TOC, suggest nitrate reduction (leading ultimately to denitrification and/or anaerobic ammonium oxidation). Black shales deposited before the onset of the OAE in Italy have unusually low bulk δ57Fe values, unlike those found in the black shale (Livello Bonarelli) deposited during the oceanic anoxic event itself: These latter conform to the Phanerozoic norm for organic-rich sediments. Pyrite formation in the pre-OAE black shales has apparently taken place via dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR), within the sediment, a suboxic process that causes an approximately -2‰ fractionation between a lithogenic Fe(III)oxide source and Fe(II)aq. In contrast, bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR), at least partly in the water column, characterized the OAE itself and was accompanied by only minor iron isotope fractionation. This change in the manner of pyrite formation is reflected in a decrease in the average pyrite framboid diameter from ˜10 to ˜7 μm. The gradual, albeit irregular increase in Fe isotope values during the OAE, as recorded in the Italian section, is taken to demonstrate limited isotopic evolution of the dissolved iron pool, consequent upon ongoing water column precipitation of pyrite under euxinic conditions. Given that evidence exists for both nitrate and sulfate reduction during the OAE, it is evident that redox conditions in the water column were

  8. Potential application of microbial iron redox cycles in nitrate removal and their effects on clay mineral properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Dong, H.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Briggs, B. R.; Zeng, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Phyllosilicates that are ubiquitous in subsurface can serve as an iron source for microbial respiration. The objective of this research is to determine the ability of the phyllosilicate Fe to remove nitrate in subsurface undergoing microbial-driven redox cycles. In this study, thus, a well-characterized reference clay (NAu-2; nontronite), was subjected to redox cycles in a system containing dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, and nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria, Pseudogulbenkiania sp. Strain 2002. Three redox cycles were conducted in bicarbonate- and PIPES-buffered medium. The extents of Fe(III) reduction, Fe(II) oxidation, nitrate reduction, and its various intermediate products were measured by wet chemical methods. For each cycle, Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy and Mossbauer spectroscopy confirmed Fe oxidation state. Mineralogical changes were identified by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, and infrared absorption spectroscopy. For all three cycles, nitrate was completely reduced to nitrogen gas under both bicarbonate- and PIPES- buffered conditions. As redox cycle increased, bio-reduction extents of Fe(III) in NAu-2 decreased by 33% and 48% in PIPES- and bicarbonate-buffered medium, respectively; however, bio-oxidation extents increased by 66% and 55% in the same medium, respectively. Despite the change of OH-stretching vibration band and OH-bending vibration bands in NAu-2 structure along Fe redox cycles, XRD data showed interlayer spacing of NAu-2 to be constant along the same Fe redox cycle. 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy indicated complex reduction and re-oxidation pathways. For example, a distinct Fe(II) doublet and a Fe2.5+ feature due to interfacial Fe(II)-Fe(III) electron transfer on clay mineral are prominent in their RT spectra. Both these Fe(II) are partially oxidized by Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. The result of this study shows that Fe in biogenically reduced or oxidized NAu-2

  9. Biological Redox Cycling Of Iron In Nontronite And Its Potential Application In Nitrate Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Zeng, Qiang; Edelmann, Richard E.; Pentrak, Martin; Agrawal, Abinash

    2015-05-05

    Redox cycling of structural Fe in phyllosilicates provides a potential method to remediate nitrate contamination in natural environment. Past research has only studied chemical redox cycles or a single biologically mediated redox cycle of Fe in phyllosilicates. The objective of this research was to study three microbially driven redox cycles of Fe in one phyllosilicate, nontronite (NAu-2). During the reduction phase structural Fe(III) in NAu-2 served as electron acceptor, lactate as electron donor, AQDS as electron shuttle, and dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 as mediator in bicarbonate-buffered and PIPES-buffered media. During the oxidation phase, biogenic Fe(II) served an electron donor, nitrate as electron acceptor, and nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strain 2002 as mediator in the same media. For all three cycles, structural Fe in NAu-2 was able to reversibly undergo 3 redox cycles without significant reductive or oxidative dissolution. X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed that NAu-2 was the dominant residual mineral throughout the 3 redox cycles with some dissolution textures but no significant secondary mineralization. Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(II) in bio-reduced samples likely occurred in two distinct environments, at edges and the interior of the NAu-2 structure. Nitrate was completely reduced to nitrogen gas under both buffer conditions and this extent and rate did not change with Fe redox cycles. Mössbauer spectroscopy further revealed that nitrate reduction was coupled to predominant/preferred oxidation of edge Fe(II). These results suggest that structural Fe in phyllosilicates may represent a renewable source to continuously remove nitrate in natural environments.

  10. Nitrate-Dependent Ferrous Iron Oxidation by Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (Anammox) Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Oshiki, M.; Ishii, S.; Yoshida, K.; Fujii, N.; Ishiguro, M.; Satoh, H.

    2013-01-01

    We examined nitrate-dependent Fe2+ oxidation mediated by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) bacteria. Enrichment cultures of “Candidatus Brocadia sinica” anaerobically oxidized Fe2+ and reduced NO3− to nitrogen gas at rates of 3.7 ± 0.2 and 1.3 ± 0.1 (mean ± standard deviation [SD]) nmol mg protein−1 min−1, respectively (37°C and pH 7.3). This nitrate reduction rate is an order of magnitude lower than the anammox activity of “Ca. Brocadia sinica” (10 to 75 nmol NH4+ mg protein−1 min−1). A 15N tracer experiment demonstrated that coupling of nitrate-dependent Fe2+ oxidation and the anammox reaction was responsible for producing nitrogen gas from NO3− by “Ca. Brocadia sinica.” The activities of nitrate-dependent Fe2+ oxidation were dependent on temperature and pH, and the highest activities were seen at temperatures of 30 to 45°C and pHs ranging from 5.9 to 9.8. The mean half-saturation constant for NO3− ± SD of “Ca. Brocadia sinica” was determined to be 51 ± 21 μM. Nitrate-dependent Fe2+ oxidation was further demonstrated by another anammox bacterium, “Candidatus Scalindua sp.,” whose rates of Fe2+ oxidation and NO3− reduction were 4.7 ± 0.59 and 1.45 ± 0.05 nmol mg protein−1 min−1, respectively (20°C and pH 7.3). Co-occurrence of nitrate-dependent Fe2+ oxidation and the anammox reaction decreased the molar ratios of consumed NO2− to consumed NH4+ (ΔNO2−/ΔNH4+) and produced NO3− to consumed NH4+ (ΔNO3−/ΔNH4+). These reactions are preferable to the application of anammox processes for wastewater treatment. PMID:23624480

  11. Enhanced and Stabilized Arsenic Retention in Microcosms through the Microbial Oxidation of Ferrous Iron by Nitrate

    PubMed Central

    SUN, JING; CHILLRUD, STEVEN N.; MAILLOUX, BRIAN J.; STUTE, MARTIN; SINGH, RAJESH; DONG, HAILIANG; LEPRE, CHRISTOPHER J.; BOSTICK, BENJAMIN C.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite strongly retains As, and is relatively stable under Fe(III)-reducing conditions common in aquifers that release As. Here, laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted to investigate a potential As remediation method involving magnetite formation, using groundwater and sediments from the Vineland Superfund site. The microcosms were amended with various combinations of nitrate, Fe(II)(aq)(as ferrous sulfate) and lactate, and were incubated for more than 5 weeks. In the microcosms enriched with 10 mM nitrate and 5 mM Fe(II)(aq), black magnetic particles were produced, and As removal from solution was observed even under sustained Fe(III) reduction stimulated by the addition of 10 mM lactate. The enhanced As retention was mainly attributed to co-precipitation within magnetite and adsorption on a mixture of magnetite and ferrihydrite. Sequential chemical extraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements showed that these minerals formed at pH 6 – 7 following nitrate-Fe(II) addition, and As-bearing magnetite was stable under reducing conditions. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction indicated that nano-particulate magnetite was produced as coatings on fine sediments, and no aging effect was detected on morphology over the course of incubation. These results suggest that a magnetite based strategy may be a long-term remedial option for As-contaminated aquifers. PMID:26454120

  12. Treatment of dissolved perchlorate, nitrate, and sulfate using zero-valent iron and organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Liu, YingYing; Ptacek, Carol J; Blowes, David W

    2014-05-01

    Waters containing ClO and dissolved NO, derived from detonated explosives and solid propellants, often also contain elevated concentrations of other dissolved constituents, including SO. Four column experiments, containing mixtures of silica sand, zero-valent Fe (ZVI) and organic C (OC) were conducted to evaluate the potential for simultaneous removal of NO, SO and ClO. Initially, the flow rate was maintained at 0.5 pore volumes (PV) d and then decreased to 0.1 PV d after 100 PV of flow. Nitrate concentrations decreased from 10.8 mg L (NO-N) to trace levels through NO reduction to NH using ZVI alone and through denitrification using OC. Observations from the mixture of ZVI and OC suggest a combination of NO reduction and denitrification. Up to 71% of input SO (24.5 ± 3.5 mg L) was removed in the column containing OC, and >99.7% of the input ClO (857 ± 63 μg L) was removed by the OC- and (ZVI + OC)-containing columns as the flow rate was maintained at 0.1 PV d. Nitrate and ClO removal followed first-order and zero-order rates, respectively. Nitrate >2 mg L (NO-N) inhibited ClO removal in the OC-containing column but not in the (ZVI + OC)-containing column. Sulfate did not inhibit ClO degradation within any of the columns.

  13. Enhanced and stabilized arsenic retention in microcosms through the microbial oxidation of ferrous iron by nitrate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Chillrud, Steven N; Mailloux, Brian J; Stute, Martin; Singh, Rajesh; Dong, Hailiang; Lepre, Christopher J; Bostick, Benjamin C

    2016-02-01

    Magnetite strongly retains As, and is relatively stable under Fe(III)-reducing conditions common in aquifers that release As. Here, laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted to investigate a potential As remediation method involving magnetite formation, using groundwater and sediments from the Vineland Superfund site. The microcosms were amended with various combinations of nitrate, Fe(II) (aq) (as ferrous sulfate) and lactate, and were incubated for more than 5 weeks. In the microcosms enriched with 10 mM nitrate and 5 mM Fe(II) (aq), black magnetic particles were produced, and As removal from solution was observed even under sustained Fe(III) reduction stimulated by the addition of 10 mM lactate. The enhanced As retention was mainly attributed to co-precipitation within magnetite and adsorption on a mixture of magnetite and ferrihydrite. Sequential chemical extraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements showed that these minerals formed at pH 6-7 following nitrate-Fe(II) addition, and As-bearing magnetite was stable under reducing conditions. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction indicated that nano-particulate magnetite was produced as coatings on fine sediments, and no aging effect was detected on morphology over the course of incubation. These results suggest that a magnetite based strategy may be a long-term remedial option for As-contaminated aquifers.

  14. Inhibition of nitrate reduction by NaCl adsorption on a nano-zero-valent iron surface during a concentrate treatment for water reuse.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yuhoon; Kim, Dogun; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) has been considered as a possible material to treat water and wastewater. However, it is necessary to verify the effect of the matrix components in different types of target water. In this study, different effects depending on the sodium chloride (NaCl) concentration on reductions of nitrates and on the characteristics of NZVI were investigated. Although NaCl is known as a promoter of iron corrosion, a high concentration of NaCl (>3 g/L) has a significant inhibition effect on the degree of NZVI reactivity towards nitrate. The experimental results were interpreted by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson reaction in terms of inhibition, and the decreased NZVI reactivity could be explained by the increase in the inhibition constant. As a result of a chloride concentration analysis, it was verified that 7.7-26.5% of chloride was adsorbed onto the surface of NZVI. Moreover, the change of the iron corrosion product under different NaCl concentrations was investigated by a surface analysis of spent NZVI. Magnetite was the main product, with a low NaCl concentration (0.5 g/L), whereas amorphous iron hydroxide was observed at a high concentration (12 g/L). Though the surface was changed to permeable iron hydroxide, the Fe(0) in the core was not completely oxidized. Therefore, the inhibition effect of NaCl could be explained as the competitive adsorption of chloride and nitrate. PMID:25358487

  15. Inhibition of nitrate reduction by NaCl adsorption on a nano-zero-valent iron surface during a concentrate treatment for water reuse.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yuhoon; Kim, Dogun; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) has been considered as a possible material to treat water and wastewater. However, it is necessary to verify the effect of the matrix components in different types of target water. In this study, different effects depending on the sodium chloride (NaCl) concentration on reductions of nitrates and on the characteristics of NZVI were investigated. Although NaCl is known as a promoter of iron corrosion, a high concentration of NaCl (>3 g/L) has a significant inhibition effect on the degree of NZVI reactivity towards nitrate. The experimental results were interpreted by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson reaction in terms of inhibition, and the decreased NZVI reactivity could be explained by the increase in the inhibition constant. As a result of a chloride concentration analysis, it was verified that 7.7-26.5% of chloride was adsorbed onto the surface of NZVI. Moreover, the change of the iron corrosion product under different NaCl concentrations was investigated by a surface analysis of spent NZVI. Magnetite was the main product, with a low NaCl concentration (0.5 g/L), whereas amorphous iron hydroxide was observed at a high concentration (12 g/L). Though the surface was changed to permeable iron hydroxide, the Fe(0) in the core was not completely oxidized. Therefore, the inhibition effect of NaCl could be explained as the competitive adsorption of chloride and nitrate.

  16. Changing Distributions of Methyl Halides, Nonmethane Hydrocarbons, Alkyl Nitrates, and Dimethyl Sulfide during the SOFeX Iron Fertilization Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingenter, O. W.; Haase, K. B.; Strutton, P.; Friederich, G.; Meinardi, S.; Blake, D. R.; Rowland, F. S.

    2002-12-01

    Concentrations for selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including methyl halides, nonmethane hydrocarbons, alkyl nitrates, and dimethyl sulfide were determined from whole air samples collected simultaneously from surface ocean water and 15 meters above the water during a mesoscale Fe enrichment experiment. The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) (January-February, 2002) involved the research vessels Revelle, Melville, and Polar Star. Previous Fe enhancement experiments have induced intense phytoplankton blooms that consumed significant amounts of CO2, resulting in the uptake of additional CO2 from the atmosphere. During SOFeX, two areas of the Southern Ocean (SO) were fertilized, one north of the Antarctic Polar Front and the other south of the front. The northern patch (NP) was low in silicate with high concentrations of nitrate and other nutrients, while the southern patch (SP) contained high concentrations of both nitrate and silicate. It was expected that the addition of Fe to waters low in silicate would not stimulate diatom production because diatoms require silicate to form. It is believed that diatoms remove most of the CO2 from surface waters, therefore little CO2 uptake was expected in the NP. Most of the HNLC water in the SO is found north of the front. Oceanic phytoplankton and other microorganisms are known to produce and consume certain VOCs. The question that we seek to address is: What impact does Fe fertilization in the SO have on the oceanic production and losses of trace gases that can affect stratospheric ozone and global climate? A total of 420 whole air samples (half from an equilibrator and half from above the bow of the ship) were collected aboard the Revelle, in and outside of the two iron-enriched sites. The samples were later returned to the UCI laboratory for gas chromatographic analysis. Approximately 30 days elapsed between the first Fe addition in the NP and the final VOC sampling in the NP on the return leg. Fourteen days

  17. Nitration of iron corrolates: further evidence for non-innocence of the corrole ligand†

    PubMed Central

    Stefanelli, Manuela; Nardis, Sara; Tortora, Luca; Fronczek, Frank R.; Smith, Kevin M.; Licoccia, Silvia; Paolesse, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Mono- and di-substituted β-nitro derivatives have been obtained from the reaction of ttcorrFeCl with sodium nitrite in refluxing DMF. This result is unprecedented for iron corrolates and further evidences the non-innocent character of the corrole ligand. PMID:21380423

  18. Impact of orchard and tillage management practices on soil leaching of atrazine, potassium, magnesium, manganese, iron, ammonium, nitrates and phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szajdak, L.; Lipiec, J.; Siczek, A.; Kotowska, U.; Nosalewicz, A.

    2009-04-01

    The experiments were carried out on an Orthic Luvisol developed from loess, over limestone, at the experimental field of Lublin Agricultural University in Felin (51o15'N, 22o35'E), Poland. The investigation deals with the problems of leaching's rate of atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-1,2,3-triazine), potassium, magnesium, manganese, iron, ammonium, nitrates and phosphates from two management systems of soil: (i) conventionally tilled field with main tillage operations including stubble cultivator (10 cm) + harrowing followed by mouldboard ploughing to 20 cm depth, and crop rotation including selected cereals, root crops and papillionaceous crops, (ii) 35-year-old apple orchard field (100x200m) with a permanent sward that was mown in the inter-rows during the growing season. The conventionally tilled plot was under the current management practice for approximately 30 years. Field sites were close to each other (about 150 m). Core samples of 100 cm3 volume and 5 cm diameter were taken from two depths 0-10 cm and 10-20 cm, and were used to determine the soil water characteristic curve. It was observed that management practices impacted on the physic-chemical properties of soils. pH (in H2O) in tilled soil ranged from 5.80 to 5.91. However soil of orchard soil revealed higher values of pH than tilled soil and ranged from 6.36 to 6.40. The content of organic carbon for tilled soil ranged from 1.13 to 1.17%, but in orchard soil from 1.59 to 1.77%. Tillled soil showed broader range of bulk density 1.38-1.62 mg m-3, than orchard soil 1.33-134 mg m-3. The first-order kinetic reaction model was fitted to the experimental atrazine, potassium, magnesium, manganese, iron, nitrates, ammonium and phosphates leaching vs. time data. The concentrations of leached chemical compounds revealed linear curves. The correlation coefficients ranged from -0.873 to -0.993. The first-order reaction constants measured for the orchard soils were from 3.8 to 19 times higher than

  19. Iron uptake system mediates nitrate-facilitated cadmium accumulation in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bing Fang; Du, Shao Ting; Lu, Kai Xing; Liu, Wen Jing; Lin, Xian Yong; Jin, Chong Wei

    2012-05-01

    Nitrogen (N) management is a promising agronomic strategy to minimize cadmium (Cd) contamination in crops. However, it is unclear how N affects Cd uptake by plants. Wild-type and iron uptake-inefficient tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant (T3238fer) plants were grown in pH-buffered hydroponic culture to investigate the direct effect of N-form on Cd uptake. Wild-type plants fed NO₃⁻ accumulated more Cd than plants fed NH₄⁺. Iron uptake and LeIRT1 expression in roots were also greater in plants fed NO₃⁻. However, in mutant T3238fer which loses FER function, LeIRT1 expression in roots was almost completely terminated, and the difference between NO₃⁻ and NH₄⁺ treatments vanished. As a result, the N-form had no effect on Cd uptake in this mutant. Furthermore, suppression of LeIRT1 expression by NO synthesis inhibition with either tungstate or L-NAME, also substantially inhibited Cd uptake in roots, and the difference between N-form treatments was diminished. Considering all of these findings, it was concluded that the up-regulation of the Fe uptake system was responsible for NO₃⁻-facilitated Cd accumulation in plants.

  20. Formation of single domain magnetite by green rust oxidation promoted by microbial anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Li, Jinhua; Benzerara, Karim; Sougrati, Moulay Tahar; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Bernard, Sylvain; Jumas, Jean-Claude; Guyot, François

    2014-08-01

    Biomineralization of magnetite is a central geomicrobiological process that might have played a primordial role over Earth’s history, possibly leaving traces of life in the geological record or controlling trace metal(loid)s and organic pollutants mobility in modern environments. Magnetite biomineralization has been attributed to two main microbial pathways to date (namely magnetotactic bacteria and dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria). Here, we uncover a new route of magnetite biomineralization involving the anaerobic nitrate-reducing iron(II) oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1. Using transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy and rock magnetic analyses, this strain is shown to promote the transformation of hydroxychloride green rust in equilibrium with dissolved Fe(II) to (1) periplasmic lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and (2) extracellular magnetite, thus leading to strong redox heterogeneities at the nanometer scale. On the one hand, lepidocrocite was associated with protein moieties and exhibited an anisotropic texture, with the elongated axis parallel to the cell wall. On the other hand, magnetite crystals exhibited grain sizes and magnetic properties consistent with stable single domain particles. By comparison, abiotic controls led to a very slow (4 months vs. 2 days in BoFeN1 cultures) and incomplete oxidation of hydroxychloride green rust towards magnetite. As this abiotic magnetite exhibited the same size and magnetic properties (stable single domain particles) as magnetite produced in BoFeN1 cultures, only the co-occurrence of textured Fe(III)-oxides and magnetite, associated with the persistence of organic carbon molecules, might constitute valuable biosignatures to be looked for in the geological record. Our results furthermore contribute to a more complex picture of Fe redox cycling in the environment, providing an additional process of Fe(II)-bearing phase

  1. Nitrate reduction by mixed iron(II-III) hydroxycarbonate green rust in the presence of phosphate anions: the key parameters influencing the ammonium selectivity.

    PubMed

    Etique, Marjorie; Zegeye, Asfaw; Grégoire, Brian; Carteret, Cédric; Ruby, Christian

    2014-10-01

    The reduction of nitrate anions by a mixed Fe(II)-Fe(III) carbonated green rust (GR) in aqueous medium is studied as a function of the initial pH and the initial concentrations of iron, phosphate and nitrate. The influence of these parameters on the fraction of nitrate removed and the production of ammonium is investigated by the help of statistical experimental designs. The goal is to determine experimental conditions that maximize the fraction of NO3(-) removed and concomitantly minimize the production of NH4(+). Increasing the phosphate concentration relatively to the initial Fe(II) concentration inhibits the reduction of nitrate probably due to a surface saturation of the lateral sites of the GR crystals. The kinetics of the reaction is greatly enhanced by increasing the initial pH at 10.5, however it leads to a global increase of the NH4(+) production. A partial saturation of the surface sites by phosphate leads to a global decrease of selectivity of the reaction towards ammonium. The evolution of the ratio of the NH4(+) concentration to the Fe(II) concentration confirms that the NO3(-) species are only partially transformed into ammonium. Interestingly at an initial pH of 7.5, the selectivity of the reaction towards NH4(+) is often lower than ∼30%. The reduction of nitrate by carbonated GR differs from the behavior of other GRs incorporating Cl(-), F(-) and SO4(2-) anions that fully transform nitrate into ammonium. Finally, if GR is intended to be used during a passive water denitrification process, complementary dephosphatation and ammonium treatments should be considered.

  2. Nitrate reduction by mixed iron(II-III) hydroxycarbonate green rust in the presence of phosphate anions: the key parameters influencing the ammonium selectivity.

    PubMed

    Etique, Marjorie; Zegeye, Asfaw; Grégoire, Brian; Carteret, Cédric; Ruby, Christian

    2014-10-01

    The reduction of nitrate anions by a mixed Fe(II)-Fe(III) carbonated green rust (GR) in aqueous medium is studied as a function of the initial pH and the initial concentrations of iron, phosphate and nitrate. The influence of these parameters on the fraction of nitrate removed and the production of ammonium is investigated by the help of statistical experimental designs. The goal is to determine experimental conditions that maximize the fraction of NO3(-) removed and concomitantly minimize the production of NH4(+). Increasing the phosphate concentration relatively to the initial Fe(II) concentration inhibits the reduction of nitrate probably due to a surface saturation of the lateral sites of the GR crystals. The kinetics of the reaction is greatly enhanced by increasing the initial pH at 10.5, however it leads to a global increase of the NH4(+) production. A partial saturation of the surface sites by phosphate leads to a global decrease of selectivity of the reaction towards ammonium. The evolution of the ratio of the NH4(+) concentration to the Fe(II) concentration confirms that the NO3(-) species are only partially transformed into ammonium. Interestingly at an initial pH of 7.5, the selectivity of the reaction towards NH4(+) is often lower than ∼30%. The reduction of nitrate by carbonated GR differs from the behavior of other GRs incorporating Cl(-), F(-) and SO4(2-) anions that fully transform nitrate into ammonium. Finally, if GR is intended to be used during a passive water denitrification process, complementary dephosphatation and ammonium treatments should be considered. PMID:24934322

  3. An electrochemical and surface analysis study of the influence of phosphorus on the corrosion of iron in calcium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Baer, D.R.; Jones, R.H.; Engelhard, M.H.

    1990-10-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of metallic alloys including iron is strongly influenced by the presence of grain boundary impurities such as phosphorus. In this study to determine how phosphorus affects the corrosion of iron, electrochemical polarization methods were used in conjunction with surface analyses employing ultra-high vacuum transfer. Specifically, these methods were used to examine the corrosion of iron, iron/phosphorus alloys, and iron implanted with phosphorus in deaerated 55 wt % Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} solutions at 60{degree}C. 18 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    ... cereals and breads. White beans, lentils, spinach, kidney beans, and peas. Nuts and some dried fruits, such as raisins. Iron in food comes in two forms: heme iron and nonheme iron. Nonheme iron is found in plant foods and iron-fortified food products. Meat, seafood, ...

  5. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  6. Preservation of protein globules and peptidoglycan in the mineralized cell wall of nitrate-reducing, iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria: a cryo-electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Miot, J; Maclellan, K; Benzerara, K; Boisset, N

    2011-11-01

    Iron-oxidizing bacteria are important actors of the geochemical cycle of iron in modern environments and may have played a key role all over Earth's history. However, in order to better assess that role on the modern and the past Earth, there is a need for better understanding the mechanisms of bacterial iron oxidation and for defining potential biosignatures to be looked for in the geologic record. In this study, we investigated experimentally and at the nanometre scale the mineralization of iron-oxidizing bacteria with a combination of synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). We show that the use of cryo-TEM instead of conventional microscopy provides detailed information of the successive iron biomineralization stages in anaerobic nitrate-reducing iron-oxidizing bacteria. These results suggest the existence of preferential Fe-binding and Fe-oxidizing sites on the outer face of the plasma membrane leading to the nucleation and growth of Fe minerals within the periplasm of these cells that eventually become completely encrusted. In contrast, the septa of dividing cells remain nonmineralized. In addition, the use of cryo-TEM offers a detailed view of the exceptional preservation of protein globules and the peptidoglycan within the Fe-mineralized cell walls of these bacteria. These organic molecules and ultrastructural details might be protected from further degradation by entrapment in the mineral matrix down to the nanometre scale. This is discussed in the light of previous studies on the properties of Fe-organic interactions and more generally on the fossilization of mineral-organic assemblies.

  7. Genome-enabled studies of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent iron oxidation in the chemolithoautotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    PubMed Central

    Beller, Harry R.; Zhou, Peng; Legler, Tina C.; Chakicherla, Anu; Kane, Staci; Letain, Tracy E.; A. O’Day, Peggy

    2013-01-01

    Thiobacillus denitrificans is a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium capable of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, both of which can strongly influence the long-term efficacy of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium in contaminated aquifers. We previously identified two c-type cytochromes involved in nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidation in T. denitrificans and hypothesized that c-type cytochromes would also catalyze Fe(II) oxidation, as they have been found to play this role in anaerobic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Here we report on efforts to identify genes associated with nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation, namely (a) whole-genome transcriptional studies [using FeCO3, Fe2+, and U(IV) oxides as electron donors under denitrifying conditions], (b) Fe(II) oxidation assays performed with knockout mutants targeting primarily highly expressed or upregulated c-type cytochromes, and (c) random transposon-mutagenesis studies with screening for Fe(II) oxidation. Assays of mutants for 26 target genes, most of which were c-type cytochromes, indicated that none of the mutants tested were significantly defective in nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The non-defective mutants included the c1-cytochrome subunit of the cytochrome bc1 complex (complex III), which has relevance to a previously proposed role for this complex in nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation and to current concepts of reverse electron transfer. A transposon mutant with a disrupted gene associated with NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) was ~35% defective relative to the wild-type strain; this strain was similarly defective in nitrate reduction with thiosulfate as the electron donor. Overall, our results indicate that nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation in T. denitrificans is not catalyzed by the same c-type cytochromes involved in U(IV) oxidation, nor have other c-type cytochromes yet been implicated in the process. PMID:24065960

  8. Structural and Molecular Basis of the Peroxynitrite-mediated Nitration and Inactivation of Trypanosoma cruzi Iron-Superoxide Dismutases (Fe-SODs) A and B

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Alejandra; Peluffo, Gonzalo; Petruk, Ariel A.; Hugo, Martín; Piñeyro, Dolores; Demicheli, Verónica; Moreno, Diego M.; Lima, Analía; Batthyány, Carlos; Durán, Rosario; Robello, Carlos; Martí, Marcelo A.; Larrieux, Nicole; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Trujillo, Madia; Radi, Rafael; Piacenza, Lucía

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, contains exclusively iron-dependent superoxide dismutases (Fe-SODs) located in different subcellular compartments. Peroxynitrite, a key cytotoxic and oxidizing effector biomolecule, reacted with T. cruzi mitochondrial (Fe-SODA) and cytosolic (Fe-SODB) SODs with second order rate constants of 4.6 ± 0.2 × 104 m−1 s−1 and 4.3 ± 0.4 × 104 m−1 s−1 at pH 7.4 and 37 °C, respectively. Both isoforms are dose-dependently nitrated and inactivated by peroxynitrite. Susceptibility of T. cruzi Fe-SODA toward peroxynitrite was similar to that reported previously for Escherichia coli Mn- and Fe-SODs and mammalian Mn-SOD, whereas Fe-SODB was exceptionally resistant to oxidant-mediated inactivation. We report mass spectrometry analysis indicating that peroxynitrite-mediated inactivation of T. cruzi Fe-SODs is due to the site-specific nitration of the critical and universally conserved Tyr35. Searching for structural differences, the crystal structure of Fe-SODA was solved at 2.2 Å resolution. Structural analysis comparing both Fe-SOD isoforms reveals differences in key cysteines and tryptophan residues. Thiol alkylation of Fe-SODB cysteines made the enzyme more susceptible to peroxynitrite. In particular, Cys83 mutation (C83S, absent in Fe-SODA) increased the Fe-SODB sensitivity toward peroxynitrite. Molecular dynamics, electron paramagnetic resonance, and immunospin trapping analysis revealed that Cys83 present in Fe-SODB acts as an electron donor that repairs Tyr35 radical via intramolecular electron transfer, preventing peroxynitrite-dependent nitration and consequent inactivation of Fe-SODB. Parasites exposed to exogenous or endogenous sources of peroxynitrite resulted in nitration and inactivation of Fe-SODA but not Fe-SODB, suggesting that these enzymes play distinctive biological roles during parasite infection of mammalian cells. PMID:24616096

  9. Genome-Enabled Studies of Anaerobic, Nitrate-Dependent Iron Oxidation in the Chemolithoautotrophic Bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Zhou, P.; Legler, T. C.; Chakicherla, A.; O'Day, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Thiobacillus denitrificans is a chemolithoautotrophic bacterium capable of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent U(IV) and Fe(II) oxidation, both of which can strongly influence the long-term efficacy of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium in contaminated aquifers. We previously identified two c-type cytochromes involved in nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidation in T. denitrificans and hypothesized that c-type cytochromes would also catalyze Fe(II) oxidation, as they have been found to play this role in anaerobic phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Here we report on efforts to identify genes associated with nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation, namely (a) whole-genome transcriptional studies [using FeCO3, Fe2+, and U(IV) oxides as electron donors under denitrifying conditions], (b) Fe(II) oxidation assays performed with knockout mutants targeting primarily highly expressed or upregulated c-type cytochromes, and (c) random transposon-mutagenesis studies with screening for Fe(II) oxidation. Assays of mutants for 26 target genes, most of which were c-type cytochromes, indicated that none of the mutants tested were significantly defective in nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation. The non-defective mutants included the c1-cytochrome subunit of the cytochrome bc1 complex (complex III), which has relevance to a previously proposed role for this complex in nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation and to current concepts of reverse electron transfer. Of the transposon mutants defective in Fe(II) oxidation, one mutant with a disrupted gene associated with NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) was ~35% defective relative to the wild-type strain; this strain was similarly defective in nitrate reduction with thiosulfate as the electron donor. Overall, our results indicate that nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation in T. denitrificans is not catalyzed by the same c-type cytochromes involved in U(IV) oxidation, nor have other c-type cytochromes yet been implicated in the process.

  10. Sustaining reactivity of Fe(0) for nitrate reduction via electron transfer between dissolved Fe(2+) and surface iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Han, Luchao; yang, Li; Wang, Haibo; Hu, Xuexiang; Chen, Zhan; Hu, Chun

    2016-05-01

    The mechanism of the effects of Fe(2+)(aq) on the reduction of NO3(-) by Fe(0) was investigated. The effects of initial pH on the rate of NO3(-) reduction and the Fe(0) surface characteristics revealed Fe(2+)(aq) and the characteristics of minerals on the surface of Fe(0) played an important role in NO3(-) reduction. Both NO3(-) reduction and the decrease of Fe(2+)(aq) exhibited similar kinetics and were promoted by each other. This promotion was associated with the types of the surface iron oxides of Fe(0). Additionally, further reduction of NO3(-) produced more surface iron oxides, supplying more active sites for Fe(2+)(aq), resulting in more electron transfer between Fe(2+) and surface iron oxides and a higher reaction rate. Using the isotope specificity of (57)Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy, it was verified that the Fe(2+)(aq) was continuously converted into Fe(3+) oxides on the surface of Fe(0) and then converted into Fe3O4 via electron transfer between Fe(2+) and the pre-existing surface Fe(3+) oxides. Electrochemistry measurements confirmed that the spontaneous electron transfer between the Fe(2+) and structural Fe(3+) species accelerated the interfacial electron transfer between the Fe species and NO3(-). This study provides a new insight into the interaction between Fe species and contaminants and interface electron transfer.

  11. EXTRACTION OF URANYL NITRATE FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Furman, N.H.; Mundy, R.J.

    1957-12-10

    An improvement in the process is described for extracting aqueous uranyl nitrate solutions with an organic solvent such as ether. It has been found that the organic phase will extract a larger quantity of uranyl nitrate if the aqueous phase contains in addition to the uranyl nitrate, a quantity of some other soluble nitrate to act as a salting out agent. Mentioned as suitable are the nitrates of lithium, calcium, zinc, bivalent copper, and trivalent iron.

  12. Remediation of nitrate-nitrogen contaminated groundwater using a pilot-scale two-layer heterotrophic-autotrophic denitrification permeable reactive barrier with spongy iron/pine bark.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoxin; Huang, Yuanying; Hu, Hongyan; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Ying; Deng, Renwei

    2015-07-01

    A novel two-layer heterotrophic-autotrophic denitrification (HAD) permeable reactive barrier (PRB) was proposed for remediating nitrate-nitrogen contaminated groundwater in an oxygen rich environment, which has a packing structure of an upstream pine bark layer and a downstream spongy iron and river sand mixture layer. The HAD PRB involves biological deoxygenation, heterotrophic denitrification, hydrogenotrophic denitrification, and anaerobic Fe corrosion. Column and batch experiments were performed to: (1) investigate the NO3(-)-N removal and inorganic geochemistry; (2) explore the nitrogen transformation and removal mechanisms; (3) identify the hydrogenotrophic denitrification capacity; and (4) evaluate the HAD performance by comparison with other approaches. The results showed that the HAD PRB could maintain constant high NO3(-)-N removal efficiency (>91%) before 38 pore volumes (PVs) of operation (corresponding to 504d), form little or even negative NO2(-)-N during the 45 PVs, and produce low NH4(+)-N after 10 PVs. Aerobic heterotrophic bacteria played a dominant role in oxygen depletion via aerobic respiration, providing more CO2 for hydrogenotrophic denitrification. The HAD PRB significantly relied on heterotrophic denitrification. Hydrogenotrophic denitrification removed 10-20% of the initial NO3(-)-N. Effluent total organic carbon decreased from 403.44mgL(-1) at PV 1 to 9.34mgL(-1) at PV 45. Packing structure had a noticeable effect on its denitrification. PMID:25747301

  13. Remediation of nitrate-nitrogen contaminated groundwater using a pilot-scale two-layer heterotrophic-autotrophic denitrification permeable reactive barrier with spongy iron/pine bark.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoxin; Huang, Yuanying; Hu, Hongyan; Liu, Fei; Zhang, Ying; Deng, Renwei

    2015-07-01

    A novel two-layer heterotrophic-autotrophic denitrification (HAD) permeable reactive barrier (PRB) was proposed for remediating nitrate-nitrogen contaminated groundwater in an oxygen rich environment, which has a packing structure of an upstream pine bark layer and a downstream spongy iron and river sand mixture layer. The HAD PRB involves biological deoxygenation, heterotrophic denitrification, hydrogenotrophic denitrification, and anaerobic Fe corrosion. Column and batch experiments were performed to: (1) investigate the NO3(-)-N removal and inorganic geochemistry; (2) explore the nitrogen transformation and removal mechanisms; (3) identify the hydrogenotrophic denitrification capacity; and (4) evaluate the HAD performance by comparison with other approaches. The results showed that the HAD PRB could maintain constant high NO3(-)-N removal efficiency (>91%) before 38 pore volumes (PVs) of operation (corresponding to 504d), form little or even negative NO2(-)-N during the 45 PVs, and produce low NH4(+)-N after 10 PVs. Aerobic heterotrophic bacteria played a dominant role in oxygen depletion via aerobic respiration, providing more CO2 for hydrogenotrophic denitrification. The HAD PRB significantly relied on heterotrophic denitrification. Hydrogenotrophic denitrification removed 10-20% of the initial NO3(-)-N. Effluent total organic carbon decreased from 403.44mgL(-1) at PV 1 to 9.34mgL(-1) at PV 45. Packing structure had a noticeable effect on its denitrification.

  14. 3-D analysis of bacterial cell-(iron)mineral aggregates formed during Fe(II) oxidation by the nitrate-reducing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 using complementary microscopy tomography approaches.

    PubMed

    Schmid, G; Zeitvogel, F; Hao, L; Ingino, P; Floetenmeyer, M; Stierhof, Y-D; Schroeppel, B; Burkhardt, C J; Kappler, A; Obst, M

    2014-07-01

    The formation of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates as a consequence of bacterial iron oxidation is an environmentally widespread process with a number of implications for processes such as sorption and coprecipitation of contaminants and nutrients. Whereas the overall appearance of such aggregates is easily accessible using 2-D microscopy techniques, the 3-D and internal structure remain obscure. In this study, we examined the 3-D structure of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates formed during Fe(II) oxidation by the nitrate-reducing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 using a combination of advanced 3-D microscopy techniques. We obtained 3-D structural and chemical information on different cellular encrustation patterns at high spatial resolution (4-200 nm, depending on the method): more specifically, (1) cells free of iron minerals, (2) periplasm filled with iron minerals, (3) spike- or platelet-shaped iron mineral structures, (4) bulky structures on the cell surface, (5) extracellular iron mineral shell structures, (6) cells with iron mineral filled cytoplasm, and (7) agglomerations of extracellular globular structures. In addition to structural information, chemical nanotomography suggests a dominant role of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in controlling the formation of cell-(iron)mineral aggregates. Furthermore, samples in their hydrated state showed cell-(iron)mineral aggregates in pristine conditions free of preparation (i.e., drying/dehydration) artifacts. All these results were obtained using 3-D microscopy techniques such as focused ion beam (FIB)/scanning electron microscopy (SEM) tomography, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) tomography, scanning transmission (soft) X-ray microscopy (STXM) tomography, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). It turned out that, due to the various different contrast mechanisms of the individual approaches, and due to the required sample preparation steps, only the combination of these techniques was able to provide a

  15. Removal of nitrate and hexavalent uranium from groundwater by sequential treatment in bioreactors packed with elemental sulfur and zero-valent iron.

    PubMed

    Luna-Velasco, Antonia; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Castro, Beatriz; Field, Jim A

    2010-12-15

    The bioreduction of soluble hexavalent uranium (U(VI)) to insoluble tetravalent uranium (U(IV)) is an attractive bioremediation strategy for the clean-up of contaminated groundwater. High levels of the common occurring co-contaminant, nitrate (NO3(-)), can potentially interfere with uranium bioremediation. In this study, treatment of a synthetic groundwater containing a mixture of NO3(-) and U(VI) was investigated in a sulfur-limestone autotrophic denitrifying (SLAD) bioreactor that was coupled in series with a bioreactor packed with zero-valent iron (Fe(0), ZVI) and sand. An additional aim of the study was to explore the possible role of biological activity in enhancing the reduction of U(VI) by Fe(0). The SLAD reactor removed NO3(-) efficiently (99.8%) at loadings of up to 20 mmol NO3(-) L(r)(-1) d(-1), with near stoichiometric conversion to benign dinitrogen gas (N(2)). The ZVI bioreactor subsequently removed uranium (99.8%) at high (0.22 mM) and low (0.02 mM) influent concentrations of the radionuclide. Aqueous uranium was reliably eliminated to below the maximum contaminant level of 30 µg L(-1) (0.13 µM) when the ZVI reactor was operated at average empty bed hydraulic retention times as low as 2.3 h, demonstrating the feasibility of the sequential treatment strategy in packed bed bioreactors. Sequential extraction of the ZVI reactor packing confirmed that uranium was immobilized as U(IV). Uranium removal was enhanced by microbial activity as confirmed by the increased rate of uranium removal in batch assays inoculated with effluent from the ZVI bioreactor and spiked with Fe(0) compared to abiotic controls.

  16. Nitrate reduction

    DOEpatents

    Dziewinski, Jacek J.; Marczak, Stanislaw

    2000-01-01

    Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

  17. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  18. Nitrate reductase from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, N L; Cardenas, J

    1982-01-01

    The facultative phototroph Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides DSM158 was incapable of either assimilating or dissimilating nitrate, although the organism could reduce it enzymatically to nitrite either anaerobically in the light or aerobically in the dark. Reduction of nitrate was mediated by a nitrate reductase bound to chromatophores that could be easily solubilized and functioned with chemically reduced viologens or photochemically reduced flavins as electron donors. The enzyme was solubilized, and some of its kinetic and molecular parameters were determined. It seemed to be nonadaptive, ammonia did not repress its synthesis, and its activity underwent a rapid decline when the cells entered the stationary growth phase. Studies with inhibitors and with metal antagonists indicated that molybdenum and possibly iron participate in the enzymatic reduction of nitrate. The conjectural significance of this nitrate reductase in phototrophic bacteria is discussed. PMID:6978883

  19. Iron(III) complexes of 2-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)phenol and acetate or nitrate as catalysts for epoxidation of olefins with hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Amit Kumar; Samanta, Suvendu; Dutta, Supriya; Lucas, C. Robert; Dawe, Louise N.; Biswas, Papu; Adhikary, Bibhutosh

    2016-07-01

    Cheap and environmentally friendly Fe(III) catalysts [Fe(L)2(CH3COO)] (1) and [Fe(L)2(NO3)]·2CH3OH (2) where HL = 2-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)phenol for epoxidation of olefins have been developed. The catalysts have been characterized by elemental analyses, IR, UV-Vis spectroscopy and by X-ray crystallography. The X-ray structures reveal mononuclear compounds having a bidentate acetate or nitrate in 1 and 2, respectively. Catalytic epoxidations of styrene and cyclohexene have been carried out homogeneously by using 30% aqueous hydrogen peroxide in acetonitrile in the presence of catalytic amounts of 1 or 2. Yields of the respective epoxides were fair (1) to good (2) and selectivities were good in all cases although 2 produced two to three times the yield, depending on the substrate, than 1 and higher selectivity as well. A hypothesis for these differences in catalytic efficacy between 1 and 2 that is consistent with mechanistic details of related enzymatic and biomimetic model systems is proposed. Herein we report [Fe(L)2(NO3)]·2CH3OH (2) as the first structurally characterized non-heme iron epoxidation catalyst with a bidentate nitrate ligand.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Ardenticatena maritima 110S, a Thermophilic Nitrate- and Iron-Reducing Member of the Chloroflexi Class Ardenticatenia

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Lewis M.; Pace, Laura A.; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Ardenticatena maritima 110S, the first sequenced member of class Ardenticatenia of the phylum Chloroflexi. This thermophilic organism is capable of a range of physiologies, including aerobic respiration and iron reduction. It also encodes a complete denitrification pathway with a novel nitric oxide reductase. PMID:26586887

  1. Characterization of toluene and ethylbenzene biodegradation under nitrate-, iron(III)- and manganese(IV)-reducing conditions by compound-specific isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Dorer, Conrad; Vogt, Carsten; Neu, Thomas R; Stryhanyuk, Hryhoriy; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2016-04-01

    Ethylbenzene and toluene degradation under nitrate-, Mn(IV)-, or Fe(III)-reducing conditions was investigated by compound specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) using three model cultures (Aromatoleum aromaticum EbN1, Georgfuchsia toluolica G5G6, and a Azoarcus-dominated mixed culture). Systematically lower isotope enrichment factors for carbon and hydrogen were observed for particulate Mn(IV). The increasing diffusion distances of toluene or ethylbenzene to the solid Mn(IV) most likely caused limited bioavailability and hence resulted in the observed masking effect. The data suggests further ethylbenzene hydroxylation by ethylbenzene dehydrogenase (EBDH) and toluene activation by benzylsuccinate synthase (BSS) as initial activation steps. Notably, significantly different values in dual isotope analysis were detected for toluene degradation by G. toluolica under the three studied redox conditions, suggesting variations in the enzymatic transition state depending on the available TEA. The results indicate that two-dimensional CSIA has significant potential to assess anaerobic biodegradation of ethylbenzene and toluene at contaminated sites.

  2. The threshold feeding response of microzooplankton within Pacific high-nitrate low-chlorophyll ecosystem models under steady and variable iron input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leising, Andrew W.; Gentleman, Wendy C.; Frost, Bruce W.

    2003-11-01

    The equatorial Pacific is an HNLC (High-Nitrate Low-Chlorophyll) region. Modeling and in-situ process studies have confirmed the importance of microzooplankton grazing in this ecosystem. Unfortunately, both the parameters and functions representing microzooplankton grazing within current ecosystem models are poorly constrained. We used a simple 4-component food web model to test the assumption that a lower grazing threshold, which is common in many models, is necessary to achieve the HNLC condition. Without the grazing threshold, the model did not reproduce the HNLC condition. However, by raising the half-saturation constant within the microzooplankton functional response with no threshold, it was possible to reproduce the critical dynamics of the HNLC condition under both steady and moderate seasonal variability in nutrient input. It was also possible to reproduce the HNLC system using a sigmoidal functional response for the microzooplankton, with results somewhere between the other two forms of the model, although this version had the highest sensitivity to changes in its parameters. The three models predicted similar phytoplankton biomass and primary productivity under steady nutrient input, but diverge in these metrics as the amplitude of nutrient input variability increases. These three functional responses also imply certain important differences in the microzooplankton community. Whereas the threshold model had the least sensitivity to parameter choice, the high half-saturation constant, no-threshold model may actually be a better approximation when modeling a community of grazers. Ecosystem models that predict carbon production and export in HNLC regions can be very sensitive to assumptions concerning microzooplankton grazing; future studies need to concentrate on the functional responses of microzooplankton before these models can be used for predicting fluxes in times or regions where forcing is beyond that used to constrain the original model.

  3. Alkali metal nitrate purification

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Morgan, Michael J.

    1986-02-04

    A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

  4. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources...

  5. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33 Section 181.33 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions...

  6. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources...

  7. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate are subject to prior sanctions issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for use as sources...

  8. Nitrate in groundwater in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burow, K. R.; Nolan, B. T.; Rupert, M. G.; Dubrovsky, N. M.

    2009-12-01

    dissolved iron concentrations explained most of the variation in groundwater nitrate concentration, followed by manganese, calcium, farm fertilizer, percent well-drained soils, dissolved oxygen, and other chemical and physical factors. The high rankings of iron, manganese, and farm fertilizer indicate that nitrate concentrations in groundwater are most significantly affected by redox conditions and nonpoint-source nitrogen inputs. The other water-quality indicators and physical variables have a secondary influence on nitrate concentrations.

  9. Conversion of {Fe(NO)2}10 dinitrosyl iron to nitrato iron(III) species by molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Skodje, Kelsey M; Williard, Paul G; Kim, Eunsuk

    2012-07-14

    A new {Fe(NO)(2)}(10) dinitrosyl iron complex possessing a 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline ligand has been prepared. This complex exhibits dioxygenase activity, converting NO to nitrate (NO(3)(-)) anions. During the oxygenation reaction, formation of reactive nitrating species is implicated, as shown in the effective o-nitration with a phenolic substrate.

  10. Structural and molecular basis of the peroxynitrite-mediated nitration and inactivation of Trypanosoma cruzi iron-superoxide dismutases (Fe-SODs) A and B: disparate susceptibilities due to the repair of Tyr35 radical by Cys83 in Fe-SODB through intramolecular electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Alejandra; Peluffo, Gonzalo; Petruk, Ariel A; Hugo, Martín; Piñeyro, Dolores; Demicheli, Verónica; Moreno, Diego M; Lima, Analía; Batthyány, Carlos; Durán, Rosario; Robello, Carlos; Martí, Marcelo A; Larrieux, Nicole; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Trujillo, Madia; Radi, Rafael; Piacenza, Lucía

    2014-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, contains exclusively iron-dependent superoxide dismutases (Fe-SODs) located in different subcellular compartments. Peroxynitrite, a key cytotoxic and oxidizing effector biomolecule, reacted with T. cruzi mitochondrial (Fe-SODA) and cytosolic (Fe-SODB) SODs with second order rate constants of 4.6 ± 0.2 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and 4.3 ± 0.4 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.4 and 37 °C, respectively. Both isoforms are dose-dependently nitrated and inactivated by peroxynitrite. Susceptibility of T. cruzi Fe-SODA toward peroxynitrite was similar to that reported previously for Escherichia coli Mn- and Fe-SODs and mammalian Mn-SOD, whereas Fe-SODB was exceptionally resistant to oxidant-mediated inactivation. We report mass spectrometry analysis indicating that peroxynitrite-mediated inactivation of T. cruzi Fe-SODs is due to the site-specific nitration of the critical and universally conserved Tyr(35). Searching for structural differences, the crystal structure of Fe-SODA was solved at 2.2 Å resolution. Structural analysis comparing both Fe-SOD isoforms reveals differences in key cysteines and tryptophan residues. Thiol alkylation of Fe-SODB cysteines made the enzyme more susceptible to peroxynitrite. In particular, Cys(83) mutation (C83S, absent in Fe-SODA) increased the Fe-SODB sensitivity toward peroxynitrite. Molecular dynamics, electron paramagnetic resonance, and immunospin trapping analysis revealed that Cys(83) present in Fe-SODB acts as an electron donor that repairs Tyr(35) radical via intramolecular electron transfer, preventing peroxynitrite-dependent nitration and consequent inactivation of Fe-SODB. Parasites exposed to exogenous or endogenous sources of peroxynitrite resulted in nitration and inactivation of Fe-SODA but not Fe-SODB, suggesting that these enzymes play distinctive biological roles during parasite infection of mammalian cells. PMID:24616096

  11. Cylodextrin Polymer Nitrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosowski, Bernard; Ruebner, Anja; Statton, Gary; Robitelle, Danielle; Meyers, Curtis

    2000-01-01

    The development of the use of cyclodextrin nitrates as possible components of insensitive, high-energy energetics is outlined over a time period of 12 years. Four different types of cyclodextrin polymers were synthesized, nitrated, and evaluated regarding their potential use for the military and aerospace community. The synthesis of these novel cyclodextrin polymers and different nitration techniques are shown and the potential of these new materials is discussed.

  12. 21 CFR 181.33 - Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. 181.33...-Sanctioned Food Ingredients § 181.33 Sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate. Sodium nitrate and potassium... nitrite, with or without sodium or potassium nitrite, in the production of cured red meat products...

  13. Thermochemical nitrate destruction

    DOEpatents

    Cox, John L.; Hallen, Richard T.; Lilga, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrates present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C., and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

  14. Gallium nitrate revisited.

    PubMed

    Chitambar, Christopher R

    2003-04-01

    Gallium nitrate, the nitrate salt of the "near-metal" element gallium, is highly effective in the treatment of cancer-related hypercalcemia. Unlike bisphosphonates, gallium nitrate is effective in both parathyroid hormone-related protein-mediated and non-parathyroid hormone-related protein-mediated hypercalcemia. Gallium nitrate's effects on bone are clearly different from those of bisphosphonates. Gallium nitrate enhances calcium and phosphate content of bone and has direct, noncytotoxic effects on osteoclasts at markedly lower doses than those used for the treatment of cancer-related hypercalcemia. The drug may have clinical application in a variety of disorders associated with accelerated bone loss, including multiple myeloma. Gallium nitrate was originally evaluated as an antitumor agent. Its antitumor activity occurs at somewhat higher doses than those used in the treatment of cancer-related hypercalcemia. Gallium nitrate has substantial single-agent activity in the treatment of advanced lymphoma, particularly diffuse large cell lymphoma, small lymphocytic lymphoma, and follicular lymphoma. Because of its profile, including a different mechanism of action and minimal myelosuppression, the drug merits further evaluation in the treatment of advanced lymphoma. Gallium nitrate also has activity in advanced bladder cancer and may be useful in patients with metastatic or unresectable disease failing first-line chemotherapy regimens. Gallium nitrate exhibits a range of dose-dependent pharmacologic actions that provide a basis for its therapeutic potential in a variety of diseases and warrants further investigational evaluation as an antiresorptive and antitumor agent. PMID:12776253

  15. Iron Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... detect and help diagnose iron deficiency or iron overload. In people with anemia , these tests can help ... also be ordered when iron deficiency or iron overload is suspected. Early iron deficiency often goes unnoticed. ...

  16. Corrosion of aluminides by molten nitrate salt

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Bishop, P.S.

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion of titanium-, iron-, and nickel-based aluminides by a highly aggressive, oxidizing NaNO{sub 3}(-KNO{sub 3})-Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} has been studied at 650{degree}C. It was shown that weight changes could be used to effectively evaluate corrosion behavior in the subject nitrate salt environments provided these data were combined with salt analyses and microstructural examinations. The studies indicated that the corrosion of relatively resistant aluminides by these nitrate salts proceeded by oxidation and a slow release from an aluminum-rich product layer into the salt at rates lower than that associated with many other types of metallic materials. The overall corrosion process and resulting rate depended on the particular aluminide being exposed. In order to minimize corrosion of nickel or iron aluminides, it was necessary to have aluminum concentrations in excess of 30 at. %. However, even at a concentration of 50 at. % Al, the corrosion resistance of TiAl was inferior to that of Ni{sub 3}Al and Fe{sub 3}Al. At higher aluminum concentrations, iron, nickel, and iron-nickel aluminides exhibited quite similar weight changes, indicative of the principal role of aluminum in controlling the corrosion process in NaNO{sub 3}(-KNO{sub 3})-Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} salts. 20 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Thermochemical nitrate destruction

    DOEpatents

    Cox, J.L.; Hallen, R.T.; Lilga, M.A.

    1992-06-02

    A method is disclosed for denitrification of nitrates and nitrites present in aqueous waste streams. The method comprises the steps of (1) identifying the concentration nitrates and nitrites present in a waste stream, (2) causing formate to be present in the waste stream, (3) heating the mixture to a predetermined reaction temperature from about 200 C to about 600 C, and (4) holding the mixture and accumulating products at heated and pressurized conditions for a residence time, thereby resulting in nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, and hydroxides, and reducing the level of nitrates and nitrites to below drinking water standards.

  18. Nitrate attenuation in groundwater: a review of biogeochemical controlling processes.

    PubMed

    Rivett, Michael O; Buss, Stephen R; Morgan, Philip; Smith, Jonathan W N; Bemment, Chrystina D

    2008-10-01

    Biogeochemical processes controlling nitrate attenuation in aquifers are critically reviewed. An understanding of the fate of nitrate in groundwater is vital for managing risks associated with nitrate pollution, and to safeguard groundwater supplies and groundwater-dependent surface waters. Denitrification is focused upon as the dominant nitrate attenuation process in groundwater. As denitrifying bacteria are essentially ubiquitous in the subsurface, the critical limiting factors are oxygen and electron donor concentration and availability. Variability in other environmental conditions such as nitrate concentration, nutrient availability, pH, temperature, presence of toxins and microbial acclimation appears to be less important, exerting only secondary influences on denitrification rates. Other nitrate depletion mechanisms such as dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium and assimilation of nitrate into microbial biomass are unlikely to be important in most subsurface settings relative to denitrification. Further research is recommended to improve current understanding on the influence of organic carbon, sulphur and iron electron donors, physical restrictions on microbial activity in dual porosity aquifers, influences of environmental condition (e.g. pH in poorly buffered environments and salinity in coastal or salinized soil settings), co-contaminant influences (particularly the contrasting inhibitory and electron donor influences of pesticides) and improved quantification of denitrification rates in the laboratory and field.

  19. Iron Chelation

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron overload and need treatment. What is iron overload? Iron chelation therapy is used when you have ... may want to perform: How quickly does iron overload happen? This is different for each person. It ...

  20. Determination of intracellular nitrate.

    PubMed Central

    Romero, J M; Lara, C; Guerrero, M G

    1989-01-01

    A sensitive procedure has been developed for the determination of intracellular nitrate. The method includes: (i) preparation of cell lysates in 2 M-H3PO4 after separation of cells from the outer medium by rapid centrifugation through a layer of silicone oil, and (ii) subsequent nitrate analysis by ion-exchange h.p.l.c. with, as mobile phase, a solution containing 50 mM-H3PO4 and 2% (v/v) tetrahydrofuran, adjusted to pH 1.9 with NaOH. The determination of nitrate is subjected to interference by chloride and sulphate when present in the samples at high concentrations. Nitrite also interferes, but it is easily eliminated by treatment of the samples with sulphamic acid. The method has been successfully applied to the study of nitrate transport in the unicellular cyanobacterium Anacystis nidulans. PMID:2497740

  1. Protein tyrosine nitration

    PubMed Central

    Chaki, Mounira; Leterrier, Marina; Barroso, Juan B

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide metabolism in plant cells has a relative short history. Nitration is a chemical process which consists of introducing a nitro group (-NO2) into a chemical compound. in biological systems, this process has been found in different molecules such as proteins, lipids and nucleic acids that can affect its function. This mini-review offers an overview of this process with special emphasis on protein tyrosine nitration in plants and its involvement in the process of nitrosative stress. PMID:19826215

  2. Thermochemical nitrate reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.L.; Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1992-09-01

    A series of preliminary experiments was conducted directed at thermochemically converting nitrate to nitrogen and water. Nitrates are a major constituent of the waste stored in the underground tanks on the Hanford Site, and the characteristics and effects of nitrate compounds on stabilization techniques must be considered before permanent disposal operations begin. For the thermochemical reduction experiments, six reducing agents (ammonia, formate, urea, glucose, methane, and hydrogen) were mixed separately with {approximately}3 wt% NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} solutions in a buffered aqueous solution at high pH (13); ammonia and formate were also mixed at low pH (4). Reactions were conducted in an aqueous solution in a batch reactor at temperatures of 200{degrees}C to 350{degrees}C and pressures of 600 to 2800 psig. Both gas and liquid samples were analyzed. The specific components analyzed were nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia. Results of experimental runs showed the following order of nitrate reduction of the six reducing agents in basic solution: formate > glucose > urea > hydrogen > ammonia {approx} methane. Airnmonia was more effective under acidic conditions than basic conditions. Formate was also effective under acidic conditions. A more thorough, fundamental study appears warranted to provide additional data on the mechanism of nitrate reduction. Furthermore, an expanded data base and engineering feasibility study could be used to evaluate conversion conditions for promising reducing agents in more detail and identify new reducing agents with improved performance characteristics.

  3. TREATMENT OF 1,2-DIBROMO-3-CHLOROPROPANE AND NITRATE-CONTAMINATED WATER WITH ZERO-VALENT IRON OR HYDROGEN/PALLADIUM CATALYSTS. (R825689C054,R825689C078)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The abilities of zero-valent iron powder and hydrogen with a palladium catalyst (H2/Pd-alumina) to hydrodehalogenate 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) to propane under water treatment conditions (ambient temperature and circumneutral pH) were compa...

  4. Electroreduction of nitrate ions in concentrated sodium hydroxide solutions at lead, zinc, nickel, and phthalocyanine-modified electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H. |; Chambers, J.Q.; Hobbs, D.T.

    1987-12-31

    The electrochemical reduction of nitrate in strongly alkaline solution has been studied using nickel, lead, zinc, and iron cathodes. Intermediate formation of nitrate ion and ammonia product was observed for all electrode materials. Coating a nickel sponge electrode with phthalocyanine renders it less active toward nitrate reduction, while iron electrodes appear to be activated. Electrolysis between a lead cathode and a nickel anode is an efficient means of removing nitrate from strongly alkaline solutions. Electrode pretreatment and solution conditions were chosen to correspond to those that might be encountered in practical applications, for example, the cleanup of radioactive waste solutions.

  5. Nitrate behavior in ground waters of the southeastern USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nolan, B.T.

    1999-01-01

    Principal components analysis (PCA) was performed with water-quality data from studies conducted during 1993 to 1995 to explore potential nitrate- attenuation processes in ground waters of the southeastern USA. Nitrate reduction is an important attenuation process in selected areas of the Southeast. A nitrate-reduction component explains 23% of the total variance in the data and indicates that nitrate and dissolved oxygen (DO) are inversely related to ammonium, iron, manganese, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Additional components extracted by PCA include calcite dissolution (18% of variance explained) and phosphate dissolution (9% of variance explained). Reducing conditions in ground waters of the region influence nitrate behavior through bacterially mediated reduction in the presence of organic matter, and by inhibition of nitrate formation in anoxic ground water beneath forested areas. Component scores are consistent with observed water- quality conditions in the region. For example, median nitrate concentration in ground-water samples from the Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage Basin (ALBE) Coastal Plain is <0.05 mg L-1, median DOC concentration is 4.2 mg L-1, and median DO concentration is 2.1 mg L-1, consistent with denitrification. Nitrate reduction does not occur uniformly throughout the Southeast. Median DO concentrations in ground-water samples from the Apalachicola- Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin (ACFB) are 6.2 to 7.1 mg L-1, and median nitrate concentrations are 0.61 to 2.2 mg L-1, inconsistent with denitrification. Similarly, median DO concentration in samples from the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain (GAFL) is 6.0 mg L-1 and median nitrate concentration is 5.8 mg L-1.

  6. Nitrate behavior in ground water of the southeastern USA

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, B.T.

    1999-10-01

    Principal components analysis (PCA) was performed with water-quality data from studies conducted during 1993 to 1995 to explore potential nitrate-attenuation processes in ground waters of the southeastern USA. Nitrate reduction is an important attenuation process in selected areas of the Southeast. A nitrate-reduction component explains 23% of the total variance in the data and indicates that nitrate and dissolved oxygen (DO) are inversely related to ammonium, iron, manganese, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Additional components extracted by PCA include calcite dissolution (18% of variance explained) and phosphate dissolution (9% of variance explained). Reducing conditions in ground waters of the region influence nitrate behavior through bacterially mediated reduction in the presence of organic matter, and by inhibition of nitrate formation in anoxic ground water beneath forested areas. Component scores are consistent with observed water-quality conditions in the region. For example, median nitrate concentration in ground-water samples from the Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage Basin (ALBE) Coastal Plain is {lt}0.05 mg L{sup {minus}1}, median DOC concentration is 4.2 mg L{sup {minus}1}, and median DO concentration is 2.1 mg L{sup {minus}1}, consistent with denitrification. Nitrate reduction does not occur uniformly throughout the Southeast. Median DO concentrations in ground-water samples from the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin (ACFB) are 6.2 to 7.1 mg L{sup {minus}1}, and median nitrate concentrations are 0.61 to 2.2 mg L{sup {minus}1}, inconsistent with denitrification. Similarly, median DO concentration in samples from the Georgia-Florida Coastal Plain (GAFL) is 6.0 mg L{sup {minus}1} and median nitrate concentration is 5.8 mg L{sup {minus}1}.

  7. Nitrate in groundwater of the United States, 1991-2003.

    PubMed

    Burow, Karen R; Nolan, Bernard T; Rupert, Michael G; Dubrovsky, Neil M

    2010-07-01

    An assessment of nitrate concentrations in groundwater in the United States indicates that concentrations are highest in shallow, oxic groundwater beneath areas with high N inputs. During 1991-2003, 5101 wells were sampled in 51 study areas throughout the U.S. as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program. The well networks reflect the existing used resource represented by domestic wells in major aquifers (major aquifer studies), and recently recharged groundwater beneath dominant land-surface activities (land-use studies). Nitrate concentrations were highest in shallow groundwater beneath agricultural land use in areas with well-drained soils and oxic geochemical conditions. Nitrate concentrations were lowest in deep groundwater where groundwater is reduced, or where groundwater is older and hence concentrations reflect historically low N application rates. Classification and regression tree analysis was used to identify the relative importance of N inputs, biogeochemical processes, and physical aquifer properties in explaining nitrate concentrations in groundwater. Factors ranked by reduction in sum of squares indicate that dissolved iron concentrations explained most of the variation in groundwater nitrate concentration, followed by manganese, calcium, farm N fertilizer inputs, percent well-drained soils, and dissolved oxygen. Overall, nitrate concentrations in groundwater are most significantly affected by redox conditions, followed by nonpoint-source N inputs. Other water-quality indicators and physical variables had a secondary influence on nitrate concentrations.

  8. Nitrate in groundwater of the United States, 1991-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burow, Karen R.; Nolan, Bernard T.; Rupert, Michael G.; Dubrovsky, Neil M.

    2010-01-01

    An assessment of nitrate concentrations in groundwater in the United States indicates that concentrations are highest in shallow, oxic groundwater beneath areas with high N inputs. During 1991-2003, 5101 wells were sampled in 51 study areas throughout the U.S. as part of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program. The well networks reflect the existing used resource represented by domestic wells in major aquifers (major aquifer studies), and recently recharged groundwater beneath dominant land-surface activities (land-use studies). Nitrate concentrations were highest in shallow groundwater beneath agricultural land use in areas with well-drained soils and oxic geochemical conditions. Nitrate concentrations were lowest in deep groundwater where groundwater is reduced, or where groundwater is older and hence concentrations reflect historically low N application rates. Classification and regression tree analysis was used to identify the relative importance of N inputs, biogeochemical processes, and physical aquifer properties in explaining nitrate concentrations in groundwater. Factors ranked by reduction in sum of squares indicate that dissolved iron concentrations explained most of the variation in groundwater nitrate concentration, followed by manganese, calcium, farm N fertilizer inputs, percent well-drained soils, and dissolved oxygen. Overall, nitrate concentrations in groundwater are most significantly affected by redox conditions, followed by nonpoint-source N inputs. Other water-quality indicators and physical variables had a secondary influence on nitrate concentrations.

  9. Metal-catalyzed protein tyrosine nitration in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Campolo, Nicolás; Bartesaghi, Silvina; Radi, Rafael

    2014-11-01

    Protein tyrosine nitration is an oxidative postranslational modification that can affect protein structure and function. It is mediated in vivo by the production of nitric oxide-derived reactive nitrogen species (RNS), including peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) and nitrogen dioxide ((•)NO₂). Redox-active transition metals such as iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and manganese (Mn) can actively participate in the processes of tyrosine nitration in biological systems, as they catalyze the production of both reactive oxygen species and RNS, enhance nitration yields and provide site-specificity to this process. Early after the discovery that protein tyrosine nitration can occur under biologically relevant conditions, it was shown that some low molecular weight transition-metal centers and metalloproteins could promote peroxynitrite-dependent nitration. Later studies showed that nitration could be achieved by peroxynitrite-independent routes as well, depending on the transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of nitrite (NO₂(-)) to (•)NO₂ in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Processes like these can be achieved either by hemeperoxidase-dependent reactions or by ferrous and cuprous ions through Fenton-type chemistry. Besides the in vitro evidence, there are now several in vivo studies that support the close relationship between transition metal levels and protein tyrosine nitration. So, the contribution of transition metals to the levels of tyrosine nitrated proteins observed under basal conditions and, specially, in disease states related with high levels of these metal ions, seems to be quite clear. Altogether, current evidence unambiguously supports a central role of transition metals in determining the extent and selectivity of protein tyrosine nitration mediated both by peroxynitrite-dependent and independent mechanisms.

  10. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    DOEpatents

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  11. Ammonium nitrate explosive systems

    DOEpatents

    Stinecipher, Mary M.; Coburn, Michael D.

    1981-01-01

    Novel explosives which comprise mixtures of ammonium nitrate and an ammonium salt of a nitroazole in desired ratios are disclosed. A preferred nitroazole is 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole. The explosive and physical properties of these explosives may readily be varied by the addition of other explosives and oxidizers. Certain of these mixtures have been found to act as ideal explosives.

  12. Nitrate Storage and Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction by Eukaryotic Microbes.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Stief, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described. A first compilation of intracellular nitrate inventories in various marine sediments is presented, indicating that intracellular nitrate pools vastly exceed porewater nitrate pools. The relative contribution by foraminifers to total sedimentary denitrification is estimated for different marine settings, suggesting that eukaryotes may rival prokaryotes in terms of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Finally, this review article sketches some evolutionary perspectives of eukaryotic nitrate metabolism and identifies open questions that need to be addressed in future investigations. PMID:26734001

  13. Nitrate Storage and Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction by Eukaryotic Microbes.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Stief, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described. A first compilation of intracellular nitrate inventories in various marine sediments is presented, indicating that intracellular nitrate pools vastly exceed porewater nitrate pools. The relative contribution by foraminifers to total sedimentary denitrification is estimated for different marine settings, suggesting that eukaryotes may rival prokaryotes in terms of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Finally, this review article sketches some evolutionary perspectives of eukaryotic nitrate metabolism and identifies open questions that need to be addressed in future investigations.

  14. Nitrate Storage and Dissimilatory Nitrate Reduction by Eukaryotic Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Kamp, Anja; Høgslund, Signe; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Stief, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen cycle is one of the most complex and environmentally important element cycles on Earth and has long been thought to be mediated exclusively by prokaryotic microbes. Rather recently, it was discovered that certain eukaryotic microbes are able to store nitrate intracellularly and use it for dissimilatory nitrate reduction in the absence of oxygen. The paradigm shift that this entailed is ecologically significant because the eukaryotes in question comprise global players like diatoms, foraminifers, and fungi. This review article provides an unprecedented overview of nitrate storage and dissimilatory nitrate reduction by diverse marine eukaryotes placed into an eco-physiological context. The advantage of intracellular nitrate storage for anaerobic energy conservation in oxygen-depleted habitats is explained and the life style enabled by this metabolic trait is described. A first compilation of intracellular nitrate inventories in various marine sediments is presented, indicating that intracellular nitrate pools vastly exceed porewater nitrate pools. The relative contribution by foraminifers to total sedimentary denitrification is estimated for different marine settings, suggesting that eukaryotes may rival prokaryotes in terms of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Finally, this review article sketches some evolutionary perspectives of eukaryotic nitrate metabolism and identifies open questions that need to be addressed in future investigations. PMID:26734001

  15. Presence of nitrate NO 3 a ects animal production, photocalysis is a possible solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba-Molina, Heli; Barba-Ortega, J.; Joya, M. R.

    2016-02-01

    Farmers and ranchers depend on the successful combination of livestock and crops. However, they have lost in the production by nitrate pollution. Nitrate poisoning in cattle is caused by the consumption of an excessive amount of nitrate or nitrite from grazing or water. Both humans and livestock can be affected. It would appear that well fertilised pasture seems to take up nitrogen from the soil and store it as nitrate in the leaf. Climatic conditions, favour the uptake of nitrate. Nitrate poisoning is a noninfectious disease condition that affects domestic ruminants. It is a serious problem, often resulting in the death of many animals. When nitrogen fertilizers are used to enrich soils, nitrates may be carried by rain, irrigation and other surface waters through the soil into ground water. Human and animal wastes can also contribute to nitrate contamination of ground water. A possible method to decontaminate polluted water by nitrates is with methods of fabrication of zero valent iron nanoparticles (FeNps) are found to affect their efficiency in nitrate removal from water.

  16. Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFex)

    SciTech Connect

    Coale, Kenneth H.

    2005-07-28

    The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) was an experiment decades in the planning. It's implementation was among the most complex ship operations that SIO has been involved in. The SOFeX field expedition was successful in creating and tracking two experimentally enriched areas of the Southern Ocean, one characterized by low silicic acid, one characterized by high silicic acid. Both experimental sites were replete with abundant nitrate. About 100 scientists were involved overall. The major findings of this study were significant in several ways: (1) The productivity of the southern ocean is limited by iron availability. (2) Carbon uptake and flux is therefore controlled by iron availability (3) In spite of low silicic acid, iron promotes non-silicious phytoplankton growth and the uptake of carbon dioxide. (4) The transport of fixed carbon from the surface layers proceeds with a C:N ratio that would indicate differential remineralization of nitrogen at shallow depths. (5) These finding have major implications for modeling of carbon export based on nitrate utilization. (6) The general results of the experiment indicate that, beyond other southern ocean enrichment experiments, iron inputs have a much wider impact of productivity and carbon cycling than previously demonstrated. Scientific presentations: Coale, K., Johnson, K, Buesseler, K., 2002. The SOFeX Group. Eos. Trans. AGU 83(47) OS11A-0199. Coale, K., Johnson, K. Buesseler, K., 2002. SOFeX: Southern Ocean Iron Experiments. Overview and Experimental Design. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47) OS22D-01. Buesseler, K.,et al. 2002. Does Iron Fertilization Enhance Carbon Sequestration? Particle flux results from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-09. Johnson, K. et al. 2002. Open Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiments From IronEx-I through SOFeX: What We Know and What We Still Need to Understand. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-12. Coale, K. H., 2003. Carbon and Nutrient Cycling During the Southern

  17. Iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Scrimshaw, N S

    1991-10-01

    The world's leading nutritional problem is iron deficiency. 66% of children and women aged 15-44 years in developing countries have it. Further, 10-20% of women of childbearing age in developed countries are anemic. Iron deficiency is identified with often irreversible impairment of a child's learning ability. It is also associated with low capacity for adults to work which reduces productivity. In addition, it impairs the immune system which reduces the body's ability to fight infection. Iron deficiency also lowers the metabolic rate and the body temperature when exposed to cold. Hemoglobin contains nearly 73% of the body's iron. This iron is always being recycled as more red blood cells are made. The rest of the needed iron does important tasks for the body, such as binds to molecules that are reservoirs of oxygen for muscle cells. This iron comes from our diet, especially meat. Even though some plants, such as spinach, are high in iron, the body can only absorb 1.4-7% of the iron in plants whereas it can absorb 20% of the iron in red meat. In many developing countries, the common vegetarian diets contribute to high rates of iron deficiency. Parasitic diseases and abnormal uterine bleeding also promote iron deficiency. Iron therapy in anemic children can often, but not always, improve behavior and cognitive performance. Iron deficiency during pregnancy often contributes to maternal and perinatal mortality. Yet treatment, if given to a child in time, can lead to normal growth and hinder infections. However, excess iron can be damaging. Too much supplemental iron in a malnourished child promotes fatal infections since the excess iron is available for the pathogens use. Many countries do not have an effective system for diagnosing, treating, and preventing iron deficiency. Therefore a concerted international effort is needed to eliminate iron deficiency in the world.

  18. Desferrioxamine Inhibits Protein Tyrosine Nitration: Mechanisms and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Adgent, Margaret A.; Squadrito, Giuseppe L.; Ballinger, Carol A.; Krzywanski, David M.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Postlethwait, Edward M.

    2012-01-01

    Tissues are exposed to exogenous and endogenous nitrogen dioxide (•NO2), which is the terminal agent in protein tyrosine nitration. Besides iron chelation, the hydroxamic acid (HA) desferrioxamine (DFO) shows multiple functionalities including nitration inhibition. To investigate mechanisms whereby DFO affects 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) formation, we utilized gas phase •NO2 exposures, to limit introduction of other reactive species, and a lung surface model wherein red cell membranes (RCM) were immobilized under a defined aqueous film. When RCM were exposed to •NO2 covered by +/− DFO: (i) DFO inhibited 3-NT formation more effectively than other HA and non-HA chelators; (ii) 3-NT inhibition occurred at very low [DFO] for prolonged times; and (iii) 3-NT formation was iron independent but inhibition required DFO present. DFO poorly reacted with •NO2 compared to ascorbate, assessed via •NO2 reactive absorption and aqueous phase oxidation rates, yet limited 3-NT formation at far lower concentrations. DFO also inhibited nitration under aqueous bulk phase conditions, and inhibited 3-NT generated by active myeloperoxidase “bound” to RCM. Per the above and kinetic analyses suggesting preferential DFO versus •NO2 reaction within membranes, we conclude that DFO inhibits 3-NT formation predominantly by facile repair of the tyrosyl radical intermediate, which prevents •NO2 addition, and thus nitration, and potentially influences biochemical functionalities. PMID:22705369

  19. Glycine lithium nitrate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Valenzuela, R.; Hernández-Paredes, J.; Medrano-Pesqueira, T.; Esparza-Ponce, H. E.; Jesús-Castillo, S.; Rodriguez-Mijangos, R.; Terpugov, V. S.; Alvarez-Ramos, M. E.; Duarte-Möller, A.

    Crystals of glycine lithium nitrate with non-linear optical properties have been grown in a solution by slow evaporation at room temperature. The crystal shows a good thermal stability from room temperature to 175 °C where the crystal begins to degrade. This property is desirable for future technological applications. Also, a good performance on the second harmonic generation was found, characterizing the emitted dominant wavelength by a customized indirect procedure using luminance and chromaticity measured data based on the CIE-1931 standard. Additionally, the 532 nm signal was detected by using a variant to the Kurtz and Perry method.

  20. Regulation of Nitrate Assimilation and Nitrate Respiration in Aerobacter aerogenes

    PubMed Central

    Van 'T Riet, J.; Stouthamer, A. H.; Planta, R. J.

    1968-01-01

    The influence of growth conditions on assimilatory and respiratory nitrate reduction in Aerobacter aerogenes was studied. The level of nitrate reductase activity in cells, growing in minimal medium with nitrate as the sole nitrogen source, was much lower under aerobic than anaerobic conditions. Further, the enzyme of the aerobic cultures was very sensitive to sonic disintegration, as distinct from the enzyme of anaerobic cultures. When a culture of A. aerogenes was shifted from anaerobic growth in minimal medium with nitrate and NH4+ to aerobiosis in the same medium, but without NH4+, the production of nitrite stopped instantaneously and the total activity of nitrate reductase decreased sharply. Moreover, there was a lag in growth of about 3 hr after such a shift. After resumption of growth, the total enzymatic activity increased again slowly and simultaneously became gradually sensitive to sonic disintegration. These findings show that oxygen inactivates the anaerobic nitrate reductase and represses its further formation; only after a de novo synthesis of nitrate reductase with an assimilatory function will growth be resumed. The enzyme in aerobic cultures was not significantly inactivated by air, only by pure oxygen. The formation of the assimilatory enzyme complex was repressed, however, by NH4+, under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The results indicate that the formation of the assimilatory enzyme complex and that of the respiratory enzyme complex are regulated differently. We suggest that both complexes have a different composition, but that the nitrate reductase in both cases is the same protein. PMID:5726295

  1. Iron Meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A meteorite composed mainly of nickel-iron, with traces of other metals; also referred to simply as an iron, and formerly known as a siderite. Irons account for over 6% of all known meteorite specimens. They are the easiest type to identify, being heavy, magnetic and rust-colored; their metallic sheen tarnishes quickly on the Earth's surface, but otherwise irons show better resistance to weatheri...

  2. Analytical Chemistry and Materials Characterization Results for Debris Recovered from Nitrate Salt Waste Drum S855793

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Patrick Thomas; Chamberlin, Rebecca M.; Schwartz, Daniel S.; Worley, Christopher Gordon; Garduno, Katherine; Lujan, Elmer J. W.; Borrego, Andres Patricio; Castro, Alonso; Colletti, Lisa Michelle; Fulwyler, James Brent; Holland, Charlotte S.; Keller, Russell C.; Klundt, Dylan James; Martinez, Alexander; Martin, Frances Louise; Montoya, Dennis Patrick; Myers, Steven Charles; Porterfield, Donivan R.; Schake, Ann Rene; Schappert, Michael Francis; Soderberg, Constance B.; Spencer, Khalil J.; Stanley, Floyd E.; Thomas, Mariam R.; Townsend, Lisa Ellen; Xu, Ning

    2015-09-16

    Solid debris was recovered from the previously-emptied nitrate salt waste drum S855793. The bulk sample was nondestructively assayed for radionuclides in its as-received condition. Three monoliths were selected for further characterization. Two of the monoliths, designated Specimen 1 and 3, consisted primarily of sodium nitrate and lead nitrate, with smaller amounts of lead nitrate oxalate and lead oxide by powder x-ray diffraction. The third monolith, Specimen 2, had a complex composition; lead carbonate was identified as the predominant component, and smaller amounts of nitrate, nitrite and carbonate salts of lead, magnesium and sodium were also identified. Microfocused x-ray fluorescence (MXRF) mapping showed that lead was ubiquitous throughout the cross-sections of Specimens 1 and 2, while heteroelements such as potassium, calcium, chromium, iron, and nickel were found in localized deposits. MXRF examination and destructive analysis of fragments of Specimen 3 showed elevated concentrations of iron, which were broadly distributed through the sample. With the exception of its high iron content and low carbon content, the chemical composition of Specimen 3 was within the ranges of values previously observed in four other nitrate salt samples recovered from emptied waste drums.

  3. Some History of Nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Dennis W.

    2003-12-01

    The history of saltpeter is an interesting combination of chemistry, world trade, technology, politics, and warfare. Originally it was obtained from the dirt floors of stables, sheep pens, pigeon houses, caverns, and even peasants' cottages; any place manure and refuse accumulated in soil under dry conditions. When these sources became inadequate to meet demand it was manufactured on saltpeter plantations, located in dry climates, where piles of dirt, limestone, and manure were allowed to stand for three to five years while soil microbes oxidized the nitrogen to nitrate—an example of early bioengineering. Extensive deposits of sodium nitrate were mined in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile from 1830 until the mid 1920s when the mines were displaced by the Haber Ostwald process.

  4. TREATMENT OF AMMONIUM NITRATE SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Boyer, T.W.; MacHutchin, J.G.; Yaffe, L.

    1958-06-10

    The treatment of waste solutions obtained in the processing of neutron- irradiated uranium containing fission products and ammonium nitrate is described. The object of this process is to provide a method whereby the ammonium nitrate is destroyed and removed from the solution so as to permit subsequent concentration of the solution.. In accordance with the process the residual nitrate solutions are treated with an excess of alkyl acid anhydride, such as acetic anhydride. Preferably, the residual nitrate solution is added to an excess of the acetic anhydride at such a rate that external heat is not required. The result of this operation is that the ammonium nitrate and acetic anhydride react to form N/sub 2/ O and acetic acid.

  5. Iron biomineralization by anaerobic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Benzerara, Karim; Morin, Guillaume; Kappler, Andreas; Bernard, Sylvain; Obst, Martin; Férard, Céline; Skouri-Panet, Fériel; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Posth, Nicole; Galvez, Matthieu; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; Guyot, François

    2009-02-01

    Minerals formed by bio-oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) at neutral pH, their association with bacterial ultrastructures as well as their impact on the metabolism of iron-oxidizing bacteria remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated iron biomineralization by the anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron-oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1 in the presence of dissolved Fe(II) using electron microscopy and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy (STXM). All detected minerals consisted mainly of amorphous iron phosphates, but based on their morphology and localization, three types of precipitates could be discriminated: (1) mineralized filaments at distance from the cells, (2) globules of 100 ± 25 nm in diameter, at the cell surface and (3) a 40-nm thick mineralized layer within the periplasm. All of those phases were shown to be intimately associated with organic molecules. Periplasmic encrustation was accompanied by an accumulation of protein moieties. In the same way, exopolysaccharides were associated with the extracellular mineralized filaments. The evolution of cell encrustation was followed by TEM over the time course of a culture: cell encrustation proceeded progressively, with rapid precipitation in the periplasm (in a few tens of minutes), followed by the formation of surface-bound globules. Moreover, we frequently observed an asymmetric mineral thickening at the cell poles. In parallel, the evolution of iron oxidation was quantified by STXM: iron both contained in the bacteria and in the extracellular precipitates reached complete oxidation within 6 days. While a progressive oxidation of Fe in the bacteria and in the medium could be observed, spatial redox (oxido-reduction state) heterogeneities were detected at the cell poles and in the extracellular precipitates after 1 day. All these findings provide new information to further the understanding of molecular processes involved in iron biomineralization by anaerobic iron-oxidizing bacteria and

  6. Mortality of nitrate fertiliser workers.

    PubMed

    Al-Dabbagh, S; Forman, D; Bryson, D; Stratton, I; Doll, R

    1986-08-01

    An epidemiological cohort study was conducted to investigate the mortality patterns among a group of workers engaged in the production of nitrate based fertilisers. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that individuals exposed to high concentrations of nitrates might be at increased risk of developing cancers, particularly gastric cancer. A total of 1327 male workers who had been employed in the production of fertilisers between 1946 and 1981 and who had been occupationally exposed to nitrates for at least one year were followed up until 1 March 1981. In total, 304 deaths were observed in this group and these were compared with expected numbers calculated from mortality rates in the northern region of England, where the factory was located. Analysis was also carried out separately for a subgroup of the cohort who had been heavily exposed to nitrates--that is, working in an environment likely to contain more than 10 mg nitrate/m3 for a year or longer. In neither the entire cohort nor the subgroup was any significant excess observed for all causes of mortality or for mortality from any of five broad categories of cause or from four specific types of cancer. A small excess of lung cancer was noted more than 20 years after first exposure in men heavily exposed for more than 10 years. That men were exposed to high concentrations of nitrate was confirmed by comparing concentrations of nitrates in the saliva of a sample of currently employed men with control men, employed at the same factory but not in fertiliser production. The men exposed to nitrate had substantially raised concentrations of nitrate in their saliva compared with both controls within the industry and with men in the general population and resident nearby. The results of this study therefore weight against the idea that exposure to nitrates in the environment leads to the formation in vivo of material amounts of carcinogens. PMID:3015194

  7. Aniline-induced nitrosative stress in rat spleen: Proteomic identification of nitrated proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Xiuzhen; Wang Jianling; Soman, Kizhake V.; Ansari, G.A.S.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2011-08-15

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen which is characterized by splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis, and a variety of sarcomas on chronic exposure in rats. However, mechanisms by which aniline elicits splenotoxic responses are not well understood. Earlier we have shown that aniline exposure leads to increased nitration of proteins in the spleen. However, nitrated proteins remain to be characterized. Therefore, in the current study using proteomic approaches, we focused on characterizing the nitrated proteins in the spleen of aniline-exposed rats. Aniline exposure led to increased tyrosine nitration of proteins, as determined by 2D Western blotting with anti-3-nitrotyrosine specific antibody, compared to the controls. The analyzed nitrated proteins were found in the molecular weight range of 27.7 to 123.6 kDa. A total of 37 nitrated proteins were identified in aniline-treated and control spleens. Among them, 25 were found only in aniline-treated rats, 11 were present in both aniline-treated and control rats, while one was found in controls only. The nitrated proteins identified mainly represent skeletal proteins, chaperones, ferric iron transporter, enzymes, nucleic acids binding protein, and signaling and protein synthesis pathways. Furthermore, aniline exposure led to significantly increased iNOS mRNA and protein expression in the spleen, suggesting its role in increased reactive nitrogen species formation and contribution to increased nitrated proteins. The identified nitrated proteins provide a global map to further investigate alterations in their structural and functional properties, which will lead to a better understanding of the role of protein nitration in aniline-mediated splenic toxicity. - Highlights: > Proteomic approaches are used to identify nitrated proteins in the spleen. > Twenty five nitrated proteins were found only in the spleen of aniline-treated rats. > Aniline exposure led to increased iNOS mRNA and protein expression in

  8. Nitrate Transport System in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Schloemer, Robert H.; Garrett, Reginald H.

    1974-01-01

    Nitrate uptake in Neurospora crassa has been investigated under various conditions of nitrogen nutrition by measuring the rate of disappearance of nitrate from the medium and by determining mycelial nitrate accumulation. The nitrate transport system is induced by either nitrate or nitrite, but is not present in mycelia grown on ammonia or Casamino Acids. The appearance of nitrate uptake activity is prevented by cycloheximide, puromycin, or 6-methyl purine. The induced nitrate transport system displays a Km for nitrate of 0.25 mM. Nitrate uptake is inhibited by metabolic poisons such as 2,4-dinitrophenol, cyanide, and antimycin A. Furthermore, mycelia can concentrate nitrate 50-fold. Ammonia and nitrite are non-competitive inhibitors with respect to nitrate, with Ki values of 0.13 and 0.17 mM, respectively. Ammonia does not repress the formation of the nitrate transport system. In contrast, the nitrate uptake system is repressed by Casamino Acids. All amino acids individually prevent nitrate accumulation, with the exception of methionine, glutamine, and alanine. The influence of nitrate reduction and the nitrate reductase protein on nitrate transport was investigated in wild-type Neurospora lacking a functional nitrate reductase and in nitrate non-utilizing mutants, nit-1, nit-2, and nit-3. These mycelia contain an inducible nitrate transport system which displays the same characteristics as those found in the wild-type mycelia having the functional nitrate reductase. These findings suggest that nitrate transport is not dependent upon nitrate reduction and that these two processes are separate events in the assimilation of nitrate. PMID:4274457

  9. Influence of Nitrate on the Hanford 100D Area In Situ Redox Manipulation Barrier Longevity

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, Jim E.; Phillips, Jerry L.; Vermeul, Vince R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Williams, Mark D.

    2005-07-15

    The purpose of this laboratory study is to determine the influence of nitrate on the Hanford 100D Area in situ redox manipulation (ISRM) barrier longevity. There is a wide spread groundwater plume of 60 mg/L nitrate upgradient of the ISRM barrier with lower nitrate concentrations downgradient, suggestive of nitrate reduction occurring. Batch and 1-D column experiments showed that nitrate is being slowly reduced to nitrite and ammonia. These nitrate reduction reactions are predominantly abiotic, as experiments with and without bactericides present showed no difference in nitrate degradation rates. Nitrogen species transformation rates determined in experiments covered a range of ferrous iron/nitrate ratios such that the data can be used to predict rates in field scale conditions. Field scale reaction rate estimates for 100% reduced sediment (16 C) are: (a) nitrate degradation = 202 {+-} 50 h (half-life), (b) nitrite production = 850 {+-} 300 h, and (c) ammonia production = 650 {+-} 300 h. Calculation of the influence of nitrate reduction on the 100D Area reductive capacity requires consideration of mass balance and reaction rate effects. While dissolved oxygen and chromate reduction rates are rapid and essentially at equilibrium in the aquifer, nitrate transformation reactions are slow (100s of hours). In the limited (20-40 day) residence time in the ISRM barrier, only a portion of the nitrate will be reduced, whereas dissolved oxygen and chromate are reduced to completion. Assuming a groundwater flow rate of 1 ft/day, it is estimated that the ISRM barrier reductive capacity is 160 pore volumes (with no nitrate), and 85 pore volumes if 60 mg/L nitrate is present (i.e., a 47% decrease in the ISRM barrier longevity). Zones with more rapid groundwater flow will be less influenced by nitrate reduction. For example, a zone with a groundwater flow rate of 3 ft/day and 60 mg/L nitrate will have a reductive capacity of 130 pore volumes. Finally, long-term column experiments

  10. Nitrate concentrations under irrigated agriculture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zaporozec, A.

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, considerable interest has been expressed in the nitrate content of water supplies. The most notable toxic effect of nitrate is infant methemoglobinemia. The risk of this disease increases significantly at nitrate-nitrogen levels exceeding 10 mg/l. For this reason, this concentration has been established as a limit for drinking water in many countries. In natural waters, nitrate is a minor ionic constituent and seldom accounts for more than a few percent of the total anions. However, nitrate in a significant concentration may occur in the vicinity of some point sources such as septic tanks, manure pits, and waste-disposal sites. Non-point sources contributing to groundwater pollution are numerous and a majority of them are related to agricultural activities. The largest single anthropogenic input of nitrate into the groundwater is fertilizer. Even though it has not been proven that nitrogen fertilizers are responsible for much of nitrate pollution, they are generally recognized as the main threat to groundwater quality, especially when inefficiently applied to irrigated fields on sandy soils. The biggest challenge facing today's agriculture is to maintain the balance between the enhancement of crop productivity and the risk of groundwater pollution. ?? 1982 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  11. Gallium and its competing roles with iron in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Chitambar, Christopher R

    2016-08-01

    Gallium, a group IIIa metal, shares chemical properties with iron. Studies have shown that gallium-based compounds have potential therapeutic activity against certain cancers and infectious microorganisms. By functioning as an iron mimetic, gallium perturbs iron-dependent proliferation processes in tumor cells. Gallium's action on iron homeostasis leads to disruption of ribonucleotide reductase, mitochondrial function, and the regulation of transferrin receptor and ferritin. In addition, gallium nitrate stimulates an increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in cells which triggers downstream upregulation of metallothionein and hemoxygenase-1. Gallium's anti-infective activity against bacteria and fungi results from disruption of microbial iron utilization through mechanisms which include gallium binding to siderophores and downregulation of bacterial iron uptake. Gallium compounds lack cross-resistance to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs and antibiotics thus making them attractive agents for drug development. This review will focus on the mechanisms of action of gallium with emphasis on its interaction with iron and iron proteins. PMID:27150508

  12. Gallium and its competing roles with iron in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Chitambar, Christopher R

    2016-08-01

    Gallium, a group IIIa metal, shares chemical properties with iron. Studies have shown that gallium-based compounds have potential therapeutic activity against certain cancers and infectious microorganisms. By functioning as an iron mimetic, gallium perturbs iron-dependent proliferation processes in tumor cells. Gallium's action on iron homeostasis leads to disruption of ribonucleotide reductase, mitochondrial function, and the regulation of transferrin receptor and ferritin. In addition, gallium nitrate stimulates an increase in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in cells which triggers downstream upregulation of metallothionein and hemoxygenase-1. Gallium's anti-infective activity against bacteria and fungi results from disruption of microbial iron utilization through mechanisms which include gallium binding to siderophores and downregulation of bacterial iron uptake. Gallium compounds lack cross-resistance to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs and antibiotics thus making them attractive agents for drug development. This review will focus on the mechanisms of action of gallium with emphasis on its interaction with iron and iron proteins.

  13. Abiotic process for Fe(II) oxidation and green rust mineralization driven by a heterotrophic nitrate reducing bacteria (Klebsiella mobilis).

    PubMed

    Etique, Marjorie; Jorand, Frédéric P A; Zegeye, Asfaw; Grégoire, Brian; Despas, Christelle; Ruby, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Green rusts (GRs) are mixed Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides with a high reactivity toward organic and inorganic pollutants. GRs can be produced from ferric reducing or ferrous oxidizing bacterial activities. In this study, we investigated the capability of Klebsiella mobilis to produce iron minerals in the presence of nitrate and ferrous iron. This bacterium is well-known to reduce nitrate using an organic carbon source as electron donor but is unable to enzymatically oxidize Fe(II) species. During incubation, GR formation occurred as a secondary iron mineral precipitating on cell surfaces, resulting from Fe(II) oxidation by nitrite produced via bacterial respiration of nitrate. For the first time, we demonstrate GR formation by indirect microbial oxidation of Fe(II) (i.e., a combination of biotic/abiotic processes). These results therefore suggest that nitrate-reducing bacteria can potentially contribute to the formation of GR in natural environments. In addition, the chemical reduction of nitrite to ammonium by GR is observed, which gradually turns the GR into the end-product goethite. The nitrogen mass-balance clearly demonstrates that the total amount of ammonium produced corresponds to the quantity of bioreduced nitrate. These findings demonstrate how the activity of nitrate-reducing bacteria in ferrous environments may provide a direct link between the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and iron. PMID:24605878

  14. Abiotic process for Fe(II) oxidation and green rust mineralization driven by a heterotrophic nitrate reducing bacteria (Klebsiella mobilis).

    PubMed

    Etique, Marjorie; Jorand, Frédéric P A; Zegeye, Asfaw; Grégoire, Brian; Despas, Christelle; Ruby, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Green rusts (GRs) are mixed Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides with a high reactivity toward organic and inorganic pollutants. GRs can be produced from ferric reducing or ferrous oxidizing bacterial activities. In this study, we investigated the capability of Klebsiella mobilis to produce iron minerals in the presence of nitrate and ferrous iron. This bacterium is well-known to reduce nitrate using an organic carbon source as electron donor but is unable to enzymatically oxidize Fe(II) species. During incubation, GR formation occurred as a secondary iron mineral precipitating on cell surfaces, resulting from Fe(II) oxidation by nitrite produced via bacterial respiration of nitrate. For the first time, we demonstrate GR formation by indirect microbial oxidation of Fe(II) (i.e., a combination of biotic/abiotic processes). These results therefore suggest that nitrate-reducing bacteria can potentially contribute to the formation of GR in natural environments. In addition, the chemical reduction of nitrite to ammonium by GR is observed, which gradually turns the GR into the end-product goethite. The nitrogen mass-balance clearly demonstrates that the total amount of ammonium produced corresponds to the quantity of bioreduced nitrate. These findings demonstrate how the activity of nitrate-reducing bacteria in ferrous environments may provide a direct link between the biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen and iron.

  15. Development of hydraulic properties and nitrate turnover processes in minerotrophic fen soil on differnet scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleimeier, Christian; Lennartz, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Generally, it is recommended to remove the uppermost highly degraded peat layer from fens prior to rewetting to eliminate a potential source of organic pollutants for downstream water bodies. We investigated this material as a potential medium for denitrifying filters to further use the organic material. We are aiming to remove nitrate from tile drainage runoff at the outlet drainage dominated catchments to fullfill the requirements of the European Water Framework Directive. In a lysimeter scale long term mesocosm experiments we were aiming to reveal the peats behavior after disturbing and rewetting under constant flow conditions. Tracer experiments revealed a restructuring of the peat ending up at 20/80 percentage of mobile immobile pore volume. Additionally we observed the nitrate turnover. The turnover rate was determined by the hydraulic load. Absolute turnover rates were equal at lower and higher concentrations as well as flow rates, whereas the turnover reached higher percentages at lower concentrations. To further reveal the nitrate turnover processes flow through rector experiments were conducted in an anaerobic environment. We found that strongly reducing conditions can be created in peat even at the presence of nitrate. Thus we can conclude that the minerotrophic peat with its high iron and sulfur concentrations also enables autotrophic denitrification oxidizing iron and sulfur. While the conditions are favorable to re-reduce iron and sulfur,thus an electron shuttling system developed transporting electrons from the organic material as initial e- donor to nitrate as terminal e- acceptor.

  16. Vasodilator Therapy: Nitrates and Nicorandil.

    PubMed

    Tarkin, Jason M; Kaski, Juan Carlos

    2016-08-01

    Nitrates have been used to treat symptoms of chronic stable angina for over 135 years. These drugs are known to activate nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine-3',-5'-monophasphate (cGMP) signaling pathways underlying vascular smooth muscle cell relaxation, albeit many questions relating to how nitrates work at the cellular level remain unanswered. Physiologically, the anti-angina effects of nitrates are mostly due to peripheral venous dilatation leading to reduction in preload and therefore left ventricular wall stress, and, to a lesser extent, epicardial coronary artery dilatation and lowering of systemic blood pressure. By counteracting ischemic mechanisms, short-acting nitrates offer rapid relief following an angina attack. Long-acting nitrates, used commonly for angina prophylaxis are recommended second-line, after beta-blockers and calcium channel antagonists. Nicorandil is a balanced vasodilator that acts as both NO donor and arterial K(+) ATP channel opener. Nicorandil might also exhibit cardioprotective properties via mitochondrial ischemic preconditioning. While nitrates and nicorandil are effective pharmacological agents for prevention of angina symptoms, when prescribing these drugs it is important to consider that unwanted and poorly tolerated hemodynamic side-effects such as headache and orthostatic hypotension can often occur owing to systemic vasodilatation. It is also necessary to ensure that a dosing regime is followed that avoids nitrate tolerance, which not only results in loss of drug efficacy, but might also cause endothelial dysfunction and increase long-term cardiovascular risk. Here we provide an update on the pharmacological management of chronic stable angina using nitrates and nicorandil.

  17. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  18. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and smoked, cured shad, so that the level of sodium nitrate does not...

  19. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and smoked, cured shad, so that the level of sodium nitrate does not...

  20. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and smoked, cured shad, so that the level of sodium nitrate does not...

  1. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified... sablefish, smoked, cured salmon, and smoked, cured shad, so that the level of sodium nitrate does not...

  2. Electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanocomposite fibers reinforced with iron nitrate nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Asif

    The methodology of preparing pure Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers and magnetic PAN/FeNO3 composite Nanofibers is the traditional electrospinning process where fibers of diameter ranging less than 100 nm and larger lengths can be sophisticatedly produced on laboratory bench. With varying properties of polymer concentration, voltage and other parameters pure PAN fibers and those loaded with FeNO3 are produced. Analysis of those prepared fibers has been done through a series of experiments like SEM, FITR and X-ray Diffraction. SEM analysis explains the formation of fibers and leads to the selection of best possible ones for future methods of rheological and TGA analysis. In the past where similar contributions have been done for the fibers with FeO and Fe3O4 and the Nanoparticles, the same mentioned procedure replaces them with FeNO3. On the whole, uniform bead-less fibers are obtained and their behaviors' are studied as well. Also, graphical information for correlating the size of fibers and their polymer concentrations has been obtained. TGA analysis for recording their stability under different thermal conditions is reported. Anilining methods using microwave equipment are done instead of conventional ones.

  3. Enhanced removal of nitrate from water using nZVI@MWCNTs composite: synthesis, kinetics and mechanism of reduction.

    PubMed

    Babaei, Ali Akbar; Azari, Ali; Kalantary, Roshanak Rezaei; Kakavandi, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Herein, multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used as the carrier of nano-zero valent iron (nZVI) particles to fabricate a composite known as nZVI@MWCNTs. The composite was then characterized and applied in the nitrate removal process in a batch system under anoxic conditions. The influential parameters such as pH, various concentrations of nitrate and composite were investigated within 240 min of the reaction. The mechanism, kinetics and end-products of nitrate reduction were also evaluated. Results revealed that the removal nitrate percentage for nZVI@MWCNTs composite was higher than that of nZVI and MWCNTs alone. Experimental data from nitrate reduction were fitted to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model. The values of observed rate constant (kobs) decreased with increasing the initial concentration of nitrate. Our experiments proved that the nitrate removal efficiency was favorable once both high amounts of nZVI@MWCNTs and low concentrations of nitrate were applied. The predominant end-products of the nitrate reduction were ammonium (84%) and nitrogen gas (15%). Our findings also revealed that ZVI@MWCNTs is potentially a good composite for removal/reduction of nitrate from aqueous solutions. PMID:26606093

  4. Nitrate Utilization by the Diatom Skeletonema costatum

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Juan L.; Llama, Maria J.; Cadenas, Eduardo

    1978-01-01

    Nitrate utilization has been characterized in nitrogen-deficient cells of the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum. In order to separate nitrate uptake from nitrate reduction, nitrate reductase activity was suppressed with tungstate. Neither nitrite nor the presence of amino acids in the external medium or darkness affects nitrate uptake kinetics. Ammonium strongly inhibits carrier-mediated nitrate uptake, without affecting diffusion transfer. A model is proposed for the uptake and assimilation of nitrate in S. costatum and their regulation by ammonium ions. PMID:16660653

  5. Fe(III) oxides accelerate microbial nitrate reduction and electricity generation by Klebsiella pneumoniae L17.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongxu; Li, Xiaomin; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Min; Li, Fangbai

    2014-06-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae L17 is a fermentative bacterium that can reduce iron oxide and generate electricity under anoxic conditions, as previously reported. This study reveals that K. pneumoniae L17 is also capable of dissimilatory nitrate reduction, producing NO2(-), NH4(+), NO and N2O under anoxic conditions. The presence of Fe(III) oxides (i.e., α-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH, α-Fe2O3 and γ-Fe2O3) significantly accelerates the reduction of nitrate and generation of electricity by K. pneumoniae L17, which is similar to a previous report regarding another fermentative bacterium, Bacillus. No significant nitrate reduction was observed upon treatment with Fe(2+) or α-FeOOH+Fe(2+), but a slight facilitation of nitrate reduction and electricity generation was observed upon treatment with L17+Fe(2+). This result suggests that aqueous Fe(II) or mineral-adsorbed Fe(II) cannot reduce nitrate abiotically but that L17 can catalyze the reduction of nitrate and generation of electricity in the presence of Fe(II) (which might exist as cell surface-bound Fe(II)). To rule out the potential effect of Fe(II) produced by L17 during microbial iron reduction, treatments with the addition of TiO2 or Al2O3 instead of Fe(III) oxides also exhibited accelerated microbial nitrate reduction and electricity generation, indicating that cell-mineral sorption did account for the acceleration effect. However, the acceleration caused by Fe(III) oxides is only partially attributed to the cell surface-bound Fe(II) and cell-mineral sorption but may be driven by the iron oxide conduction band-mediated electron transfer from L17 to nitrate or an electrode, as proposed previously. The current study extends the diversity of bacteria of which nitrate reduction and electricity generation can be facilitated by the presence of iron oxides and confirms the positive role of Fe(III) oxides on microbial nitrate reduction and electricity generation by particular fermentative bacteria in anoxic environments.

  6. Nitrate attenuation in the Missoula Flood Deposits Aquitard (Willamette Silt) of the Willamette Valley, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arighi, L.; Haggerty, R.; Myrold, D. D.; Iverson, J.; Baham, J. E.; Madin, I. P.; Arendt, J.

    2005-12-01

    Low-permeability geologic units may offer significant chemical and hydraulic protection of adjacent aquifers, and are important for managing groundwater quality, especially in areas with significant non-point source contamination. Nitrate in the Willamette Valley is attenuated across the Willamette Silt, a semi-confining unit overlying a regionally important aquifer. To quantify the main mechanism responsible for nitrate attenuation, soil cores were taken at 19 locations, and profiles of nitrate concentrations were constructed for each site. In 7 locations a sharp, major geochemical transition - a "redoxcline" - is present near the base of the Willamette Silt; this redoxcline is characterized by a color change from red-brown to blue-gray, an increase in iron(II) concentration, a rise in pH, and the appearance of carbonate minerals. At all sites where a significant surface input of nitrate was detected, the nitrate signal was attenuated before reaching the base of the silt. Denitrifier Enzyme Activity assays from one site show no denitrification potential in the profile, suggesting that a non-biological mechanism is responsible. We suggest that iron(II) is reducing the nitrate abiotically to nitrite, and that the blue-gray reducing zone of Willamette Silt is indicative of the presence of sufficient iron(II) for the reaction to go forward. To increase the usefulness of this study to regional water management agencies, a thickness isopach map of the reduced zone was created both for the northern and southern Willamette Valley to help determine areas where nitrate is most likely to be attenuated.

  7. Nitrate transport is independent of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases in barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, R. L.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) has NADH-specific and NAD(P)H-bispecific nitrate reductase isozymes. Four isogenic lines with different nitrate reductase isozyme combinations were used to determine the role of NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductases on nitrate transport and assimilation in barley seedlings. Both nitrate reductase isozymes were induced by nitrate and were required for maximum nitrate assimilation in barley seedlings. Genotypes lacking the NADH isozyme (Az12) or the NAD(P)H isozyme (Az70) assimilated 65 or 85%, respectively, as much nitrate as the wild type. Nitrate assimilation by genotype (Az12;Az70) which is deficient in both nitrate reductases, was only 13% of the wild type indicating that the NADH and NAD(P)H nitrate reductase isozymes are responsible for most of the nitrate reduction in barley seedlings. For all genotypes, nitrate assimilation rates in the dark were about 55% of the rates in light. Hypotheses that nitrate reductase has direct or indirect roles in nitrate uptake were not supported by this study. Induction of nitrate transporters and the kinetics of net nitrate uptake were the same for all four genotypes indicating that neither nitrate reductase isozyme has a direct role in nitrate uptake in barley seedlings.

  8. Reduction of nitrate in Shewanella

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Haichun; Yang, Zamin Koo; Barua, Sumitra; Reed, SB; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrikson, JK; Tiedje, James; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-01

    In the genome of Shewanella oneidensis, a napDAGHB gene cluster encoding periplasmic nitrate reductase (NapA) and accessory proteins and an nrfA gene encoding periplasmic nitrite reductase (NrfA) have been identified. These two systems seem to be atypical because the genome lacks genes encoding cytoplasmic membrane electron transport proteins, NapC for NAP and NrfBCD/NrfH for NRF, respectively. Here, we present evidence that reduction of nitrate to ammonium in S. oneidensis is carried out by these atypical systems in a two-step manner. Transcriptional and mutational analyses suggest that CymA, a cytoplasmic membrane electron transport protein, is likely to be the functional replacement of both NapC and NrfH in S. oneidensis. Surprisingly, a strain devoid of napB encoding the small subunit of nitrate reductase exhibited the maximum cell density sooner than the wild type. Further characterization of this strain showed that nitrite was not detected as a free intermediate in its culture and NapB provides a fitness gain for S. oneidensis to compete for nitrate in the environments. On the basis results from mutational analyses of napA, napB, nrfA and napBnrfA in-frame deletion mutants, we propose that NapB is able to favor nitrate reduction by routing electrons to NapA exclusively.

  9. Aniline-induced nitrosative stress in rat spleen: proteomic identification of nitrated proteins.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiuzhen; Wang, Jianling; Soman, Kizhake V; Ansari, G A S; Khan, M Firoze

    2011-08-15

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen which is characterized by splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis, and a variety of sarcomas on chronic exposure in rats. However, mechanisms by which aniline elicits splenotoxic responses are not well understood. Earlier we have shown that aniline exposure leads to increased nitration of proteins in the spleen. However, nitrated proteins remain to be characterized. Therefore, in the current study using proteomic approaches, we focused on characterizing the nitrated proteins in the spleen of aniline-exposed rats. Aniline exposure led to increased tyrosine nitration of proteins, as determined by 2D Western blotting with anti-3-nitrotyrosine specific antibody, compared to the controls. The analyzed nitrated proteins were found in the molecular weight range of 27.7 to 123.6kDa. A total of 37 nitrated proteins were identified in aniline-treated and control spleens. Among them, 25 were found only in aniline-treated rats, 11 were present in both aniline-treated and control rats, while one was found in controls only. The nitrated proteins identified mainly represent skeletal proteins, chaperones, ferric iron transporter, enzymes, nucleic acids binding protein, and signaling and protein synthesis pathways. Furthermore, aniline exposure led to significantly increased iNOS mRNA and protein expression in the spleen, suggesting its role in increased reactive nitrogen species formation and contribution to increased nitrated proteins. The identified nitrated proteins provide a global map to further investigate alterations in their structural and functional properties, which will lead to a better understanding of the role of protein nitration in aniline-mediated splenic toxicity.

  10. The case for iron

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.H.; Gordon, R.M.; Fitzwater, S.E. )

    1991-12-01

    Excess major nutrients occur in offshore areas ranging from the tropical equatorial Pacific to the polar Antarctic. In spite of the great ecological differences in these environments, the authors believe they share a common trait: iron deficiency. Here they present the case of iron; they point out that all of these areas are far from Fe-rich terrestrial sources and that atmospheric dust loads in these regions are among the lowest in the world. The authors summarize experiments performed in three nutrient-rich areas: The Gulf of Alaska, the Ross Sea, and the equatorial Pacific. In general, populations without added Fe doubled at rates 11-40% of the expected maxima at various temperatures. The additions of nanomole quantities of Fe increased these doubling rates by factors of 2-3. In spite of the lack of Fe, tightly coupled phytoplankton/zooplankton communities seem to inhabit these major nutrient-rich areas. Since Fe is required for the synthesis of chlorophyll and nitrate reductase, little chlorophyll is found and NH{sub 3} is the favored N source. Normal rate values of specific productivity indicate that these populations are healthy, but limited by the insufficient Fe supply. When Fe becomes available either artificially in bottle experiments or in the environment as Fe-rich land masses are approached, diatoms quickly bloom, chlorophyll levels increase, and nutrient stocks are rapidly depleted. These combined results indicate that Fe availability is the primary factor controlling phytoplankton production in nutrient-rich areas of the open sea.

  11. Microbial and biogeochemical responses to projected future nitrate enrichment in the California upwelling system

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Katherine R. M.; Chien, Chia-Te; Paytan, Adina

    2014-01-01

    Coastal California is a dynamic upwelling region where nitrogen (N) and iron (Fe) can both limit productivity and influence biogeochemistry over different spatial and temporal scales. With global change, the flux of nitrate from upwelling is expected to increase over the next century, potentially driving additional oceanic regions toward Fe limitation. In this study we explored the effect of changes in Fe/N ratio on native phytoplankton from five currently Fe-replete sites near the major California upwelling centers at Bodega Bay and Monterey Bay using nutrient addition incubation experiments. Despite the high nitrate levels (13–30 μ M) in the upwelled water, phytoplankton at three of the five sites showed increased growth when 10 μ M nitrate was added. None of the sites showed enhanced growth following addition of 10 nM Fe. Nitrate additions favored slow sinking single-celled diatoms over faster sinking chain-forming diatoms, suggesting that future increases in nitrate flux could affect carbon and silicate export and alter grazer populations. In particular, solitary cells of Cylindrotheca were more abundant than the toxin-producing genus Pseudonitzschia following nitrate addition. These responses suggest the biogeochemistry of coastal California could change in response to future increases in nitrate, and multiple stressors like ocean acidification and hypoxia may further result in ecosystem shifts. PMID:25477873

  12. Enhanced sensitivity of oceanic CO2 uptake to dust deposition by iron-light colimitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickelsen, Levin; Oschlies, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The iron hypothesis suggests that in large areas of the ocean phytoplankton growth and thus photosynthetic CO2 uptake is limited by the micronutrient iron. Phytoplankton requires iron in particular for nitrate uptake, light harvesting, and electron transport in photosynthesis, suggesting a tight coupling of iron and light limitation. One important source of iron to the open ocean is dust deposition. Previous global biogeochemical modeling studies have suggested a low sensitivity of oceanic CO2 uptake to changes in dust deposition. Here we show that this sensitivity is increased significantly when iron-light colimitation, i.e., the impact of iron bioavailability on light-harvesting capabilities, is explicitly considered. Accounting for iron-light colimitation increases the shift of export production from tropical and subtropical regions to the higher latitudes of subpolar regions at high dust deposition and amplifies iron limitation at low dust deposition. Our results reemphasize the role of iron as a key limiting nutrient for phytoplankton.

  13. Central role for ferritin in the day/night regulation of iron homeostasis in marine phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Botebol, Hugo; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Šuták, Robert; Six, Christophe; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Schatt, Philippe; Vergé, Valérie; Kirilovsky, Amos; Morrissey, Joe; Léger, Thibaut; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Gueneugues, Audrey; Bowler, Chris; Blain, Stéphane; Bouget, François-Yves

    2015-01-01

    In large regions of the open ocean, iron is a limiting resource for phytoplankton. The reduction of iron quota and the recycling of internal iron pools are among the diverse strategies that phytoplankton have evolved to allow them to grow under chronically low ambient iron levels. Phytoplankton species also have evolved strategies to cope with sporadic iron supply such as long-term storage of iron in ferritin. In the picophytoplanktonic species Ostreococcus we report evidence from observations both in the field and in laboratory cultures that ferritin and the main iron-binding proteins involved in photosynthesis and nitrate assimilation pathways show opposite diurnal expression patterns, with ferritin being maximally expressed during the night. Biochemical and physiological experiments using a ferritin knock-out line subsequently revealed that this protein plays a central role in the diel regulation of iron uptake and recycling and that this regulation of iron homeostasis is essential for cell survival under iron limitation. PMID:26553998

  14. Nitrate Trends in Minnesota Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wall, Dave; Christopherson, Dave; Lorenz, Dave; Martin, Gary

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess long-term trends (30 to 35 years) of flow-adjusted concentrations of nitrite+nitrate-N (hereinafter referred to as nitrate) in a way that would allow us to discern changing trends. Recognizing that these trends are commonly different from one river to another river and from one part of the state to another, our objective was to examine as many river monitoring sites across the state as possible for which sufficient long term streamflow and concentration data were available.

  15. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since the pioneering research by Shoden in 1953. However, we recently developed a new method for determining ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron by computer-assisted serum ferritin kinetics. Serum ferritin increase or decrease curves were measured in patients with normal storage iron levels (chronic hepatitis C and iron deficiency anemia treated by intravenous iron injection), and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis and transfusion dependent anemia). We thereby confirmed the existence of two iron pathways where iron flows followed the numbered order (1) labile iron, (2) ferritin and (3) hemosiderin in iron deposition and mobilization among many previously proposed but mostly unproven routes. We also demonstrated the increasing and decreasing phases of ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron in iron deposition and mobilization. The author first demonstrated here the change in proportion between pre-existing ferritin iron and new ferritin iron synthesized by removing iron from hemosiderin in the course of iron removal. In addition, the author disclosed the cause of underestimation of storage iron turnover rate which had been reported by previous investigators in estimating storage iron turnover rate of normal subjects. PMID:25741033

  16. β-Nitro Derivatives of Iron Corrolates

    PubMed Central

    Nardis, Sara; Stefanelli, Manuela; Mohite, Pruthviraj; Pomarico, Giuseppe; Tortora, Luca; Manowong, Machima; Chen, Ping; Fronczek, Frank R.; McCandless, Gregory T.

    2012-01-01

    Two different methods for the regioselective nitration of different meso-triarylcorroles leading to the corresponding β-substituted nitrocorrole iron complexes have been developed. A two-step procedure affords three Fe(III) nitrosyl products - the unsubstituted corrole, the 3-nitrocorrole and the 3,17-dinitrocorrole. In contrast, a one-pot synthetic approach drives the reaction almost exclusively to formation of the iron nitrosyl 3,17-dinitrocorrole. Electron-releasing substituents on the meso-aryl groups of the triarylcorroles induce higher yields and longer reaction times than what is observed for the synthesis of similar triarylcorroles with electron-withdrawing functionalities, and these results can be confidently attributed to the facile formation and stabilization of an intermediate iron corrole π-cation radical. Electron-withdrawing substituents on the meso-aryl groups of triarylcorrole also seem to labilize the axial nitrosyl group which, in the case of the pentafluorophenylcorrole derivative, results in the direct formation of a disubstituted iron μ-oxo dimer complex. The influence of meso-aryl substituents on the progress and products of the nitration reaction was investigated. In addition, to elucidate the most important factors which influence the redox reactivity of these different iron nitrosyl complexes, selected compounds were examined by cyclic voltammetry and thin-layer UV-visible or FTIR spectroelectrochemistry in CH2Cl2. PMID:22394192

  17. Dietary nitrate and cardiovascular health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ahluwalia, A.; Gladwin, M.T.; Harman, Jane L.; Ward, M.H.; Nolan, Bernard T.

    2014-01-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened this workshop to discuss the results of recent research on the effects of inorganic nitrate and nitrite on the cardiovascular system, possible long term effects of these compounds in the diet and drinking water, and future research needs including population-wide effects examined through epidemiological studies.

  18. Comparative metatranscriptomics identifies molecular bases for the physiological responses of phytoplankton to varying iron availability.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Adrian; Schruth, David M; Durkin, Colleen A; Parker, Micaela S; Kodner, Robin B; Berthiaume, Chris T; Morales, Rhonda; Allen, Andrew E; Armbrust, E Virginia

    2012-02-01

    In vast expanses of the oceans, growth of large phytoplankton such as diatoms is limited by iron availability. Diatoms respond almost immediately to the delivery of iron and rapidly compose the majority of phytoplankton biomass. The molecular bases underlying the subsistence of diatoms in iron-poor waters and the plankton community dynamics that follow iron resupply remain largely unknown. Here we use comparative metatranscriptomics to identify changes in gene expression associated with iron-stimulated growth of diatoms and other eukaryotic plankton. A microcosm iron-enrichment experiment using mixed-layer waters from the northeastern Pacific Ocean resulted in increased proportions of diatom transcripts and reduced proportions of transcripts from most other taxa within 98 h after iron addition. Hundreds of diatom genes were differentially expressed in the iron-enriched community compared with the iron-limited community; transcripts of diatom genes required for synthesis of photosynthesis and chlorophyll components, nitrate assimilation and the urea cycle, and synthesis of carbohydrate storage compounds were significantly overrepresented. Transcripts of genes encoding rhodopsins in eukaryotic phytoplankton were significantly underrepresented following iron enrichment, suggesting rhodopsins help cells cope with low-iron conditions. Oceanic diatoms appear to display a distinctive transcriptional response to iron enrichment that allows chemical reduction of available nitrogen and carbon sources along with a continued dependence on iron-free photosynthetic proteins rather than substituting for iron-containing functional equivalents present within their gene repertoire. This ability of diatoms to divert their newly acquired iron toward nitrate assimilation may underlie why diatoms consistently dominate iron enrichments in high-nitrate, low-chlorophyll regions.

  19. SEPARATION OF SCANDIUM VALUES FORM IRON VALUES BY SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Kuhlman, C.W. Jr.; Lang, G.P.

    1961-12-19

    A process is given for separating scandium from trivalent iron values. In this process, an aqueous nitric acid solution is contacted with a water- immiscible alkyl phosphate solution, the aqueous solution containing the values to be separated, whereby the scandium is taken up by the alkyl phosphate. The aqueous so1ution is preferably saturated with magnesium nitrate to retain the iron in the aqueous solution. (AEC)

  20. Biological denitrification of high concentration nitrate waste

    DOEpatents

    Francis, Chester W.; Brinkley, Frank S.

    1977-01-01

    Biological denitrification of nitrate solutions at concentrations of greater than one kilogram nitrate per cubic meter is accomplished anaerobically in an upflow column having as a packing material a support for denitrifying bacteria.

  1. An electrokinetic/Fe0 permeable reactive barrier system for the treatment of nitrate-contaminated subsurface soils.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tasuma; Oyama, Yukinori; Moribe, Mai; Niinae, Masakazu

    2012-03-01

    Effective nitrate removal by Fe(0) permeable reactive barriers (Fe(0) PRB) has been recognized as a challenging task because the iron corrosion product foamed on Fe(0) hinders effective electron transfer from Fe(0) to surface-bound nitrate. The objectives of this study were (i) to demonstrate the effectiveness of an electrokinetic/Fe(0) PRB system for remediating nitrate-contaminated low permeability soils using a bench-scale system and (ii) to deepen the understanding of the behavior and fate of nitrate in the system. Bench-scale laboratory experiments were designed to investigate the influence of the Fe(0) content in the permeable reactive barrier, the pH in the anode well, and the applied voltage on remediation efficiency. The experimental results showed that the major reaction product of nitrate reduction by Fe(0) was ammonium and that nitrate reduction efficiency was significantly influenced by the variables investigated in this study. Nitrate reduction efficiency was enhanced by either increasing the Fe(0) content in the Fe(0) reactive barrier or decreasing the initial anode pH. However, nitrate reduction efficiency was reduced by increasing the applied voltage from 10 V to 40 V due to the insufficient reaction time during nitrate migration through the Fe(0) PRB. For all experimental conditions, nearly all nitrate nitrogen was recovered in either anode or cathode wells as nitrate or ammonium within 100 h, demonstrating the effectiveness of the system for remediating nitrate-contaminated subsurface soils. PMID:22153957

  2. A Novel Chemical Nitrate Destruction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.

    1999-03-01

    Nitrates represent one of the most significant pollutant discharged to the Baltic Sea by the Sliiamae hydrometallurgical plant. This article contains a brief overview of the existing nitrate destruction technologies followed by the description of a new process developed by the authors. The new chemical process for nitrate destruction is cost effective and simple to operate. It converts the nitrate to nitrogen gas which goes to the atmosphere.

  3. Nitrate reduction in sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Marietou, Angeliki

    2016-08-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) gain their energy by coupling the oxidation of organic substrate to the reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Several SRBs are able to use alternative terminal electron acceptors to sulfate such as nitrate. Nitrate-reducing SRBs have been isolated from a diverse range of environments. In order to be able to understand the significance of nitrate reduction in SRBs, we need to examine the ecology and physiology of the nitrate-reducing SRB isolates.

  4. Nitrate removal by Fe0/Pd/Cu nano-composite in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongyuan; Guo, Min; Zhang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate pollution in groundwater shows a great threat to the safety of drinking water. Chemical reduction by zero-valent iron is being considered as a promising technique for nitrate removal from contaminated groundwater. In this paper, Fe0/Pd/Cu nano-composites were prepared by the liquid-phase reduction method, and batch experiments of nitrate reduction by the prepared Fe0/Pd/Cu nano-composites under various operating conditions were carried out. It has been found that nano-Fe0/Pd/Cu composites processed dual functions: catalytic reduction and chemical reduction. The introduction of Pd and Cu not only improved nitrate removal rate, but also reduced the generation of ammonia. Nitrate removal rate was affected by the amount of Fe0/Pd/Cu, initial nitrate concentration, solution pH, dissolved oxygen (DO), reaction temperature, the presence of anions, and organic pollutant. Moreover, nitrate reduction by Fe0/Pd/Cu composites followed the pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. The removal rate of nitrate and total nitrogen were about 85% and 40.8%, respectively, under the reaction condition of Fe-6.0%Pd-3.0%Cu amount of 0.25 g/L, pH value of 7.1, DO of 0.42 mg/L, and initial nitrate concentration of 100 mg/L. Compared with the previous studies with Fe0 alone or Fe-Cu, nano-Fe-6%Pd-3%Cu composites showed a better selectivity to N2.

  5. Nitrosative stress and apoptosis in non-anemic healthy rats induced by intravenous iron sucrose similars versus iron sucrose originator.

    PubMed

    Toblli, Jorge E; Cao, Gabriel; Angerosa, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Iron can both induce and inhibit nitrosative stress. Intracellular iron levels play an important role in nitric oxide (NO(•)) signaling mechanisms. Depending on various factors, such as the cell's redox state and transition metal levels, NO(•) generation may lead to lipid peroxidation and DNA damage as well as both anti- and pro-apoptotic effects. Administration of intravenous iron sucrose originator (IS(ORIG)) has been shown not to cause significant tyrosine nitration or significantly increased caspase 3 levels in non-anemic rats. In this study, the potential of several marketed iron sucrose similars (ISSs) to induce tyrosine nitration and caspase 3 expression in non-anemic rats was assessed. Although the physico-chemical properties of most of the analyzed ISSs complied with the United States Pharmacopeia for iron sucrose injection, all ISSs resulted in higher levels of tyrosine nitration and increased the expression of caspase 3 versus IS(ORIG). Moreover, significant differences were detected in tissue iron distribution between IS(ORIG)- and ISS-treated animals. In general, ISORIG resulted in higher levels of ferritin deposits versus ISSs whereas ISSs showed higher Prussian blue-stainable iron(III) deposits than IS(ORIG). This result suggests that some iron from ISSs bypassed the tightly regulated pathway through resident macrophages of the liver, spleen and bone marrow thus, ending up in the cellular compartment that favors oxidative and or nitrosative stress as well as apoptosis. The results also confirm that polynuclear iron(III)-oxyhydroxide carbohydrates, such as iron sucrose, cannot be fully characterized by physico-chemical methods alone.

  6. Nitrate reductase assay using sodium nitrate for rapid detection of multidrug resistant tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Maíra Bidart; Groll, Andrea Von; Fissette, Krista; Palomino, Juan Carlos; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; Martin, Anandi

    2012-01-01

    We validated the nitrate reductase assay (NRA) for the detection of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) using sodium nitrate (NaNO3) in replacement of potassium nitrate (KNO3) as nitrate source. NaNO3 is cheaper than KNO3 and has no restriction on use which facilitates the implementation of NRA to detect MDR-TB. PMID:24031916

  7. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  8. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  9. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  10. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  11. 49 CFR 176.410 - Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Division 1.5 materials, ammonium nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. 176.410 Section 176.410 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... nitrate and ammonium nitrate mixtures. (a) This section prescribes requirements to be observed...

  12. Nitration of Naphthol: A Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowery, Dwight F.

    1982-01-01

    Products of nitrations, upon distillation or steam distillation, may produce dermatitis in some students. A procedure for nitration of beta-naphthol producing a relatively non-volatile product not purified by steam distillation is described. Nitration of alpha-naphthol by the same procedure yields Martius Yellow dye which dyes wool yellow or…

  13. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Denitrification beds are being promoted to reduce nitrate concentrations in agricultural drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution in surface water. In this system, water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transfor...

  14. Method of producing thin cellulose nitrate film

    DOEpatents

    Lupica, S.B.

    1975-12-23

    An improved method for forming a thin nitrocellulose film of reproducible thickness is described. The film is a cellulose nitrate film, 10 to 20 microns in thickness, cast from a solution of cellulose nitrate in tetrahydrofuran, said solution containing from 7 to 15 percent, by weight, of dioctyl phthalate, said cellulose nitrate having a nitrogen content of from 10 to 13 percent.

  15. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a...

  16. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  17. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely used as a curing agent in the processing of...

  18. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely...

  19. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely...

  20. Efflux Of Nitrate From Hydroponically Grown Wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. C.; Aslam, M.; Ward, M. R.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments to measure influx, and efflux of nitrate from hydroponically grown wheat seedlings. Ratio between efflux and influx greater in darkness than in light; increased with concentration of nitrate in nutrient solution. On basis of experiments, authors suggest nutrient solution optimized at lowest possible concentration of nitrate.

  1. 21 CFR 172.170 - Sodium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrate. 172.170 Section 172.170 Food and... PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.170 Sodium nitrate. The food additive sodium nitrate may be safely used in or on specified foods in accordance with...

  2. 21 CFR 172.160 - Potassium nitrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium nitrate. 172.160 Section 172.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Food Preservatives § 172.160 Potassium nitrate. The food additive potassium nitrate may be safely...

  3. Protective effect of salivary nitrate and microbial nitrate reductase activity against caries.

    PubMed

    Doel, J J; Hector, M P; Amirtham, C V; Al-Anzan, L A; Benjamin, N; Allaker, R P

    2004-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that a combination of high salivary nitrate and high nitrate-reducing capacity are protective against dental caries, 209 children attending the Dental Institute, Barts and The London NHS Trust were examined. Salivary nitrate and nitrite levels, counts of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp., and caries experience were recorded. Compared with control subjects, a significant reduction in caries experience was found in patients with high salivary nitrate and high nitrate-reducing ability. Production of nitrite from salivary nitrate by commensal nitrate-reducing bacteria may limit the growth of cariogenic bacteria as a result of the production of antimicrobial oxides of nitrogen, including nitric oxide. PMID:15458501

  4. Iron and alloys of iron. [lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastri, Sankar

    1992-01-01

    All lunar soil contains iron in the metallic form, mostly as an iron-nickel alloy in concentrations of a few tenths of 1 percent. Some of this free iron can be easily separated by magnetic means. It is estimated that the magnetic separation of 100,000 tons of lunar soil would yield 150-200 tons of iron. Agglutinates contain metallic iron which could be extracted by melting and made into powder metallurgy products. The characteristics and potential uses of the pure-iron and iron-alloy lunar products are discussed. Processes for working iron that might be used in a nonterrestrial facility are also addressed.

  5. Continuous flow nitration in miniaturized devices

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary This review highlights the state of the art in the field of continuous flow nitration with miniaturized devices. Although nitration has been one of the oldest and most important unit reactions, the advent of miniaturized devices has paved the way for new opportunities to reconsider the conventional approach for exothermic and selectivity sensitive nitration reactions. Four different approaches to flow nitration with microreactors are presented herein and discussed in view of their advantages, limitations and applicability of the information towards scale-up. Selected recent patents that disclose scale-up methodologies for continuous flow nitration are also briefly reviewed. PMID:24605161

  6. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, M.; Yoo, C. S.

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood -resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 17 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400 °C.

  7. Deconstructing nitrate isotope dynamics in aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, J.

    2012-12-01

    The natural abundance N and O stable isotope ratios of nitrate provide an invaluable tool to differentiate N sources to the environment, track their dispersal, and monitor their attenuation by biological transformations. The interpretation of patterns in isotope abundances relies on knowledge of the isotope ratios of the source end-members, as well as on constraints on the isotope discrimination imposed on nitrate by respective biological processes. Emergent observations from mono-culture experiments of denitrifying bacteria reveal nitrate fractionation trends that appear at odds with trends ascribed to denitrification in soils and aquifers. This discrepancy raises the possibility that additional biological N transformations may be acting in tandem with denitrification. Here, the N and O isotope enrichments associated with nitrate removal by denitrification in aquifers are posited to bear evidence of coincident biological nitrate production - from nitrification and/or from anammox. Simulations are presented from a simple time-dependent one-box model of a groundwater mass ageing that is subject to net nitrate loss by denitrification with coincident nitrate production by nitrification or anammox. Within boundary conditions characteristic of freshwater aquifers, the apparent slope of the parallel enrichments in nitrate N and O isotopes associated with net N loss to denitrification can vary in proportion to the nitrate added simultaneous by oxidative processes. Pertinent observations from nitrate plumes in suboxic to anoxic aquifers are examined to validate this premise. In this perspective, nitrate isotope distributions suggest that we may be missing important N fluxes inherent to most aquifers.

  8. Biological Oxidation of Fe(II) in Reduced Nontronite Coupled with Nitrate Reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania sp. Strain 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Agrawal, A.; Liu, Deng; Zhang, Jing; Edelmann, Richard E.

    2013-10-15

    Nitrate contamination in soils, sediments, and water bodies is a significant issue. Although much is known about nitrate degradation in these environments, especially via microbial pathways, a complete understanding of all degradation processes, especially in clay mineral-rich soils, is still lacking. The objective of this study was to study the potential of removing nitrate contaminant using structural Fe(II) in clay mineral nontronite. Specifically, the coupled processes of microbial oxidation of Fe(II) in microbially reduced nontronite (NAu-2) and nitrate reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania species strain 2002 was investigated. Bio-oxidation experiments were conducted in bicarbonate-buffered medium under both growth and nongrowth conditions. The extents of Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction were measured by wet chemical methods. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), and 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to observe mineralogical changes associated with Fe(III) reduction and Fe(II) oxidation in nontronite. The bio-oxidation extent under growth and nongrowth conditions reached 93% and 57%, respectively. Over the same time period, nitrate was completely reduced under both conditions to nitrogen gas (N2), via an intermediate product nitrite. Magnetite was a mineral product of nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation, as evidenced by XRD data and TEM diffraction patterns. The results of this study highlight the importance of iron-bearing clay minerals in the global nitrogen cycle with potential applications in nitrate removal in soils.

  9. Iron and iron derived radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Nitrate Utilization by the Diatom Skeletonema costatum

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Juan L.; Llama, Maria J.; Cadenas, Eduardo

    1978-01-01

    Nitrate uptake has been studied in nitrogen-deficient cells of the marine diatom Skeletonema costatum. When these cells are incubated in the presence of nitrate, this ion is quickly taken up from the medium, and nitrite is excreted by the cells. Nitrite is excreted following classical saturation kinetics, its rate being independent of nitrate concentration in the incubation medium for nitrate concentration values higher than 3 micromolar. Nitrate uptake shows mixed-transfer kinetics, which can be attributed to the simultaneous contributions of mediated and diffusion transfer. Cycloheximide and p-hydroxymercuribenzoate inhibit the carrier-mediated contribution to nitrate uptake, without affecting the diffusion component. When cells are preincubated with nitrate, the net nitrogen uptake is increased. PMID:16660652

  11. Pollution of drinking water with nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Cabel, B.; Kozicki, R.; Lahl, U.; Podbielshi, A.; Stachel, B.; Struss, S.

    1982-01-01

    The main sources of nitrate in man are food and drinking water. The legislature in West Germany intends to lower the permitted level of nitrate in drinking water from the present 90 mg/l to 50 mg/l in 1982. The European Community has issued a directive that recommends a level of only 25 mg/l, and for babies 10 mg/l nitrate should not be exceeded. At present, nitrate cannot be removed from raw water at an acceptable cost. The problem of high nitrate content is mainly one of drinking water generation from ground water. Several analyses indicate rising concentrations of nitrate in ground water in different regions of West Germany, especially in the last few years. The following sources of nitrate-contamination of ground water aquifers in West are discussed: natural sources; over-manuring of agricultural areas with natural organic fertilizers; over-manuring of agricultural areas with synthetic fertilizers.

  12. High performance ammonium nitrate propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, F. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A high performance propellant having greatly reduced hydrogen chloride emission is presented. It is comprised of: (1) a minor amount of hydrocarbon binder (10-15%), (2) at least 85% solids including ammonium nitrate as the primary oxidizer (about 40% to 70%), (3) a significant amount (5-25%) powdered metal fuel, such as aluminum, (4) a small amount (5-25%) of ammonium perchlorate as a supplementary oxidizer, and (5) optionally a small amount (0-20%) of a nitramine.

  13. Photochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, W.K.

    1993-10-20

    The photochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate solutions to tetravalent uranium was investigated as a means of producing uranium dioxide feed for the saltless direct oxide reduction (SDOR) process. At high uranium concentrations, reoxidation of U{sup +4} occurs rapidly. The kinetics of the nitric oxidation of tetravalent uranium depend on the concentrations of hydrogen ion, nitrate ion, nitrous acid, and tetravalent uranium in the same manner as was reported elsewhere for the nitrate oxidation of PU{sup +3}. Reaction rate data were successfully correlated with a mechanism in which nitrogen dioxide is the reactive intermediate. Addition of a nitrous acid scavenger suppresses the reoxidation reaction. An immersion reactor employing a mercury vapor lamp gave reduction times fast enough for routine production usage. Precipitation techniques for conversion of aqueous U(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} to hydrous UO{sub 2} were evaluated. Prolonged dewatering times tended to make the process time consuming. Use of 3- to 4-M aqueous NaOH gave the best dewatering times observed. Reoxidation of the UO{sub 2} by water of hydration was encountered, which required the drying process to be carried out under a reducing atmosphere.

  14. Maximal Expression of Membrane-Bound Nitrate Reductase in Paracoccus Is Induced by Nitrate via a Third FNR-Like Regulator Named NarR

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Nicholas J.; Alizadeh, Tooba; Bennett, Scott; Pearce, Joanne; Ferguson, Stuart J.; Richardson, David J.; Moir, James W. B.

    2001-01-01

    Respiratory reduction of nitrate to nitrite is the first key step in the denitrification process that leads to nitrate loss from soils. In Paracoccus pantotrophus, the enzyme system that catalyzes this reaction is encoded by the narKGHJI gene cluster. Expression of this cluster is maximal under anaerobic conditions in the presence of nitrate. Upstream from narK is narR, a gene encoding a member of the FNR family of transcriptional activators. narR is transcribed divergently from the other nar genes. Mutational analysis reveals that NarR is required for maximal expression of the membrane-bound nitrate reductase genes and narK but has no other regulatory function related to denitrification. NarR is shown to require nitrate and/or nitrite is order to activate gene expression. The N-terminal region of the protein lacks the cysteine residues that are required for formation of an oxygen-sensitive iron-sulfur cluster in some other members of the FNR family. Also, NarR lacks a crucial residue involved in interactions of this family of regulators with the ς70 subunit of RNA polymerase, indicating that a different mechanism is used to promote transcription. narR is also found in Paracoccus denitrificans, indicating that this species contains at least three FNR homologues. PMID:11371524

  15. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  16. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  17. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  18. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  19. 49 CFR 176.415 - Permit requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. 176.415 Section 176.415 Transportation Other... requirements for Division 1.5, ammonium nitrates, and certain ammonium nitrate fertilizers. (a) Except as... Captain of the Port (COTP). (1) Ammonium nitrate UN1942, ammonium nitrate fertilizers containing more...

  20. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulot, F.; Ginoux, P.; Cooke, W. F.; Donner, L. J.; Fan, S.; Lin, M.-Y.; Mao, J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2016-02-01

    We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model (AM3). Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 %) or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %). Our best estimate for fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm in 2010 is 0.006 (0.005-0.008). In wintertime, nitrate aerosols are simulated to account for over 30 % of the aerosol optical depth over western Europe and North America. Simulated nitrate optical depth increases by less than 30 % (0.0061-0.010) in response to projected changes in anthropogenic emissions from 2010 to 2050 (e.g., -40 % for SO2 and +38 % for ammonia). This increase is primarily driven by greater concentrations of nitrate in the free troposphere, while surface nitrate concentrations decrease in the midlatitudes following lower concentrations of nitric acid. With the projected increase of ammonia emissions, we show that better constraints on the vertical distribution of ammonia (e.g., convective transport and biomass burning injection) and on the sources and sinks of nitric acid (e.g., heterogeneous reaction on dust) are needed to improve estimates of future nitrate optical depth.

  1. Bacteria associated with iron seeps in a sulfur-rich, neutral pH, freshwater ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Haaijer, Suzanne C M; Harhangi, Harry R; Meijerink, Bas B; Strous, Marc; Pol, Arjan; Smolders, Alfons J P; Verwegen, Karin; Jetten, Mike S M; Op den Camp, Huub J M

    2008-12-01

    The freshwater nature reserve De Bruuk is an iron- and sulfur-rich minerotrophic peatland containing many iron seeps and forms a suitable habitat for iron and sulfur cycle bacteria. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene-based clone libraries showed a striking correlation of the bacterial population of samples from this freshwater ecosystem with the processes of iron reduction (genus Geobacter), iron oxidation (genera Leptothrix and Gallionella) and sulfur oxidation (genus Sulfuricurvum). Results from fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses with a probe specific for the beta-1 subgroup of Proteobacteria, to which the genera Leptothrix and Gallionella belong, and newly developed probes specific for the genera Geobacter and Sulfuricurvum, supported the clone library data. Molecular data suggested members of the epsilonproteobacterial genus Sulfuricurvum as contributors to the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds in the iron seeps of De Bruuk. In an evaluation of anaerobic dimethyl sulfide (DMS)-degrading activity of sediment, incubations with the electron acceptors sulfate, ferric iron and nitrate were performed. The fastest conversion of DMS was observed with nitrate. Further, a DMS-oxidizing, nitrate-reducing enrichment culture was established with sediment material from De Bruuk. This culture was dominated by dimorphic, prosthecate bacteria, and the 16S rRNA gene sequence obtained from this enrichment was closely affiliated with Hyphomicrobium facile, which indicates that the Hyphomicrobium species are capable of both aerobic and nitrate-driven DMS degradation. PMID:18754044

  2. [Nitrate storage and transport within a typical karst aquifer system in the paralleled ridge-valley of east Sichuan].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping-Heng; Yuan, Dao-Xian; Ren, You-Rong; Xie, Shi-You; He, Qiu-Fang; Hu, Xiao-Feng

    2012-09-01

    In order to investigate the nitrate storage and transport in the karst aquifer system, the hydrochemical dynamics of Qingmuguan underground river system was monitored online by achieving high-resolution data during storm events and monthly data in normal weather. The principal component analysis was employed to analyze the karst water geochemistry. Results showed that nitrate in Jiangjia spring did not share the same source with soluble iron, manganese and aluminum, and exhibited different geochemical behaviors. Nitrate was derived from land surface and infiltrated together with soil water, which was mainly stored in fissure, pore and solution crack of karst unsaturated zone, whereas soluble iron, manganese and aluminum were derived from soil erosion and directly recharged the underground river through sinkholes and shafts. Nitrate transport in the karst aquifer system could be ideally divided into three phases, including input storage, fast output and re-inputting storage. Under similar external conditions, the karstification intensity of vadose zone was the key factor to determine the dynamics of nitrate concentrations in the groundwater during storm events. Nitrate stored in the karst vadose zone was easily released, which would impair the aquatic ecosystem and pose seriously threats to the local health. Thus, to strengthen the management of ecological system, changing the land-use patterns and scientifically applying fertilizer could effectively make a contribution to controlling mass nutrient input from the surface.

  3. Effect of nitrate on microbial perchlorate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Over the last decade perchlorate has been recognized as an important emerging water contaminant that poses a significant public health threat. Because of its chemical stability, low ionic charge density, and significant water solubility microbial remediation has been identified as the most feasible method for its in situ attenuation. Our previous studies have demonstrated that dissimilatory perchlorate reducing bacteria (DPRB) capable of the respiratory reduction of perchlorate into innocuous chloride are ubiquitous in soil and sedimentary environments. As part of their metabolism these organisms reduce perchlorate to chlorite which is subsequently dismutated into chloride and molecular oxygen. These initial steps are mediated by the perchlorate reductase and chlorite dismutase enzymes respectively. Previously we found that the activity of these organisms is dependent on the presence of molybdenum and is inhibited by the presence of oxygen and to different extents nitrate. However, to date, there is little understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of perchlorate reduction by oxygen and nitrate. As a continuation of our studies into the factors that control DPRB activity we investigated these regulatory mechanisms in more detail as a model organism, Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB, transitions from aerobic metabolism through nitrate reduction to perchlorate reduction. In series of growth transition studies where both nitrate and perchlorate were present, preference for nitrate to perchlorate was observed regardless of the nitrate to perchlorate ratio. Even when the organism was pre-grown anaerobically in perchlorate, nitrate was reduced prior to perchlorate. Using non-growth washed cell suspension, perchlorate- grown D. aromatica was capable of reducing both perchlorate and nitrate concomitantly suggesting the preferentially utilization of nitrate was not a result of enzyme functionality. To elucidate the mechanism for preferential utilization of

  4. Identification of periplasmic nitrate reductase Mo(V) EPR signals in intact cells of Paracoccus denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Sears, H J; Bennett, B; Spiro, S; Thomson, A J; Richardson, D J

    1995-08-15

    EPR spectroscopy has been successfully used to detect signals due to molybdenum (V) and ferric iron in intact cells of aerobically grown Paracoccus denitrificans. The signals are ascribed to the catalytic molybdenum centre and to the haem iron of the periplasmic nitrate reductase. These signals are absent from a mutant strain deficient in this enzyme. The Mo(V) signal is due to the High-g Split species which has been well characterized in the purified enzyme. This confirms that the High-g Split is the physiologically relevant signal of a number observed in the previous work on the purified enzyme. PMID:7646461

  5. Nitrate deposition and impact on Adirondack streams

    SciTech Connect

    Simonin, H.A.; Kretser, W.A.

    1997-12-31

    Acidic deposition has a great impact on water chemistry and fish populations in the Adirondack region. Although the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 have resulted in some reductions of sulfate deposition, nitrate deposition has not yet been well controlled, and continues to impact aquatic resources. As part of the USEPA funded Episodic Response Project four Adirondack headwater streams were intensively monitored over an 18 month period. Atmospheric deposition was also monitored at a centrally located station. The quantity of nitrate being deposited on the study watersheds was calculated based on monthly net deposition data which ranged from 0.6 kg/ha/month to 3.6 kg/ha/month. These data were then compared to the monthly export of nitrate from the watershed in these streams. Nitrate concentrations were highest in the streamwater during the spring snowmelt period prior to the time when forest vegetation actively utilizes nitrate. On an annual basis the amount of nitrate which left the watershed via stream water exceeded the amount which fell as nitrate deposition. These data are important in documenting the impact of nitrate in the acidification of Adirondack streams during the spring, which coincides with brook trout hatching. Control programs for nitrous oxide emissions are presently aimed at reducing ozone levels during the May-September period. These emissions control programs need to be expanded to also reduce nitrate deposition in the sensitive Adirondack region during the winter and spring periods when nitrate deposition has its greatest impact on aquatic resources.

  6. In situ reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes in high nitrate groundwater.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Peter; Gandhi, Deepa; Warner, Scott; Bussey, Julia

    2007-11-19

    In situ bioremediation using carbohydrate was evaluated as an in situ treatment alternative for trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE) in groundwater containing high nitrate concentrations. Upon addition of carbohydrate to groundwater, sequential reduction of electron acceptors was observed, where nitrate was reduced early in the pilot test, followed by sulfate and TCE. Reduction of cDCE to vinyl chloride and ethene occurred in conjunction with increased iron and manganese, and increased methane concentrations, approximately 7 months into the evaluation period, following depletion of nitrate and sulfate. TCE, cDCE, and vinyl chloride concentrations decreased from approximately 500 to >10 microg/L within 21 months of operation.

  7. Nitrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... or interactions with other medicines and vitamin or herbal supplements. This information should not be used as medical ... your doctor about every medicine and vitamin or herbal supplement that you are taking, so he or she ...

  8. Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Stolz

    2011-06-15

    proteins (Gmet_2478 and Gmet_1641) were up-regulated with exposure to Cr(VI). A nine-heme cytochrome C was purified that could reduce nitrite and could be oxidized by Cr(VI). For D. desulfuricans, we found that confirmed that Cr(VI) induced a prolonged lag period when Cr(VI) was reduced. Over three hundred proteins were unequivocally identified by LC/MS-MS and a significant number of down-regulated proteins for which the levels were changed >2 fold compared to control. Sulfite reductase levels were similar, however, nitrate and nitrite reductase were down-regulated. The supernatant of spent cultures was found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI). In addition, desulfoviridin was purified from nitrate grown cells and shown to have nitrite reductase activity that was inhibited by Cr(VI). For S. barnesii, periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), nitrite reductase (Nrf), and the metalloid reductase (Rar) were purified and characterized. The supernatant of spent cultures was also found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI) but that Rar also reduced Cr(VI). Our results from specific aims 1 through 3 indicate that for G. metallireducens, Cr(VI) inhibits nitrate respiration as it oxidizes cytochromes involved in nitrate respiration. Iron reduction is apparently not affected and the inhibitory affects of Cr(VI) may be attenuated by the addition of sufficient Fe(III) to generate Fe(II) that abiotically reduces the chromium. For S. barnesii, although the enzyme assays indicate that the components of the respiratory pathway for nitrate (e.g. Nap and Nrf) are inhibited by chromate, the organism has a mechanism to prevent this from actually occurring. Our current hypothesis is that the non-specific metalloid reductase (Rar) is providing resistance by reducing the Cr(VI). The strategy here would be to enhance its growth and metabolism in the natural setting. Lactate is a suitable electron donor for S. barnesii but other

  9. Effects of microbial redox cycling of iron on cast iron pipe corrosion in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Lili; Li, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min

    2014-11-15

    Bacterial characteristics in corrosion products and their effect on the formation of dense corrosion scales on cast iron coupons were studied in drinking water, with sterile water acting as a reference. The corrosion process and corrosion scales were characterized by electrochemical and physico-chemical measurements. The results indicated that the corrosion was more rapidly inhibited and iron release was lower due to formation of more dense protective corrosion scales in drinking water than in sterile water. The microbial community and denitrifying functional genes were analyzed by pyrosequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR), respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the bacteria in corrosion products played an important role in the corrosion process in drinking water. Nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Acidovorax and Hydrogenophaga enhanced iron corrosion before 6 days. After 20 days, the dominant bacteria became NRB Dechloromonas (40.08%) with the protective corrosion layer formation. The Dechloromonas exhibited the stronger corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron, to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4. Subsequently, other minor bacteria appeared in the corrosion scales, including iron-respiring bacteria and Rhizobium which captured iron by the produced siderophores, having a weaker corrosion-inhibition effect. Therefore, the microbially-driven redox cycling of iron with associated microbial capture of iron caused more compact corrosion scales formation and lower iron release.

  10. Catalytic etching of synthetic diamond crystallites by iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Tatsuya; Sugimoto, Wataru; Takasu, Yoshio

    2012-08-01

    For the expansion of the functionality of diamond crystallites by modification of surface morphology, catalytic etching of synthetic diamond crystallites at 1173 K by iron, which were loaded by the impregnation method using an aqueous solution of iron nitrate; in a streaming mixed gas (pH2=0.1   MPa, pN2=0.9   MPa), has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The dependence of the crystal planes {1 1 1} and {1 0 0}, of the diamond crystallites and the loading amount of iron on the diamond on the etching behavior by iron particles, the morphology of the etch pits, and potential formation of iron carbide through the catalytic etching, were discussed.

  11. Pharmacology of Iron Transport

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Shaina L.; Krishnamurthy, Divya; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular basis for the regulation of iron uptake, storage, and distribution is necessary to understand iron homeostasis. Pharmacological tools are emerging to identify and distinguish among different iron transport pathways. Stimulatory or inhibitory small molecules with effects on iron uptake can help characterize the mechanistic elements of iron transport and the roles of the transporters involved in these processes. In particular, iron chelators can serve as potential pharmacological tools to alleviate diseases of iron overload. This review focuses on the pharmacology of iron transport, introducing iron transport membrane proteins and known inhibitors. PMID:23020294

  12. Trend Analyses of Nitrate in Danish Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, B.; Thorling, L.; Dalgaard, T.; Erlandsen, M.

    2012-04-01

    This presentation assesses the long-term development in the oxic groundwater nitrate concentration and nitrogen (N) loss due to intensive farming in Denmark. Firstly, up to 20-year time-series from the national groundwater monitoring network enable a statistically systematic analysis of distribution, trends and trend reversals in the groundwater nitrate concentration. Secondly, knowledge about the N surplus in Danish agriculture since 1950 is used as an indicator of the potential loss of N. Thirdly, groundwater recharge CFC (Chlorofluorocarbon) age determination allows linking of the first two dataset. The development in the nitrate concentration of oxic groundwater clearly mirrors the development in the national agricultural N surplus, and a corresponding trend reversal is found in groundwater. Regulation and technical improvements in the intensive farming in Denmark have succeeded in decreasing the N surplus by 40% since the mid 1980s while at the same time maintaining crop yields and increasing the animal production of especially pigs. Trend analyses prove that the youngest (0-15 years old) oxic groundwater shows more pronounced significant downward nitrate trends (44%) than the oldest (25-50 years old) oxic groundwater (9%). This amounts to clear evidence of the effect of reduced nitrate leaching on groundwater nitrate concentrations in Denmark. Are the Danish groundwater monitoring strategy obtimal for detection of nitrate trends? Will the nitrate concentrations in Danish groundwater continue to decrease or are the Danish nitrate concentration levels now appropriate according to the Water Framework Directive?

  13. Measurement of isoprene nitrates by GCMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Graham P.; Hiatt-Gipson, Glyn D.; Bew, Sean P.; Reeves, Claire E.

    2016-09-01

    According to atmospheric chemistry models, isoprene nitrates play an important role in determining the ozone production efficiency of isoprene; however this is very poorly constrained through observations as isoprene nitrates have not been widely measured. Measurements have been severely restricted largely due to a limited ability to measure individual isoprene nitrate isomers. An instrument based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GCMS) and the associated calibration methods are described for the speciated measurements of individual isoprene nitrate isomers. Five of the primary isoprene nitrates which formed in the presence of NOx by reaction of isoprene with the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the Master Chemical Mechanism are identified using known isomers on two column phases and are fully separated on the Rtx-200 column. Three primary isoprene nitrates from the reaction of isoprene with the nitrate radical (NO3) are identified after synthesis from the already identified analogous hydroxy nitrate. A Tenax adsorbent-based trapping system allows the analysis of the majority of the known hydroxy and carbonyl primary isoprene nitrates, although not the (1,2)-IN isomer, under field-like levels of humidity and showed no impact from typical ambient concentrations of NOx and ozone.

  14. Groundwater nitrate contamination: factors and indicators.

    PubMed

    Wick, Katharina; Heumesser, Christine; Schmid, Erwin

    2012-11-30

    Identifying significant determinants of groundwater nitrate contamination is critical in order to define sensible agri-environmental indicators that support the design, enforcement, and monitoring of regulatory policies. We use data from approximately 1200 Austrian municipalities to provide a detailed statistical analysis of (1) the factors influencing groundwater nitrate contamination and (2) the predictive capacity of the Gross Nitrogen Balance, one of the most commonly used agri-environmental indicators. We find that the percentage of cropland in a given region correlates positively with nitrate concentration in groundwater. Additionally, environmental characteristics such as temperature and precipitation are important co-factors. Higher average temperatures result in lower nitrate contamination of groundwater, possibly due to increased evapotranspiration. Higher average precipitation dilutes nitrates in the soil, further reducing groundwater nitrate concentration. Finally, we assess whether the Gross Nitrogen Balance is a valid predictor of groundwater nitrate contamination. Our regression analysis reveals that the Gross Nitrogen Balance is a statistically significant predictor for nitrate contamination. We also show that its predictive power can be improved if we account for average regional precipitation. The Gross Nitrogen Balance predicts nitrate contamination in groundwater more precisely in regions with higher average precipitation.

  15. Groundwater nitrate contamination: Factors and indicators

    PubMed Central

    Wick, Katharina; Heumesser, Christine; Schmid, Erwin

    2012-01-01

    Identifying significant determinants of groundwater nitrate contamination is critical in order to define sensible agri-environmental indicators that support the design, enforcement, and monitoring of regulatory policies. We use data from approximately 1200 Austrian municipalities to provide a detailed statistical analysis of (1) the factors influencing groundwater nitrate contamination and (2) the predictive capacity of the Gross Nitrogen Balance, one of the most commonly used agri-environmental indicators. We find that the percentage of cropland in a given region correlates positively with nitrate concentration in groundwater. Additionally, environmental characteristics such as temperature and precipitation are important co-factors. Higher average temperatures result in lower nitrate contamination of groundwater, possibly due to increased evapotranspiration. Higher average precipitation dilutes nitrates in the soil, further reducing groundwater nitrate concentration. Finally, we assess whether the Gross Nitrogen Balance is a valid predictor of groundwater nitrate contamination. Our regression analysis reveals that the Gross Nitrogen Balance is a statistically significant predictor for nitrate contamination. We also show that its predictive power can be improved if we account for average regional precipitation. The Gross Nitrogen Balance predicts nitrate contamination in groundwater more precisely in regions with higher average precipitation. PMID:22906701

  16. Iron supply and demand in the upper ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, I.Y.; Meyn, S.K.; Tegen, I.; Doney, S.C.; John, J.; Bishop, J.

    1999-09-29

    Iron is hypothesized to be a limiting micronutrient for ocean primary production. This paper presents an analysis of the iron budget in the upper ocean. The global distribution of annual iron assimilation by phytoplankton was estimated from distributions of satellite-derived oceanic primary production and measured (Fe:C)(cellular) ratios. The distributions of iron supply by upwelling/mixing and aeolian deposition were obtained by applying (Fe:NO3)(dissolved) ratios to the nitrate supply and by assuming the soluble fraction of mineral aerosols. A lower bound on the rate of iron recycling in the photic zone was estimated as the difference between iron assimilation and supply. Global iron assimilation by phytoplankton for the open ocean was estimated to be 12 x 10(9) mol Fe yr(-1). Atmospheric deposition of total Fe is estimated to be 96 x 10(9) mol Fe yr(-1) in the open ocean, with the soluble Fe fraction ranging between 1 and 10 percent (or 1-10 x 10(9) mol Fe yr(-1)). By comparison, the upwelling/entrainment supply of dissolved Fe to the upper ocean is small, similar to 0.7 x 10(9) mol Fe yr(-1). Uncertainties in the aeolian flux and assimilation may be as large as a factor of 5-10 but remain difficult to quantify, as information is limited about the form and transformation of iron from the soil to phytoplankton incorporation. An iron stress index, relating the (Fe:N) demand to the (Fe:N) supply, confirms the production in the high-nitrate low-chlorophyll regions is indeed limited by iron availability.

  17. Phase Diagram of Ammonium Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-06-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) has often been subjected to uses in improvised explosive devices, due to its wide availability as a fertilizer and its capability of becoming explosive with slight additions of organic and inorganic compounds. Yet, the origin of enhanced energetic properties of impure AN (or AN mixtures) is neither chemically unique nor well understood - resulting in rather catastrophic disasters in the past1 and thereby a significant burden on safety, in using ammonium nitrates even today. To remedy this situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN, in different chemical environments, at high pressure and temperature, using diamond anvil cells and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The present results confirm the recently proposed phase IV-to-IV' transition above 15 GPa2 and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 673 K. The present study has been supported by the U.S. DHS under Award Number 2008-ST-061-ED0001.

  18. Peroxyacetyl nitrate and peroxypropionyl nitrate in Porto Alegre, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosjean, Eric; Grosjean, Daniel; Woodhouse, Luis F.; Yang, Yueh-Jiun

    For 41 days between 25 May 1996 and 27 March 1997, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and peroxypropionyl nitrate (PPN) have been measured by electron capture gas chromatography at Santa Rita near Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil, where light-duty vehicles used either ethanol or a gasoline-MTBE blend. Daily maximum concentrations ranged from 0.19 to 6.67 ppb for PAN and 0.06 to 0.72 ppb for PPN. Linear regression of maximum PPN vs. maximum PAN yielded a slope of 0.105±0.004 ( R2=0.974). Diurnal variations of ambient PAN often followed those of ozone with respect to time of day but not with respect to amplitude. This was reflected in the large relative standard deviations associated with the study-averaged PAN/ozone concentration ratio, 0.037±0.105 (ppb/ppb, n=789) and the maximum PAN/maximum ozone concentration ratio, 0.028±0.015 (ppb/ppb, range 0.005-0.078, n=41). On several days PAN accounted for large fractions of the total ambient NO x in the late morning and afternoon hours, e.g., PAN/NO x⩽0.58 and PAN/(NO x-NO) ⩽0.76 on 27 March 1997. The amount of PAN lost by thermal decomposition (TPAN) was comparable in magnitude to that present in ambient air. The ratios TPAN/(PAN+TPAN) were up to 0.53, 0.67 and 0.64 during the warm afternoons of 25, 26 and 27 March 1997, respectively. The highest calculated value of TPAN was 5.6 ppb on 27 March 1997. On that day the 24 h-averaged value of TPAN (1.01 ppb) was nearly the same as that of PAN (1.09 ppb). Using computer kinetic modeling (SAPRC 97 chemical mechanism) and sensitivity analysis of VOC incremental reactivity, we ranked VOC present in Porto Alegre ambient air for their importance as precursors to PAN and to PPN. Using as input data the averages of VOC concentrations measured in downtown Porto Alegre during the ca. 1 yr period March 1996-April 1997, we calculated that the most important precursors to PAN and PPN were the SAPRC 97 model species ARO2 (which includes the aromatics xylenes, trimethylbenzenes, ethyltoluenes, etc

  19. Challenges with nitrate therapy and nitrate tolerance: prevalence, prevention, and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Thadani, Udho

    2014-08-01

    Nitrate therapy has been an effective treatment for ischemic heart disease for over 100 years. The anti-ischemic and exercise-promoting benefits of sublingually administered nitrates are well established. Nitroglycerin is indicated for the relief of an established attack of angina and for prophylactic use, but its effects are short lived. In an effort to increase the duration of beneficial effects, long-acting orally administered and topical applications of nitrates have been developed; however, following their continued or frequent daily use, patients soon develop tolerance to these long-acting nitrate preparations. Once tolerance develops, patients begin losing the protective effects of the long-acting nitrate therapy. By providing a nitrate-free interval, or declining nitrate levels at night, one can overcome or reduce the development of tolerance, but cannot provide 24-h anti-anginal and anti-ischemic protection. In addition, patients may be vulnerable to occurrence of rebound angina and myocardial ischemia during periods of absent nitrate levels at night and early hours of the morning, and worsening of exercise capacity prior to the morning dose of the medication. This has been a concern with nitroglycerin patches but not with oral formulations of isosorbide-5 mononitrates, and has not been adequately studied with isosorbide dinitrate. This paper describes problems associated with nitrate tolerance, reviews mechanisms by which nitrate tolerance and loss of efficacy develop, and presents strategies to avoid nitrate tolerance and maintain efficacy when using long-acting nitrate formulations.

  20. Arabidopsis Nitrate Transporter NRT1.9 Is Important in Phloem Nitrate Transport[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Yun; Tsay, Yi-Fang

    2011-01-01

    This study of the Arabidopsis thaliana nitrate transporter NRT1.9 reveals an important function for a NRT1 family member in phloem nitrate transport. Functional analysis in Xenopus laevis oocytes showed that NRT1.9 is a low-affinity nitrate transporter. Green fluorescent protein and β-glucuronidase reporter analyses indicated that NRT1.9 is a plasma membrane transporter expressed in the companion cells of root phloem. In nrt1.9 mutants, nitrate content in root phloem exudates was decreased, and downward nitrate transport was reduced, suggesting that NRT1.9 may facilitate loading of nitrate into the root phloem and enhance downward nitrate transport in roots. Under high nitrate conditions, the nrt1.9 mutant showed enhanced root-to-shoot nitrate transport and plant growth. We conclude that phloem nitrate transport is facilitated by expression of NRT1.9 in root companion cells. In addition, enhanced root-to-shoot xylem transport of nitrate in nrt1.9 mutants points to a negative correlation between xylem and phloem nitrate transport. PMID:21571952

  1. REDUCTION OF NITRATE THROUGH THE USE OF NITRATE REDUCTASE FOR THE SMARTCHEM AUTOANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The standard method for the determination of nitrate in drinking water, USEPA Method 353.2 “Determination of Nitrate-Nitrite by Automated Colorimetry,” employs cadmium as the reductant for the conversion of nitrate to nitrite. The nitrite is then analyzed colorimetrically by way ...

  2. Removal of Nitrate from Groundwater by Cyanobacteria: Quantitative Assessment of Factors Influencing Nitrate Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qiang; Westerhoff, Paul; Vermaas, Wim

    2000-01-01

    The feasibility of biologically removing nitrate from groundwater was tested by using cyanobacterial cultures in batch mode under laboratory conditions. Results demonstrated that nitrate-contaminated groundwater, when supplemented with phosphate and some trace elements, can be used as growth medium supporting vigorous growth of several strains of cyanobacteria. As cyanobacteria grew, nitrate was removed from the water. Of three species tested, Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 displayed the highest nitrate uptake rate, but all species showed rapid removal of nitrate from groundwater. The nitrate uptake rate increased proportionally with increasing light intensity up to 100 μmol of photons m−2 s−1, which parallels photosynthetic activity. The nitrate uptake rate was affected by inoculum size (i.e., cell density), fixed-nitrogen level in the cells in the inoculum, and aeration rate, with vigorously aerated, nitrate-sufficient cells in mid-logarithmic phase having the highest long-term nitrate uptake rate. Average nitrate uptake rates up to 0.05 mM NO3− h−1 could be achieved at a culture optical density at 730 nm of 0.5 to 1.0 over a 2-day culture period. This result compares favorably with those reported for nitrate removal by other cyanobacteria and algae, and therefore effective nitrate removal from groundwater using this organism could be anticipated on large-scale operations. PMID:10618214

  3. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Nitric Acid, Nitrates, and Nitro Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretherick, Leslie

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are the potential hazards associated with nitric acid, inorganic and organic nitrate salts, alkyl nitrates, acyl nitrates, aliphatic nitro compounds, aromatic nitro compounds, and nitration reactions. (CW)

  4. Nitrate Reduction Functional Genes and Nitrate Reduction Potentials Persist in Deeper Estuarine Sediments. Why?

    PubMed Central

    Papaspyrou, Sokratis; Smith, Cindy J.; Dong, Liang F.; Whitby, Corinne; Dumbrell, Alex J.; Nedwell, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) are processes occurring simultaneously under oxygen-limited or anaerobic conditions, where both compete for nitrate and organic carbon. Despite their ecological importance, there has been little investigation of how denitrification and DNRA potentials and related functional genes vary vertically with sediment depth. Nitrate reduction potentials measured in sediment depth profiles along the Colne estuary were in the upper range of nitrate reduction rates reported from other sediments and showed the existence of strong decreasing trends both with increasing depth and along the estuary. Denitrification potential decreased along the estuary, decreasing more rapidly with depth towards the estuary mouth. In contrast, DNRA potential increased along the estuary. Significant decreases in copy numbers of 16S rRNA and nitrate reducing genes were observed along the estuary and from surface to deeper sediments. Both metabolic potentials and functional genes persisted at sediment depths where porewater nitrate was absent. Transport of nitrate by bioturbation, based on macrofauna distributions, could only account for the upper 10 cm depth of sediment. A several fold higher combined freeze-lysable KCl-extractable nitrate pool compared to porewater nitrate was detected. We hypothesised that his could be attributed to intracellular nitrate pools from nitrate accumulating microorganisms like Thioploca or Beggiatoa. However, pyrosequencing analysis did not detect any such organisms, leaving other bacteria, microbenthic algae, or foraminiferans which have also been shown to accumulate nitrate, as possible candidates. The importance and bioavailability of a KCl-extractable nitrate sediment pool remains to be tested. The significant variation in the vertical pattern and abundance of the various nitrate reducing genes phylotypes reasonably suggests differences in their activity throughout the sediment column. This

  5. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  6. 76 FR 46907 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation FR Federal Register HMR Hazardous Materials Regulations HMT Hazardous... ``Secure Handling of Ammonium Nitrate Program'' on October 29, 2008. See 73 FR 64280. The ANPRM solicited... interacting with state and local governments regarding ammonium nitrate security. ] See 73 FR 64280,...

  7. Dietary Nitrate, Nitric Oxide, and Cardiovascular Health.

    PubMed

    Bondonno, Catherine P; Croft, Kevin D; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence strongly suggests that dietary nitrate, derived in the diet primarily from vegetables, could contribute to cardiovascular health via effects on nitric oxide (NO) status. NO plays an essential role in cardiovascular health. It is produced via the classical L-arginine-NO-synthase pathway and the recently discovered enterosalivary nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. The discovery of this alternate pathway has highlighted dietary nitrate as a candidate for the cardioprotective effect of a diet rich in fruit and vegetables. Clinical trials with dietary nitrate have observed improvements in blood pressure, endothelial function, ischemia-reperfusion injury, arterial stiffness, platelet function, and exercise performance with a concomitant augmentation of markers of NO status. While these results are indicative of cardiovascular benefits with dietary nitrate intake, there is still a lingering concern about nitrate in relation to methemoglobinemia, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. It is the purpose of this review to present an overview of NO and its critical role in cardiovascular health; to detail the observed vascular benefits of dietary nitrate intake through effects on NO status as well as to discuss the controversy surrounding the possible toxic effects of nitrate.

  8. Intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Brian D.; Boorjian, Stephen A.; Ziegelmann, Matthew J.; Joyce, Daniel D.; Linder, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hemorrhagic cystitis is a challenging clinical entity with limited evidence available to guide treatment. The use of intravesical silver nitrate has been reported, though supporting literature is sparse. Here, we sought to assess outcomes of patients treated with intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis. Material and methods We identified nine patients with refractory hemorrhagic cystitis treated at our institution with intravesical silver nitrate between 2000–2015. All patients had failed previous continuous bladder irrigation with normal saline and clot evacuation. Treatment success was defined as requiring no additional therapy beyond normal saline irrigation after silver nitrate instillation prior to hospital discharge. Results Median patient age was 80 years (IQR 73, 82). Radiation was the most common etiology for hemorrhagic cystitis 89% (8/9). Two patients underwent high dose (0.1%–0.4%) silver nitrate under anesthesia, while the remaining seven were treated with doses from 0.01% to 0.1% via continuous bladder irrigation for a median of 3 days (range 2–4). All nine patients (100%) had persistent hematuria despite intravesical silver nitrate therapy, requiring additional interventions and red blood cell transfusion during the hospitalization. There were no identified complications related to intravesical silver nitrate instillation. Conclusion Although well tolerated, we found that intravesical silver nitrate was ineffective for bleeding control, suggesting a limited role for this agent in the management of patients with hemorrhagic cystitis.

  9. COMPARTMENTAL MODEL OF NITRATE RETENTION IN STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A compartmental modeling approach is presented to route nitrate retention along a cascade of stream reach sections. A process transfer function is used for transient storage equations with first order reaction terms to represent nitrate uptake in the free stream, and denitrifica...

  10. Intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Brian D.; Boorjian, Stephen A.; Ziegelmann, Matthew J.; Joyce, Daniel D.; Linder, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hemorrhagic cystitis is a challenging clinical entity with limited evidence available to guide treatment. The use of intravesical silver nitrate has been reported, though supporting literature is sparse. Here, we sought to assess outcomes of patients treated with intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis. Material and methods We identified nine patients with refractory hemorrhagic cystitis treated at our institution with intravesical silver nitrate between 2000–2015. All patients had failed previous continuous bladder irrigation with normal saline and clot evacuation. Treatment success was defined as requiring no additional therapy beyond normal saline irrigation after silver nitrate instillation prior to hospital discharge. Results Median patient age was 80 years (IQR 73, 82). Radiation was the most common etiology for hemorrhagic cystitis 89% (8/9). Two patients underwent high dose (0.1%–0.4%) silver nitrate under anesthesia, while the remaining seven were treated with doses from 0.01% to 0.1% via continuous bladder irrigation for a median of 3 days (range 2–4). All nine patients (100%) had persistent hematuria despite intravesical silver nitrate therapy, requiring additional interventions and red blood cell transfusion during the hospitalization. There were no identified complications related to intravesical silver nitrate instillation. Conclusion Although well tolerated, we found that intravesical silver nitrate was ineffective for bleeding control, suggesting a limited role for this agent in the management of patients with hemorrhagic cystitis. PMID:27635296

  11. NITRATE CONTAMINATION OF GROUND WATER (GW-761)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The occurrence of nitrate and related compounds in ground water is discussed from the perspectives of its natural as well as anthropogenic origins. A brief explanation of the nitrogen cycle touches on the production as well as utilization of ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, and nitrog...

  12. The contributions of nitrate uptake and efflux to isotope fractionation during algal nitrate assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsh, K. L.; Trull, T. W.; Sigman, D. M.; Thompson, P. A.; Granger, J.

    2014-05-01

    In order to strengthen environmental application of nitrate N and O isotopes, we measured the N and O isotopic fractionation associated with cellular nitrate uptake and efflux in the nitrate-assimilating marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii. We isolated nitrate uptake and efflux from nitrate reduction by growing the cells in the presence of tungsten, which substitutes for molybdenum in assimilatory nitrate reductase, yielding an inactive enzyme. After growth on ammonium and then N starvation, cells were exposed to nitrate. Numerical models fit to the evolution of intracellular nitrate concentration and N and O isotopic composition yielded distinct N isotope effects (15ɛ) for nitrate uptake and nitrate efflux (2.0 ± 0.3‰ and 1.2 ± 0.4‰, respectively). The O isotope effects (18ɛ) for nitrate uptake and nitrate efflux were indistinguishable (2.8 ± 0.6‰), yielding a ratio of O to N isotopic fractionation for uptake of 1.4 ± 0.4 and for efflux of 2.3 ± 0.9. The 15ɛ for nitrate uptake can account for at most 40% of the organism-level N isotope effect (15ɛorg) measured in laboratory studies of T. weissflogii and in the open ocean (typically 5‰ or greater). This observation supports previous evidence that most isotope fractionation during nitrate assimilation is due to intracellular nitrate reduction, with nitrate efflux allowing the signal to be communicated to the environment. An O to N fractionation ratio (18ɛorg:15ɛorg) of ˜1 has been measured for nitrate assimilation in algal cultures and linked to the N and O isotope effects of nitrate reductase. Our results suggest that the ratios of O to N fractionation for both nitrate uptake and efflux may be distinct from a ratio of 1, to a degree that could cause the net 18ɛorg:15ɛorg to rise appreciably above 1 when 15ɛorg is low (e.g., yielding a ratio of 1.1 when 15ɛorg is 5‰). However, field and culture studies have consistently measured nearly equivalent fractionation of N and O isotopes in

  13. Aerosol-spray diverse mesoporous metal oxides from metal nitrates

    PubMed Central

    Kuai, Long; Wang, Junxin; Ming, Tian; Fang, Caihong; Sun, Zhenhua; Geng, Baoyou; Wang, Jianfang

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal oxides are widely used in solar cells, batteries, transistors, memories, transparent conductive electrodes, photocatalysts, gas sensors, supercapacitors, and smart windows. In many of these applications, large surface areas and pore volumes can enhance molecular adsorption, facilitate ion transfer, and increase interfacial areas; the formation of complex oxides (mixed, doped, multimetallic oxides and oxide-based hybrids) can alter electronic band structures, modify/enhance charge carrier concentrations/separation, and introduce desired functionalities. A general synthetic approach to diverse mesoporous metal oxides is therefore very attractive. Here we describe a powerful aerosol-spray method for synthesizing various mesoporous metal oxides from low-cost nitrate salts. During spray, thermal heating of precursor droplets drives solvent evaporation and induces surfactant-directed formation of mesostructures, nitrate decomposition and oxide cross-linking. Thirteen types of monometallic oxides and four groups of complex ones are successfully produced, with mesoporous iron oxide microspheres demonstrated for photocatalytic oxygen evolution and gas sensing with superior performances. PMID:25897988

  14. Aerosol-spray diverse mesoporous metal oxides from metal nitrates.

    PubMed

    Kuai, Long; Wang, Junxin; Ming, Tian; Fang, Caihong; Sun, Zhenhua; Geng, Baoyou; Wang, Jianfang

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal oxides are widely used in solar cells, batteries, transistors, memories, transparent conductive electrodes, photocatalysts, gas sensors, supercapacitors, and smart windows. In many of these applications, large surface areas and pore volumes can enhance molecular adsorption, facilitate ion transfer, and increase interfacial areas; the formation of complex oxides (mixed, doped, multimetallic oxides and oxide-based hybrids) can alter electronic band structures, modify/enhance charge carrier concentrations/separation, and introduce desired functionalities. A general synthetic approach to diverse mesoporous metal oxides is therefore very attractive. Here we describe a powerful aerosol-spray method for synthesizing various mesoporous metal oxides from low-cost nitrate salts. During spray, thermal heating of precursor droplets drives solvent evaporation and induces surfactant-directed formation of mesostructures, nitrate decomposition and oxide cross-linking. Thirteen types of monometallic oxides and four groups of complex ones are successfully produced, with mesoporous iron oxide microspheres demonstrated for photocatalytic oxygen evolution and gas sensing with superior performances. PMID:25897988

  15. Vinegar-amended anaerobic biosand filter for the removal of arsenic and nitrate from groundwater.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Kathryn V; Webster, Tara M; Upadhyaya, Giridhar; Hayes, Kim F; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2016-04-15

    The performance of a vinegar-amended anaerobic biosand filter was evaluated for future application as point-of-use water treatment in rural areas for the removal of arsenic and nitrate from groundwater containing common ions. Due to the importance of sulfate and iron in arsenic removal and their variable concentrations in groundwater, influent sulfate and iron concentrations were varied. Complete removal of influent nitrate (50 mg/L) and over 50% removal of influent arsenic (200 μg/L) occurred. Of all conditions tested, the lowest median effluent arsenic concentration was 88 μg/L. Iron removal occurred completely when 4 mg/L was added, and sulfate concentrations were lowered to a median concentration <2 mg/L from influent concentrations of 22 and 50 mg/L. Despite iron and sulfate removal and the establishment of reducing conditions, arsenic concentrations remained above the World Health Organization's arsenic drinking water standard. Further research is necessary to determine if anaerobic biosand filters can be improved to meet the arsenic drinking water standard and to evaluate practical implementation challenges.

  16. PREPARATION OF DIBASIC ALUMINUM NITRATE

    DOEpatents

    Gresky, A.T.; Nurmi, E.O.; Foster, D.L.; Wischow, R.P.; Savolainen, J.E.

    1960-04-01

    A method is given for the preparation and recovery of basic aluminum nltrates having an OH: Al ratio of at least two, comprising two steps. First, metallic aluminum is dissolved in aqueous Al(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, in the presence of a small quantity of elemental or ionic mercury, to increase its Al: NO/sub 3/ ratio into the range 1 to 1.2. The resulting aqueous solution is then added to an excess of a special organic solvent, typically a mixture of five parts methanol and six parts diethyl ether, whereupon the basic aluminum nitrate, e.g. Al/sub 6/(OH)/sub 13/-(NO/sub 3/)/sub 5/, recoverably precipitates.

  17. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate.

    PubMed

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-12-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is a fertilizer, yet becomes an explosive upon a small addition of chemical impurities. The origin of enhanced chemical sensitivity in impure AN (or AN mixtures) is not well understood, posing significant safety issues in using AN even today. To remedy the situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN and its mixtures with hexane (ANFO-AN mixed with fuel oil) and Aluminum (Ammonal) at high pressures and temperatures, using diamond anvil cells (DAC) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that pure AN decomposes to N2, N2O, and H2O at the onset of the melt, whereas the mixtures, ANFO and Ammonal, decompose at substantially lower temperatures. The present results also confirm the recently proposed phase IV-IV' transition above 17 GPa and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400°C.

  18. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-12-01

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is a fertilizer, yet becomes an explosive upon a small addition of chemical impurities. The origin of enhanced chemical sensitivity in impure AN (or AN mixtures) is not well understood, posing significant safety issues in using AN even today. To remedy the situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN and its mixtures with hexane (ANFO-AN mixed with fuel oil) and Aluminum (Ammonal) at high pressures and temperatures, using diamond anvil cells (DAC) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that pure AN decomposes to N2, N2O, and H2O at the onset of the melt, whereas the mixtures, ANFO and Ammonal, decompose at substantially lower temperatures. The present results also confirm the recently proposed phase IV-IV' transition above 17 GPa and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400°C.

  19. Nitrate removal from drinking water -- Review

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, A.; Viraraghavan, T.

    1997-04-01

    Nitrate concentrations in surface water and especially in ground water have increased in Canada, the US, Europe, and other areas of the world. This trend has raised concern because nitrates cause methemoglobiinemia in infants. Several treatment processes including ion exchange, biological denitrification, chemical denitrification, reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, and catalytic denitrification can remove nitrates from water with varying degrees of efficiency, cost, and ease of operation. Available technical data, experience, and economics indicate that ion exchange and biological denitrification are more acceptable for nitrate removal than reverse osmosis. Ion exchange is more viable for ground water while biological denitrification is the preferred alternative for surface water. This paper reviews the developments in the field of nitrate removal processes.

  20. Use of nitrates in ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Giuseppe, Cocco; Paul, Jerie; Hans-Ulrich, Iselin

    2015-01-01

    Short-acting nitrates are beneficial in acute myocardial ischemia. However, many unresolved questions remain about the use of long-acting nitrates in stable ischemic heart disease. The use of long-acting nitrates is weakened by the development of endothelial dysfunction and tolerance. Also, we currently ignore whether lower doses of transdermal nitroglycerin would be better than those presently used. Multivariate analysis data from large nonrandomized studies suggested that long-acting nitrates increase the incidence of acute coronary syndromes, while data from another multivariate study indicate that they have positive effects. Because of methodological differences and open questions, the two studies cannot be compared. A study in Japanese patients with vasospastic angina has shown that, when compared with calcium antagonists, long-acting nitrates do not improve long-term prognosis and that the risk for cardiac adverse events increases with the combined therapy. We have many unanswered questions.

  1. Dietary nitrates, nitrites, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Hord, Norman G

    2011-12-01

    Dietary nitrate (NO(3)), nitrite (NO(2)), and arginine can serve as sources for production of NO(x) (a diverse group of metabolites including nitric oxide, nitrosothiols, and nitroalkenes) via ultraviolet light exposure to skin, mammalian nitrate/nitrite reductases in tissues, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, respectively. NO(x) are responsible for the hypotensive, antiplatelet, and cytoprotective effects of dietary nitrates and nitrites. Current regulatory limits on nitrate intakes, based on concerns regarding potential risk of carcinogenicity and methemoglobinemia, are exceeded by normal daily intakes of single foods, such as soya milk and spinach, as well as by some recommended dietary patterns such as the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet. This review includes a call for regulatory bodies to consider all available data on the beneficial physiologic roles of nitrate and nitrite in order to derive rational bases for dietary recommendations.

  2. Efficient syntheses of climate relevant isoprene nitrates and (1R,5S)-(-)-myrtenol nitrate.

    PubMed

    Bew, Sean P; Hiatt-Gipson, Glyn D; Mills, Graham P; Reeves, Claire E

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the chemoselective synthesis of several important, climate relevant isoprene nitrates using silver nitrate to mediate a 'halide for nitrate' substitution. Employing readily available starting materials, reagents and Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons chemistry the synthesis of easily separable, synthetically versatile 'key building blocks' (E)- and (Z)-3-methyl-4-chlorobut-2-en-1-ol as well as (E)- and (Z)-1-((2-methyl-4-bromobut-2-enyloxy)methyl)-4-methoxybenzene has been achieved using cheap, 'off the shelf' materials. Exploiting their reactivity we have studied their ability to undergo an 'allylic halide for allylic nitrate' substitution reaction which we demonstrate generates (E)- and (Z)-3-methyl-4-hydroxybut-2-enyl nitrate, and (E)- and (Z)-2-methyl-4-hydroxybut-2-enyl nitrates ('isoprene nitrates') in 66-80% overall yields. Using NOESY experiments the elucidation of the carbon-carbon double bond configuration within the purified isoprene nitrates has been established. Further exemplifying our 'halide for nitrate' substitution chemistry we outline the straightforward transformation of (1R,2S)-(-)-myrtenol bromide into the previously unknown monoterpene nitrate (1R,2S)-(-)-myrtenol nitrate. PMID:27340495

  3. Efficient syntheses of climate relevant isoprene nitrates and (1R,5S)-(-)-myrtenol nitrate.

    PubMed

    Bew, Sean P; Hiatt-Gipson, Glyn D; Mills, Graham P; Reeves, Claire E

    2016-01-01

    Here we report the chemoselective synthesis of several important, climate relevant isoprene nitrates using silver nitrate to mediate a 'halide for nitrate' substitution. Employing readily available starting materials, reagents and Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons chemistry the synthesis of easily separable, synthetically versatile 'key building blocks' (E)- and (Z)-3-methyl-4-chlorobut-2-en-1-ol as well as (E)- and (Z)-1-((2-methyl-4-bromobut-2-enyloxy)methyl)-4-methoxybenzene has been achieved using cheap, 'off the shelf' materials. Exploiting their reactivity we have studied their ability to undergo an 'allylic halide for allylic nitrate' substitution reaction which we demonstrate generates (E)- and (Z)-3-methyl-4-hydroxybut-2-enyl nitrate, and (E)- and (Z)-2-methyl-4-hydroxybut-2-enyl nitrates ('isoprene nitrates') in 66-80% overall yields. Using NOESY experiments the elucidation of the carbon-carbon double bond configuration within the purified isoprene nitrates has been established. Further exemplifying our 'halide for nitrate' substitution chemistry we outline the straightforward transformation of (1R,2S)-(-)-myrtenol bromide into the previously unknown monoterpene nitrate (1R,2S)-(-)-myrtenol nitrate.

  4. Nitrate-Induced Genes in Tomato Roots. Array Analysis Reveals Novel Genes That May Play a Role in Nitrogen Nutrition1[w

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Hong; Garvin, David F.; Kochian, Leon V.

    2001-01-01

    A subtractive tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) root cDNA library enriched in genes up-regulated by changes in plant mineral status was screened with labeled mRNA from roots of both nitrate-induced and mineral nutrient-deficient (−nitrogen [N], −phosphorus, −potassium [K], −sulfur, −magnesium, −calcium, −iron, −zinc, and −copper) tomato plants. A subset of cDNAs was selected from this library based on mineral nutrient-related changes in expression. Additional cDNAs were selected from a second mineral-deficient tomato root library based on sequence homology to known genes. These selection processes yielded a set of 1,280 mineral nutrition-related cDNAs that were arrayed on nylon membranes for further analysis. These high-density arrays were hybridized with mRNA from tomato plants exposed to nitrate at different time points after N was withheld for 48 h, for plants that were grown on nitrate/ammonium for 5 weeks prior to the withholding of N. One hundred-fifteen genes were found to be up-regulated by nitrate resupply. Among these genes were several previously identified as nitrate responsive, including nitrate transporters, nitrate and nitrite reductase, and metabolic enzymes such as transaldolase, transketolase, malate dehydrogenase, asparagine synthetase, and histidine decarboxylase. We also identified 14 novel nitrate-inducible genes, including: (a) water channels, (b) root phosphate and K+ transporters, (c) genes potentially involved in transcriptional regulation, (d) stress response genes, and (e) ribosomal protein genes. In addition, both families of nitrate transporters were also found to be inducible by phosphate, K, and iron deficiencies. The identification of these novel nitrate-inducible genes is providing avenues of research that will yield new insights into the molecular basis of plant N nutrition, as well as possible networking between the regulation of N, phosphorus, and K nutrition. PMID:11553762

  5. 70. INTERIOR VIEW OF AMMONIUM NITRATE HOUSE, LOOKING AT AMMONIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. INTERIOR VIEW OF AMMONIUM NITRATE HOUSE, LOOKING AT AMMONIUM NITRATE IN STORAGE. APRIL 18, 1919. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  6. Nitrate Transport, Sensing, and Responses in Plants.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, José A; Vega, Andrea; Bouguyon, Eléonore; Krouk, Gabriel; Gojon, Alain; Coruzzi, Gloria; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential macronutrient that affects plant growth and development. N is an important component of chlorophyll, amino acids, nucleic acids, and secondary metabolites. Nitrate is one of the most abundant N sources in the soil. Because nitrate and other N nutrients are often limiting, plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to ensure adequate supply of nutrients in a variable environment. Nitrate is absorbed in the root and mobilized to other organs by nitrate transporters. Nitrate sensing activates signaling pathways that impinge upon molecular, metabolic, physiological, and developmental responses locally and at the whole plant level. With the advent of genomics technologies and genetic tools, important advances in our understanding of nitrate and other N nutrient responses have been achieved in the past decade. Furthermore, techniques that take advantage of natural polymorphisms present in divergent individuals from a single species have been essential in uncovering new components. However, there are still gaps in our understanding of how nitrate signaling affects biological processes in plants. Moreover, we still lack an integrated view of how all the regulatory factors identified interact or crosstalk to orchestrate the myriad N responses plants typically exhibit. In this review, we provide an updated overview of mechanisms by which nitrate is sensed and transported throughout the plant. We discuss signaling components and how nitrate sensing crosstalks with hormonal pathways for developmental responses locally and globally in the plant. Understanding how nitrate impacts on plant metabolism, physiology, and growth and development in plants is key to improving crops for sustainable agriculture. PMID:27212387

  7. Nitrate Transport, Sensing, and Responses in Plants.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, José A; Vega, Andrea; Bouguyon, Eléonore; Krouk, Gabriel; Gojon, Alain; Coruzzi, Gloria; Gutiérrez, Rodrigo A

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen (N) is an essential macronutrient that affects plant growth and development. N is an important component of chlorophyll, amino acids, nucleic acids, and secondary metabolites. Nitrate is one of the most abundant N sources in the soil. Because nitrate and other N nutrients are often limiting, plants have developed sophisticated mechanisms to ensure adequate supply of nutrients in a variable environment. Nitrate is absorbed in the root and mobilized to other organs by nitrate transporters. Nitrate sensing activates signaling pathways that impinge upon molecular, metabolic, physiological, and developmental responses locally and at the whole plant level. With the advent of genomics technologies and genetic tools, important advances in our understanding of nitrate and other N nutrient responses have been achieved in the past decade. Furthermore, techniques that take advantage of natural polymorphisms present in divergent individuals from a single species have been essential in uncovering new components. However, there are still gaps in our understanding of how nitrate signaling affects biological processes in plants. Moreover, we still lack an integrated view of how all the regulatory factors identified interact or crosstalk to orchestrate the myriad N responses plants typically exhibit. In this review, we provide an updated overview of mechanisms by which nitrate is sensed and transported throughout the plant. We discuss signaling components and how nitrate sensing crosstalks with hormonal pathways for developmental responses locally and globally in the plant. Understanding how nitrate impacts on plant metabolism, physiology, and growth and development in plants is key to improving crops for sustainable agriculture.

  8. HEPCIDIN AND IRON HOMEOSTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2014-01-01

    Despite fluctuations in dietary iron intake and intermittent losses through bleeding, the plasma iron concentrations in humans remain stable at 10–30 μM. While most of the iron entering blood plasma comes from recycling, appropriate amount of iron is absorbed from the diet to compensate for losses and maintain nontoxic amounts in stores. Plasma iron concentration and iron distribution are similarly regulated in laboratory rodents. The hepatic peptide hepcidin was identified as the systemic iron-regulatory hormone. In the efferent arc, hepcidin regulates intestinal iron absorption, plasma iron concentrations, and tissue iron distribution by inducing degradation of its receptor, the cellular iron exporter ferroportin. Ferroportin exports iron into plasma from absorptive enterocytes, from macrophages that recycle the iron of senescent erythrocytes, and from hepatocytes that store iron. In the more complex and less well understood afferent arc, hepatic hepcidin synthesis is transcriptionally regulated by extracellular and intracellular iron concentrations through a molecular complex of bone morphogenetic protein receptors and their iron-specific ligands, modulators and iron sensors. Through as yet undefined pathways, hepcidin is also homeostatically regulated by the iron requirements of erythroid precursors for hemoglobin synthesis. In accordance with the role of hepcidin-mediated iron redistribution in host defense, hepcidin production is regulated by inflammation as well. Increased hepcidin concentrations in plasma are pathogenic in iron-restrictive anemias including anemias associated with inflammation, chronic kidney disease and some cancers. Hepcidin deficiency causes iron overload in hereditary hemochromatosis and ineffective erythropoiesis. Hepcidin, ferroportin and their regulators represent potential targets for the diagnosis and treatment of iron disorders and anemias. PMID:22306005

  9. 'Low-acid' sulfide oxidation using nitrate-enriched groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donn, Michael; Boxall, Naomi; Reid, Nathan; Meakin, Rebecca; Gray, David; Kaksonen, Anna; Robson, Thomas; Shiers, Denis

    2016-04-01

    where pH remains neutral. The "low-acid" oxidation of sulfides with nitrate as an electron acceptor has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale. In 90-day microcosm respirometry experiments, we exposed a mixture of pulverized quartz and pyrite -rich ore to natural, high-nitrate groundwater and inoculated the microcosms with a culture of aerobic and anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron and sulfur-oxidising microorganisms, which were enriched from ore, groundwater and activated waste water. Incubations were performed under both oxic and anoxic conditions, in addition to abiotic controls. Initial results show that oxidation of the sulfides under nitrate-rich and microbially enhanced conditions does produce less acid than the same material under oxic conditions, and to some degree can match the models as long as oxygen ingress can be controlled. These results are the focus of further research into how this process can be enhanced and whether it can be applied in the field. Nitrate-driven oxidation of sulfides could potentially be used as a new approach to reduce acid generation and leaching of contaminants from waste dumps, in a passive or actively managed process designed to deplete and/or ameliorate (i.e. through surface passivation) the mineralogical hazard. Developing our understanding of biological aspects of these processes may also allow testing of longer-term "bio-caps" for various tailings and dump materials.

  10. Effects of nitrate on the stability of uranium in a bioreduced region of the subsurface.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-Min; Carley, Jack; Green, Stefan J; Luo, Jian; Kelly, Shelly D; Van Nostrand, Joy; Lowe, Kenneth; Mehlhorn, Tonia; Carroll, Sue; Boonchayanant, Benjaporn; Löfller, Frank E; Watson, David; Kemner, Kenneth M; Zhou, Jizhong; Kitanidis, Peter K; Kostka, Joel E; Jardine, Philip M; Criddle, Craig S

    2010-07-01

    The effects of nitrate on the stability of reduced, immobilized uranium were evaluated in field experiments at a U.S. Department of Energy site in Oak Ridge, TN. Nitrate (2.0 mM) was injected into a reduced region of the subsurface containing high levels of previously immobilized U(IV). The nitrate was reduced to nitrite, ammonium, and nitrogen gas; sulfide levels decreased; and Fe(II) levels increased then deceased. Uranium remobilization occurred concomitant with nitrite formation, suggesting nitrate-dependent, iron-accelerated oxidation of U(IV). Bromide tracer results indicated changes in subsurface flowpaths likely due to gas formation and/or precipitate. Desorption-adsorption of uranium by the iron-rich sediment impacted uranium mobilization and sequestration. After rereduction of the subsurface through ethanol additions, background groundwater containing high levels of nitrate was allowed to enter the reduced test zone. Aqueous uranium concentrations increased then decreased. Clone library analyses of sediment samples revealed the presence of denitrifying bacteria that can oxidize elemental sulfur, H(2)S, Fe(II), and U(IV) (e.g., Thiobacillus spp.), and a decrease in relative abundance of bacteria that can reduce Fe(III) and sulfate. XANES analyses of sediment samples confirmed changes in uranium oxidation state. Addition of ethanol restored reduced conditions and triggered a short-term increase in Fe(II) and aqueous uranium, likely due to reductive dissolution of Fe(III) oxides and release of sorbed U(VI). After two months of intermittent ethanol addition, sulfide levels increased, and aqueous uranium concentrations gradually decreased to <0.1 microM.

  11. Interaction of inorganic anions with iron-mineral adsorbents in aqueous media--a review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Eva; Bhatnagar, Amit; Hogland, William; Marques, Marcia; Sillanpää, Mika

    2014-01-01

    A number of inorganic anions (e.g., nitrate, fluoride, bromate, phosphate, and perchlorate) have been reported in alarming concentrations in numerous drinking water sources around the world. Their presence even in very low concentrations may cause serious environmental and health related problems. Due to the presence and significance of iron minerals in the natural aquatic environment and increasing application of iron in water treatment, the knowledge of the structure of iron and iron minerals and their interactions with aquatic pollutants, especially inorganic anions in water are of great importance. Iron minerals have been known since long as potential adsorbents for the removal of inorganic anions from aqueous phase. The chemistry of iron and iron minerals reactions in water is complex. The adsorption ability of iron and iron minerals towards inorganic anions is influenced by several factors such as, surface characteristics of the adsorbent (surface area, density, pore volume, porosity, pore size distribution, pHpzc, purity), pH of the solution, and ionic strength. Furthermore, the physico-chemical properties of inorganic anions (pore size, ionic radius, bulk diffusion coefficient) also significantly influence the adsorption process. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the properties of iron and iron minerals and their reactivity with some important inorganic anionic contaminants present in water. It also summarizes the usage of iron and iron minerals in water treatment technology.

  12. Significant mixed layer nitrification in a natural iron-fertilized bloom of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fripiat, F.; Elskens, M.; Trull, T. W.; Blain, S.; Cavagna, A.-J.; Fernandez, C.; Fonseca-Batista, D.; Planchon, F.; Raimbault, P.; Roukaerts, A.; Dehairs, F.

    2015-11-01

    Nitrification, the microbially mediated oxidation of ammonium into nitrate, is generally expected to be low in the Southern Ocean mixed layer. This paradigm assumes that nitrate is mainly provided through vertical mixing and assimilated during the vegetative season, supporting the concept that nitrate uptake is equivalent to the new primary production (i.e., primary production which is potentially available for export). Here we show that nitrification is significant (~40-80% of the seasonal nitrate uptake) in the naturally iron-fertilized bloom over the southeast Kerguelen Plateau. Hence, a large fraction of the nitrate-based primary production is regenerated, instead of being exported. It appears that nitrate assimilation (light dependent) and nitrification (partly light inhibited) are spatially separated between the upper and lower parts, respectively, of the deep surface mixed layers. These deep mixed layers, extending well below the euphotic layer, allow nitrifiers to compete with phytoplankton for the assimilation of ammonium. The high contributions of nitrification to nitrate uptake are in agreement with both low export efficiency (i.e., the percentage of primary production that is exported) and low seasonal nitrate drawdown despite high nitrate assimilation.

  13. [Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia].

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked.

  14. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  15. Modeling nitrate removal in a denitrification bed.

    PubMed

    Ghane, Ehsan; Fausey, Norman R; Brown, Larry C

    2015-03-15

    Denitrification beds are promoted to reduce nitrate load in agricultural subsurface drainage water to alleviate the adverse environmental effects associated with nitrate pollution of surface water. In this system, drainage water flows through a trench filled with a carbon media where nitrate is transformed into nitrogen gas under anaerobic conditions. The main objectives of this study were to model a denitrification bed treating drainage water and evaluate its adverse greenhouse gas emissions. Field experiments were conducted at an existing denitrification bed. Evaluations showed very low greenhouse gas emissions (mean N2O emission of 0.12 μg N m(-2) min(-1)) from the denitrification bed surface. Field experiments indicated that nitrate removal rate was described by Michaelis-Menten kinetics with the Michaelis-Menten constant of 7.2 mg N L(-1). We developed a novel denitrification bed model based on the governing equations for water flow and nitrate removal kinetics. The model evaluation statistics showed satisfactory prediction of bed outflow nitrate concentration during subsurface drainage flow. The model can be used to design denitrification beds with efficient nitrate removal which in turn leads to enhanced drainage water quality. PMID:25638338

  16. Synthesis of Nitrate Reductase in Chlorella

    PubMed Central

    Funkhouser, Edward A.; Shen, Teh-Chien; Ackermann, Renate

    1980-01-01

    Synthesis of nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1) in Chlorella vulgaris was studied under inducing conditions, i.e. with cells grown on ammonia and then transferred to nitrate medium. Cycloheximide (but not chloramphenicol) completely inhibited synthesis of the enzyme, but only if it was added at the start (i.e. at the time of nitrate addition) of the induction period. Cycloheximide inhibition became less effective as induction by nitrate proceeded. Enzyme from small quantities of culture (1 to 3 milliliters of packed cells) was purified to homogeneity with the aid of blue dextran-Sepharose chromatography. Incorporation of radioactivity from labeled arginine into nitrate reductase was measured in the presence and absence of cycloheximide. Conditions were found under which the inhibitor completely blocked the incorporation of labeled amino acid, but only slightly decreased the increase in nitrate reductase activity. The results indicate that synthesis of nitrate reductase from amino acids proceeds by way of a protein precursor which is inactive enzymically. PMID:16661310

  17. Microbial Uranium Immobilization Independent of Nitrate Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, Andrew; Smith, April; Balkwill, Dr. David; Fagan, Lisa Anne; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2007-01-01

    At many uranium processing and handling facilities, including sites in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex, high levels of nitrate are present as co-contamination with uranium in groundwater. The daunting prospect of complete nitrate removal prior to the reduction of uranium provides a strong incentive to explore bioremediation strategies that allow for uranium bioreduction and stabilization in the presence of nitrate. Typical in-situ strategies involving the stimulation of metal-reducing bacteria are hindered by low pH environments at this study site and require that the persistent nitrate must first and continuously be removed or transformed prior to uranium being a preferred electron acceptor. This project investigates the possibility of stimulating nitrate-indifferent, pH-tolerant microorganisms to achieve bioreduction of U(VI) despite nitrate persistence. Successful enrichments from U-contaminated sediments demonstrated nearly complete reduction of uranium with very little loss of nitrate from pH 4.9-5.6 using methanol or glycerol as a carbon source. Higher pH enrichments also demonstrated similar U reduction capacity with 5-30% nitrate loss within one week. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified from uranium-reducing enrichments (pH 5.7-6.7) and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses classified the clone sequences into four distinct clusters. Data from sequencing and T-RFLP profiles indicated that the majority of the microorganisms stimulated by these enrichment conditions consisted of low G+C Gram-positive bacteria most closely related to Clostridium and Clostridium-like organisms. This research demonstrates that the stimulation of a natural microbial community to immobilize U through bioreduction is possible without the removal of nitrate.

  18. Iron status of vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Craig, W J

    1994-05-01

    An appropriately planned well-balanced vegetarian diet is compatible with an adequate iron status. Although the iron stores of vegetarians may be reduced, the incidence of iron-deficiency anemia in vegetarians is not significantly different from that in omnivores. Restrictive vegetarian diets (eg, macrobiotic) are associated with more widespread iron-deficiency anemia. Western vegetarians who consume a variety of foods have a better iron status than do those in developing countries who consume a limited diet based on unleavened, unrefined cereals. Whereas phytates, polyphenolics, and other plant constituents found in vegetarian diets inhibit nonheme-iron absorption, vitamin C, citric acid, and other organic acids facilitate nonheme-iron absorption.

  19. Measurement and Chemistry of Atmospheric Organic Nitrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhr, Martin Patrick

    1990-01-01

    Organic nitrates are important reservoir species for NO_{rm x} (NO + NO_2) in the atmosphere. Typically formed in and around urban areas, the organic nitrates sequester NO_{rm x} and allow it to be transported to rural and remote regions, wherein it may be released into the atmosphere and participate in catalytic cycles leading to the formation of ozone. The research described in this work focusses on two problems related to our understanding of the atmospheric chemistry of the organic nitrates, (1) measuring the organic nitrates contributions to total reactive nitrogen (NO_ {rm y}) in the atmosphere, and (2) determining the conditions under which the organic nitrates release NO_{rm x} into the atmosphere and thereby participate in ozone formation. The work performed included development of measurement methods for the organic nitrates, ambient measurements of several organic nitrates made under a variety of conditions, and data interpretation using a combination of bivariate and multivariate analysis. The instrument development that was performed centered around incorporation of capillary column technology in a gas chromatographic method. Use of a capillary column resulted in improved chromatographic resolution and instrument sensitivity. In addition to the work on the chromatographic separation of the organic nitrates, some work was done regarding the sensitivity of the electron capture detector (ECD) as a function of electrical mode of operation. Ambient measurements of several of the organic nitrates were made during three field experiments in conjunction with NOAA's Aeronomy laboratory, including PAN rm CH_3C(O)O_2NO_2), PPN rm (C_2H_5C(O)O_2NO _2), and the C_1-C _5 alkyl nitrates (RONO_2 ). The measurements were made in conjunction with a wide variety of other chemical and physical parameters. Data interpretation was performed using bivariate analysis in order to understand the diurnal variation of the concentrations of the organic nitrates and their

  20. Photodegradation of Paracetamol in Nitrate Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Cui; Qu Ruijuan; Liang Jinyan; Yang Xi

    2010-11-24

    The photodegradation of paracetamol in nitrate solution under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated. The degradation rates were compared by varying environmental parameters including concentrations of nitrate ion, humic substance and pH values. The quantifications of paracetamol were conducted by HPLC method. The results demonstrate that the photodegradation of paracetamol followed first-order kinetics. The photoproducts and intermediates of paracetamol in the presence of nitrate ions were identified by extensive GC-MS method. The photodegradation pathways involving. OH radicals as reactive species were proposed.

  1. Influence of groundwater composition on subsurface iron and arsenic removal.

    PubMed

    Moed, D H; van Halem, D; Verberk, J Q J C; Amy, G L; van Dijk, J C

    2012-01-01

    Subsurface arsenic and iron removal (SAR/SIR) is a novel technology to remove arsenic, iron and other groundwater components by using the subsoil. This research project investigated the influence of the groundwater composition on subsurface treatment. In anoxic sand column experiments, with synthetic groundwater and virgin sand, it was found that several dissolved substances in groundwater compete for adsorption sites with arsenic and iron. The presence of 0.01 mmol L(-1) phosphate, 0.2 mmol L(-1) silicate, and 1 mmol L(-1) nitrate greatly reduced the efficiency of SAR, illustrating the vulnerability of this technology in diverse geochemical settings. SIR was not as sensitive to other inorganic groundwater compounds, though iron retardation was limited by 1.2 mmol L(-1) calcium and 0.06 mmol L(-1) manganese.

  2. Influence of groundwater composition on subsurface iron and arsenic removal.

    PubMed

    Moed, D H; van Halem, D; Verberk, J Q J C; Amy, G L; van Dijk, J C

    2012-01-01

    Subsurface arsenic and iron removal (SAR/SIR) is a novel technology to remove arsenic, iron and other groundwater components by using the subsoil. This research project investigated the influence of the groundwater composition on subsurface treatment. In anoxic sand column experiments, with synthetic groundwater and virgin sand, it was found that several dissolved substances in groundwater compete for adsorption sites with arsenic and iron. The presence of 0.01 mmol L(-1) phosphate, 0.2 mmol L(-1) silicate, and 1 mmol L(-1) nitrate greatly reduced the efficiency of SAR, illustrating the vulnerability of this technology in diverse geochemical settings. SIR was not as sensitive to other inorganic groundwater compounds, though iron retardation was limited by 1.2 mmol L(-1) calcium and 0.06 mmol L(-1) manganese. PMID:22678215

  3. Freezing-Enhanced Dissolution of Iron Oxides: Effects of Inorganic Acid Anions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Daun; Kim, Kitae; Min, Dae Wi; Choi, Wonyong

    2015-11-01

    Dissolution of iron from mineral dust particles greatly depends upon the type and amount of copresent inorganic anions. In this study, we investigated the roles of sulfate, chloride, nitrate, and perchlorate on the dissolution of maghemite and lepidocrocite in ice under both dark and UV irradiation and compared the results with those of their aqueous counterparts. After 96 h of reaction, the total dissolved iron in ice (pH 3 before freezing) was higher than that in the aqueous phase (pH 3) by 6-28 times and 10-20 times under dark and UV irradiation, respectively. Sulfuric acid was the most efficient in producing labile iron under dark condition, whereas hydrochloric acid induced the most dissolution of the total and ferrous iron in the presence of light. This ice-induced dissolution result was also confirmed with Arizona Test Dust (AZTD). In the freeze-thaw cycling test, the iron oxide samples containing chloride, nitrate, or perchlorate showed a similar extent of total dissolved iron after each cycling while the sulfate-containing sample rapidly lost its dissolution activity with repeating the cycle. This unique phenomenon observed in ice might be related to the freeze concentration of protons, iron oxides, and inorganic anions in the liquid-like ice grain boundary region. These results suggest that the ice-enhanced dissolution of iron oxides can be a potential source of bioavailable iron, and the acid anions critically influence this process.

  4. Freezing-Enhanced Dissolution of Iron Oxides: Effects of Inorganic Acid Anions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Daun; Kim, Kitae; Min, Dae Wi; Choi, Wonyong

    2015-11-01

    Dissolution of iron from mineral dust particles greatly depends upon the type and amount of copresent inorganic anions. In this study, we investigated the roles of sulfate, chloride, nitrate, and perchlorate on the dissolution of maghemite and lepidocrocite in ice under both dark and UV irradiation and compared the results with those of their aqueous counterparts. After 96 h of reaction, the total dissolved iron in ice (pH 3 before freezing) was higher than that in the aqueous phase (pH 3) by 6-28 times and 10-20 times under dark and UV irradiation, respectively. Sulfuric acid was the most efficient in producing labile iron under dark condition, whereas hydrochloric acid induced the most dissolution of the total and ferrous iron in the presence of light. This ice-induced dissolution result was also confirmed with Arizona Test Dust (AZTD). In the freeze-thaw cycling test, the iron oxide samples containing chloride, nitrate, or perchlorate showed a similar extent of total dissolved iron after each cycling while the sulfate-containing sample rapidly lost its dissolution activity with repeating the cycle. This unique phenomenon observed in ice might be related to the freeze concentration of protons, iron oxides, and inorganic anions in the liquid-like ice grain boundary region. These results suggest that the ice-enhanced dissolution of iron oxides can be a potential source of bioavailable iron, and the acid anions critically influence this process. PMID:26444653

  5. Performance Evaluation of In-Situ Iron Reactive Barriers at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Site

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.B.

    2003-12-30

    In November 1997, a permeable iron reactive barrier trench was installed at the S-3 Ponds Pathway 2 Site located at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The overall goal of the project is to evaluate the ability of permeable reactive barrier technology to remove uranium, nitrate, and other inorganic contaminants in groundwater and to assess impacts of biogeochemical interactions on long-term performance of the treatment system. Zero-valent iron (Fe0) was used as the reactive medium, which creates a localized zone of reduction or low oxidation reduction potential (ORP), elevated pH, and dissolved H{sub 2} as Fe{sup 0} corrodes in groundwater. These conditions favor the removal of metals and radionuclides (such as uranium and technetium) through redox-driven precipitation and/or sorption to iron corrosion byproducts, such as iron oxyhydroxides. The technology is anticipated to be economical and low in maintenance as compared with conventional pump-and-treat technology. Groundwater monitoring results indicate that the iron barrier is effectively removing uranium and technetium, the primary contaminants of concern, as anticipated from our previous laboratory studies. In addition to uranium and technetium, nitrate, sulfate, bicarbonate, calcium, and magnesium are also found to be removed, either partially or completely by the iron barrier. Elevated concentrations of ferrous ions and sulfide, and pH were observed within the iron barrier. Although ferrous iron concentrations were initially very high after barrier installation, ferrous ion concentrations have decreased to low to non-detectable levels as the pH within the iron has increased over time (as high as 9 or 10). Iron and soil core samples were taken in February 1999 and May 2000 in order to evaluate the iron surface passivation, morphology, mineral precipitation and cementation, and microbial activity within and in the vicinity of the iron barrier. Results indicate that most of the iron filings collected in cores

  6. Effect of nitrate injection on the bacterial community in a water-oil tank system analyzed by PCR-DGGE.

    PubMed

    Jurelevicius, Diogo; von der Weid, Irene; Korenblum, Elisa; Valoni, Erika; Penna, Mônica; Seldin, Lucy

    2008-04-01

    Sulfide production by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is a major concern for the petroleum industry since it is toxic and corrosive, and causes plugging due to the formation of insoluble iron sulfides (reservoir souring). In this study, PCR followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) using two sets of primers based on the 16S rRNA gene and on the aps gene (adenosine-5-phosphosulfate reductase) was used to track changes in the total bacterial and SRB communities, respectively, present in the water-oil tank system on an offshore platform in Brazil in which nitrate treatment was applied for 2 months (15 nitrate injections). PCR-DGGE analysis of the total bacterial community showed the existence of a dominant population in the water-oil tank, and that the appearance and/or the increase of intensity of some bands in the gels were not permanently affected by the introduction of nitrate. On the other hand, the SRB community was stimulated following nitrate treatment. Moreover, sulfide production did not exceed the permissible exposure limit in the water-oil separation tank studied treated with nitrate. Therefore, controlling sulfide production by treating the produced water tank with nitrate could reduce the quantity of chemical biocides required to control microbial activities. PMID:18180965

  7. Phase diagram of ammonium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Dunuwille, Mihindra; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2013-12-07

    Ammonium Nitrate (AN) is a fertilizer, yet becomes an explosive upon a small addition of chemical impurities. The origin of enhanced chemical sensitivity in impure AN (or AN mixtures) is not well understood, posing significant safety issues in using AN even today. To remedy the situation, we have carried out an extensive study to investigate the phase stability of AN and its mixtures with hexane (ANFO–AN mixed with fuel oil) and Aluminum (Ammonal) at high pressures and temperatures, using diamond anvil cells (DAC) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results indicate that pure AN decomposes to N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and H{sub 2}O at the onset of the melt, whereas the mixtures, ANFO and Ammonal, decompose at substantially lower temperatures. The present results also confirm the recently proposed phase IV-IV{sup ′} transition above 17 GPa and provide new constraints for the melting and phase diagram of AN to 40 GPa and 400°C.

  8. Peroxyacetyl nitrate in eastern Scotland.

    PubMed

    McFadyen, G G; Cape, J N

    2005-01-20

    Peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) concentrations in air were sampled hourly from 1994 to 1998 at a rural site 15 km south-west of Edinburgh, in eastern Scotland. Annual average concentrations were between 0.1 and 0.15 nl l(-1), with episodes up to 3 nl l(-1) in long-range transported polluted air. PAN concentrations were approximately log-normally distributed. The concentrations measured are the result of a balance between photochemical production rates and removal by thermal decomposition and dry deposition. In general, there was a poor correlation between PAN and ozone concentrations at this rural site except during episodes of photochemical pollution, when the PAN/O(3) volume ratio exceeded 0.01. The PAN/NO(x) volume ratio had a median value of 0.015 but ranged up to 0.25. There was a pronounced seasonal maximum in PAN concentrations in late spring, and a strong diurnal cycle only in April-June, with a maximum at 1700 h. Individual episodes, with concentrations up to 3 nl l(-1), could be traced over distances of ca. 1000 km, with rapid changes in concentration as the prevailing winds advected polluted air masses across the site.

  9. Treatment of Selenium and Nitrate in Acid Mine Drainage: A Column Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, H.; Jeen, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    Treatment efficiency of selenium and nitrate in acid mine drainage (AMD) by two types of reactive mixtures, i.e., organic carbon-limestone (OC-LS) and organic carbon-zero valent iron (OC-ZVI), was evaluated through column experiments. The influent AMD, collected at an abandoned metal mine site in Korea, had pH of 2.9 and contained 1600 mg/ L of SO42- and elevated concentrations of metals (e.g., Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Zn). Selenium (40 mg/L) and nitrate (100 mg/L as NO3-N initially and 10 mg/L as NO3-N after 55 days) were spiked into the AMD. The columns were operated for a total of 90 days. The results showed the increase of pH from 2.9 to 7.0 and the decreases in concentrations of most of major ions including selenium and nitrate in both the OC-LS and OC-ZVI columns. The OC-ZVI column had higher removal rates of selenium and nitrate and created a more reduced environment than the OC-LS column due to the abiotic reactions of ZVI. However, a notable amount of ammonia was produced as a reaction product in the OC-ZVI column, while the OC-LS produced a minimum amount of ammonia, suggesting formation of N2 by denitrification. In both columns, removal rates of selenium were substantially increased when the influent NO3-N concentration was changed from 100 mg/L to 10 mg/L. Sulfate was reduced as much as 390 mg/L, as indicated by detection of hydrogen sulfide. The reduction of most metals is considered to be due to precipitation of metal-containing secondary minerals (e.g., sulfides, hydroxides, carbonates). This study shows that treatment of selenium and nitrate in AMD can be achievable using organic carbon-based reactive mixtures through reduction of selenium and nitrate. However, the use of ZVI is not recommended when selenium and nitrate coexist in AMD because of production of ammonia by abiotic reaction between ZVI and nitrate. This study also shows that concentration of nitrate in AMD is an important factor to determine the rate of selenium removal.

  10. Iron fertilization of the Subantarctic ocean during the last ice age.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Alfredo; Sigman, Daniel M; Ren, Haojia; Anderson, Robert F; Straub, Marietta; Hodell, David A; Jaccard, Samuel L; Eglinton, Timothy I; Haug, Gerald H

    2014-03-21

    John H. Martin, who discovered widespread iron limitation of ocean productivity, proposed that dust-borne iron fertilization of Southern Ocean phytoplankton caused the ice age reduction in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). In a sediment core from the Subantarctic Atlantic, we measured foraminifera-bound nitrogen isotopes to reconstruct ice age nitrate consumption, burial fluxes of iron, and proxies for productivity. Peak glacial times and millennial cold events are characterized by increases in dust flux, productivity, and the degree of nitrate consumption; this combination is uniquely consistent with Subantarctic iron fertilization. The associated strengthening of the Southern Ocean's biological pump can explain the lowering of CO2 at the transition from mid-climate states to full ice age conditions as well as the millennial-scale CO2 oscillations. PMID:24653031

  11. Iron fertilization of the Subantarctic ocean during the last ice age.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Alfredo; Sigman, Daniel M; Ren, Haojia; Anderson, Robert F; Straub, Marietta; Hodell, David A; Jaccard, Samuel L; Eglinton, Timothy I; Haug, Gerald H

    2014-03-21

    John H. Martin, who discovered widespread iron limitation of ocean productivity, proposed that dust-borne iron fertilization of Southern Ocean phytoplankton caused the ice age reduction in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). In a sediment core from the Subantarctic Atlantic, we measured foraminifera-bound nitrogen isotopes to reconstruct ice age nitrate consumption, burial fluxes of iron, and proxies for productivity. Peak glacial times and millennial cold events are characterized by increases in dust flux, productivity, and the degree of nitrate consumption; this combination is uniquely consistent with Subantarctic iron fertilization. The associated strengthening of the Southern Ocean's biological pump can explain the lowering of CO2 at the transition from mid-climate states to full ice age conditions as well as the millennial-scale CO2 oscillations.

  12. Manganese and iron oxidation by fungi isolated from building stone.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, M A; Gomez-Alarcon, G

    1994-01-01

    Acid and nonacid generating fungal strains isolated from weathered sandstone, limestone, and granite of Spanish cathedrals were assayed for their ability to oxidize iron and manganese. In general, the concentration of the different cations present in the mineral salt media directly affected Mn(IV) oxide formation, although in some cases, the addition of glucose and nitrate to the culture media was necessary. Mn(II) oxidation in acidogenic strains was greater in a medium containing the highest concentrations of glucose, nitrate, and manganese. High concentrations of Fe(II), glucose, and mineral salts were optimal for iron oxidation. Mn(IV) precipitated as oxides or hydroxides adhered to the mycelium. Most of the Fe(III) remained in solution by chelation with organic acids excreted by acidogenic strains. Other metabolites acted as Fe(III) chelators in nonacidogenic strains, although Fe(III) deposits around the mycelium were also detected. Both iron and manganese oxidation were shown to involve extracellular, hydrosoluble enzymes, with maximum specific activities during exponential growth. Strains able to oxidize manganese were also able to oxidize iron. It is concluded that iron and manganese oxidation reported in this work were biologically induced by filamentous fungi mainly by direct (enzymatic) mechanisms.

  13. New methods of nitrate removal from water.

    PubMed

    Shrimali, M; Singh, K P

    2001-01-01

    Nitrate contamination in groundwater resources originates mainly from the excessive use of fertilisers and uncontrolled land discharges of treated wastewater. This can cause potential health hazards to infants and pregnant women, thus limiting the direct use of the groundwater resources for the human consumption in several parts of the world, including India. The conventional processes used to eliminate nitrate from water are ion exchange, reverse osmosis and electro-dialysis. The utility of these processes has been limited due to their expensive operation and subsequent disposal problem of the generated nitrate waste brine. This paper presents a comprehensive account of the methods/techniques used for the removal of nitrate ion from water during the last 10 years with special reference to the biological denitrification and fate of the metals in decontamination processes.

  14. Qualitative Determination of Nitrate with Triphenylbenzylphosphonium Chloride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Donna A.; Cole, Jerry J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses two procedures for the identification of nitrate, the standard test ("Brown Ring" test) and a new procedure using triphenylbenzylphosphonium chloride (TPBPC). Effectiveness of both procedures is compared, with the TPBPC test proving to be more sensitive and accurate. (JM)

  15. Synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, David E

    2008-01-01

    Nitrate esters have been known as useful energetic materials since the discovery of nitroglycerin by Ascanio Sobrero in 1846. The development of methods to increase the safety and utility of nitroglycerin by Alfred Nobel led to the revolutionary improvement in the utility of nitroglycerin in explosive applications in the form of dynamite. Since then, many nitrate esters have been prepared and incorporated into military applications such as double-based propellants, detonators and as energetic plasticizers. Nitrate esters have also been shown to have vasodilatory effects in humans and thus have been studied and used for treatments of ailments such as angina. The mechanism of the biological response towards nitrate esters has been elucidated recently. Interestingly, many of the nitrate esters used for military purposes are liquids (ethylene glycol dinitrate, propylene glycol dinitrate, etc). Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) is one of the only solid nitrate esters, besides nitrocellulose, that is used in any application. Unfortunately, PETN melting point is above 100 {sup o}C, and thus must be pressed as a solid for detonator applications. A more practical material would be a melt-castable explosive, for potential simplification of manufacturing processes. Herein we describe the synthesis of a new energetic nitrate ester (1) that is a solid at ambient temperatures, has a melting point of 85-86 {sup o}C and has the highest density of any known nitrate ester composed only of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen. We also describe the chemical, thermal and sensitivity properties of 1 as well as some preliminary explosive performance data.

  16. The UK Nitrate Time Bomb (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, R.; Wang, L.; Stuart, M.; Bloomfield, J.; Gooddy, D.; Lewis, M.; McKenzie, A.

    2013-12-01

    The developed world has benefitted enormously from the intensification of agriculture and the increased availability and use of synthetic fertilizers during the last century. However there has also been unintended adverse impact on the natural environment (water and ecosystems) with nitrate the most significant cause of water pollution and ecosystem damage . Many countries have introduced controls on nitrate, e.g. the European Union's Water Framework and Nitrate Directives, but despite this are continuing to see a serious decline in water quality. The purpose of our research is to investigate and quantify the importance of the unsaturated (vadose) zone pathway and groundwater in contributing to the decline. Understanding nutrient behaviour in the sub-surface environment and, in particular, the time lag between action and improvement is critical to effective management and remediation of nutrient pollution. A readily-transferable process-based model has been used to predict temporal loading of nitrate at the water table across the UK. A time-varying nitrate input function has been developed based on nitrate usage since 1925. Depth to the water table has been calculated from groundwater levels based on regional-scale observations in-filled by interpolated river base levels and vertical unsaturated zone velocities estimated from hydrogeological properties and mapping. The model has been validated using the results of more than 300 unsaturated zone nitrate profiles. Results show that for about 60% of the Chalk - the principal aquifer in the UK - peak nitrate input has yet to reach the water table and concentrations will continue to rise over the next 60 years. The implications are hugely significant especially where environmental objectives must be achieved in much shorter timescales. Current environmental and regulatory management strategies rarely take lag times into account and as a result will be poorly informed, leading to inappropriate controls and conflicts

  17. A search for nitrates in Martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, Monica M.; Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1995-03-01

    Martian atmospheric nitrogen is highly enriched in N-15; nitrates formed by interaction of the atmosphere with the Martian regolith should therefore also be characterized by an elevated delta N-15 value. A search has been made for nitrates in two Martian meteorites, in order to determine the extent of possible regolith-atmosphere interaction. Shock-produced glass from the Elephant Moraine (EET) A79001 shergottite (E1,149) and a water-soluble extract from Nakhla were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and stepped combustion-stable isotope mass spectrometry. FTIR of both meteorites had features at 1375/cm and 1630/cm, consistent with nitrates. On account of their low thermal stability, nitrates break down at temperatures below 600 C; in this temperature range, E1,149 yeilded approximately 1250 ppb nitrogen with delta N-15 -8 +/- 5%. If this nitrogen is from a nitrate, then it cannot be distinquished from terrestial salts by its isotopic composition. The water-soluble extract from Nakhla also released nitrogen at low temperatures, approximately 17 ppb with delta N-15 approximately -11 +/- 4%. Since Nakhla is an observed 'fall', this is unlikely to be a terrestial weathering product. Nitrates apparently occur in E1,149 and Nakhla, but in very low abundance, and their origin is unclear. The isotopic composition of the salts, which is within the range of that proposed for Martian magmatic volatiles, is far removed from that of nitrogen in the present-day Martian atmosphere. If the nitrates are Martian in origin, they did not form in recent times from reactions involving atmospheric gases. Rather, the nitrates could be the result of an earlier episode of atmospheric interaction with the regolith, or with implantation of magmatic volatiles introduced during degassing.

  18. Microbial uranium immobilization independent of nitrate reduction.

    PubMed

    Madden, Andrew S; Smith, April C; Balkwill, David L; Fagan, Lisa A; Phelps, Tommy J

    2007-09-01

    At many uranium processing and handling facilities, including sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex, high levels of nitrate are present as co-contamination with uranium in groundwater. The daunting prospect of complete nitrate removal prior to the reduction of uranium provides a strong incentive to explore bioremediation strategies that allow for uranium bioreduction and stabilization in the presence of nitrate. Typical in situ strategies involving the stimulation of metal-reducing bacteria are hindered by low-pH environments and require that the persistent nitrate must first and continuously be removed or transformed prior to uranium being a preferred electron acceptor. This work investigated the possibility of stimulating nitrate-indifferent, pH-tolerant microorganisms to achieve bioreduction of U(VI) despite nitrate persistence. Enrichments from U-contaminated sediments demonstrated nearly complete reduction of uranium with very little loss of nitrate from pH 5.7-6.2 using methanol or glycerol as a carbon source. Bacterial 16S rRNA genes were amplified from uranium-reducing enrichments (pH 5.7-6.2) and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses classified the clone sequences into four distinct clusters. Data from sequencing and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) profiles indicated that the majority of the microorganisms stimulated by these enrichment conditions consisted of low G+C Gram-positive bacteria most closely related to Clostridium and Clostridium-like organisms. This research demonstrates that the stimulation of a natural microbial community to immobilize U through bioreduction is possible without the removal of nitrate.

  19. Is beetroot juice more effective than sodium nitrate? The effects of equimolar nitrate dosages of nitrate-rich beetroot juice and sodium nitrate on oxygen consumption during exercise.

    PubMed

    Flueck, Joelle Leonie; Bogdanova, Anna; Mettler, Samuel; Perret, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Dietary nitrate has been reported to lower oxygen consumption in moderate- and severe-intensity exercise. To date, it is unproven that sodium nitrate (NaNO3(-); NIT) and nitrate-rich beetroot juice (BR) have the same effects on oxygen consumption, blood pressure, and plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations or not. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different dosages of NIT and BR on oxygen consumption in male athletes. Twelve healthy, well-trained men (median [minimum; maximum]; peak oxygen consumption: 59.4 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1) [40.5; 67.0]) performed 7 trials on different days, ingesting different nitrate dosages and placebo (PLC). Dosages were 3, 6, and 12 mmol nitrate as concentrated BR or NIT dissolved in plain water. Plasma nitrate and nitrite concentrations were measured before, 3 h after ingestion, and postexercise. Participants cycled for 5 min at moderate intensity and further 8 min at severe intensity. End-exercise oxygen consumption at moderate intensity was not significantly different between the 7 trials (p = 0.08). At severe-intensity exercise, end-exercise oxygen consumption was ~4% lower in the 6-mmol BR trial compared with the 6-mmol NIT (p = 0.003) trial as well as compared with PLC (p = 0.010). Plasma nitrite and nitrate concentrations were significantly increased after the ingestion of BR and NIT with the highest concentrations in the 12-mmol trials. Plasma nitrite concentration between NIT and BR did not significantly differ in the 6-mmol (p = 0.27) and in the 12-mmol (p = 0.75) trials. In conclusion, BR might reduce oxygen consumption to a greater extent compared with NIT. PMID:26988767

  20. Preformed Nitrate in the Glacial North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homola, K.; Spivack, A. J.; D'Hondt, S.; Estes, E. R.; Insua, T. L.; McKinley, C. C.; Murray, R. W.; Pockalny, R. A.; Robinson, R. S.; Sauvage, J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric CO2 abundances are highly correlated with global temperature variations over the past 800,000 years. Consequently, understanding the feedbacks between climate and CO2 is important for predictions of future climate. Leading hypotheses to explain this feedback invoke changes in ocean biology, circulation, chemistry, and/or gas exchange rates to trap CO2 in the deep ocean, thereby reducing the greenhouse effect of CO2 in the atmosphere. To test these hypotheses, we use sediment pore water profiles of dissolved nitrate and oxygen to reconstruct paleo-preformed nitrate concentrations at two deep-water sites in the western North Atlantic (23°N 57°W, 5557 m water depth; 30°N 58°W, 5367 m water depth). Preformed nitrate increases down-core to 22.7 μM (25.6 m core depth) at the northern site, and to 28.5 μM (27.8 m core depth) at the southern site. The large preformed nitrate gradient between these sites reveals a paleo-boundary between a southern water source high in preformed nitrate and a northern water source with lower concentrations, similar to today's ocean. However, the boundary between these water masses occurs north of where their modern counterparts meet, indicating that Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) extended farther north during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In addition, the southern source had a higher preformed nitrate concentration than today's AABW (25 μM), contradicting hypotheses that nutrient utilization was more efficient in the Southern Ocean deep-water formation regions during the LGM. Comparison to our previous Pacific data reveals that the average preformed nitrate concentration of the deep ocean was slightly higher during the LGM than today. This result implies that the CO2-climate feedback was not principally due to more efficient nitrate utilization.

  1. Nitrate inhibition of legume nodule growth and activity. II. Short term studies with high nitrate supply

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.

    1985-02-01

    Soybean plants (Glycine max (L.) Merr) were grown in sand culture with 2 millimolar nitrate for 37 days and then supplied with 15 millimolar nitrate for 7 days. Control plants received 2 millimolar nitrate and 13 millimolar chloride and, after the 7-day treatment period, all plants were supplied with nil nitrate. The temporary treatment with high nitrate inhibited nitrogenase (acetylene reduction) activity by 80% whether or not Rhizobium japonicum bacteroids had nitrate reductase (NR) activity. The pattern of nitrite accumulation in nodules formed by NR/sup +/ rhizobia was inversely related to the decrease and recovery of nitrogenase activity. However, nitrite concentration in nodules formed by NR/sup -/ rhizobia appeared to be too low to explain the inhibition of nitrogenase. Nodules on plants treated with 15 millimolar nitrate contained higher concentrations of amino N and, especially, ureide N than control nodules and, after withdrawal of nitrate, reduced N content of treated and control nodules returned to similar levels. The accumulation of N/sub 2/ fixation products in nodules in response to high nitrate treatment was observed with three R. japonicum strains, two NR/sup +/ and one NR/sup -/.

  2. Approximate prediction of melting point of nitramines, nitrate esters, nitrate salts and nitroaliphatics energetic compounds.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, Mohammad Hossein

    2006-12-01

    A simple new procedure is introduced to predict melting point of selected class of energetic compounds containing nitramines, nitrate esters, nitrate salts and nitroaliphatics energetic compounds. The number of nitrogen and oxygen as well as the number of nitramine group and the contribution of some specific functional groups would be needed in the new method. Energetic compounds should contain at least one of the functional groups including N-NO(2), C-ONO(2) or nonaromatic C-NO(2). Calculated melting point for 33 nitramines, nitrate esters, nitrate salt and nitroaliphatics are compared with experimental data. Predicted melting points have average deviation of 5.4% for these energetic compounds.

  3. The Arabidopsis ATNRT2.7 nitrate transporter controls nitrate content in seeds.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Franck; Orsel, Mathilde; Dorbe, Marie-France; Chardon, Fabien; Truong, Hoai-Nam; Miller, Anthony J; Krapp, Anne; Daniel-Vedele, Françoise

    2007-05-01

    In higher plants, nitrate is taken up by root cells where Arabidopsis thaliana NITRATE TRANSPORTER2.1 (ATNRT2.1) chiefly acts as the high-affinity nitrate uptake system. Nitrate taken up by the roots can then be translocated from the root to the leaves and the seeds. In this work, the function of the ATNRT2.7 gene, one of the seven members of the NRT2 family in Arabidopsis, was investigated. High expression of the gene was detected in reproductive organs and peaked in dry seeds. beta-Glucuronidase or green fluorescent protein reporter gene expression driven by the ATNRT2.7 promoter confirmed this organ specificity. We assessed the capacity of ATNRT2.7 to transport nitrate in Xenopus laevis oocytes or when it is expressed ectopically in mutant plants deficient in nitrate transport. We measured the impact of an ATNRT2.7 mutation and found no difference from the wild type during vegetative development. By contrast, seed nitrate content was affected by overexpression of ATNRT2.7 or a mutation in the gene. Finally, we showed that this nitrate transporter protein was localized to the vacuolar membrane. Our results demonstrate that ATNRT2.7 plays a specific role in nitrate accumulation in the seed.

  4. Organic nitrates and nitrate tolerance--state of the art and future developments.

    PubMed

    Daiber, Andreas; Münzel, Thomas; Gori, Tommaso

    2010-01-01

    The hemodynamic and antiischemic effects of nitroglycerin (GTN) are lost upon chronic administration due to the rapid development of nitrate tolerance. The mechanism of this phenomenon has puzzled several generations of scientists, but recent findings have led to novel hypotheses. The formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the mitochondria and the subsequent inhibition of the nitrate-bioactivating enzyme mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2) appear to play a central role, at least for GTN, that is, bioactivated by ALDH-2. Importantly, these findings provide the opportunity to reconcile the two "traditional" hypotheses of nitrate tolerance, that is, the one postulating a decreased bioactivation and the concurrent one suggesting a role of oxidative stress. Furthermore, recent animal and human experimental studies suggest that the organic nitrates are not a homogeneous group but demonstrate a broad diversity with regard to induction of vascular dysfunction, oxidative stress, and other side effects. In the past, attempts to avoid nitrate-induced side effects have focused on administration schedules that would allow a "nitrate-free interval"; in the future, the role of co-therapies with antioxidant compounds and of activation of endogeneous protective pathways such as the heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) will need to be explored. However, the development of new nitrates, for example, tolerance-free aminoalkyl nitrates or combination of nitrate groups with established cardiovascular drugs like ACE inhibitors or AT(1)-receptor blockers (hybrid molecules) may be of great clinical interest.

  5. Iron-mediated changes in phytoplankton photosynthetic competence during SOIREE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, P. W.; Abraham, E. R.

    Active fluorescence (fast repetition rate fluorometry, FRRF) was used to follow the photosynthetic response of the phytoplankton community during the 13-day Southern Ocean Iron RElease Experiment (SOIREE). This in situ iron enrichment was conducted in the polar waters of the Australasian-Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean in February 1999. Iron fertilisation of these high nitrate low chlorophyll (HNLC) waters resulted in an increase in the photosynthetic competence ( Fv/ Fm) of the resident cells from around 0.20 to greater than 0.60 (i.e. close to the theoretical maximum) by 10/11 days after the first enrichment. Although a significant iron-mediated response in Fv/ Fm was detected as early as 24 h after the initial fertilisation, the increase in Fv/ Fm to double ambient levels took 6 days. This response was five-fold slower than observed in iron enrichments (in situ and in vitro) in the HNLC waters of the subarctic and equatorial Pacific. Although little is known about the relationship between water temperature and Fv/ Fm, it is likely that low water temperatures — and possibly the deep mixed layer — were responsible for this slow response time. During SOIREE, the photosynthetic competence of the resident phytoplankton in iron-enriched waters increased at dissolved iron levels above 0.2 nM, suggesting that iron limitation was alleviated at this concentration. Increases in Fv/ Fm of cells within four algal size classes suggested that all taxa displayed a photosynthetic response to iron enrichment. Other physiological proxies of algal iron stress (such as flavodoxin levels in diatoms) exhibited different temporal trends to iron-enrichment than Fv/ Fm during the time-course of SOIREE. The relationship between Fv/ Fm, algal growth rate and such proxies in Southern Ocean waters is discussed.

  6. Neonatal iron nutrition.

    PubMed

    Rao, R; Georgieff, M K

    2001-10-01

    Preterm infants are prone to iron deficiency. Their total body iron content at birth is low and gets further depleted by clinical practices such as uncompensated phlebotomy losses and exogenous erythropoietin administration during the neonatal period. Early iron deficiency appears to adversely affect cognitive development in human infants. To maintain iron sufficiency and meet the iron demands of catch-up postnatal growth, iron supplementation is prudent in preterm infants. A dose of 2-4 mg/kg/day is recommended for preterm infants who are fed exclusively human milk. A dose of 6 mg/kg/day or more is needed with the use of exogenous erythropoietin or to correct preexisting iron deficiency. However, due to the poor antioxidant capabilities of preterm infants and the potential role of iron in several oxidant-related perinatal disorders, indiscriminate iron supplementation should be avoided.

  7. Stimulating nitrate removal processes of restored wetlands.

    PubMed

    Ballantine, Kate A; Groffman, Peter M; Lehmann, Johannes; Schneider, Rebecca L

    2014-07-01

    The environmental and health effects caused by nitrate contamination of aquatic systems are a serious problem throughout the world. A strategy proposed to address nitrate pollution is the restoration of wetlands. However, although natural wetlands often remove nitrate via high rates of denitrification, wetlands restored for water quality functions often fall below expectations. This may be in part because key drivers for denitrification, in particular soil carbon, are slow to develop in restored wetlands. We added organic soil amendments that range along a gradient of carbon lability to four newly restored wetlands in western New York to investigate the effect of carbon additions on denitrification and other processes of the nitrogen cycle. Soil carbon increased by 12.67-63.30% with the use of soil amendments (p ≤ 0.0001). Soil nitrate, the carbon to nitrogen ratio, and microbial biomass nitrogen were the most significant predictors of denitrification potential. Denitrification potential, potential net nitrogen nitrification and mineralization, and soil nitrate and ammonium, were highest in topsoil-amended plots, with increases in denitrification potential of 161.27% over control plots. While amendment with topsoil more than doubled several key nitrogen cycling processes, more research is required to determine what type and level of amendment application are most effective for stimulating removal of exogenous nitrate and meeting functional goals within an acceptable time frame. PMID:24915604

  8. Denitrification inhibition by high nitrate wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Veydovec, W.; Silverstein, J.; Cook, N.E. Jr.; Figueroa, L.A.; Hund, R.; Lehmkuhl, G.D.

    1994-12-31

    The processing of radioactive metal products at nuclear weapons plants and research labs has produced wastewaters containing high concentrations of nitrate, often greater than 50,000 mg/l N. The adaptation of activated sludge and inhibition of denitrification at high nitrate concentrations was studied using pH controlled bench-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs), operated with 50% of the SBR volume recycled (recycle volume = influent volume). Denitrification of 1,350 and 2,700 mg/l NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N was completed after approximately 5 hours and 15 hours, respectively. No denitrification of 5,400 mg/l NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N was observed. These results suggest that there is a progressive inhibition of denitrification as nitrate concentrations increase from 1,350 to 5,400 mg/l NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N. In a subsequent series of experiments at an initial reactor nitrate concentration of 1,350 mg/l N, a significant accumulation of nitrate was observed, resulting once in destabilization with loss of denitrification and once in successful adaptation of the activated sludge. At a nitrate concentration of 1,350 mg/l N, the adaptation of activated sludge appears to be unstable, resulting sometimes in stable denitrification and sometimes in biomass washout.

  9. Stimulating nitrate removal processes of restored wetlands.

    PubMed

    Ballantine, Kate A; Groffman, Peter M; Lehmann, Johannes; Schneider, Rebecca L

    2014-07-01

    The environmental and health effects caused by nitrate contamination of aquatic systems are a serious problem throughout the world. A strategy proposed to address nitrate pollution is the restoration of wetlands. However, although natural wetlands often remove nitrate via high rates of denitrification, wetlands restored for water quality functions often fall below expectations. This may be in part because key drivers for denitrification, in particular soil carbon, are slow to develop in restored wetlands. We added organic soil amendments that range along a gradient of carbon lability to four newly restored wetlands in western New York to investigate the effect of carbon additions on denitrification and other processes of the nitrogen cycle. Soil carbon increased by 12.67-63.30% with the use of soil amendments (p ≤ 0.0001). Soil nitrate, the carbon to nitrogen ratio, and microbial biomass nitrogen were the most significant predictors of denitrification potential. Denitrification potential, potential net nitrogen nitrification and mineralization, and soil nitrate and ammonium, were highest in topsoil-amended plots, with increases in denitrification potential of 161.27% over control plots. While amendment with topsoil more than doubled several key nitrogen cycling processes, more research is required to determine what type and level of amendment application are most effective for stimulating removal of exogenous nitrate and meeting functional goals within an acceptable time frame.

  10. Protein tyrosine nitration in the cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Min; Mateoiu, Claudia; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Enrichment of 3-nitrotyrosine containing proteins from cells synchronized in different phases of the cell cycle. {yields} Identification of 76 tyrosine nitrated proteins that change expression during the cell cycle. {yields} Nineteen identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Nitration of tyrosine residues in proteins is associated with cell response to oxidative/nitrosative stress. Tyrosine nitration is relatively low abundant post-translational modification that may affect protein functions. Little is known about the extent of protein tyrosine nitration in cells during progression through the cell cycle. Here we report identification of proteins enriched for tyrosine nitration in cells synchronized in G0/G1, S or G2/M phases of the cell cycle. We identified 27 proteins in cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase, 37 proteins in S phase synchronized cells, and 12 proteins related to G2/M phase. Nineteen of the identified proteins were previously described as regulators of cell proliferation. Thus, our data indicate which tyrosine nitrated proteins may affect regulation of the cell cycle.

  11. Process for decomposing nitrates in aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Paul A.

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a process for decomposing ammonium nitrate and/or selected metal nitrates in an aqueous solution at an elevated temperature and pressure. Where the compound to be decomposed is a metal nitrate (e.g., a nuclear-fuel metal nitrate), a hydroxylated organic reducing agent therefor is provided in the solution. In accordance with the invention, an effective proportion of both nitromethane and nitric acid is incorporated in the solution to accelerate decomposition of the ammonium nitrate and/or selected metal nitrate. As a result, decomposition can be effected at significantly lower temperatures and pressures, permitting the use of system components composed of off-the-shelf materials, such as stainless steel, rather than more costly materials of construction. Preferably, the process is conducted on a continuous basis. Fluid can be automatically vented from the reaction zone as required to maintain the operating temperature at a moderate value--e.g., at a value in the range of from about 130.degree.-200.degree. C.

  12. FeCycle: Attempting an iron biogeochemical budget from a mesoscale SF6 tracer experiment in unperturbed low iron waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, P. W.; Law, C. S.; Hutchins, D. A.; Abraham, E. R.; Croot, P. L.; Ellwood, M.; Frew, R. D.; Hadfield, M.; Hall, J.; Handy, S.; Hare, C.; Higgins, J.; Hill, P.; Hunter, K. A.; Leblanc, K.; Maldonado, M. T.; McKay, R. M.; Mioni, C.; Oliver, M.; Pickmere, S.; Pinkerton, M.; Safi, K.; Sander, S.; Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S. A.; Smith, M.; Strzepek, R.; Tovar-Sanchez, A.; Wilhelm, S. W.

    2005-12-01

    An improved knowledge of iron biogeochemistry is needed to better understand key controls on the functioning of high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) oceanic regions. Iron budgets for HNLC waters have been constructed using data from disparate sources ranging from laboratory algal cultures to ocean physics. In summer 2003 we conducted FeCycle, a 10-day mesoscale tracer release in HNLC waters SE of New Zealand, and measured concurrently all sources (with the exception of aerosol deposition) to, sinks of iron from, and rates of iron recycling within, the surface mixed layer. A pelagic iron budget (timescale of days) indicated that oceanic supply terms (lateral advection and vertical diffusion) were relatively small compared to the main sink (downward particulate export). Remote sensing and terrestrial monitoring reveal 13 dust or wildfire events in Australia, prior to and during FeCycle, one of which may have deposited iron at the study location. However, iron deposition rates cannot be derived from such observations, illustrating the difficulties in closing iron budgets without quantification of episodic atmospheric supply. Despite the threefold uncertainties reported for rates of aerosol deposition (Duce et al., 1991), published atmospheric iron supply for the New Zealand region is ˜50-fold (i.e., 7- to 150-fold) greater than the oceanic iron supply measured in our budget, and thus was comparable (i.e., a third to threefold) to our estimates of downward export of particulate iron. During FeCycle, the fluxes due to short term (hours) biological iron uptake and regeneration were indicative of rapid recycling and were tenfold greater than for new iron (i.e. estimated atmospheric and measured oceanic supply), giving an "fe" ratio (uptake of new iron/uptake of new + regenerated iron) of 0.17 (i.e., a range of 0.06 to 0.51 due to uncertainties on aerosol iron supply), and an "Fe" ratio (biogenic Fe export/uptake of new + regenerated iron) of 0.09 (i.e., 0.03 to 0.24).

  13. Differential inhibition of Arabidopsis superoxide dismutases by peroxynitrite-mediated tyrosine nitration

    PubMed Central

    Holzmeister, Christian; Gaupels, Frank; Geerlof, Arie; Sarioglu, Hakan; Sattler, Michael; Durner, Jörg; Lindermayr, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of superoxide dismutases (SODs) in the plant antioxidant defence system little is known about their regulation by post-translational modifications. Here, we investigated the in vitro effects of nitric oxide derivatives on the seven SOD isoforms of Arabidopsis thaliana. S-nitrosoglutathione, which causes S-nitrosylation of cysteine residues, did not influence SOD activities. By contrast, peroxynitrite inhibited the mitochondrial manganese SOD1 (MSD1), peroxisomal copper/zinc SOD3 (CSD3), and chloroplastic iron SOD3 (FSD3), but no other SODs. MSD1 was inhibited by up to 90% but CSD3 and FSD3 only by a maximum of 30%. Down-regulation of these SOD isoforms correlated with tyrosine (Tyr) nitration and both could be prevented by the peroxynitrite scavenger urate. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that—amongst the 10 Tyr residues present in MSD1—Tyr63 was the main target responsible for nitration and inactivation of the enzyme. Tyr63 is located nearby the active centre at a distance of only 5.26 Å indicating that nitration could affect accessibility of the substrate binding pocket. The corresponding Tyr34 of human manganese SOD is also nitrated, suggesting that this might be an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for regulation of manganese SODs. PMID:25428993

  14. Study of Nitrate Stress in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Using iTRAQ Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Redding, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Joyner, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Keasling, J.D.

    2006-10-12

    The response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH),a sulphate-reducing bacterium, to nitrate stress was examined usingquantitative proteomic analysis. DvH was stressed with 105 m M sodiumnitrate(NaNO3), a level that caused a 50 percent inhibition in growth.The protein profile of stressed cells was compared with that of cellsgrown in the absence of nitrate using the iTRAQ peptide labellingstrategy and tandem liquid chromatography separation coupled with massspectrometry (quadrupoletime-of-flight) detection. A total of 737 uniqueproteins were identified by two or more peptides, representing 22 percentof the total DvH proteome and spanning every functional category. Theresults indicate that this was a mild stress, as proteins involved incentral metabolism and the sulphate reduction pathway were unperturbed.Proteins involved in the nitrate reduction pathway increased. Increasesseen in transport systems for proline, glycine^ betaineandglutamateindicate that the NaNO3 exposure led to both salt stress and nitratestress.Up-regulation observed in oxidative stress response proteins (Rbr,RbO, etc.) and a large number of ABC transport systems as well as in iron^ sulphur -cluster-containing proteins, however, appear to be specific tonitrate exposure. Finally, a number of hypothetical proteins were amongthe most significant changers, indicating that there may be unknownmechanisms initiated upon nitrate stress in DvH.

  15. Coagulation and flocculation study of iron ore fines

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, B.P.; Besra, L.; Ravi Prasad, A.

    1999-03-01

    A comparative study of the flocculation and coagulation response of an iron ore fines suspension has been carried out, and the extent of flocculation has been assessed by measurement of electrophoretic mobility, supernatant clarity, and settling rate. Of the several commercial flocculants and polyelectrolyte studied, the combination of medium molecular weight anionic flocculants Magnafloc 1011 and Rishfloc 258 (1:1), and coagulant aluminum nitrate was most effective in terms of enhancing settling rate and supernatant clarity.

  16. Laboratory Evaluation of Sulfur Modified Iron for Use as a Filter Material to Treat Agricultural Drainage Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, B. J.

    2009-12-01

    Where subsurface drainage practices are employed, fertilizer nutrients and pesticides applied on farm fields and municipal locations are commonly intercepted by the buried drainage pipes and then discharged into local streams and lakes, oftentimes producing adverse environmental impacts on these surface water bodies. On-site water filter treatment systems can be employed to prevent the release of agricultural nutrients/pesticides into adjacent waterways. Sulfur modified iron is a relatively unknown industrial product that may have promise for use as a filter material to remove contaminants from subsurface drainage waters. Sulfur modified iron (SMI) is a high surface area iron powder (zero valent iron) that has been altered via chemical reaction with pure sulfur to produce a sulfur/iron surface coating on the iron particles. A laboratory investigation was conducted with contaminant removal batch tests, saturated falling-head hydraulic conductivity tests, and saturated solute transport column experiments to evaluate the feasibility for using SMI to treat subsurface drainage waters. Contaminant removal batch tests showed that three SMI samples were much more effective removing nitrate (> 94% nitrate removed) than three zero valent iron samples (< 10% nitrate removed). Batch test results additionally showed that SMI removed greater that 94% of dissolved phosphate, but was not particularly effective removing the pesticide, atrazine (< 37% atrazine removed). Hydraulic conductivity tests indicated that all three SMI samples that were evaluated had sufficient hydraulic conductivity, much greater than the 1 x 10-3 cm/s standard used for stormwater sand filters. The saturated solute transport tests confirmed that SMI can be effective removing nitrate and phosphate from drainage waters. Analysis of column effluent also showed that the large majority of nitrate removed by SMI was converted to ammonium. Consequently, these laboratory findings support the use of SMI in

  17. Organic Nitrate Therapy, Nitrate Tolerance, and Nitrate-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Emphasis on Redox Biology and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin (GTN), isosorbide-5-mononitrate and isosorbide dinitrate, and pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN), when given acutely, have potent vasodilator effects improving symptoms in patients with acute and chronic congestive heart failure, stable coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, or arterial hypertension. The mechanisms underlying vasodilation include the release of •NO or a related compound in response to intracellular bioactivation (for GTN, the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase [ALDH-2]) and activation of the enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase. Increasing cyclic guanosine-3′,-5′-monophosphate (cGMP) levels lead to an activation of the cGMP-dependent kinase I, thereby causing the relaxation of the vascular smooth muscle by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations. The hemodynamic and anti-ischemic effects of organic nitrates are rapidly lost upon long-term (low-dose) administration due to the rapid development of tolerance and endothelial dysfunction, which is in most cases linked to increased intracellular oxidative stress. Enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species under nitrate therapy include mitochondria, NADPH oxidases, and an uncoupled •NO synthase. Acute high-dose challenges with organic nitrates cause a similar loss of potency (tachyphylaxis), but with distinct pathomechanism. The differences among organic nitrates are highlighted regarding their potency to induce oxidative stress and subsequent tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. We also address pleiotropic effects of organic nitrates, for example, their capacity to stimulate antioxidant pathways like those demonstrated for PETN, all of which may prevent adverse effects in response to long-term therapy. Based on these considerations, we will discuss and present some preclinical data on how the nitrate of the future should be designed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 899–942. PMID:26261901

  18. Organic Nitrate Therapy, Nitrate Tolerance, and Nitrate-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction: Emphasis on Redox Biology and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Daiber, Andreas; Münzel, Thomas

    2015-10-10

    Organic nitrates, such as nitroglycerin (GTN), isosorbide-5-mononitrate and isosorbide dinitrate, and pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN), when given acutely, have potent vasodilator effects improving symptoms in patients with acute and chronic congestive heart failure, stable coronary artery disease, acute coronary syndromes, or arterial hypertension. The mechanisms underlying vasodilation include the release of •NO or a related compound in response to intracellular bioactivation (for GTN, the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase [ALDH-2]) and activation of the enzyme, soluble guanylyl cyclase. Increasing cyclic guanosine-3',-5'-monophosphate (cGMP) levels lead to an activation of the cGMP-dependent kinase I, thereby causing the relaxation of the vascular smooth muscle by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations. The hemodynamic and anti-ischemic effects of organic nitrates are rapidly lost upon long-term (low-dose) administration due to the rapid development of tolerance and endothelial dysfunction, which is in most cases linked to increased intracellular oxidative stress. Enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species under nitrate therapy include mitochondria, NADPH oxidases, and an uncoupled •NO synthase. Acute high-dose challenges with organic nitrates cause a similar loss of potency (tachyphylaxis), but with distinct pathomechanism. The differences among organic nitrates are highlighted regarding their potency to induce oxidative stress and subsequent tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. We also address pleiotropic effects of organic nitrates, for example, their capacity to stimulate antioxidant pathways like those demonstrated for PETN, all of which may prevent adverse effects in response to long-term therapy. Based on these considerations, we will discuss and present some preclinical data on how the nitrate of the future should be designed.

  19. Effect of nitrate enrichment and diatoms on the bioavailability of Fe(III) oxyhydroxide colloids in seawater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng-Jiao; Huang, Bang-Qin; Li, Shun-Xing; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-03-01

    The photoconversion of colloidal iron oxyhydroxides was a significant source of bioavailable iron in coastal systems. Diatoms dominate phytoplankton communities in coastal and upwelling regions. Diatoms are often exposed to eutrophication. We investigated the effects of different species of diatom, cell density, illumination period, and nitrate additions on the bioavailability of Fe(III) oxy-hydroxide colloids in seawaters. With the increase of illumination period from 1 to 4 h, the ratios of concentrations of total dissolved Fe (DFe) to colloidal iron oxyhydroxides and Fe(II) to DFe increased up to 24.3% and 23.9% for seawater without coastal diatoms, 45.6% and 30.2% for Skeletonema costatum, 44.3% and 29.7% for Thalassiosira weissflogii, respectively. The photochemical activity of coastal diatoms themselves (excluding the dissolved organic matter secreted by algae) on the species transformation of iron in seawater (including the light-induced dissolution of Fe(III) oxyhydroxide colloids and the photo-reduction of Fe(III) into Fe(II)) was confirmed for the first time. There was no significant difference of the ability of S. costatum and Thalassiosira weissflogii on the photoconversion of colloidal iron oxyhydroxides. The photoproduction of dissolved Fe(II) and DFe in the seawater with or without diatoms could be depressed by the nitrate addition.

  20. Effect of nitrate enrichment and diatoms on the bioavailability of Fe(III) oxyhydroxide colloids in seawater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng-Jiao; Huang, Bang-Qin; Li, Shun-Xing; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2016-03-01

    The photoconversion of colloidal iron oxyhydroxides was a significant source of bioavailable iron in coastal systems. Diatoms dominate phytoplankton communities in coastal and upwelling regions. Diatoms are often exposed to eutrophication. We investigated the effects of different species of diatom, cell density, illumination period, and nitrate additions on the bioavailability of Fe(III) oxy-hydroxide colloids in seawaters. With the increase of illumination period from 1 to 4 h, the ratios of concentrations of total dissolved Fe (DFe) to colloidal iron oxyhydroxides and Fe(II) to DFe increased up to 24.3% and 23.9% for seawater without coastal diatoms, 45.6% and 30.2% for Skeletonema costatum, 44.3% and 29.7% for Thalassiosira weissflogii, respectively. The photochemical activity of coastal diatoms themselves (excluding the dissolved organic matter secreted by algae) on the species transformation of iron in seawater (including the light-induced dissolution of Fe(III) oxyhydroxide colloids and the photo-reduction of Fe(III) into Fe(II)) was confirmed for the first time. There was no significant difference of the ability of S. costatum and Thalassiosira weissflogii on the photoconversion of colloidal iron oxyhydroxides. The photoproduction of dissolved Fe(II) and DFe in the seawater with or without diatoms could be depressed by the nitrate addition. PMID:26766021

  1. Historical Tracking of Nitrate in Contrasting Vineyard Using Water Isotopes and Nitrate Depth Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprenger, M.; Erhardt, M.; Riedel, M.; Weiler, M.

    2015-12-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (EWFD) aims to achieve a good chemical status for the groundwater bodies in Europe by the year 2015. Despite the effort to reduce the nitrate pollution from agriculture within the last two decades, there are still many groundwater aquifers that exceed nitrate concentrations above the EWFD threshold of 50 mg/l. Viticulture is seen as a major contributor of nitrate leaching and sowing of a green cover was shown to have a positive effect on lowering the nitrate loads in the upper 90 cm of the soil. However, the consequences for nitrate leaching into the subsoil were not yet tested. We analyzed the nitrate concentrations and pore water stable isotope composition to a depth of 380 cm in soil profiles under an old vineyard and a young vineyard with either soil tillage or permanent green cover in between the grapevines. The pore water stable isotopes were used to calibrate a soil physical model, which was then used to infer the age of the soil water at different depths. This way, we could relate elevated nitrate concentrations below an old vineyard to tillage processes that took place during the winter two years before the sampling. We further showed that the elevated nitrate concentration in the subsoil of a young vineyard can be related to the soil tillage prior to the planting of the new vineyard. If the soil is kept bare due to tillage, a nitrate concentration of 200 kg NO3--N/ha is found in 290 to 380 cm depth 2.5 years after the installation of the vineyard. The amount of nitrate leaching is considerably reduced due to a seeded green cover between the grapevines that takes up a high share of the mobilized nitrate reducing a potential contamination of the groundwater.

  2. Microbially catalyzed nitrate-dependent metal/radionuclide oxidation in shallow subsurface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, K.; Healy, O.; Spanbauer, T. L.; Snow, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Anaerobic, microbially catalyzed nitrate-dependent metal/radionuclide oxidation has been demonstrated in a variety of sediments, soils, and groundwater. To date, studies evaluating U bio-oxidation and mobilization have primarily focused on anthropogenically U contaminated sites. In the Platte River Basin U originating from weathering of uranium-rich igneous rocks in the Rocky Mountains was deposited in shallow alluvial sediments as insoluble reduced uranium minerals. These reduced U minerals are subject to reoxidation by available oxidants, such nitrate, in situ. Soluble uranium (U) from natural sources is a recognized contaminant in public water supplies throughout the state of Nebraska and Colorado. Here we evaluate the potential of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent microbially catalyzed metal/radionuclide oxidation in subsurface sediments near Alda, NE. Subsurface sediments and groundwater (20-64ft.) were collected from a shallow aquifer containing nitrate (from fertilizer) and natural iron and uranium. The reduction potential revealed a reduced environment and was confirmed by the presence of Fe(II) and U(IV) in sediments. Although sediments were reduced, nitrate persisted in the groundwater. Nitrate concentrations decreased, 38 mg/L to 30 mg/L, with increasing concentrations of Fe(II) and U(IV). Dissolved U, primarily as U(VI), increased with depth, 30.3 μg/L to 302 μg/L. Analysis of sequentially extracted U(VI) and U(IV) revealed that virtually all U in sediments existed as U(IV). The presence of U(IV) is consistent with reduced Fe (Fe(II)) and low reduction potential. The increase in aqueous U concentrations with depth suggests active U cycling may occur at this site. Tetravalent U (U(IV)) phases are stable in reduced environments, however the input of an oxidant such as oxygen or nitrate into these systems would result in oxidation. Thus co-occurrence of nitrate suggests that nitrate could be used by bacteria as a U(IV) oxidant. Most probable number

  3. Nitrate in aquifers beneath agricultural systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkart, M.R.; Stoner, J.D.; ,

    2007-01-01

    Research from several regions of the world provides spatially anecdotal evidence to hypothesize which hydrologic and agricultural factors contribute to groundwater vulnerability to nitrate contamination. Analysis of nationally consistent measurements from the U.S. Geological Survey's NAWQA program confirms these hypotheses for a substantial range of agricultural systems. Shallow unconfined aquifers are most susceptible to nitrate contamination associated with agricultural systems. Alluvial and other unconsolidated aquifers are the most vulnerable and also shallow carbonate aquifers that provide a substantial but smaller contamination risk. Where any of these aquifers are overlain by permeable soils the risk of contamination is larger. Irrigated systems can compound this vulnerability by increasing leaching facilitated by additional recharge and additional nutrient applications. The system of corn, soybean, and hogs produced significantly larger concentrations of groundwater nitrate than all other agricultural systems because this system imports the largest amount of N-fertilizer per unit production area. Mean nitrate under dairy, poultry, horticulture, and cattle and grains systems were similar. If trends in the relation between increased fertilizer use and groundwater nitrate in the United States are repeated in other regions of the world, Asia may experience increasing problems because of recent increases in fertilizer use. Groundwater monitoring in Western and Eastern Europe as well as Russia over the next decade may provide data to determine if the trend in increased nitrate contamination can be reversed. If the concentrated livestock trend in the United States is global, it may be accompanied by increasing nitrogen contamination in groundwater. Concentrated livestock provide both point sources in the confinement area and intense non-point sources as fields close to facilities are used for manure disposal. Regions where irrigated cropland is expanding, such as

  4. Nitrate in aquifers beneath agricultural systems.

    PubMed

    Burkart, M R; Stoner, J D

    2007-01-01

    Research from several regions of the world provides spatially anecdotal evidence to hypothesize which hydrologic and agricultural factors contribute to groundwater vulnerability to nitrate contamination. Analysis of nationally consistent measurements from the U.S. Geological Survey's NAWQA program confirms these hypotheses for a substantial range of agricultural systems. Shallow unconfined aquifers are most susceptible to nitrate contamination associated with agricultural systems. Alluvial and other unconsolidated aquifers are the most vulnerable and also shallow carbonate aquifers that provide a substantial but smaller contamination risk. Where any of these aquifers are overlain by permeable soils the risk of contamination is larger. Irrigated systems can compound this vulnerability by increasing leaching facilitated by additional recharge and additional nutrient applications. The system of corn, soybean, and hogs produced significantly larger concentrations of groundwater nitrate than all other agricultural systems because this system imports the largest amount of N-fertilizer per unit production area. Mean nitrate under dairy, poultry, horticulture, and cattle and grains systems were similar. If trends in the relation between increased fertilizer use and groundwater nitrate in the United States are repeated in other regions of the world, Asia may experience increasing problems because of recent increases in fertilizer use. Groundwater monitoring in Western and Eastern Europe as well as Russia over the next decade may provide data to determine if the trend in increased nitrate contamination can be reversed. If the concentrated livestock trend in the United States is global, it may be accompanied by increasing nitrogen contamination in groundwater. Concentrated livestock provide both point sources in the confinement area and intense non-point sources as fields close to facilities are used for manure disposal. Regions where irrigated cropland is expanding, such as

  5. Catalytic effect of different forms of iron in purification of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomoko; Inoue, Sakae; Ando, Yoshinori

    2010-06-01

    In the arc plasma jet (APJ) method, a large amount of soot including single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be produced in a short time. However, as-grown soot contains a lot of impurities, such as metallic particles used as catalyst and amorphous carbon. Hence it is necessary to purify the soot to obtain pure SWNTs. The biggest problem in purifying APJ-SWNTs is how to remove the thick amorphous carbon covering the catalyst metal particles. By refluxing APJ-SWNTs in hydrogen peroxide using iron particle as catalyst, it can be purified. The added fine particle of pure iron is found to be effective. Then, we examine whether SWNTs can be purified more effectively by adding solution containing the Fe ion instead of the iron particle. We used iron (III) nitrate nonahydrate, hydrogen peroxide decomposing agent which contains catalase and ammonium iron (II) sulfate hexahydrate. In the case of iron (III) nitrate and catalase, purification effect is not obvious. Under these conditions hydrogen peroxide was decomposed into H2O and O2, and the hydroxyl radical was not generated. On the other hand, ammonium iron (II) sulfate is effective. Because of existence of Fe2+ in solution Fenton's reaction takes place. Reaction rate is increased at high temperature. Therefore, APJ-SWNT is purified more effectively if refluxed in hydrogen peroxide using ammonium iron (II) sulfate as catalyst.

  6. Biological oxidation of Fe(II) in reduced nontronite coupled with nitrate reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania sp. Strain 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Linduo; Dong, Hailiang; Kukkadapu, Ravi; Agrawal, Abinash; Liu, Deng; Zhang, Jing; Edelmann, Richard E.

    2013-10-01

    The importance of microbial nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation to iron biogeochemistry is well recognized. Past research has focused on oxidation of aqueous Fe2+ and structural Fe(II) in oxides, carbonates, and phosphate, but the importance of structural Fe(II) in phyllosilicates in this reaction is only recently studied. However, the effect of clay mineralogy on the rate and the mechanism of the reaction, and subsequent mineralogical end products are still poorly known. The objective of this research was to study the coupled process of microbial oxidation of Fe(II) in clay mineral nontronite (NAu-2), and nitrate reduction by Pseudogulbenkiania species strain 2002, and to determine mineralogical changes associated with this process. Bio-oxidation experiments were conducted using Fe(II) in microbially reduced nontronite as electron donor and nitrate as electron acceptor in bicarbonate-buffered medium under both growth and nongrowth conditions to investigate cell growth on this process. The extents of Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction were measured by wet chemical methods. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), and 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy were used to observe mineralogical changes associated with Fe(III) reduction and Fe(II) oxidation in NAu-2. The bio-oxidation extent under growth and nongrowth conditions reached 67% and 57%, respectively. Over the same time period, nitrate was completely reduced under both conditions to nitrogen gas (N2), via an intermediate product nitrite. Abiotic oxidation by nitrite partly accelerated Fe(II) oxidation rate under the growth condition. The oxidized Fe(III) largely remained in the nontronite structure, but secondary minerals such as vivianite, ferrihydrite, and magnetite formed depending on specific experimental conditions. The results of this study highlight the importance of iron-bearing clay minerals in the global nitrogen cycle with potential applications in nitrate

  7. Effect of molybdenum treatment on molybdenum concentration and nitrate reduction in maize seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Béla; Puskás-Preszner, Anita; Huzsvai, László; Lévai, László; Bódi, Éva

    2015-11-01

    Since 1940 molybdenum has been known as an essential trace element in plant nutrition and physiology. It has a central role in nitrogen metabolism, and its deficiency leads to nitrate accumulation in plants. In this study, we cultivated maize seedlings (Zea mays L. cv. Norma SC) in nutrient solution and soil (rhizoboxes) to investigate the effect of molybdenum treatment on the absorption of molybdenum, sulfur and iron. These elements have been previously shown to play important roles in nitrate reduction, because they are necessary for the function of the nitrate reductase enzyme. We also investigated the relationship between molybdenum treatments and different nitrogen forms in maize. Molybdenum treatments were 0, 0.96, 9.6 and 96 μg kg(-1) in the nutrition solution experiments, and 0, 30, 90, 270 mg kg(-1) in the rhizobox experiments. On the basis of our results, the increased Mo level produced higher plant available Mo concentration in nutrient solution and in soil, which resulted increased concentration of Mo in shoots and roots of maize seedlings. In addition it was observed that maize seedlings accumulated more molybdenum in their roots than in their shoots at all treatments. In contrast, molybdenum treatments did not affect significantly either iron or sulfur concentrations in the plant, even if these elements (Mo, S and Fe) play alike important roles in nitrogen metabolism. Furthermore, the physiological molybdenum level (1× Mo = 0.01 μM) reduced NO3-N and enhanced the NH4-N concentrations in seedlings, suggesting that nitrate reduction was more intense under a well-balanced molybdenum supply.

  8. Comparison of biotic and abiotic treatment approaches for co-mingled perchlorate, nitrate, and nitramine explosives in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, C. E.; Fuller, M. E.; Condee, C. W.; Lowey, J. M.; Hatzinger, P. B.

    2007-01-01

    Biological and abiotic approaches for treating co-mingled perchlorate, nitrate, and nitramine explosives in groundwater were compared in microcosm and column studies. In microcosms, microscale zero-valent iron (mZVI), nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI), and nickel catalyzed the reduction of RDX and HMX from initial concentrations of 9 and 1 mg/L, respectively, to below detection (0.02 mg/L), within 2 h. The mZVI and nZVI also degraded nitrate (3 mg/L) to below 0.4 mg/L, but none of the metal catalysts were observed to appreciably reduce perchlorate (˜ 5 mg/L) in microcosms. Perchlorate losses were observed after approximately 2 months in columns of aquifer solids treated with mZVI, but this decline appears to be the result of biodegradation rather than abiotic reduction. An emulsified vegetable oil substrate was observed to effectively promote the biological reduction of nitrate, RDX and perchlorate in microcosms, and all four target contaminants in the flow-through columns. Nitrate and perchlorate were biodegraded most rapidly, followed by RDX and then HMX, although the rates of biological reduction for the nitramine explosives were appreciably slower than observed for mZVI or nickel. A model was developed to compare contaminant degradation mechanisms and rates between the biotic and abiotic treatments.

  9. Comparison of biotic and abiotic treatment approaches for co-mingled perchlorate, nitrate, and nitramine explosives in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, C E; Fuller, M E; Condee, C W; Lowey, J M; Hatzinger, P B

    2007-01-30

    Biological and abiotic approaches for treating co-mingled perchlorate, nitrate, and nitramine explosives in groundwater were compared in microcosm and column studies. In microcosms, microscale zero-valent iron (mZVI), nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI), and nickel catalyzed the reduction of RDX and HMX from initial concentrations of 9 and 1 mg/L, respectively, to below detection (0.02 mg/L), within 2 h. The mZVI and nZVI also degraded nitrate (3 mg/L) to below 0.4 mg/L, but none of the metal catalysts were observed to appreciably reduce perchlorate ( approximately 5 mg/L) in microcosms. Perchlorate losses were observed after approximately 2 months in columns of aquifer solids treated with mZVI, but this decline appears to be the result of biodegradation rather than abiotic reduction. An emulsified vegetable oil substrate was observed to effectively promote the biological reduction of nitrate, RDX and perchlorate in microcosms, and all four target contaminants in the flow-through columns. Nitrate and perchlorate were biodegraded most rapidly, followed by RDX and then HMX, although the rates of biological reduction for the nitramine explosives were appreciably slower than observed for mZVI or nickel. A model was developed to compare contaminant degradation mechanisms and rates between the biotic and abiotic treatments. PMID:17055109

  10. Nitrate removal from high strength nitrate-bearing wastes in granular sludge sequencing batch reactors.

    PubMed

    Krishna Mohan, Tulasi Venkata; Renu, Kadali; Nancharaiah, Yarlagadda Venkata; Satya Sai, Pedapati Murali; Venugopalan, Vayalam Purath

    2016-02-01

    A 6-L sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was operated for development of granular sludge capable of denitrification of high strength nitrates. Complete and stable denitrification of up to 5420 mg L(-1) nitrate-N (2710 mg L(-1) nitrate-N in reactor) was achieved by feeding simulated nitrate waste at a C/N ratio of 3. Compact and dense denitrifying granular sludge with relatively stable microbial community was developed during reactor operation. Accumulation of large amounts of nitrite due to incomplete denitrification occurred when the SBR was fed with 5420 mg L(-1) NO3-N at a C/N ratio of 2. Complete denitrification could not be achieved at this C/N ratio, even after one week of reactor operation as the nitrite levels continued to accumulate. In order to improve denitrification performance, the reactor was fed with nitrate concentrations of 1354 mg L(-1), while keeping C/N ratio at 2. Subsequently, nitrate concentration in the feed was increased in a step-wise manner to establish complete denitrification of 5420 mg L(-1) NO3-N at a C/N ratio of 2. The results show that substrate concentration plays an important role in denitrification of high strength nitrate by influencing nitrite accumulation. Complete denitrification of high strength nitrates can be achieved at lower substrate concentrations, by an appropriate acclimatization strategy.

  11. An unexpected truth: increasing nitrate loading can decrease nitrate export from watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askarizadeh Bardsiri, A.; Grant, S. B.; Rippy, M.

    2015-12-01

    The discharge of anthropogenic nitrate (e.g., from partially treated sewage, return flows from agricultural irrigation, and runoff from animal feeding operations) to streams can negatively impact both human and ecosystem health. Managing these many point and non-point sources to achieve some specific end-point—for example, reducing the annual mass of nitrate exported from a watershed—can be a challenge, particularly in rapidly growing urban areas. Adding to this complexity is the fact that streams are not inert: they too can add or remove nitrate through assimilation (e.g., by stream-associated plants and animals) and microbially-mediated biogeochemical reactions that occur in streambed sediments (e.g., respiration, ammonification, nitrification, denitrification). By coupling a previously published correlation for in-stream processing of nitrate [Mulholland et al., Nature, 2008, 452, 202-205] with a stream network model of the Jacksons Creek watershed (Victoria, Australia) I demonstrate that managing anthropogenic sources of stream nitrate without consideration of in-stream processing can result in a number of non-intuitive "surprises"; for example, wastewater effluent discharges that increase nitrate loading but decrease in-stream nitrate concentrations can reduce the mass of nitrate exported from a watershed.

  12. Serum iron test

    MedlinePlus

    ... of iron homeostasis: iron deficiency and overload. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, et al, ... EJ, Gardner LB. Anemia of chronic diseases. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, et al, ...

  13. Total iron binding capacity

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM. Disorders of iron homeostasis: iron deficiency and overload. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  14. Iron and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... 24 months old. Serve iron-rich foods alongside foods containing vitamin C — such as tomatoes, broccoli, oranges, and strawberries — which improves the body's absorption of iron. Avoid serving coffee ...

  15. Ferrous Sulfate (Iron)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells. It is used to treat or prevent iron-deficiency anemia, a condition that occurs when the body ... than prescribed by your doctor.Although symptoms of iron deficiency usually improve within a few days, you may ...

  16. Iron losses in sweat

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, M.; Magnusson, B.; Persson, H.; Hallberg, L.

    1986-03-01

    The losses of iron in whole body cell-free sweat were determined in eleven healthy men. A new experimental design was used with a very careful cleaning procedure of the skin and repeated consecutive sampling periods of sweat in a sauna. The purpose was to achieve a steady state of sweat iron losses with minimal influence from iron originating from desquamated cells and iron contaminating the skin. A steady state was reached in the third sauna period (second sweat sampling period). Iron loss was directly related to the volume of sweat lost and amounted to 22.5 micrograms iron/l sweat. The findings indicate that iron is a physiological constituent of sweat and derived not only from contamination. Present results imply that variations in the amount of sweat lost will have only a marginal effect on the variation in total body iron losses.

  17. Iron supplements (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  18. Contribution of atmospheric nitrate deposition to nitrate loading in the Chesapeake Bay. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, M.

    1988-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested that nitrate introduced into the Chesapeake Bay via atmospheric deposition may be a significant source of excess nutrients. In order to determine if concerns about atmospheric deposition are justified, modeled estimates of wetfall nitrate deposition over the Chesapeake Bay basin, based on monitoring data collected in 1984, were used to estimate basin-wide nitrate loading (1.38 x 10/sup 8/ kg) over the land area of the basin. Estimates of transfer coefficients and nitrate loadings to the Bay for various land-use categories were also calculated, using figures developed by the EPA Chesapeake Bay Program. The conservative nature of assumptions made in developing these figures suggests that the actual percentage contribution of atmospheric nitrate deposition may be lower than the estimated value.

  19. Immobilisation of arsenic by iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappler, A.; Hohmann, C.; Winkler, E.; Muehe, M.; Morin, G.

    2008-12-01

    Arsenic-contaminated groundwater is an environmental problem that affects about 1-2% of the world's population. As arsenic-contaminated water is also used for irrigating rice fields, the uptake of arsenic via rice is in some cases even higher than via drinking water. Arsenic is often of geogenic origin and in many cases bound to iron(III) minerals. Microbial iron(III) reduction leads to dissolution of Fe(III) minerals and thus the arsenic bound to these minerals is released to the environment. In turn, iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria have the potential to co-precipitate or sorb arsenic during iron(II) oxidation followed by iron(III) mineral formation. Here, we present work on arsenic co-precipitation and immobilization by anaerobic and aerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria. Co-precipitation batch experiments with pure cultures of nitrate-dependent, phototrophic, and microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are used to quantify the amount of arsenic that can be immobilized during microbial iron mineral precipitation. Iron and arsenic speciation and redox state are determined by X- ray diffraction and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption methods (EXAFS, XANES). Microcosm experiments are set-up either with liquid media or with rice paddy soil amended with arsenic. Rice paddy soil from arsenic contaminated rice fields in China that include a natural population of Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms is used as inoculum. Dissolved and solid-phase arsenic and iron are quantified, Arsenic speciation is determined and the iron minerals are identified. Additionally, Arsenic uptake into the rice plant is quantified and a gene expression pattern in rice (Oryza sativa cv Gladia) is determined by microarrays as a response to the presence of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria.

  20. Insight into the evolution of the iron oxidation pathways.

    PubMed

    Ilbert, Marianne; Bonnefoy, Violaine

    2013-02-01

    Iron is a ubiquitous element in the universe. Ferrous iron (Fe(II)) was abundant in the primordial ocean until the oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere led to its widespread oxidation and precipitation. This change of iron bioavailability likely put selective pressure on the evolution of life. This element is essential to most extant life forms and is an important cofactor in many redox-active proteins involved in a number of vital pathways. In addition, iron plays a central role in many environments as an energy source for some microorganisms. This review is focused on Fe(II) oxidation. The fact that the ability to oxidize Fe(II) is widely distributed in Bacteria and Archaea and in a number of quite different biotopes suggests that the dissimilatory Fe(II) oxidation is an ancient energy metabolism. Based on what is known today about Fe(II) oxidation pathways, we propose that they arose independently more than once in evolution and evolved convergently. The iron paleochemistry, the phylogeny, the physiology of the iron oxidizers, and the nature of the cofactors of the redox proteins involved in these pathways suggest a possible scenario for the timescale in which each type of Fe(II) oxidation pathways evolved. The nitrate dependent anoxic iron oxidizers are likely the most ancient iron oxidizers. We suggest that the phototrophic anoxic iron oxidizers arose in surface waters after the Archaea/Bacteria-split but before the Great Oxidation Event. The neutrophilic oxic iron oxidizers possibly appeared in microaerobic marine environments prior to the Great Oxidation Event while the acidophilic ones emerged likely after the advent of atmospheric O(2). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The evolutionary aspects of bioenergetic systems. PMID:23044392

  1. Structural and mechanistic insights on nitrate reductases.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Catarina; Romão, Maria João

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate reductases (NR) belong to the DMSO reductase family of Mo-containing enzymes and perform key roles in the metabolism of the nitrogen cycle, reducing nitrate to nitrite. Due to variable cell location, structure and function, they have been divided into periplasmic (Nap), cytoplasmic, and membrane-bound (Nar) nitrate reductases. The first crystal structure obtained for a NR was that of the monomeric NapA from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in 1999. Since then several new crystal structures were solved providing novel insights that led to the revision of the commonly accepted reaction mechanism for periplasmic nitrate reductases. The two crystal structures available for the NarGHI protein are from the same organism (Escherichia coli) and the combination with electrochemical and spectroscopic studies also lead to the proposal of a reaction mechanism for this group of enzymes. Here we present an overview on the current advances in structural and functional aspects of bacterial nitrate reductases, focusing on the mechanistic implications drawn from the crystallographic data. PMID:26362109

  2. Exclusion of Nitrate from Frozen Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocco, H. A.; Michelsen, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    Reactions occurring at the surface of ice, sea ice, and snow in Earth's cryosphere have an impact on the composition of the overlying atmosphere. In order to elucidate reaction mechanisms and model their contributions to atmospheric processes, the morphology of frozen aqueous surfaces and amounts of reactants contained therein must be determined. To this end, the exclusion of nitrate ions to the surface of frozen aqueous solutions has been studied by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). In this technique the near-surface region of the frozen films are interrogated to a depth of a few hundred nanometers from the film-crystal interface. Aqueous solutions (0.001 to 0.01 M) of sodium nitrate (NaNO3), magnesium nitrate (Mg(NO3)2), and nitric acid (HNO3) were quickly frozen on the germanium ATR crystal and observed at a constant temperature of about -18°C. In addition to ice and the solutes, liquid water in varying amounts was observed in the spectra. The amount of nitrate in the surface liquid is three to four orders of magnitude higher than in the unfrozen solution. While all the nitrate salts exhibit exclusion to the unfrozen surface, the dynamics are different for different counter-ions. Results are compared to freezing point depression data and the predictions of equilibrium thermodynamics.

  3. Cutaneous candidiasis: treatment with miconazole nitrate.

    PubMed

    Cullin, S I

    1977-01-01

    In a well-controlled, double-blind, randomized study, 30 patients with cutaneous candidiasis were treated with a 2% miconazole nitrate lotion or its placebo control. By the 14th day, 13 of the 15 patients [87%] treated with miconazole nitrate achieved clinical and mycologic cures. Only a single patient treated with the placebo lotion would be classified as a therapeutic cure. In a second portion of the study those patients judged to be therapeutic failures were treated with the lotion containing 2% miconazole nitrate. By combining the results of both portions of the study we find that miconazole nitrate lotion produced both a clinical and mycologic cure in all patients receiving the active lotion. The miconazole lotion formula was well tolerated by all patients and no side effects were noted. The fact that miconazole nitrate acts rapidly in relieving symptoms, is well tolerated, and is highly effective against dermatophytes, yeasts and gram-positive bacteria, makes it a welcome addition to available topical therapy of skin infections.

  4. Ion Pairing in Alkali Nitrate Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-10

    In this study, we investigate the thermodynamics of alkali nitrate salt solutions, especially the formation of contact ion pairs between alkali cation and nitrate anion. The ion-pairing propensity shows an order of LiNO3 < NaNO3 < KNO3. Such results explain the salt activity coefficients and suggest that the empirical "law of matching water affinity" is followed by these alkali nitrate salt solutions. The spatial patterns of contact ion pairs are different in the three salt solutions studied here: Li(+) forms the contact ion pair with only one oxygen of the nitrate while Na(+) and K(+) can also be shared by two oxygens of the nitrate. In reproducing the salt activity coefficient using Kirkwood-Buff theory, we find that it is essential to include electronic polarization for Li(+) which has a high charge density. The electronic continuum correction for nonpolarizable force field significantly improves the agreement between the calculated activity coefficients and their experimental values. This approach also improves the performance of the force field on salt solubility. From these two aspects, this study suggests that electronic continuum correction can be a promising approach to force-field development for ions with high charge densities. PMID:26901167

  5. Measurement of Isoprene Nitrates by GCMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Graham; Hiatt-Gipson, Glyn; Bew, Sean; Reeves, Claire

    2016-04-01

    We have, for the first time, synthesised and identified the majority of the primary isoprene nitrates (INs), formed by reaction of isoprene with the hydroxyl radical (OH) and nitrate radical (NO3) as described in the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM). An instrument based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GCMS) and the associated calibration methods is described for the speciated measurements of individual isoprene nitrate isomers. Seven of the primary isoprene nitrates formed by reaction of the OH with isoprene in the MCM and three primary isoprene nitrates from the reaction of the NO3 and isoprene are identified, including six newly synthesised INs. Simple photochemistry bag experiments were performed to demonstrate the capability to measure speciated INs in complex mixtures. Interestingly, the results showed isomeric distributions of INs that were quite different to those predicted by model calculations in earlier studies. In addition, we observed INs that we would expect from NO3 addition to isoprene despite the bag experiments being carried out in daylight conditions when we would expect OH to be the only isoprene oxidant.

  6. Ion Pairing in Alkali Nitrate Electrolyte Solutions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-10

    In this study, we investigate the thermodynamics of alkali nitrate salt solutions, especially the formation of contact ion pairs between alkali cation and nitrate anion. The ion-pairing propensity shows an order of LiNO3 < NaNO3 < KNO3. Such results explain the salt activity coefficients and suggest that the empirical "law of matching water affinity" is followed by these alkali nitrate salt solutions. The spatial patterns of contact ion pairs are different in the three salt solutions studied here: Li(+) forms the contact ion pair with only one oxygen of the nitrate while Na(+) and K(+) can also be shared by two oxygens of the nitrate. In reproducing the salt activity coefficient using Kirkwood-Buff theory, we find that it is essential to include electronic polarization for Li(+) which has a high charge density. The electronic continuum correction for nonpolarizable force field significantly improves the agreement between the calculated activity coefficients and their experimental values. This approach also improves the performance of the force field on salt solubility. From these two aspects, this study suggests that electronic continuum correction can be a promising approach to force-field development for ions with high charge densities.

  7. Vulnerability of streams to legacy nitrate sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tesoriero, Anthony J.; Duff, John H.; Saad, David A.; Spahr, Norman E.; Wolock, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of hydrogeologic setting on the susceptibility of streams to legacy nitrate was examined at seven study sites having a wide range of base flow index (BFI) values. BFI is the ratio of base flow to total streamflow volume. The portion of annual stream nitrate loads from base flow was strongly correlated with BFI. Furthermore, dissolved oxygen concentrations in streambed pore water were significantly higher in high BFI watersheds than in low BFI watersheds suggesting that geochemical conditions favor nitrate transport through the bed when BFI is high. Results from a groundwater-surface water interaction study at a high BFI watershed indicate that decades old nitrate-laden water is discharging to this stream. These findings indicate that high nitrate levels in this stream may be sustained for decades to come regardless of current practices. It is hypothesized that a first approximation of stream vulnerability to legacy nutrients may be made by geospatial analysis of watersheds with high nitrogen inputs and a strong connection to groundwater (e.g., high BFI).

  8. Iron Dextran Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... called iron replacement products. It works by replenishing iron stores so that the body can make more red blood cells. ... and order certain lab tests to check your body's response to iron dextran injection.Before having any laboratory test, tell ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia? Español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily ... Featured Video Living With and Managing Iron-Deficiency Anemia 05/18/2011 This video—presented by the ...

  10. Iron aluminides and nickel aluminides as materials for chemical air separation

    DOEpatents

    Kang, D.

    1991-01-29

    The present invention is directed to a chemical air separation process using a molten salt solution of alkali metal nitrate and nitrite wherein the materials of construction of the containment for the process are chosen from intermetallic alloys of nickel and/or iron aluminide wherein the aluminum content is 28 atomic percent or greater to impart enhanced corrosion resistance.

  11. Iron aluminides and nickel aluminides as materials for chemical air separation

    DOEpatents

    Kang, Doohee

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a chemical air separation process using a molten salt solution of alkali metal nitrate and nitrite wherein the materials of construction of the containment for the process are chosen from intermetallic alloys of nickel and/or iron aluminide wherein the aluminum content is 28 atomic percent or greater to impart enhanced corrosion resistance.

  12. Structure and Function of Metal- and Nitrate-reducing Microbial Communities in the FRC Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Akob, Denise M.; Mills, Heath J.; Kerkhof, Lee; Gihring, Thomas M.; Kostk, Joel E.

    2006-04-05

    The overall goal of this study is to evaluate structure-function relationships of sedimentary microbial communities likely to regulate U(VI) reduction and immobilization in the subsurface of Area 2 at the Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge, TN. Microcosm experiments were conducted under near in situ conditions with FRC subsurface materials cocontaminated with high levels of U(VI) and nitrate. The activity, abundance, and community composition of microorganisms was determined in microcosm samples, stimulated with ethanol or glucose, and compared to those from sediment cores and unamended controls. Activity was assessed by monitoring terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs; nitrate, sulfate, uranium, and iron reduction) as well as electron donor utilization. Microbial functional groups, nitrate- and iron(III)-reducing bacteria, were enumerated during the nitrate- and metal-reduction phases of the incubation and in sediment core samples using a most probable number (MPN) serial dilution assay. U(VI) and Fe(III) were reduced concurrently in the glucose but not the ethanol treatments. In ethanol-amended microcosms, U(VI) was reduced during a 4-day lag phase between nitrate- and Fe(III)-reduction phases. Biostimulation resulted in 3 to 5 orders of magnitude higher counts of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, whereas populations of nitrate-reducers were enhanced by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude. One to 2 orders of magnitude more Fe(III)-reducers were observed in ethanol- as compared to glucose-amended treatments in parallel with enhanced U(VI) removal in ethanol treatments. Cultivatable Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in the ethanol treatments were dominated by Geobacter sp. while those cultured on glucose were dominated by fermentative organisms, i.e., Tolumonas sp. Currently, carbon substrate utilization is being examined through HPLC analysis of microcosm porewaters. In addition, changes in the overall microbial community composition are being assessed using cultivation

  13. Molecular Components of Nitrate and Nitrite Efflux in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Elisa; González-Montelongo, Rafaela; Giraldez, Teresa; de la Rosa, Diego Alvarez

    2014-01-01

    Some eukaryotes, such as plant and fungi, are capable of utilizing nitrate as the sole nitrogen source. Once transported into the cell, nitrate is reduced to ammonium by the consecutive action of nitrate and nitrite reductase. How nitrate assimilation is balanced with nitrate and nitrite efflux is unknown, as are the proteins involved. The nitrate assimilatory yeast Hansenula polymorpha was used as a model to dissect these efflux systems. We identified the sulfite transporters Ssu1 and Ssu2 as effective nitrate exporters, Ssu2 being quantitatively more important, and we characterize the Nar1 protein as a nitrate/nitrite exporter. The use of strains lacking either SSU2 or NAR1 along with the nitrate reductase gene YNR1 showed that nitrate reductase activity is not required for net nitrate uptake. Growth test experiments indicated that Ssu2 and Nar1 exporters allow yeast to cope with nitrite toxicity. We also have shown that the well-known Saccharomyces cerevisiae sulfite efflux permease Ssu1 is also able to excrete nitrite and nitrate. These results characterize for the first time essential components of the nitrate/nitrite efflux system and their impact on net nitrate uptake and its regulation. PMID:24363367

  14. Iron and the liver.

    PubMed

    Pietrangelo, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Humans have evolved to retain iron in the body and are exposed to a high risk of iron overload and iron-related toxicity. Excess iron in the blood, in the absence of increased erythropoietic needs, can saturate the buffering capacity of serum transferrin and result in non-transferrin-bound highly reactive forms of iron that can cause damage, as well as promote fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis in the parenchymatous organs. A number of hereditary or acquired diseases are associated with systemic or local iron deposition or iron misdistribution in organs or cells. Two of these, the HFE- and non-HFE hemochromatosis syndromes represent the paradigms of genetic iron overload. They share common clinical features and the same pathogenic basis, in particular, a lack of synthesis or activity of hepcidin, the iron hormone. Before hepcidin was discovered, the liver was simply regarded as the main site of iron storage and, as such, the main target of iron toxicity. Now, as the main source of hepcidin, it appears that the loss of the hepcidin-producing liver mass or genetic and acquired factors that repress hepcidin synthesis in the liver may also lead to iron overload. Usually, there is low-grade excess iron which, through oxidative stress, is sufficient to worsen the course of the underlying liver disease or other chronic diseases that are apparently unrelated to iron, such as chronic metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. In the future, modulation of hepcidin synthesis and activity or hepcidin hormone-replacing strategies may become therapeutic options to cure iron-related disorders.

  15. Ammonium and nitrate tolerance in lichens.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Since lichens lack roots and take up water, solutes and gases over the entire thallus surface, these organisms respond more sensitively to changes in atmospheric purity than vascular plants. After centuries where effects of sulphur dioxide and acidity were in the focus of research on atmospheric chemistry and lichens, recently the globally increased levels of ammonia and nitrate increasingly affect lichen vegetation and gave rise to intense research on the tolerance of lichens to nitrogen pollution. The present paper discusses the main findings on the uptake of ammonia and nitrate in the lichen symbiosis and to the tolerance of lichens to eutrophication. Ammonia and nitrate are both efficiently taken up under ambient conditions. The tolerance to high nitrogen levels depends, among others, on the capability of the photobiont to provide sufficient amounts of carbon skeletons for ammonia assimilation. Lowly productive lichens are apparently predisposed to be sensitive to excess nitrogen.

  16. Organic nitrates: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    França-Silva, Maria S; Balarini, Camille M; Cruz, Josiane C; Khan, Barkat A; Rampelotto, Pabulo H; Braga, Valdir A

    2014-09-24

    Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the most important vasodilator molecules produced by the endothelium. It has already been established that NO/cGMP signaling pathway deficiencies are involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of many cardiovascular diseases. In this context, the development of NO-releasing drugs for therapeutic use appears to be an effective alternative to replace the deficient endogenous NO and mimic the role of this molecule in the body. Organic nitrates represent the oldest class of NO donors that have been clinically used. Considering that tolerance can occur when these drugs are applied chronically, the search for new compounds of this class with lower tolerance potential is increasing. Here, we briefly discuss the mechanisms involved in nitrate tolerance and highlight some achievements from our group in the development of new organic nitrates and their preclinical application in cardiovascular disorders.

  17. An anaerobic two-layer permeable reactive biobarrier for the remediation of nitrate-contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Liu, She-Jiang; Zhao, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Jie; Wang, Juan; Qi, Yun

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, an anaerobic two-layer permeable reactive biobarrier system consisting of an oxygen-capturing layer followed by a biodegradation layer was designed firstly for evaluating the remediation effectiveness of nitrate-contaminated groundwater. The first layer filling with granular oxygen-capturing materials is used to capture dissolved oxygen (DO) in groundwater in order to create an anaerobic condition for the microbial denitrification. Furthermore, it can also provide nutrition, such as carbon and phosphorus, for the normal metabolism of immobilized denitrifying bacteria filled in the second layer. The second layer using granular activated carbon as microbial carrier is able to biodegrade nitrate entering the barrier system. Batch experiments were conducted to identify the effect of DO on microbial denitrification, oxygen-capturing performance of zero valent iron (ZVI) powder and the characteristics of the prepared oxygen-capturing materials used to stimulate growth of denitrifying bacteria. A laboratory-scale experiment using two continuous upflow stainless-steel columns was then performed to evaluate the feasibility of this designed system. The first column was filled with granular oxygen-capturing materials prepared by ZVI powder, sodium citrate as well as other inorganic salts, etc. The second column was filled with activated carbon immobilizing denitrifying microbial consortium. Simulated nitrate-contaminated groundwater (40 mg NO3-N/L, pH 7.0) with 6 mg/L of DO content was pumped into this system at a flow rate of 235 mL/d. Samples from the second column were analyzed for nitrate and its major degradation byproduct. Results showed that nitrate could be removed more than 94%, and its metabolic intermediate, nitrite, could also be biodegraded further in this passive system. Further study is necessary in order to evaluate performance of its field application.

  18. Iron, radiation, and cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, R G; Kalkwarf, D R

    1990-01-01

    Increased iron content of cells and tissue may increase the risk of cancer. In particular, high available iron status may increase the risk of a radiation-induced cancer. There are two possible mechanisms for this effect: iron can catalyze the production of oxygen radicals, and it may be a limiting nutrient to the growth and development of a transformed cell in vivo. Given the high available iron content of the western diet and the fact that the world is changing to the western model, it is important to determine if high iron increases the risk of cancer. PMID:2269234

  19. Nitrate in aquifers beneath agricultural systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burkart, M.R.; Stoner, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    Research from several regions of the world provides spatially anecdotal evidence to hypothesize which hydrologic and agricultural factors contribute to groundwater vulnerability to nitrate contamination. Analysis of nationally consistent measurements from the U.S. Geological Survey's NAWOA program confirms these hypotheses for a substantial range of agricultural systems. Shallow unconfined aquifers are most susceptible to nitrate contamination associated with agricultural systems. Alluvial and other unconsolidated aquifers are the most vulnerable and shallow carbonate aquifers provide a substantial but smaller contamination risk. Where any of these aquifers are overlain by permeable soils the risk of contamination is larger. Irrigated systems can compound this vulnerability by increasing leaching facilitated by additional recharge and additional nutrient applications. The agricultural system of corn, soybeans, and hogs produced significantly larger concentrations of groundwater nitrate than all other agricultural systems, although mean nitrate concentrations in counties with dairy, poultry, cattle and grains, and horticulture systems were similar. If trends in the relation between increased fertilizer use and groundwater nitrate in the United States are repeated in other regions of the world, Asia may experience increasing problems because of recent increases in fertilizer use. Groundwater monitoring in Western and Eastern Europe as well as Russia over the next decade may provide data to determine if the trend in increased nitrate contamination can be reversed. If the concentrated livestock trend in the United States is global, it may be accompanied by increasing nitrogen contamination in groundwater. Concentrated livestock provide both point sources in the confinement area and intense non-point sources as fields close to facilities are used for manure disposal. Regions where irrigated cropland is expanding, such as in Asia, may experience the greatest impact of

  20. Halide Ion Enhancement of Nitrate Ion Photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, N. K.; Wingen, L. M.; Callahan, K. M.; Tobias, D. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrate ion photochemistry is an important source of NOx in the polar regions. It is uncertain whether coexisting ions such as halides play a role in nitrate photochemistry. The effect of halides on NO3 photolysis was investigated using photolysis experiments in 230 L Teflon chambers that contain deliquesced aerosols of NaBr:NaNO3, KBr:KNO3 and ternary mixtures of NaCl:NaBr:NaNO3. Gas phase NO2 and gaseous halogen products were measured as a function of photolysis time using long path FTIR, NOx chemiluminescence and API-MS (atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometry). Experiments were conducted with NO3- held at a constant 0.5 M and with the amount of total halide concentration varying from 0.25 M to 4 M. Studies on NaBr:NaNO3 mixtures suggest that as the bromide ion to nitrate ion ratio increases, there is an enhancement in the rate of production of NO2 in the nitrate-bromide mixtures over that formed in the photolysis of NaNO3. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations provide molecular level insight into the ions near the air-water interface in the aqueous halide-nitrate mixtures. These studies suggest that the presence of sodium halides at the air-water interface may encourage some nitrate ions to approach the top layers of water, allowing for more efficient escape of photoproducts than is seen in the absence of halides. Experiments on mixtures of KBr:KNO3 are being conducted to determine potential cation effects. In addition, ternary mixtures of NaCl:NaBr:NaNO3 are being examined to determine the effects of mixtures of halides on production of NO2 and gaseous halogen products. The implications of this photochemistry for tropospheric chemistry will be discussed.

  1. Nitrate postdeposition processes in Svalbard surface snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björkman, Mats P.; Vega, Carmen P.; Kühnel, Rafael; Spataro, Francesca; Ianniello, Antonietta; Esposito, Giulio; Kaiser, Jan; Marca, Alina; Hodson, Andy; Isaksson, Elisabeth; Roberts, Tjarda J.

    2014-11-01

    The snowpack acts as a sink for atmospheric reactive nitrogen, but several postdeposition pathways have been reported to alter the concentration and isotopic composition of snow nitrate with implications for atmospheric boundary layer chemistry, ice core records, and terrestrial ecology following snow melt. Careful daily sampling of surface snow during winter (11-15 February 2010) and springtime (9 April to 5 May 2010) near Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard reveals a complex pattern of processes within the snowpack. Dry deposition was found to dominate over postdeposition losses, with a net nitrate deposition rate of (0.6 ± 0.2) µmol m-2 d-1 to homogeneous surface snow. At Ny-Ålesund, such surface dry deposition can either solely result from long-range atmospheric transport of oxidized nitrogen or include the redeposition of photolytic/bacterial emission originating from deeper snow layers. Our data further confirm that polar basin air masses bring 15N-depleted nitrate to Svalbard, while high nitrate δ(18O) values only occur in connection with ozone-depleted air, and show that these signatures are reflected in the deposited nitrate. Such ozone-depleted air is attributed to active halogen chemistry in the air masses advected to the site. However, here the Ny-Ålesund surface snow was shown to have an active role in the halogen dynamics for this region, as indicated by declining bromide concentrations and increasing nitrate δ(18O), during high BrO (low-ozone) events. The data also indicate that the snowpack BrO-NOx cycling continued in postevent periods, when ambient ozone and BrO levels recovered.

  2. Nitrate in aquifers beneath agricultural systems.

    PubMed

    Burkart, M R; Stoner, J D

    2002-01-01

    Research from several regions of the world provides spatially anecdotal evidence to hypothesize which hydrologic and agricultural factors contribute to groundwater vulnerability to nitrate contamination. Analysis of nationally consistent measurements from the U.S. Geological Survey's NAWOA program confirms these hypotheses for a substantial range of agricultural systems. Shallow unconfined aquifers are most susceptible to nitrate contamination associated with agricultural systems. Alluvial and other unconsolidated aquifers are the most vulnerable and shallow carbonate aquifers provide a substantial but smaller contamination risk. Where any of these aquifers are overlain by permeable soils the risk of contamination is larger. Irrigated systems can compound this vulnerability by increasing leaching facilitated by additional recharge and additional concentrations of groundwater nitrate than all other agricultural systems, although mean nitrate concentrations in counties with dairy, poultry, cattle and grains, and horticulture systems were similar. If trends in the relation between increased fertilizer use and groundwater nitrate in the United States are repeated in other regions of the world, Asia may experience increasing problems because of recent increases in fertilizer use. Groundwater monitoring in Western and Eastern Europe as well as Russia over the next decade may provide data to determine if the trend in increased nitrate contamination can be reversed. If the concentrated livestock trend in the United States is global, it may be accompanied by increasing nitrogen contamination in groundwater. Concentrated livestock provide both point sources in the confinement area and intense non-point sources as fields close to facilities are used for manure disposal. Regions where irrigated cropland is expanding, such as in Asia, may experience the greatest impact of this practice.

  3. Biodegradation of glycidol and glycidyl nitrate.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D L; Cornell, J H; Kaplan, A M

    1982-01-01

    When calcium hydroxide is used to desensitize glycerol trinitrate (nitroglycerine)-containing waste streams, the epoxides glycidol and glycidyl nitrate are formed. The epoxide rings of both compounds are unstable to heat in aqueous solutions, and they open to form glycerol 1-mononitrate and presumably glycerol. These transformations were accelerated by microbial activity. Glycerol 1-mononitrate was slowly denitrated to form glycerol. Glycidol and glycidyl nitrate caused base-pair substitutions in the Ames test for mutagenicity, whereas glycerol 1-mononitrate tests were negative.

  4. Methylhydrazinium nitrate. [rocket plume deposit chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, E. A.; Moran, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Methylhydrazinium nitrate was synthesized by the reaction of dilute nitric acid with methylhydrazine in water and in methanol. The white needles formed are extremely hygroscopic and melt at 37.5-40.5 C. The IR spectrum differs from that reported elsewhere. The mass spectrum exhibited no parent peak at 109 m/z, and thermogravimetric analysis indicated that the compound decomposed slowly at 63-103 C to give ammonium and methylammonium nitrate. The density is near 1.55 g/cu cm.

  5. A Reservoir of Nitrate Beneath Desert Soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walvoord, M.A.; Phillips, F.M.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Evans, R.D.; Hartsough, P.C.; Newman, B.D.; Striegl, R.G.

    2003-01-01

    A large reservoir of bioavailable nitrogen (upto ???104 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare, as nitrate) has been previously overlooked in studies of global nitrogen distribution. The reservoir has been accumulating in subsoil zones of and regions throughout the Holocene. Consideration of the subsoil reservoir raises estimates of vadose-zone nitrogen inventories by 14 to 71% for warm deserts and arid shrublands worldwide and by 3 to 16% globally. Subsoil nitrate accumulation indicates long-term leaching from desert soils, impelling further evaluation of nutrient dynamics in xeric ecosystems. Evidence that subsoil accumulations are readily mobilized raises concern about groundwater contamination after land-use or climate change.

  6. A reservoir of nitrate beneath desert soils.

    PubMed

    Walvoord, Michelle A; Phillips, Fred M; Stonestrom, David A; Evans, R Dave; Hartsough, Peter C; Newman, Brent D; Striegl, Robert G

    2003-11-01

    A large reservoir of bioavailable nitrogen (up to approximately 10(4) kilograms of nitrogen per hectare, as nitrate) has been previously overlooked in studies of global nitrogen distribution. The reservoir has been accumulating in subsoil zones of arid regions throughout the Holocene. Consideration of the subsoil reservoir raises estimates of vadose-zone nitrogen inventories by 14 to 71% for warm deserts and arid shrublands worldwide and by 3 to 16% globally. Subsoil nitrate accumulation indicates long-term leaching from desert soils, impelling further evaluation of nutrient dynamics in xeric ecosystems. Evidence that subsoil accumulations are readily mobilized raises concern about groundwater contamination after land-use or climate change.

  7. Biodegradation of Glycidol and Glycidyl Nitrate

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, David L.; Cornell, John H.; Kaplan, Arthur M.

    1982-01-01

    When calcium hydroxide is used to desensitize glycerol trinitrate (nitroglycerine)-containing waste streams, the epoxides glycidol and glycidyl nitrate are formed. The epoxide rings of both compounds are unstable to heat in aqueous solutions, and they open to form glycerol 1-mononitrate and presumably glycerol. These transformations were accelerated by microbial activity. Glycerol 1-mononitrate was slowly denitrated to form glycerol. Glycidol and glycidyl nitrate caused base-pair substitutions in the Ames test for mutagenicity, whereas glycerol 1-mononitrate tests were negative. PMID:16345917

  8. SEPARATION OF URANYL NITRATE BY EXTRACTION

    DOEpatents

    Stoughton, R.W.; Steahly, F.L.

    1958-08-26

    A process is presented for obtaining U/sup 233/ from solutions containing Pa/sup 233/. A carrier precipitate, such as MnO/sub 2/, is formed in such solutions and carries with it the Pa/sup 233/ present. This precipitate is then dissolved in nitric acid and the solution is aged to allow decay of the Pa/ sup 233/ into U/sup 233/. After a sufficient length of time the U/sup 233/ bearing solution is made 2.5 to 4.5 Molar in manganese nitrate by addition thereof, and the solution is then treated with ether to obtain uranyl nitrate by solvent extraction techniques.

  9. Techniques for Measurement of Nitrate Movement in Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadbent, F. E.

    1971-01-01

    Contamination of surface and ground waters with nitrate usually involves leaching through soil of nitrate produced by mineralization of soil organic matter, decomposition of animal wastes or plant residues, or derived from fertilizers. Nitrate concentrations in the soil solution may be measured by several chemical procedures or by the nitrate electrode. since nitrate is produced throughout the soil mass it is difficult to identify a source of nitrate contamination by conventional means. This problem can be solved by use of N-15-enriched or N-15-depleted materials as tracers. The latter is particularly attractive because of the negligible possibility of the tracer hazardous to health.

  10. Nitrate isotope fractionations during biological nitrate reduction: Insights from first principles theoretical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, W.; Granger, J.; Sigman, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Coupled fractionations of N and O isotopes during biological nitrate reduction provide important constraints on the marine nitrogen cycle at present and in the geologic past. Recent laboratory experiments with mono-cultures of nitrate-assimilative algae and plankton, and denitrifying bacteria demonstrate that N and O isotopic compositions of the residual nitrate co-vary linearly with a constant ratio (i.e., Δδ18O: Δδ15N) of ~1 or ~0.6 [1]. These systematic variations have been inferred to derive from the kinetic isotope fractionations associated with nitrate reductases. The isotope fractionation mechanisms at the enzymatic level, however, remain elusive. Here we present models of isotope fractionations accompanying the nitrate reduction (NO3-→NO2-) by three functional types of nitrate reductases, using techniques from ab initio, transition state and statistical thermodynamic theory. We consider three types of nitrate reductases: eukNR (eukaryotic assimilatory nitrate reductase), NAR (prokaryotic respiratory nitrate reductase) and Nap (prokaryotic periplasmic nitrate reductase). All are penta- or hexa-coordinated molybdo-enzymes, but bear considerable differences in protein geometry among functional types. Our models, based on the simplified structures of their active sites, predict N and O isotope effects (15ɛ and 18ɛ) ranging from 32.7 to 36.6‰ and from 33.5 to 34.8‰, respectively, at 300K with 18ɛ:15ɛ ratios of 0.9-1.1. The predicted amplitudes of N and O isotope fractionations are in the range measured for eukNR in vitro (~27‰, Karsh et al. in prep), and also correspond to the upper amplitudes observed for denitrifiers in vivo (~25‰, [1]). Moreover, the computed 18ɛ:15ɛ ratios corroborate the consistent relationships of ~1 observed experimentally for eukNR and the respiratory NAR. These findings indicate the enzymatic reduction is likely the rate-limiting step in most biological nitrate reductions. In addition, the predicted similarity of 18

  11. [Iron function and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Though iron is an essential micronutrient for humans, the excess state is acknowledged to be associated with oncogenesis. For example, iron overload in the liver of the patients with hereditary hemocromatosis highly increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, as to asbestos-related mesothelioma, such kinds of asbestos with a higher iron content are considered to be more carcinogenic. Iron is a useful element, which enables fundamental functions for life such as oxygen carrying and electron transport. However, in the situation where organisms are unable to have good control of it, iron turns into a dangerous element which catalyzes generation of reactive oxygen. In this review, I first outline the relationships between iron and cancer in general, then give an explanation about iron-related animal carcinogenesis models.

  12. Macrophages and Iron Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Soares, Miguel P; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-03-15

    Iron is a transition metal that due to its inherent ability to exchange electrons with a variety of molecules is essential to support life. In mammals, iron exists mostly in the form of heme, enclosed within an organic protoporphyrin ring and functioning primarily as a prosthetic group in proteins. Paradoxically, free iron also has the potential to become cytotoxic when electron exchange with oxygen is unrestricted and catalyzes the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological properties demand that iron metabolism is tightly regulated such that iron is available for core biological functions while preventing its cytotoxic effects. Macrophages play a central role in establishing this delicate balance. Here, we review the impact of macrophages on heme-iron metabolism and, reciprocally, how heme-iron modulates macrophage function.

  13. [Iron function and carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Though iron is an essential micronutrient for humans, the excess state is acknowledged to be associated with oncogenesis. For example, iron overload in the liver of the patients with hereditary hemocromatosis highly increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, as to asbestos-related mesothelioma, such kinds of asbestos with a higher iron content are considered to be more carcinogenic. Iron is a useful element, which enables fundamental functions for life such as oxygen carrying and electron transport. However, in the situation where organisms are unable to have good control of it, iron turns into a dangerous element which catalyzes generation of reactive oxygen. In this review, I first outline the relationships between iron and cancer in general, then give an explanation about iron-related animal carcinogenesis models. PMID:27455808

  14. Efficient syntheses of climate relevant isoprene nitrates and (1R,5S)-(−)-myrtenol nitrate

    PubMed Central

    Hiatt-Gipson, Glyn D; Mills, Graham P; Reeves, Claire E

    2016-01-01

    Summary Here we report the chemoselective synthesis of several important, climate relevant isoprene nitrates using silver nitrate to mediate a ’halide for nitrate’ substitution. Employing readily available starting materials, reagents and Horner–Wadsworth–Emmons chemistry the synthesis of easily separable, synthetically versatile ‘key building blocks’ (E)- and (Z)-3-methyl-4-chlorobut-2-en-1-ol as well as (E)- and (Z)-1-((2-methyl-4-bromobut-2-enyloxy)methyl)-4-methoxybenzene has been achieved using cheap, ’off the shelf’ materials. Exploiting their reactivity we have studied their ability to undergo an ‘allylic halide for allylic nitrate’ substitution reaction which we demonstrate generates (E)- and (Z)-3-methyl-4-hydroxybut-2-enyl nitrate, and (E)- and (Z)-2-methyl-4-hydroxybut-2-enyl nitrates (‘isoprene nitrates’) in 66–80% overall yields. Using NOESY experiments the elucidation of the carbon–carbon double bond configuration within the purified isoprene nitrates has been established. Further exemplifying our ‘halide for nitrate’ substitution chemistry we outline the straightforward transformation of (1R,2S)-(−)-myrtenol bromide into the previously unknown monoterpene nitrate (1R,2S)-(−)-myrtenol nitrate. PMID:27340495

  15. Evaluation of Nitrate Sources and Nitrate Management Strategies in California Suburban Growth Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, M. J.; Moran, J. E.; Esser, B. K.; Leif, R. N.; McNab, W. W.; Carle, S. F.; Moore, K. B.

    2005-12-01

    Population growth in California has pushed the boundaries of suburban communities into formerly agricultural areas. As a result there is considerable uncertainty as to whether nitrate contamination in groundwater wells results from current sources or is a legacy of agriculture. Fertilizer application for historical agriculture is frequently assumed to be a major source, but septic system leachate, other animal waste, and residential fertilizer application may also contribute. Potential remediation strategies may include improved fertilizer management and/or conversion from septic tanks to sewer systems, but the sources of nitrate and pathways to groundwater must first be identified in order to develop a plan of action. We combine the detection of trace organic compounds that are specific to domestic waste with isotopic compositions of nitrogen and oxygen in nitrate in order to determine nitrate sources. Under anaerobic conditions and in the presence of an electron donor such as organic carbon, microbially mediated denitrification may transform nitrate to harmless nitrogen gas, and fractionate the isotopologues of any residual nitrate. The occurrence of saturated zone denitrification is detected by measuring excess dissolved nitrogen gas with a field-portable membrane inlet mass spectrometer system. Groundwater age dating using the 3H/3He method provides a means of tracking the history of nitrate inputs to groundwater, including changes in nitrate flux after implementation of a remediation program. Groundwater that pre-dates agricultural or suburban activity is used to define natural background levels of nitrate. Study areas in California include Chico, Livermore, and Gilroy. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  16. The Acid Catalyzed Nitration of Methanol: Formation of Methyl Nitrate via Aerosol Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riffel, Brent G.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Iraci, Laura T.

    2004-01-01

    The liquid phase acid catalyzed reaction of methanol with nitric acid to yield methyl nitrate under atmospheric conditions has been investigated using gas phase infrared spectroscopy. This nitration reaction is expected to occur in acidic aerosol particles found in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere as highly soluble methanol and nitric acid diffuse into these aerosols. Gaseous methyl nitrate is released upon formation, suggesting that some fraction of NO(x) may he liberated from nitric acid (methyl nitrate is later photolyzed to NO(x)) before it is removed from the atmosphere by wet deposition. Thus, this reaction may have important implications for the NO(x) budget. Reactions have been initiated in 45-62 wt% H2SO4 solutions at 10.0 C. Methyl nitrate production rates increased exponentially with acidity within the acidity regime studied. Preliminary calculations suggest that the nitronium ion (NO2(+) is the active nitrating agent under these conditions. The reaction order in methanol appears to depend on the water/methanol ratio and varies from first to zeroth order under conditions investigated. The nitration is first order in nitronium at all acidities investigated. A second order rate constant, kappa(sub 2), has been calculated to be 1 x 10(exp 8)/ M s when the reaction is first order in methanol. Calculations suggest the nitration is first order in methanol under tropospheric conditions. The infinitesimal percentage of nitric acid in the nitronium ion form in this acidity regime probably makes this reaction insignificant for the upper troposphere; however, this nitration may become significant in the mid stratosphere where colder temperatures increase nitric acid solubility and higher sulfuric acid content shifts nitric acid speciation toward the nitronium ion.

  17. Cellular iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ponka, P

    1999-03-01

    Iron is essential for oxidation-reduction catalysis and bioenergetics, but unless appropriately shielded, iron plays a key role in the formation of toxic oxygen radicals that can attack all biological molecules. Hence, specialized molecules for the acquisition, transport (transferrin), and storage (ferritin) of iron in a soluble nontoxic form have evolved. Delivery of iron to most cells, probably including those of the kidney, occurs following the binding of transferrin to transferrin receptors on the cell membrane. The transferrin-receptor complexes are then internalized by endocytosis, and iron is released from transferrin by a process involving endosomal acidification. Cellular iron storage and uptake are coordinately regulated post-transcriptionally by cytoplasmic factors, iron-regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP-1 and IRP-2). Under conditions of limited iron supply, IRP binding to iron-responsive elements (present in 5' untranslated region of ferritin mRNA and 3' untranslated region of transferrin receptor mRNA) blocks ferritin mRNA translation and stabilizes transferrin receptor mRNA. The opposite scenario develops when iron in the transit pool is plentiful. Moreover, IRP activities/levels can be affected by various forms of "oxidative stress" and nitric oxide. The kidney also requires iron for metabolic processes, and it is likely that iron deficiency or excess can cause disturbed function of kidney cells. Transferrin receptors are not evenly distributed throughout the kidney, and there is a cortical-to-medullary gradient in heme biosynthesis, with greatest activity in the cortex and least in the medulla. This suggests that there are unique iron/heme metabolism features in some kidney cells, but the specific aspects of iron and heme metabolism in the kidney are yet to be explained.

  18. COGEMA Experience in Uranous Nitrate Preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Tison, E.; Bretault, Ph.

    2006-07-01

    Separation and purification of plutonium by PUREX process is based on a sequence of extraction and back extraction which requires reducing plutonium Pu IV (extractable form) into Pu III (inextractable form) Different reducers can be used to reduce Pu IV into Pu III. Early plants such as that for Magnox fuel at Sellafield used ferrous sulfamate while UP 1 at Marcoule used uranous sulfamate. These reducers are efficient and easy to prepare but generates ferric and/or sulphate ions and so complicates management of the wastes from the plutonium purification cycle. Recent plants such as UP3 and UP2 800 at La Hague, THORP at Sellafield, and RRP at Rokkasho Mura (currently under tests) use uranous nitrate (U IV) stabilized by hydrazinium nitrate (N{sub 2}H{sub 5}NO{sub 3}) and hydroxyl ammonium nitrate (HAN). In the French plants, uranous nitrate is used in U-Pu separation and alpha barrier and HAN is used in Pu purification. Compared to sulfamate, U IV does not generate extraneous chemical species and uranyl nitrate (U VI) generated by reducing Pu IV follows the main uranium stream. More over uranous nitrate is prepared from reprocessed purified uranyl nitrate taken at the outlet of the reprocessing plant. Hydrazine and HAN offer the advantage to be salt-free reagents. Uranous nitrate can be generated either by electrolysis or by catalytic hydrogenation process. Electrolytic process has been implemented in early plant UP 1 at Marcoule (when changing reducer from uranous sulfamate to uranous nitrate) and was used again in UP2 plant at La Hague. However, the electrolytic process presented several disadvantages such as a low conversion rate and problems associated with the use of mercury. Electrolysis cells with no mercury were developed for the Eurochemic plant in Belgium and then implemented in the first Japanese reprocessing plant in Tokai-Mura. But finally, in 1975, the electrolytic process was abandoned in favor of the catalytic hydrogenation process developed at La

  19. Aggregate-Scale Variation in Iron Biogeochemistry Controls Element Cycling from Nitrogen to Uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendorf, S. E.; Ying, S.; Jones, L. C.; Jones, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Iron exerts a major control on element cycling in soils by serving as a prominent sorbent (principally when present as an oxide phase) and as an electron acceptor (in the ferric-form) or donor (ferrous-form) in both chemical and microbially-mediated reactions. Within the aggregated structure of soils, steep chemical gradients arise from the supply of oxygen and nutrients along macropores that are rapidly consumed (relative to supply) within the micropore domains of aggregate interiors. As a consequence, iron undergoes a dynamic biogeochemical cycle whereby ferric (hydr)oxides form within aggregate exteriors while ferrous-iron generation dominates within interior regions. Further, inter-aggregate cycling of iron can transpire through the supply of electron donors and acceptors, linked with diffusive controlled response to gradients. Coupling to iron transformation are the varying retention of adsorptives such as lead and phosphorus and the redox alterations of elements from nitrogen to uranium. Nitrate, for example, diffusing into aggregate interiors encounters ferrous-iron fronts where the ensuring oxidation of Fe(II)-coupled to nitrate reduction transpires. The outcome of aggregate-scale iron transformations, described within this presentation, is fundamental controls on the cycling of redox active elements from nutrients such as carbon and nitrogen to contaminants such arsenic and uranium.

  20. Statistical evaluation of effects of riparian buffers on nitrate and ground water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spruill, T.B.

    2000-01-01

    A study was conducted to statistically evaluate the effectiveness of riparian buffers for decreasing nitrate concentrations in ground water and for affecting other chemical constituents. Values for pH, specific conductance, alkalinity, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), silica, ammonium, phosphorus, iron, and manganese at 28 sites in the Contentnea Creek Basin were significantly higher (p 20 yr) discharging ground water draining areas with riparian buffers compared with areas without riparian buffers. No differences in chloride, nitrate nitrogen, calcium, sodium, and dssolved oxygen concentrations in old ground water between buffer and nonbuffer areas were detected. Comparison of samples of young (20 yr) discharging ground water draining areas with riparian buffers compared with areas without riparian buffers. No differences in chloride, nitrate nitrogen, calcium, sodium, and dissolved oxygen concentrations in old ground water between buffer and nonbuffer areas were detected. Comparison of samples of young (<20 yr) discharging ground water samples from buffer and nonbuffer areas indicated significantly higher specific conductance, calcium, chloride, and nitrate nitrogen in nonbuffer areas. Riparian buffers along streams can affect the composition of the hyporheic zone by providing a source of organic carbon to the streambed, which creates reducing geochemical conditions that consequently can affect the chemical quality of old ground water discharging through it. Buffer zones between agricultural fields and streams facilitate dilution of conservative chemical constituents in young ground water that originate from fertilizer applications and also allow denitrification in ground water by providing an adequate source of organic carbon generated by vegetation in the buffer zone. Based on the median chloride and nitrate values for young ground water in the Contentnea Creek Basin, nitrate was 95% lower in buffer areas compared with nonbuffer areas, with a 30 to 35% reduction

  1. Modeling the long-term fate of agricultural nitrate in groundwater in the San Joaquin Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapelle, Francis H.; Campbell, Bruce G.; Widdowson, Mark A.; Landon, Mathew K.

    2013-01-01

    (POC) are the primary electron donors driving active denitrification in groundwater. The purpose of this chapter is to use a numerical mass balance modeling approach to quantitatively compare sources of electron donors (DOC, POC) and electron acceptors (dissolved oxygen, nitrate, and ferric iron) in order to assess the potential for denitrification to attenuate nitrate migration in the Central Valley aquifer.

  2. Homogeneous Iron Phosphate Nanoparticles by Combustion of Sprays.

    PubMed

    Rudin, Thomas; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2012-06-13

    Low-cost synthesis of iron phosphate nanostructured particles is attractive for large scale fortification of basic foods (rice, bread, etc.) as well as for Li-battery materials. This is achieved here by flame-assisted and flame spray pyrolysis (FASP and FSP) of inexpensive precursors (iron nitrate, phosphate), solvents (ethanol), and support gases (acetylene and methane). The iron phosphate powders produced here were mostly amorphous and exhibited excellent solubility in dilute acid, an indicator of relative iron bioavailability. The amorphous and crystalline fractions of such powders were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and their cumulative size distribution by X-ray disk centrifuge. Fine and coarse size fractions were obtained also by sedimentation and characterized by microscopy and XRD. The coarse size fraction contained maghemite Fe(2)O(3) while the fine was amorphous iron phosphate. Furthermore, the effect of increased production rate (up to 11 g/h) on product morphology and solubility was explored. Using increased methane flow rates through the ignition/pilot flame of the FSP-burner and inexpensive powder precursors resulted in also homogeneous iron phosphate nanoparticles essentially converting the FSP to a FASP process. The powders produced by FSP at increased methane flow had excellent solubility in dilute acid as well. Such use of methane or even natural gas might be economically attractive for large scale flame-synthesis of nanoparticles.

  3. Homogeneous Iron Phosphate Nanoparticles by Combustion of Sprays.

    PubMed

    Rudin, Thomas; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2012-06-13

    Low-cost synthesis of iron phosphate nanostructured particles is attractive for large scale fortification of basic foods (rice, bread, etc.) as well as for Li-battery materials. This is achieved here by flame-assisted and flame spray pyrolysis (FASP and FSP) of inexpensive precursors (iron nitrate, phosphate), solvents (ethanol), and support gases (acetylene and methane). The iron phosphate powders produced here were mostly amorphous and exhibited excellent solubility in dilute acid, an indicator of relative iron bioavailability. The amorphous and crystalline fractions of such powders were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and their cumulative size distribution by X-ray disk centrifuge. Fine and coarse size fractions were obtained also by sedimentation and characterized by microscopy and XRD. The coarse size fraction contained maghemite Fe(2)O(3) while the fine was amorphous iron phosphate. Furthermore, the effect of increased production rate (up to 11 g/h) on product morphology and solubility was explored. Using increased methane flow rates through the ignition/pilot flame of the FSP-burner and inexpensive powder precursors resulted in also homogeneous iron phosphate nanoparticles essentially converting the FSP to a FASP process. The powders produced by FSP at increased methane flow had excellent solubility in dilute acid as well. Such use of methane or even natural gas might be economically attractive for large scale flame-synthesis of nanoparticles. PMID:23407874

  4. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment.

  5. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment. PMID:26314490

  6. The ubiquity of iron.

    PubMed

    Frey, Perry A; Reed, George H

    2012-09-21

    The importance of iron in living systems can be traced to the many complexes within which it is found, to its chemical mobility in undergoing oxidation-reduction reactions, and to the abundance of iron in Earth's crust. Iron is the most abundant element, by mass, in the Earth, constituting about 80% of the inner and outer cores of Earth. The molten outer core is about 8000 km in diameter, and the solid inner core is about 2400 km in diameter. Iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust. It is the chemically functional component of mononuclear iron complexes, dinuclear iron complexes, [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters, [Fe-Ni-S] clusters, iron protophorphyrin IX, and many other complexes in protein biochemistry. Metals such as nickel, cobalt, copper, and manganese are present in the crust and could in principle function chemically in place of iron, but they are scarce in Earth's crust. Iron is plentiful because of its nuclear stability in stellar nuclear fusion reactions. It seems likely that other solid planets, formed by the same processes as Earth, would also foster the evolution of life and that iron would be similarly important to life on those planets as it is on Earth. PMID:22845493

  7. The ubiquity of iron.

    PubMed

    Frey, Perry A; Reed, George H

    2012-09-21

    The importance of iron in living systems can be traced to the many complexes within which it is found, to its chemical mobility in undergoing oxidation-reduction reactions, and to the abundance of iron in Earth's crust. Iron is the most abundant element, by mass, in the Earth, constituting about 80% of the inner and outer cores of Earth. The molten outer core is about 8000 km in diameter, and the solid inner core is about 2400 km in diameter. Iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust. It is the chemically functional component of mononuclear iron complexes, dinuclear iron complexes, [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters, [Fe-Ni-S] clusters, iron protophorphyrin IX, and many other complexes in protein biochemistry. Metals such as nickel, cobalt, copper, and manganese are present in the crust and could in principle function chemically in place of iron, but they are scarce in Earth's crust. Iron is plentiful because of its nuclear stability in stellar nuclear fusion reactions. It seems likely that other solid planets, formed by the same processes as Earth, would also foster the evolution of life and that iron would be similarly important to life on those planets as it is on Earth.

  8. Assimilatory Nitrate Reduction in Hansenula polymorpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Beatrice; Berardi, Enrico

    In the last decade, the yeast Hansenula polymorpha (syn.: Pichia angusta) has become an excellent experimental model for genetic and molecular investigations of nitrate assimilation, a subject traditionally investigated in plants, filamentous fungi and bacteria. Among other advantages, H. polymorpha offers classical and molecular genetic tools, as well as the availability of genomic sequence data.

  9. Enzyme catalytic nitration of aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Kong, Mingming; Wang, Kun; Dong, Runan; Gao, Haijun

    2015-06-01

    Nitroaromatic compounds are important intermediates in organic synthesis. The classic method used to synthesize them is chemical nitration, which involves the use of nitric acid diluted in water or acetic acid, both harmful to the environment. With the development of green chemistry, environmental friendly enzyme catalysis is increasingly employed in chemical processes. In this work, we adopted a non-aqueous horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/NaNO2/H2O2 reaction system to study the structural characteristics of aromatic compounds potentially nitrated by enzyme catalysis, as well as the relationship between the charges on carbon atoms in benzene ring and the nitro product distribution. Investigation of various reaction parameters showed that mild reaction conditions (ambient temperature and neutral pH), plus appropriate use of H2O2 and NaNO2 could prevent inactivation of HRP and polymerization of the substrates. Compared to aqueous-organic co-solvent reaction media, the aqueous-organic two-liquid phase system had great advantages in increasing the dissolved concentration of substrate and alleviating substrate inhibition. Analysis of the aromatic compounds' structural characteristics indicated that substrates containing substituents of NH2 or OH were readily catalyzed. Furthermore, analysis of the relationship between natural bond orbital (NBO) charges on carbon atoms in benzene ring, as calculated by the density functional method, and the nitro product distribution characteristics, demonstrated that the favored nitration sites were the ortho and para positions of substituents in benzene ring, similar to the selectivity of chemical nitration. PMID:26002502

  10. Nitrates, Nitrites, and Health. Bulletin 750.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeb, Barbara S.; Sloan, Kenneth W.

    This review is intended to assess available literature in order to define the range of nitrate/nitrite effects on animals. Though the literature deals primarily with livestock and experimental animals, much of the contemporary research is concerned with human nitrite intoxication. Thus, the effects on man are discussed where appropriate. Some of…

  11. Negative ion spectrometry for detecting nitrated explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boettger, H. G.; Yinon, J.

    1975-01-01

    Ionization procedure is modified to produce mainly negative ions by electron capture. Peaks of negative ions are monitored conventionally. Nitrated organic materials could be identified directly from sample sniff inlet stream by suitably modified mass spectrometer because of unique electronegativity which nitro group imparts to organic material.

  12. Denitration of High Nitrate Salts Using Reductants

    SciTech Connect

    HD Smith; EO Jones; AJ Schmidt; AH Zacher; MD Brown; MR Elmore; SR Gano

    1999-05-03

    This report describes work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in conjunction with Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), to remove nitrates in simulated low-activity waste (LAW). The major objective of this work was to provide data for identifying and demonstrating a technically viable and cost-effective approach to condition LAW for immobilization (grout).

  13. Nitrate Salt Surrogate Blending Scoping Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Anast, Kurt Roy

    2015-11-13

    Test blending equipment identified in the “Engineering Options Assessment Report: Nitrate Salt Waste Stream Processing”. Determine if the equipment will provide adequate mixing of zeolite and surrogate salt/Swheat stream; optimize equipment type and operational sequencing; impact of baffles and inserts on mixing performance; and means of validating mixing performance

  14. A toxicological study of gadolinium nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    London, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    The sensitization study in the guinea pig did not show gadolinium nitrate to have potential sensitizing properties. Skin application studies in the rabbit demonstrated that it was cutaneously a severe irritant. This material was considered an irritant in the rabbit eye application studies. 3 refs., 1 tab.

  15. 76 FR 70366 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... Department previously announced a series of public meetings on the same topic on October 2, 2011 (see 76 FR... public comment on August 3, 2011. See 73 FR 64280 (advance notice of proposed rulemaking); 76 FR 46908... SECURITY Office of the Secretary 6 CFR Part 31 RIN 1601-AA52 Ammonium Nitrate Security Program...

  16. 76 FR 62311 - Ammonium Nitrate Security Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... FR 64280 (advance notice of proposed rulemaking); 76 FR 46908 (notice of proposed rulemaking...; ] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Office of the Secretary 6 CFR Part 31 RIN 1601-AA52 Ammonium Nitrate Security.... SUMMARY: The National Protection and Programs Directorate of the Department of Homeland Security...

  17. Enzyme catalytic nitration of aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Kong, Mingming; Wang, Kun; Dong, Runan; Gao, Haijun

    2015-06-01

    Nitroaromatic compounds are important intermediates in organic synthesis. The classic method used to synthesize them is chemical nitration, which involves the use of nitric acid diluted in water or acetic acid, both harmful to the environment. With the development of green chemistry, environmental friendly enzyme catalysis is increasingly employed in chemical processes. In this work, we adopted a non-aqueous horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/NaNO2/H2O2 reaction system to study the structural characteristics of aromatic compounds potentially nitrated by enzyme catalysis, as well as the relationship between the charges on carbon atoms in benzene ring and the nitro product distribution. Investigation of various reaction parameters showed that mild reaction conditions (ambient temperature and neutral pH), plus appropriate use of H2O2 and NaNO2 could prevent inactivation of HRP and polymerization of the substrates. Compared to aqueous-organic co-solvent reaction media, the aqueous-organic two-liquid phase system had great advantages in increasing the dissolved concentration of substrate and alleviating substrate inhibition. Analysis of the aromatic compounds' structural characteristics indicated that substrates containing substituents of NH2 or OH were readily catalyzed. Furthermore, analysis of the relationship between natural bond orbital (NBO) charges on carbon atoms in benzene ring, as calculated by the density functional method, and the nitro product distribution characteristics, demonstrated that the favored nitration sites were the ortho and para positions of substituents in benzene ring, similar to the selectivity of chemical nitration.

  18. Background-like nitrate in desert air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Feng; Zhang, Daizhou; Cao, Junji; Zhang, Ting; An, Zhisheng

    2014-02-01

    The atmospheric nitrogen cycle is a key process driving the earth's environmental evolution. Current model studies require knowledge of NOx soil emissions from various land types, but desert emissions remain unquantified or are not addressed with high confidence. Our measurements at two observatories in Taklimakan desert during a dust episode showed an approximately stable and dust-independent nitrate in the air. Its concentration estimated from PM2.5, PM10 and TSP samples under non-dust, floating dust and dust storm conditions was 3.81 ± 1.24 μg m-3, 2.95 ± 0.69 μg m-3, 4.99 ± 1.71 μg m-3, respectively, despite the more-than-one-order difference of dust loading. This concentration was much larger than that in remote marine and tropical forest air. Comprehensive investigation revealed a similar presence of nitrate in other desert air. The nitrate was hypothesized to be the consequence of the conversion of NOx released from desert soils. These results indicate a background-like nitrate and active reactions of nitrogen compounds in desert air.

  19. 76 FR 47238 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ...)). Background The Commission instituted this review on March 1, 2011 (76 FR 11273) and determined on June 6, 2011 that it would conduct an expedited review (76 FR 34749, June 14, 2011). The Commission transmitted... COMMISSION Ammonium Nitrate From Russia Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the...

  20. 76 FR 11273 - Ammonium Nitrate From Russia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... nitrate from Russia (71 FR 17080). The Commission is now conducting a second review to determine whether... recently amended at 74 FR 2847 (January 16, 2009). \\1\\ No response to this request for information is... (65 FR 37759, June 16, 2000). Following five-year reviews by Commerce and the Commission,...

  1. Iron-sulfur clusters: why iron?

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kasper P

    2006-08-01

    This communication addresses a simple question by means of density functional calculations: Why is iron used as the metal in iron-sulfur clusters? While there may be several answers to this question, it is shown here that one feature - the well-defined inner-sphere reorganization energy of self-exchange electron transfer - is very much favored in iron-sulfur clusters as opposed to metal substituted analogues of Mn, Co, Ni, and Cu. Furthermore, the conclusion holds for both 1Fe and 2Fe type iron-sulfur clusters. The results show that only iron provides a small inner-sphere reorganization energy of 21 kJ/mol in 1Fe (rubredoxin) and 46 kJ/mol in 2Fe (ferredoxin) models, whereas other metal ions exhibit values in the range 57-135 kJ/mol (1Fe) and 94-140 kJ/mol (2Fe). This simple result provides an important, although partial, explanation why iron alone is used in this type of clusters. The results can be explained by simple orbital rules of electron transfer, which state that the occupation of anti-bonding orbitals should not change during the redox reactions. This rule immediately suggests good and poor electron carriers.

  2. Reduction of Nitrite and Nitrate to Ammonium on Pyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singireddy, Soujanya; Gordon, Alexander D.; Smirnov, Alexander; Vance, Michael A.; Schoonen, Martin A. A.; Szilagyi, Robert K.; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2012-08-01

    An important constraint on the formation of the building blocks of life in the Hadean is the availability of small, activated compounds such as ammonia (NH3) relative to its inert dinitrogen source. Iron-sulfur particles and/or mineral surfaces have been implicated to provide the catalytic active sites for the reduction of dinitrogen. Here we provide a combined kinetic, spectroscopic, and computational modeling study for an alternative source of ammonia from water soluble nitrogen oxide ions. The adsorption of aqueous nitrite (NO{2/-}) and nitrate (NO{3/-}) on pyrite (FeS2) and subsequent reduction chemistry to ammonia was investigated at 22°C, 70°C, and 120°C. Batch geochemical and in situ Attenuated Total Reflection - Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy experiments were used to determine the reduction kinetics to NH3 and to elucidate the identity of the surface complexes, respectively, during the reaction chemistry of NO{2/-} and NO{3/-}. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations aided the interpretation of the vibrational data for a representative set of surface species. Under the experimental conditions used in this study, we detected the adsorption of nitric oxide (NO) intermediate on the pyrite surface. NH3 production from NO{2/-} occurred at 70 and 120°C and from NO{3/-} occurred only at 120°C.

  3. Silver nitrate masquerading as a radiopaque foreign body.

    PubMed

    Healy, Claragh; Canney, Mark; Murphy, Adrian; Regan, Padraic

    2007-04-01

    Silver nitrate is commonly used as a method of chemical cauterization to areas of hypergranulation. We report two cases wherein silver nitrate in the hand was misinterpreted radiologically as foreign bodies.

  4. Perchlorate and nitrate in situ bioremediation of ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Strietelmeier, E. A.; Nuttall, H. Eric; Hatzinger, Paul; Goltz, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Nitrate and perchlorate are growing worldwide problems as mobile anionic groundwater contaminants. Biological rduction of nitrate and perchlorate in groundwater is under development as a technology to address these problems.

  5. Electrochemical nitrate biosensor based on poly(pyrrole-viologen) film-nitrate reductase-clay composite.

    PubMed

    Cosnier, S; Da Silva, S; Shan, D; Gorgy, K

    2008-11-01

    The immobilization of nitrate reductase (NR) was performed by entrapment in a laponite clay gel and cross-linking by glutaraldehyde. In presence of nitrate and methyl viologen, a catalytic current appeared at -0.60 V illustrating the enzymatic reduction of nitrate into nitrite via the reduced form of the freely diffusing methyl viologen. The electropolymerization of a water-soluble pyrrole viologen derivative within the interlamellar spaces and channels of the host clay matrix successfully carried out the electrical wiring of the entrapped NR. Rotating disk measurements led to the determination of kinetic constants, namely k(2)=10.7 s(-1) and K(M)=7 microM. These parameters reflect the efficiency of the electro-enzymatic reduction of nitrate and the substrate affinity for the immobilized enzyme.

  6. Evidence for a plasma-membrane-bound nitrate reductase involved in nitrate uptake of Chlorella sorokiniana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischner, R.; Ward, M. R.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Anti-nitrate-reductase (NR) immunoglobulin-G (IgG) fragments inhibited nitrate uptake into Chlorella cells but had no affect on nitrate uptake. Intact anti-NR serum and preimmune IgG fragments had no affect on nitrate uptake. Membrane-associated NR was detected in plasma-membrane (PM) fractions isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning. The PM-associated NR was not removed by sonicating PM vesicles in 500 mM NaCl and 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and represented up to 0.8% of the total Chlorella NR activity. The PM NR was solubilized by Triton X-100 and inactivated by Chlorella NR antiserum. Plasma-membrane NR was present in ammonium-grown Chlorella cells that completely lacked soluble NR activity. The subunit sizes of the PM and soluble NRs were 60 and 95 kDa, respectively, as determined by sodium-dodecyl-sulfate electrophoresis and western blotting.

  7. Molten nitrate salt technology development status report

    SciTech Connect

    Carling, R.W.; Kramer, C.M.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Nissen, D.A.; Goods, S.H.; Mar, R.W.; Munford, J.W.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Biefeld, R.N.; Norem, N.J.

    1981-03-01

    Recognizing thermal energy storage as potentially critical to the successful commercialization of solar thermal power systems, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established a comprehensive and aggressive thermal energy storage technology development program. Of the fluids proposed for heat transfer and energy storage molten nitrate salts offer significant economic advantages. The nitrate salt of most interest is a binary mixture of NaNO/sub 3/ and KNO/sub 3/. Although nitrate/nitrite mixtures have been used for decades as heat transfer and heat treatment fluids the use has been at temperatures of about 450/sup 0/C and lower. In solar thermal power systems the salts will experience a temperature range of 350 to 600/sup 0/C. Because central receiver applications place more rigorous demands and higher temperatures on nitrate salts a comprehensive experimental program has been developed to examine what effects, if any, the new demands and temperatures have on the salts. The experiments include corrosion testing, environmental cracking of containment materials, and determinations of physical properties and decomposition mechanisms. This report details the work done at Sandia National Laboratories in each area listed. In addition, summaries of the experimental programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the University of New York, EIC Laboratories, Inc., and the Norwegian Institute of Technology on molten nitrate salts are given. Also discussed is how the experimental programs will influence the near-term central receiver programs such as utility repowering/industrial retrofit and cogeneration. The report is designed to provide easy access to the latest information and data on molten NaNO/sub 3//KNO/sub 3/ for the designers and engineers of future central receiver projects.

  8. Fe(II) Oxidation Is an Innate Capability of Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria That Involves Abiotic and Biotic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Hans K.; Clark, Iain C.; Blazewicz, Steven J.; Iavarone, Anthony T.

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetically diverse species of bacteria can catalyze the oxidation of ferrous iron [Fe(II)] coupled to nitrate (NO3−) reduction, often referred to as nitrate-dependent iron oxidation (NDFO). Very little is known about the biochemistry of NDFO, and though growth benefits have been observed, mineral encrustations and nitrite accumulation likely limit growth. Acidovorax ebreus, like other species in the Acidovorax genus, is proficient at catalyzing NDFO. Our results suggest that the induction of specific Fe(II) oxidoreductase proteins is not required for NDFO. No upregulated periplasmic or outer membrane redox-active proteins, like those involved in Fe(II) oxidation by acidophilic iron oxidizers or anaerobic photoferrotrophs, were observed in proteomic experiments. We demonstrate that while “abiotic” extracellular reactions between Fe(II) and biogenic NO2−/NO can be involved in NDFO, intracellular reactions between Fe(II) and periplasmic components are essential to initiate extensive NDFO. We present evidence that an organic cosubstrate inhibits NDFO, likely by keeping periplasmic enzymes in their reduced state, stimulating metal efflux pumping, or both, and that growth during NDFO relies on the capacity of a nitrate-reducing bacterium to overcome the toxicity of Fe(II) and reactive nitrogen species. On the basis of our data and evidence in the literature, we postulate that all respiratory nitrate-reducing bacteria are innately capable of catalyzing NDFO. Our findings have implications for a mechanistic understanding of NDFO, the biogeochemical controls on anaerobic Fe(II) oxidation, and the production of NO2−, NO, and N2O in the environment. PMID:23687275

  9. Fe(II) oxidation is an innate capability of nitrate-reducing bacteria that involves abiotic and biotic reactions.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Hans K; Clark, Iain C; Blazewicz, Steven J; Iavarone, Anthony T; Coates, John D

    2013-07-01

    Phylogenetically diverse species of bacteria can catalyze the oxidation of ferrous iron [Fe(II)] coupled to nitrate (NO(3)(-)) reduction, often referred to as nitrate-dependent iron oxidation (NDFO). Very little is known about the biochemistry of NDFO, and though growth benefits have been observed, mineral encrustations and nitrite accumulation likely limit growth. Acidovorax ebreus, like other species in the Acidovorax genus, is proficient at catalyzing NDFO. Our results suggest that the induction of specific Fe(II) oxidoreductase proteins is not required for NDFO. No upregulated periplasmic or outer membrane redox-active proteins, like those involved in Fe(II) oxidation by acidophilic iron oxidizers or anaerobic photoferrotrophs, were observed in proteomic experiments. We demonstrate that while "abiotic" extracellular reactions between Fe(II) and biogenic NO(2)(-)/NO can be involved in NDFO, intracellular reactions between Fe(II) and periplasmic components are essential to initiate extensive NDFO. We present evidence that an organic cosubstrate inhibits NDFO, likely by keeping periplasmic enzymes in their reduced state, stimulating metal efflux pumping, or both, and that growth during NDFO relies on the capacity of a nitrate-reducing bacterium to overcome the toxicity of Fe(II) and reactive nitrogen species. On the basis of our data and evidence in the literature, we postulate that all respiratory nitrate-reducing bacteria are innately capable of catalyzing NDFO. Our findings have implications for a mechanistic understanding of NDFO, the biogeochemical controls on anaerobic Fe(II) oxidation, and the production of NO(2)(-), NO, and N(2)O in the environment.

  10. Iron and Stony-iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haack, H.; McCoy, T. J.

    2003-12-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids.Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar to that continuing on Earth - although on much smaller length- and timescales - with melting of the metal and silicates, differentiation into core, mantle, and crust, and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth and other terrestrial planets. This fact has been recognized since the work of Chladni (1794), who argued that stony-iron meteorites must have originated in outer space and fallen during fireballs and that they provide our closest analogue to the material that comprises our own planet's core. This chapter deals with our current knowledge of these meteorites. How did they form? What can they tell us about the early evolution of the solar system and its solid bodies? How closely do they resemble the materials from planetary interiors? What do we know and don't we know?Iron and stony-iron meteorites constitute ˜6% of meteorite falls (Grady, 2000). Despite their scarcity among falls, iron meteorites are our only samples of ˜75 of the ˜135 asteroids from which meteorites originate ( Keil et al., 1994; Scott, 1979; Meibom and Clark, 1999; see also Chapter 1.05), suggesting that both differentiated asteroids and the geologic processes that produced them were common.Despite the highly evolved nature of iron and stony-iron meteorites, their chemistry provides important

  11. Brain iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moos, Torben

    2002-11-01

    Iron is essential for virtually all types of cells and organisms. The significance of the iron for brain function is reflected by the presence of receptors for transferrin on brain capillary endothelial cells. The transport of iron into the brain from the circulation is regulated so that the extraction of iron by brain capillary endothelial cells is low in iron-replete conditions and the reverse when the iron need of the brain is high as in conditions with iron deficiency and during development of the brain. Whereas there is good agreement that iron is taken up by means of receptor-mediated uptake of iron-transferrin at the brain barriers, there are contradictory views on how iron is transported further on from the brain barriers and into the brain extracellular space. The prevailing hypothesis for transport of iron across the BBB suggests a mechanism that involves detachment of iron from transferrin within barrier cells followed by recycling of apo-transferrin to blood plasma and release of iron as non-transferrin-bound iron into the brain interstitium from where the iron is taken up by neurons and glial cells. Another hypothesis claims that iron-transferrin is transported into the brain by means of transcytosis through the BBB. This thesis deals with the topic "brain iron homeostasis" defined as the attempts to maintain constant concentrations of iron in the brain internal environment via regulation of iron transport through brain barriers, cellular iron uptake by neurons and glia, and export of iron from brain to blood. The first part deals with transport of iron-transferrin complexes from blood to brain either by transport across the brain barriers or by uptake and retrograde axonal transport in motor neurons projecting beyond the blood-brain barrier. The transport of iron and transport into the brain was examined using radiolabeled iron-transferrin. Intravenous injection of [59Fe-125]transferrin led to an almost two-fold higher accumulation of 59Fe than of

  12. Salivary nitrate, nitrite and nitrate reductase activity in relation to risk of oral cancer in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Badawi, A F; Hosny, G; el-Hadary, M; Mostafa, M H

    1998-10-01

    It has been suggested that nitrate and nitrite may play a role in the etiology of human oral cancer. We investigated whether salivary nitrate and nitrite and the activity of nitrate reductase (NRase) may affect the risk of oral cancer in Egypt, an area with high levels of environmental nitrosating agents. Levels of salivary nitrite (8.3 +/- 1.0 micrograms/ml) and nitrate (44 +/- 3.7 micrograms/ml) and activity of NRase (74 +/- 10 nmol/ml/min) were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in oral cancer patients (n = 42) compared to control Egyptian healthy individuals (n = 40, nitrite = 5.3 +/- 0.3 micrograms/ml, nitrate = 27 +/- 1.2 micrograms/ml, and NRase activity = 46 +/- 4 nmol/ml/min). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) and the 95% confidence intervals (C.I.) for risk of oral cancer, categorized by the levels of salivary nitrate and nitrite and NRase activity, showed a higher cancer risk associated with nitrite > 7.5 micrograms/ml (OR: 3.0, C.I.: 1.0-9.3), nitrite > 40 micrograms/ml (OR: 4.3, C.I.: 1.4-13.3) and NRase activity > 50 nmol/ml/min (OR: 2.9, C.I.: 1.1-7.4). Our findings suggest that increased consumption of dietary nitrate and nitrite is associated with elevated levels of salivary nitrite. Together with the increased activity of salivary NRase, these observations may explain, at least in part, the role of nitrate and nitrite in the development of oral cancer in individuals from an area with a high burden of N-nitroso precursors.

  13. Mechanisms of mammalian iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pantopoulos, Kostas; Porwal, Suheel Kumar; Tartakoff, Alan; Devireddy, L

    2012-07-24

    Iron is vital for almost all organisms because of its ability to donate and accept electrons with relative ease. It serves as a cofactor for many proteins and enzymes necessary for oxygen and energy metabolism, as well as for several other essential processes. Mammalian cells utilize multiple mechanisms to acquire iron. Disruption of iron homeostasis is associated with various human diseases: iron deficiency resulting from defects in the acquisition or distribution of the metal causes anemia, whereas iron surfeit resulting from excessive iron absorption or defective utilization causes abnormal tissue iron deposition, leading to oxidative damage. Mammals utilize distinct mechanisms to regulate iron homeostasis at the systemic and cellular levels. These involve the hormone hepcidin and iron regulatory proteins, which collectively ensure iron balance. This review outlines recent advances in iron regulatory pathways as well as in mechanisms underlying intracellular iron trafficking, an important but less studied area of mammalian iron homeostasis.

  14. IRON IN MULTIPLE MYELOMA

    PubMed Central

    VanderWall, Kristina; Daniels-Wells, Tracy R; Penichet, Manuel; Lichtenstein, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a non-curable B cell malignancy in which iron metabolism plays an important role. Patients with this disorder almost universally suffer from a clinically significant anemia, which is often symptomatic, and which is due to impaired iron utilization. Recent studies indicate that the proximal cause of dysregulated iron metabolism and anemia in these patients is cytokine-induced upregulation of hepcidin expression. Malignant myeloma cells are dependent on an increased influx of iron and therapeutic efforts are being made to target this requirement. The studies detailing the characteristics and biochemical abnormalities in iron metabolism causing anemia and the initial attempts to target iron therapeutically are described in this review. PMID:23879589

  15. Cellular iron transport.

    PubMed

    Garrick, Michael D; Garrick, Laura M

    2009-05-01

    Iron has a split personality as an essential nutrient that also has the potential to generate reactive oxygen species. We discuss how different cell types within specific tissues manage this schizophrenia. The emphasis in enterocytes is on regulating the body's supply of iron by regulating transport into the blood stream. In developing red blood cells, adaptations in transport manage the body's highest flux of iron. Hepatocytes buffer the body's stock of iron. Macrophage recycle the iron from effete red cells among other iron management tasks. Pneumocytes provide a barrier to prevent illicit entry that, when at risk of breaching, leads to a need to handle the dangers in a fashion essentially shared with macrophage. We also discuss or introduce cell types including renal cells, neurons, other brain cells, and more where our ignorance, currently still vast, needs to be removed by future research. PMID:19344751

  16. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

  17. Thermal Conductivity of Eutectic Nitrates and Nitrates/Expanded Graphite Composite as Phase Change Materials.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xin; Zhang, Peng; Meng, Zhao-Nan; Li, Ming

    2015-04-01

    Nitrates and eutectic nitrate mixtures are considered as potential phase change materials (PCMs) for the middle-temperature-range solar energy storage applications. But the extensive utilization is restricted by the poor thermal conductivity and thermal stability. In the present study, sodium nitrate-potassium nitrate eutectic mixture was used as the base PCM, and expanded graphite (EG) was added to the mixture so as to improve the thermal conductivities. The elaboration method consists of a physically mixing of salt powders with or without EG, and the composite PCMs were cold-compressed to form shape-stabilized PCMs at room temperature. The thermal conductivities of the composite PCMs fabricated by cold-compression were investigated at different temperatures by the steady state method. The results showed that the addition of EG significantly enhanced the thermal conductivities. The thermal conductivities of pure nitrates and nitrates/EG composite PCMs in solid state showed the behavior of temperature dependant, and they slightly decreased with the increase of the temperature.

  18. FLAME DENITRATION AND REDUCTION OF URANIUM NITRATE TO URANIUM DIOXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Hedley, W.H.; Roehrs, R.J.; Henderson, C.M.

    1962-06-26

    A process is given for converting uranyl nitrate solution to uranium dioxide. The process comprises spraying fine droplets of aqueous uranyl nitrate solution into a hightemperature hydrocarbon flame, said flame being deficient in oxygen approximately 30%, retaining the feed in the flame for a sufficient length of time to reduce the nitrate to the dioxide, and recovering uranium dioxide. (AEC)

  19. Disposable nitrate-selective optical sensor based on fluorescent dye

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple, disposable thin-film optical nitrate sensor was developed. The sensor was fabricated by applying a nitrate-selective polymer membrane on the surface of a thin polyester film. The membrane was composed of polyvinylchloride (PVC), plasticizer, fluorescent dye, and nitrate-selective ionophore...

  20. 40 CFR 721.5769 - Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols... Substances § 721.5769 Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as a mixture of nitrated alkylated...

  1. 40 CFR 721.5769 - Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols... Substances § 721.5769 Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as a mixture of nitrated alkylated...

  2. Nitrate to ammonia ceramic (NAC) bench scale stabilization study

    SciTech Connect

    Caime, W.J.; Hoeffner, S.L.

    1995-10-01

    Department of Energy (DOE) sites such as the Hanford site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Savannah River site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have large quantities of sodium-nitrate based liquid wastes. A process to reduce the nitrates to ammonia has been developed at ORNL. This technology creates a sludge lower in nitrates. This report describes stabilization possibilities of the sludge.

  3. 40 CFR 721.5769 - Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols... Substances § 721.5769 Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as a mixture of nitrated alkylated...

  4. 40 CFR 721.5769 - Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols... Substances § 721.5769 Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as a mixture of nitrated alkylated...

  5. 40 CFR 721.5769 - Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols... Substances § 721.5769 Mixture of nitrated alkylated phenols. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as a mixture of nitrated alkylated...

  6. 40 CFR 721.7500 - Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name... Substances § 721.7500 Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance nitrate polyether polyol (PMN P88-2540)...

  7. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  8. 40 CFR 721.7500 - Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name... Substances § 721.7500 Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance nitrate polyether polyol (PMN P88-2540)...

  9. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium nitrate-urea complex may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in...

  10. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium nitrate-urea complex may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in...

  11. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  12. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Paperboard § 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium nitrate-urea complex may be safely used as a..., packaging, transporting, or holding food, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Sodium...

  13. 46 CFR 148.220 - Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. 148.220 Section... § 148.220 Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and... nitrate and containing a maximum of 0.4 percent total added combustible material or containing a...

  14. 46 CFR 148.220 - Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. 148.220 Section... § 148.220 Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and... nitrate and containing a maximum of 0.4 percent total added combustible material or containing a...

  15. 46 CFR 148.227 - Calcium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Calcium nitrate fertilizers. 148.227 Section 148.227... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.227 Calcium nitrate fertilizers. This part does not apply to commercial grades of calcium nitrate fertilizers consisting mainly...

  16. 40 CFR 721.7500 - Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name... Substances § 721.7500 Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance nitrate polyether polyol (PMN P88-2540)...

  17. 46 CFR 148.227 - Calcium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Calcium nitrate fertilizers. 148.227 Section 148.227... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.227 Calcium nitrate fertilizers. This part does not apply to commercial grades of calcium nitrate fertilizers consisting mainly...

  18. 46 CFR 148.220 - Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. 148.220 Section... § 148.220 Ammonium nitrate-phosphate fertilizers. (a) This section applies to the stowage and... nitrate and containing a maximum of 0.4 percent total added combustible material or containing a...

  19. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  20. 46 CFR 148.227 - Calcium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Calcium nitrate fertilizers. 148.227 Section 148.227... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.227 Calcium nitrate fertilizers. This part does not apply to commercial grades of calcium nitrate fertilizers consisting mainly...

  1. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  2. 21 CFR 176.320 - Sodium nitrate-urea complex.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium nitrate-urea complex. 176.320 Section 176... Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard § 176.320 Sodium nitrate-urea complex. Sodium nitrate-urea complex may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in...

  3. 40 CFR 721.7500 - Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name... Substances § 721.7500 Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance nitrate polyether polyol (PMN P88-2540)...

  4. 46 CFR 148.227 - Calcium nitrate fertilizers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Calcium nitrate fertilizers. 148.227 Section 148.227... MATERIALS THAT REQUIRE SPECIAL HANDLING Special Requirements for Certain Materials § 148.227 Calcium nitrate fertilizers. This part does not apply to commercial grades of calcium nitrate fertilizers consisting mainly...

  5. 9 CFR 319.2 - Products and nitrates and nitrites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Products and nitrates and nitrites... and nitrates and nitrites. Any product, such as frankfurters and corned beef, for which there is a standard in this part and to which nitrate or nitrite is permitted or required to be added, may be...

  6. 40 CFR 721.7500 - Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name... Substances § 721.7500 Nitrate polyether polyol (generic name). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance nitrate polyether polyol (PMN P88-2540)...

  7. Denitrification and Nitrate-Dependent Fe(II) Oxidation in Various Pseudogulbenkiania Strains

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Satoshi; Joikai, Kazuki; Otsuka, Shigeto; Senoo, Keishi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Pseudogulbenkiania is a relatively recently characterized genus within the order Neisseriales, class Betaproteobacteria. This genus contains several strains that are capable of anaerobic, nitrate-dependent Fe(II) oxidation (NDFO), a geochemically important reaction for nitrogen and iron cycles. In the present study, we examined denitrification functional gene diversities within this genus, and clarified whether other Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strains perform denitrification and NDFO. Seventy strains were analyzed, including two type strains, a well-characterized NDFO strain, and 67 denitrifying strains isolated from various rice paddy fields and rice-soybean rotation fields in Japan. We also attempted to identify the genes responsible for NDFO by mutagenesis. Our comprehensive analysis showed that all Pseudogulbenkiania strains tested performed denitrification and NDFO; however, we were unable to obtain NDFO-deficient denitrifying mutants in our mutagenesis experiment. This result suggests that Fe(II) oxidation in these strains is not enzymatic, but is caused by reactive N-species that are formed during nitrate reduction. Based on the results of the comparative genome analysis among Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strains, we identified low sequence similarity within the nos gene as well as different gene arrangements within the nos gene cluster, suggesting that nos genes were horizontally transferred. Since Pseudogulbenkiania sp. strains have been isolated from various locations around the world, their denitrification and NDFO abilities may contribute significantly to nitrogen and iron biogeochemical cycles. PMID:27431373

  8. Formation and occurrence of biogenic iron-rich minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, Danielle; Langley, Sean

    2005-09-01

    Iron cycling in the Earth's crust depends on redox reactions, which often trigger the precipitation and dissolution of Fe-rich minerals. Microbial activity is also an integral part of iron cycling, through carbon fixation, respiration and passive sorption reactions. Iron oxides formed in close association with bacteria (either as internal or external precipitates) are referred to as biogenic minerals. They form in several types of environments on Earth, from freshwater to marine systems, aquifers, soils and mining impacted systems. Biogenic iron oxides generally occur as nanocrystals and show a wide range of morphology and mineralogy. These minerals form as a result of the direct metabolic activity of bacteria or as a result of passive sorption and nucleation reactions. The metabolic activity of acidophilic and neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria under oxic conditions promotes the oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) and the precipitation of biogenic iron oxides as extracellular precipitates near or on the bacterial cells. Iron oxidation under anoxic conditions can also occur, as a result of the activity of nitrate-reducers and photoautotrophic bacteria using Fe(II) as an electron donor. Secondary Fe-oxide formation has been reported during the microbial reduction of iron oxides. Passive Fe sorption and nucleation onto bacterial cell walls represents another important mechanism leading to iron oxide formation. The surface reactivity of the bacterial surface under environmental pH conditions confers a net negative charge to the cell wall, which leads to the binding of soluble iron and eventually to the precipitation of iron oxides under saturation conditions. Extracellular polymers produced by bacteria can act as a template for iron sorption and Fe-oxide nucleation. Intracellular iron oxide formation has been observed in natural environments. Magnetotactic bacteria produce intracellular magnetosomes, occurring as chains of magnetite crystals within the cells, and an

  9. Austempered Ductile Iron Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilc, Jozef; Šajgalík, Michal; Holubják, Jozef; Piešová, Marianna; Zaušková, Lucia; Babík, Ondrej; Kuždák, Viktor; Rákoci, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    This article deals with the machining of cast iron. In industrial practice, Austempered Ductile Iron began to be used relatively recently. ADI is ductile iron that has gone through austempering to get improved properties, among which we can include strength, wear resistance or noise damping. This specific material is defined also by other properties, such as high elasticity, ductility and endurance against tenigue, which are the properties, that considerably make the tooling characteristic worse.

  10. Effects of nitrate input from a water reclamation facility on the Occoquan Reservoir water quality.

    PubMed

    Cubas, Francisco J; Novak, John T; Godrej, Adil N; Grizzard, Thomas J

    2014-02-01

    To manage water quality in the Occoquan Reservoir, Virginia, a water reclamation facility discharges nitrified product water that reduces the release of undesirable substances (e.g., phosphorus, iron, and ammonia) from sediments during periods of hypolimnetic anoxia. Results showed that when the oxidized nitrogen (OxN) concentration input to the reservoir was lower than 5 mg N/L during periods of anoxia following thermal stratification, nitrate was depleted in the upper reaches of the reservoir resulting in the release of ammonia and orthophosphate from the sediments downstream. When the OxN input to the reservoir was operationally increased to a concentration greater than 10 mg-N/L, orthophosphate release was suppressed. Introducing OxN to the system decreased sediment ammonia release but did not eliminate it. By discharging reclaimed water that contained nitrate levels greater than 10 mg N/L, reservoir water quality was protected and the discharged nitrate was converted to nitrogen gas as it moved downstream. PMID:24645542

  11. An exploration of nitrate concentrations in groundwater aquifers of central-west region of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Ratan K; Hasnat, Mohammad A; Hossain, Shahadat; Ikeue, Keita; Machida, Masato

    2008-11-30

    Groundwater and river water samples were collected from the study area to investigate the spatial distribution of nitrate (NO(3)(-)) in the central-west region of Bangladesh. The shallow and deep groundwater nitrate concentrations ranged from <0.10 to 75.12 and <0.10 to 40.78 mg/L, respectively. Major river water NO(3)(-) concentrations were ranged from 0.98 to 2.32 mg/L with an average of 1.8 mg/L. The average Cl(-)/NO(3)(-) ratio (4.9) of major river water has been considered as reference point to delineate denitrification processes. The alluvial fan, alluvial, deltaic and coastal deposits shallow groundwater having C1(-)/NO(3)(-) values less than that of the average river water value (4.9), suggested denitrification processes within the aquifers. On the other hand, denitrification processes are insignificant in the Pleistocene terraces area aquifers related to relatively higher concentrations of nitrate. Iron pyrite has been found as insignificant effect on denitrification. PMID:18406518

  12. The nitrate time bomb: a numerical way to investigate nitrate storage and lag time in the unsaturated zone.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Butcher, A S; Stuart, M E; Gooddy, D C; Bloomfield, J P

    2013-10-01

    Nitrate pollution in groundwater, which is mainly from agricultural activities, remains an international problem. It threatens the environment, economics and human health. There is a rising trend in nitrate concentrations in many UK groundwater bodies. Research has shown it can take decades for leached nitrate from the soil to discharge into groundwater and surface water due to the 'store' of nitrate and its potentially long travel time in the unsaturated and saturated zones. However, this time lag is rarely considered in current water nitrate management and policy development. The aim of this study was to develop a catchment-scale integrated numerical method to investigate the nitrate lag time in the groundwater system, and the Eden Valley, UK, was selected as a case study area. The method involves three models, namely the nitrate time bomb-a process-based model to simulate the nitrate transport in the unsaturated zone (USZ), GISGroundwater--a GISGroundwater flow model, and N-FM--a model to simulate the nitrate transport in the saturated zone. This study answers the scientific questions of when the nitrate currently in the groundwater was loaded into the unsaturated zones and eventually reached the water table; is the rising groundwater nitrate concentration in the study area caused by historic nitrate load; what caused the uneven distribution of groundwater nitrate concentration in the study area; and whether the historic peak nitrate loading has reached the water table in the area. The groundwater nitrate in the area was mainly from the 1980s to 2000s, whilst the groundwater nitrate in most of the source protection zones leached into the system during 1940s-1970s; the large and spatially variable thickness of the USZ is one of the major reasons for unevenly distributed groundwater nitrate concentrations in the study area; the peak nitrate loading around 1983 has affected most of the study area. For areas around the Bowscar, Beacon Edge, Low Plains, Nord Vue

  13. The nitrate time bomb: a numerical way to investigate nitrate storage and lag time in the unsaturated zone.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Butcher, A S; Stuart, M E; Gooddy, D C; Bloomfield, J P

    2013-10-01

    Nitrate pollution in groundwater, which is mainly from agricultural activities, remains an international problem. It threatens the environment, economics and human health. There is a rising trend in nitrate concentrations in many UK groundwater bodies. Research has shown it can take decades for leached nitrate from the soil to discharge into groundwater and surface water due to the 'store' of nitrate and its potentially long travel time in the unsaturated and saturated zones. However, this time lag is rarely considered in current water nitrate management and policy development. The aim of this study was to develop a catchment-scale integrated numerical method to investigate the nitrate lag time in the groundwater system, and the Eden Valley, UK, was selected as a case study area. The method involves three models, namely the nitrate time bomb-a process-based model to simulate the nitrate transport in the unsaturated zone (USZ), GISGroundwater--a GISGroundwater flow model, and N-FM--a model to simulate the nitrate transport in the saturated zone. This study answers the scientific questions of when the nitrate currently in the groundwater was loaded into the unsaturated zones and eventually reached the water table; is the rising groundwater nitrate concentration in the study area caused by historic nitrate load; what caused the uneven distribution of groundwater nitrate concentration in the study area; and whether the historic peak nitrate loading has reached the water table in the area. The groundwater nitrate in the area was mainly from the 1980s to 2000s, whilst the groundwater nitrate in most of the source protection zones leached into the system during 1940s-1970s; the large and spatially variable thickness of the USZ is one of the major reasons for unevenly distributed groundwater nitrate concentrations in the study area; the peak nitrate loading around 1983 has affected most of the study area. For areas around the Bowscar, Beacon Edge, Low Plains, Nord Vue

  14. Plea for Iron Astrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Mostefaoui, T. A.; Benmerad, B.; Kerkar, M.

    2010-10-31

    Iron is a key element and compound in living bodies. It is the most abundant refractory element and has the most stable nucleus in the Universe. Also, elemental Iron has a relevant abundance in the interstellar medium and dense clouds, it can be in gas phase or included in dust particles. During this talk, I shall explain why this special interest in Iron and shall give a brief explanation about its origin and the interstellar nucleosynthesis. After this I'll detail the rich chemistry that Iron can be involved in the interstellar medium, dense clouds with several species.

  15. Iron deficiency: beyond anemia.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Dinesh; Chandra, Jagdish

    2011-01-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder affecting at least one third of world's population. Though anemia is common manifestation of iron deficiency, other effects of iron deficiency on various tissues, organs and systems are usually under recognized. Impaired brain development and cognitive, behavioural and psychomotor impairment are most worrisome manifestations of iron deficiency. Studies have demonstrated that some of these changes occurring during period of brain growth spurt (<2 years age) may be irreversible. Association of iron deficiency with febrile seizures, pica, breath holding spells, restless leg syndrome and thrombosis is increasingly being recognized. Impaired cell-mediated immunity and bactericidal function are generally noted in iron-deficient persons; however, the findings are inconsistent. Despite proven reversible functional immunological defects in vitro studies, a clinically important relationship between states of iron deficiency and susceptibility to infections remains controversial. Studies from malaria endemic regions have reported increased incidence of malaria in association with iron supplementation. These and some other aspects of iron deficiency are reviewed in this article.

  16. Physics of iron

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, O.

    1993-10-01

    This volume comprises papers presented at the AIRAPT Conference, June 28 to July 1993. The iron sessions at the meeting were identified as the Second Ironworkers Convention. The renewal of interest stems from advances in technologies in both diamond-anvil cell (DAC) and shock wave studies as well as from controversies arising from a lack of consensus among both experimentalists and theoreticians. These advances have produced new data on iron in the pressure-temperature regime of interest for phase diagrams and for temperatures of the core/mantle and inner-core/outer-core boundaries. Particularly interesting is the iron phase diagram inferred from DAC studies. A new phase, {beta}, with a {gamma}-{beta}-{epsilon} triple point at about 30 GPa and 1190 K, and possible sixth phase, {omega}, with an {epsilon}-{Theta}-melt triple point at about 190 GPa and 4000 K are deemed possible. The importance of the equation of state of iron in consideration of Earth`s heat budget and the origin of its magnetic field invoke the interest of theoreticians who argue on the basis of molecular dynamics and other first principles methods. While the major thrust of both meetings was on the physics of pure iron, there was notable contributions on iron alloys. Hydrogen-iron alloys, iron-sulfur liquids, and the comparability to rhenium in phase diagram studies are discussed. The knowledge of the physical properties of iron were increased by several contributions.

  17. Physiology of Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Waldvogel-Abramowski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M.; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary A revolution occurred during the last decade in the comprehension of the physiology as well as in the physiopathology of iron metabolism. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent knowledge that has accumulated, allowing a better comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in iron homeostasis. Iron metabolism is very fine tuned. The free molecule is very toxic; therefore, complex regulatory mechanisms have been developed in mammalian to insure adequate intestinal absorption, transportation, utilization, and elimination. ‘Ironomics’ certainly will be the future of the understanding of genes as well as of the protein-protein interactions involved in iron metabolism. PMID:25053935

  18. Physics of iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, O.

    1993-10-01

    This volume comprises papers presented at the AIRAPT Conference, 28 June - 2 July 1993. The iron sessions at the meeting were identified as the Second Ironworkers Convention. The renewal of interest stems from advances in technologies in both diamond-anvil cell (DAC) and shock wave studies as well as from controversies arising from a lack of consensus among both experimentalists and theoreticians. These advances have produced new data on iron in the pressure-temperature regime of interest for phase diagrams and for temperatures of the core/mantle and inner-core/outer-core boundaries. Particularly interesting is the iron phase diagram inferred from DAC studies. A new phase, (beta), with a (gamma)-(beta)-(epsilon) triple point at about 30 GPa and 1190 K, and possible sixth phase, (omega), with an (epsilon)-(Theta)-melt triple point at about 190 GPa and 4000 K are deemed possible. The importance of the equation of state of iron in consideration of Earth's heat budget and the origin of its magnetic field invoke the interest of theoreticians who argue on the basis of molecular dynamics and other first principles methods. While the major thrust of both meetings was on the physics of pure iron, there were notable contributions on iron alloys. Hydrogen-iron alloys, iron-sulfur liquids, and the comparability to rhenium in phase diagram studies are discussed. The knowledge of the physical properties of iron were increased by several contributions.

  19. 35. GREY IRON TUMBLERS, IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ROTATE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. GREY IRON TUMBLERS, IN THE GREY IRON FOUNDRY ROTATE CASTINGS WITH SHOT TO REMOVE AND SURFACE OXIDES AND REMAINING EXCESS METALS. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  20. Iron metabolism and iron supplementation in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Heinz; Evstatiev, Rayko; Kornek, Gabriela; Aapro, Matti; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Buxhofer-Ausch, Veronika; Fridrik, Michael; Geissler, Dietmar; Geissler, Klaus; Gisslinger, Heinz; Koller, Elisabeth; Kopetzky, Gerhard; Lang, Alois; Rumpold, Holger; Steurer, Michael; Kamali, Houman; Link, Hartmut

    2015-12-01

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency-associated anemia are common complications in cancer patients. Most iron deficient cancer patients present with functional iron deficiency (FID), a status with adequate storage iron, but insufficient iron supply for erythroblasts and other iron dependent tissues. FID is the consequence of the cancer-associated cytokine release, while in absolute iron deficiency iron stores are depleted resulting in similar but often more severe symptoms of insufficient iron supply. Here we present a short review on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, clinical symptoms, and treatment of iron deficiency in cancer patients. Special emphasis is given to intravenous iron supplementation and on the benefits and limitations of different formulations. Based on these considerations and recommendations from current international guidelines we developed recommendations for clinical practice and classified the level of evidence and grade of recommendation according to the principles of evidence-based medicine.

  1. Genetic basis for nitrate resistance in Desulfovibrio strains

    PubMed Central

    Korte, Hannah L.; Fels, Samuel R.; Christensen, Geoff A.; Price, Morgan N.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Zane, Grant M.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate is an inhibitor of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In petroleum production sites, amendments of nitrate and nitrite are used to prevent SRB production of sulfide that causes souring of oil wells. A better understanding of nitrate stress responses in the model SRB, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20, will strengthen predictions of environmental outcomes of nitrate application. Nitrate inhibition of SRB has historically been considered to result from the generation of small amounts of nitrite, to which SRB are quite sensitive. Here we explored the possibility that nitrate might inhibit SRB by a mechanism other than through nitrite inhibition. We found that nitrate-stressed D. vulgaris cultures grown in lactate-sulfate conditions eventually grew in the presence of high concentrations of nitrate, and their resistance continued through several subcultures. Nitrate consumption was not detected over the course of the experiment, suggesting adaptation to nitrate. With high-throughput genetic approaches employing TnLE-seq for D. vulgaris and a pooled mutant library of D. alaskensis, we determined the fitness of many transposon mutants of both organisms in nitrate stress conditions. We found that several mutants, including homologs present in both strains, had a greatly increased ability to grow in the presence of nitrate but not nitrite. The mutated genes conferring nitrate resistance included the gene encoding the putative Rex transcriptional regulator (DVU0916/Dde_2702), as well as a cluster of genes (DVU0251-DVU0245/Dde_0597-Dde_0605) that is poorly annotated. Follow-up studies with individual D. vulgaris transposon and deletion mutants confirmed high-throughput results. We conclude that, in D. vulgaris and D. alaskensis, nitrate resistance in wild-type cultures is likely conferred by spontaneous mutations. Furthermore, the mechanisms that confer nitrate resistance may be different from those that confer nitrite resistance

  2. Benefits and harms of iron supplementation in iron-deficient and iron-sufficient children.

    PubMed

    Domellöf, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Due to high iron requirements, young children are at risk for iron deficiency anemia. Iron supplements are therefore often recommended, especially since iron deficiency anemia in children is associated with poor neurodevelopment. However, in contrast to most other nutrients, excess iron cannot be excreted by the human body and it has recently been suggested that excessive iron supplementation of young children may have adverse effects on growth, risk of infections, and even on cognitive development. Recent studies support that iron supplements are beneficial in iron-deficient children but there is a risk of adverse effects in those who are iron replete. In populations with a low prevalence of iron deficiency, general supplementation should therefore be avoided. Iron-fortified foods can still be generally recommended since they seem to be safer than medicinal iron supplements, but the level of iron fortification should be limited. General iron supplementation is recommended in areas with a high prevalence of iron deficiency, with the exception of malarious areas where a cautious supplementation approach needs to be adopted, based either on screening or a combination of iron supplements and infection control measures. More studies are urgently needed to better determine the risks and benefits of iron supplementation and iron-fortified foods given to iron-deficient and iron-sufficient children.

  3. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation Information Page Synonym(s): Hallervorden-Spatz Disease, ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation? Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) ...

  4. Iron porphyrin polymer films: Materials for the modification of electrode surfaces and the detection of nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, M.; Drew, S.M.

    1996-10-01

    We are currently investigating a new method for the detection and quantification of nitric oxide (NO) based on a carbon electrode chemically modified with an iron porphyrin polymer film. Commercially available vinyl-substituted iron porphyrin monomers can be polymerized directly onto electrode surfaces through a published electrochemical polymerization process. We are also developing a synthesis for a new vinyl-substituted monomer, iron 5,10,15-triphenyl-20-vinyl porphyrin chloride, in hopes of improving polymer film stability. The electrochemistry of NO is also being investigated at electrodes chemically modified with an iron porphyrin polymer film. We are studying the catalytic oxidation of iron porphyrin bound NO to nitrate by molecular oxygen. The reaction with molecular oxygen is preceded by a one electron reduction of the iron porphyrin-NO complex. If currents proportional to nitric oxide concentration can be measured, a new NO electrochemical sensor will be designed.

  5. Seasonal nitrate algorithms for nitrate retrieval using OCEANSAT-2 and MODIS-AQUA satellite data.

    PubMed

    Durairaj, Poornima; Sarangi, Ranjit Kumar; Ramalingam, Shanthi; Thirunavukarassu, Thangaradjou; Chauhan, Prakash

    2015-04-01

    In situ datasets of nitrate, sea surface temperature (SST), and chlorophyll a (chl a) collected during the monthly coastal samplings and organized cruises along the Tamilnadu and Andhra Pradesh coast between 2009 and 2013 were used to develop seasonal nitrate algorithms. The nitrate algorithms have been built up based on the three-dimensional regressions between SST, chl a, and nitrate in situ data using linear, Gaussian, Lorentzian, and paraboloid function fittings. Among these four functions, paraboloid was found to be better with the highest co-efficient of determination (postmonsoon: R2=0.711, n=357; summer: R2=0.635, n=302; premonsoon: R2=0.829, n=249; and monsoon: R2=0.692, n=272) for all seasons. Based on these fittings, seasonal nitrate images were generated using the concurrent satellite data of SST from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and chlorophyll (chl) from Ocean Color Monitor (OCM-2) and MODIS. The best retrieval of modeled nitrate (R2=0.527, root mean square error (RMSE)=3.72, and mean normalized bias (MNB)=0.821) was observed for the postmonsoon season due to the better retrieval of both SST MODIS (28 February 2012, R2=0.651, RMSE=2.037, and MNB=0.068) and chl OCM-2 (R2=0.534, RMSE=0.317, and MNB=0.27). Present results confirm that the chl OCM-2 and SST MODIS retrieve nitrate well than the MODIS-derived chl and SST largely due to the better retrieval of chl by OCM-2 than MODIS.

  6. Catalytic reduction of nitrate in secondary effluent of wastewater treatment plants by Fe(0) and Pd-Cu/γ-Al2O3.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yupan; Li, Zifu; Chen, Yi-Hung; Saino, Mayiani; Cheng, Shikun; Zheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Total nitrogen, in which NO3(-) is dominant in the effluent of most wastewater treatment plants, cannot meet the requirements of the Chinese wastewater discharge standard (<15 mg/L), making nitrate (NO3(-)) elimination attract considerable attention. In this study, reductant iron (Fe(0)) and γ-Al2O3 supported palladium-copper bimetallic catalysts (Pd-Cu/γ-Al2O3) were innovatively used for the chemical catalytic reduction of nitrate in wastewater. A series of specific operational conditions (such as mass ratio of Pd:Cu, catalyst amounts, reaction time and pH of solution) were optimized for nitrate reduction in the artificial solution, and then the selected optimal conditions were further applied for investigating the nitrate elimination of secondary effluent of a wastewater treatment plant in Beijing, China. Results indicated that a better catalytic performance (74% of nitrate removal and 62% of N2 selectivity) could be obtained under the optimal condition: 5 g/L Fe(0), 3:1 mass ratio (Pd:Cu), 4 g/L catalyst, 2 h reaction time and pH 5.1. It is noteworthy to point out that nitrogen gas (N2) predominated in the byproducts without another system to treat ammonium and nitrite. Therefore, the chemical catalytic reduction combining Fe(0) with Pd-Cu/γ-Al2O3 could be regarded as a better alternative for nitrate removal in wastewater treatment. PMID:27232406

  7. Does iron inhibit cryptoendolithic microbial communities?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, C. G.; Vestal, J. R.; Friedmann, E. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    Photosynthetic activity of three cryptoendolithic microbial communities was studied under controlled conditions in the laboratory. In two of these communities, the dominant organisms were lichens, collected from Linnaeus Terrace and from Battleship Promontory. The third community, dominated by cyanobacteria, was collected from Battleship Promontory. Both sites are in the ice-free valleys of southern Victoria Land. Previous efforts have shown how physical conditions can influence metabolic activity in endolithic communities (Kappen and Friedmann 1983; Kappen, Friedmann, and Garty 1981; Vestal, Federle, and Friedmann 1984). Biological activity can also be strongly influenced by the chemical environment. Inorganic nutrients such as nitrate, ammonia, and phosphate are often limiting factors, so their effects on photosynthetic carbon-14 bicarbonate incorporation were investigated. Iron and manganese are two metals present in Linnaeus Terrace and Battleship Promontory sandstones, and their effects on photosynthesis were also studied. The results may add to our understanding of biogeochemical interactions within this unique microbial community.

  8. Does iron inhibit cryptoendolithic microbial communities?

    PubMed

    Johnston, C G; Vestal, J R

    1988-01-01

    Photosynthetic activity of three cryptoendolithic microbial communities was studied under controlled conditions in the laboratory. In two of these communities, the dominant organisms were lichens, collected from Linnaeus Terrace and from Battleship Promontory. The third community, dominated by cyanobacteria, was collected from Battleship Promontory. Both sites are in the ice-free valleys of southern Victoria Land. Previous efforts have shown how physical conditions can influence metabolic activity in endolithic communities (Kappen and Friedmann 1983; Kappen, Friedmann, and Garty 1981; Vestal, Federle, and Friedmann 1984). Biological activity can also be strongly influenced by the chemical environment. Inorganic nutrients such as nitrate, ammonia, and phosphate are often limiting factors, so their effects on photosynthetic carbon-14 bicarbonate incorporation were investigated. Iron and manganese are two metals present in Linnaeus Terrace and Battleship Promontory sandstones, and their effects on photosynthesis were also studied. The results may add to our understanding of biogeochemical interactions within this unique microbial community. PMID:11538332

  9. Gas phase chemistry of chlorine nitrate

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, M.; Moore, T.A.; Crellin, K.C.

    1995-12-31

    Chlorine nitrate (ClONO{sub 2}) is a reservoir of both ClO{sub x} and NO{sub x} radicals in Earth`s stratosphere, and its decomposition is important in determining the abundance of stratospheric ozone. We present experimental and theoretical studies that explore the mechanisms and dynamics of processes leading to ClONO{sub 2} destruction in the stratosphere. Molecular beam photodissociation experiments have been performed to determine the decomposition pathways of ClONO{sub 2} upon excitation at 308 nm and to explore the possibility of a long-lived excited state. We have also investigated the reaction of chlorine nitrate with chloride ions Cl{sup -} in the gas phase. The gas phase ionic reaction may elucidate ionic mechanisms of heterogeneous reactions occurring on the surfaces of Polar Stratospheric Cloud particles and also raise doubts about proposed schemes to mitigate ozone depletion by electrifying the stratosphere.

  10. Groundwater pollution by nitrates from livestock wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, V.M. )

    1989-11-01

    Utilization of wastes from livestock complexes for irrigation involves the danger of groundwater pollution by nitrates. In order to prevent and minimize pollution, it is necessary to apply geological-hydrogeological evidence and concepts to the situation of wastewater irrigation for the purposes of studying natural groundwater protectiveness and predicting changes in groundwater quality as a result of infiltrating wastes. The procedure of protectiveness evaluation and quality prediction is described. With groundwater pollution by nitrate nitrogen, the concentration of ammonium nitrogen noticeably increases. One of the reasons for this change is the process of denitrification due to changes in the hydrogeochemical conditions in a layer. At representative field sites, it is necessary to collect systematic stationary observations of the concentrations of nitrogenous compounds in groundwater and changes in redox conditions and temperature.

  11. Open-Source Photometric System for Enzymatic Nitrate Quantification.

    PubMed

    Wittbrodt, B T; Squires, D A; Walbeck, J; Campbell, E; Campbell, W H; Pearce, J M

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate, the most oxidized form of nitrogen, is regulated to protect people and animals from harmful levels as there is a large over abundance due to anthropogenic factors. Widespread field testing for nitrate could begin to address the nitrate pollution problem, however, the Cadmium Reduction Method, the leading certified method to detect and quantify nitrate, demands the use of a toxic heavy metal. An alternative, the recently proposed Environmental Protection Agency Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis Method, eliminates this problem but requires an expensive proprietary spectrophotometer. The development of an inexpensive portable, handheld photometer will greatly expedite field nitrate analysis to combat pollution. To accomplish this goal, a methodology for the design, development, and technical validation of an improved open-source water testing platform capable of performing Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis Method. This approach is evaluated for its potential to i) eliminate the need for toxic chemicals in water testing for nitrate and nitrite, ii) reduce the cost of equipment to perform this method for measurement for water quality, and iii) make the method easier to carryout in the field. The device is able to perform as well as commercial proprietary systems for less than 15% of the cost for materials. This allows for greater access to the technology and the new, safer nitrate testing technique. PMID:26244342

  12. Open-Source Photometric System for Enzymatic Nitrate Quantification.

    PubMed

    Wittbrodt, B T; Squires, D A; Walbeck, J; Campbell, E; Campbell, W H; Pearce, J M

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate, the most oxidized form of nitrogen, is regulated to protect people and animals from harmful levels as there is a large over abundance due to anthropogenic factors. Widespread field testing for nitrate could begin to address the nitrate pollution problem, however, the Cadmium Reduction Method, the leading certified method to detect and quantify nitrate, demands the use of a toxic heavy metal. An alternative, the recently proposed Environmental Protection Agency Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis Method, eliminates this problem but requires an expensive proprietary spectrophotometer. The development of an inexpensive portable, handheld photometer will greatly expedite field nitrate analysis to combat pollution. To accomplish this goal, a methodology for the design, development, and technical validation of an improved open-source water testing platform capable of performing Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis Method. This approach is evaluated for its potential to i) eliminate the need for toxic chemicals in water testing for nitrate and nitrite, ii) reduce the cost of equipment to perform this method for measurement for water quality, and iii) make the method easier to carryout in the field. The device is able to perform as well as commercial proprietary systems for less than 15% of the cost for materials. This allows for greater access to the technology and the new, safer nitrate testing technique.

  13. Open-Source Photometric System for Enzymatic Nitrate Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Wittbrodt, B. T.; Squires, D. A.; Walbeck, J.; Campbell, E.; Campbell, W. H.; Pearce, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate, the most oxidized form of nitrogen, is regulated to protect people and animals from harmful levels as there is a large over abundance due to anthropogenic factors. Widespread field testing for nitrate could begin to address the nitrate pollution problem, however, the Cadmium Reduction Method, the leading certified method to detect and quantify nitrate, demands the use of a toxic heavy metal. An alternative, the recently proposed Environmental Protection Agency Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis Method, eliminates this problem but requires an expensive proprietary spectrophotometer. The development of an inexpensive portable, handheld photometer will greatly expedite field nitrate analysis to combat pollution. To accomplish this goal, a methodology for the design, development, and technical validation of an improved open-source water testing platform capable of performing Nitrate Reductase Nitrate-Nitrogen Analysis Method. This approach is evaluated for its potential to i) eliminate the need for toxic chemicals in water testing for nitrate and nitrite, ii) reduce the cost of equipment to perform this method for measurement for water quality, and iii) make the method easier to carryout in the field. The device is able to perform as well as commercial proprietary systems for less than 15% of the cost for materials. This allows for greater access to the technology and the new, safer nitrate testing technique. PMID:26244342

  14. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    PubMed

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption.

  15. Substrate induction of nitrate reductase in barley aleurone layers.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, T E; Varner, J E

    1969-01-01

    Nitrate induces the formation of nitrate reductase activity in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Himalaya) aleurone layers. Previous work has demonstrated de novo synthesis of alpha-amylase by gibberellic acid in the same tissue. The increase in nitrate reductase activity is inhibited by cycloheximide and 6-methylpurine, but not by actinomycin D. Nitrate does not induce alpha-amylase synthesis, and it has no effect on the gibberellic acid-induced synthesis of alpha-amylase. Also, there is little or no direct effect of gibberellic acid (during the first 6 hr of induction) or of abscisic acid on the nitrate-induced formation of nitrate reductase. Gibberellic acid does interfere with nitrate reductase activity during long-term experiments (greater than 6 hr). However, the time course of this inhibition suggests that the inhibition may be a secondary one. Barley aleurone layers therefore provide a convenient tissue for the study of both substrate- and hormone-induced enzyme formation.

  16. Understanding nitrate assimilation and its regulation in microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Chamizo-Ampudia, Alejandro; Llamas, Angel; Galvan, Aurora; Fernandez, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation is a key process for nitrogen (N) acquisition in green microalgae. Among Chlorophyte algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has resulted to be a good model system to unravel important facts of this process, and has provided important insights for agriculturally relevant plants. In this work, the recent findings on nitrate transport, nitrate reduction and the regulation of nitrate assimilation are presented in this and several other algae. Latest data have shown nitric oxide (NO) as an important signal molecule in the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of nitrate reductase and inorganic N transport. Participation of regulatory genes and proteins in positive and negative signaling of the pathway and the mechanisms involved in the regulation of nitrate assimilation, as well as those involved in Molybdenum cofactor synthesis required to nitrate assimilation, are critically reviewed. PMID:26579149

  17. [Toxicological and hygienic assessment of nitrates in food products].

    PubMed

    Tulupov, V P; Prikhod'ko, E I; Fomichenko, E I

    2001-01-01

    The toxicological and hygienic estimation of the contents of nitrates in the basic vegetable cultures (beet, carrots, potato etc.) is given. Is shown, that nitrates, contained in the increased amounts in the aforesaid cultures are not indifferent for human and animals organism. At a unbalanced diet of cattle use of forages with the increased contents of nitrates can result in occurrence them in livestock products. The hygienic regulation of permissible concentrations nitrates in some products should be carried out with an allowance fo structure of nutrition of the population, contents nitrates in drinking water, and also other factors capable to influence on formation of nitrate body burden on the population and to aggravate effect of nitrates action.

  18. Selective Inhibition of the Oxidation of Ferrous Iron or Sulfur in Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Harahuc, Lesia; Lizama, Hector M.; Suzuki, Isamu

    2000-01-01

    The oxidation of either ferrous iron or sulfur by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was selectively inhibited or controlled by various anions, inhibitors, and osmotic pressure. Iron oxidation was more sensitive than sulfur oxidation to inhibition by chloride, phosphate, and nitrate at low concentrations (below 0.1 M) and also to inhibition by azide and cyanide. Sulfur oxidation was more sensitive than iron oxidation to the inhibitory effect of high osmotic pressure. These differences were evident not only between iron oxidation by iron-grown cells and sulfur oxidation by sulfur-grown cells but also between the iron and sulfur oxidation activities of the same iron-grown cells. Growth experiments with ferrous iron or sulfur as an oxidizable substrate confirmed the higher sensitivity of iron oxidation to inhibition by phosphate, chloride, azide, and cyanide. Sulfur oxidation was actually stimulated by 50 mM phosphate or chloride. Leaching of Fe and Zn from pyrite (FeS2) and sphalerite (ZnS) by T. ferrooxidans was differentially affected by phosphate and chloride, which inhibited the solubilization of Fe without significantly affecting the solubilization of Zn. PMID:10698768

  19. Iron-based dehydrogenation catalysts supported on zirconia. I. Preparation and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Boot, L.A.; Dillen, A.J. van; Geus, J.W.

    1996-09-15

    Zirconia-supported iron oxide catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation, followed by drying and calcination in air. Characterization of the catalysts were performed with electron microscopy combined with element analysis (HR-TEM/EDAX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), and thermomagnetic analysis. A homogeneous distribution of the iron containing phase can be obtained by using the metal complexes ammonium iron (III) citrate or ammonium (III) iron EDTA. A simple salt, such as iron nitrate, proved to be less suitable for this purpose. By HR-TEM/EDAX, it was shown that coverage of the zirconia support had been accomplished. XRL showed that crystalline Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles were formed at loadings {ge} 3 wt% Fe. TPR studies point to a bi-modal particle size distribution for the catalysts with 3 wt% Fe. Above this loading (>3 wt%) bulk properties prevail in TPR, whereas at lower loadings (<3 wt%) no distinct iron oxide species could be indicated. Magnetization measurements confirmed the results obtained by TPR. Catalysts prepared by coimpregnation of iron and potassium were also studied. TEM and XRD results show that a well-dispersed phase is obtained, but from XRD only potassium carbonate and no iron oxide or ferrite is evident. It was also found that the presence of potassium increases the onset of reduction of the iron phase by about 100{degrees}C. 25 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. GRAPHITE PRODUCTION UTILIZING URANYL NITRATE HEXAHYDRATE CATALYST

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.; Armstrong, J.R.; Schell, D.H.

    1964-03-10

    ABS>The graphitizing of a mixture composed of furfuryl alcohol binder and uranyl nitrate hexahydrate hardener and the subsequent curing, baking, and graphitizing with pressure being initially applied prior to curing are described. The pressure step may be carried out by extrusion, methyl cellulose being added to the mixture before the completion of extrusion. Uranium oxide may be added to the graphitizable mixture prior to the heating and pressure steps. The graphitizable mixture may consist of discrete layers of different compositions. (AEC)

  1. Supplemental Cooling for Nitrate Salt Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Mitchell S.

    2015-08-19

    In July 2015, Los Alamos National Laboratory completed installation of a supplemental cooling system in the structure where remediated nitrate salt waste drums are stored. Although the waste currently is in a safe configuration and is monitored daily,controlling the temperature inside the structure adds another layer of protection for workers, the public,and the environment.This effort is among several layers of precautions designed to secure the waste.

  2. Iron nutrition in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Mesías, Marta; Seiquer, Isabel; Navarro, M Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is an important period of nutritional vulnerability due to increased dietary requirements for growth and development. Iron needs are elevated as a result of intensive growth and muscular development, which implies an increase in blood volume; thus, it is extremely important for the adolescent's iron requirements to be met. Diet, therefore, must provide enough iron and, moreover, nutrients producing adequate iron bioavailability to favor element utilization and thus be sufficient for needs at this stage of life. Currently, many adolescents consume monotonous and unbalanced diets which may limit mineral intake and/or bioavailability, leading to iron deficiency and, consequently, to ferropenic anemia, a nutritional deficit of worldwide prevalence. Iron deficiency, apart from provoking important physiological repercussions, can adversely affect adolescents' cognitive ability and behavior. Accordingly, promoting the consumption of a varied, adjusted, and balanced diet by adolescents will facilitate iron utilization, benefiting their health both at present and in adulthood. This review discusses how physiological changes during adolescence can cause iron requirements to increase. Consequently, it is important that diet should contribute an appropriate amount of this mineral and, moreover, with an adequate bioavailability to satisfy needs during this special period of life.

  3. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    SciTech Connect

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  4. Effect of changing the nanoscale environment on activity and stability of nitrate reductase.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Veena; Hooda, Vinita

    2016-07-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) is employed for fabrication of nitrate sensing devices in which the enzyme in immobilized form is used to catalyze the conversion of nitrate to nitrite in the presence of a suitable cofactor. So far, instability of immobilized NR due to the use of inappropriate immobilization matrices has limited the practical applications of these devices. Present study is an attempt to improve the kinetic properties and stability of NR using nanoscale iron oxide (nFe3O4) and zinc oxide (nZnO) particles. The desired nanoparticles were synthesized, surface functionalized, characterized and affixed onto the epoxy resin to yield two nanocomposite supports (epoxy/nFe3O4 and epoxy/nZnO) for immobilizing NR. Epoxy/nFe3O4 and epoxy/nZnO support could load as much as 35.8±0.01 and 33.20±0.01μg/cm(2) of NR with retention of about 93.72±0.50 and 84.81±0.80% of its initial activity respectively. Changes in surface morphology and chemical bonding structure of both the nanocomposite supports after addition of NR were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Optimum working conditions of pH, temperature and substrate concentration were ascertained for free as well as immobilized NR preparations. Further, storage stability at 4°C and thermal stability between 25-50°C were determined for all the NR preparations. Analytical applications of immobilized NR for determination of soil and water nitrates along with reusability data has been included to make sure the usefulness of the procedure. PMID:27233127

  5. Soil Iron Content as a Predictor of Carbon and Nutrient Mobilization in Rewetted Fens

    PubMed Central

    Emsens, Willem-Jan; Aggenbach, Camiel J. S.; Schoutens, Ken; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Zak, Dominik; van Diggelen, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    Rewetted, previously drained fens often remain sources rather than sinks for carbon and nutrients. To date, it is poorly understood which soil characteristics stimulate carbon and nutrient mobilization upon rewetting. Here, we assess the hypothesis that a large pool of iron in the soil negatively affects fen restoration success, as flooding-induced iron reduction (Fe3+ to Fe2+) causes a disproportionate breakdown of organic matter that is coupled with a release of inorganic compounds. We collected intact soil cores in two iron-poor and two iron-rich drained fens, half of which were subjected to a rewetting treatment while the other half was kept drained. Prolonged drainage led to the mobilization of nitrate (NO3-, > 1 mmol L-1) in all cores, regardless of soil iron content. In the rewetted iron-rich cores, a sharp increase in pore water iron (Fe) concentrations correlated with concentrations of inorganic carbon (TIC, > 13 mmol L-1) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC, > 16 mmol L-1). Additionally, ammonium (NH4+) accumulated up to phytotoxic concentrations of 1 mmol L-1 in the pore water of the rewetted iron-rich cores. Disproportionate mobilization of Fe, TIC, DOC and NH4+ was absent in the rewetted iron-poor cores, indicating a strong interaction between waterlogging and iron-mediated breakdown of organic matter. Concentrations of dissolved phosphorus (P) rose slightly in all cores upon rewetting, but remained low throughout the experiment. Our results suggest that large pools of iron in the top soil of drained fens can hamper the restoration of the fen’s sink-service for ammonium and carbon upon rewetting. We argue that negative effects of iron should be most apparent in fens with fluctuating water levels, as temporary oxygenation allows frequent regeneration of Fe3+. We conclude that rewetting of iron-poor fens may be more feasible for restoration. PMID:27050837

  6. Soil Iron Content as a Predictor of Carbon and Nutrient Mobilization in Rewetted Fens.

    PubMed

    Emsens, Willem-Jan; Aggenbach, Camiel J S; Schoutens, Ken; Smolders, Alfons J P; Zak, Dominik; van Diggelen, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    Rewetted, previously drained fens often remain sources rather than sinks for carbon and nutrients. To date, it is poorly understood which soil characteristics stimulate carbon and nutrient mobilization upon rewetting. Here, we assess the hypothesis that a large pool of iron in the soil negatively affects fen restoration success, as flooding-induced iron reduction (Fe3+ to Fe2+) causes a disproportionate breakdown of organic matter that is coupled with a release of inorganic compounds. We collected intact soil cores in two iron-poor and two iron-rich drained fens, half of which were subjected to a rewetting treatment while the other half was kept drained. Prolonged drainage led to the mobilization of nitrate (NO3-, > 1 mmol L-1) in all cores, regardless of soil iron content. In the rewetted iron-rich cores, a sharp increase in pore water iron (Fe) concentrations correlated with concentrations of inorganic carbon (TIC, > 13 mmol L-1) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC, > 16 mmol L-1). Additionally, ammonium (NH4+) accumulated up to phytotoxic concentrations of 1 mmol L-1 in the pore water of the rewetted iron-rich cores. Disproportionate mobilization of Fe, TIC, DOC and NH4+ was absent in the rewetted iron-poor cores, indicating a strong interaction between waterlogging and iron-mediated breakdown of organic matter. Concentrations of dissolved phosphorus (P) rose slightly in all cores upon rewetting, but remained low throughout the experiment. Our results suggest that large pools of iron in the top soil of drained fens can hamper the restoration of the fen's sink-service for ammonium and carbon upon rewetting. We argue that negative effects of iron should be most apparent in fens with fluctuating water levels, as temporary oxygenation allows frequent regeneration of Fe3+. We conclude that rewetting of iron-poor fens may be more feasible for restoration.

  7. Soil Iron Content as a Predictor of Carbon and Nutrient Mobilization in Rewetted Fens.

    PubMed

    Emsens, Willem-Jan; Aggenbach, Camiel J S; Schoutens, Ken; Smolders, Alfons J P; Zak, Dominik; van Diggelen, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    Rewetted, previously drained fens often remain sources rather than sinks for carbon and nutrients. To date, it is poorly understood which soil characteristics stimulate carbon and nutrient mobilization upon rewetting. Here, we assess the hypothesis that a large pool of iron in the soil negatively affects fen restoration success, as flooding-induced iron reduction (Fe3+ to Fe2+) causes a disproportionate breakdown of organic matter that is coupled with a release of inorganic compounds. We collected intact soil cores in two iron-poor and two iron-rich drained fens, half of which were subjected to a rewetting treatment while the other half was kept drained. Prolonged drainage led to the mobilization of nitrate (NO3-, > 1 mmol L-1) in all cores, regardless of soil iron content. In the rewetted iron-rich cores, a sharp increase in pore water iron (Fe) concentrations correlated with concentrations of inorganic carbon (TIC, > 13 mmol L-1) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC, > 16 mmol L-1). Additionally, ammonium (NH4+) accumulated up to phytotoxic concentrations of 1 mmol L-1 in the pore water of the rewetted iron-rich cores. Disproportionate mobilization of Fe, TIC, DOC and NH4+ was absent in the rewetted iron-poor cores, indicating a strong interaction between waterlogging and iron-mediated breakdown of organic matter. Concentrations of dissolved phosphorus (P) rose slightly in all cores upon rewetting, but remained low throughout the experiment. Our results suggest that large pools of iron in the top soil of drained fens can hamper the restoration of the fen's sink-service for ammonium and carbon upon rewetting. We argue that negative effects of iron should be most apparent in fens with fluctuating water levels, as temporary oxygenation allows frequent regeneration of Fe3+. We conclude that rewetting of iron-poor fens may be more feasible for restoration. PMID:27050837

  8. Equation of State of Ammonium Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, David L.; Sheffield, Stephen A.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Velisavljevic, Nenad; Stahl, David B.

    2009-12-01

    Ammonium nitrate (AN) is a widely used fertilizer and mining explosive. AN is commonly used in ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO), which is a mixture of explosive-grade AN prills and fuel oil in a 94:6 ratio by weight. ANFO is a non-ideal explosive with measured detonation velocities around 4 km/s. The equation of state properties and known initiation behavior of neat AN are limited. We present the results of a series of gas gun-driven plate impact experiments on pressed neat ammonium nitrate at 1.72 g/cm3. No evidence of initiation was observed under shock loading to 22 GPa. High pressure x-ray diffraction experiments in diamond anvil cells provided insight into the high pressure phase behavior over the same pressure range (to 25 GPa), as well as a static isotherm at ambient temperature. From the isotherm and thermodynamic properties at ambient conditions, a preliminary unreacted equation of state (EOS) has been developed based on the Murnaghan isotherm and Helmholtz formalism [1], which compares favorably with the available experimental Hugoniot data on several densities of AN.

  9. Cold adaptation of the mononuclear molybdoenzyme periplasmic nitrate reductase from the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Philippa J L; Codd, Rachel

    2011-11-01

    The reduction of nitrate to nitrite is catalysed in bacteria by periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) which describes a system of variable protein subunits encoded by the nap operon. Nitrate reduction occurs in the NapA subunit, which contains a bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide (Mo-MGD) cofactor and one [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster. The activity of periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) isolated as native protein from the cold-adapted (psychrophilic) Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina (Nap(Sgel)) and middle-temperature adapted (mesophilic) Shewanella putrefaciens (Nap(Sput)) was examined at varied temperature. Irreversible deactivation of Nap(Sgel) and Nap(Sput) occurred at 54.5 and 65°C, respectively. When Nap(Sgel) was preincubated at 21-70°C for 30 min, the room-temperature nitrate reductase activity was maximal and invariant between 21 and 54°C, which suggested that Nap(Sgel) was poised for optimal catalysis at modest temperatures and, unlike Nap(Sput), did not benefit from thermally-induced refolding. At 20°C, Nap(Sgel) reduced selenate at 16% of the rate of nitrate reduction. Nap(Sput) did not reduce selenate. Sequence alignment showed 46 amino acid residue substitutions in Nap(Sgel) that were conserved in NapA from mesophilic Shewanella, Rhodobacter and Escherichia species and could be associated with the Nap(Sgel) cold-adapted phenotype. Protein homology modeling of Nap(Sgel) using a mesophilic template with 66% amino acid identity showed the majority of substitutions occurred at the protein surface distal to the Mo-MGD cofactor. Two mesophilic↔psychrophilic substitutions (Asn↔His, Val↔Trp) occurred in a region close to the surface of the NapA substrate funnel resulting in potential interdomain π-π and/or cation-π interactions. Three mesophilic↔psychrophilic substitutions occurred within 4.5Å of the Mo-MGD cofactor (Phe↔Met, Ala↔Ser, Ser↔Thr) resulting in local regions that varied in hydrophobicity and hydrogen bonding

  10. Storm to Seasonal Nitrate Flushing and Relationship to Hydroclimatic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barco, J.; Wessel, C.; Gunawan, S.; Hogue, T. S.

    2009-05-01

    Coupled hydrological and geochemical cycles have historically been used to understand the mechanisms controlling chemical export at the watershed scale. Numerous studies have focused on stream geochemistry dynamics and particularly on the effects of nitrogen deposition on catchments and ecosystems. However, few studies have evaluated the variability in nitrate behavior in watersheds with different climate and hydrologic characteristics. Furthermore, storm nitrate dynamics (flushing) and corresponding relationship to discharge patterns, precipitation intensity, atmospheric deposition, and watershed properties is an area with few published studies. In the current study, we utilize hydrologic, geochemical and atmospheric data to better understand the primary processes controlling nitrate dynamics at monthly and seasonal time scales in ten watersheds located in the U.S. Stream data (discharge and nitrate concentrations) was obtained from the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Atmospheric deposition data was gathered from regional National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) sites. Collected data were assessed to evaluate nitrate dynamics for the period 2000-2006. Intra-storm nitrate variability was also evaluated in a watershed in Southern California (Arroyo Seco) where estimates of dry deposition are considered some of the highest in North America. Results from our analyses show that nitrate concentration appears to respond differently in the studied watersheds, exhibiting dilution effects in some watersheds and concentration effects in others. Discharge and nitrate concentrations during the 2009 winter reveal that the Arroyo Seco watershed is characterized by distinctive flushing of nitrates within storms. The role of specific hydrological events (size, intensity and duration) on the nitrate mobilization proved to be important as well as the accumulated nitrate pool available for mobilization. In general, results show a strong linkage between hydrological and

  11. Microbes: mini iron factories.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Kumar Batuk

    2014-12-01

    Microbes have flourished in extreme habitats since beginning of the Earth and have played an important role in geological processes like weathering, mineralization, diagenesis, mineral formation and destruction. Biotic mineralization is one of the most fascinating examples of how microbes have been influencing geological processes. Iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria are capable of precipitating wide varieties of iron oxides (magnetite), carbonates (siderite) and sulphides (greigite) via controlled or induced mineralization processes. Microbes have also been considered to play an important role in the history of evolution of sedimentary rocks on Earth from the formation of banded iron formations during the Archean to modern biotic bog iron and ochre deposits. Here, we discuss the role that microbes have been playing in precipitation of iron and the role and importance of interdisciplinary studies in the field of geology and biology in solving some of the major geological mysteries. PMID:25320452

  12. Microbes: mini iron factories.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Kumar Batuk

    2014-12-01

    Microbes have flourished in extreme habitats since beginning of the Earth and have played an important role in geological processes like weathering, mineralization, diagenesis, mineral formation and destruction. Biotic mineralization is one of the most fascinating examples of how microbes have been influencing geological processes. Iron oxidizing and reducing bacteria are capable of precipitating wide varieties of iron oxides (magnetite), carbonates (siderite) and sulphides (greigite) via controlled or induced mineralization processes. Microbes have also been considered to play an important role in the history of evolution of sedimentary rocks on Earth from the formation of banded iron formations during the Archean to modern biotic bog iron and ochre deposits. Here, we discuss the role that microbes have been playing in precipitation of iron and the role and importance of interdisciplinary studies in the field of geology and biology in solving some of the major geological mysteries.

  13. Iron studies in hemophilia

    SciTech Connect

    Lottenberg, R.; Kitchens, C.S.; Roessler, G.S.; Noyes, W.D.

    1981-12-01

    Although iron deficiency is not recognized as a usual complication of hemophilia, we questioned whether intermittent occult loss of blood in urine or stool might predispose hemophiliacs to chronic iron deficiency. Seven men with factor VII and one with factor IX deficiency were studied. Blood studied, bone marrow aspirates, urine and stool samples, and ferrokinetics with total-body counting up to five months were examined. These data showed no excessive loss of blood during the study period; however, marrow iron stores were decidedly decreased, being absent in four subjects. We suggest that in some hemophiliacs, iron deposits in tissues such as synovial membranes may form a high proportion of the body's total iron stores.

  14. Amperometric nitrate biosensor based on Carbon nanotube/Polypyrrole/Nitrate reductase biofilm electrode.

    PubMed

    Can, Faruk; Korkut Ozoner, Seyda; Ergenekon, Pinar; Erhan, Elif

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the construction and characterization of an amperometric nitrate biosensor based on the Polypyrrole (PPy)/Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) film. Nitrate reductase (NR) was both entrapped into the growing PPy film and chemically immobilized via the carboxyl groups of CNTs to the CNT/PPy film electrode. The optimum amperometric response for nitrate was obtained in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS), pH 7.5 including 0.1 M lithium chloride and 7 mM potassium ferricyanide with an applied potential of 0.13 V (vs. Ag/AgCl, 3 M NaCl). Sensitivity was found to be 300 nA/mM in a linear range of 0.44-1.45 mM with a regression coefficient of 0.97. The biosensor response showed a higher linear range in comparison to standard nitrate analysis methods which were tested in this study and NADH based nitrate biosensors. A minimum detectable concentration of 0.17 mM (S/N=3) with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 5.4% (n=7) was obtained for the biosensor. Phenol and glucose inhibit the electrochemical reaction strictly at a concentration of 1 μg/L and 20 mg/L, respectively. The biosensor response retained 70% of its initial response over 10 day usage period when used everyday.

  15. Transcriptomic analysis of Staphylococcus xylosus in the presence of nitrate and nitrite in meat reveals its response to nitrosative stress

    PubMed Central

    Vermassen, Aurore; de la Foye, Anne; Loux, Valentin; Talon, Régine; Leroy, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus xylosus is one of the major starter cultures used for meat fermentation because of its crucial role in the reduction of nitrate to nitrite which contributes to color and flavor development. Despite longstanding use of these additives, their impact on the physiology of S. xylosus has not yet been explored. We present the first in situ global gene expression profile of S. xylosus in meat supplemented with nitrate and nitrite at the levels used in the meat industry. More than 600 genes of S. xylosus were differentially expressed at 24 or 72 h of incubation. They represent more than 20% of the total genes and let us to suppose that addition of nitrate and nitrite to meat leads to a global change in gene expression. This profile revealed that S. xylosus is subject to nitrosative stress caused by reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated from nitrate and nitrite. To overcome this stress, S. xylosus has developed several oxidative stress resistance mechanisms, such as modulation of the expression of several genes involved in iron homeostasis and in antioxidant defense. Most of which belong to the Fur and PerR regulons, respectively. S. xylosus has also counteracted this stress by developing DNA and protein repair. Furthermore, it has adapted its metabolic response—carbon and nitrogen metabolism, energy production and cell wall biogenesis—to the alterations produced by nitrosative stress. PMID:25566208

  16. Degradation of bromothymol blue by 'greener' nano-scale zero-valent iron synthesized using tea polyphenols

    EPA Science Inventory

    A green single-step synthesis of iron nanoparticles using tea (Camellia sinensis) polyphenols is described that uses no added surfactants/polymers as a capping or reducing agents. The expeditious reaction between polyphenols and ferric nitrate occurs within few minutes at room te...

  17. Iron economy in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Glaesener, Anne G.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.

    2013-01-01

    While research on iron nutrition in plants has largely focused on iron-uptake pathways, photosynthetic microbes such as the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii provide excellent experimental systems for understanding iron metabolism at the subcellular level. Several paradigms in iron homeostasis have been established in this alga, including photosystem remodeling in the chloroplast and preferential retention of some pathways and key iron-dependent proteins in response to suboptimal iron supply. This review presents our current understanding of iron homeostasis in Chlamydomonas, with specific attention on characterized responses to changes in iron supply, like iron-deficiency. An overview of frequently used methods for the investigation of iron-responsive gene expression, physiology and metabolism is also provided, including preparation of media, the effect of cell size, cell density and strain choice on quantitative measurements and methods for the determination of metal content and assessing the effect of iron supply on photosynthetic performance. PMID:24032036

  18. [Neutrophilic lithotrophic iron-oxidizing prokaryotes and their role in the biogeochemical processes of the iron cycle].

    PubMed

    Dubinina, G A; Sorokina, A Iu

    2014-01-01

    Biology of lithotrophic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing prokaryotes and their role in the processes of the biogeochemical cycle of iron are discussed. This group of microorganisms is phylogenetically, taxonomically, and physiologically heterogeneous, comprising three metabolically different groups: aerobes, nitrate-dependent anaerobes, and phototrophs; the latter two groups have been revealed relatively recently. Their taxonomy and metabolism are described. Materials on the structure and functioning of the electron transport chain in the course of Fe(II) oxidation by members of various physiological groups are discussed. Occurrence of iron oxidizers in freshwater and marine ecosystems, thermal springs, areas of hydrothermal activity, and underwater volcanic areas are considered. Molecular genetic techniques were used to determine the structure of iron-oxidizing microbial communities in various natural ecosystems. Analysis of stable isotope fractioning of 56/54Fe in pure cultures and model experiments revealed predominance of biological oxidation over abiotic ones in shallow aquatic habitats and mineral springs, which was especially pronounced under microaerobic conditions at the redox zone boundary. Discovery of anaerobic bacterial Fe(II) oxidation resulted in development of new hypotheses concerning the possible role of microorganisms and the mechanisms of formation of the major iron ore deposits in Precambrian and early Proterozoic epoch. Paleobiological data are presented on the microfossils and specific biomarkers retrieved from ancient ore samples and confirming involvement of anaerobic biogenic processes in their formation.

  19. [Neutrophilic lithotrophic iron-oxidizing prokaryotes and their role in the biogeochemical processes of the iron cycle].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Biology of lithotrophic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing prokaryotes and their role in the processes of the biogeochemical cycle of iron are discussed. This group of microorganisms is phylogenetically, taxonomically, and physiologically heterogeneous, comprising three metabolically different groups: aerobes, nitrate-dependent anaerobes, and phototrophs; the latter two groups have been revealed relatively recently. Their taxonomy and metabolism are described. Materials on the structure and functioning of the electron transport chain in the course of Fe(II) oxidation by members of various physiological groups are discussed. Occurrence of iron oxidizers in freshwater and marine ecosystems, thermal springs, areas of hydrothermal activity, and underwater volcanic areas are considered. Molecular genetic techniques were used to determine the structure of iron-oxidizing microbial communities in various natural ecosystems. Analysis of stable isotope fractioning of 56/54Fe in pure cultures and model experiments revealed predominance of biological oxidation over abiotic ones in shallow aquatic habitats and mineral springs, which was especially pronounced under microaerobic conditions at the redox zone boundary. Discovery of anaerobic bacterial Fe(II) oxidation resulted in development of new hypotheses concerning the possible role of microorganisms and the mechanisms of formation of the major iron ore deposits in Precambrian and early Proterozoic epoch. Paleobiological data are presented on the microfossils and specific biomarkers retrieved from ancient ore samples and confirming involvement of anaerobic biogenic processes in their formation. PMID:25507440

  20. [Neutrophilic lithotrophic iron-oxidizing prokaryotes and their role in the biogeochemical processes of the iron cycle].

    PubMed

    Dubinina, G A; Sorokina, A Iu

    2014-01-01

    Biology of lithotrophic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing prokaryotes and their role in the processes of the biogeochemical cycle of iron are discussed. This group of microorganisms is phylogenetically, taxonomically, and physiologically heterogeneous, comprising three metabolically different groups: aerobes, nitrate-dependent anaerobes, and phototrophs; the latter two groups have been revealed relatively recently. Their taxonomy and metabolism are described. Materials on the structure and functioning of the electron transport chain in the course of Fe(II) oxidation by members of various physiological groups are discussed. Occurrence of iron oxidizers in freshwater and marine ecosystems, thermal springs, areas of hydrothermal activity, and underwater volcanic areas are considered. Molecular genetic techniques were used to determine the structure of iron-oxidizing microbial communities in various natural ecosystems. Analysis of stable isotope fractioning of 56/54Fe in pure cultures and model experiments revealed predominance of biological oxidation over abiotic ones in shallow aquatic habitats and mineral springs, which was especially pronounced under microaerobic conditions at the redox zone boundary. Discovery of anaerobic bacterial Fe(II) oxidation resulted in development of new hypotheses concerning the possible role of microorganisms and the mechanisms of formation of the major iron ore deposits in Precambrian and early Proterozoic epoch. Paleobiological data are presented on the microfossils and specific biomarkers retrieved from ancient ore samples and confirming involvement of anaerobic biogenic processes in their formation. PMID:25423717