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Sample records for iron stores correlate

  1. Distribution and quantitation of skin iron in primary haemochromatosis: correlation with total body iron stores in patients undergoing phlebotomy.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Teresa; Silva, Raquel; Fleming, Rita; Gonçalves, Afonso; Barreiros, Maria A; Silva, João N; Morlière, Patrice; Santus, René; Filipe, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of the concentration of iron in the skin, if correlated with total body iron stores, may enable better informed decisions on when to initiate, change or stop therapy in hereditary heamochromatosis. Naïve haemochromatosis patients with iron overload and with C282Y and/or H63D HFE mutations were evaluated at the following time-points: disease diagnosis, end of the therapy programme, and 6 months after the end of therapy. The distribution and concentration of iron in the skin were assessed by quantitative nuclear microscopy methods, in parallel with serum and plasma iron concentration. Iron content in the liver was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. Iron accumulated in the epidermis; its concentration increased from outer to inner layers, being maximal in the basal layer (7.33 ± 0.98 µmol/g). At all 3 time-points, most of the iron was associated with the extracellular space. During the phlebotomy programme the iron content of the skin and the liver decreased by a factor of 2. These data suggest that measurements of iron concentration in the epidermis, which is a readily accessible tissue, reflect iron overload in the liver.

  2. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since the pioneering research by Shoden in 1953. However, we recently developed a new method for determining ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron by computer-assisted serum ferritin kinetics. Serum ferritin increase or decrease curves were measured in patients with normal storage iron levels (chronic hepatitis C and iron deficiency anemia treated by intravenous iron injection), and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis and transfusion dependent anemia). We thereby confirmed the existence of two iron pathways where iron flows followed the numbered order (1) labile iron, (2) ferritin and (3) hemosiderin in iron deposition and mobilization among many previously proposed but mostly unproven routes. We also demonstrated the increasing and decreasing phases of ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron in iron deposition and mobilization. The author first demonstrated here the change in proportion between pre-existing ferritin iron and new ferritin iron synthesized by removing iron from hemosiderin in the course of iron removal. In addition, the author disclosed the cause of underestimation of storage iron turnover rate which had been reported by previous investigators in estimating storage iron turnover rate of normal subjects. PMID:25741033

  3. [Relationship between maternal and neonatal iron stores].

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Molina, M E; Corral-Terrazas, M; Apezteguia, M A; Carmona-Sawasky, J; Levario-Carrillo, M

    2001-01-01

    To establish the relationship of normal, low, and moderate blood iron values in mothers and their newborns. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 163 pregnant women and their newborns, users of Hospital de Ginecología y Obstetricia número 15, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, from Chihuahua, Mexico. The mothers' clinical histories were collected and analyzed; hemoglobin, hematocrit, and ferritin serum levels were measured in maternal and umbilical cord samples. Iron maternal stores were determined by ferritin (microgram/l) values as follows: low: < or = 11; moderate: 12-20; and normal: > or = 20.1. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to establish differences among group; the chi-squared test to determine differences of proportions; and Pearson's correlation coefficient for assessing the association between maternal and newborn iron stores. A weak correlation between maternal and neonatal ferritin was found (r = 0.14, p = 0.07). Geometric means of neonatal ferritin for low, moderate, and normal maternal iron stores were 4.77, 4.85, and 5.02 respectively (p = 0.12). The maternal iron stores changed after iron supplementation (p = 0.01). Iron stores in mothers and their newborns are closely related. Women who take iron supplements during pregnancy have significantly higher iron stores at the end of pregnancy.

  4. Transformation rate between ferritin and hemosiderin assayed by serum ferritin kinetics in patients with normal iron stores and iron overload.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hisao

    2015-11-01

    Ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron, total iron stores and transformation rate were determined by serum ferritin kinetics. The transformation rate between ferritin and hemosiderin is motivated by the potential difference between them. The transformer determines transformation rate according to the potential difference in iron mobilization and deposition. The correlations between transformation rate and iron stores were studied in 11 patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), 1 patent with treated iron deficiency anemia (TIDA), 9 patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) and 4 patients with transfusion-dependent anemia (TD). The power regression curve of approximation showed an inverse correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron in part and total iron stores in HH. Such an inverse correlation between transformation rate and iron stores implies that the larger the amount of iron stores, the smaller the transformation of iron stores. On the other hand, a minimal inverse correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron and no correlation between transformation rate and hemosiderin iron or total iron stores in CHC indicate the derangement of storage iron metabolism in the cells with CHC. Radio-iron fixation on the iron storing tissue in iron overload was larger than that in normal subjects by ferrokinetics. This is consistent with the inverse correlation between transformation rate and total iron stores in HH. The characteristics of iron turnover between ferritin and hemosiderin were disclosed from the correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron or total iron stores.

  5. Use of near infrared correlation spectroscopy for quantitation of surface iron, absorbed water and stored electronic energy in a suite of Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, Lelia M.; Banin, Amos; Carle, Glenn; Orenberg, James; Scattergood, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A number of questions concerning the surface mineralogy and the history of water on Mars remain unresolved using the Viking analyses and Earth-based telescopic data. Identification and quantitation of iron-bearing clays on Mars would elucidate these outstanding issues. Near infrared correlation analysis, a method typically applied to qualitative and quantitative analysis of individual constituents of multicomponent mixtures, is adapted here to selection of distinctive features of a small, highly homologous series of Fe/Ca-exchanged montmorillonites and several kalinites. Independently determined measures of surface iron, relative humidity and stored electronic energy were used as constituent data for linear regression of the constituent vs. reflectance data throughout the spectral region 0.68 to 2.5 micrometers. High correlations were found in appropriate regions for all three constituents, though that with stored energy is still considered tenuous. Quantitation was improved using 1st and 2nd derivative spectra. High resolution data over a broad spectral range would be required to quantitatively identify iron-bearing clays by remotely sensed reflectance.

  6. Liver iron stores in patients with secondary haemosiderosis under iron chelation therapy with deferoxamine or deferiprone.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, P; Fischer, R; Engelhardt, R; Tondüry, P; Gabbe, E E; Janka, G E

    1995-12-01

    Total body iron stores including liver and spleen iron were assessed by non-invasive SQUID biomagnetometry. The liver iron concentration was measured in groups of patients with beta-thalassaemia major or other posttransfusional siderosis under treatment with the oral iron chelator deferiprone (n = 19) and/or with parenteral deferoxamine (n = 33). An interquartile range for liver iron concentrations of 1680-4470 micrograms/g liver was found in these patients. In both groups a poor correlation between liver iron and serum ferritin values was observed. Repeated measurements of liver and spleen iron concentrations as well as determination of liver and spleen volume by sonography were performed in six patients under continuous deferiprone treatment for 3-15 months. In this group detailed information was obtained on the whole body iron store (5-36g) and the iron excretion rates (14-34 mg/d) for each patient. As indicated by decreasing liver iron concentrations, five out of six subjects showed a negative iron balance (2-13 mg/d). Conventional measurements of both serum ferritin and urine iron excretion gave fluctuating results, thus being only of limited use in the control of iron depletion therapy. The non-invasive biomagnetic liver iron quantification is a precise and clinically verified technique which offers more direct information on the long-term efficacy of an iron depletion therapy than the hitherto used methods. This technique may be of use in the clinical evaluation of new oral iron chelators.

  7. Daily supplementation with iron increases lipid peroxidation in young women with low iron stores.

    PubMed

    King, Sarah M; Donangelo, Carmen M; Knutson, Mitchell D; Walter, Patrick B; Ames, Bruce N; Viteri, Fernando E; King, Janet C

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether women with low iron stores (plasma ferritin iron supplement for 8 wks at a level commonly used to treat poor iron status develop increased lipid peroxidation as measured by ethane exhalation rates and plasma malondialdehyde. The women served as their own control as pre- and post-supplementation periods were compared. Twelve women participated in the study for a 70-day period and consumed daily iron supplements (98 mg of iron as ferrous sulfate) from day 14 to day 70. Baseline blood and expired air samples were obtained on days 1 and 14; measurements during supplementation were performed on days 56 and 70, that is at 6 and 8 weeks of supplementation. Iron status improved during the iron supplementation period; biochemical indicators of lipid peroxidation also increased. After 6 wks of iron supplementation, serum ferritin almost doubled and body iron more than doubled. Hemoglobin levels increased slightly and other indicators of iron status became normal. However, plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and breath ethane exhalation rates (BEER) increased by more than 40% between baseline and 6 wks of supplementation; these increases correlated significantly with plasma iron and ferritin levels. MDA was positively correlated with BEER. BEER increased further after 8 wks of iron supplementation. The increased indicators of lipid peroxidation with duration of supplementation and as iron status improved suggest that providing daily nearly 100 mg iron may not be a totally innocuous regimen for correcting iron depletion in women.

  8. Study of iron stores in regular plateletpheresis donors.

    PubMed

    Page, E A; Coppock, J E; Harrison, J F

    2010-02-01

    Plateletpheresis donors will lose up to 100 mL of blood at each donation, leading to concern that they may become iron deficient, particularly if donating at the maximum allowed frequency under National Blood Service policy of every 2 weeks. The serum ferritin levels of 508 regular plateletpheresis donors and 101 non-donors were measured to indicate the level of their iron stores. About 33.9% (156/460) of platelet donors had depleted iron stores compared with 3.1% (3/97) non-donors. Results for male and post-menopausal female donors were similar with 36.2% (131/362) of males and 37.7% (20/53) of post-menopausal females showing iron depletion. There was clear correlation with donation frequency in males with 63.9% (46/72) of males donating at 2 weekly intervals found to be iron depleted. The percentage of iron depleted male subjects decreased as donation intervals increased. Correlation with lifetime donations of platelets was not demonstrated, although no donor who had given fewer than 14 blood and/or platelet donations was found to be iron depleted. In males there was a clear correlation between iron depletion and frequency of donation. There appeared to be no correlation with lifetime number of platelet donations. As a result of this study, we have advised that volunteers should not donate platelets more than 15 times per year, so that red cell loss is no more than the equivalent of three whole blood donations (1500 mL).

  9. Electrolytic iron or ferrous sulfate increase body iron in women with moderate to low iron stores.

    PubMed

    Swain, James H; Johnson, LuAnn K; Hunt, Janet R

    2007-03-01

    Commercial elemental iron powders (electrolytic and reduced iron), as well as heme iron supplements, were tested for efficacy in improving the iron status of women. In a randomized, double-blind trial, 51 women with moderate to low iron stores received daily for 12 wk: 1) placebo, 2) 5 mg iron as heme iron or 50 mg iron as 3) electrolytic iron, 4) reduced iron, or 5) FeSO(4). Treatments were provided in 2 capsules (heme carrier) and 3 wheat rolls (other iron sources). Differences in iron status, food nonheme iron absorption, and fecal properties were evaluated. Body iron, assessed from the serum transferrin receptor:ferritin ratio, increased significantly more in subjects administered FeSO(4) (127 +/- 29 mg; mean +/- SEM) and electrolytic (115 +/- 37 mg), but not the reduced (74 +/- 32 mg) or heme (65 +/- 26 mg) iron forms, compared with those given placebo (2 +/- 19 mg). Based on body iron determinations, retention of the added iron was estimated as 3.0, 2.7, 1.8, and 15.5%, in the 4 iron-treated groups, respectively. Iron treatments did not affect food iron absorption. The 50 mg/d iron treatments increased fecal iron and free radical-generating capacity in vitro, but did not affect fecal water cytotoxicity. In subjects administered FeSO(4), fecal water content was increased slightly but significantly more than in the placebo group. In conclusion, electrolytic iron was approximately 86% as efficacious as FeSO(4) for improving body iron, but the power of this study was insufficient to detect any efficacy of the reduced or heme iron within 12 wk. With modification, this methodology of testing higher levels of food fortification for several weeks in healthy women with low iron stores has the potential for economically assessing the efficiency of iron compounds to improve iron status.

  10. Combined cell index in assessing blood donor iron stores.

    PubMed

    Vuk, T; Bingulac-Popović, J; Očić, T; Mayer, L J; Milošević, M; Jukić, I

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the appropriateness of using combined cell index (CCI) in the assessment of iron stores in blood donors. This index is calculated by the formula: red blood cell distribution width (RDW) × 10(4) × mean corpuscular volume (MCV)(-1) × mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH)(-1) . Ferritin measurement is a reliable method for estimating iron stores in blood donors. The sensitivity of red blood cell (RBC) parameters of complete blood count in detecting non-anaemic iron deficiency is significantly lower. Consequently, there were several attempts to increase the detection sensitivity by combining these parameters in different indices. This study included 1084 male and 792 female whole blood donors accepted for blood donation. For six RBC parameters with the highest level of correlation relative to ferritin [Hgb, MCV, MCH, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC), RDW and CCI], diagnostic efficacy in the detection of iron depletion (ferritin <12 µg L(-1) ) was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. CCI showed the highest degree of correlation with ferritin (r = -0·373 for men and r = -0·590 for women) and the highest area under the curve (0·961 for men and 0·864 for women). Using the cut-off value of 52·6 for men and 50·6 for women, the corresponding Youden index was the highest for CCI in both genders (0·851 for men and 0·612 for women). The sensitivity and specificity of CCI in the population of male donors were higher in comparison to female donors (0·941 and 0·910 vs 0·851 and 0·761, respectively). Study results confirmed the satisfactory diagnostic value of CCI in detecting depleted iron stores in blood donors. © 2016 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  11. Effect of Iron Supplementation on Iron Stores and Total Body Iron after Whole Blood Donation

    PubMed Central

    Cable, Ritchard G.; Brambilla, Donald; Glynn, Simone A.; Kleinman, Steven; Mast, Alan E.; Spencer, Bryan R.; Stone, Mars; Kiss, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Understanding the effect of blood donation and iron supplementation on iron balance will inform strategies to manage donor iron status Study Design and Methods 215 donors were randomized to receive ferrous gluconate daily (37.5 mg iron) or no iron for 24 weeks after blood donation. Iron stores were assessed using ferritin and soluble Transferrin Receptor. Hemoglobin iron was calculated from total body hemoglobin. Total Body Iron (TBI) was estimated by summing iron stores and hemoglobin iron. Results At 24 weeks, TBI in donors taking iron increased by 281.0 mg (95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 223.4, 338.6) compared to pre-donation, while TBI in donors not on iron decreased by 74.1 mg (CI: −112.3, −35.9), p<0.0001, iron vs. no iron. TBI increased rapidly following blood donation with iron supplementation, especially in iron depleted donors. Supplementation increased TBI compared to controls during the first 8 weeks after donation: 367.8 mg (CI: 293.5, 442.1) versus −24.1 mg (CI: −82.5, 34.3) for donors with baseline ferritin ≤26 ng/mL; and 167.8 mg (95%CI: 116.5, 219.2) versus −68.1 mg (CI: −136.7, 0.5) for donors with baseline ferritin >26 ng/mL. 88% of the benefit of iron supplementation occurred during the first 8 weeks after blood donation. Conclusion Donors on iron supplementation replaced donated iron while donors not on iron did not. Eight weeks of iron supplementation provided nearly all of the measured improvement in TBI. Daily iron supplementation after blood donation allows blood donors to recover the iron loss from blood donation and prevents sustained iron deficiency. PMID:27232535

  12. Effect of iron supplementation on iron stores and total body iron after whole blood donation.

    PubMed

    Cable, Ritchard G; Brambilla, Donald; Glynn, Simone A; Kleinman, Steven; Mast, Alan E; Spencer, Bryan R; Stone, Mars; Kiss, Joseph E

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the effect of blood donation and iron supplementation on iron balance will inform strategies to manage donor iron status. A total of 215 donors were randomized to receive ferrous gluconate daily (37.5 mg iron) or no iron for 24 weeks after blood donation. Iron stores were assessed using ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor. Hemoglobin (Hb) iron was calculated from total body Hb. Total body iron (TBI) was estimated by summing iron stores and Hb iron. At 24 weeks, TBI in donors taking iron increased by 281.0 mg (95% confidence interval [CI], 223.4-338.6 mg) compared to before donation, while TBI in donors not on iron decreased by 74.1 mg (95% CI, -112.3 to -35.9; p < 0.0001, iron vs. no iron). TBI increased rapidly after blood donation with iron supplementation, especially in iron-depleted donors. Supplementation increased TBI compared to controls during the first 8 weeks after donation: 367.8 mg (95% CI, 293.5-442.1) versus -24.1 mg (95% CI, -82.5 to 34.3) for donors with a baseline ferritin level of not more than 26 ng/mL and 167.8 mg (95% CI, 116.5-219.2) versus -68.1 mg (95% CI, -136.7 to 0.5) for donors with a baseline ferritin level of more than 26 ng/mL. A total of 88% of the benefit of iron supplementation occurred during the first 8 weeks after blood donation. Donors on iron supplementation replaced donated iron while donors not on iron did not. Eight weeks of iron supplementation provided nearly all of the measured improvement in TBI. Daily iron supplementation after blood donation allows blood donors to recover the iron loss from blood donation and prevents sustained iron deficiency. © 2016 AABB.

  13. Cobalt Excretion Test for the Assessment of Body Iron Stores

    PubMed Central

    Sorbie, Janet; Olatunbosun, David; Corbett, William E. N.; Valberg, Leslie S.

    1971-01-01

    Iron absorption is under delicate control and the level of absorption is adjusted to comply with the body's need for iron. To measure the intestinal setting for iron absorption, and thereby indirectly assess body iron requirements, cobaltous chloride labelled with 57Co or 60Co was given by mouth and the percentage of the test dose excreted in the urine in 24 hours was measured in a gamma counter. Seventeen control subjects with normal iron stores excreted 18% (9-23%) of the dose. Increased excretion, 31% (23-42%), was found in 10 patients with iron deficiency anemia and in 15 patients with depleted iron stores in the absence of anemia. In contrast, 12 patients with anemia due to causes other than iron deficiency excreted amounts of radiocobalt within the normal control range. In patients with iron deficiency, replenishment of iron stores by either oral or parenteral iron caused the previously high results to return to normal. Excretion of the test dose was normal in portal cirrhosis with normal iron stores but it was markedly increased in patients with cirrhosis complicated by either iron deficiency or endogenous iron overload. It was also raised in primary hemochromatosis. Excretion of the dose was reduced in gluten-sensitive enteropathy. Gastrointestinal surgery and inflammatory disease of the lower small intestine had no effect on the results except that some patients with steatorrhea had diminished excretion. The cobalt excretion test provides the clinician with a tool for the assessment of iron absorption, the detection of a reduction in body iron stores below the level that is normal for the subject in question, the differentiation of iron deficiency anemia from anemia due to other causes, and the investigation of patients with iron-loading disorders. PMID:5578125

  14. Blood donations, iron stores, and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Logroscino, Giancarlo; Chen, Honglei; Wing, Al; Ascherio, Alberto

    2006-06-01

    Iron overload and systemic iron stores may be important in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). We therefore examined the association between blood donations, which reduce body iron stores, and risk of PD in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, a large cohort investigation of U.S. men. Our hypothesis was that blood donation reduces the risk of PD by lowering systemic iron stores. Although the number of blood donations was inversely related to the ferritin levels in a subsample of the study population, no association was found between the number of blood donations and risk of PD (P for trend = 0.6). Unexpectedly, the risk of PD was higher among men who reported recent multiple blood donations (P for trend = 0.05). The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that reduced systemic iron stores lower the risk of PD.

  15. [Iron stores status at early pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Barón, María Adela; Solano, Liseti; Peña, Evelyn; Del Real, Sara

    2005-06-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common cause of nutritional anemia. During pregnancy there is a high risk of developing it, due to the increase of iron requirements for fetal and maternal tissues growth. The objective of this study was to determine the iron nutritional status in early pregnancy and to determine its relationship with the dietary intake. The study applied a cross-sectional and descriptive design in 419 pregnant women (13-41 y) from Valencia, Carabobo, Venezuela. Serum ferritin was determined by enzimoinmunoassay and hemoglobin by a semi-automated method. Dietary iron intake was assessed through two non-consecutive 24 hours recalls. Statistical analysis included basic descriptives, Fisher exact test, Chi-square, and Mann-Whitney tests; with a statistical significance of p < 0.05. The iron deficiency and anemia prevalence were 16.2% and 14.4%, respectively; corresponding 36.6% to ferropenic anemia. 10.4%, 29.0% and 24.2% of the women had deficient intake for iron, vitamin C and A, respectively. There were no significant differences by age. A nutritional risk was observed regarding the iron status, demonstrated by the percentage of ferropenic anemia and because the main dietary contribution came from non-heme iron, which has low bioavailability. Additionally, there was an important percentage of inadequate vitamin C and A intakes; hence, their contribution to iron absorption was limited.

  16. Effect of Maternal Iron Deficiency Anemia on the Iron Store of Newborns in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Birhanu, Asaye; Nigussie, Paulos; Tsegaye, Aster

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia among pregnant women is a widespread problem in developing countries including Ethiopia, though its influence on neonatal iron status was inconsistently reported in literature. This cross-sectional study was conducted to compare hematologic profiles and iron status of newborns from mothers with different anemia status and determine correlation between maternal and neonatal hematologic profiles and iron status in Ethiopian context. We included 89 mothers and their respective newborns and performed complete blood count and assessed serum ferritin and C-reactive protein levels from blood samples collected from study participants. Maternal median hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels were 12.2 g/dL and 47.0 ng/mL, respectively. The median hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels for the newborns were 16.2 g/dL and 187.6 ng/mL, respectively. The mothers were classified into two groups based on hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels as iron deficient anemic (IDA) and nonanemic (NA) and newborns of IDA mothers had significantly lower levels of serum ferritin (P = 0.017) and hemoglobin concentration (P = 0.024). Besides, newborns' ferritin and hemoglobin levels showed significant correlation with maternal hemoglobin (P = 0.018; P = 0.039) and ferritin (P = 0.000; P = 0.008) levels. We concluded that maternal IDA may have an effect on the iron stores of newborns. PMID:25734012

  17. Mobilization of Stored Iron in Mammals: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Linder, Maria C.

    2013-01-01

    From the nutritional standpoint, several aspects of the biochemistry and physiology of iron are unique. In stark contrast to most other elements, most of the iron in mammals is in the blood attached to red blood cell hemoglobin and transporting oxygen to cells for oxidative phosphorylation and other purposes. Controlled and uncontrolled blood loss thus has a major impact on iron availability. Also, in contrast to most other nutrients, iron is poorly absorbed and poorly excreted. Moreover, amounts absorbed (~1 mg/day in adults) are much less than the total iron (~20 mg/day) cycling into and out of hemoglobin, involving bone marrow erythropoiesis and reticuloendothelial cell degradation of aged red cells. In the face of uncertainties in iron bioavailability, the mammalian organism has evolved a complex system to retain and store iron not immediately in use, and to make that iron available when and where it is needed. Iron is stored innocuously in the large hollow protein, ferritin, particularly in cells of the liver, spleen and bone marrow. Our current understanding of the molecular, cellular and physiological mechanisms by which this stored iron in ferritin is mobilized and distributed—within the cell or to other organs—is the subject of this review. PMID:24152745

  18. Nuclear resonance scattering measurement of human iron stores

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Ancona, R.C.; Mossey, R.T.; Vaswani, A.N.; Cohn, S.H.

    1985-07-01

    Hepatic iron stores were measured noninvasively in 31 patients (thalassemia, hemodialysis, hemosiderosis, refractory anemia) with suspected iron overload, employing a nuclear resonance scattering (NRS) technique. The thalassemia patients were undergoing desferrioxamine chelation therapy during the NRS measurements. The hemodialysis patients were measured before chelation therapy. Iron levels measured by NRS were in general agreement with those determined in liver biopsies by atomic absorption spectroscopy. In addition, NRS measurements from the thorax of some of these patients suggest that this method may also prove useful for clinical assessment of cardiac iron.

  19. Iron stores, blood donation, and insulin sensitivity and secretion.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Real, José Manuel; López-Bermejo, Abel; Ricart, Wifredo

    2005-07-01

    Epidemiologists have observed that blood donation is associated with decreased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We investigated the relationship between iron stores and insulin sensitivity, after controlling for known confounding factors, and compared insulin sensitivity between blood donors and individuals who had never donated blood (nondonors). In 181 men, insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion were evaluated through frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance tests with minimal model analysis. Men who donated blood between 6 months and 5 years before inclusion (n = 21) were carefully matched with nondonors (n = 66) for age, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, and cardiovascular risk profile, including blood lipids, blood pressure, and smoking status. Frequent blood donors (2-10 donations) had increased insulin sensitivity [3.42 (1.03) vs 2.45 (1.2) x 10(-4) x min(-1) x mIU/L; P = 0.04], decreased insulin secretion [186 (82) vs 401.7 (254) mIU/L x min; P <0.0001], and significantly lower iron stores [serum ferritin, 101.5 (74) vs 162 (100) microg/L; P = 0.017] than nondonors, but the 2 groups had similar blood hematocrits and blood hemoglobin concentrations. Blood donation is simultaneously associated with increased insulin sensitivity and decreased iron stores. Stored iron seems to impact negatively on insulin action even in healthy people, and not just in classic pathologic conditions associated with iron overload (hemochromatosis and hemosiderosis). According to these observations, it is imperative that a definition of excessive iron stores in healthy people be formulated.

  20. Assessment of iron stores in anemic geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Patterson, C; Turpie, I D; Benger, A M

    1985-11-01

    Of patients referred to a geriatric service, 66 were identified who were clearly anemic (hemoglobin less than 12 g in men, less than 11 g in women) but whose cause of anemia was not readily identifiable by noninvasive measures. The difficulty in distinguishing iron deficiency from chronic disease as a cause of anemia by noninvasive means (serum iron, total iron binding capacity, transferrin saturation ratio, and serum ferritin), is highlighted by the poor power of these investigations when compared with bone marrow iron stores. A transferrin saturation ratio of less than 11% and a serum ferritin of less than 45 pg/L serve better than currently accepted values to identify iron deficiency in this population.

  1. Evaluation of iron stores in blood donors by serum ferritin.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Romilla; Marwaha, Neelam; Basu, Sabita; Mohan, Harsh; Ravi Kumar, A

    2006-12-01

    Regular blood donation can lead to pre-clinical iron deficiency as well as iron deficiency anaemia. There is a need to increase the national voluntary blood donation for safe blood supply. However, there is paucity of data in the country regarding impact of regular voluntary blood donation on iron status of donors. Hence, iron stores were evaluated by serum ferritin estimation in the voluntary blood donors at Chandigarh. 400 voluntary blood donors included in the study were divided into four groups depending upon their periodicity of blood donations. Pre-donation haemoglobin assessment was done by copper sulphate method. Serum ferritin was estimated by indirect ELISA. The number of female donors with deficient iron stores was more as compared to male donors. First time donors had higher mean serum ferritin levels than that in repeat donors. The frequency of donations per year was more predictive of decreased iron stores rather than the number of lifetime donations. An increase in donation frequency was accompanied by a significant decrease in serum ferritin; values <15 microg/l were found in 21 and 46 per cent of male and female donors respectively who donated once per year, in 29 and 27 per cent in those who donated twice per year and in 49 and 100 per cent in those who donated thrice per year. Haemoglobin estimation alone in regular blood donors may not be adequate; serum ferritin estimations may need to be done to detect pre-clinical iron deficiency states. Also, iron supplementation needs to be considered in regular, repeat voluntary blood donors.

  2. Evaluation of Iron Store by Serum Ferritin in Healthy Blood Donors of Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hoque, M M; Adnan, S D; Karim, S; Mamun, M A; Nandy, S; Faruki, M A; Islam, K

    2016-07-01

    Iron stores in the body exist primarily in the form of ferritin. Small amounts of ferritin secreted into the plasma and plasma ferritin is positively correlated with the size of the total body iron stores. The present study conducted to determine the iron status using the serum ferritin level among healthy Bangladeshi blood donors. The present cross sectional study was conducted in the Department of Transfusion Medicine, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka, Bangladesh from July 2011 to June 2012. Blood donor signed informed consent and has satisfactory pre-donation health assessment and satisfactory post-donation blood test results were included in the study. Full blood counts were performed within 4 hours of collection using an automated haematology analyzer. Serum ferritin was measured using a validated enzyme immunoassay. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16 (SPPS Incorporation, Chicago, IL, USA). P value <0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Total 100 blood donors were included in the study, among them 88 were male and 12 were female. Mean±SD of the age of the respondents was 26.8±5.9 years with a range of 19 to 45 years. Mean±SD of heamoglobin level (gm/dl) and total count of Red Blood Cell (million/cmm) were 14.1±1.4 and 5.1±0.4 respectively. Mean±SD of serum ferritin level (ng/ml) was 96.4±69.0ng/ml with a range of 4.1ng/ml to 298.7ng/ml. Among the respondents 9.0% had depleted iron store, 7.0 reduced iron store and 84.0% had normal iron store. Among the respondents 5.0% had iron deficiency anaemia in term of serum ferritin level. Statistically significant difference of serum ferritin level observed between male and female and donors with and without history of previous blood donation. Among the healthy blood donors of Bangladesh abnormal serum ferritin is highly prevalent among blood donors specially among female. Monitoring of iron stores by serum ferritin seems justified in order to identify those with depleted iron stores who will

  3. Evaluation of iron status: zinc protoporphyrin vis-a-vis bone marrow iron stores.

    PubMed

    Das, Sheila; Philip, Kandathil Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) in the red cells is an indicator of iron status in the bone marrow (BM) and can be easily measured by Protofluor-Z Hematofluorometer from Helena Laboratories. It is well known that bone marrow iron is a gold standard for the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) even in the pre-latent phase. Hence, it was considered pertinent to evaluate the diagnostic utility of ZPP in comparison with bone marrow iron stores. 107 random BM were selected over a period of 2(1/2) years; in each case, RBC indices where recorded along with ZPP and Perls' Prussian blue reaction for BM iron stores. The specificity and sensitivity were found to be 77.8% and sensitivity 69.8%, respectively. However, the sensitivity increased up to 96.2% when Hb, RBC indices and ZPP were considered for the diagnosis of IDA.

  4. Absorption and loss of iron in toddlers are highly correlated.

    PubMed

    Fomon, Samuel J; Nelson, Steven E; Serfass, Robert E; Ziegler, Ekhard E

    2005-04-01

    For estimating the requirements for dietary iron, it is important to know the amount of iron that is lost from the body. Inevitable losses of iron have been determined in adult humans but not in infants or children. We administered (58)Fe, the least abundant stable isotope of iron, to free-living infants at 168 d of age (5.6 mo) and followed them to age 26 mo. There was no dietary restriction after isotope administration. Blood was obtained at regular intervals for determination of isotopic enrichment and indices of iron status. We estimated the quantity of circulating iron, noncirculating active iron, and storage iron at each age. The administered isotope equilibrated with total body iron by 13 mo of age. From 13 to 26 mo of age, we estimated inevitable loss and absorption of iron from the change in tracer abundance in circulating iron. The rate of decrease of tracer abundance was proportional to addition of tracee, i.e., absorption of iron. Conversely, the rate of decrease in quantity of tracer was proportional to removal of tracee, i.e., loss of iron. From 13 to 26 mo of age, iron absorption was (mean +/- SD) 0.49 +/- 0.13 mg/d and inevitable iron loss was 0.25 +/- 0.12 mg/d. Intersubject variability of iron loss and iron absorption was high, and iron loss and absorption were highly correlated (r = 0.789, P < 0.001). Iron stores were low throughout the study and decreased significantly from 13 to 26 mo of age, suggesting that iron absorption from the diet was inadequate to maintain or increase iron nutritional status. The data suggest that, in this cohort, which may be representative, the intake of bioavailable iron from 13 to 26 mo of age was insufficient to maintain iron nutritional status.

  5. Risk of Oxidative Damage to Bone from Increased Iron Stores During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwart, S. R.; Smith, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Iron stores are increased secondary to neocytolysis of red blood cells and a high dietary intake of iron during space flight. This raises concerns about the risk of excess iron causing oxidative damage in many tissues, including bone. Biomarkers of iron status, oxidative damage, and bone resorption during space flight were analyzed for 23 (16 M/7 F) International Space Station crewmembers as part of the Nutrition SMO project. Up to 5 in-flight blood samples and 24-h urine pools were collected over the course of the 4-6 month missions. Serum iron increased slightly during space flight and was decreased at landing (P < 0.0004). An increase in serum ferritin early in flight (217% in women and 68% in men, P < 0.0004), returning to preflight concentrations at landing, and a decrease in transferrin and transferrin receptors during flight indicated that a transient increase in iron stores occurred. No inflammatory response was observed during flight. The oxidative damage markers 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and prostaglandin F(sub 2(alpha)) were positively correlated (both P < 0.001) with serum ferritin. A greater area under the curve for ferritin during flight was correlated with greater changes in bone mineral density of several bone regions after flight (1). In a separate study (2), a ground-based investigation was conducted that examined the combined effects of radiation exposure and iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury in several physiological systems in 12-wk male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were acclimated to an adequate iron diet (45 mg iron (ferric citrate)/kg diet) for 3 wk and then assigned to one of four groups: adequate iron (Fe) diet/no radiation, adequate Fe diet/ radiation, moderately high Fe diet (650 mg Fe (ferric citrate)/kg diet)/no radiation, and moderately high Fe diet/radiation. Animals remained on the assigned diet for 4 wk. Starting on day 14 of experimental diet treatment, animals were exposed to a fractionated dose (0.375 Gy) of Cs

  6. Body iron stores and iron restoration rate in Japanese patients with chronic hepatitis C as measured during therapeutic iron removal revealed neither increased body iron stores nor effects of C282Y and H63D mutations on iron indices.

    PubMed

    Shiono, Y; Hayashi, H; Wakusawa, S; Sanae, F; Takikawa, T; Yano, M; Yoshioka, K; Saito, H

    2001-05-01

    Information on the level of iron stores in chronic hepatitis C is clinically important because its reduction is technically simple and therapeutically effective. This study was performed to measure the levels of iron stores from the total amounts of hemoglobin removed during iron reduction therapy. The C282Y and H63D mutations of HFE gene were analyzed in 94 patients. All of the patients were negative for C282Y mutation. One patient was homozygous, and 4 patients were heterozygous for H63D mutation. The body iron stores and iron restoration rate were measured in 59 patients in serial courses of iron reduction therapy. Mean values of body iron stores in the two groups with and without H63D mutation were 890 and 606 mg, while those of iron restoration rate were 1.85 and 1.52 mg/day, respectively. None of the indices of iron metabolism were different from the reference values measured similarly in healthy subjects, suggesting that the iron deposition in chronic hepatitis C is limited to the liver, probably due to changes in the iron distribution in tissues.

  7. Quantitative analysis and modelling of hepatic iron stores using stereology and spatial statistics.

    PubMed

    Ghugre, N R; Gonzalez-Gomez, I; Shimada, H; Coates, T D; Wood, J C

    2010-06-01

    Hepatic iron overload is a common clinical problem resulting from hyperabsorption syndromes and from chronic transfusion therapy. Not only does iron loading vary between reticuloendothelial stores and hepatocytes, but iron is heterogeneously distributed within hepatocytes as well. Since the accessibility of iron particles to chelation may depend, in part, on their distribution, we sought to characterize the shape and scale of iron deposition in humans with transfusional iron overload. Toward this end, we performed a histological analysis of iron stores in liver biopsy specimens of 20 patients (1.3-57.8 mg iron/g dry tissue weight) with aid of electron and light microscopy. We estimated distributions related to variability in siderosomal size, proximity of iron centres and inter-cellular iron loading. These distributions could be well modelled by Gamma distribution functions over most of the pathologic range of iron concentrations. Thus, for a given liver iron burden, a virtual iron-overloaded liver could be created that served as a model for the true histologic appearance. Such a model may be helpful for understanding the mechanics of iron loading or in predicting response to iron removal therapy.

  8. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure serum ferritin and the relationship between serum ferritin and nonheme iron stores in cats.

    PubMed

    Andrews, G A; Chavey, P S; Smith, J E

    1994-11-01

    Serum ferritin concentration correlates with tissue iron stores in humans, horses, calves, dogs, and pigs but not in rats. Because serum iron and total iron-binding capacity can be affected by disorders unrelated to iron adequacy (such as hypoproteinemia, chronic infection, hemolytic anemia, hypothyroidism, and renal disease), serum ferritin is probably the most reliable indicator of total body iron stores in larger species. To test the hypothesis that serum ferritin might be correlated with tissue iron levels in cats, we developed a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that uses two monoclonal antibodies in a sandwich arrangement to measure feline serum ferritin. The recovery of purified ferritin added to feline sera ranged from 94% to 104%; the within-assay coefficient of variability was 8.4%, and the assay-to-assay variability was 13.2%. Mean serum ferritin from 40 apparently healthy cats was 76 ng/ml (SD = 24 ng/ml). Serum ferritin concentration was significantly correlated (P < 0.001, n = 101, r = 0.365) with the nonheme iron in the liver and spleen (expressed as milligrams of iron per kilogram of body weight), as determined by Pearson product-moment correlation analysis. Because serum iron can decrease in diseases other than iron deficiency, the combination of serum iron and serum ferritin should provide sufficient evidence to differentiate anemia of chronic inflammation from anemia of iron deficiency in the cat.

  9. Effective Pb2+ removal from water using nanozerovalent iron stored 10 months

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Bishay, Samiha T.; Ahmed, Fatma M.; El-Dek, S. I.

    2017-08-01

    Heavy metal removal from water required reliable and cost-effective considerations, fast separation as well as easy methodology. In this piece of research, nanozerovalent iron (NZVI) was prepared as ideal sorbent for Pb2+ removal. The sample was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and atomic force microscope (AFM-SPM). Batch experiments comprised the effect of pH value and contact time on the adsorption process. The same NZVI was stored for a shelf time (10 months) and the batch experiment was repeated. The outcomes of the investigation assured that NZVI publicized an extraordinary large metal uptake (98%) after a short contact time (10 h). The stored sample revealed the same effectiveness on Pb2+ removal under the same conditions. The results of the physical properties, magnetic susceptibility, and conductance were correlated with the adsorption efficiency. This work offers evidence that these NZVI particles could be potential candidate for Pb2+ removal in large scale, stored for a long time using a simple, green, and cost-effective methodology, and represent an actual feedback in waste water treatment.

  10. Effect of an intravenous iron dextran regimen on iron stores, hemoglobin, and erythropoietin requirements in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Park, L; Uhthoff, T; Tierney, M; Nadler, S

    1998-05-01

    Iron deficiency is a common cause of delayed or diminished response to erythropoietin (EPO) in hemodialysis patients. Although oral iron is often prescribed to replete iron stores, this approach to iron supplementation may not be adequate with chronic EPO therapy. Intravenous (IV) iron dextran may be an effective alternative approach to replete iron stores and may facilitate more cost-effective use of EPO. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an IV iron dextran regimen that consisted of a loading dose phase followed by monthly maintenance doses of iron dextran. The effect of this regimen on iron stores, hemoglobin, and EPO doses was evaluated. This was an open prospective study in adult hemodialysis patients who were iron deficient as defined by a serum ferritin less than 100 ng/mL or transferrin saturation (TSAT) of less than 20%. Patients were loaded with 1 g iron dextran in five divided doses and then received monthly maintenance doses of 100 mg for the 4-month study period. Values of serum ferritin, TSAT, hemoglobin, and EPO dose were followed for the 4-month study period. Thirty hemodialysis patients receiving EPO were identified as being iron deficient and were enrolled in the study. The mean serum ferritin increased significantly from 49 ng/mL at baseline to 225 ng/mL at the end of the study period (P < 0.0001). Mean TSAT also increased significantly from 27% to 33% (P = 0.002). Values for hemoglobin did not change significantly during the study period; however, there was a significant reduction in EPO dose from a mean baseline dose of 112 U/kg/wk to 88 U/kg/wk at the end of the study period (P = 0.009). Seventeen patients experienced an increase in hemoglobin or a decrease in EPO dose. Economic analysis showed that approximately $580 (Cdn) per patient per year could be saved by use of IV iron dextran. The administration of the IV iron dextran regimen in the iron-deficient hemodialysis population was effective at repleting and maintaining iron stores

  11. Hepcidin is a Better Predictor of Iron Stores in Premenopausal Women than Blood Loss or Dietary Intake.

    PubMed

    Lim, Karen H C; Booth, Alison O; Nowson, Caryl A; Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A; Irving, David O; Riddell, Lynn J

    2016-09-02

    The relationship between dietary intake, circulating hepcidin and iron status in free-living premenopausal women has not been explored. This cross-sectional study aimed to identify dietary determinants of iron stores after accounting for blood loss and to determine whether iron intake predicts iron stores independently of hepcidin in a sample of Australian women. Three hundred thirty eight women aged 18-50 years were recruited. Total intake and food sources of iron were determined via food frequency questionnaire; the magnitude of menstrual losses was estimated by self-report; and blood donation volume was quantified using blood donation records and self-reported donation frequency. Serum samples were analysed for ferritin, hepcidin and C-reactive protein concentrations. Linear regression was used to investigate associations. Accounting for blood loss, each 1 mg/day increase in dietary iron was associated with a 3% increase in iron stores (p = 0.027); this association was not independent of hepcidin. Hepcidin was a more influential determinant of iron stores than blood loss and dietary factors combined (R² of model including hepcidin = 0.65; R² of model excluding hepcidin = 0.17, p for difference <0.001), and increased hepcidin diminished the positive association between iron intake and iron stores. Despite not being the biggest contributor to dietary iron intake, unprocessed meat was positively associated with iron stores, and each 10% increase in consumption was associated with a 1% increase in iron stores (p = 0.006). No other dietary factors were associated with iron stores. Interventions that reduce hepcidin production combined with dietary strategies to increase iron intake may be important means of improving iron status in women with depleted iron stores.

  12. Hepcidin is a Better Predictor of Iron Stores in Premenopausal Women than Blood Loss or Dietary Intake

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Karen H. C.; Booth, Alison O.; Nowson, Caryl A.; Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A.; Irving, David O.; Riddell, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between dietary intake, circulating hepcidin and iron status in free-living premenopausal women has not been explored. This cross-sectional study aimed to identify dietary determinants of iron stores after accounting for blood loss and to determine whether iron intake predicts iron stores independently of hepcidin in a sample of Australian women. Three hundred thirty eight women aged 18–50 years were recruited. Total intake and food sources of iron were determined via food frequency questionnaire; the magnitude of menstrual losses was estimated by self-report; and blood donation volume was quantified using blood donation records and self-reported donation frequency. Serum samples were analysed for ferritin, hepcidin and C-reactive protein concentrations. Linear regression was used to investigate associations. Accounting for blood loss, each 1 mg/day increase in dietary iron was associated with a 3% increase in iron stores (p = 0.027); this association was not independent of hepcidin. Hepcidin was a more influential determinant of iron stores than blood loss and dietary factors combined (R2 of model including hepcidin = 0.65; R2 of model excluding hepcidin = 0.17, p for difference <0.001), and increased hepcidin diminished the positive association between iron intake and iron stores. Despite not being the biggest contributor to dietary iron intake, unprocessed meat was positively associated with iron stores, and each 10% increase in consumption was associated with a 1% increase in iron stores (p = 0.006). No other dietary factors were associated with iron stores. Interventions that reduce hepcidin production combined with dietary strategies to increase iron intake may be important means of improving iron status in women with depleted iron stores. PMID:27598194

  13. Serum ferritin concentrations and body iron stores in a multicenter, multiethnic primary-care population

    PubMed Central

    Gordeuk, Victor R.; Reboussin, David M.; McLaren, Christine E.; Barton, James C.; Acton, Ronald T.; McLaren, Gordon D.; Harris, Emily L.; Reiss, Jacob A.; Adams, Paul C.; Speechley, Mark; Phatak, Pradyumna D.; Sholinsky, Phyliss; Eckfeldt, John H.; Chen, Wen-Pin; Passmore, Leah; Dawkins, Fitzroy W.

    2013-01-01

    How often elevated serum ferritin in primary-care patients reflects increased iron stores (normally 0.8 g in men, 0.4 g in women) is not known. The Hereditary Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) study screened 101,168 primary-care participants (44% Caucasians, 27% African-Americans, 14% Asians/Pacific Islanders, 13% Hispanics, 2% others). Follow-up clinical evaluation was performed in 302 of 333 HFE C282Y homozygotes regardless of iron measures and 1,375 of 1,920 nonhomozygotes with serum ferritin >300 μg/L (men), >200 μg/L (women) and transferrin saturation >50% (men), >45% (women). Quantitative phlebotomy was conducted in 122 of 175 C282Y homozygotes and 122 of 1,102 nonhomozygotes with non-transfusional serum ferritin elevation at evaluation. The estimated prevalence in the Caucasian population of C282Y homozygotes with serum ferritin >900 μg/L at evaluation was 20 per 10,000 men and 4 per 10,000 women; this constellation was predictive of iron stores >4 g in men and >2 g in women. The estimated prevalence per 10,000 of non-C282Y homozygotes with serum ferritin >900 μg/L at evaluation was 7 among Caucasians, 13 among Hispanics, 20 among African Americans, and 38 among Asians and Pacific Islanders, and this constellation was predictive of iron stores >2 g but <4 g. In conclusion, serum ferritin >900 μg/L after initial elevations of both serum ferritin and transferrin saturation is predictive of mildly increased iron stores in multiple ethnic populations regardless of HFE genotype. Serum ferritin >900 μg/L in male C282Y homozygotes is predictive of moderately increased iron stores. PMID:18429050

  14. Transfusion of human volunteers with older, stored red blood cells produces extravascular hemolysis and circulating non-transferrin-bound iron.

    PubMed

    Hod, Eldad A; Brittenham, Gary M; Billote, Genia B; Francis, Richard O; Ginzburg, Yelena Z; Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Jhang, Jeffrey; Schwartz, Joseph; Sharma, Shruti; Sheth, Sujit; Sireci, Anthony N; Stephens, Hannah L; Stotler, Brie A; Wojczyk, Boguslaw S; Zimring, James C; Spitalnik, Steven L

    2011-12-15

    Transfusions of RBCs stored for longer durations are associated with adverse effects in hospitalized patients. We prospectively studied 14 healthy human volunteers who donated standard leuko-reduced, double RBC units. One unit was autologously transfused "fresh" (3-7 days of storage), and the other "older" unit was transfused after 40 to 42 days of storage. Of the routine laboratory parameters measured at defined times surrounding transfusion, significant differences between fresh and older transfusions were only observed in iron parameters and markers of extravascular hemolysis. Compared with fresh RBCs, mean serum total bilirubin increased by 0.55 mg/dL at 4 hours after transfusion of older RBCs (P = .0003), without significant changes in haptoglobin or lactate dehydrogenase. In addition, only after the older transfusion, transferrin saturation increased progressively over 4 hours to a mean of 64%, and non-transferrin-bound iron appeared, reaching a mean of 3.2μM. The increased concentrations of non-transferrin-bound iron correlated with enhanced proliferation in vitro of a pathogenic strain of Escherichia coli (r = 0.94, P = .002). Therefore, circulating non-transferrin-bound iron derived from rapid clearance of transfused, older stored RBCs may enhance transfusion-related complications, such as infection.

  15. Transfusion of human volunteers with older, stored red blood cells produces extravascular hemolysis and circulating non–transferrin-bound iron

    PubMed Central

    Brittenham, Gary M.; Billote, Genia B.; Francis, Richard O.; Ginzburg, Yelena Z.; Hendrickson, Jeanne E.; Jhang, Jeffrey; Schwartz, Joseph; Sharma, Shruti; Sheth, Sujit; Sireci, Anthony N.; Stephens, Hannah L.; Stotler, Brie A.; Wojczyk, Boguslaw S.; Zimring, James C.; Spitalnik, Steven L.

    2011-01-01

    Transfusions of RBCs stored for longer durations are associated with adverse effects in hospitalized patients. We prospectively studied 14 healthy human volunteers who donated standard leuko-reduced, double RBC units. One unit was autologously transfused “fresh” (3-7 days of storage), and the other “older” unit was transfused after 40 to 42 days of storage. Of the routine laboratory parameters measured at defined times surrounding transfusion, significant differences between fresh and older transfusions were only observed in iron parameters and markers of extravascular hemolysis. Compared with fresh RBCs, mean serum total bilirubin increased by 0.55 mg/dL at 4 hours after transfusion of older RBCs (P = .0003), without significant changes in haptoglobin or lactate dehydrogenase. In addition, only after the older transfusion, transferrin saturation increased progressively over 4 hours to a mean of 64%, and non–transferrin-bound iron appeared, reaching a mean of 3.2μM. The increased concentrations of non–transferrin-bound iron correlated with enhanced proliferation in vitro of a pathogenic strain of Escherichia coli (r = 0.94, P = .002). Therefore, circulating non–transferrin-bound iron derived from rapid clearance of transfused, older stored RBCs may enhance transfusion-related complications, such as infection. The trial was registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01319552. PMID:22021369

  16. Relationship between body iron stores and diquat toxicity in male Fischer-344 rats.

    PubMed

    Abe, Teruhisa; Kinda, Takasuke; Takano, Yasushi; Chikazawa, Seishiro; Higuchi, Masashi; Kawasaki, Naomi; Orino, Koichi; Watanabe, Kiyotaka

    2006-12-01

    The effects of body iron stores on diquat (DQ)-induced toxicity were examined in male Fischer-344 rats, which are sensitive to this herbicide. The rats (5 weeks old) were fed diets containing 40 (lower iron storage [LIS] group) or 320 ppm iron (higher iron storage [HIS] group) for 5 weeks. The concentrations of nonheme iron and ferritin in the liver and kidney were significantly higher in the HIS group than in the LIS group (P<0.0001), although there was no significant differences between the HIS and LIS groups in hematological parameters, including red blood cell count, hemoglobin concentration, and mean corpuscular volume. Three hours after administration of 0.1 mmol DQ/kg, serum alanine aminotransferase and urea nitrogen were significantly higher than in controls (saline injection) for both the LIS and HIS groups (P<0.01), and, after DQ injection, these parameters were significantly higher in the HIS group than in the LIS group (P<0.01). When the rats were injected with 0.075 or 0.1 mmol DQ/kg, the survival time was significantly shorter in the HIS group than in the LIS group (P<0.05). These findings suggest that higher body iron stores result in more severe DQ toxicity in Fischer-344 rats.

  17. Proposal for the standardization of the serum unsaturated iron binding capacity assay, and results in groups of subjects with normal iron stores and with prelatent, latent, and manifest iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gabbe, E E; Heinrich, H C; Icagić, F

    1982-02-26

    An effort has been made to standardize the indirect iron saturation excess method for the determination of the serum unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC) and thus to relinquish the direct adsorption methods for the assay of the serum total iron binding capacity (TIBC) which give falsely high results due to unspecific binding of the saturating iron to serum proteins. In order to eliminate the interfering effects of hydrolytic polymerization of iron(III) on the saturation of apotransferrin in serum and on the colorimetric determination of the unbound iron excess at pH 8.3, conditions have been studied for the preparation of the iron-nitrilotriacetate-complex (Fe(NTA)2) solution at pH 8.3 with respect to its reactivity with the reductant sodium ascorbate and with the chromogen bathophenanthroline-disulfonate in photometric standards and in samples containing iron-saturated serum. The validity of the results for the UIBC thus obtained has been investigated (1) by direct spectrophotometric titration with Fe(NTA)2 of the apotransferrin in serum by measuring the absorbance of transferrin at 470 nm in 50-mm cuvettes, and of the UIBC using the modified indirect iron saturation excess assay, both of which gave the same saturation points, and (2) by the correlation of the TIBC obtained from serum iron determinations and the UIBC, with the transferrin concentration measured by the radial immunodiffusion assay. Results of UIBC determinations are presented along with serum iron concentration, TIBC, and transferrin saturation in groups of subjects with normal iron stores and prelatent, latent, and manifest iron deficiency.

  18. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  19. Iron Stores of Breastfed Infants during the First Year of Life

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Ekhard E.; Nelson, Steven E.; Jeter, Janice M.

    2014-01-01

    The birth iron endowment provides iron for growth in the first months of life. We describe the iron endowment under conditions of low dietary iron supply. Subjects were infants participating in a trial of Vitamin D supplementation from 1 to 9 months. Infants were exclusively breastfed at enrollment but could receive complementary foods from 4 months but not formula. Plasma ferritin (PF) and transferrin receptor (TfR) were determined at 1, 2, 4, 5.5, 7.5, 9 and 12 months. At 1 month PF ranged from 38 to 752 µg/L and was only weakly related to maternal PF. PF declined subsequently and flattened out at 5.5 months. PF of females was significantly higher than PF of males except at 12 months. TfR increased with age and was inversely correlated with PF. PF and TfR tracked strongly until 9 months. Iron deficiency (PF < 10 µg/L) began to appear at 4 months and increased in frequency until 9 months. Infants with ID were born with low iron endowment. We concluded that the birth iron endowment is highly variable in size and a small endowment places infants at risk of iron deficiency before 6 months. Boys have smaller iron endowments and are at greater risk of iron deficiency than girls. PMID:24853888

  20. Correlation effects in the iron pnictides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jian-xin; Si, Qimiao; Abrahams, Elihu; Dai, Jianhui

    2009-01-01

    One of the central questions about the iron pnictides concerns the extent to which their electrons are strongly correlated. Here we address this issue through the phenomenology of the charge transport and dynamics, single-electron excitation spectrum, and magnetic ordering and dynamics. We outline the evidence that the parent compounds, while metallic, have electron interactions that are sufficiently strong to produce incipient Mott physics. In other words, in terms of the strength of electron correlations compared to the kinetic energy, the iron pnictides are closer to intermediately-coupled systems lying at the boundary between itinerancy and localization, such as V{sub 2}O{sub 3} a or Se-doped NiS{sub 2} , rather than to simple antiferromagnetic metals like Cr. This level of electronic correlations produces a new small parameter for controlled theoretical analyses, namely the fraction of the single-electron spectral weight that lies in the coherent part. Using this expansion parameter, we construct the effective low-energy Hamiltonian and discuss its implications for the magnetic order and magnetic quantum criticality. Finally, this approach sharpens the notion of magnetic frustration for such a metallic system, and brings about a multi band matrix t-J{sub 1}-J{sub 2} model for the carrier-doped iron pnictides.

  1. The effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on iron stores and iron deficiency in urban Alaska Native adults.

    PubMed

    Miernyk, Karen; Bruden, Dana; Zanis, Carolyn; McMahon, Brian; Sacco, Frank; Hennessy, Thomas; Parkinson, Alan; Bruce, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been correlated with low serum ferritin and iron deficiency. As a secondary analysis of a study of H. pylori reinfection, we investigated the association of H. pylori infection and the effect of its eradication on serum ferritin and iron deficiency. Alaska Native adults undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy had sera collected and a (13) C urea breath test (UBT) was performed. Those H. pylori positive were treated with an antibiotic regimen; those who tested negative 2 months after treatment were evaluated at 4, 6, 12, and 24 months by UBT and serum ferritin with an immunoradiometric assay. We excluded persons from further analysis if they were prescribed iron by their provider. We measured serum ferritin for 241 persons; 121/241 were H. pylori positive. The geometric mean ferritin (GMF) for persons with and without H. pylori infection was 37 μg/L and 50 μg/L, respectively (p = .04). At enrollment, 19/121 H. pylori-positive persons had iron deficiency compared with 8/120 H. pylori negative (p = .02). Among 66 persons tested at 24 months, the GMF was higher at 24 months (49.6 μg/L) versus enrollment (36.5 μg/L; p = .02). Six of 11 persons with iron deficiency at enrollment no longer had iron deficiency and had a higher GMF (p = .02) 24 months after treatment. H. pylori infection was correlated with lower serum ferritin and iron deficiency. After H. pylori eradication, serum ferritin increased and approximately half of persons resolved their iron deficiency. Testing for H. pylori infection and subsequent treatment of those positive could be considered in persons with unexplained iron deficiency. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Red blood cell distribution width is not a reliable biomarker for low iron stores in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Akkermans, M D; Uijterschout, L; Nuijsink, M; Hendriks, D M; van Goudoever, J B; Brus, F

    2017-02-01

    Low iron stores in children, absolute iron deficiency (AID), can lead to impaired neurodevelopment and requires iron therapy. In the presence of infection/inflammation, like in cystic fibrosis (CF), serum ferritin (SF) is not a reliable biomarker for AID. Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is a promising alternative reported not to be influenced by infection in healthy children. Currently, there are no data on the diagnostic capacity of RDW to detect AID in pediatric CF patients. This was a prospective observational study that investigated iron status biomarkers in 53 Dutch pediatric CF patients. AID was defined using World Health Organization criteria for SF in stable patients (no recent pulmonary exacerbation) and C-reactive protein (CRP) ≤10 mg/l. Patients with AID had higher RDW levels than patients without AID (p = 0.019). An RDW ≥13.2% showed the following test statistics: sensitivity 100%; specificity 39.4%; positive predictive value 20%; and negative predictive value 100%. Furthermore, we found a correlation between RDW and CRP in the total group that originated from the stable patients (r = 0.308; p = 0.042). In conclusion, the diagnostic capacity of RDW for detecting AID in pediatric CF patients seems limited because RDW levels might also be influenced by chronic infection/inflammation in these patients.

  3. Nordic walking training attenuation of oxidative stress in association with a drop in body iron stores in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Kortas, Jakub; Kuchta, Agnieszka; Prusik, Krzysztof; Prusik, Katarzyna; Ziemann, Ewa; Labudda, Sandra; Ćwiklińska, Agnieszka; Wieczorek, Ewa; Jankowski, Maciej; Antosiewicz, Jedrzej

    2017-02-22

    Excess body iron accumulation and oxidative stress has been associated with ageing. Regular exercise has been shown to reduce oxidative stress and induce some changes in iron metabolism. However, the effects of exercise on both of these parameters have been poorly investigated. In our study, 35 elderly women participated in 12 weeks of Nordic walking (NW) training (three times a week). We demonstrated that the training caused a significant reduction in malondialdehyde advanced oxidation protein products-markers of oxidative stress but had no effects on paraoxonase 1 activity. These changes were associated with the decrease of blood ferritin (99.4 ± 62.7 vs. 81.4 ± 61.7 ng/ml p < 0.05). Measurement of physical fitness revealed that the training caused a significant improvement in performance and a negative correlation between the blood ferritin and endurance test was recorded (r = -0.34, p = 0.03). In addition, a significant correlation between blood ferritin and fasting glucose level was noted. The training induced a rise of HDL cholesterol from 70.8 ± 19.3-75.3 ± 21.1, p < 0.05, whereas other lipid parameters remained unchanged. In conclusion, NW training reduced body iron stores and it was associated with lower oxidative stress and better endurance.

  4. Evidence of relative iron deficiency in platelet- and plasma-pheresis donors correlates with donation frequency.

    PubMed

    Li, Huihui; Condon, Frances; Kessler, Debra; Nandi, Vijay; Rebosa, Mark; Westerman, Mark; Shaz, Beth H; Ginzburg, Yelena

    2016-12-01

    The loss of iron stores and resulting iron deficiency is well documented in whole blood or red blood cell donors. We hypothesized that relative iron deficiency also occurs as a result of more frequent platelet- and plasma-pheresis (apheresis) donation. To test this hypothesis, we proposed a pilot cross-sectional study to analyze erythropoiesis- and iron-related parameters in white male apheresis donors: (1) relative to controls, (2) in correlation with apheresis donation frequency, and (3) in correlation with pre-donation platelet count. Fifty eligible apheresis donors and eight controls were enrolled in the study. Apheresis donors were found to have a lower serum ferritin and serum hepcidin and exhibited evidence of iron restricted erythropoiesis relative to controls. Furthermore, among donors, lower MCV, CH(r) , hepcidin concentration, and serum ferritin were observed in more frequent apheresis donors. Correlations between donation frequency and hepcidin and ferritin were noted in apheresis donors. This pilot study demonstrates that apheresis donors are relatively iron deficient compared to controls and supports the premise that frequent apheresis donation correlates with relatively iron restricted erythropoiesis. An analysis of iron- and erythropoiesis-related parameters in a broader population of frequent apheresis donors (i.e., female and non-white donors) may demonstrate larger deficits and an even greater potential benefit of iron replacement. J. Clin. Apheresis 31:551-558, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Intestinal absorption of dietary cadmium in women depends on body iron stores and fiber intake.

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, M; Akesson, A; Nermell, B; Vahter, M

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of intake and uptake of cadmium in relation to diet composition were carried out in 57 nonsmoking women, 20-50 years of age. A vegetarian/high-fiber diet and a mixed-diet group were constructed based on results from a food frequency questionnaire. Duplicate diets and the corresponding feces were collected during 4 consecutive days in parallel with dietary recording of type and amount of food ingested for determination of the dietary intake of cadmium and various nutrients. Blood and 24-hr urine samples were collected for determination of cadmium, hemoglobin, ferritin, and zinc. There were no differences in the intake of nutrients between the mixed-diet and the high-fiber diet groups, except for a significantly higher intake of fiber (p < 0.001) and cadmium (p < 0.002) in the high-fiber group. Fecal cadmium corresponded to 98% in the mixed-diet group and 100% in the high-fiber diet group. No differences in blood cadmium (BCd) or urinary cadmium (UCd) between groups could be detected. There was a tendency toward higher BCd and UCd concentrations with increasing fiber intake; however, the concentrations were not statistically significant at the 5% level, indicating an inhibitory effect of fiber on the gastrointestinal absorption of cadmium. Sixty-seven percent of the women had serum ferritin < 30 micrograms/l, indicating reduced body iron stores, which were highly associated with higher BCd (irrespective of fiber intake). BCd was mainly correlated with UCd, serum ferritin, age, anf fibre intake. UCd and serum ferritin explained almost 60% of the variation in BCd.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 4. Figure 5. PMID:7713018

  6. The difference between fingerstick and venous hemoglobin and hematocrit varies by sex and iron stores.

    PubMed

    Cable, Ritchard G; Steele, Whitney R; Melmed, Russell S; Johnson, Bryce; Mast, Alan E; Carey, Patricia M; Kiss, Joseph E; Kleinman, Steven H; Wright, David J

    2012-05-01

    Fingerstick blood samples are used to estimate donor venous hemoglobin (Hb). Fingerstick Hb or hematocrit (Hct) was determined routinely for 2425 selected donors at six blood centers, along with venous Hb. Using sex and measures of iron status including absent iron stores (AIS; ferritin < 12 ng/mL), linear regression models were developed to predict venous Hb from fingerstick. Across all subjects, fingerstick Hb was higher than venous Hb in the higher part of the clinical range, but lower in the lower part of the range. The relationship varied by sex and iron status. Across centers, a female donor had on average a venous Hb result 0.5 to 0.8 g/dL lower than a male donor with the same fingerstick Hb and iron status. Similarly, a donor with AIS had on average a venous Hb result 0.3 to 1.1 g/dL lower than an iron-replete donor with the same fingerstick value and sex. An iron-replete male donor with a fingerstick result at the cutoff (Hb 12.5 g/dL) had an acceptable expected venous Hb (12.8 to 13.8 g/dL). A female donor with AIS with a fingerstick result at the cutoff had an expected venous Hb below 12.5 g/dL (11.7 to 12.4 g/dL). Of females with AIS, 40.2% donated blood when their venous Hb was less than 12.5 g/dL. Fingerstick is considered a useful estimator of venous Hb. However, in some donor groups, particularly female donors with AIS, fingerstick overestimates venous Hb at the donation cutoff. This significant limitation should be considered in setting donor fingerstick Hb or Hct requirements. © 2011 American Association of Blood Banks.

  7. The difference between fingerstick and venous hemoglobin and hematocrit varies by sex and iron stores

    PubMed Central

    Cable, Ritchard G.; Steele, Whitney R.; Melmed, Russell S.; Johnson, Bryce; Mast, Alan E.; Carey, Patricia M.; Kiss, Joseph E.; Kleinman, Steven H.; Wright, David J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fingerstick blood samples are used to estimate donor venous hemoglobin (Hb). STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Fingerstick Hb or hematocrit (Hct) was determined routinely for 2425 selected donors at six blood centers, along with venous Hb. Using sex and measures of iron status including absent iron stores (AIS; ferritin < 12 ng/mL), linear regression models were developed to predict venous Hb from fingerstick. RESULTS Across all subjects, fingerstick Hb was higher than venous Hb in the higher part of the clinical range, but lower in the lower part of the range. The relationship varied by sex and iron status. Across centers, a female donor had on average a venous Hb result 0.5 to 0.8 g/dL lower than a male donor with the same fingerstick Hb and iron status. Similarly, a donor with AIS had on average a venous Hb result 0.3 to 1.1 g/dL lower than an iron-replete donor with the same fingerstick value and sex. An iron-replete male donor with a fingerstick result at the cutoff (Hb 12.5 g/dL) had an acceptable expected venous Hb (12.8 to 13.8 g/dL). A female donor with AIS with a fingerstick result at the cutoff had an expected venous Hb below 12.5 g/dL (11.7 to 12.4 g/dL). Of females with AIS, 40.2% donated blood when their venous Hb was less than 12.5 g/dL. CONCLUSIONS Fingerstick is considered a useful estimator of venous Hb. However, in some donor groups, particularly female donors with AIS, fingerstick overestimates venous Hb at the donation cutoff. This significant limitation should be considered in setting donor fingerstick Hb or Hct requirements. PMID:22014071

  8. Effects of phlebotomy-induced reduction of body iron stores on metabolic syndrome: results from a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Houschyar, Khosrow S; Lüdtke, Rainer; Dobos, Gustav J; Kalus, Ulrich; Broecker-Preuss, Martina; Rampp, Thomas; Brinkhaus, Benno; Michalsen, Andreas

    2012-05-30

    Metabolic syndrome (METS) is an increasingly prevalent but poorly understood clinical condition characterized by insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and obesity. Increased oxidative stress catalyzed by accumulation of iron in excess of physiologic requirements has been implicated in the pathogenesis of METS, but the relationships between cause and effect remain uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that phlebotomy-induced reduction of body iron stores would alter the clinical presentation of METS, using a randomized trial. In a randomized, controlled, single-blind clinical trial, 64 patients with METS were randomly assigned to iron reduction by phlebotomy (n = 33) or to a control group (n = 31), which was offered phlebotomy at the end of the study (waiting-list design). The iron-reduction patients had 300 ml of blood removed at entry and between 250 and 500 ml removed after 4 weeks, depending on ferritin levels at study entry. Primary outcomes were change in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and insulin sensitivity as measured by Homeostatic Model Assessment (HOMA) index after 6 weeks. Secondary outcomes included HbA1c, plasma glucose, blood lipids, and heart rate (HR). SBP decreased from 148.5 ± 12.3 mmHg to 130.5 ± 11.8 mmHg in the phlebotomy group, and from 144.7 ± 14.4 mmHg to 143.8 ± 11.9 mmHg in the control group (difference -16.6 mmHg; 95% CI -20.7 to -12.5; P < 0.001). No significant effect on HOMA index was seen. With regard to secondary outcomes, blood glucose, HbA1c, low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein ratio, and HR were significantly decreased by phlebotomy. Changes in BP and HOMA index correlated with ferritin reduction. In patients with METS, phlebotomy, with consecutive reduction of body iron stores, lowered BP and resulted in improvements in markers of cardiovascular risk and glycemic control. Blood donation may have beneficial effects for blood donors with METS. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01328210 Please see

  9. Insulin sensitivity, vascular function, and iron stores in voluntary blood donors.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haoyi; Patel, Milan; Cable, Ritchard; Young, Lawrence; Katz, Stuart D

    2007-10-01

    Reduced iron stores after blood donation are associated with improved vascular function and decreased cardiovascular risk. We sought to determine whether iron-dependent changes in glucose metabolism may contribute to improved vascular function in blood donors. We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study in 21 high-frequency blood donors (more than eight donations in the last 2 years) and 21 low-frequency blood donors (one to two donations in the last 2 years) aged 50-75 years. Serum markers of iron stores, whole-body insulin sensitivity index (WBISI) during oral glucose tolerance testing, and flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery were determined in all subjects. Serum ferritin was decreased (median values 23 vs. 36 ng/ml, P < 0.05) and flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery was increased (median values 5.9 vs. 5.3%, P < 0.05) in high-frequency donors compared with low-frequency donors, respectively, but WBISI (median values 4.8 vs. 4.7) and related measures of glucose tolerance did not differ between groups. Flow-mediated dilation significantly decreased at 1 h after oral glucose loading in both groups, but the decrease in flow-mediated dilation at 1 h did not differ between high- and low-frequency donors. High-frequency blood donation reduced serum ferritin and increased flow-mediated dilation compared with low-frequency donation but did not improve insulin sensitivity or protect the vascular endothelium from the adverse effects of acute hyperglycemia after oral glucose loading. These findings suggest that the mechanisms linking blood donation to improved vascular function are not likely related to changes in glucose metabolism.

  10. Storing Light with Subradiant Correlations in Arrays of Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchinetti, G.; Jenkins, S. D.; Ruostekoski, J.

    2016-12-01

    We show how strong light-mediated resonant dipole-dipole interactions between atoms can be utilized in a control and storage of light. The method is based on a high-fidelity preparation of a collective atomic excitation in a single correlated subradiant eigenmode in a lattice. We demonstrate how a simple phenomenological model captures the qualitative features of the dynamics and sharp transmission resonances that may find applications in sensing.

  11. Increased Body Mass Index may lead to Hyperferritinemia Irrespective of Body Iron Stores

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Faiza; Memon, Abdul Shakoor; Fatima, Syeda Sadia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Obesity causes subclinical inflammation which results in the secretion of various bioactive peptides that are key players in metabolic regulation of iron homeostasis. We sought to establish correlation of one such peptide (ferritin) with marker of subclinical inflammation (CRP) in various BMI. Methods: Total 150 subjects between the ages of 20-60 years were included in the cross-sectional study conducted at Basic Medical Sciences Institute, Jinnah Post Graduate Medical Centre, Karachi, Pakistan. Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated by weight (kg) /height (m2). The given values were used as reference for Group A: normal weight (18.0-22.9 kg/m2), Group B: overweight (23.0-24.9 kg/m2), Group C: obese (>25.0 kg/m2) according to South Asian criteria. Serum Iron, Total Iron Binding Capacity, serum Transferrin Saturation, serum Ferritin and C-reactive protein were measured by commercially available kits. ANNOVA with Tukey’s minimum significant difference and Spearman Rho correlation were used considering p<0.05 significant. Results: The results identified an increased serum Ferritin and CRP in obese versus lean subjects (p < 0.001). BMI showed significantly positive correlation with serum CRP (r = 0.815; p-value < 0.01) and Ferritin (r = 0.584; p-value < 0.01). However, serum Iron levels and Transferrin saturation decreased in obese versus normal weight individuals (p < 0.001). Conclusion: This integrated new data reveals that individuals with high BMI had high levels of Serum Ferritin despite low levels of iron with high levels of C- reactive protein. This might be caused due to inflammatory conditions prevailing in the presence of increased adipose tissue. PMID:26870128

  12. Timing of clamping and factors associated with iron stores in full-term newborns

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Fabiana de Cássia Carvalho; Assis, Karine Franklin; Martins, Mariana Campos; do Prado, Mara Rúbia Maciel Cardoso; Ribeiro, Andréia Queiroz; Sant’Ana, Luciana Ferreira da Rocha; Priore, Silvia Eloiza; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the impact of timing of clamping and obstetric, biological and socioeconomic factors on the iron stores of full-term newborns. METHODS Cross-sectional study between October 2011 and July 2012 in which hematological parameters were evaluated for newborns in Viçosa, MG, Southeastern Brazil. It involved collecting 7 mL of umbilical cord blood from 144 full-term not underweight newborns. The parameters investigated were complete blood count, serum iron, ferritin and C-reactive protein. The time of umbilical cord clamping was measured using a digital timer without interfering in the procedures of childbirth. The birth data were collected from Live Birth Certificates and other information was obtained from the mother through a questionnaire applied in the first month postpartum. Analysis of multiple linear regression was then used to estimate the influence of biological, obstetrics and socioeconomic factors on the ferritin levels at birth. RESULTS The median ferritin was 130.3 µg/L (n = 129, minimum = 16.4; maximum = 420.5 µg/L), the mean serum iron was 137.9 μg/dL (n = 144, SD = 39.29) and mean hemoglobin was 14.7 g/dL (n = 144, SD = 1.47). The median time of cord clamping was 36 seconds, ranging between 7 and 100. The bivariate analysis detected an association between ferritin levels and color of the child, timing clamping of 60 seconds, type of delivery, the presence of gestational diabetes and per capita family income. In multivariate analysis, the variables per capita income, number of antenatal visits and length at birth accounted for 22.0% of variation in ferritin levels. CONCLUSIONS Iron stores at birth were influenced by biological, obstetric and social characteristics. Tackling anemia should involve creating policies aimed at reducing social inequalities, improving the quality of antenatal care, as well as implementing a criterion of delayed clamping of the umbilical cord within the guidelines of labor. PMID:24789632

  13. Signatures of electronic correlations in iron silicide

    PubMed Central

    Tomczak, Jan M.; Haule, Kristjan; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    The intermetallic FeSi exhibits an unusual temperature dependence in its electronic and magnetic degrees of freedom, epitomized by the cross-over from a low-temperature nonmagnetic semiconductor to a high-temperature paramagnetic metal with a Curie–Weiss-like susceptibility. Many proposals for this unconventional behavior have been advanced, yet a consensus remains elusive. Using realistic many-body calculations, we here reproduce the signatures of the metal-insulator cross-over in various observables: the spectral function, the optical conductivity, the spin susceptibility, and the Seebeck coefficient. Validated by quantitative agreement with experiment, we then address the underlying microscopic picture. We propose a new scenario in which FeSi is a band insulator at low temperatures and is metalized with increasing temperature through correlation induced incoherence. We explain that the emergent incoherence is linked to the unlocking of iron fluctuating moments, which are almost temperature independent at short timescales. Finally, we make explicit suggestions for improving the thermoelectric performance of FeSi based systems. PMID:22328152

  14. Iron fortification of whole wheat flour reduces iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia and increases body iron stores in Indian school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Muthayya, Sumithra; Thankachan, Prashanth; Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Amalrajan, Vani; Thomas, Tinku; Lubree, Himangi; Agarwal, Dhiraj; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Hurrell, Richard F; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Kurpad, Anura V

    2012-11-01

    Wheat is the primary staple food for nearly one-third of the world's population. NaFeEDTA is the only iron (Fe) compound suitable for fortifying high extraction flours. We tested the hypothesis that NaFeEDTA-fortified, whole wheat flour reduces Fe deficiency (ID) and improves body Fe stores (BIS) and cognitive performance in Indian children. In a randomized, double-blind, controlled, school feeding trial, 6- to 15-y-old, Fe-depleted children (n = 401) were randomly assigned to either a daily wheat-based lunch meal fortified with 6 mg of Fe as NaFeEDTA or an otherwise identical unfortified control meal. Hemoglobin (Hb) and Fe status were measured at baseline, 3.5 mo, and 7 mo. Cognitive performance was evaluated at baseline and 7 mo in children (n = 170) at one of the study sites. After 7 mo, the prevalence of ID and ID anemia in the treatment group significantly decreased from 62 to 21% and 18 to 9%, respectively. There was a time x treatment interaction for Hb, serum ferritin, transferrin receptor, zinc protoporphyrin, and BIS (all P < 0.0001). Changes in BIS differed between the groups; it increased in the treatment group (0.04 ± 0.04 mmol/kg body weight) and decreased in the control group (-0.02 ± 0.04 mmol/kg body weight) (P < 0.0001). In sensory tests, NaFeEDTA-fortified flour could not be differentiated from unfortified flour. There were no significant differences in cognitive performance tests between the groups. NaFeEDTA-fortified wheat flour markedly improved BIS and reduced ID in Fe-depleted children. It may be recommended for wider use in national school feeding programs.

  15. Therapeutic Depletion of Iron Stores Is Not Associated with a Reduced Hemoglobin Mass in a Hemochromatosis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Nina; Pottgiesser, Torben; Birkner, Philipp; Deibert, Peter; Ahlgrim, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hereditary hemochromatosis features a dysregulated iron absorption leading to iron overload and organ damage. The regulation of total hemoglobin mass during depletion of iron deposits by therapeutic phlebotomy has not been studied. Case Presentation The initial ferritin level of the 52-year-old male subject was 1,276 μg/l. Despite successful depletion of iron stores (ferritinmin: 53 μg/l) through phlebotomies, total hemoglobin mass stabilized at the pretherapy level. However, regeneration of total hemoglobin mass was accelerated (up to 10.8 g/day). Conclusion In this hemochromatosis patient, the total hemoglobin mass was not altered in the long term, but regeneration was accelerated, possibly due to elevated body iron content. PMID:27721733

  16. Iron stores and obesity are negatively associated with ovarian volume and anti-Müllerian hormone levels in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jehn-Hsiahn; Chou, Chia-Hung; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Yang, Yu-Shih; Chen, Mei-Jou

    2015-12-01

    Obesity and insulin resistance are associated with increased iron stores, but have conflicting effects on ovarian reserve in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Iron-catalyzed oxidative stress might be detrimental to ovarian tissue and granulosa cell function. In this study we determined the association between body iron stores, obesity, and ovarian reserve in women with PCOS. One hundred and fifty-six women diagnosed with PCOS according to Rotterdam criteria and 30 normoweight healthy control women were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Ovarian volume, total antral follicle count, and the anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) level were measured as an indicator of ovarian reserve. Ferritin and transferrin-bound iron levels were significantly higher in women with PCOS than normoweight controls. Obese women with PCOS had higher ferritin levels (p = 0.006), but lower AMH levels (p < 0.0001) than nonobese women with PCOS. Using univariate analysis, the AMH level and mean ovarian volume were inversely related to the ferritin level, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and body mass index in women with PCOS. Body mass index and ferritin level remained significantly correlated with a lower AMH level and reduced ovarian volume, respectively, after considering other confounding variables. An elevated ferritin level and obesity were negatively associated with ovarian volume and the AMH level, respectively, in women with PCOS. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Elevated levels of iron in groundwater in Prey Veng province in Cambodia: a possible factor contributing to high iron stores in women.

    PubMed

    Karakochuk, Crystal D; Murphy, Heather M; Whitfield, Kyly C; Barr, Susan I; Vercauteren, Suzanne M; Talukder, Aminuzzaman; Porter, Keith; Kroeun, Hou; Eath, Many; McLean, Judy; Green, Timothy J

    2015-06-01

    Iron is a natural element found in food, water and soil and is essential for human health. Our aim was to determine the levels of iron and 25 other metals and trace elements in groundwater from 22 households in Prey Veng, Cambodia. Water analyses were conducted using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and optical emission spectrometry. Compared to the 2011 World Health Organization guidelines for drinking water quality, aluminum, iron and manganese exceeded maximum levels (in 4.5, 72.7 and 40.9% of samples, respectively). Compared to the 2004 Cambodian drinking water quality standards, iron and manganese exceeded maximum levels (in 59.1 and 36.4% of samples, respectively). We found no evidence of arsenic contamination. Guidelines for iron were established primarily for esthetic reasons (e.g. taste), whereas other metals and elements have adverse effects associated with toxicity. Iron in groundwater ranged from 134 to 5,200 μg/L (mean ∼1,422 μg/L). Based on a daily consumption of 3 L groundwater, this equates to ∼0.4-15.6 mg iron (mean ∼4.3 mg/day), which may be contributing to high iron stores and the low prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in Prey Veng women. Elevated levels of manganese in groundwater are a concern and warrant further investigation.

  18. Comparison of plasma ferritin concentration versus the ratio of plasma transferrin receptor to ferritin in estimating body iron stores: results of 4 intervention trials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: To develop global programs for the control of iron deficiency, simple, low-cost, accurate indicators of iron status are needed. Objectives: To compare estimates of body iron stores, as calculated from either plasma ferritin concentration alone (BI-ferritin) or the ratio of plasma transf...

  19. 76 FR 51041 - Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ...). Nonetheless, some donors, especially repeat and premenopausal female donors, can develop iron deficiency, with... reduce donor deferrals due to low hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and reduce iron deficiency that can result from blood donation. Different strategies to minimize iron deficiency in blood donors (e.g...

  20. Blood withdrawal affects iron store dynamics in primates with consequences on monoaminergic system function.

    PubMed

    Hyacinthe, C; De Deurwaerdere, P; Thiollier, T; Li, Q; Bezard, E; Ghorayeb, I

    2015-04-02

    Iron homeostasis is essential for the integrity of brain monoaminergic functions and its deregulation might be involved in neurological movement disorders such as the restless legs syndrome (RLS). Although iron metabolism breakdown concomitantly appears with monoaminergic system dysfunction in iron-deficient rodents and in RLS patients, the direct consequences of peripheral iron deficiency in the central nervous system (CNS) of non-human primates have received little attention. Here, we evaluated the peripheral iron-depletion impact on brain monoamine levels in macaque monkeys. After documenting circadian variations of iron and iron-related proteins (hemoglobin, ferritin and transferrin) in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of normal macaques, repeated blood withdrawals (RBW) were used to reduce peripheral iron-related parameter levels. Decreased serum iron levels were paradoxically associated with increased CSF iron concentrations. Despite limited consequences on tissue monoamine contents (dopamine - DA, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid - DOPAC, homovanillic acid, L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine - L-DOPA, 5-8 hydroxytryptamine - 5-HT, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid - 5-HIAA and noradrenaline) measured with post-mortem chromatography, we found distinct and region-dependent relationships of these tissue concentrations with CSF iron and/or serum iron and/or blood hemoglobin. Additionally, striatal extracellular DA, DOPAC and 5-HIAA levels evaluated by in vivo microdialysis showed a substantial increase, suggesting an overall increase in both DA and 5-HT tones. Finally, a trending increase in general locomotor activity, measured by actimetry, was observed in the most serum iron-depleted macaques. Taken together, our data are compatible with an increase in nigrostriatal DAergic function in the event of iron deficiency and point to a specific alteration of the 5-HT/DA interaction in the CNS that is possibly involved in the etiology of RLS.

  1. Prevention of Iron Overload and Long Term Maintenance of Normal Iron Stores in Thalassaemia Major Patients using Deferiprone or Deferiprone Deferoxamine Combination.

    PubMed

    Kolnagou, Annita; Kontoghiorghe, Christina N; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2017-07-01

    Decrease in mortality and morbidity is observed in thalassaemia major patients with reduced iron load in comparison to heavy iron loaded patients. Effective and complete treatment of transfusional iron overload can be achieved by chelation protocols that can eliminate excess iron and maintain normal iron stores (NIS). The maintenance of NIS, i. e., serum ferritin (350 μg/L >), MRI T2* cardiac (>20 ms) and liver (>6.3 ms) relaxation time levels was monitored in 16 thalassaemia major patients (32-53 years, 12 splenectomized, 10 male, erythrocyte transfusions 120-323 ml/kg/year) for about 90 patient years. The patients were treated with individualised tailor-made deferiprone or deferiprone/deferoxamine combination protocols. In 8 patients deferiprone (50-100 mg/kg/day) was sufficient for maintaining NIS and withdrawal of deferiprone for 28 months in total was necessary in 4 patients for preventing iron deficiency. In 3 other patients intermittent deferoxamine (50-75 mg/kg/8-30 h, 1-4 days/week) in combination with deferiprone (75-100 mg/kg/day) was sufficient for maintaining NIS. In the remaining 5 patients deferiprone (75-100 mg/kg/day) and deferoxamine (50-60 mg/kg/8-15 h, 1-7 days/week) combination was used for maintaining NIS, as a result of increased transfusions which were caused mainly by splenomegaly and infections. No toxic side effects were detected during the study. Lower chelation doses were used for the maintenance of NIS in comparison to iron loaded categories of patients. The safe maintenance of NIS using deferiprone and deferiprone/deferoxamine combinations should be considered as an optimum therapy for the complete treatment of iron overload in the majority of thalassaemia patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Dietary and stored iron as predictors of breast cancer risk: A nested case–control study in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Amber B.; Shannon, Jackilen; Chen, Chu; Lampe, Johanna W.; Ray, Roberta M.; Lewis, Sharon K.; Lin, Minggang; Stalsberg, Helge; Thomas, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Increases in risk of breast cancer in successive generations of migrants to the United States from China and rapid temporal changes in incidence rates in China following social and economic changes clearly implicate environmental factors in the etiology of this disease. Case–control and cohort studies have provided evidence that at least some of these factors may be dietary. Iron, an essential element necessary for cell function, has also been demonstrated to have potential carcinogenic and co-carcinogenic activities. Iron overload, which was previously uncommon, has become more common in the United States than iron deficiency and may be increasing in China concurrently with dramatic increases in meat consumption. A case–control study nested in a cohort of women in Shanghai, China, was conducted to evaluate possible associations between risk of proliferative and nonproliferative fibrocystic changes as well as breast cancer and dietary iron intake and plasma ferritin levels. Plasma ferritin levels and reported dietary iron intake were compared in 346 women with fibrocystic changes, 248 breast cancer cases and 1,040 controls. Increasing ferritin levels were significantly associated with increasing risk of nonproliferative fibrocystic changes (OR: 2.51, 95% CI: 1.16–5.45, p trend = 0.04). Similar, but weaker, trends were observed for proliferative changes and for breast cancer. Risk of breast cancer relative to the risk of fibrocystic changes was associated with dietary iron intake in women with nonproliferative fibrocystic changes (OR: 2.63, 95% CI: 1.04–6.68, p = 0.02). In conclusion, this study finds significant associations between iron (stored and dietary) and fibrocystic disease and breast cancer. PMID:19444907

  3. Association Between Meat and Meat-Alternative Consumption and Iron Stores in Early Childhood.

    PubMed

    Cox, Kelly Anne; Parkin, Patricia C; Anderson, Laura N; Chen, Yang; Birken, Catherine S; Maguire, Jonathon L; Macarthur, Colin; Borkhoff, Cornelia M

    To prevent iron deficiency, 2014 Canadian recommendations for healthy term infants from 6 to 24 months recommend iron-rich complementary foods such as meat and meat alternatives 2 or more times a day. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the association between meat and meat-alternative consumption and iron status in young children and the association between red meat consumption and iron status among children meeting recommendations. Healthy children aged 12 to 36 months were recruited. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Meat and meat-alternative consumption was measured using the NutriSTEP questionnaire. Adjusted multivariable regression analyses were used to evaluate an association between meat consumption and serum ferritin, and iron deficiency (serum ferritin <14 μg/L). A total of 1043 children were included. Seventy-three percent of children met the recommended daily intake of meat and meat alternatives, and 66% ate red meat in the past 3 days. Eating meat and meat alternatives was not associated with serum ferritin (0.13 μg/L, 95% confidence interval -0.05, 0.31, P = .16), but it was associated with a decreased odds of iron deficiency (odds ratio 0.97, 95% confidence interval 0.94, 0.99, P = .03). Associations between red meat consumption and iron status were not statistically significant. Statistically significant covariates associated with increased odds of iron deficiency included longer breast-feeding duration, daily cow's milk intake of >2 cups, and a higher body mass index z score. Daily cow's milk intake of >2 cups, longer breast-feeding duration, and a higher body mass index z score were modifiable risk factors associated with iron deficiency. Eating meat according to recommendations may be a promising additional target for the prevention of iron deficiency in early childhood. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of allogeneic 2-RBC apheresis on iron stores of Brazilian blood donors.

    PubMed

    Mendrone, Alfredo; Arrais, Cyntia Araújo; Almeida Neto, César; Gualandro, Sandra de Fátima Menocci; Dorlhiac-Llacer, Pedro Enrique; Chamone, Dalton de Alencar Fischer; Sabino, Ester Cerdeira

    2009-08-01

    One limiting factor for automated two-red blood cells collections (2-RBC) is its potential iron depletion. We analyzed hematological parameters and iron balance before, two and four months after 2-RBC of 96 non-supplemented male donors. Four months after 2-RBC, ferritin level was significantly lower (P<0.01) than baseline levels and the number of donors who presented ferritin <30 ng/ml increased from 18 to 47. We concluded that four months was not sufficient for iron recuperation in the population studied. In an attempt to avoid iron depletion after 2-RBC, we recommend augmentation in the interval between blood donations and pre-donation ferritin measurement.

  5. The phonological short-term store-rehearsal system: patterns of impairment and neural correlates.

    PubMed

    Vallar, G; Di Betta, A M; Silveri, M C

    1997-06-01

    Two left brain-damaged patients (L.A. and T.O.) with a selective impairment of auditory-verbal span are reported. Patient L.A. was unable to hold auditory-verbal material in the phonological store component of short-term memory. His performance was however normal on tasks requiring phonological judgements, which specifically involve the phonological output buffer component of the rehearsal process. He also showed some evidence that rehearsal contributed to the immediate retention of auditory-verbal material. Patient T.O. never made use of the rehearsal process in tasks assessing both immediate retention and the ability to make phonological judgements, but the memory capacity of the phonological short-term store was comparatively preserved. These contrasting patterns of impairment suggest that the phonological store component of verbal short-term memory was severely impaired in patient L.A., and spared, at least in part, in patient T.O. The rehearsal process was preserved in L.A., and primarily defective in T.O. The localisation of the lesions in the left hemisphere (L.A.: inferior parietal lobule, superior and middle temporal gyri; T.O.: sub-cortical premotor and rolandic regions, anterior insula) suggests that these two sub-components of phonological short-term memory have discrete anatomical correlates.

  6. Unified Picture for Magnetic Correlations in Iron-Based Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, W.G.; Lee, E.-C.; Ku, W.

    2010-09-02

    The varying metallic antiferromagnetic correlations observed in iron-based superconductors are unified in a model consisting of both itinerant electrons and localized spins. The decisive factor is found to be the sensitive competition between the superexchange antiferromagnetism and the orbital-degenerate double-exchange ferromagnetism. Our results reveal the crucial role of Hund's rule coupling for the strongly correlated nature of the system and suggest that the iron-based superconductors are closer kin to manganites than cuprates in terms of their diverse magnetism and incoherent normal-state electron transport. This unified picture would be instrumental for exploring other exotic properties and the mechanism of superconductivity in this new class of superconductors.

  7. Unified picture for magnetic correlations in iron-based superconductors.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wei-Guo; Lee, Chi-Cheng; Ku, Wei

    2010-09-03

    The varying metallic antiferromagnetic correlations observed in iron-based superconductors are unified in a model consisting of both itinerant electrons and localized spins. The decisive factor is found to be the sensitive competition between the superexchange antiferromagnetism and the orbital-degenerate double-exchange ferromagnetism. Our results reveal the crucial role of Hund's rule coupling for the strongly correlated nature of the system and suggest that the iron-based superconductors are closer kin to manganites than cuprates in terms of their diverse magnetism and incoherent normal-state electron transport. This unified picture would be instrumental for exploring other exotic properties and the mechanism of superconductivity in this new class of superconductors.

  8. A virus capsid-like nanocompartment that stores iron and protects bacteria from oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Colleen A; Fontana, Juan; Nemecek, Daniel; Cheng, Naiqian; Aksyuk, Anastasia A; Heymann, J Bernard; Winkler, Dennis C; Lam, Alan S; Wall, Joseph S; Steven, Alasdair C; Hoiczyk, Egbert

    2014-01-01

    Living cells compartmentalize materials and enzymatic reactions to increase metabolic efficiency. While eukaryotes use membrane-bound organelles, bacteria and archaea rely primarily on protein-bound nanocompartments. Encapsulins constitute a class of nanocompartments widespread in bacteria and archaea whose functions have hitherto been unclear. Here, we characterize the encapsulin nanocompartment from Myxococcus xanthus, which consists of a shell protein (EncA, 32.5 kDa) and three internal proteins (EncB, 17 kDa; EncC, 13 kDa; EncD, 11 kDa). Using cryo-electron microscopy, we determined that EncA self-assembles into an icosahedral shell 32 nm in diameter (26 nm internal diameter), built from 180 subunits with the fold first observed in bacteriophage HK97 capsid. The internal proteins, of which EncB and EncC have ferritin-like domains, attach to its inner surface. Native nanocompartments have dense iron-rich cores. Functionally, they resemble ferritins, cage-like iron storage proteins, but with a massively greater capacity (˜30,000 iron atoms versus ˜3,000 in ferritin). Physiological data reveal that few nanocompartments are assembled during vegetative growth, but they increase fivefold upon starvation, protecting cells from oxidative stress through iron sequestration. PMID:25024436

  9. Impairment of short-term memory associated with low iron stores in a volunteer multidose plateletpheresis donor.

    PubMed

    Page, E A; Harrison, J F; Jaldow, E J; Kopelman, M

    2008-10-01

    A platelet donor may lose 80-100 mL of blood both in the harness and by blood sampling at each donation, the equivalent of four to five whole blood donations per annum for a donor attending at 2-weekly intervals. A 54-year-old male multidose platelet donor had donated platelets at regular 2-weekly intervals for 6 years. He developed an impairment of anterograde memory (new learning). A self-rating scale revealed a moderate degree of depression [Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score 22]. Memory testing (Doors and People Memory Battery) showed low scores, particularly for verbal recall and verbal recognition memory. He was found to have a normal haemoglobin of 157 g L(-1) with normal red blood cell indices, but a low serum ferritin (15 ng mL(-1)) and a low serum iron (8.1 mmol L(-1)). Following iron therapy and a return of his iron stores to normal levels, there was an improved BDI score of 13 (minimal level of depression) and a marked improvement in memory test scores. This has been maintained even though he has resumed platelet donation but at reduced intervals.

  10. Evaluation of hemoglobin performance in the assessment of iron stores in feto-maternal pairs in a high-risk population: receiver operating characteristic curve analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; García-Arellano, Gisela; Méndez-Ramírez, Nereida; González-Llano, Óscar; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2015-01-01

    Objective By applying receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the objective of this study was to see whether hemoglobin levels reflect body iron stores in a group of pregnant women at term who, by using serum ferritin as the reference test, had a high pre-test probability of having iron deficiency anemia. Likewise, we evaluated the ability of hemoglobin and maternal serum ferritin levels to predict iron deficiency anemia in newborns. Methods Hemoglobin and serum ferritin were measured in 187 pregnant women at term belonging to a group with a high pre-test probability of iron deficiency anemia and their newborns. Women with Hb <11.0 g/dL and newborns with cord Hb <13.0 g/dL were classified as anemic. A serum ferritin <12.0 μg/L in women and a cord blood serum ferritin <35.0 μg/L were considered to reflect empty iron stores. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was applied to select the cut-off points that better reflected iron stores. Results The Hb cut-off point selected by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis in women was <11.5 g/dL (sensitivity: 60.82, specificity: 53.33%, Youden Index: 0.450). Most of the newborns had normal Hb which precluded this analysis. Maternal Hb <11.0 g/dL was the cut-off point that best reflected iron deficiency anemia in newborns (sensitivity: 55.88%, specificity: 57.24%, Youden Index: 0.217). The best cut-off point of maternal serum ferritin to reflect empty iron stores in newborns was <6.0 μg/L (sensitivity: 76.47%, specificity: 31.58%, Youden Index: 0.200). Conclusion Hemoglobin concentration performed poorly to detect iron deficiency anemia in women at term with high risk for iron deficiency and their newborns. PMID:26041420

  11. Correlation between liver iron concentration determined by magnetic resonance imaging and serum ferritin in adolescents with thalassaemia disease.

    PubMed

    Chuansumrit, Ampaiwan; Laothamathat, Jiraporn; Sirachainan, Nongnuch; Sungkarat, Witaya; Wongwerawattanakoon, Pakawan; Kumkrua, Patrapop

    2016-08-01

    MRI imaging is an alternative to serum ferritin for assessing iron overload in patients with thalassaemia disease. To correlate liver iron concentration (LIC) determined by MRI and clinical and biochemical parameters. An MRI study using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) tools to determine cardiac and liver iron was undertaken in adolescents with thalassaemia disease. Eighty-nine patients (48 males) with thalassaemia disease were enrolled. Seventy patients had been transfusion-dependent since a mean (SD) age of 3.8 (3.0) years, and 19 patients were not transfusiondependent. Mean (SD) haematocrit was 27.3 (2.9)%. Twenty-eight patients were splenectomized. Mean (SD) serum ferritin was 1673 (1506) μg/L. All transfusion-dependent patients received iron chelation at the mean (SD) age of 8.4 (3.5) years with either monotherapy of desferrioxamine, deferiprone, deferasirox or combined therapy of desferrioxamine and deferiprone, while only 5 of 19 patients who were not transfusion-dependent received oral chelation. The 89 patients underwent an MRI scan at the mean (SD) age of 14.8 (3.2) years. No patients had myocardial iron overload, but nine had severe liver iron overload, 27 had moderate liver iron overload, and 36 had mild liver iron overload. A significant correlation between liver T2* and serum ferritin was expressed as the equation: T2* (ms) = 28.080-7.629 log ferritin (μg/L) (r(2) 0.424, P = 0.0001). Patients with serum ferritin of >1000 to >2500 μg/L risked moderate and severe liver iron loading with the odds ratio ranging from 6.8 to 13.3 (95% CI 2.5-50.8). In thalassaemia, MRI is an alternative means of assessing iron stores, but when it is not available serum ferritin can be used to estimate liver T2*.

  12. Fermi surface and electron correlation effects of ferromagnetic iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, J.; Hoinkis, M.; Rotenberg, Eli; Blaha, P.; Claessen, R.

    2005-10-01

    The electronic band structure of bulk ferromagnetic iron is explored by angle-resolved photoemission for electron correlation effects. Fermi surface cross sections as well as band maps are contrasted with density functional calculations. The Fermi vectors and band parameters obtained from photoemission and their prediction from band theory are analyzed in detail. Generally good agreement is found for the Fermi surface. A bandwidth reduction for shallow bands of ˜30% is observed. Additional strong quasiparticle renormalization effects are found near the Fermi level, leading to a considerable mass enhancement. The role of electronic correlation effects and the electronic coupling to magnetic excitations is discussed in view of the experimental results.

  13. Property and process correlations for iron-enriched basalt waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Grandy, J.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

    1993-02-01

    Correlations of thermodynamic properties and process parameters of high-temperature slag for a range of compositions of iron-enriched basalt are presented. The quantification of the properties of this complex mixture can assist in the design and monitoring of high-temperature melting systems for the treatment of radioactive and hazardous wastes at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The buried and stored wastes at the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Complex have a similar composition to iron-enriched basalt after oxidation of organics. The properties correlated are the viscosity, electrical conductivity, refractory corrosion, and recrystallization temperature. The correlations are expressed as a function of input waste-soil mixture composition, alkali concentration, and slag temperature. An application to determine the effect of alkali flux on slag temperature, leach rate, and volume reduction is presented. Though the correlations are for mixtures of soil and waste with average transuranic-contaminated waste compositions, it appears that good approximations for other waste streams and glass-ceramic waste forms can be obtained because of similarities in composition.

  14. Decline in RNA integrity of dry-stored soybean seeds correlates with loss of germination potential.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Margaret B; Richards, Christopher M; Walters, Christina

    2017-04-12

    This study investigates the relationship between germination ability and damage to RNA in soybean seeds (cv 'Williams 82') stored dry at 5 °C for 1-27 years. Total germination of 14 age cohorts harvested between 2015 and 1989 ranged from 100% to 3%. Germination decline followed classic seed viability kinetics, with symptomatic seed aging beginning after 17 years of storage. RNA integrity was assessed in dry seeds by electrophoresis of total RNA, followed by calculation of the RNA integrity number (RIN, Agilent Bioanalyzer software), which evaluates RNA fragment size distributions. Analysis of RNA extracted from cotyledons, embryonic axes, plumules, and seed coats across the range of age cohorts showed consistent RNA degradation: older seeds had over-representation of small RNAs compared with younger seeds, which had nearly a 2:1 ratio of 25S and 18S rRNAs. RIN values for cotyledons and embryonic axes from the same seed were correlated. Decline in RIN tracked reduced germination, with a pronounced decrease in RIN after 17 years of storage. This led to a high correlation between the mean RIN of cotyledon RNA and the total germination percentage (R2=0.91, P<0.0001). Despite this relationship, germinable and non-germinable seeds within cohorts could not be distinguished unless the RIN was <3.5, indicating substantial deterioration. Our work demonstrates that seed RNA incurs damage over time, observable in fragment size distributions. Under the experimental conditions used here, RIN appears to be a promising surrogate for germination tests used to monitor viability of stored seeds.

  15. Metabolic pathways that correlate with post-transfusion circulation of stored murine red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    de Wolski, Karen; Fu, Xiaoyoun; Dumont, Larry J.; Roback, John D.; Waterman, Hayley; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Howie, Heather L.; Zimring, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells is a very common inpatient procedure, with more than 1 in 70 people in the USA receiving a red blood cell transfusion annually. However, stored red blood cells are a non-uniform product, based upon donor-to-donor variation in red blood cell storage biology. While thousands of biological parameters change in red blood cells over storage, it has remained unclear which changes correlate with function of the red blood cells, as opposed to being co-incidental changes. In the current report, a murine model of red blood cell storage/transfusion is applied across 13 genetically distinct mouse strains and combined with high resolution metabolomics to identify metabolic changes that correlated with red blood cell circulation post storage. Oxidation in general, and peroxidation of lipids in particular, emerged as changes that correlated with extreme statistical significance, including generation of dicarboxylic acids and monohydroxy fatty acids. In addition, differences in anti-oxidant pathways known to regulate oxidative stress on lipid membranes were identified. Finally, metabolites were identified that differed at the time the blood was harvested, and predict how the red blood cells perform after storage, allowing the potential to screen donors at time of collection. Together, these findings map out a new landscape in understanding metabolic changes during red blood cell storage as they relate to red blood cell circulation. PMID:26921359

  16. Metabolic pathways that correlate with post-transfusion circulation of stored murine red blood cells.

    PubMed

    de Wolski, Karen; Fu, Xiaoyoun; Dumont, Larry J; Roback, John D; Waterman, Hayley; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Howie, Heather L; Zimring, James C

    2016-05-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells is a very common inpatient procedure, with more than 1 in 70 people in the USA receiving a red blood cell transfusion annually. However, stored red blood cells are a non-uniform product, based upon donor-to-donor variation in red blood cell storage biology. While thousands of biological parameters change in red blood cells over storage, it has remained unclear which changes correlate with function of the red blood cells, as opposed to being co-incidental changes. In the current report, a murine model of red blood cell storage/transfusion is applied across 13 genetically distinct mouse strains and combined with high resolution metabolomics to identify metabolic changes that correlated with red blood cell circulation post storage. Oxidation in general, and peroxidation of lipids in particular, emerged as changes that correlated with extreme statistical significance, including generation of dicarboxylic acids and monohydroxy fatty acids. In addition, differences in anti-oxidant pathways known to regulate oxidative stress on lipid membranes were identified. Finally, metabolites were identified that differed at the time the blood was harvested, and predict how the red blood cells perform after storage, allowing the potential to screen donors at time of collection. Together, these findings map out a new landscape in understanding metabolic changes during red blood cell storage as they relate to red blood cell circulation.

  17. Weak-coupling superconductivity in a strongly correlated iron pnictide

    PubMed Central

    Charnukha, A.; Post, K. W.; Thirupathaiah, S.; Pröpper, D.; Wurmehl, S.; Roslova, M.; Morozov, I.; Büchner, B.; Yaresko, A. N.; Boris, A. V.; Borisenko, S. V.; Basov, D. N.

    2016-01-01

    Iron-based superconductors have been found to exhibit an intimate interplay of orbital, spin, and lattice degrees of freedom, dramatically affecting their low-energy electronic properties, including superconductivity. Albeit the precise pairing mechanism remains unidentified, several candidate interactions have been suggested to mediate the superconducting pairing, both in the orbital and in the spin channel. Here, we employ optical spectroscopy (OS), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), ab initio band-structure, and Eliashberg calculations to show that nearly optimally doped NaFe0.978Co0.022As exhibits some of the strongest orbitally selective electronic correlations in the family of iron pnictides. Unexpectedly, we find that the mass enhancement of itinerant charge carriers in the strongly correlated band is dramatically reduced near the Γ point and attribute this effect to orbital mixing induced by pronounced spin-orbit coupling. Embracing the true band structure allows us to describe all low-energy electronic properties obtained in our experiments with remarkable consistency and demonstrate that superconductivity in this material is rather weak and mediated by spin fluctuations. PMID:26729630

  18. Weak-coupling superconductivity in a strongly correlated iron pnictide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnukha, Aliaksei

    Iron-based superconductors have been found to exhibit an intimate interplay of orbital, spin, and lattice degrees of freedom, dramatically affecting their low-energy electronic properties, including superconductivity. Albeit the precise pairing mechanism remains unidentified, several candidate interactions have been suggested to mediate the superconducting pairing, both in the orbital and in the spin channel. Here, we employ optical spectroscopy (OS), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, ab initio band-structure, and Eliashberg calculations to show that nearly optimally doped NaFe0.978Co0.022As exhibits some of the strongest orbitally selective electronic correlations in the family of iron pnictides. Unexpectedly, we find that the mass enhancement of itinerant charge carriers in the strongly correlated band is dramatically reduced near the Γ point and attribute this effect to orbital mixing induced by pronounced spin-orbit coupling. Embracing the true band structure allows us to describe all low-energy electronic properties obtained in our experiments with remarkable consistency and demonstrate that superconductivity in this material is rather weak and mediated by spin fluctuations. A. Charnukha acknowledges financial support by the Alexander von Humboldt foundation.

  19. A Survival Strategy for Pseudomonas aeruginosa That Uses Exopolysaccharides To Sequester and Store Iron To Stimulate Psl-Dependent Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shan; Wei, Qing; Zhao, Tianhu; Guo, Yuan; Ma, Luyan Z

    2016-11-01

    Exopolysaccharide Psl is a critical biofilm matrix component in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which forms a fiber-like matrix to enmesh bacterial communities. Iron is important for P. aeruginosa biofilm development, yet it is not clearly understood how iron contributes to biofilm development. Here, we showed that iron promoted biofilm formation via elevating Psl production in P. aeruginosa The high level of iron stimulated the synthesis of Psl by reducing rhamnolipid biosynthesis and inhibiting the expression of AmrZ, a repressor of psl genes. Iron-stimulated Psl biosynthesis and biofilm formation held true in mucoid P. aeruginosa strains. Subsequent experiments indicated that iron bound with Psl in vitro and in biofilms, which suggested that Psl fibers functioned as an iron storage channel in P. aeruginosa biofilms. Moreover, among three matrix exopolysaccharides of P. aeruginosa, Psl is the only exopolysaccharide that can bind with both ferrous and ferric ion, yet with higher affinity for ferrous iron. Our data suggest a survival strategy of P. aeruginosa that uses exopolysaccharide to sequester and store iron to stimulate Psl-dependent biofilm formation.

  20. Decreased Serum Hepcidin Concentration Correlates with Brain Iron Deposition in Patients with HBV-Related Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Ying; He, Yi-Feng; Dai, Zhi; Chen, Cai-Zhong; Cheng, Wei-Zhong; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Excessive brain iron accumulation contributes to cognitive impairments in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related cirrhotic patients. The underlying mechanism remains unclear. Hepcidin, a liver-produced, 25-aminoacid peptide, is the major regulator of systemic iron metabolism. Abnormal hepcidin level is a key factor in some body iron accumulation or deficiency disorders, especially in those associated with liver diseases. Our study was aimed to explore the relationship between brain iron content in patients with HBV-related cirrhosis and serum hepcidin level. Methods Seventy HBV-related cirrhotic patients and forty age- sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Brain iron content was quantified by susceptibility weighted phase imaging technique. Serum hepcidin as well as serum iron, serum transferrin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, total iron binding capacity, and transferrin saturation were tested in thirty cirrhotic patients and nineteen healthy controls. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to investigate correlation between brain iron concentrations and serum hepcidin, or other iron parameters. Results Cirrhotic patients had increased brain iron accumulation compared to controls in the left red nuclear, the bilateral substantia nigra, the bilateral thalamus, the right caudate, and the right putamen. Cirrhotic patients had significantly decreased serum hepcidin concentration, as well as lower serum transferring level, lower total iron binding capacity and higher transferrin saturation, compared to controls. Serum hepcidin level negatively correlated with the iron content in the right caudate, while serum ferritin level positively correlated with the iron content in the bilateral putamen in cirrhotic patients. Conclusions Decreased serum hepcidin level correlated with excessive iron accumulation in the basal ganglia in HBV-related cirrhotic patients. Our results indicated that systemic iron overload underlined regional brain iron repletion. Serum

  1. Decreased serum hepcidin concentration correlates with brain iron deposition in patients with HBV-related cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dong; Ding, Jing; Liu, Jian-Ying; He, Yi-Feng; Dai, Zhi; Chen, Cai-Zhong; Cheng, Wei-Zhong; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Excessive brain iron accumulation contributes to cognitive impairments in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related cirrhotic patients. The underlying mechanism remains unclear. Hepcidin, a liver-produced, 25-aminoacid peptide, is the major regulator of systemic iron metabolism. Abnormal hepcidin level is a key factor in some body iron accumulation or deficiency disorders, especially in those associated with liver diseases. Our study was aimed to explore the relationship between brain iron content in patients with HBV-related cirrhosis and serum hepcidin level. Seventy HBV-related cirrhotic patients and forty age- sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Brain iron content was quantified by susceptibility weighted phase imaging technique. Serum hepcidin as well as serum iron, serum transferrin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, total iron binding capacity, and transferrin saturation were tested in thirty cirrhotic patients and nineteen healthy controls. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to investigate correlation between brain iron concentrations and serum hepcidin, or other iron parameters. Cirrhotic patients had increased brain iron accumulation compared to controls in the left red nuclear, the bilateral substantia nigra, the bilateral thalamus, the right caudate, and the right putamen. Cirrhotic patients had significantly decreased serum hepcidin concentration, as well as lower serum transferring level, lower total iron binding capacity and higher transferrin saturation, compared to controls. Serum hepcidin level negatively correlated with the iron content in the right caudate, while serum ferritin level positively correlated with the iron content in the bilateral putamen in cirrhotic patients. Decreased serum hepcidin level correlated with excessive iron accumulation in the basal ganglia in HBV-related cirrhotic patients. Our results indicated that systemic iron overload underlined regional brain iron repletion. Serum hepcidin may be a clinical

  2. Increased iron stores prolong the QT interval - a general population study including 20 261 individuals and meta-analysis of thalassaemia major.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Lise Fischer; Petri, Anne-Sofie; Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Kanters, Jørgen Kim; Ellervik, Christina

    2016-09-01

    The prolongation of cardiac repolarization (QT interval) has been investigated in studies of patients with secondary iron overload. However, no previous population-based study examining the effect of increased iron stores on QT interval prolongation has previously been undertaken. We tested the hypothesis that increased iron stores and haemochromatosis genotype (genetically increased iron stores) are associated with prolongation of the QT interval. We included 20 261 individuals from the Danish General Suburban Population Study and examined differences in QT interval according to ferritin concentration, transferrin saturation, iron concentration, transferrin concentration and haemochromatosis genotype (C282Y/C282Y). Furthermore, we performed a meta-analysis of case-control studies on thalassaemia major patients and QT interval. Age- and C-reactive protein-adjusted mean corrected QT (QTc) intervals for ferritin concentration ≥99% vs. ≥25-<50% percentile were 418·9 ms vs. 412·7 ms in men (P < 0·001) and 422·4 ms vs. 419·1 ms in women (P = 0·78). Corresponding values for transferrin saturation were 417·6 ms vs. 412·6 ms in men (P = 0·02) and 421·5 ms vs. 419·4 ms in women (P = 0·86). The associations were not explained by inflammation and haemochromatosis genotype was not associated with QT interval length. In conclusion, increased iron stores, independent of haemochromatosis genotype and inflammation, are associated with prolongation of the QTc interval in men. This is a novel finding. In addition, the meta-analysis showed prolonged QT interval in thalassaemia major patients compared to healthy controls. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Urinary Hepcidin Levels in Iron-Deficient and Iron-Supplemented Piglets Correlate with Hepcidin Hepatic mRNA and Serum Levels and with Body Iron Status

    PubMed Central

    Staroń, Robert; Van Swelm, Rachel P. L.; Lipiński, Paweł; Gajowiak, Anna; Lenartowicz, Małgorzata; Bednarz, Aleksandra; Gajewska, Małgorzata; Pieszka, Marek; Laarakkers, Coby M. M.; Swinkels, Dorine W.; Starzyński, Rafał R.

    2015-01-01

    Among livestock, domestic pig (Sus scrofa) is a species, in which iron metabolism has been most intensively examined during last decade. The obvious reason for studying the regulation of iron homeostasis especially in young pigs is neonatal iron deficiency anemia commonly occurring in these animals. Moreover, supplementation of essentially all commercially reared piglets with iron entails a need for monitoring the efficacy of this routine practice followed in the swine industry for several decades. Since the discovery of hepcidin many studies confirmed its role as key regulator of iron metabolism and pointed out the assessment of its concentrations in biological fluids as diagnostic tool for iron-related disorder. Here we demonstrate that urine hepcidin-25 levels measured by a combination of weak cation exchange chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (WCX-TOF MS) are highly correlated with mRNA hepcidin expression in the liver and plasma hepcidin-25 concentrations in anemic and iron-supplemented 28-day old piglets. We also found a high correlation between urine hepcidin level and hepatic non-heme iron content. Our results show that similarly to previously described transgenic mouse models of iron disorders, young pigs constitute a convenient animal model to explore accuracy and relationship between indicators for assessing systemic iron status. PMID:26323096

  4. Urinary Hepcidin Levels in Iron-Deficient and Iron-Supplemented Piglets Correlate with Hepcidin Hepatic mRNA and Serum Levels and with Body Iron Status.

    PubMed

    Staroń, Robert; Van Swelm, Rachel P L; Lipiński, Paweł; Gajowiak, Anna; Lenartowicz, Małgorzata; Bednarz, Aleksandra; Gajewska, Małgorzata; Pieszka, Marek; Laarakkers, Coby M M; Swinkels, Dorine W; Starzyński, Rafał R

    2015-01-01

    Among livestock, domestic pig (Sus scrofa) is a species, in which iron metabolism has been most intensively examined during last decade. The obvious reason for studying the regulation of iron homeostasis especially in young pigs is neonatal iron deficiency anemia commonly occurring in these animals. Moreover, supplementation of essentially all commercially reared piglets with iron entails a need for monitoring the efficacy of this routine practice followed in the swine industry for several decades. Since the discovery of hepcidin many studies confirmed its role as key regulator of iron metabolism and pointed out the assessment of its concentrations in biological fluids as diagnostic tool for iron-related disorder. Here we demonstrate that urine hepcidin-25 levels measured by a combination of weak cation exchange chromatography and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (WCX-TOF MS) are highly correlated with mRNA hepcidin expression in the liver and plasma hepcidin-25 concentrations in anemic and iron-supplemented 28-day old piglets. We also found a high correlation between urine hepcidin level and hepatic non-heme iron content. Our results show that similarly to previously described transgenic mouse models of iron disorders, young pigs constitute a convenient animal model to explore accuracy and relationship between indicators for assessing systemic iron status.

  5. Correlation between Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, Free Iron Content and Lipid Oxidation in Four Lines of Korean Native Chicken Meat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Chang-Yeon; Lee, Cheol-Koo

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to observe the association between antioxidant enzyme activity, free iron content and lipid oxidation of Korean native chicken (KNC) meat during refrigerated storage. Four lines of KNC (Yeonsan ogye, Hyunin black, Hoengseong yakdak and Hwangbong) were raised under similar conditions. A total of 16 roosters were randomly sampled and slaughtered at the age of 12 mon. The breast and thigh meats were stored aerobically for 10 d at 4℃. Although thigh meat had higher antioxidant enzyme activity, it was more susceptible to lipid oxidation and released more iron during storage than breast meat. Aerobic refrigerated storage for 10 d significantly decreased the activity of antioxidant enzymes and increased the amount of free iron and malondialdehyde. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were negatively correlated with lipid oxidation, whereas that of catalase was not. The amount of free iron was positively associated with lipid oxidation. We concluded that chicken line did not affect strongly on antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid oxidation in breast meat of KNC. However, the thigh meat of Hwangbong and Hyunin black had higher SOD and GSH-Px activity, respectively, and lower malondialdehyde contents than that of other chickens. SOD, GSH-Px and free iron play significant roles in meat lipid oxidation during refrigerated storage. PMID:27499663

  6. The relationship between body iron stores and blood and urine cadmium concentrations in US never-smoking, non-pregnant women aged 20-49 years

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, Carolyn M.; Chen, John J.; Kovach, John S.

    2011-07-15

    Background: Cadmium is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant associated with increased risk of leading causes of mortality and morbidity in women, including breast cancer and osteoporosis. Iron deficiency increases absorption of dietary cadmium, rendering women, who tend to have lower iron stores than men, more susceptible to cadmium uptake. We used body iron, a measure that incorporates both serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor, as recommended by the World Health Organization, to evaluate the relationships between iron status and urine and blood cadmium. Methods: Serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, urine and blood cadmium values in never-smoking, non-pregnant, non-lactating, non-menopausal women aged 20-49 years (n=599) were obtained from the 2003-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. Body iron was calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor, and iron deficiency defined as body iron <0 mg/kg. Robust linear regression was used to evaluate the relationships between body iron and blood and urine cadmium, adjusted for age, race, poverty, body mass index, and parity. Results: Per incremental (mg/kg) increase in body iron, urine cadmium decreased by 0.003 {mu}g/g creatinine and blood cadmium decreased by 0.014 {mu}g/L. Iron deficiency was associated with 0.044 {mu}g/g creatinine greater urine cadmium (95% CI=0.020, 0.069) and 0.162 {mu}g/L greater blood cadmium (95% CI=0.132, 0.193). Conclusions: Iron deficiency is a risk factor for increased blood and urine cadmium among never-smoking, pre-menopausal, non-pregnant US women, independent of age, race, poverty, body mass index and parity. Expanding programs to detect and correct iron deficiency among non-pregnant women merits consideration as a potential means to reduce the risk of cadmium associated diseases. - Highlights: {yields} Body iron was calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor. {yields} Body iron was inversely associated with blood

  7. Decline in RNA integrity of dry-stored soybean seeds correlates with loss of germination potential.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study investigates the relationship between germination ability and damage to RNA in soybean seeds (cv “Williams ‘82”) stored dry at 5 oC for 1 – 27 years. Total germination of 14 age cohorts harvested between 2015 and 1989 ranged from 100 to 3%. Germination decline followed classic seed viabil...

  8. Heme Oxygenase Activity Correlates with Serum Indices of Iron Homeostasis in Healthy Nonsmokers

    PubMed Central

    Ghio, Andrew J.; Schreinemachers, Dina M.

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirmed such participation of HO in iron homeostasis of humans. Carbon monoxide produced through HO activity will bind to hemoglobin in circulating erythrocytes, and therefore, blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) can be used as an index of HO activity. Using the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we tested the postulate that HO activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers. The investigation included 844 lifetime nonsmokers (586 females) 18 years of age and older in the study population. Significant correlations were demonstrated between COHb and several indices of iron homeostasis including serum levels of both ferritin and iron and percentage iron saturation of transferrin. There was no significant association between COHb and hemoglobin, the largest repository of heme in the human body, which functions as the substrate for HO. We conclude that HO activity contributes to human iron homeostasis with significant correlations between COHb and serum ferritin and iron levels and percentage iron saturation of transferrin. PMID:27199547

  9. Correlates of in-store promotions for beer: differential effects of market and product characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bray, Jeremy W; Loomis, Brett; Engelen, Mark

    2007-03-01

    We estimated the strength and direction of the association between product characteristics (beer type, package size, and brand name) and market-area socioeconomic characteristics, and promoted sales of beer in grocery stores. Supermarket scanner data from 64 market areas across the United States over 5 years were used to estimate regression models of the share of beer sales that are promoted, controlling for beer price, packaging, and type; and for market-level age, race/ethnicity, income, unemployment rate, and percentage of the population living in an alcohol control state. Large-volume units, such as 144-oz and 288-oz packages, are more likely to be promoted than smaller package sizes. Malt-liquor beverages are less likely to be promoted than non-malt-liquor beverages. Age, race/ethnicity, income, and geographic location of the market area are not significantly related to promoted beer sales. Marketing research has shown that in-store merchandising and promotions can substantially increase beer sales and that purchasing large package sizes may increase total consumption. Our results suggest that high levels of promoted sales for large-volume beer packages may result in increased beer consumption.

  10. Depletion of calcium stores in injured sensory neurons: anatomic and functional correlates.

    PubMed

    Gemes, Geza; Rigaud, Marcel; Weyker, Paul D; Abram, Stephen E; Weihrauch, Dorothee; Poroli, Mark; Zoga, Vasiliki; Hogan, Quinn H

    2009-08-01

    Painful nerve injury leads to disrupted Ca signaling in primary sensory neurons, including decreased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca storage. This study examines potential causes and functional consequences of Ca store limitation after injury. Neurons were dissociated from axotomized fifth lumbar (L5) and the adjacent L4 dorsal root ganglia after L5 spinal nerve ligation that produced hyperalgesia, and they were compared to neurons from control animals. Intracellular Ca levels were measured with Fura-2 microfluorometry, and ER was labeled with probes or antibodies. Ultrastructural morphology was analyzed by electron microscopy of nondissociated dorsal root ganglia, and intracellular electrophysiological recordings were obtained from intact ganglia. Live neuron staining with BODIPY FL-X thapsigargin (Invitrogen, Carlsbad, CA) revealed a 40% decrease in sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase binding in axotomized L5 neurons and a 34% decrease in L4 neurons. Immunocytochemical labeling for the ER Ca-binding protein calreticulin was unaffected by injury. Total length of ER profiles in electron micrographs was reduced by 53% in small axotomized L5 neurons, but it was increased in L4 neurons. Cisternal stacks of ER and aggregation of ribosomes occurred less frequently in axotomized neurons. Ca-induced Ca release, examined by microfluorometry with dantrolene, was eliminated in axotomized neurons. Pharmacologic blockade of Ca-induced Ca release with dantrolene produced hyperexcitability in control neurons, confirming its functional importance. After axotomy, ER Ca stores are reduced by anatomic loss and possibly diminished sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase. The resulting disruption of Ca-induced Ca release and protein synthesis may contribute to the generation of neuropathic pain.

  11. Depleted iron stores and iron deficiency anemia associated with reduced ferritin and hepcidin and elevated soluble transferrin receptors in a multiethnic group of preschool-age children.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Hope A; Jean-Philippe, Sonia; Cohen, Tamara R; Vanstone, Catherine A; Agellon, Sherry

    2015-09-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is prevalent in subgroups of the Canadian population. The objective of this study was to examine iron status and anemia in preschool-age children. Healthy children (n = 430, 2-5 years old, Montreal, Quebec, Canada) were sampled from randomly selected daycares. Anthropometry, demographics, and diet were assessed. Biochemistry included hemoglobin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptors (sTfR), ferritin index, markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)), and hepcidin. Iron deficiency and anemia cutoffs conformed to the World Health Organization criteria. Differences among categories were tested using mixed-model ANOVA or χ(2) tests. Children were 3.8 ± 1.0 years of age, with a body mass index z score of 0.48 ± 0.97, and 51% were white. Adjusted intakes of iron indicated <1% were at risk for deficiency. Hemoglobin was higher in white children, whereas ferritin was higher with greater age and female sex. Inflammatory markers and hepcidin did not vary with any demographic variable. The prevalence of iron deficiency was 16.5% (95% confidence interval (CI), 13.0-20.0). Three percent (95% CI, 1.4-4.6) of children had iron deficiency anemia and 12.8% (95% CI, 9.6-16.0) had unexplained anemia. Children with iron deficiency, with and without anemia, had lower plasma ferritin and hepcidin but higher sTfR, ferritin index, and IL-6, whereas those with unexplained anemia had elevated TNFα. We conclude that iron deficiency anemia is not very common in young children in Montreal. While iron deficiency without anemia is more common than iron deficiency with anemia, the correspondingly reduced circulating hepcidin would have enabled heightened absorption of dietary iron in support of erythropoiesis.

  12. Low iron stores are related to higher blood concentrations of manganese, cobalt and cadmium in non-smoking, Norwegian women in the HUNT 2 study

    SciTech Connect

    Margrete Meltzer, Helle; Lise Brantsaeter, Anne; Borch-Iohnsen, Berit; Ellingsen, Dag G.; Alexander, Jan; Thomassen, Yngvar; Stigum, Hein; Ydersbond, Trond A.

    2010-07-15

    Low iron (Fe) stores may influence absorption or transport of divalent metals in blood. To obtain more knowledge about such associations, the divalent metal ions cadmium (Cd), manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) and parameters of Fe metabolism (serum ferritin, haemoglobin (Hb) and transferrin) were investigated in 448 healthy, menstruating non-smoking women, age 20-55 years (mean 38 years), participating in the Norwegian HUNT 2 study. The study population was stratified for serum ferritin: 257 were iron-depleted (serum ferritin <12 {mu}g/L) and 84 had iron deficiency anaemia (serum ferritin <12 {mu}g/L and Hb<120 g/L). The low ferritin group had increased blood concentrations of Mn, Co and Cd but normal concentrations of Cu, Zn and Pb. In multiple regression models, ferritin emerged as the main determinant of Mn, Co and Cd (p<0.001), while no significant associations with Cu, Zn and Pb were found. Adjusted r{sup 2} for the models were 0.28, 0.48 and 0.34, respectively. Strong positive associations between blood concentrations of Mn, Co and Cd were observed, also when controlled for their common association with ferritin. Apart from these associations, the models showed no significant interactions between the six divalent metals studied. Very mild anaemia (110{<=}Hb<120 g/L) did not seem to have any effect independent of low ferritin. Approximately 26% of the women with iron deficiency anaemia had high concentrations of all of Mn, Co and Cd as opposed to 2.3% of iron-replete subjects. The results confirm that low serum ferritin may have an impact on body kinetics of certain divalent metal ions, but not all. Only a fraction of women with low iron status exhibited an increased blood concentration of divalent metals, providing indication of complexities in the body's handling of these metals.

  13. Low iron stores are related to higher blood concentrations of manganese, cobalt and cadmium in non-smoking, Norwegian women in the HUNT 2 study.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Helle Margrete; Brantsaeter, Anne Lise; Borch-Iohnsen, Berit; Ellingsen, Dag G; Alexander, Jan; Thomassen, Yngvar; Stigum, Hein; Ydersbond, Trond A

    2010-07-01

    Low iron (Fe) stores may influence absorption or transport of divalent metals in blood. To obtain more knowledge about such associations, the divalent metal ions cadmium (Cd), manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) and parameters of Fe metabolism (serum ferritin, haemoglobin (Hb) and transferrin) were investigated in 448 healthy, menstruating non-smoking women, age 20-55 years (mean 38 years), participating in the Norwegian HUNT 2 study. The study population was stratified for serum ferritin: 257 were iron-depleted (serum ferritin < 12 microg/L) and 84 had iron deficiency anaemia (serum ferritin < 12 microg/L and Hb < 120 g/L). The low ferritin group had increased blood concentrations of Mn, Co and Cd but normal concentrations of Cu, Zn and Pb. In multiple regression models, ferritin emerged as the main determinant of Mn, Co and Cd (p < 0.001), while no significant associations with Cu, Zn and Pb were found. Adjusted r(2) for the models were 0.28, 0.48 and 0.34, respectively. Strong positive associations between blood concentrations of Mn, Co and Cd were observed, also when controlled for their common association with ferritin. Apart from these associations, the models showed no significant interactions between the six divalent metals studied. Very mild anaemia (110 < or = Hb < 120 g/L) did not seem to have any effect independent of low ferritin. Approximately 26% of the women with iron deficiency anaemia had high concentrations of all of Mn, Co and Cd as opposed to 2.3% of iron-replete subjects. The results confirm that low serum ferritin may have an impact on body kinetics of certain divalent metal ions, but not all. Only a fraction of women with low iron status exhibited an increased blood concentration of divalent metals, providing indication of complexities in the body's handling of these metals. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. High Iron Stores in the Low Malaria Season Increase Malaria Risk in the High Transmission Season in a Prospective Cohort of Rural Zambian Children.

    PubMed

    Barffour, Maxwell A; Schulze, Kerry J; Coles, Christian L; Chileshe, Justin; Kalungwana, Ng'andwe; Arguello, Margia; Siamusantu, Ward; Moss, William J; West, Keith P; Palmer, Amanda C

    2017-08-01

    Background: Higher iron stores, defined by serum ferritin (SF) concentration, may increase malaria risk.Objective: We evaluated the association between SF assessed during low malaria season and the risk of malaria during high malaria season, controlling for inflammation.Methods: Data for this prospective study were collected from children aged 4-8 y (n = 745) participating in a biofortified maize efficacy trial in rural Zambia. All malaria cases were treated at baseline (September 2012). We used baseline SF and malaria status indicated by positive microscopy at endline (March 2013) to define exposure and outcome, respectively. Iron status was defined as deficient (corrected or uncorrected SF <12 or <15 μg/L, depending on age <5 or ≥5 y, respectively), moderate (<75 μg/L, excluding deficient), or high (≥75 μg/L). We used a modified Poisson regression to model the risk of malaria in the high transmission seasons (endline) as a function of iron status assessed in the low malaria seasons (baseline).Results: We observed an age-dependent, positive dose-response association between ferritin in the low malaria season and malaria incidence during the high malaria season in younger children. In children aged <6 y (but not older children), we observed a relative increase in malaria risk in the moderate iron status [incidence rate ratio (IRR) with SF: 1.56; 95% CI: 0.64, 3.86; IRR with inflammation-corrected SF: 1.92; 95% CI: 0.75, 4.93] and high iron status (IRR with SF: 2.66; 95% CI: 1.10, 6.43; or IRR with corrected SF: 2.93; 95% CI: 1.17, 7.33) categories compared with the deficient iron status category. The relative increase in malaria risk for children with high iron status was statistically significant only among those with a concurrently normal serum soluble transferrin receptor concentration (<8.3 mg/L; IRR: 1.97; 95% CI: 1.20, 7.37).Conclusions: Iron adequacy in 4- to 8-y-old children in rural Zambia was associated with increased malaria risk. Our findings

  15. A cohort study of haemoglobin and zinc protoporphyrin levels in term Zambian infants: effects of iron stores at birth, complementary food and placental malaria.

    PubMed

    van Rheenen, P F; de Moor, L T T; Eschbach, S; Brabin, B J

    2008-12-01

    To examine zinc-protoporphyrin (ZPP) and haemoglobin levels, and to determine predictors of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) in Zambian infants. Ninety-one women and their normal birth weight (NBW) infants were followed bi-monthly during the first 6 months of life, and iron status, food intake, malaria parasitaemia and growth were monitored. At 4 months, the infants were divided into two groups, and the data were analysed according to whether or not they were exclusively breastfed. Almost two-third of infants were born with low iron stores as defined by ZPP levels, and this proportion increased with age. Over 50% had developed IDA by 6 months. Exclusive breastfeeding at 4 months could be a protective factor for IDA (odds ratio (OR): 0.2; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.0-1.1). Exclusively breastfed infants had higher haemoglobin values at 4 and 6 months (mean difference 0.6; 95% CI: 0.1-1.2 g/dl and mean difference 0.9; 95% CI: 0.2-1.7 g/dl, respectively), compared with infants with early complementary feeding. In univariate analysis, past or chronic placental malaria appeared to be a predictor of IDA at 4 and 6 months, but the significance was lost in multivariate analysis. Zambian NBW infants are born with low iron stores and have a high risk to develop IDA in the first 6 months of life. Continuation of exclusive breastfeeding after 4 months is associated with a reduction of anaemia. The effect of placental malaria infection on increased risk of infant IDA could not be proven.

  16. The role of Hund's coupling in the correlations and the nematicity of iron superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bascones, Elena

    Since their discovery in 2008 the strength and the nature of correlations in iron superconductors have been widely discussed. Understanding the correlations is key to unveil the nature of the superconducting, nematic and magnetic instabilities which appear in the phase diagram. Due to their multi-orbital character, correlations in iron superconductors are strongly affected by Hund's coupling and these materials have been classified by some authors as Hund metals. For a long time there has been a strong controversy on the nature of correlations induced by Hund's coupling and its relation to Mott physics. While some authors describe Hund metals as strongly correlated systems which are not in proximity to a Mott insulating state, others, have described iron superconductors as doped Mott insulators. In the talk, after some introduction, I will first show our recent results which show that while the spin polarization of the atoms, promoted by Hund's coupling induces strong correlations, this does not necessary mean that the total charge is more localized. On the contrary, in some cases this polarization promotes itinerancy. I will then present a generic framework to address the correlations in iron superconductors and discuss the role of Hund's coupling in the nematicity of iron superconductors, with special emphasis on FeSe. Funding from Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología FIS2011-29689, FIS2014-53219-P and Fundacion Ramon Areces.

  17. Elective caesarean: does delay in cord clamping for 30 s ensure sufficient iron stores at 4 months of age? A historical cohort control study

    PubMed Central

    Hellström-Westas, Lena; Domellöf, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare iron stores in infants born after elective caesarean section (CS) and a 30 s delay of umbilical cord clamping with those born vaginally after early (≤10 s) or delayed (≥180 s) cord clamping. Design Prospective observational study with historical control. Setting Swedish county hospital. Population 64 infants born after elective CS were compared with a historical control of 166 early clamped and 168 delayed clamped after vaginal birth. Methods Blood and iron status were measured in blood samples collected at birth, 48–96 hours after birth, 4 and 12 months of age. Primary and secondary outcome measures Ferritin at 4 months of age was the primary outcome, second outcome measures were other indicators of iron status, and haemoglobin, at 4 and 12 months of age, as well as respiratory distress at 1 and 6 hours after birth. Results At 4 months infants born by elective CS had better iron status than those born vaginally subjected to early cord clamping, shown by higher adjusted mean difference of ferritin concentration (39 µg/L (95% CI 10 to 60)) and mean cell volume (1.8 fL (95% CI 0.6 to 3.0)); and lower levels of transferrin receptors (−0.39 mg/L (95% CI −0.69 to −0.08)). No differences were seen between infants born after elective CS and delayed clamped vaginally born infants at 4 months. No differences were found between groups at 12 months of age. Conclusions Waiting to clamp the umbilical cord for 30 s after elective CS results in higher iron stores at 4 months of age compared with early cord clamping after vaginal birth, and seems to ensure iron status comparable with those achieved after 180 s delayed cord clamping after vaginal birth. PMID:27807089

  18. Elective caesarean: does delay in cord clamping for 30 s ensure sufficient iron stores at 4 months of age? A historical cohort control study.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Ola; Hellström-Westas, Lena; Domellöf, Magnus

    2016-11-02

    To compare iron stores in infants born after elective caesarean section (CS) and a 30 s delay of umbilical cord clamping with those born vaginally after early (≤10 s) or delayed (≥180 s) cord clamping. Prospective observational study with historical control. Swedish county hospital. 64 infants born after elective CS were compared with a historical control of 166 early clamped and 168 delayed clamped after vaginal birth. Blood and iron status were measured in blood samples collected at birth, 48-96 hours after birth, 4 and 12 months of age. Ferritin at 4 months of age was the primary outcome, second outcome measures were other indicators of iron status, and haemoglobin, at 4 and 12 months of age, as well as respiratory distress at 1 and 6 hours after birth. At 4 months infants born by elective CS had better iron status than those born vaginally subjected to early cord clamping, shown by higher adjusted mean difference of ferritin concentration (39 µg/L (95% CI 10 to 60)) and mean cell volume (1.8 fL (95% CI 0.6 to 3.0)); and lower levels of transferrin receptors (-0.39 mg/L (95% CI -0.69 to -0.08)). No differences were seen between infants born after elective CS and delayed clamped vaginally born infants at 4 months. No differences were found between groups at 12 months of age. Waiting to clamp the umbilical cord for 30 s after elective CS results in higher iron stores at 4 months of age compared with early cord clamping after vaginal birth, and seems to ensure iron status comparable with those achieved after 180 s delayed cord clamping after vaginal birth. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Assessment of Iron Deposition in the Brain in Frontotemporal Dementia and Its Correlation with Behavioral Traits.

    PubMed

    Sheelakumari, R; Kesavadas, C; Varghese, T; Sreedharan, R M; Thomas, B; Verghese, J; Mathuranath, P S

    2017-08-24

    Brain iron deposition has been implicated as a major culprit in the pathophysiology of neurodegeneration. However, the quantitative assessment of iron in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and primary progressive aphasia brains has not been performed, to our knowledge. The aim of our study was to investigate the characteristic iron levels in the frontotemporal dementia subtypes using susceptibility-weighted imaging and report its association with behavioral profiles. This prospective study included 46 patients with frontotemporal dementia (34 with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and 12 with primary progressive aphasia) and 34 age-matched healthy controls. We performed behavioral and neuropsychological assessment in all the subjects. The quantitative iron load was determined on SWI in the superior frontal gyrus and temporal pole, precentral gyrus, basal ganglia, anterior cingulate, frontal white matter, head and body of the hippocampus, red nucleus, substantia nigra, insula, and dentate nucleus. A linear regression analysis was performed to correlate iron content and behavioral scores in patients. The iron content of the bilateral superior frontal and temporal gyri, anterior cingulate, putamen, right hemispheric precentral gyrus, insula, hippocampus, and red nucleus was higher in patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia than in controls. Patients with primary progressive aphasia had increased iron levels in the left superior temporal gyrus. In addition, right superior frontal gyrus iron deposition discriminated behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia from primary progressive aphasia. A strong positive association was found between apathy and iron content in the superior frontal gyrus and disinhibition and iron content in the putamen. Quantitative assessment of iron deposition with SWI may serve as a new biomarker in the diagnostic work-up of frontotemporal dementia and help distinguish frontotemporal dementia subtypes. © 2017

  20. In Vivo Assessment of Age-related Brain Iron Differences by Magnetic Field Correlation Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Adisetiyo, Vitria; Jensen, Jens H.; Ramani, Anita; Tabesh, Ali; Di Martino, Adriana; Fieremans, Els; Castellanos, Francisco X.; Helpern, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To assess a recently developed Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique called Magnetic Field Correlation (MFC) imaging along with a conventional imaging method, the transverse relaxation rate (R2), for estimating age-related brain iron concentration in adolescents and adults. Brain region measures were compared to non-heme iron concentrations (CPM) based on a prior postmortem study. Materials and Methods Asymmetric spin echo (ASE) images were acquired at 3T from 26 healthy individuals (16 adolescents, 10 adults). Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed in areas in which age-related iron content has been estimated post-mortem: globus pallidus (GP), putamen (PUT), caudate nucleus (CN), thalamus (THL) and frontal white matter (FWM). Regression and group analyses were conducted on ROI means. Results MFC and R2 displayed significant linear relationships to CPM when all regions were combined. Whereas MFC was significantly correlated with CPM for every individual region except FWM and detected significantly lower means in adolescents than adults for each region, R2 detected significant correlation and lower means for only PUT and CN. Conclusion Our results support the hypothesis that MFC is sensitive to brain iron in GM regions and detects age-related iron increases known to occur from adolescence to adulthood. MFC may be more sensitive than R2 to iron-related changes occurring within specific brain regions. PMID:22392846

  1. Transportation Safety of Lithium Iron Phosphate Batteries - A Feasibility Study of Storing at Very Low States of Charge.

    PubMed

    Barai, Anup; Uddin, Kotub; Chevalier, Julie; Chouchelamane, Gael H; McGordon, Andrew; Low, John; Jennings, Paul

    2017-07-11

    In freight classification, lithium-ion batteries are classed as dangerous goods and are therefore subject to stringent regulations and guidelines for certification for safe transport. One such guideline is the requirement for batteries to be at a state of charge of 30%. Under such conditions, a significant amount of the battery's energy is stored; in the event of mismanagement, or indeed an airside incident, this energy can lead to ignition and a fire. In this work, we investigate the effect on the battery of removing 99.1% of the total stored energy. The performance of 8Ah C6/LiFePO4 pouch cells were measured following periods of calendar ageing at low voltages, at and well below the manufacturer's recommended value. Battery degradation was monitored using impedance spectroscopy and capacity tests; the results show that the cells stored at 2.3 V exhibited no change in cell capacity after 90 days; resistance rise was negligible. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy results indicate that there was no significant copper dissolution. To test the safety of the batteries at low voltages, external short-circuit tests were performed on the cells. While the cells discharged to 2.3 V only exhibited a surface temperature rise of 6 °C, cells at higher voltages exhibited sparks, fumes and fire.

  2. Iron supplementation prevents a decline in iron stores and enhances strength performance in elite female volleyball players during the competitive season.

    PubMed

    Mielgo-Ayuso, Juan; Zourdos, Michael C; Calleja-González, Julio; Urdampilleta, Aritz; Ostojic, Sergej

    2015-06-01

    The primary aim of this study was to examine the effects of 11 weeks of iron supplementation on hematological and strength markers in elite female volleyball players. Twenty-two volleyball players (aged 27.0 ± 5.6 years) from 2 Spanish First National League teams participated and were counterbalanced into 1 of 2 groups based upon iron status: (i) control group (CG, n = 11); or (ii) iron treatment group (ITG, n = 11), which received 325 mg/day of ferrous sulphate daily. Subjects performed their team's regimen of training or match play every day. Both groups were tested for hematological and strength levels at 2 points: (i) baseline (T0, before preseason) and (ii) 11 weeks later (T11, post-testing). Hematological parameters were serum iron (sFe), serum ferritin (FER), transferrin saturation index (TSI), and hemoglobin (Hb); strength assessments were bench press, military press, half-squat, power clean, clean and jerk, and pull-over. CG experienced a significant decrease (p < 0.05) for sFe (T0, 112.7 ± 31.5; T11, 69.0 ± 20.5 μg·dL(-1); -33.9%), FER (T0, 60.2 ± 28.6; T11, 38.2 ± 16.4 ng·mL(-1); -34.6%), TSI (T0, 29.4% ± 9.5%; T11, 17.4% ± 5.1%; -35.3%), and Hb (T0, 14.1 ± 1.0; T11, 13.0 ± 0.8 g·L(-1); -7.44%); however, ITG experienced no changes (p > 0.05). Consequently, in ITG all hematological parameters were significantly greater (p < 0.05) than CG at T11. There was greater (p < 0.05) percent increase in the clean and jerk (CG: +5.1% ± 20.9 vs. ITG: +29.0% ± 21.3%), power clean (CG: -5.8% ± 30.3% vs. ITG: +44.6% ± 56.6%), and total mean strength (CG: +10.9% ± 3.2% vs. ITG: +26.2% ± 3.6%) in ITG. Our findings suggest that oral iron supplementation prevents iron loss and enhances strength in female volleyball players during the competitive season.

  3. Serum hepcidin concentrations correlate with serum iron level and outcome in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiao-Yi; Chen, Jing; Zhu, Wen-Yao; Zhao, Ting; Zhong, Qi; Zhou, Kai; Meng, Zhao-You; Wang, Yan-Chun; Wang, Peng-Fei; Fang, Huang; Yang, Qing-Wu

    2015-10-01

    Iron plays a detrimental role in the intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)-induced brain damage, while hepcidin is the most important iron-regulated hormone. Here, we investigate the association between serum hepcidin and serum iron, outcome in patients with ICH. Serum samples of 81 cases with ICH were obtained on consecutive days to detect the levels of hepcidin, iron, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (NIHSS) was measured at admission and on days 7 and 30, and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score was evaluated at 3 months after ICH. Additionally, the correlations of serum hepcidin with serum iron and the mRS score were analyzed by a generalized linear model. Higher serum hepcidin levels were detected in patients with poor outcomes (P < 0.001), and the mRS score increased by a mean of 1.135 points (95% CI 1.021-1.247, P < 0.001) for every serum hepcidin quartile after adjusting for other prognostic variables. Pearson correlation analysis showed that serum hepcidin was negatively correlated with serum iron (r = -0.5301, P < 0.001), and a significantly lower concentration of serum iron was found in patients with poor outcomes (P = 0.007). Additionally, serum hepcidin was independently correlated with mRS scores of ICH patients (OR 1.115, 95% CI 0.995-1.249, P = 0.021). Our results suggest that serum hepcidin is closely related to the outcome of patients with ICH and may be a biological marker for outcome prediction.

  4. Maternal Serum Ferritin Concentration Is Positively Associated with Newborn Iron Stores in Women with Low Ferritin Status in Late Pregnancy123

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jie; Lou, Jingan; Rao, Raghavendra; Georgieff, Michael K.; Kaciroti, Niko; Felt, Barbara T.; Zhao, Zheng-Yan; Lozoff, Betsy

    2012-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is common in pregnant women and infants, particularly in developing countries. The relation between maternal and neonatal iron status remains unclear. This study considered the issue in a large sample of mother-newborn pairs in rural southeastern China. Hemoglobin (Hb) and serum ferritin (SF) were measured in 3702 pregnant women at ≥37 wk gestation and in cord blood of their infants born at term (37–42 wk gestation). Maternal anemia (Hb <110 g/L) was present in 27.5% and associated with maternal SF <20 μg/L in 86.9%. Only 5.6% of neonates were anemic (Hb <130 g/L) and 9.5% had cord-blood SF <75 μg/L. There were low-order correlations between maternal and newborn iron measures (r = 0.07–0.10 for both Hb and SF; P ≤ 0.0001 due to the large number). We excluded 430 neonates with suggestion of inflammation [cord SF >370 μg/L, n = 208 and/or C-reactive protein (CRP) >5 mg/L, n = 233]. Piecewise linear regression analyses identified a threshold for maternal SF at which cord-blood SF was affected. For maternal SF below the threshold of 13.6 μg/L (β = 2.4; P = 0.001), cord SF was 0.17 SD lower than in neonates whose mothers had SF above the threshold (167 ± 75 vs. 179 ± 80 μg/L). The study confirmed that ID anemia remains common during pregnancy in rural southeastern China. Despite widespread maternal ID, however, iron nutrition seemed to meet fetal needs except when mothers were very iron deficient. The impact of somewhat lower cord SF on iron status later in infancy warrants further study. PMID:23014493

  5. Observation of universal strong orbital-dependent correlation effects in iron chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, M.; Liu, Z. -K.; Zhang, Y.; Yu, R.; Zhu, J. -X.; Lee, J. J.; Moore, R. G.; Schmitt, F. T.; Li, W.; Riggs, S. C.; Chu, J. -H.; Lv, B.; Hu, J.; Hashimoto, M.; Mo, S. -K.; Hussain, Z.; Mao, Z. Q.; Chu, C. W.; Fisher, I. R.; Si, Q.; Shen, Z. -X.; Lu, D. H.

    2015-07-23

    Establishing the appropriate theoretical framework for unconventional superconductivity in the iron-based materials requires correct understanding of both the electron correlation strength and the role of Fermi surfaces. This fundamental issue becomes especially relevant with the discovery of the iron chalcogenide superconductors. Here, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to measure three representative iron chalcogenides, FeTe0.56Se0.44, monolayer FeSe grown on SrTiO3 and K0.76Fe1.72Se2. We show that these superconductors are all strongly correlated, with an orbital-selective strong renormalization in the dxy bands despite having drastically different Fermi surface topologies. Furthermore, raising temperature brings all three compounds from a metallic state to a phase where the dxy orbital loses all spectral weight while other orbitals remain itinerant. As a result, these observations establish that iron chalcogenides display universal orbital-selective strong correlations that are insensitive to the Fermi surface topology, and are close to an orbital-selective Mott phase, hence placing strong constraints for theoretical understanding of iron-based superconductors.

  6. Observation of universal strong orbital-dependent correlation effects in iron chalcogenides

    DOE PAGES

    Yi, M.; Liu, Z. -K.; Zhang, Y.; ...

    2015-07-23

    Establishing the appropriate theoretical framework for unconventional superconductivity in the iron-based materials requires correct understanding of both the electron correlation strength and the role of Fermi surfaces. This fundamental issue becomes especially relevant with the discovery of the iron chalcogenide superconductors. Here, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to measure three representative iron chalcogenides, FeTe0.56Se0.44, monolayer FeSe grown on SrTiO3 and K0.76Fe1.72Se2. We show that these superconductors are all strongly correlated, with an orbital-selective strong renormalization in the dxy bands despite having drastically different Fermi surface topologies. Furthermore, raising temperature brings all three compounds from a metallic state to a phasemore » where the dxy orbital loses all spectral weight while other orbitals remain itinerant. As a result, these observations establish that iron chalcogenides display universal orbital-selective strong correlations that are insensitive to the Fermi surface topology, and are close to an orbital-selective Mott phase, hence placing strong constraints for theoretical understanding of iron-based superconductors.« less

  7. Observation of universal strong orbital-dependent correlation effects in iron chalcogenides

    PubMed Central

    Yi, M.; Liu, Z-K; Zhang, Y.; Yu, R.; Zhu, J.-X.; Lee, J.J.; Moore, R.G.; Schmitt, F.T.; Li, W.; Riggs, S.C.; Chu, J.-H.; Lv, B.; Hu, J.; Hashimoto, M.; Mo, S.-K.; Hussain, Z.; Mao, Z.Q.; Chu, C.W.; Fisher, I.R.; Si, Q.; Shen, Z.-X.; Lu, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    Establishing the appropriate theoretical framework for unconventional superconductivity in the iron-based materials requires correct understanding of both the electron correlation strength and the role of Fermi surfaces. This fundamental issue becomes especially relevant with the discovery of the iron chalcogenide superconductors. Here, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to measure three representative iron chalcogenides, FeTe0.56Se0.44, monolayer FeSe grown on SrTiO3 and K0.76Fe1.72Se2. We show that these superconductors are all strongly correlated, with an orbital-selective strong renormalization in the dxy bands despite having drastically different Fermi surface topologies. Furthermore, raising temperature brings all three compounds from a metallic state to a phase where the dxy orbital loses all spectral weight while other orbitals remain itinerant. These observations establish that iron chalcogenides display universal orbital-selective strong correlations that are insensitive to the Fermi surface topology, and are close to an orbital-selective Mott phase, hence placing strong constraints for theoretical understanding of iron-based superconductors. PMID:26204461

  8. Reduction of body iron stores to normal range levels in thalassaemia by using a deferiprone/deferoxamine combination and their maintenance thereafter by deferiprone monotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kolnagou, Annita; Kleanthous, Marios; Kontoghiorghes, George J

    2010-11-01

    Iron overload and toxicity is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in thalassaemia patients. New chelating drug protocols are necessary to treat completely transfusional iron overload and eliminate associated toxicity. Appropriate deferiprone/deferoxamine combinations could achieve this goal. A single-centre, single-armed, proof-of-concept study of the combination of deferiprone (75-100 mg/kg/d) and deferoxamine (40-60 mg/kg, at least 3 d per week) was carried out in eight patients with thalassaemia major (four men and four women) for 21-68 months. The patients were previously treated with deferoxamine and had variable serum ferritin [geometric (G) mean ± SD = 1446 ± 1035 μg/L] and magnetic resonance imaging relaxation times T2* cardiac (Gmean ± SD = 10.32 ± 6.72 ms) and liver (G mean ± SD = 3.77 ± 4.69 ms). The use of deferiprone (80-100 mg/kg/d) continued for 7-26 months in seven of the eight patients following the combination therapy. Organ function, blood and other biochemical parameters were monitored for toxicity.   The deferiprone/deferoxamine combination caused an absolute value increase in cardiac (G mean ± SD = 29.6 ± 6.6 ms, P < 0.00076) and liver (G mean ± SD = 25.9 ± 8.07 ms, P < 0.00075) T2* and reduction in serum ferritin (G mean ± SD = 114.7 ± 139.8 μg/L, P < 0.0052) to within the normal body iron store range levels. In two cases, normalisation was achieved within a year. Deferiprone monotherapy was sufficient thereafter in maintaining normal range cardiac (G mean ± SD = 31.4 ± 5.25 ms, P < 0.79) and liver (G mean ± SD = 26.2 ± 12.4 ms, P < 0.58) T2* and normal serum ferritin (G mean ± SD = 150.7 ± 159.1, μg/L, P < 0.17) in five of the seven patients. No serious toxicity was observed.   Transfusional iron overload in patients with thalassaemia could be reduced to normal body iron range levels using effective deferiprone/deferoxamine combinations. These levels could be maintained using deferiprone monotherapy. © 2010

  9. Correlation between blood lead concentration and iron deficiency in Iranian children.

    PubMed

    Keramati, Mohammad Reza; Manavifar, Lida; Badiee, Zahra; Sadeghian, Mohammad Hadi; Farhangi, Hamid; Mood, Mahdi Balali

    2013-09-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is the most common nutritional anaemia among children. Lead toxicity is a serious health threat, especially in developing countries due to environmental pollution. It was thus aimed to investigate correlation between blood lead concentration and iron deficiency in children of Mashhad, Iran. This cross sectional study was performed on children between 1 year and 10 years, in Imam Reza teaching hospital of Mashhad, Iran, in 2010. Indeed during complete blood count (CBC), we measured iron and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) by colorimetric methods, ferritin by radioimmune assay and blood lead concentration by atomic absorption method. Results were analysed by Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) (version 11.5), using statistical tests including independent sample t-test, Mann-Whitney U test, Spearman's test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Pearson's or Spearman's correlation coefficient. P value ≤ 0.05 was considered as a significant level. We studied 223 cases including 98 control children and 125 patients. All children had lead intoxication. Mean (±SD) blood lead concentration in the control group was 57.1 ± 25.3 (ranged 20-212) μg/dl and in the patient group was 57 ± 20.4 (ranged 10.9-159) μg/dl with no significant difference (P value = 0.713). We also did not find any correlation between blood lead concentration and haemoglobin, ferritin, iron, TIBC, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC), white blood cells (WBC) and platelets. Based on these results, no correlation was found between blood lead concentration and iron deficiency in the children. Because all children had lead intoxication, further studies in highly polluted and a comparison with a low polluted area are necessary to make a general conclusion.

  10. Plasma ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations and body iron stores identify similar risk factors for iron deficiency but result in different estimates of the national prevalence of iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia among women and children in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Engle-Stone, Reina; Nankap, Martin; Ndjebayi, Alex O; Erhardt, Juergen G; Brown, Kenneth H

    2013-03-01

    Available iron status indicators reflect different aspects of metabolism. We compared the prevalence and distribution of iron deficiency (ID) and iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) among Cameroonian women and children, as measured by plasma ferritin, and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, body iron stores (BIS), and hemoglobin, and evaluated the impact of adjustments for inflammation on these measures. In a nationally representative survey, we randomly selected 30 clusters in each of 3 zones (north, south, and large cities) and 10 households/ cluster, each with a child aged 12-59 mo and a woman 15-49 y. Ferritin and BIS were mathematically adjusted for inflammation, using plasma C-reactive protein and α(1)-acid glycoprotein both as continuous and categorical variables. Inflammation was present in 48.0% of children and 20.8% of women and anemia was diagnosed in 57.6% of children and 38.8% of women. Depending on the iron status indicator applied, the prevalence of ID ranged from 14.2 to 68.4% among children and 11.5 to 31.8% among women, and the prevalence of IDA ranged from 12.0 to 47.4% among children and 9.0 to 19.4% among women; the proportion of anemia associated with ID ranged from 20.8 to 82.3% among children and 23.2 to 50.0% among women. The different iron indicators generally identified similar groups at greatest risk of deficiency, using both conventional and derived cutoffs: younger children, pregnant women, and women and children in the north and rural areas. Research is needed to clarify the relationships between iron status indicators, particularly in the presence of inflammation, to harmonize global data on prevalence of ID.

  11. Correlated wave functions for the ground and some excited states of the iron atom.

    PubMed

    Buendía, E; Gálvez, F J; Sarsa, A

    2006-04-21

    We study the states arising from the [Ar]4s(2)3d6 and [Ar]4s(1)3d7 configurations of iron atom with explicitly correlated wave functions. The variational wave function is the product of the Jastrow correlation factor times a model function obtained within the parametrized optimized effective potential framework. A systematic analysis of the dependence of both the effective potential and the correlation factor on the configuration and on the term is carried out. The ground state of both, the cation, Fe+, and anion, Fe-, are calculated with correlated wave functions and the ionization potential and the electron affinity are obtained.

  12. Isn't it ironic? Neural correlates of irony comprehension in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Alexander M; Langohr, Karin; Mutschler, Dorothee E; Klingberg, Stefan; Wild, Barbara; Erb, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ironic remarks are frequent in everyday language and represent an important form of social cognition. Increasing evidence indicates a deficit in comprehension in schizophrenia. Several models for defective comprehension have been proposed, including possible roles of the medial prefrontal lobe, default mode network, inferior frontal gyri, mirror neurons, right cerebral hemisphere and a possible mediating role of schizotypal personality traits. We investigated the neural correlates of irony comprehension in schizophrenia by using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In a prosody-free reading paradigm, 15 female patients with schizophrenia and 15 healthy female controls silently read ironic and literal text vignettes during fMRI. Each text vignette ended in either an ironic (n = 22) or literal (n = 22) statement. Ironic and literal text vignettes were matched for word frequency, length, grammatical complexity, and syntax. After fMRI, the subjects performed an off-line test to detect error rate. In this test, the subjects indicated by button press whether the target sentence has ironic, literal, or meaningless content. Schizotypal personality traits were assessed using the German version of the schizotypal personality questionnaire (SPQ). Patients with schizophrenia made significantly more errors than did the controls (correct answers, 85.3% vs. 96.3%) on a behavioural level. Patients showed attenuated blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response during irony comprehension mainly in right hemisphere temporal regions (ironic>literal contrast) and in posterior medial prefrontal and left anterior insula regions (for ironic>visual baseline, but not for literal>visual baseline). In patients with schizophrenia, the parahippocampal gyrus showed increased activation. Across all subjects, BOLD response in the medial prefrontal area was negatively correlated with the SPQ score. These results highlight the role of the posterior medial prefrontal and right

  13. Isn’t it ironic? Neural Correlates of Irony Comprehension in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, Alexander M.; Langohr, Karin; Mutschler, Dorothee E.; Klingberg, Stefan; Wild, Barbara; Erb, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ironic remarks are frequent in everyday language and represent an important form of social cognition. Increasing evidence indicates a deficit in comprehension in schizophrenia. Several models for defective comprehension have been proposed, including possible roles of the medial prefrontal lobe, default mode network, inferior frontal gyri, mirror neurons, right cerebral hemisphere and a possible mediating role of schizotypal personality traits. We investigated the neural correlates of irony comprehension in schizophrenia by using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In a prosody-free reading paradigm, 15 female patients with schizophrenia and 15 healthy female controls silently read ironic and literal text vignettes during fMRI. Each text vignette ended in either an ironic (n = 22) or literal (n = 22) statement. Ironic and literal text vignettes were matched for word frequency, length, grammatical complexity, and syntax. After fMRI, the subjects performed an off-line test to detect error rate. In this test, the subjects indicated by button press whether the target sentence has ironic, literal, or meaningless content. Schizotypal personality traits were assessed using the German version of the schizotypal personality questionnaire (SPQ). Patients with schizophrenia made significantly more errors than did the controls (correct answers, 85.3% vs. 96.3%) on a behavioural level. Patients showed attenuated blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response during irony comprehension mainly in right hemisphere temporal regions (ironic>literal contrast) and in posterior medial prefrontal and left anterior insula regions (for ironic>visual baseline, but not for literal>visual baseline). In patients with schizophrenia, the parahippocampal gyrus showed increased activation. Across all subjects, BOLD response in the medial prefrontal area was negatively correlated with the SPQ score. These results highlight the role of the posterior medial prefrontal

  14. Orbital-dependent electron correlation effects in iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ming

    The iron chalcogenide superconductors constitute arguably one of the most intriguing families of the iron-based high temperature superconductors given their ability to superconduct at comparable temperatures as the iron pnictides, despite the lack of similarities in their magnetic structures and Fermi surface topologies. In particular, the lack of hole Fermi pockets at the Brillouin zone center posts a challenge to the previous proposal of spin fluctuation mediated pairing via Fermi surface nesting. In this talk, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements, I will present evidence that show that instead of Fermi surface topology, strong electron correlation observed in electron bandwidth is an important ingredient for superconductivity in the iron chalcogenides. Specifically, I will show i) there exists universal strong orbital-selective renormalization effects and proximity to an orbital-selective Mott phase in Fe1+yTe1-xSex, AxFe2-ySe2, and monolayer FeSe film on SrTiO3, and ii) in RbxFe2(Se1-zSz)2 , where sulfur substitution for selenium continuously suppresses superconductivity down to zero, little change occurs in the Fermi surface topology while a substantial reduction of electron correlation is observed in an expansion of the overall bandwidth, implying that electron correlation is one of the key tuning parameters for superconductivity in these materials.

  15. Correlation of change in R2* and phase with putative iron content in deep gray matter of healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Haacke, E. Mark; Miao, Yanwei; Liu, Manju; Habib, Charbel A.; Katkuri, Yashwanth; Liu, Ting; Yang, Zhihong; Lang, Zhijin; Hu, Jiani; Wu, Jianlin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To establish a correlation between putative iron content using susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) phase and T2* weighted magnitude values in the basal ganglia as a function of age in healthy human brains. Materials and methods 100 healthy adults (20-69 yr.; mean = 43 yr) were evaluated for this study using a gradient echo sequence. The original magnitude and high pass filtered phase data were analyzed as proxy variables for iron content in the substantia nigra, red nucleus, globus pallidus, putamen, caudate nucleus, thalamus and pulvinar thalamus. Each structure was broken into two parts, a high iron content region and a low iron content region. Results Both magnitude and phase data showed an increase in putative iron content with age. However, the high iron content region revealed two new pieces of information: both the average iron content per pixel and the area of high iron increased with age. Further, significant increase in iron uptake as a function of age was found past the age of 40. Conclusion A two region of interest analysis of iron is a much more sensitive means to evaluate iron content change over time. Contrary to the current belief that iron content increases level off with age, the putative iron deposition in region two is seen to increase with age. PMID:20815053

  16. Correlation of natural gas content to iron species in the New Albany shale group

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shiley, R.H.; Cluff, R.M.; Dickerson, D.R.; Hinckley, C.C.; Smith, Gerard V.; Twardowska, H.; Saporoschenko, Mykola

    1981-01-01

    Mo??ssbauer parameters were obtained for four Illinois Basin shales and their corresponding < 2??m clay fractions from wells drilled through the New Albany Shale Group in Henderson, Tazewell, and Effingham counties in Illinois and Christian County in Kentucky. Off-gas analysis indicated that the Illinois cores were in an area of low gas potential, while the Kentucky core was in an area of moderate-to-good potential. Iron-rich dolomite (ankerite) was found in the Kentucky core but not in the Illinois cores. In the Kentucky core, gas content could be correlated with the ankerite in the bulk sample, the Mo??ssbauer M (2) species in the clay fraction, and a ferrous iron species in the clay fraction. The location of the greatest concentration of natural gas in the Kentucky core could be predicted by following the changes in percentage concentration of these iron species when plotted against the depth of burial of the core sample. ?? 1981.

  17. Competing magnetic fluctuations in iron pnictide superconductors: Role of ferromagnetic spin correlations revealed by NMR

    DOE PAGES

    Wiecki, P.; Roy, B.; Johnston, D. C.; ...

    2015-09-22

    In the iron pnictide superconductors, theoretical calculations have consistently shown enhancements of the static magnetic susceptibility at both the stripe-type antiferromagnetic and in-plane ferromagnetic (FM) wave vectors. However, the possible existence of FM fluctuations has not yet been examined from a microscopic point of view. Here, using 75As NMR data, we provide clear evidence for the existence of FM spin correlations in both the hole- and electron-doped BaFe2As2 families of iron-pnictide superconductors. Furthermore, these FM fluctuations appear to compete with superconductivity and are thus a crucial ingredient to understanding the variability of Tc and the shape of the superconducting domemore » in these and other iron-pnictide families.« less

  18. Competing magnetic fluctuations in iron pnictide superconductors: Role of ferromagnetic spin correlations revealed by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Wiecki, P.; Roy, B.; Johnston, D. C.; Bud’ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Furukawa, Y.

    2015-09-22

    In the iron pnictide superconductors, theoretical calculations have consistently shown enhancements of the static magnetic susceptibility at both the stripe-type antiferromagnetic and in-plane ferromagnetic (FM) wave vectors. However, the possible existence of FM fluctuations has not yet been examined from a microscopic point of view. Here, using 75As NMR data, we provide clear evidence for the existence of FM spin correlations in both the hole- and electron-doped BaFe2As2 families of iron-pnictide superconductors. Furthermore, these FM fluctuations appear to compete with superconductivity and are thus a crucial ingredient to understanding the variability of Tc and the shape of the superconducting dome in these and other iron-pnictide families.

  19. Correlation of microstructure with the wear resistance and fracture toughness of white cast iron alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filipovic, M.; Kamberovic, Z.; Korac, M.; Gavrilovski, M.

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this investigation was to set down (on the basis of the results obtained by the examination of white cast iron alloys with different contents of alloying elements) a correlation between chemical composition and microstructure, on one hand, and the properties relevant for this group of materials, i.e., wear resistance and fracture toughness, on the other. Experimental results indicate that the volume fraction of the eutectic carbide phase (M3C or M7C3) have an important influence on the wear resistance of white iron alloys under low-stress abrasion conditions. Besides, the martensitic or martensite-austenitic matrix microstructure more adequately reinforced the eutectic carbides, minimizing cracking and removal during wear, than did the austenitic matrix. The secondary carbides which precipitate in the matrix regions of high chromium iron also influence the abrasion behaviour. The results of fracture toughness tests show that the dynamic fracture toughness in white irons is determined mainly by the properties of the matrix. The high chromium iron containing 1.19 wt% V in the as-cast condition, showed the greater fracture toughness when compared to other experimental alloys. The higher toughness was attributed to strengthening during fracture, since very fine secondary carbide particles were present mainly in an austenitic matrix.

  20. Multiscale correlations of iron phases and heavy metals in technogenic magnetic particles from contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiuling; Lu, Shenggao

    2016-12-01

    Technogenic magnetic particles (TMPs) are carriers of heavy metals and organic contaminants, which derived from anthropogenic activities. However, little information on the relationship between heavy metals and TMP carrier phases at the micrometer scale is available. This study determined the distribution and association of heavy metals and magnetic phases in TMPs in three contaminated soils at the micrometer scale using micro-X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) and micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure (μ-XANES) spectroscopy. Multiscale correlations of heavy metals in TMPs were elucidated using wavelet transform analysis. μ-XRF mapping showed that Fe was enriched and closely correlated with Co, Cr, and Pb in TMPs from steel industrial areas. Fluorescence mapping and wavelet analysis showed that ferroalloy was a major magnetic signature and heavy metal carrier in TMPs, because most heavy metals were highly associated with ferroalloy at all size scales. Multiscale analysis revealed that heavy metals in the TMPs were from multiple sources. Iron K-edge μ-XANES spectra revealed that metallic iron, ferroalloy, and magnetite were the main iron magnetic phases in the TMPs. The relative percentage of these magnetic phases depended on their emission sources. Heatmap analysis revealed that Co, Pb, Cu, Cr, and Ni were mainly derived from ferroalloy particles, while As was derived from both ferroalloy and metallic iron phases. Our results indicated the scale-dependent correlations of magnetic phases and heavy metals in TMPs. The combination of synchrotron based X-ray microprobe techniques and multiscale analysis provides a powerful tool for identifying the magnetic phases from different sources and quantifying the association of iron phases and heavy metals at micrometer scale.

  1. Oxidatively damaged guanosine in white blood cells and in urine of welders: associations with exposure to welding fumes and body iron stores.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Koch, Holger M; Marczynski, Boleslaw; Casjens, Swaantje; Käfferlein, Heiko U; Welge, Peter; Lehnert, Martin; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Behrens, Thomas; Raulf, Monika; Hartwig, Andrea; Weiss, Tobias; Brüning, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer considers the carcinogenicity of welding fume of priority for re-evaluation. Genotoxic effects in experimental animals are still inconclusive. Here, we investigated the association of personal exposure to metals in respirable welding fumes during a working shift with oxidatively damaged guanosine in DNA of white blood cells (WBC) and in postshift urine samples from 238 welders. Medians of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) were 2.35/10(6) dGuo in DNA of WBC and 4.33 µg/g creatinine in urine. The median of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo) was 7.03 µg/g creatinine in urine. The extent of both urinary parameters was higher in welders applying techniques with high particle emission rates to stainless steel than in tungsten inert gas welders (8-oxodGuo: 9.96 vs. 4.49 µg/L, 8-oxoGuo: 15.7 vs. 7.7 µg/L), but this apparent difference diminished after creatinine adjustment. We applied random intercept models to estimate the influence of airborne and systemic exposure to metals on oxidatively damaged guanosine in WBC and urine together with covariates. We observed a highly significant nonlinear association of urinary 8-oxoGuo with serum ferritin (P < 0.0001) and higher 8-oxoGuo concentrations for respirable iron >1,000 µg/m(3) compared to ≤57 µg/m(3). Similar effects were found for manganese. Airborne chromium but not nickel was associated with all oxidatively modified guanosine measures, whereas urinary chromium as well as nickel showed associations with urinary modified guanosines. In summary, oxidatively damaged urinary guanosine was associated with airborne and systemic exposure to metals in welders and showed a strong relation to body iron stores.

  2. Correlation between iron self-diffusion and thermal stability in doped iron nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayal, Akhil; Gupta, Mukul; Kumar, D.; Reddy, V. R.; Gupta, Ajay; Amir, S. M.; Korelis, Panagiotis; Stahn, Jochen

    2014-12-01

    Nanocrystalline Fe-X-N thin films (with doping X = 0, 3.1 at. % Al, 1.6 at. % Zr), were deposited using reactive ion beam sputtering. Magnetization study reveals that the deposited films exhibit a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Thermal stability of the films was investigated systematically and it was observed that the structural and the magnetic stability gets significantly enhanced with Al doping, whereas Zr doping has only a marginal effect. Fe self-diffusion, obtained using polarized neutron reflectivity, shows a suppression with both additives. A correlation between the thermal stability and the diffusion process gives a direct evidence that the enhancement in the thermal stability is primarily diffusion controlled. A combined picture of diffusion, structural, and magnetic stability has been drawn to understand the obtained results.

  3. Correlation between iron self-diffusion and thermal stability in doped iron nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Tayal, Akhil; Gupta, Mukul E-mail: dr.mukul.gupta@gmail.com; Kumar, D.; Reddy, V. R.; Gupta, Ajay; Amir, S. M.; Korelis, Panagiotis; Stahn, Jochen

    2014-12-14

    Nanocrystalline Fe-X-N thin films (with doping X = 0, 3.1 at. % Al, 1.6 at. % Zr), were deposited using reactive ion beam sputtering. Magnetization study reveals that the deposited films exhibit a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Thermal stability of the films was investigated systematically and it was observed that the structural and the magnetic stability gets significantly enhanced with Al doping, whereas Zr doping has only a marginal effect. Fe self-diffusion, obtained using polarized neutron reflectivity, shows a suppression with both additives. A correlation between the thermal stability and the diffusion process gives a direct evidence that the enhancement in the thermal stability is primarily diffusion controlled. A combined picture of diffusion, structural, and magnetic stability has been drawn to understand the obtained results.

  4. Correlated helium-3 and tungsten isotopes in iron meteorites: Quantitative cosmogenic corrections and planetesimal formation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowski, A.; Leya, I.; Quitté, G.; Ammon, K.; Halliday, A. N.; Wieler, R.

    2006-10-01

    Core formation in planetesimals can, in principle, be dated using the short-lived 182Hf- 182W chronometer. However, it has been predicted that burnout and production of W isotopes by nuclear reactions can substantially modify the compositions in iron meteorites when exposed for several hundred million years (Myr) to galactic cosmic-rays. This may severely limit the use of the Hf-W system for determining chronologies of metal segregation as recorded in iron meteorites. Here we present the first experimental evidence of cosmogenic effects on W isotopes in two magmatic iron meteorites, Carbo (IID) and Grant (IIIAB). The 182W/ 184W ratio near the pre-atmospheric centre of the meteorites is lower by ˜ 0.5 epsilon compared to values near the pre-atmospheric surface. The 182W/ 184W ratio displays excellent correlations with the 3He concentration, which in turn provides a proxy for the fluence of the relevant cosmic-ray particles. Using new nuclear physics parameters, a first order correction for cosmic-ray effects on W isotopes is proposed based on the 3He concentration and on an independent exposure age of the meteorite. This method is then applied to other magmatic iron meteorites (Negrillos, Cape of Good Hope, Navajo and Arispe). When corrected for cosmogenic effects the W isotopic compositions of Carbo, Grant, Negrillos, Cape of Good Hope, and Navajo are similar to the initial composition recorded in Allende CAIs. This shows that at least some magmatic meteorites from groups IIAB, IID, IIIAB, and IVB segregated within less than 1.2 Myr of the Hf-W system closure in Allende CAIs. The isotopic variations among the samples indicate that the iron meteorites studied in this paper segregated over a time interval of ˜ 4 Myr, Carbo being the oldest iron meteorites of this study.

  5. C-reactive protein, waist circumference, and family history of heart attack are independent predictors of body iron stores in apparently healthy premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Ortegón, M F; Arbeláez, A; Mosquera, M; Méndez, F; Aguilar-de Plata, C

    2012-08-01

    Ferritin levels have been associated with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prediction of ferritin levels by variables related to cardiometabolic disease risk in a multivariate analysis. For this aim, 123 healthy women (72 premenopausal and 51 posmenopausal) were recruited. Data were collected through procedures of anthropometric measurements, questionnaires for personal/familial antecedents, and dietary intake (24-h recall), and biochemical determinations (ferritin, C reactive protein (CRP), glucose, insulin, and lipid profile) in blood serum samples obtained. Multiple linear regression analysis was used and variables with no normal distribution were log-transformed for this analysis. In premenopausal women, a model to explain log-ferritin levels was found with log-CRP levels, heart attack familial history, and waist circumference as independent predictors. Ferritin behaves as other cardiovascular markers in terms of prediction of its levels by documented predictors of cardiometabolic disease and related disorders. This is the first report of a relationship between heart attack familial history and ferritin levels. Further research is required to evaluate the mechanism to explain the relationship of central body fat and heart attack familial history with body iron stores values.

  6. Strong electronic correlations in iron pnictides: Comparison of the optical spectra for BaFe2As2-related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Masamichi

    2014-03-01

    The role of electronic correlations in iron pnictides is one of the hottest issues in research of iron-based superconductors. Utilizing optical spectroscopy, we quantified the strength of electronic correlations in BaFe2As2-related compounds. For the parent compound BaFe2As2, the fraction of the coherent spectral weight in the low-energy optical conductivity spectrum is distinctly small. Such a spectral feature is also observed in KFe2As2, indicating that the charge dynamics is highly incoherent in iron arsenides. It is found that the strength of electronic correlations significantly changes by chemical substitution, either through changing the electron filling and/or the As-Fe-As bond angle. The present result indicates that superconductivity of the iron pnictides emerges when the materials possess adequate amount of electronic correlations, and that either too weak or too strong correlations are not favorable for high-Tc superconductivity. The degree of electronic correlations in iron arsenides turns out to be comparable to that in the hole-underdoped cuprate superconductors. In this sense, the iron arsenides are classified into strongly correlated systems, probably arising from the Hund's rule coupling. This work was done in collaboration with S. Ishida, K. Kihou, Y. Tomioka, C. H. Lee, A. Iyo, T. Ito, H. Eisaki (AIST), T. Tanaka, T. Kakeshita, S. Uchida (University of Tokyo), T. Saito, H. Fukazawa, and Y. Kohori (Chiba University).

  7. ARPES Study on the Strongly Correlated Iron Chalcogenides Fe1+ySexTe1-x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhongkai

    2014-03-01

    The level of electronic correlation has been one of the key questions in understanding the nature of iron-based superconductivity. Using Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES), we systematically investigated the correlation level in the iron chalcogenide family Fe1+ySexTe1-x. For the parent compound Fe1.02Te, we discovered ``peak-dip-hump'' spectra with heavily renormalized quasiparticles in the low temperature antiferromagnetic (AFM) state, characteristic of coherent polarons seen in other correlated materials with complex electronic and lattice interactions. As the temperature (or Se ratio x) increases and Fe1.02SexTe1-x is in the paramagnetic (PM) phase, we observed dissociation behavior of polarons, suggestive of connection between the weakening electron-phonon coupling and AFM. Further increase of x leads to an incoherent to coherent crossover in the electronic structure, indicating a reduction in the electronic correlation as the superconductivity emerges. Furthermore, the reduction of the electronic correlation in Fe1+ySexTe1-x evolves in an orbital-dependent way, where the dxy orbital is influenced most significantly. At the other end of the phase diagram (FeSe) where the single crystal is not stable, we have studied the MBE-grown thin film which also reveals orbital-dependent strong correlation in the electronic structure. Our findings provide a quantitative comprehension on the correlation level and its evolution on the phase diagram of Fe1+ySexTe1-x. We discuss the physical scenarios leading to strong correlations and its connection to superconductivity.

  8. Metabolic correlation between polyol and energy-storing carbohydrate under osmotic and oxidative stress condition in Moniliella megachiliensis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yosuke; Iwata, Hisashi; Yoshida, Junjiro; Ogihara, Jun; Kato, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2015-10-01

    Moniliella megachiliensis, the osmo-tolerant basidiomycetous yeast was found to accumulate intracellularly energy-storing carbohydrates (trehalose and glycogen) along with polyols (glycerol and erythritol) up to stationary growth phase. In trehalose-loaded cell, osmotic-stress resulted in the rapid generation of glycerol, and oxidative stress with menadione resulted in the rapid generation of erythritol. Under either of these conditions, the levels of the energy-storing carbohydrates were depleted, while little glucose uptake was observed. These results suggested that the intracellular pools of trehalose and glycogen were rapidly converted to glycerol in response to osmotic stress, and to erythritol in response to oxidative stress and altered redox balance. Expression of tps1 encoding trehalose synthetic enzymes paralleled trehalose accumulation in the cell during the culture in 2% glucose, in contrast, expression of tpp1 or tpp2 encoding trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase was little increased under the same condition. Expression of tre (tre1/tre2) encoding trehalose hydrolase (trehalase) increased with time associated with depletion of trehalose during oxidative stress. From these results, we concluded that glycerol and erythritol, the compatible solutes in M. megachiliensis were metabolically interrelated to energy-storing carbohydrates such as trehalose or glycogen during conditions of osmotic or oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Iron overload correlates with serum liver fibrotic markers and liver dysfunction: Potential new methods to predict iron overload-related liver fibrosis in thalassemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Man; Liu, Rongrong; Liang, Yuzhen; Yang, Gaohui; Huang, Yumei; Yu, Chunlan; Sun, Kaiqi; Xia, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background Early detection of liver fibrosis in thalassemia patients and rapid initiation of treatment to interfere with its progression are extremely important. Objective This study aimed to find a sensitive, easy-to-detect and noninvasive method other than liver biopsy for early detection of liver fibrosis in thalassemia patients. Methods A total of 244 Chinese Thalassemia patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia (NTDT, n = 105) or thalassemia major (TM, n = 139) and 120 healthy individuals were recruited into the present study, and blood collagen type IV (C IV), precollagen type III (PIIINPC) and hyaluronic acid (HA), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and ferritin were measured. Liver iron concentration was determined by MRI. The correlation of serum markers with liver iron load and liver function was evaluated. Results Serum C IV, PIIINPC and HA were significantly elevated in Chinese patients with NTDT and further elevated in TM patients. Moreover, C IV, PIIINPC and HA were also positively correlated to serum ferritin and liver iron concentration and further elevated during the progression to multi-organ damage in NTDT patients. Finally, serum ferritin and liver iron concentration were significantly correlated with liver dysfunction determined by AST and ALT. Conclusion Taken together, our results indicate that monitoring serum C IV, PIIINPC and HA is a potentially sensitive method to predict the risks for iron overload-related liver fibrosis in Chinese thalassemia patients. PMID:28405327

  10. Effects of electron correlations on transport properties of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Cohen, R E; Haule, K

    2015-01-29

    Earth's magnetic field has been thought to arise from thermal convection of molten iron alloy in the outer core, but recent density functional theory calculations have suggested that the conductivity of iron is too high to support thermal convection, resulting in the investigation of chemically driven convection. These calculations for resistivity were based on electron-phonon scattering. Here we apply self-consistent density functional theory plus dynamical mean-field theory (DFT + DMFT) to iron and find that at high temperatures electron-electron scattering is comparable to the electron-phonon scattering, bringing theory into agreement with experiments and solving the transport problem in Earth's core. The conventional thermal dynamo picture is safe. We find that electron-electron scattering of d electrons is important at high temperatures in transition metals, in contrast to textbook analyses since Mott, and that 4s electron contributions to transport are negligible, in contrast to numerous models used for over fifty years. The DFT+DMFT method should be applicable to other high-temperature systems where electron correlations are important.

  11. Doping dependence of spin excitations and its correlations with high-temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Chenglin; Lu, Xingye; Tan, Guotai; Luo, Huiqian; Song, Yu; Wang, Miaoyin; Zhang, Xiaotian; Goremychkin, E.A.; Perring, T.G.; Maier, T.A.; Yin, Zhiping; Haule, Kristjan; Kotliar, Gabriel; Dai, Pengcheng

    2013-01-01

    High-temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides occurs when electrons and holes are doped into their antiferromagnetic parent compounds. Since spin excitations may be responsible for electron pairing and superconductivity, it is important to determine their electron/hole-doping evolution and connection with superconductivity. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to show that while electron doping to the antiferromagnetic BaFe2As2 parent compound modifies the low-energy spin excitations and their correlation with superconductivity (<50 meV) without affecting the high-energy spin excitations (>100 meV), hole-doping suppresses the high-energy spin excitations and shifts the magnetic spectral weight to low-energies. In addition, our absolute spin susceptibility measurements for the optimally hole-doped iron pnictide reveal that the change in magnetic exchange energy below and above Tc can account for the superconducting condensation energy. These results suggest that high-Tc superconductivity in iron pnictides is associated with both the presence of high-energy spin excitations and a coupling between low-energy spin excitations and itinerant electrons. PMID:24301219

  12. Doping dependence of spin excitations and its correlations with high-temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Zhang, Chenglin; Lu, Xingye; Tan, Guotai; Luo, Huiqian; Song, Yu; Wang, Miaoyin; Zhang, Xiaotian; Goremychkin, E A; Perring, T G; Maier, T A; Yin, Zhiping; Haule, Kristjan; Kotliar, Gabriel; Dai, Pengcheng

    2013-01-01

    High-temperature superconductivity in iron pnictides occurs when electrons and holes are doped into their antiferromagnetic parent compounds. Since spin excitations may be responsible for electron pairing and superconductivity, it is important to determine their electron/hole-doping evolution and connection with superconductivity. Here we use inelastic neutron scattering to show that while electron doping to the antiferromagnetic BaFe₂As₂ parent compound modifies the low-energy spin excitations and their correlation with superconductivity (<50 meV) without affecting the high-energy spin excitations (>100 meV), hole-doping suppresses the high-energy spin excitations and shifts the magnetic spectral weight to low-energies. In addition, our absolute spin susceptibility measurements for the optimally hole-doped iron pnictide reveal that the change in magnetic exchange energy below and above T(c) can account for the superconducting condensation energy. These results suggest that high-T(c) superconductivity in iron pnictides is associated with both the presence of high-energy spin excitations and a coupling between low-energy spin excitations and itinerant electrons.

  13. Evaluation of carotid artery dynamics & correlation with cardiac & hepatic iron in β-thalassaemia patients.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Rashid H; Chate, Someshwar; Ahmed, Javed; Ahmad, Noor; Karnik, Alka; Jankaria, Bhavin

    2016-04-01

    Early atherosclerosis and vascular complication have been described in thalassaemia patients. There is lack of data or guidelines regarding monitoring of vascular health in thalassaemia. This study was conducted to compare carotid artery structural and functional indices such as carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT), stiffness index (SI) and Young's elastic modulus (YEM) in β-thalassemia patients with age and sex matched controls, and to correlate these parameters with serum ferritin, cardiac iron, and hepatic iron. This cross-sectional study included 53 β-thalassaemia patients receiving regular blood transfusions. Carotid artery indices such as CIMT, SI, and YEM were calculated by duplex ultrasound and colour Doppler. Serum ferritin levels were measured by chemiluminescence. Cardiac and hepatic iron estimation were done using MRI T2* sequences analyzed by a special thalassaemia software. Mean CIMT of cases and controls were 0.48 ± 0.04 and 0.44±0.02 mm, respectively and these were significantly different (P<0.001). Similarly significant differences were noted in SI and YEM of cases (2.45±0.79 and 96.12±34.85, respectively) as compared to controls (1.98±0.54 and 68.60±24.29, respectively) (p<0.001). There was significant inverse correlation between stiffness index and cardiac iron overload assessed by MRI cardiac T2* (p=0.03). Mean SI and YEM of cases were (2.1736 ± 0.2986 and 107.3± 41.6, respectively) significantly higher among non-splenectomized patients compared to splenectomized patients (2.0136 ± 0.263 and 86.9 ± 25.2, respectively) (p<0.05). CIMT and arterial stiffness indices were significantly increased in β-thalassaemia patients compared to controls which was indicative of early atherogenic changes. This study supports the hypothesis that iron overload is a risk factor for early atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease.

  14. Improving Detection of Iron Deposition in Cirrhotic Liver Using Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging With Emphasis on Histopathological Correlation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruo-Kun; Zeng, Meng-Su; Qiang, Jin-Wei; Palmer, Suzanne L; Chen, Frank; Rao, Sheng-Xiang; Chen, Ling-Li; Dai, Yong-Ming

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the value of susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) for detection and quantification of iron deposition in cirrhotic liver. Fifty-five cirrhotic patients underwent hepatic magnetic resonance imaging examination including SWI and multiecho T2*-weighted imaging (T2*WI). Detection of iron deposition and number of siderotic nodules were compared between SWI and T2*WI. Correlation among SWI phase value, T2* value, and hepatic iron concentration were determined. Susceptibility-weighted imaging significantly improved detection of iron deposition compared with T2*WI (90.7% vs 66.7%, P = 0.002), attributing to grade 1 (73.3% vs 26.7%, P = 0.027) and grade 2 (93.8% vs 56.3%, P = 0.037). Iron deposition of grade 3 and 4 could be detected by both SWI and T2*WI. The number of siderotic nodules visualized on SWI was significantly larger than that on T2*WI (107.5 ± 7.4 vs 62.7 ± 4.6, P = 0.002). There were significantly negative correlation between phase value and iron score (r = -0.803), and positive correlation between phase value and T2* value (r = 0.771). Susceptibility-weighted imaging can improve detection of minimal and mild iron deposition in cirrhotic liver.

  15. Significance of tests of iron nutrition in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Metz, J.; Turchetti, L.; Combrink, B.; Krawitz, S.

    1966-01-01

    Tests of iron and folate nutrition have been carried out in early pregnancy and at delivery in 63 Bantu females. Accepted normal values for serum iron, and percentage saturation of transferrin, but not for unsaturated iron-binding capacity, for non-pregnant subjects were found to apply equally well in pregnancy. Concomitant folate deficiency in early pregnancy did not render tests of iron deficiency less valid. The unsaturated iron-binding capacity, percentage saturation, and marrow iron stores in early pregnancy all showed a significant correlation with the haemoglobin value at term. Patients with normal marrow iron stores and a percentage saturation of transferrin of 20 or more at or before the 24th week are unlikely to become anaemic from iron deficiency during pregnancy. PMID:5909700

  16. Influence of the local-spin-density correlation functional on the stability of bcc ferromagnetic iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, D.; Clougherty, D. P.; MacLaren, J. M.; Albers, R. C.; Wang, C. S.

    1991-10-01

    The influence of local-spin-dependent correlation effects on the predicted stable ground-state phase of iron is reexamined with use of general-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave calculations. Differences in the form of the Vosko-Wilk-Nusair (VWN) local-spin-density functional used in previous studies are noted, since in previous studies significant additional approximations were made with respect to those of Vosko, Wilk, and Nusan [Can. J. Phys. 58, 1200 (1980)] and of MacLaren, Clougherty, and Albers [Phys. Rev. B 42, 3205 (1990)]. While the results of previous linear muffin-tin orbital calculations using the VWN functional predict a bcc ferromagnetic ground state, the present calculations show that the VWN spin-correlation effects fail to stabilize a bcc ground state. Considerable sensitivity to the form of the spin interpolation is found.

  17. XPCS study of dynamic correlation in polyurethane gel-carbonyl iron composite under magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriew, Helena; Wiegart, Lutz; Boczkowska, Anna; Mirkowska, Monika

    2010-10-01

    An X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) study of composite-type material consisting of polyurethane gel and carbonyl iron micrometric spheres was performed under magnetic fields of 0, 300 and 600 mT. The onion-like spheres structure was destroyed during the composite processing. The following conclusions were obtained from the study: -The polyurethane matrix is preferred as a source for the observed dynamic effects. -Below 300mT the material dynamics in direction of the outer magnetic field are very clear. -For 600 mT the dependence of the dynamics on magnetic field direction disappears, but the correlation rate is much higher. These findings may be caused by a disturbance of the polymer mesostructure by larger strain leading to its cross-linking.

  18. Storing acorns

    Treesearch

    Kristina. Connor

    2004-01-01

    We examined changes that occurred in acorns during storage at different temperatures and moisture contents over a period of 3 y. In general, we found that to achieve optimum viability, acorns must be stored fully hydrated. Acorns also survived longer and sprouted less while in storage if stored at –2 °C (28 °F) instead of the usual 4 °C (39 °F). However, we suspect...

  19. Correlation between the behavior of magnetic iron oxide particles in the lungs of rabbits and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Brain, J D; Bloom, S B; Valberg, P A; Gehr, P

    1984-01-01

    Five New Zealand white male rabbits were exposed (30 min; 300 mg/m3) to a submicrometric magnetic iron oxide aerosol (gamma-Fe2O3) produced by burning iron pentacarbonyl in a reducing atmosphere. After aerosol inhalation, an external magnetic field was applied to the rabbits to magnetize and align the ferrimagnetic particles within their lungs. After removal of the external field, a remanent magnetic field was detectable at the body surface. Using a flux-gate magnetometer probe in an enclosure shielded against external magnetic noise, the peak remanent field after magnetization was measured periodically during the next 6 weeks. After each magnetization, the strength of the remanent field decayed rapidly with time (relaxation). The mechanism responsible is particle rotation caused by tissue, cell, organelle, or Brownian movement. The rate of relaxation changed with time after particle inhalation, especially during the first day; changes in the relaxation rate correlated with an estimate of in situ particle phagocytosis during that time. Analysis of pulmonary lavage fluid from 15 rabbits into which radioactive gold-198 had been intratracheally instilled showed that, at 1 hr after instillation, 27% of the gold had been phagocytized, whereas at 16 hr 91% had been ingested. The strength of the magnetic field immediately after each magnetization (that is, before relaxation) was used to estimate the amount of iron oxide in the lungs. At 1 day after exposure, 96.8 +/- 8.8% (mean +/- standard error) of the initial dust was still present; at 10 days, 67.9 +/- 16.2%; and at 40 days, 16.0 +/- 4.6%. It is concluded that ferrimagnetic particles can serve as an easily measured, long-lasting marker that can be used for noninvasive studies of clearance and of particle phagocytosis and as a probe for intracellular processes such as organelle motion.

  20. Correlation between the behavior of magnetic iron oxide particles in the lungs of rabbits and phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Brain, J.D.; Bloom, S.B.; Valberg, P.A.; Gehr, P.

    1984-01-01

    Five New Zealand white male rabbits were exposed (30 min; 300 mg/m3) to a submicrometric magnetic iron oxide aerosol (gamma-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/) produced by burning iron pentacarbonyl in a reducing atmosphere. Using a flux-gate magnetometer probe in an enclosure shielded against external magnetic noise, the peak remanent magnetic field after magnetization was measured periodically during the next 6 weeks. After each magnetization, the strength of the remanent field decayed rapidly with time (relaxation). The mechanism responsible is particle rotation caused by tissue, cell, organelle, or Brownian movement. The rate of relaxation changed with time after particle inhalation, especially during the first day; changes in the relaxation rate correlated with an estimate of in situ particle phagocytosis during that time. Analysis of pulmonary lavage fluid from 15 rabbits into which radioactive gold-198 had been intratracheally instilled showed that, at 1 hr after instillation, 27% of the gold had been phagocytized, whereas at 16 hr 91% had been ingested. The strength of the magnetic field immediately after each magnetization (that is, before relaxation) was used to estimate the amount of iron oxide in the lungs. At 1 day after exposure, 96.8 +/- 8.8% (mean +/- standard error) of the initial dust was still present; at 10 days, 67.9 +/- 16.2%; and at 40 days, 16.0 +/- 4.6%. It is concluded that ferrimagnetic particles can serve as an easily measured, long-lasting marker that can be used for noninvasive studies of clearance and of particle phagocytosis and as a probe for intracellular processes such as organelle motion.

  1. Waste from grocery stores

    SciTech Connect

    Lieb, K.

    1993-11-01

    The Community Recycling Center, Inc., (CRC, Champaign, Ill.), last year conducted a two-week audit of waste generated at two area grocery stores. The stores surveyed are part of a 10-store chain. For two of the Kirby Foods Stores, old corrugated containers (OCC) accounted for 39-45% of all waste. The summary drew correlations between the amount of OCC and the sum of food and garbage waste. The study suggested that one can reasonably estimate volumes of waste based on the amount of OCC because most things come in a box. Auditors set up a series of containers to make the collection process straightforward. Every day the containers were taken to local recycling centers and weighed. Approximate waste breakdowns for the two stores were as follows: 45% OCC; 35% food waste; 20% nonrecyclable or noncompostable items; and 10% other.

  2. Correlation of microstructure and fracture toughness in high-chromium white iron hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Choo, S.H.; Kim, N.J.; Baek, E.R.; Ahn, S.

    1996-12-01

    A correlation is made of microstructure and fracture toughness in hypereutectic high-chromium white iron hardfacing alloys. In order to investigate the matrix effect of these alloys, in particular, four different matrices such as pearlite, austenite, and a mixture of pearlite and austenite were employed by changing the ratio of Mn/Si, while the total volume fraction of carbides was fixed. The hardfacing alloys were deposited twice on a mild steel plate by the self-shielding flux-cored arc-welding method. Fracture toughness was increased by increasing the volume fraction of austenite in the matrix, whereas hardness and abrasion resistance were nearly constant. In situ observation of the fracture process showed that cracks initiated at large primary carbides tended to be blocked at the austenitic matrix. This suggested that fracture toughness was controlled mainly by the amount of austenite in the matrix, thereby yielding the better toughness in the hardfacing alloy having the austenitic matrix. Considering both abrasion resistance and fracture toughness, therefore, the austenitic matrix was preferred for the high-chromium white iron hardfacing alloys.

  3. Correlation of microstructure and fracture toughness in high-chromium white iron hardfacing alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sunghak; Choo, Seong-Hun; Kim, Nack J.; Baek, Eung-Ryul; Ahn, Sangho

    1996-12-01

    A correlation is made of microstructure and fracture toughness in hypereutectic high-chromium white iron hardfacing alloys. In order to investigate the matrix effect of these alloys, in particular, four different matrices such as pearlite, austenite, and a mixture of pearlite and austenite were employed by changing the ratio of Mn/Si, while the total volume fraction of carbides was fixed. The hardfacing alloys were deposited twice on a mild steel plate by the self-shielding flux-cored arc-welding method. Fracture toughness was increased by increasing the volume fraction of austenite in the matrix, whereas hardness and abrasion resistance were nearly constant. In situ observation of the fracture process showed that cracks initiated at large primary carbides tended to be blocked at the austenitic matrix. This suggested that fracture toughness was controlled mainly by the amount of austenite in the matrix, thereby yielding the better toughness in the hardfacing alloy having the austenitic matrix. Considering both abrasion resistance and fracture toughness, therefore, the austenitic matrix was preferred for the high-chromium white iron hardfacing alloys.

  4. Correlation of mechanical properties with the acoustic properties in case of an experimental white cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gȋrneţ, A.; Stanciu, S.; Chicet, D.; Axinte, M.; Goanţă, V.

    2016-08-01

    The general and traditional opinion regarding the materials used to build bells, musical instruments or sound transmitters is that those materials must be only from the bronze alloyed with tin category. In order to approach this idea from a scientific point of view, the materials with acoustic properties must be analyzed starting from the physical theory and experimental determination that sound travels only through bodies with elastic properties. It has been developed an experimental white cast iron, medium alloyed with Cr and Ni, in order to obtain a material with special acoustic properties. There were determined on specific samples: the vibration damping capacity, the unit energy, the tensile strength and elasticity modulus. These properties were correlated with the properties of other known acoustic materials.

  5. Heme oxygenase activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirm...

  6. Heme oxygenase activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirm...

  7. Effects of weaning cereals with different phytate contents on hemoglobin, iron stores, and serum zinc: a randomized intervention in infants from 6 to 12 mo of age.

    PubMed

    Lind, Torbjörn; Lönnerdal, Bo; Persson, Lars-Ake; Stenlund, Hans; Tennefors, Catharina; Hernell, Olle

    2003-07-01

    Weaning foods frequently contain phytate, an inhibitor of iron and zinc absorption, which may contribute to the high prevalence of iron and zinc deficiency seen in infancy. The objective was to investigate whether either an extensive reduction in the phytate content of infant cereals or the use of milk-based, iron-fortified infant formula would improve iron and zinc status in infants. In a double-blind design, infants (n = 300) were randomly assigned to 3 cereal groups from 6 to 12 mo of age: commercial milk-based cereal drink (MCD) and porridge (CC group), phytate-reduced MCD and phytate-reduced porridge (PR group), or milk-based infant formula and porridge with the usual phytate content (IF group). Venous blood samples were collected at 6 and 12 mo. Dietary intake was recorded monthly. After the intervention, 267 infants remained in the analysis. Hemoglobin concentrations of < 110 g/L, serum ferritin concentrations of < 12 microg/L, and serum zinc concentrations of < 10.7 micromol/L had overall prevalences at baseline and 12 mo of 28% and 15%, 9% and 18%, and 22% and 27%, respectively. After the intervention, there were no significant differences in any measure of iron or zinc status between the CC and the PR groups. However, hemoglobin was significantly higher (120 g/L compared with 117 g/L; P = 0.012) and the prevalence of anemia was lower (13% compared with 23%; P = 0.06) in the PR group than in the IF group, which could be explained by differences in daily iron intake between the 2 groups. Extensive reduction in the phytate content of weaning cereals had little long-term effect on the iron and zinc status of Swedish infants.

  8. Role of iron in Trypanosoma cruzi infection of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lalonde, R G; Holbein, B E

    1984-01-01

    The role of iron in experimental infection of mice with Trypanosoma cruzi was investigated. B6 mice had a transient parasitemia and a transient anemia, both of maximal intensity 28 d after the inoculation of T. cruzi. There was a biphasic hypoferremic host response to infection with T. cruzi with the peak hypoferremia also occurring 28 d after inoculation of the parasite. The mortality rate from infection was increased from 23% in phosphate-buffered saline-treated B6 mice to 50% in a group of B6 mice receiving iron-dextran (P less than or equal to 0.025), whereas depletion of iron stores with the iron chelator desferrioxamine B and an iron-deficient diet provided complete protection of B6 mice (P less than or equal to 0.05). The mortality rate in the highly susceptible C3H strain was reduced from 100% in the control group to 45% (P less than or equal to 0.025) in the iron-depleted group. The tissue iron stores were altered in mice receiving either iron-dextran or desferrioxamine B and an iron-deficient diet. In vitro, T. cruzi was shown to require both a heme and a nonheme iron source for an optimal growth rate. The effects of iron excess or depletion on the outcome of infection with T. cruzi correlated both with the growth requirements of the parasite for iron and with the availability of intracellular iron. Thus, it was suggested that the hypoferremic response, by sequestering iron within intracellular stores, potentially enhanced the pathogenicity of the intracellular parasites. Furthermore, the in vivo effects of iron excess and depletion correlated with an effect of iron on the growth rate and pathogenicity of the parasite. PMID:6421877

  9. The capacity of Porphyromonas gingivalis to multiply under iron-limiting conditions correlates with its pathogenicity in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Grenier, D; Goulet, V; Mayrand, D

    2001-07-01

    Isolates of Porphyromonas gingivalis have various abilities to induce infections in an animal model. The hypothesis of this study was that pathogenic strains of P. gingivalis could multiply under iron-limiting conditions, while non-pathogenic strains could not. Three pathogenic strains (W50, W83, and ATCC 49417) grew to a final optical density (660 nm) > 2 in horse serum, while the growth of the 3 non-pathogenic strains (ATCC 33277, LB13D-2, and HW24D-1) was negligible. When an excess of hemin or ferric chloride was added to the serum, significant growth of the non-pathogenic strains occurred. Under iron-limiting conditions, the pathogenic strains of P. gingivalis had a much lower requirement for human iron-loaded transferrin and hemin than the non-pathogenic strains. Proteolytic degradation of transferrin, which may be associated with the release of iron, was not markedly different for pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. In addition, no relationship could be established between the level of 55Fe uptake from 55Fe-transferrin and the pathogenicity of strains. Our study provided evidence that the ability of P. gingivalis to multiply in vitro under iron-limiting conditions may be correlated with its ability to induce infections in an animal model. Isolates of P. gingivalis possessing a low requirement for iron are likely to have a higher potential for initiating periodontal infections.

  10. A unifying phase diagram with correlation-driven superconductor-to-insulator transition for the 122 series of iron chalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, X. H.; Chen, S. D.; Jiang, J.; Ye, Z. R.; Yu, T. L.; Xu, D. F.; Xu, M.; Feng, Y.; Yan, Y. J.; Xie, B. P.; Zhao, J.; Gu, D. C.; Sun, L. L.; Mao, Qianhui; Wang, Hangdong; Fang, Minghu; Zhang, C. J.; Hu, J. P.; Sun, Z.; Feng, D. L.

    2016-02-01

    The 122 series of iron chalcogenide superconductors, for example KxFe2 -ySe2 , only possesses electron Fermi pockets. Their distinctive electronic structure challenges the picture built upon iron pnictide superconductors, where both electron and hole Fermi pockets coexist. However, partly due to the intrinsic phase separation in this family of compounds, many aspects of their behavior remain elusive. In particular, the evolution of the 122 series of iron chalcogenides with chemical substitution still lacks a microscopic and unified interpretation. Using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, we studied a major fraction of 122 iron chalcogenides, including the isovalently "doped" KxFe2 -ySe2 -zSz,RbxFe2 -ySe2 -zTez , and (Tl,K) xFe2 -ySe2 -zSz . We found that the bandwidths of the low energy Fe 3 d bands in these materials depend on doping; and more crucially, as the bandwidth decreases, the ground state evolves from a metal to a superconductor, and eventually to an insulator, yet the Fermi surface in the metallic phases is unaffected by the isovalent dopants. Moreover, the correlation-driven insulator found here with small band filling may be a novel insulating phase. Our study shows that almost all the known 122-series iron chalcogenides can be understood via one unifying phase diagram which implies that moderate correlation strength is beneficial for the superconductivity.

  11. Correlation of 2-chlorobiphenyl dechlorination by Fe/Pd with iron corrosion at different pH.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuanxiang; Al-Abed, Souhail R

    2008-09-15

    The rate of 2-chlorobiphenyl dechlorination by palladized iron (Fe/ Pd) decreased with increasing pH until pH > 12.5. Iron corrosion potential (Ec) and current (jc), obtained from polarization curves of a rotating disk electrode of iron, followed the Tafel equation at pH < or = 5.5 and pH > or = 9.5. The pH dependence of the dechlorination rate constant (k1) suggests four pH regimes. In the low pH regime (3-5.5), /Ec/ and je decreased with increasing pH and k1 was linearly correlated to /Ec/ and jc0.5. The correlation between k1 and jc0.5 indicates direct involvement of active hydrogen species (on the Pd surface) in PCB dechlorination. In the mid pH regime (5.5-9.5), no significant effect of pH was evident on the values of k1, je, and Ec, a combined result of limiting anodic oxidation of iron to an intermediate product (iron hydroxide) and a proton-independent overall reaction. Both /Ec/ and jc increased significantly as pH increased from 9.5 to 14. A cleartrough of the k1 values in solutions of pH between 12 and 13 and the mismatch between the kinetic and corrosion data suggest two pH regimes (9.5-12.5 and 12.5-14) of different corrosion mechanisms.

  12. A GGA+U approach to effective electronic correlations in thiolate-ligated iron-oxo (IV) porphyrin.

    PubMed

    Elenewski, Justin E; Hackett, John C

    2012-09-28

    High-valent oxo-metal complexes exhibit correlated electronic behavior on dense, low-lying electronic state manifolds, presenting challenging systems for electronic structure methods. Among these species, the iron-oxo (IV) porphyrin denoted Compound I occupies a privileged position, serving a broad spectrum of catalytic roles. The most reactive members of this family bear a thiolate axial ligand, exhibiting high activity toward molecular oxygen activation and substrate oxidation. The default approach to such systems has entailed the use of hybrid density functionals or multi-configurational/multireference methods to treat electronic correlation. An alternative approach is presented based on the GGA+U approximation to density functional theory, in which a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functional is supplemented with a localization correction to treat on-site correlation as inspired by the Hubbard model. The electronic structure of thiolate-ligated iron-oxo (IV) porphyrin and corresponding Coulomb repulsion U are determined both empirically and self-consistently, yielding spin-distributions, state level splittings, and electronic densities of states consistent with prior hybrid functional calculations. Comparison of this detailed electronic structure with model Hamiltonian calculations suggests that the localized 3d iron moments induce correlation in the surrounding electron gas, strengthening local moment formation. This behavior is analogous to strongly correlated electronic systems such as Mott insulators, in which the GGA+U scheme serves as an effective single-particle representation for the full, correlated many-body problem.

  13. A GGA+U approach to effective electronic correlations in thiolate-ligated iron-oxo (IV) porphyrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elenewski, Justin E.; Hackett, John C.

    2012-09-01

    High-valent oxo-metal complexes exhibit correlated electronic behavior on dense, low-lying electronic state manifolds, presenting challenging systems for electronic structure methods. Among these species, the iron-oxo (IV) porphyrin denoted Compound I occupies a privileged position, serving a broad spectrum of catalytic roles. The most reactive members of this family bear a thiolate axial ligand, exhibiting high activity toward molecular oxygen activation and substrate oxidation. The default approach to such systems has entailed the use of hybrid density functionals or multi-configurational/multireference methods to treat electronic correlation. An alternative approach is presented based on the GGA+U approximation to density functional theory, in which a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functional is supplemented with a localization correction to treat on-site correlation as inspired by the Hubbard model. The electronic structure of thiolate-ligated iron-oxo (IV) porphyrin and corresponding Coulomb repulsion U are determined both empirically and self-consistently, yielding spin-distributions, state level splittings, and electronic densities of states consistent with prior hybrid functional calculations. Comparison of this detailed electronic structure with model Hamiltonian calculations suggests that the localized 3d iron moments induce correlation in the surrounding electron gas, strengthening local moment formation. This behavior is analogous to strongly correlated electronic systems such as Mott insulators, in which the GGA+U scheme serves as an effective single-particle representation for the full, correlated many-body problem.

  14. [Magnetic resonance evaluations of correlation of iron overload and osteoporosis in ovariectomized rats].

    PubMed

    Jin, Jiyang; Chen, Lingshan; Zhu, Zhengqiu; Wang, Yaling; Chen, Min; Wang, Qi; Peng, Xingui

    2015-02-17

    To explore the correlation between liver T(2)(*) value and bone mineral density (BMD) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. A total of 60 rats, including sham (n = 25) and OVX (n = 35) groups, underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and liver magnetic resonance (MR)-T(2)(*) mapping for lumbar vertebra BMD and T(2)(*) values before and after operation monthly for 4 timepoints. Also micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and biochemical measurements were performed. The sensitivity of liver T(2)(*) relaxation time detecting early osteoporosis were estimated and the correlation between liver T(2)(*) values and BMD analyzed. BMD of lumber vertebra in OVX group decreased compared to control group at Month 2 postoperation ((554 ± 27) mg/cm³ vs (722 ± 19) mg/cm³, P < 0.05) in synchrony with an elevation of serum ferritin concentration ((521 ± 41) ng/ml vs (441 ± 29) ng/ml, P < 0.01) and liver iron concentration ((291 ± 18) µg/g vs (237 ± 27) µg/g, P < 0.01). A significant inter-group difference of liver T(2)(*) was detected at Month 1 postoperation ((13.2 ± 0.7) ms vs (13.9 ± 0.4) ms, P < 0.01). Liver T(2)(*) was significant positively correlated with BMD in sham group (r = 0.410, P < 0.01) and OVX group (r = 0.434, P < 0.01). Liver T(2)(*) relaxation time may a valuable detection tool of assessing pathophysiological changes of osteoporosis in early stage.

  15. Storing Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Chupas, Peter; Proffen, Thomas E.

    2010-05-31

    Researchers have been studying mesoporous materials for almost two decades with a view to using them as hosts for small molecules and scaffolds for molding organic compounds into new hybrid materials and nanoparticles. Their use as potential storage systems for large quantities of hydrogen has also been mooted. Such systems that might hold large quantities of hydrogen safely and in a very compact volume would have enormous potential for powering fuel cell vehicles, for instance. A sponge-like form of silicon dioxide, the stuff of sand particles and computer chips, can soak up and store other compounds including hydrogen. Studies carried out at the XOR/BESSRC 11-ID-B beamline at the APS have revealed that the nanoscopic properties of the hydrogenrich compound ammonia borane help it store hydrogen more efficiently than usual. The material may have potential for addressing the storage issues associated with a future hydrogen economy. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  16. Fibrosis in Chronic Hepatitis C: Correlation between Immunohistochemically-Assessed Virus Load with Steatosis and Cellular Iron Content

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Maha; Hindawi, Ali EL; Mosaad, Maha; Montasser, Ahmed; Ray, Ahmed El; Khalil, Heba; Anas, Amgad; Atta, Raffat; Paradis, Valerie; Hadi, Ahmed Abdel; Hammam, Olfat

    2016-01-01

    AIM: We aimed study impact of hepatocytic viral load, steatosis, and iron load on fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C and role of VEGF and VEGFR overexpression in cirrhotic cases in evolving HCC. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Total of 120 cases were included from TBRI and Beaujon Hospital as chronic hepatitis C (CHC), post-hepatitis C cirrhosis, and HCC. Cases of CHC were stained for Sirius red, Prussian blue and immunohistochemically (IHC) for HCV-NS3/NS4. HCC were stained IHC for VEGF and by FISH. RESULTS: Stage of fibrosis was significantly correlated with inflammation in CHC (P < 0.01). Noticed iron load did not correlate with fibrosis. Steatosis was associated with higher inflammation and fibrosis. The cellular viral load did not correlate with inflammation, steatosis or fibrosis. VEGF by IHC was significantly higher in cases of HCC when compared to cirrhotic group (P < 0.001). Amplification of VEGFR2 was confirmed in 40% of cases of HCC. Scoring of VEGF by IHC was the good indicator of VEGFR2 amplification by FISH (P < 0.005). CONCLUSION: Grade of inflammation is the factor affecting fibrosis in CHC. The degree of liver damage is not related to cellular viral load or iron load. Steatosis is associated with higher inflammation and fibrosis. VEGF by IHC is correlated with overexpression of VEGFR2 by FISH. PMID:28028394

  17. Oily fish increases iron bioavailability of a phytate rich meal in young iron deficient women.

    PubMed

    Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Pérez-Granados, Ana M; Sarriá, Beatriz; Carbajal, Angeles; Pedrosa, Mercedes M; Roe, Mark A; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J; Vaquero, M Pilar

    2008-02-01

    Iron deficiency is a major health problem worldwide, and is associated with diets of low iron bioavailability. Non-heme iron absorption is modulated by dietary constituents, one of which is the so-called "meat factor", present in meat, fish (oily and lean) and poultry, which is an important enhancer of iron absorption in humans. Food processing also affects iron bioavailability. To evaluate the effect of consuming sous vide cooked salmon fish on non-heme iron bioavailability from a bean meal, rich in phytate, in iron-deficient women. Randomized crossover trial in 21 young women with low iron stores (ferritin < 30 microg/L). Two test meals were extrinsically labelled with stable isotopes of iron (Fe-57 or Fe-58). Iron bioavailability was measured as the incorporation of stable isotopes into erythrocytes 14 d after meals consumption. The addition of fish to the bean meal significantly increased (p < 0.001) iron absorption. Serum ferritin concentration and iron absorption were inversely correlated for both the bean meal (R(2) = 0.294, p = 0.011) and the fish and bean meal (R(2) = 0.401, p = 0.002). Sous vide cooked salmon fish increases iron absorption from a high phytate bean meal in humans.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Hepatic Storage Iron in Transfusional Iron Overload

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Haiying; Jensen, Jens H.; Sammet, Christina L.; Sheth, Sujit; Swaminathan, Srirama V.; Hultman, Kristi; Kim, Daniel; Wu, Ed X.; Brown, Truman R.; Brittenham, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To quantify the two principal forms of hepatic storage iron, diffuse, soluble iron (primarily ferritin), and aggregated, insoluble iron (primarily hemosiderin) using a new MRI method in patients with transfusional iron overload. Materials and Methods Six healthy volunteers and twenty patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia syndromes and iron overload were examined. Ferritin- and hemosiderin-like iron were determined based on the measurement of two distinct relaxation parameters: the “reduced” transverse relaxation rate, RR2 and the “aggregation index,” A, using three sets of Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) datasets with different interecho spacings. Agarose phantoms, simulating the relaxation and susceptibility properties of tissue with different concentrations of dispersed (ferritin-like) and aggregated (hemosiderin-like) iron, were employed for validation. Results Both phantom and in vivo human data confirmed that transverse relaxation components associated with the dispersed and aggregated iron could be separated using the two-parameter (RR2, A) method. The MRI-determined total hepatic storage iron was highly correlated (r = 0.95) with measurements derived from biopsy or biosusceptometry. As total hepatic storage iron increased, the proportion stored as aggregated iron became greater. Conclusion This method provides a new means for non-invasive MRI determination of the partition of hepatic storage iron between ferritin and hemosiderin in iron overload disorders. PMID:23720394

  19. Prediction of iron deficiency in chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease anaemia.

    PubMed

    Baumann Kurer, S; Seifert, B; Michel, B; Ruegg, R; Fehr, J

    1995-12-01

    We prospectively studied 45 anaemic patients (37 women, 8 men) with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The combination of serum ferritin and CRP (as well as ESR) in its predictive capacity for bone marrow iron stores was examined. The relationship between other iron-related measurements (transferrin, transferrin saturation, soluble transferrin receptor, erythrocyte porphyrins and percentage of hypochromic/microcytic erythrocytes) and bone marrow iron stores was also investigated. Stainable bone marrow iron was taken as the most suitable standard to separate iron-deficient from iron-replete patients. 14 patients (31%) were lacking bone marrow iron. Regression analysis showed a good correlation between ferritin and bone marrow iron (adjusted R2 = 0.721, P < 0.0001). The combination of ferritin and CRP (ESR) did not improve the predictive power for bone marrow iron (adjusted R2 = 0.715) in this cohort of patients with low systemic inflammatory activity. With respect to the bone marrow iron content the best predictive cut-off value of ferritin was 30 micrograms/l (86% sensitivity, 90% specificity). The other iron-related parameters both individually and when combined were less powerful in predicting bone marrow iron than ferritin alone. Only zinc bound erythrocyte protoporphyrin in combination with ferritin slightly improved prediction (adjusted R2 = 0.731). A cut-off point of 11% hypochromic erythrocytes reached a high specificity (90%), but was less sensitive (77%).

  20. Serum retinol levels are positively correlated with hemoglobin concentrations, independent of iron homeostasis: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Seyed Mojtaba; Heidari, Gholamreza; Nabipour, Iraj; Amirinejad, Roya; Assadi, Majid; Bargahi, Afshar; Akbarzadeh, Samad; Tahmasebi, Rahim; Sanjdideh, Zahra

    2013-04-01

    Micronutrient interactions give rise to complex issues that have an impact on preventive strategies when multiple micronutrient deficiencies coexist. The aim of this population-based study was to determine the prevalence of vitamins A and E and iron deficiencies among women 15 to 49 years of age in the northern Persian Gulf region. We hypothesized that serum retinol levels may show correlations with hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations, independent of iron status. A total of 1242 nonpregnant women of reproductive age were selected via a multistage stratified random cluster sampling technique. Serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor levels were measured using enzyme immunoassay techniques. Serum retinol (vitamin A) and α-tocopherol (vitamin E) were determined for 727 women by high-performance liquid chromatography. The prevalence of anemia (Hb <12 g/dL), iron deficiency (serum ferritin <15 μg/L), and iron deficiency anemia was 8.7%, 25.4%, and 4.6%, respectively. Vitamin A (<0.7 μmol/L) and vitamin E (<11.6 μmol/L) deficiencies were found in 1.2% and 5.9% of the studied population, respectively. Multiple regression analysis revealed that serum retinol levels exhibit a significant association with Hb concentrations after controlling for serum ferritin levels, anemia associated with chronic disease, and risk factors for anemia. Therefore, most nonpregnant women of reproductive age in the northern Persian Gulf were found to have adequate serum vitamin A and E levels. However, the status of anemia and iron deficiency anemia could be considered a mild public health problem in this region. On the basis of multivariate analyses, we conclude that low serum retinol levels may contribute to anemia, independent of iron homeostasis.

  1. Model of reticuloendothelial iron metabolism in humans: Abnormal behavior in idiopathic hemochromatosis and in inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Fillet, G.; Beguin, Y.; Baldelli, L. )

    1989-08-01

    Iron transport in the reticuloendothelial (RE) system plays a central role in iron metabolism, but its regulation has not been characterized physiologically in vivo in humans. In particular, why serum iron is elevated and RE cells are much less iron-loaded than parenchymal cells in idiopathic hemochromatosis is not known. The processing of erythrocyte iron by the RE system was studied after intravenous (IV) injection of 59Fe heat-damaged RBCs (HDRBCs) and 55Fe transferrin in normal subjects and in patients with iron deficiency, idiopathic hemochromatosis, inflammation, marrow aplasia, or hyperplastic erythropoiesis. Early release of 59Fe by the RE system was calculated from the plasma iron turnover and the 59Fe plasma reappearance curve. Late release was calculated from the ratio of 59Fe/55Fe RBC utilization in 2 weeks. The partitioning of iron between the early (release from heme catabolism) and late (release from RE stores) phases depended on the size of RE iron stores, as illustrated by the inverse relationship observed between early release and plasma ferritin (P less than .001). There was a strong correlation between early release and the rate of change of serum iron levels during the first three hours in normal subjects (r = .85, P less than .001). Inflammation produced a blockade of the early release phase, whereas in idiopathic hemochromatosis early release was considerably increased as compared with subjects with similar iron stores. Based on these results, we describe a model of RE iron metabolism in humans. We conclude that the RE system appears to determine the diurnal fluctuations in serum iron levels through variations in the immediate output of heme iron. In idiopathic hemochromatosis, a defect of the RE cell in withholding iron freed from hemoglobin could be responsible for the high serum iron levels and low RE iron stores.

  2. Efficacy of a multi micronutrient-fortified drink in improving iron and micronutrient status among schoolchildren with low iron stores in India: A randomised, double-masked placebo-controlled trial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A multiple micronutrient-fortified drink could be an effective strategy to combating micronutrient deficiencies in school-going children. Our objective was to assess the efficacy of a multiple micronutrient-fortified drink in reducing iron deficiency (ID), ID anemia (IDA), anemia and improving micro...

  3. Combined transport, magnetization and neutron scattering study of correlated iridates and iron pnictide superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhital, Chetan

    The work performed within this thesis is divided into two parts, each focusing primarily on the study of magnetic phase behavior using neutron scattering techniques. In first part, I present transport, magnetization, and neutron scattering studies of materials within the iridium oxide-based Ruddelsden-Popper series [Srn+1IrnO3n+1] compounds Sr 3Ir2O7 (n=2) and Sr2IrO4 (n=1). This includes a comprehensive study of the doped bilayer system Sr 3(Ir1-xRux )2O7. In second part, I present my studies of the effect of uniaxial pressure on magnetic and structural phase behavior of the iron-based high temperature superconductor Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2. Iridium-based 5d transition metal oxides host rather unusual electronic/magnetic ground states due to strong interplay between electronic correlation, lattice structure and spin-orbit effects. Out of the many oxides containing iridium, the Ruddelsden-Popper series [Srn+1IrnO 3n+1] oxides are some of the most interesting systems to study both from the point of view of physics as well as from potential applications. My work is focused on two members of this series Sr3Ir2O 7 (n=2) and Sr2IrO4 (n=1). In particular, our combined transport, magnetization and neutron scattering studies of Sr 3Ir2O7 (n=2) showed that this system exhibits a complex coupling between charge transport and magnetism. The spin magnetic moments form a G-type antiferromagnetic structure with moments oriented along the c-axis, with an ordered moment of 0.35+/-0.06 muB/Ir. I also performed experiments doping holes in this bilayer Sr3(Ir1-xRu x)2O7 system in order to study the role of electronic correlation in these materials. Our results show that the ruthenium-doped holes remain localized within the Jeff=1/2 Mott insulating background of Sr3Ir2O7, suggestive of 'Mott blocking' and the presence of strong electronic correlation in these materials. Antiferromagnetic order however survives deep into the metallic regime with the same ordering q-vector, suggesting an

  4. Iron increases the susceptibility of multiple myeloma cells to bortezomib

    PubMed Central

    Campanella, Alessandro; Santambrogio, Paolo; Fontana, Francesca; Frenquelli, Michela; Cenci, Simone; Marcatti, Magda; Sitia, Roberto; Tonon, Giovanni; Camaschella, Clara

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant still incurable plasma cell disorder. Pharmacological treatment based on proteasome inhibition has improved patient outcome; however, bortezomib-resistance remains a major clinical problem. Inhibition of proteasome functionality affects cellular iron homeostasis and iron is a potent inducer of reactive oxygen species and cell death, unless safely stored in ferritin. We explored the potential role of iron in bortezomib-resistance. We analyzed iron proteins, oxidative status and cell viability in 7 multiple myeloma cell lines and in plasma cells from 5 patients. Cells were treated with increasing bortezomib concentrations with or without iron supplementation. We reduced ferritin levels by both shRNA technology and by drug-induced iron starvation. Multiple myeloma cell lines are characterized by distinct ferritin levels, which directly correlate with bortezomib resistance. We observed that iron supplementation upon bortezomib promotes protein oxidation and cell death, and that iron toxicity inversely correlates with basal ferritin levels. Bortezomib prevents ferritin upregulation in response to iron, thus limiting the ability to buffer reactive oxygen species. Consequently, reduction of basal ferritin levels increases both bortezomib sensitivity and iron toxicity. In patients’ cells, we confirmed that bortezomib prevents ferritin increase, that iron supplementation upon bortezomib increases cell death and that ferritin reduction overcomes bortezomib resistance. Bortezomib affects iron homeostasis, sensitizing cells to oxidative damage. Modulation of iron status is a strategy worth exploring to improve the efficacy of proteasome inhibition therapies. PMID:23242599

  5. Iron and vegetarian diets.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Angela V; Craig, Winston J; Baines, Surinder K; Posen, Jennifer S

    2013-08-19

    Vegetarians who eat a varied and well balanced diet are not at any greater risk of iron deficiency anaemia than non-vegetarians. A diet rich in wholegrains, legumes, nuts, seeds, dried fruits, iron-fortified cereals and green leafy vegetables provides an adequate iron intake. Vitamin C and other organic acids enhance non-haem iron absorption, a process that is carefully regulated by the gut. People with low iron stores or higher physiological need for iron will tend to absorb more iron and excrete less. Research to date on iron absorption has not been designed to accurately measure absorption rates in typical Western vegetarians with low ferritin levels.

  6. Correlation between surface physicochemical properties and the release of iron from stainless steel AISI 304 in biological media.

    PubMed

    Hedberg, Yolanda; Karlsson, Maria-Elisa; Blomberg, Eva; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Hedberg, Jonas

    2014-10-01

    Stainless steel is widely used in biological environments, for example as implant material or in food applications, where adsorption-controlled ligand-induced metal release is of importance from a corrosion, health, and food safety perspective. The objective of this study was to elucidate potential correlations between surface energy and wettability of stainless steel surfaces and the release of iron in complexing biological media. This was accomplished by studying changes in surface energies calculated from contact angle measurements, surface oxide composition (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), and released iron (graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy) for stainless steel grade AISI 304 immersed in fluids containing bovine serum albumin or citric acid, and non-complexing fluids such as NaCl, NaOH, and HNO3. It was shown that the surface wettability and polar surface energy components were all influenced by adventitious atmospheric carbon (surface contamination of low molecular weight), rather than differences in surface oxide composition in non-complexing solutions. Adsorption of both BSA and citrate, which resulted in ligand-induced metal release, strongly influenced the wettability and the surface energy, and correlated well with the measured released amount of iron.

  7. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific for murine hepcidin-1: correlation with hepatic mRNA expression in established and novel models of dysregulated iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Gutschow, Patrick; Schmidt, Paul J; Han, Huiling; Ostland, Vaughn; Bartnikas, Thomas B; Pettiglio, Michael A; Herrera, Carolina; Butler, James S; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas; Fleming, Mark D; Westerman, Mark

    2015-02-01

    Mice have been essential for distinguishing the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis. Currently, investigators monitor levels of murine hepatic hepcidin-1 mRNA as a surrogate marker for the bioactive hepcidin protein itself. Here, we describe and validate a competitive, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that quantifies hepcidin-1 in mouse serum and urine. The assay exhibits a biologically relevant lower limit of detection, high precision, and excellent linearity and recovery. We also demonstrate correlation between serum and urine hepcidin-1 values and validate the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by analyzing plasma hepcidin response of mice to physiological challenges, including iron deficiency, iron overload, acute blood loss, and inflammation. Furthermore, we analyze multiple murine genetic models of iron dysregulation, including β-thalassemia intermedia (Hbb(th3/+)), hereditary hemochromatosis (Hfe(-/-), Hjv(-/-), and Tfr2(Y245X/Y245X)), hypotransferrinemia (Trf(hpx/hpx)), heterozygous transferrin receptor 1 deficiency (Tfrc(+/-)) and iron refractory iron deficiency anemia (Tmprss6(-/-) and Tmprss6(hem8/hem8)). Novel compound iron metabolism mutants were also phenotypically characterized here for the first time. We demonstrate that serum hepcidin concentrations correlate with liver hepcidin mRNA expression, transferrin saturation and non-heme liver iron. In some circumstances, serum hepcidin-1 more accurately predicts iron parameters than hepcidin mRNA, and distinguishes smaller, statistically significant differences between experimental groups.

  8. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific for murine hepcidin-1: correlation with hepatic mRNA expression in established and novel models of dysregulated iron homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Gutschow, Patrick; Schmidt, Paul J.; Han, Huiling; Ostland, Vaughn; Bartnikas, Thomas B.; Pettiglio, Michael A.; Herrera, Carolina; Butler, James S.; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas; Fleming, Mark D.; Westerman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Mice have been essential for distinguishing the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis. Currently, investigators monitor levels of murine hepatic hepcidin-1 mRNA as a surrogate marker for the bioactive hepcidin protein itself. Here, we describe and validate a competitive, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that quantifies hepcidin-1 in mouse serum and urine. The assay exhibits a biologically relevant lower limit of detection, high precision, and excellent linearity and recovery. We also demonstrate correlation between serum and urine hepcidin-1 values and validate the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by analyzing plasma hepcidin response of mice to physiological challenges, including iron deficiency, iron overload, acute blood loss, and inflammation. Furthermore, we analyze multiple murine genetic models of iron dysregulation, including β-thalassemia intermedia (Hbbth3/+), hereditary hemochromatosis (Hfe−/−, Hjv−/−, and Tfr2Y245X/Y245X), hypotransferrinemia (Trfhpx/hpx), heterozygous transferrin receptor 1 deficiency (Tfrc+/−) and iron refractory iron deficiency anemia (Tmprss6−/− and Tmprss6hem8/hem8). Novel compound iron metabolism mutants were also phenotypically characterized here for the first time. We demonstrate that serum hepcidin concentrations correlate with liver hepcidin mRNA expression, transferrin saturation and non-heme liver iron. In some circumstances, serum hepcidin-1 more accurately predicts iron parameters than hepcidin mRNA, and distinguishes smaller, statistically significant differences between experimental groups. PMID:25425686

  9. Electronic correlations determine the phase stability of iron up to the melting temperature

    PubMed Central

    Leonov, I.; Poteryaev, A. I.; Gornostyrev, Yu. N.; Lichtenstein, A. I.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Anisimov, V. I.; Vollhardt, D.

    2014-01-01

    We present theoretical results on the high-temperature phase stability and phonon spectra of paramagnetic bcc iron which explicitly take into account many-body effects. Several peculiarities, including a pronounced softening of the [110] transverse (T1) mode and a dynamical instability of the bcc lattice in harmonic approximation are identified. We relate these features to the α-to-γ and γ-to-δ phase transformations in iron. The high-temperature bcc phase is found to be highly anharmonic and appears to be stabilized by the lattice entropy. PMID:24998330

  10. Perspectives on iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Leif; Hulthén, Lena

    2002-01-01

    Newly established relationships between dietary iron absorption and serum ferritin and between serum ferritin and iron stores permit calculation of amounts of stored iron under different conditions at steady states when absorption equals losses. The rate of growth of stores can also be calculated. All calculations are based on observations and require no model assumptions. Present analyses demonstrated an effective control of iron absorption preventing development of iron overload in otherwise healthy subjects even if the diet is fortified with iron and even if meat intake is high. There are strong relationships between iron requirements, bioavailability of dietary iron, and amounts of stored iron. Our observations that a reduction in iron stores and a calculated decrease of hemoglobin iron had the same increasing effect on iron absorption suggest that the control of iron absorption is mediated from a common cell, which may register both size of iron stores and hemoglobin iron deficit. We suggest that the hepatocyte is that cell. Nutritional iron deficiency is especially critical in menstruating women, in the latter third of pregnancy, during adolescence for both girls and boys, and in the weaning period from 4 to 6 months to 2 years of age. The body possesses remarkable, potential control systems of probable very ancient origin capable of preventing both iron deficiency and iron overload. Present problems with iron deficiency being the most frequent deficiency disorder are related to nonbiological changes in our societies over the most recent 10,000 years. This perspective on iron homeostasis or iron balance is mainly based on studies in humans of clinical and epidemiological observations, trying to understand why iron deficiency is the most frequent deficiency disorder in the world in spite of the ingenious mechanisms in the body that should prevent it. Withdrawal of iron fortification of flour in Sweden in 1994 led to a significant increase in iron deficiency

  11. Influence of welding fume on systemic iron status.

    PubMed

    Casjens, Swaantje; Henry, Jana; Rihs, Hans-Peter; Lehnert, Martin; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Welge, Peter; Lotz, Anne; Gelder, Rainer Van; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Stiegler, Hugo; Eisele, Lewin; Weiss, Tobias; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas; Pesch, Beate

    2014-11-01

    Iron is the major metal found in welding fumes, and although it is an essential trace element, its overload causes toxicity due to Fenton reactions. To avoid oxidative damage, excess iron is bound to ferritin, and as a result, serum ferritin (SF) is a recognized biomarker for iron stores, with high concentrations linked to inflammation and potentially also cancer. However, little is known about iron overload in welders. Within this study, we assessed the iron status and quantitative associations between airborne iron, body iron stores, and iron homeostasis in 192 welders not wearing dust masks. Welders were equipped with personal samplers in order to determine the levels of respirable iron in the breathing zone during a working shift. SF, prohepcidin and other markers of iron status were determined in blood samples collected after shift. The impact of iron exposure and other factors on SF and prohepcidin were estimated using multiple regression models. Our results indicate that respirable iron is a significant predictor of SF and prohepcidin. Concentrations of SF varied according to the welding technique and respiratory protection used, with a median of 103 μg l(-1) in tungsten inert gas welders, 125 μg l(-1) in those wearing air-purifying respirators, and 161 μg l(-1) in other welders. Compared to welders with low iron stores (SF < 25 μg l(-1)), those with excess body iron (SF ≥ 400 μg l(-1)) worked under a higher median concentration of airborne iron (60 μg m(-3) versus 148 μg m(-3)). Even though air concentrations of respirable iron and manganese were highly correlated, and low iron stores have been reported to increase manganese uptake in the gastrointestinal tract, no correlation was seen between SF and manganese in blood. In conclusion, monitoring SF may be a reasonable method for health surveillance of welders. Respiratory protection with air-purifying respirators can decrease iron exposure and avoid chronically higher SF in welders working with

  12. Randomised control trial showed that delayed cord clamping and milking resulted in no significant differences in iron stores and physical growth parameters at one year of age.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shivam; Jaiswal, Vijay; Singh, Dharamveer; Jaiswal, Prateek; Garg, Amit; Upadhyay, Amit

    2016-11-01

    Placental redistribution has been shown to improve haematological outcomes in the immediate neonatal period and early infancy. This study compared the effects of delayed cord clamping (DCC) and umbilical cord milking (UCM) on haematological and growth parameters at 12 months of age. This was a follow-up study of a randomised control trial, conducted in a tertiary care paediatric centre from August 2013 to August 2014. We studied 200 apparently healthy Indian infants randomised at birth to receive DCC for 60-90 seconds or UCM. The outcome measures were iron status and physical growth parameters at 12 months. Of the 200 babies, 161 completed the follow-up and baseline characteristics were comparable in both groups. The mean haemoglobin in the DCC group (102.2 (17.2) g/L and serum ferritin 16.44 (2.77) μg/L) showed no significant differences to the UCM group (98.6 (17.1) g/L and 18.2 (2.8) μg/L) at one year. In addition, there were no significant differences in weight, height and mid-upper arm circumference in the two groups. Term-born Indian infants who had DCC at 60-90 seconds or UCM showed no significant differences in ferritin and haemoglobin levels and growth parameters at 12 months of age. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Correlation of 4-month infant feeding modes with their growth and iron status in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu-hua; Ji, Cheng-ye; Zheng, Xiu-xia; Shan, Jin-ping; Hou, Rui

    2008-03-05

    Growth and development of infants has been an important topic in pediatrics for a long time. Infants must be provided with food containing all necessary nutrients. Breast milk is believed to be the most desirable natural and cheapest food for well-balanced nutrition. But with the progress in the development of substitute food in developed countries, it is thought that formula milk can meet the requirement for infant growth. During early infancy, growth, as the most sensitive index of health, is therefore a critical component in evaluating the adequacy of breast-feeding, mixed-feeding and formula feeding. Iron status is another important index of infant health. Iron deficiency anemia remains the most prevalent nutritional deficiency index in infants worldwide. This study is to compare infants in Beijing at 4 months who are on three different feeding modes (breast feeding, mixed feeding and formula feeding) in physical changes and iron status. The results may provide new mothers with support in feeding mode selection, which will also be helpful to the China Nutrition Association in feeding mode education. This is a cohort study. One thousand and one normal Beijing infants were followed regularly for 12 months. Body weight and horizontal length were measured. Hemoglobin, red blood cell counts, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin and serum iron were analyzed at 4 months. The breast feeding percentage in the first 4 months was 47.9%. The feeding mode was not significantly related to maternal delivery age, education, labor pathway nor infant sex (P>0.05). Infant boys and girls exclusively breast-fed from 0 to 4 months had the highest weight at 0-6 months. The anemia rate of breast-fed infant boys at 4 months was the highest. Breast feeding should be given more emphasis. It is compulsory for new mothers to breast-feed their infants if possible. Social environment should also guarantee the requirement for breast feeding. Furthermore the normal values of

  14. Hepcidin and Iron Metabolism in Pregnancy: Correlation with Smoking and Birth Weight and Length.

    PubMed

    Chełchowska, Magdalena; Ambroszkiewicz, Jadwiga; Gajewska, Joanna; Jabłońska-Głąb, Ewa; Maciejewski, Tomasz M; Ołtarzewski, Mariusz

    2016-09-01

    To estimate the effect of tobacco smoking on iron homeostasis and the possible association between hepcidin and the neonatal birth weight and length, concentrations of serum hepcidin and selected iron markers were measured in 81 healthy pregnant women (41 smokers and 40 nonsmokers). The smoking mothers had significantly lower concentrations of serum hepcidin (p < 0.001), iron (p < 0.001), and hemoglobin (p < 0.05), but higher erythropoietin (p < 0.05) levels compared with non-smoking pregnant women. Logistic regression analysis showed the highest negative impact of the number of cigarettes smoked per day (β = -0.46; p < 0.01) and positive impact of ferritin level (β = 0.47; p < 0.001) on serum hepcidin concentration. The birth weight and the body length of smoking mothers' infants were significantly lower than in tobacco abstinent group (p < 0.001). In multiple regression analysis, birth body weight (β = 0.56; p < 0.001) and length (β = 0.50; p < 0.001) were significantly related to maternal hepcidin values. Tobacco smoking affected hepcidin level in serum of pregnant women in a dose-dependent manner. Low concentrations of iron and hemoglobin in maternal serum coexisting with high level of erythropoietin suggest that smoking could lead to subclinical iron deficiency and chronic hypoxia not only in mothers but also in fetus. Low serum hepcidin concentration in smoking pregnant women might be associated with lower fetal birth weight and length.

  15. Increased endogenous DNA oxidation correlates to increased iron levels in melanocytes relative to keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Pelle, Edward; Huang, Xi; Zhang, Qi; Pernodet, Nadine; Yarosh, Daniel B; Frenkel, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    The endogenous oxidative state of normal human epidermal melanocytes was investigated and compared to normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) in order to gain new insight into melanocyte biology. Previously, we showed that NHEKs contain higher levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) than melanocytes and that it can migrate from NHEKs to melanocytes by passive permeation. Nevertheless, despite lower concentrations of H2O2, we now report higher levels of oxidative DNA in melanocytes as indicated by increased levels of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG): 4.49 (±0.55 SEM) 8-oxo-dG/10(6) dG compared to 1.49 (±0.11 SEM) 8-oxo-dG/10(6) dG for NHEKs. An antioxidant biomarker, glutathione (GSH), was also lower in melanocytes (3.14 nmoles (±0.15 SEM)/cell) in comparison to NHEKs (5.98 nmoles (±0.33 SEM)/cell). Intriguingly, cellular bioavailable iron as measured in ferritin was found to be nearly fourfold higher in melanocytes than in NHEKs. Further, ferritin levels in melanocytes were also higher than in hepatocarcinoma cells, an iron-rich cell, and it indicates that higher relative iron levels may be characteristic of melanocytes. To account for the increased oxidative DNA and lower GSH and H2O2 levels that we observe, we propose that iron may contribute to higher levels of oxidation by reacting with H2O2 through a Fenton reaction leading to the generation of DNA-reactive hydroxyl radicals. In conclusion, our data support the concept of elevated oxidation and high iron levels as normal parameters of melanocytic activity. We present new evidence that may contribute to our understanding of the melanogenic process and lead to the development of new skin care products.

  16. Correlation between Soil-Transmitted Helminths Infection and Serum Iron Level among Primary School Children in Medan.

    PubMed

    Arrasyid, Nurfida K; Sinambela, Monica Nadya; Tala, Zaimah Z; Darlan, Dewi Masyithah; Warli, Syah Mirsya

    2017-04-15

    The latest estimates indicate that more than 2 billion people worldwide are infected by Soil-Transmitted Helminths (STH). The burden of STH infection is mainly attributed to the chronic effect on health and quality of life of those infected. It is also contributed to micronutrient deficiencies such as iron-deficiency anaemia. The prevalence of worm infection in Public Primary School students in Medan was quite high (40.3%), and 33.3% was anaemic in the latest study. To determine the correlation between STH infection with serum iron (SI) level on primary school children, as well as to determine the prevalence of SI level and worm infection, and the type of worm that infects the most of them. This study was conducted in the cross-sectional method. Consecutive sampling technique was used and a total of 132 students age 8-12 years old were included. The study took places in Public Primary School 060925 Amplas, Medan and 101747 Hamparan Perak, Deli Serdang throughout May-October 2016. Fisher Exact test was used to analyse the correlation between STH infection and SI level. The prevalence of STH infection was 7.6%, and low SI was 11.4%. There was no significant correlation between STH infection and SI level (P = 0.317). The prevalence of low SI level was not significantly dependent on STH infection (RP = 1.877, 95% CI = 0.481-7.181).

  17. Correlation between Soil-Transmitted Helminths Infection and Serum Iron Level among Primary School Children in Medan

    PubMed Central

    Arrasyid, Nurfida K.; Sinambela, Monica Nadya; Tala, Zaimah Z.; Darlan, Dewi Masyithah; Warli, Syah Mirsya

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The latest estimates indicate that more than 2 billion people worldwide are infected by Soil-Transmitted Helminths (STH). The burden of STH infection is mainly attributed to the chronic effect on health and quality of life of those infected. It is also contributed to micronutrient deficiencies such as iron-deficiency anaemia. The prevalence of worm infection in Public Primary School students in Medan was quite high (40.3%), and 33.3% was anaemic in the latest study. AIM: To determine the correlation between STH infection with serum iron (SI) level on primary school children, as well as to determine the prevalence of SI level and worm infection, and the type of worm that infects the most of them. METHODS: This study was conducted in the cross-sectional method. Consecutive sampling technique was used and a total of 132 students age 8-12 years old were included. The study took places in Public Primary School 060925 Amplas, Medan and 101747 Hamparan Perak, Deli Serdang throughout May-October 2016. Fisher Exact test was used to analyse the correlation between STH infection and SI level. RESULTS: The prevalence of STH infection was 7.6%, and low SI was 11.4%. CONCLUSION: There was no significant correlation between STH infection and SI level (P = 0.317). The prevalence of low SI level was not significantly dependent on STH infection (RP = 1.877, 95% CI = 0.481-7.181). PMID:28507613

  18. Impact of Dynamic Orbital Correlations on Magnetic Excitations in the Normal State of Iron-Based Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Cheng; Lv, Weicheng; Tranquada, John; Phillips, Philip

    2013-03-01

    We show here that orbital degrees of freedom produce a distinct signature in the magnetic excitation spectrum of iron-based superconductors above the magnetic ordering temperature. Because dxz and dyz orbitals are strongly connected with Fermi surface topology, the nature of magnetic excitations can be modified significantly due to the presence of either static or fluctuating orbital correlations. Within a five-orbital itinerant model, we show that static orbital order generally leads to an enhancement of commensurate magnetic excitations even when the original Fermi surface lacks nesting at commensurate wavevectors. When long-range orbital order is absent, Gaussian fluctuations beyond the standard random-phase approximation capture the effects of fluctuating orbital correlations on the magnetic excitations. We find that commensurate magnetic excitations can also be enhanced if the orbital correlations are strong. We propose that this unusual incommensurate-to-commensurate transformation is an important signature to distinguish orbital from spin physics in the normal state of iron-based superconductors. This work is supported by the Center for Emergent Superconductivity, a DOE Energy Frontier Research Center, Grant No. DE-AC0298CH1088.

  19. "Off-Target" (18)F-AV-1451 Binding in the Basal Ganglia Correlates with Age-Related Iron Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Yong; Cho, Hanna; Ahn, Sung Jun; Lee, Jae Hoon; Ryu, Young Hoon; Lee, Myung Sik; Lyoo, Chul Hyoung

    2017-08-03

    Backgrounds: "Off-target" binding in the basal ganglia is commonly observed in the (18)F-AV-1451 positron emission tomography (PET) studies of the elderly. We sought to investigate the relationship between this phenomenon in the basal ganglia and iron accumulation using iron-sensitive R2(*) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Methods: 59 healthy controls and 61 patients with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment (AD/MCI) underwent (18)F-AV-1451 PET and R2(*) MR imaging studies. A correlation analysis was performed for age, (18)F-AV-1451 binding, and R2(*) values. Results: There was an age-related increase in both (18)F-AV-1451 binding in the basal ganglia and R2(*) values in the putamen in both the controls and AD/MCI patients. (18)F-AV-1451 binding in the basal ganglia increased with R2(*) values. Conclusion: "Off-target" (18)F-AV-1451 binding in the basal ganglia is associated with the age-related increases in iron accumulation. Postmortem studies are required to further investigate the nature of this association. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  20. [Study of vitamin A nutritional status and the correlation of vitamin A and iron in school-age children].

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoming; Liu, Xiangye; Long, Zhu; Shen, Xiaoyi

    2003-01-01

    To understand the VA status, the detectable rate of the sub-clinical VA deficiency and the correlation of VA and iron in the rural school-age children of Beijing Mountain Area. In the dietary survey, blood samples were collected by venopunction and serum VA, and hematological index were determined in 305 children 7-13 years. The intakes of dietary energy, protein and iron were > 85% of the RNI and AI, but dietary intake of VA were (513.7 +/- 286.1) microgram to be 59.7% of the RNI; The average concentration of serum VA was (1.01 +/- 0.29) mumol/L, 59.0% of subjects have serum VA lower than 1.05 mumol/L, in which, 12.8% of them were lower than 0.70 mumol/L, and only 41.0% of subjects were normal levels of serum. With aggravation of iron deficiency from ID to IDA phase, the average serum VA concentrations were descending from 1.02 mumol/L in ID phase to 0.97 mumol/L in IDA phase. But the trend has no statistical significance. The results showed that sub-clinical VA deficiency was 59.0% in the rural school-age children, so VA deficiency was a main nutritional problem in rural school-age children of Beijing mountain area.

  1. Investigation on positive correlation of increased brain iron deposition with cognitive impairment in Alzheimer disease by using quantitative MR R2' mapping.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Wenzhen; Zhan, Chuanjia; Zhao, Lingyun; Wang, Jianzhi; Tian, Qing; Wang, Wei

    2011-08-01

    Brain iron deposition has been proposed to play an important role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease (AD). The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation of brain iron accumulation with the severity of cognitive impairment in patients with AD by using quantitative MR relaxation rate R2' measurements. Fifteen patients with AD, 15 age- and sex-matched healthy controls, and 30 healthy volunteers underwent 1.5T MR multi-echo T2 mapping and T2* mapping for the measurement of transverse relaxation rate R2' (R2'=R2*-R2). We statistically analyzed the R2' and iron concentrations of bilateral hippocampus (HP), parietal cortex (PC), frontal white matter (FWM), putamen (PU), caudate nucleus (CN), thalamus (TH), red nucleus (RN), substantia nigra (SN), and dentate nucleus (DN) of the cerebellum for the correlation with the severity of dementia. Two-tailed t-test, Student-Newman-Keuls test (ANOVA) and linear correlation test were used for statistical analysis. In 30 healthy volunteers, the R2' values of bilateral SN, RN, PU, CN, globus pallidus (GP), TH, and FWM were measured. The correlation with the postmortem iron concentration in normal adults was analyzed in order to establish a formula on the relationship between regional R2' and brain iron concentration. The iron concentration of regions of interest (ROI) in AD patients and controls was calculated by this formula and its correlation with the severity of AD was analyzed. Regional R2' was positively correlated with regional brain iron concentration in normal adults (r=0.977, P<0.01). Iron concentrations in bilateral HP, PC, PU, CN, and DN of patients with AD were significantly higher than those of the controls (P<0.05); Moreover, the brain iron concentrations, especially in parietal cortex and hippocampus at the early stage of AD, were positively correlated with the severity of patients' cognitive impairment (P<0.05). The higher the R2' and iron concentrations were, the more severe the cognitive

  2. Spatial repolarization heterogeneity detected by magnetocardiography correlates with cardiac iron overload and adverse cardiac events in beta-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-An; Lu, Meng-Yao; Peng, Shinn-Forng; Lin, Kai-Hsin; Chang, Hsiu-Hao; Yang, Yung-Li; Jou, Shiann-Tarng; Lin, Dong-Tsamn; Liu, Yen-Bin; Horng, Herng-Er; Yang, Hong-Chang; Wang, Jou-Kou; Wu, Mei-Hwan; Wu, Chau-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Patients with transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia major (TM) are at risk for myocardial iron overload and cardiac complications. Spatial repolarization heterogeneity is known to be elevated in patients with certain cardiac diseases, but little is known in TM patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate spatial repolarization heterogeneity in patients with TM, and to investigate the relationships between spatial repolarization heterogeneity, cardiac iron load, and adverse cardiac events. Fifty patients with TM and 55 control subjects received 64-channel magnetocardiography (MCG) to determine spatial repolarization heterogeneity, which was evaluated by a smoothness index of QTc (SI-QTc), a standard deviation of QTc (SD-QTc), and a QTc dispersion. Left ventricular function and myocardial T2* values were assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance. Patients with TM had significantly greater SI-QTc, SD-QTc, and QTc dispersion compared to the control subjects (all p values<0.001). Spatial repolarization heterogeneity was even more pronounced in patients with significant iron overload (T2*<20 ms, n = 20) compared to those with normal T2* (all p values<0.001). Loge cardiac T2* correlated with SI-QTc (r = -0.609, p<0.001), SD-QTc (r = -0.572, p<0.001), and QTc dispersion (r = -0.622, p<0.001), while all these indices had no relationship with measurements of the left ventricular geometry or function. At the time of study, 10 patients had either heart failure or arrhythmia. All 3 indices of repolarization heterogeneity were related to the presence of adverse cardiac events, with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (ranged between 0.79 and 0.86), similar to that of cardiac T2*. Multichannel MCG demonstrated that patients with TM had increased spatial repolarization heterogeneity, which is related to myocardial iron load and adverse cardiac events.

  3. Liver Enzymes in Children with beta-Thalassemia Major: Correlation with Iron Overload and Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Khaled M.; Ibrahim, Ola M.; Kaddah, Ahmed M.; Boseila, Samia; Ismail, Leila Abu; Hamid, May M. Abdel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Beta Thalassemia is the most common chronic hemolytic anemia in Egypt (85.1%) with an estimated carrier rate of 9-10.2%. Injury to the liver, whether acute or chronic, eventually results in an increase in serum concentrations of Alanine transaminase (ALT) and Aspartate transaminase (AST). AIM: Evaluating the potentiating effect of iron overload & viral hepatitis infection on the liver enzymes. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eighty (80) thalassemia major patients were studied with respect to liver enzymes, ferritin, transferrin saturation, HBsAg, anti-HCV antibody and HCV-PCR for anti-HCV positive patients. RESULTS: Fifty % of the patients were anti-HCV positive and 55% of them were HCV-PCR positive. Patients with elevated ALT and AST levels had significantly higher mean serum ferritin than those with normal levels. Anti-HCV positive patients had higher mean serum ferritin, serum ALT, AST and GGT levels and higher age and duration of blood transfusion than the negative group. HCV-PCR positive patients had higher mean serum ferritin and serum ALT and also higher age and duration of blood transfusion than the negative group. CONCLUSION: Iron overload is a main leading cause of elevated liver enzymes, and presence of HCV infection is significantly related to the increased iron overload. PMID:27275237

  4. Parenteral iron dextran therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumpf, V J; Holland, E G

    1990-02-01

    Parenteral iron therapy is indicated in patients with iron-deficiency anemia associated with conditions that interfere with the ingestion or absorption of oral iron. Replacement doses of iron required to replenish iron stores are based on body weight and the observed hemoglobin value. Methods of administering iron dextran are reviewed, including intramuscular and intravenous injections of the undiluted drug, intravenous infusion of a diluted preparation, and as an addition to parenteral nutrition solutions. The overall incidence of adverse reactions associated with the parenteral administration of iron is low, but the potential for an anaphylactic reaction requires that an initial test dose be given followed by careful patient observation.

  5. Iron status of vegetarians.

    PubMed

    Craig, W J

    1994-05-01

    An appropriately planned well-balanced vegetarian diet is compatible with an adequate iron status. Although the iron stores of vegetarians may be reduced, the incidence of iron-deficiency anemia in vegetarians is not significantly different from that in omnivores. Restrictive vegetarian diets (eg, macrobiotic) are associated with more widespread iron-deficiency anemia. Western vegetarians who consume a variety of foods have a better iron status than do those in developing countries who consume a limited diet based on unleavened, unrefined cereals. Whereas phytates, polyphenolics, and other plant constituents found in vegetarian diets inhibit nonheme-iron absorption, vitamin C, citric acid, and other organic acids facilitate nonheme-iron absorption.

  6. Reassessment of Iron Biomarkers for Prediction of Dialysis Iron Overload: An MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Rostoker, Guy; Griuncelli, Mireille; Loridon, Christelle; Magna, Théophile; Machado, Gabrielle; Drahi, Gilles; Dahan, Hervé; Janklewicz, Philippe; Cohen, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Iron overload among hemodialysis patients was previously considered rare but is now an increasingly recognized clinical situation. We analyzed correlations between iron biomarkers and the liver iron concentration (LIC) measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and examined their diagnostic accuracy for iron overload. Design, Setting, Participants and Measurements We performed a prospective cross-sectional study from 31 January 2005 to 31 August 2013 in the dialysis centre of a French community-based private hospital. A cohort of 212 hemodialysis patients free of overt inflammation or malnutrition, were treated for anemia with parenteral iron-sucrose and an erythropoesis-stimulating agent, in keeping with current clinical guidelines. Blinded measurements of hepatic iron stores were performed by T1 and T2* contrast MRI, and relationships were analysed using Spearman’s coefficient, logistic regression and receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curves. Results Among the biological markers, only serum ferritin showed a strong correlation with LIC (rho= 0.52, 95% CI: 0.41-0.61, p< 0.0001, Spearman test). In logistic analysis, only serum ferritin correctly classified the overall cohort into patients with normal liver iron stores (LIC ≤ 50 μmol/g) and those with elevated liver iron stores (LIC > 50 μmol/g) (odds ratio 1.007; 95% CI: 1.004-1.010). Serum ferritin was the iron biomarker with the best discriminatory capacity in ROC curves analysis (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.767; 95% CI: 0.698-0.835). The optimal serum ferritin cutoffs were 160 μg/L for LIC > 50 μmol/g (mild iron overload) and 290 μg/L for LIC > 200 μmol/g (severe iron overload). Conclusions For clinical purposes, serum ferritin correctly reflects liver iron stores, as assessed by MRI, in hemodialysis patients without overt inflammation or malnutrition. These results strongly suggest that current ferritin target values should be lowered to avoid iron overload. Trial

  7. Perspectives on nutritional iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, L

    2001-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency (ID) is caused by an intake of dietary iron insufficient to cover physiological iron requirements. Studies on iron absorption from whole diets have examined relationships between dietary iron bioavailability/absorption, iron losses, and amounts of stored iron. New insights have been obtained into regulation of iron absorption and expected rates of changes of iron stores or hemoglobin iron deficits when bioavailability or iron content of the diet has been modified and when losses of iron occur. Negative effects of ID are probably related to age, up to about 20 years, explaining some of earlier controversies. Difficulties in establishing the prevalence of mild ID are outlined. The degree of underestimation of the prevalence of mild ID when using multiple diagnostic criteria is discussed. It is suggested that current low-energy lifestyles are a common denominator for the current high prevalence not only of ID but also of obesity, diabetes, and osteoporosis.

  8. Nonheme-iron absorption in first-degree relatives is highly correlated: a stable-isotope study in mother-child pairs.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael B; Harrington, Mary; Villalpando, Salvador; Hurrell, Richard F

    2010-03-01

    Iron absorption in humans is highly variable even after iron status and dietary components that influence iron absorption are controlled for. Inherited factors may help explain this variance. Our objective was to compare nonheme-iron absorption from a noninhibitory, stable-isotope-labeled test meal in preschool-aged children and their mothers. We provided 72 test meals based on degermed maize flour and milk powder and fortified with [(57)Fe]ferrous fumarate or [(58)Fe]ferrous sulfate to healthy Mexican preschool children [n = 18; mean (+/-SD) age: 3.6 +/- 1.0 y] and their mothers [n = 18; mean (+/-SD) age: 28.0 +/- 5.2 y]. Iron absorption was calculated on the basis of incorporation of isotopes into erythrocytes after 14 d and was adjusted for differences in iron status. There was a wide variation in iron absorption from the test meals: in the mothers and children, the median fractional absorption of ferrous sulfate was 22.55% (range: 1.65-54.83%) and 5.51% (range: 2.23-17.20%), respectively (P < 0.0001). After adjustment for serum ferritin, the significant difference in absorption between mothers and their children disappeared. Despite this broad range of iron absorption, corrected fractional iron absorption from the ferrous fumarate-fortified (r(2) = 0.582) and the ferrous sulfate-fortified test meals (r(2) = 0.557) was strongly correlated in mothers and their children (P < 0.0001). There was a striking positive correlation between the mean corrected fractional iron absorption from both test meals in mothers and their children (r(2) = 0.782, P < 0.0001). In regression analyses that included age, sex, and hemoglobin, the only significant predictor of corrected fractional iron absorption in children was corrected fractional iron absorption in their mothers (standardized beta = 0.884, P < 0.001). Nonheme-iron absorption exhibits a strong familial tendency. After differences in meal matrix and serum ferritin are accounted for, these data suggest that inheritance and

  9. Carnitine status of pregnant women: effect of carnitine supplementation and correlation between iron status and plasma carnitine concentration.

    PubMed

    Keller, U; van der Wal, C; Seliger, G; Scheler, C; Röpke, F; Eder, K

    2009-09-01

    It has been shown that plasma carnitine concentrations markedly decline during gestation in women. The reason for this, however, is unknown. One objective of this study was to investigate the effect of carnitine supplementation on plasma carnitine concentrations in pregnant women. The second objective was to investigate the hypothesis that reduced plasma carnitine concentrations during gestation are caused by a reduced carnitine synthesis because of a diminished iron status. Healthy pregnant women (n=26) were randomly assigned in two groups receiving either a L-carnitine supplement (500 mg L-carnitine per day as L-carnitine L-tartrate) (n=13) or placebo (n=13) from the 13th week of gestation to term. In the control group, there was a marked reduction of plasma carnitine concentration from the 12th week of gestation to term. This reduction was prevented by the supplementation of carnitine. In the control group, there was a positive relationship between the parameters of iron status (mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) and ferritin) and plasma concentration of carnitine (P<0.05). Moreover, there were inverse correlations between the concentrations of ferritin and the carnitine precursor gamma-butyrobetaine in plasma, and between gamma-butyrobetaine and carnitine in plasma (P<0.05). This study confirms that plasma carnitine concentrations decline in the course of pregnancy, an effect that can be prevented by the supplementation of carnitine. Data of this study, moreover, suggest that the decline of plasma carnitine concentration during pregnancy could be caused by a reduced rate of carnitine biosynthesis, possibly because of an inadequate iron status.

  10. Crystal plasticity model for BCC iron atomistically informed by kinetics of correlated kinkpair nucleation on screw dislocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Sankar; McDowell, David L.; Zhu, Ting

    2014-04-01

    The mobility of dislocation in body-centered cubic (BCC) metals is controlled by the thermally activated nucleation of kinks along the dislocation core. By employing a recent interatomic potential and the Nudged Elastic Band method, we predict the atomistic saddle-point state of 1/2<111> screw dislocation motion in BCC iron that involves the nucleation of correlated kinkpairs and the resulting double superkinks. This unique process leads to a single-humped minimum energy path that governs the one-step activation of a screw dislocation to move into the adjacent {110} Peierls valley, which contrasts with the double-humped energy path and the two-step transition predicted by other interatomic potentials. Based on transition state theory, we use the atomistically computed, stress-dependent kinkpair activation parameters to inform a coarse-grained crystal plasticity flow rule. Our atomistically-informed crystal plasticity model quantitatively predicts the orientation dependent stress-strain behavior of BCC iron single crystals in a manner that is consistent with experimental results. The predicted temperature and strain-rate dependencies of the yield stress agree with experimental results in the 200-350 K temperature regime, and are rationalized by the small activation volumes associated with the kinkpair-mediated motion of screw dislocations.

  11. Spatial Repolarization Heterogeneity Detected by Magnetocardiography Correlates with Cardiac Iron Overload and Adverse Cardiac Events in Beta-Thalassemia Major

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-An; Lu, Meng-Yao; Peng, Shinn-Forng; Lin, Kai-Hsin; Chang, Hsiu-Hao; Yang, Yung-Li; Jou, Shiann-Tarng; Lin, Dong-Tsamn; Liu, Yen-Bin; Horng, Herng-Er; Yang, Hong-Chang; Wang, Jou-Kou; Wu, Mei-Hwan; Wu, Chau-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia major (TM) are at risk for myocardial iron overload and cardiac complications. Spatial repolarization heterogeneity is known to be elevated in patients with certain cardiac diseases, but little is known in TM patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate spatial repolarization heterogeneity in patients with TM, and to investigate the relationships between spatial repolarization heterogeneity, cardiac iron load, and adverse cardiac events. Methods and Results Fifty patients with TM and 55 control subjects received 64-channel magnetocardiography (MCG) to determine spatial repolarization heterogeneity, which was evaluated by a smoothness index of QTc (SI-QTc), a standard deviation of QTc (SD-QTc), and a QTc dispersion. Left ventricular function and myocardial T2* values were assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance. Patients with TM had significantly greater SI-QTc, SD-QTc, and QTc dispersion compared to the control subjects (all p values<0.001). Spatial repolarization heterogeneity was even more pronounced in patients with significant iron overload (T2*<20 ms, n = 20) compared to those with normal T2* (all p values<0.001). Loge cardiac T2* correlated with SI-QTc (r = −0.609, p<0.001), SD-QTc (r = −0.572, p<0.001), and QTc dispersion (r = −0.622, p<0.001), while all these indices had no relationship with measurements of the left ventricular geometry or function. At the time of study, 10 patients had either heart failure or arrhythmia. All 3 indices of repolarization heterogeneity were related to the presence of adverse cardiac events, with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (ranged between 0.79 and 0.86), similar to that of cardiac T2*. Conclusions Multichannel MCG demonstrated that patients with TM had increased spatial repolarization heterogeneity, which is related to myocardial iron load and adverse cardiac events. PMID:24475137

  12. Non-invasive liver iron quantification by SQUID-biosusceptometry and serum ferritin iron as new diagnostic parameters in hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Peter; Engelhardt, Rainer; Düllmann, Jochen; Fischer, Roland

    2002-01-01

    In the HFE-gene era, precise diagnostic parameters remain important to characterize individual iron stores, because the indication for therapy and prognosis are mainly related to the extent of iron loading. The frequently used serum ferritin interferes with non-iron related factors such as inflammation and may produce falsely positive values. We used a SQUID-biosusceptometer in a large series of patients (n = 679) to measure liver iron concentration in the differential diagnosis and therapy control of hereditary hemochromatosis (SQUID = superconducting quantum interference device). This truly non-invasive technique is sensitive, reliable, fast (online results), and also cost-effective when compared to invasive liver biopsy. Recently, ferritin iron content was propagated as a better parameter than ferritin protein. However, we found a poor correlation between ferritin iron and individual liver iron concentrations in patients with iron overload. Ferritin iron saturation varied in a range between 3 and 10%, independent from liver iron concentration. No differences were found between patients with hemochromatosis and secondary iron overload disease. Only patients with liver cell damage had increased ferritin iron saturations. In conclusion the diagnostic values of serum ferritin protein and iron to assess iron overload are limited.

  13. Correlation-Enhanced Odd-Parity Interorbital Singlet Pairing in the Iron-Pnictide Superconductor LiFeAs.

    PubMed

    Nourafkan, R; Kotliar, G; Tremblay, A-M S

    2016-09-23

    The rich variety of iron-based superconductors and their complex electronic structure lead to a wide range of possibilities for gap symmetry and pairing components. Here we solve in the two-Fe Brillouin zone the full frequency-dependent linearized Eliashberg equations to investigate spin-fluctuations mediated Cooper pairing for LiFeAs. The magnetic excitations are calculated with the random phase approximation on a correlated electronic structure obtained with density functional theory and dynamical mean field theory. The interaction between electrons through Hund's coupling promotes both the intraorbital d_{xz(yz)} and the interorbital magnetic susceptibility. As a consequence, the leading pairing channel, conventional s^{+-}, acquires sizable interorbital d_{xy}-d_{xz(yz)} singlet pairing with odd parity under glide-plane symmetry. The combination of intra- and interorbital components makes the results consistent with available experiments on the angular dependence of the gaps observed on the different Fermi surfaces.

  14. Correlation-Enhanced Odd-Parity Interorbital Singlet Pairing in the Iron-Pnictide Superconductor LiFeAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourafkan, R.; Kotliar, G.; Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    2016-09-01

    The rich variety of iron-based superconductors and their complex electronic structure lead to a wide range of possibilities for gap symmetry and pairing components. Here we solve in the two-Fe Brillouin zone the full frequency-dependent linearized Eliashberg equations to investigate spin-fluctuations mediated Cooper pairing for LiFeAs. The magnetic excitations are calculated with the random phase approximation on a correlated electronic structure obtained with density functional theory and dynamical mean field theory. The interaction between electrons through Hund's coupling promotes both the intraorbital dx z (y z ) and the interorbital magnetic susceptibility. As a consequence, the leading pairing channel, conventional s+- , acquires sizable interorbital dx y-dx z (y z ) singlet pairing with odd parity under glide-plane symmetry. The combination of intra- and interorbital components makes the results consistent with available experiments on the angular dependence of the gaps observed on the different Fermi surfaces.

  15. Silicate Inclusions in IAB Irons: Correlations Between Metal Composition and Inclusion Properties, and Inferences for Their Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedix, G. K.; McCoy, T. J.; Keil, K.

    1995-09-01

    IAB irons are the largest group of iron meteorites, exhibit a large range of siderophile element concentrations in their metal, and commonly contain silicate inclusions with roughly chondritic composition. They are closely related to IIICD irons [1,2] and their inclusions resemble winonaites [3]. It has been suggested that IAB's and IIICD's formed in individual impact melt pools [4,2] on a common parent body. However, it has also been suggested that fractional crystallization [5,6] of a S-saturated core could produce the observed siderophile element trends. Metal composition is correlated with silicate inclusion mineralogy in IIICD's [1], indicating reactions between solid silicates and the metallic magma in a core. These trends observed in IIICD's differ from those in IAB's, suggesting different parent bodies. A bi-modal grouping, based primarily on mineralogy and mineral abundances, was suggested for IAB inclusions [7]. However, recent recoveries of several new silicate-bearing IAB's, along with the emergence of new ideas on their origins, prompted a comprehensive study to document more fully the range of inclusions within IAB irons, to examine possible correlations between the compositions of the metallic host and the silicate inclusions, and to elucidate the origin of IAB irons. We are studying troilite-graphite-silicate inclusions in 24 IAB irons with Ni concentrations ranging from 6.6-25.0%. These include Odessa and Copiapo types [7], newly recovered meteorites (e.g., Lueders [8]) and meteorites with extreme Ni contents (e.g., Jenny's Creek, 6.8%; San Cristobal, 25.0% [9]). The inclusions exhibit a range of textures from recrystallized to partial melts (e.g., Caddo County [10]). Rigorous classification [7] is hampered by heterogeneities between group meteorites, between different samples of distinct meteorites, and within individual inclusions. While intergroup heterogeneities make comparisons between the suite of IAB's somewhat difficult, some general trends

  16. Impact of dynamic orbital correlations on magnetic excitations in the normal state of iron-based superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Cheng; Lv, Weicheng; Tranquada, J. M.; Phillips, Philip W.

    2012-09-01

    We show here that orbital degrees of freedom produce a distinct signature in the magnetic excitation spectrum of iron-based superconductors above the magnetic ordering temperature. Because dxz and dyz orbitals are strongly connected with Fermi surface topology, the nature of magnetic excitations can be modified significantly due to the presence of either static or fluctuating orbital correlations. Within a five-orbital itinerant model, we show that static orbital order generally leads to an enhancement of commensurate magnetic excitations even when the original Fermi surface lacks nesting at (π,0) or (0,π). When long-range orbital order is absent, Gaussian fluctuations beyond the standard random-phase approximation capture the effects of fluctuating orbital correlations on the magnetic excitations. We find that commensurate magnetic excitations can also be enhanced if the orbital correlations are strong. Our results offer a natural explanation for the incommensurate-to-commensurate transformation observed in a recent neutron scattering measurement (Xu , arXiv:1201.4404), and we propose that this unusual transformation is an important signature to distinguish orbital from spin physics in the normal state of pnictides. Implications for the magnetic and superconducting states are discussed.

  17. Structure-substitution limit correlation study on Cr{sup 3+} substituted polycrystalline yttrium iron garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Modi, K. B.; Saija, K. G.; Sharma, P. U.; Lakhani, V. K.; Vasoya, N. H.; Pathak, T. K.; Zankat, K. B.

    2016-05-06

    Polycrystalline samples of Cr{sup 3+} - substituted yttrium iron garnet (Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12}) system with general chemical formula, Y{sub 3}Fe{sub 5-x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 12}, x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 were synthesized by double sintering ceramic technique and characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry. The Rietveld fitted X-ray diffraction patterns analysis revealed mono phase formation for x = 0.0 - 0.4 compositions while x = 0.6 composition possesses mixed phase character. The observed substitution limit has been discussed in the light of ionic size of substituent, electrostatic energy, electronic configuration and synthesis parameters. These observations strongly suggest that the electronic configuration of Cr{sup 3+}, which is favorable to the formation of d2sp3 (octahedral) type bonds, must be important. In the case of Cr{sup 3+}, the substitution does not appear to proceed well for x much greater than 0.5, this limitation probably is a consequence of the strong preference of a smaller ion Cr{sup 3+}, for a larger octahedral site which quickly leads to a condition not comparable with the requirement of the structure. The distribution of cations, mean ionic radii and theoretical lattice constant values have been determined.

  18. Iron deficiency in the young athlete.

    PubMed

    Rowland, T W

    1990-10-01

    Although overt anemia is uncommon, depletion of body iron stores is common among adolescent female athletes. Poor dietary iron intake, menstruation, and increased iron losses associated with physical training all appear to be important factors. Whether nonanemic iron deficiency can impair exercise performance is uncertain. Nonetheless, athletes with low ferritin levels are at risk for impaired erythropoiesis and should receive therapeutic iron supplementation.

  19. Apparatus for storing hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    McMullen, John W.; Wheeler, Michael G.; Cullingford, Hatice S.; Sherman, Robert H.

    1985-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus for storing isotopes of hydrogen (especially tritium) are provided. The hydrogen gas(es) is (are) stored as hydrides of material (for example uranium) within boreholes in a block of copper. The mass of the block is critically important to the operation, as is the selection of copper, because no cooling pipes are used. Because no cooling pipes are used, there can be no failure due to cooling pipes. And because copper is used instead of stainless steel, a significantly higher temperature can be reached before the eutectic formation of uranium with copper occurs, (the eutectic of uranium with the iron in stainless steel forming at a significantly lower temperature).

  20. Correlation Of 2-Chlorobiphenyl Dechlorination By Fe/Pd With Iron Corrosion At Different pH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of 2-chlorobiphenyl dechlorination by palladized iron (Fe/Pd) decreased with increasing pH until pH > 12.5. Iron corrosion potential (Ec) and current (jc), obtained from polarization curves of a rotating disk electrode of iron, followed the Tafel e...

  1. Correlation Of 2-Chlorobiphenyl Dechlorination By Fe/Pd With Iron Corrosion At Different pH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rate of 2-chlorobiphenyl dechlorination by palladized iron (Fe/Pd) decreased with increasing pH until pH > 12.5. Iron corrosion potential (Ec) and current (jc), obtained from polarization curves of a rotating disk electrode of iron, followed the Tafel e...

  2. Selective Mottness as a key to iron superconductors: weak and strong correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Medici, Luca

    2014-03-01

    I will discuss the strength of electronic correlations in the normal phase of Fe-superconductors and trace a comparison with cuprates. The phase diagram of the high-Tc cuprates is dominated by the Mott insulating phase of the parent compounds. Approaching it from large doping, a standard Fermi-liquid is seen to gradually turn into a bad non-Fermi liquid metal in which quasiparticles have heavily differentiated coherence depending on momentum, a process which culminates in the pseudogap regime, in which the antinodal region in momentum space acquires a gap before the material reaches a fully gapped Mott state. I will show that experiments for electron- and hole-doped BaFe2As2 support an analogous scenario. The doping evolution is dominated by the influence of a Mott insulator that would be realized for half-filled conduction bands, while the stoichiometric compound does not play a special role. Weakly and strongly correlated conduction electrons coexist in much of the phase diagram, a differentiation that increases with hole-doping. We identify the reason for this ``selective Mottness'' in a simple emergent mechanism, an ``orbital decoupling,'' triggered by the strong Hund's coupling. When this mechanism is active charge excitations in the different orbitals are decoupled and each orbital behaves as a single band Hubbard model, where the correlation degree almost only depends on how doped is each orbital from half-filling. This scenario reconciles contrasting evidences on the electronic correlation strength, implies a strong asymmetry between hole- and electron-doping and establishes a deep connection with the cuprates. L. de' Medici, G. Giovannetti and M. Capone, ArXiv:1212.3966 Work supported by CNRS - ESPCI ParisTech, France

  3. Iron accumulation in deep cortical layers accounts for MRI signal abnormalities in ALS: correlating 7 tesla MRI and pathology.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Justin Y; Jeong, Suh Young; Van Gelderen, Peter; Deng, Han-Xiang; Quezado, Martha M; Danielian, Laura E; Butman, John A; Chen, Lingye; Bayat, Elham; Russell, James; Siddique, Teepu; Duyn, Jeff H; Rouault, Tracey A; Floeter, Mary Kay

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cortical and spinal motor neuron dysfunction. Routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have previously shown hypointense signal in the motor cortex on T(2)-weighted images in some ALS patients, however, the cause of this finding is unknown. To investigate the utility of this MR signal change as a marker of cortical motor neuron degeneration, signal abnormalities on 3T and 7T MR images of the brain were compared, and pathology was obtained in two ALS patients to determine the origin of the motor cortex hypointensity. Nineteen patients with clinically probable or definite ALS by El Escorial criteria and 19 healthy controls underwent 3T MRI. A 7T MRI scan was carried out on five ALS patients who had motor cortex hypointensity on the 3T FLAIR sequence and on three healthy controls. Postmortem 7T MRI of the brain was performed in one ALS patient and histological studies of the brains and spinal cords were obtained post-mortem in two patients. The motor cortex hypointensity on 3T FLAIR images was present in greater frequency in ALS patients. Increased hypointensity correlated with greater severity of upper motor neuron impairment. Analysis of 7T T(2)(*)-weighted gradient echo imaging localized the signal alteration to the deeper layers of the motor cortex in both ALS patients. Pathological studies showed increased iron accumulation in microglial cells in areas corresponding to the location of the signal changes on the 3T and 7T MRI of the motor cortex. These findings indicate that the motor cortex hypointensity on 3T MRI FLAIR images in ALS is due to increased iron accumulation by microglia.

  4. Importance of correlation effects in hcp iron revealed by a pressure-induced electronic topological transition.

    PubMed

    Glazyrin, K; Pourovskii, L V; Dubrovinsky, L; Narygina, O; McCammon, C; Hewener, B; Schünemann, V; Wolny, J; Muffler, K; Chumakov, A I; Crichton, W; Hanfland, M; Prakapenka, V B; Tasnádi, F; Ekholm, M; Aichhorn, M; Vildosola, V; Ruban, A V; Katsnelson, M I; Abrikosov, I A

    2013-03-15

    We discover that hcp phases of Fe and Fe(0.9)Ni(0.1) undergo an electronic topological transition at pressures of about 40 GPa. This topological change of the Fermi surface manifests itself through anomalous behavior of the Debye sound velocity, c/a lattice parameter ratio, and Mössbauer center shift observed in our experiments. First-principles simulations within the dynamic mean field approach demonstrate that the transition is induced by many-electron effects. It is absent in one-electron calculations and represents a clear signature of correlation effects in hcp Fe.

  5. Circulating non–transferrin-bound iron after oral administration of supplemental and fortification doses of iron to healthy women: a randomized study1234

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Maria; Egli, Ines; Foman, Jasmin Tajeri; Zeder, Christophe; Westerman, Mark E; Hurrell, Richard F

    2014-01-01

    Background: After the oral administration of iron, the production of circulating non–transferrin-bound iron may contribute to an increased risk of illness in malaria-endemic areas that lack effective medical services. Objective: In healthy women with a range of body iron stores, we aimed to determine effects on the production of circulating non–transferrin-bound iron resulting from the oral administration of 1) a supplemental dose of iron (60 mg) with water, 2) a supplemental dose of iron (60 mg) with a standard test meal, and 3) a fortification dose of iron (6 mg) with a standard test meal. Design: With the use of serum ferritin as the indicator, healthy women with replete iron stores (ferritin concentration >25 μg/L; n = 16) and reduced iron stores (ferritin concentration ≤25 μg/L; n = 16) were enrolled in a prospective, randomized, crossover study. After the oral administration of aqueous solutions of ferrous sulfate isotopically labeled with 54Fe, 57Fe, or 58Fe, blood samples were collected for 8 h, and iron absorption was estimated by erythrocyte incorporation at 14 d. Results: At 4 h, serum non–transferrin-bound iron reached peaks with geometric mean (95% CI) concentrations of 0.81 μmol/L (0.56, 1.1 μmol/L) for 60 mg Fe with water and 0.26 μmol/L (0.15, 0.38 μmol/L) for 60 mg Fe with food but was at assay limits of detection (0.1 μmol Fe/L) for 6 mg Fe with food. For the 60 mg Fe without food, the area under the curve over 8 h for serum non–transferrin-bound iron was positively correlated with the amount of iron absorbed (R = 0.49, P < 0.01) and negatively correlated with serum ferritin (R = −0.39, P < 0.05). Conclusions: In healthy women, the production of circulating non–transferrin-bound iron is determined by the rate and amount of iron absorbed. The highest concentrations of non–transferrin-bound iron resulted from the administration of supplemental doses of iron without food. Little or no circulating non–transferrin-bound iron

  6. Correlation of iron overload and glomerular filtration rate estimated by cystatin C in patients with β-thalassemia major.

    PubMed

    Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Bhandari, Sunil; Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Mevada, Surekha; Al-Dhuhli, Hamoud; Al-Kemyani, Nasser; Daar, Shahina

    2014-01-01

    Historically, renal involvement has not been a commonly recognized complication in patients with β-thalassemia major (β-TM). Herein, we studied the impact of iron overload on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimated by cystatin C based GFR (Cyst C eGFR). We enrolled 149 patients with β-TM in a cross sectional study in a single center in Oman. We investigated the correlation between measurement of serum ferritin and Cyst C eGFR. We used univariable linear regression to study the impact of serum ferritin on Cyst C eGFR and backwards stepwise regression to adjust for potential confounders. We included 78 males and 71 females with a mean age of 17.3 ± 9 years (range 2.5-38.5). Seventeen patients had diabetes mellitus. Patients were taking deferiprone (DFP) and deferoxamine (DFO) (26 patients), DFP (58 patients), deferasirox (DFX) (62 patients) and one patient was taking only DFO. There was a very weak negative linear relationship between serum ferritin and Cyst C eGFR (correlation coefficient -0.25). In the univariable analyses, serum ferritin (p = 0.004), diabetes status (p < 0.001) and chelation therapy (p < 0.001) were statistically significant. In the multivariable model, age (p = 0.033), chelation with DFX (p = 0.05) and diabetes status (p < 0.001) were statistically significant. We found a very weak inverse linear correlation between serum ferritin and Cyst C eGFR. However, when concomitant use of chelation therapy was considered, serum ferritin did not associate with glomerular function. Prospective and larger studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  7. NACS Store Planning Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Store Journal, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Topics discussed by the NACS Store Planning/Renovation Committees in this updated version of the college store renovation manual include: short- and long-range planning, financial considerations, professional planning assistance, the store's image and business character, location considerations, building requirements, space requirements, fixtures,…

  8. Convenience Store Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luter, Robert R.

    This self-paced, individualized instructional guide is designed for use by those who are currently working in a convenience store or by those who wish to learn the basics of convenience store marketing and operations. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: today's convenience store, regular duties and…

  9. Convenience Store Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luter, Robert R.

    This self-paced, individualized instructional guide is designed for use by those who are currently working in a convenience store or by those who wish to learn the basics of convenience store marketing and operations. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: today's convenience store, regular duties and…

  10. Effect of Nordic Walking training on iron metabolism in elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Kortas, Jakub; Prusik, Katarzyna; Flis, Damian; Prusik, Krzysztof; Ziemann, Ewa; Leaver, Neil; Antosiewicz, Jedrzej

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite several, well-documented pro-healthy effects of regular physical training, its influence on body iron stores in elderly people remains unknown. At the same time, body iron accumulation is associated with high risk of different morbidities. Purpose We hypothesized that Nordic Walking training would result in pro-healthy changes in an elderly group of subjects by reducing body iron stores via shifts in iron metabolism-regulating proteins. Methods Thirty-seven women aged 67.7±5.3 years participated in this study. They underwent 32 weeks of training, 1-hour sessions three times a week, between October 2012 and May 2013. Fitness level, blood morphology, CRP, vitamin D, ferritin, hepcidin, and soluble Hjv were assessed before and after the training. Results The training program caused a significant decrease in ferritin, which serves as a good marker of body iron stores. Simultaneously, the physical cardiorespiratory fitness had improved. Furthermore, blood hepcidin was positively correlated with the ferritin concentration after the training. The concentration of blood CRP dropped, but the change was nonsignificant. The applied training resulted in a blood Hjv increase, which was inversely correlated with the vitamin D concentration. Conclusion Overall the Nordic Walking training applied in elderly people significantly reduced blood ferritin concentration, which explains the observed decrease in body iron stores. PMID:26664101

  11. Direct probe of the variability of Coulomb correlation in iron pnictide superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilmercati, P.; Cheney, C. Parks; Bondino, F.; Magnano, E.; Malvestuto, M.; McGuire, M. A.; Sefat, A. S.; Sales, B. C.; Mandrus, D.; Singh, D. J.; Johannes, M. D.; Mannella, N.

    2012-06-01

    We use core-valence-valence Auger spectra to probe the Coulomb repulsion between holes in the valence band of Fe pnictide superconductors. By comparing the two-hole final-state spectra to density functional theory calculations of the single-particle density of states, we extract a measure of the electron correlations that exist in these systems. Our results show that the Coulomb repulsion is highly screened and can definitively be considered as weak. We also find that there are differences between the 1111 and 122 families and even a small variation as a function of the doping x in Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2. We discuss how the values of the hole-hole Coulomb repulsion obtained from our study relate to the onsite Coulomb parameter U used in model and first-principles calculations based on dynamical mean field theory and establish an upper bound for its effective value. Our results impose stringent constraints on model-based phase diagrams that vary with the quantity U or U/W by restricting the latter to a rather small range of values.

  12. Field experiment for determining lead accumulation in rice grains of different genotypes and correlation with iron oxides deposited on rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Cheng; Syu, Chien-Hui; Wang, Pin-Jie; Lee, Dar-Yuan; Fan, Chihhao; Juang, Kai-Wei

    2018-01-01

    Paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.) is a major staple crop in Asia. However, heavy metal accumulation in paddy soil poses a health risk for rice consumption. Although plant uptake of Pb is usually low, Pb concentrations in rice plants have been increasing with Pb contamination in paddy fields. It is known that iron oxide deposits in the rhizosphere influence the absorption of soil Pb by rice plants. In this study, 14 rice cultivars bred in Taiwan, including ten japonica cultivars (HL21, KH145, TC192, TK9, TK14, TK16, TN11, TNG71, TNG84, and TY3) and four indica cultivars (TCS10, TCS17, TCSW2, and TNGS22), were used in a field experiment. We investigated the genotypic variation in rice plant Pb in relation to iron oxides deposited in the rhizosphere, as seen in a suspiciously contaminated site in central Taiwan. The results showed that the cultivars TCSW2, TN11, TNG71, and TNG84 accumulated brown rice Pb exceeding the tolerable level of 0.2mgkg(-1). In contrast, the cultivars TNGS22, TK9, TK14, and TY3 accumulated much lower brown rice Pb (<0.1mgkg(-1)); therefore, they should be prioritized as safe cultivars for sites with potential contamination. Moreover, the iron oxides deposited on the rhizosphere soil show stronger affinity to soil-available Pb than those on the root surface to form iron plaque. The relative tendency of Pb sequestration toward rhizosphere soil was negatively correlated with the Pb concentrations in brown rice. The iron oxides deposited on the rhizosphere soil but not on the root surface to form iron plaque dominate Pb sequestration in the rhizosphere. Therefore, the enhancement of iron oxide deposits on the rhizosphere soil could serve as a barrier preventing soil Pb on the root surface and result in reduced Pb accumulation in brown rice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Iron deficiency in Europe.

    PubMed

    Hercberg, S; Preziosi, P; Galan, P

    2001-04-01

    In Europe, iron deficiency is considered to be one of the main nutritional deficiency disorders affecting large fractions of the population, particularly such physiological groups as children, menstruating women and pregnant women. Some factors such as type of contraception in women, blood donation or minor pathological blood loss (haemorrhoids, gynaecological bleeding...) considerably increase the difficulty of covering iron needs. Moreover, women, especially adolescents consuming low-energy diets, vegetarians and vegans are at high risk of iron deficiency. Although there is no evidence that an absence of iron stores has any adverse consequences, it does indicate that iron nutrition is borderline, since any further reduction in body iron is associated with a decrease in the level of functional compounds such as haemoglobin. The prevalence of iron-deficient anaemia has slightly decreased in infants and menstruating women. Some positive factors may have contributed to reducing the prevalence of iron-deficiency anaemia in some groups of population: the use of iron-fortified formulas and iron-fortified cereals; the use of oral contraceptives and increased enrichment of iron in several countries; and the use of iron supplements during pregnancy in some European countries. It is possible to prevent and control iron deficiency by counseling individuals and families about sound iron nutrition during infancy and beyond, and about iron supplementation during pregnancy, by screening persons on the basis of their risk for iron deficiency, and by treating and following up persons with presumptive iron deficiency. This may help to reduce manifestations of iron deficiency and thus improve public health. Evidence linking iron status with risk of cardiovascular disease or cancer is unconvincing and does not justify changes in food fortification or medical practice, particularly because the benefits of assuring adequate iron intake during growth and development are well established

  14. 9. Interior, original Boiler and Engine Room, Engine Stores Building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Interior, original Boiler and Engine Room, Engine Stores Building, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to south (90mm lens). Note the roof truss system and built-up iron longitudinal roof girders. - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Engine Stores Building, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  15. 10. Interior detail, original Boiler and Engine Room, Engine Stores ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Interior detail, original Boiler and Engine Room, Engine Stores Building, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to east (90mm lens). Note the pin-connected roof truss system and built-up iron longitudinal roof girders. - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Engine Stores Building, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  16. Aggregation of retail stores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Pablo; Boisson, Jean; Larralde, Hernán

    2005-06-01

    We propose a simple model to understand the economic factors that induce aggregation of some businesses over small geographical regions. The model incorporates price competition with neighboring stores, transportation costs and the satisfaction probability of finding the desired product. We show that aggregation is more likely for stores selling expensive products and/or stores carrying only a fraction of the business variety. We illustrate our model with empirical data collected in the city of Lyon.

  17. Effect of iron saturation on the bacteriostasis of human serum: in vivo does not correlate with in vitro saturation.

    PubMed

    Baltimore, R S; Shedd, D G; Pearson, H A

    1982-10-01

    Human serum inhibits the growth of a variety of human pathogens. One of the serum bacteriostatic components is transferrin, the major iron-binding protein. In the presence of transferrin, free iron, which is required for bacterial nucleoprotein synthesis, is unavailable and bacterial growth is inhibited. In an in vitro system, we tested the hypothesis that serum with highly saturated transferrin allows free iron to be available for rapid bacterial growth. We first confirmed the finding that addition of ionic iron sufficient to saturate transferrin in normal sera inhibits the bacteriostatic activity for Escherichia coli. In contrast, no differences were found in the growth rate of E. coli in sera from individuals representing the entire range of transferrin saturation found in humans (iron-deficient, normal, and thalassemic). This finding supports the thesis that iron added in vitro is more easily extracted than in vivo, where it is tightly bound to transferrin, and does not support the contention that ordinary iron treatment predisposes infants to infection.

  18. [Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems].

    PubMed

    Dahlerup, Jens; Lindgren, Stefan; Moum, Björn

    2015-03-10

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are global health problems leading to deterioration in patients' quality of life and more serious prognosis in patients with chronic diseases. The cause of iron deficiency and anemia is usually a combination of increased loss and decreased intestinal absorption and delivery from iron stores due to inflammation. Oral iron is first line treatment, but often hampered by intolerance. Intravenous iron is safe, and the preferred treatment in patients with chronic inflammation and bowel diseases. The goal of treatment is normalisation of hemoglobin concentration and recovery of iron stores. It is important to follow up treatment to ensure that these objectives are met and also long-term in patients with chronic iron loss and/or inflammation to avoid recurrence of anemia.

  19. Light-storing photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Junying; Pan Feng; Hao Weichang; Ge Qi; Wang Tianmian

    2004-12-06

    Light-storing photocatalyst was prepared by coating light-storing phosphor and TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst in sequence on ceramic. The light-storing photocatalyst can store light irradiation and emit slowly. Consequently, the photocatalyst remains active when the irradiation source is cut off. Rhodamine B (RhB) can be decomposed efficiently by this photocatalyst in the dark after it absorbs light irradiation. This photocatalyst is photoreactive in an outdoor environment or can save energy by supplying irradiation intermittently for the photocatalyst.

  20. Iron, Human Growth, and the Global Epidemic of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Sangani, Rahul G.; Ghio, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient utilized in almost every aspect of cell function and its availability has previously limited life. Those same properties which allow iron to function as a catalyst in the reactions of life also present a threat via generation of oxygen-based free radicals. Accordingly; life exists at the interface of iron-deficiency and iron-sufficiency. We propose that: (1) human life is no longer positioned at the limits of iron availability following several decades of fortification and supplementation and there is now an overabundance of the metal among individuals of many societies; (2) this increased iron availability exerts a positive effect on growth by targeting molecules critical in regulating the progression of the cell cycle; there is increased growth in humans provided greater amounts of this metal; and indices of obesity can positively correlate with body stores of iron; and (3) diseases of obesity reflect this over-abundance of iron. Testing potential associations between iron availability and both obesity and obesity-related diseases in populations will be difficult since fortification and supplementation is so extensively practiced. PMID:24152754

  1. Iron studies in hemophilia

    SciTech Connect

    Lottenberg, R.; Kitchens, C.S.; Roessler, G.S.; Noyes, W.D.

    1981-12-01

    Although iron deficiency is not recognized as a usual complication of hemophilia, we questioned whether intermittent occult loss of blood in urine or stool might predispose hemophiliacs to chronic iron deficiency. Seven men with factor VII and one with factor IX deficiency were studied. Blood studied, bone marrow aspirates, urine and stool samples, and ferrokinetics with total-body counting up to five months were examined. These data showed no excessive loss of blood during the study period; however, marrow iron stores were decidedly decreased, being absent in four subjects. We suggest that in some hemophiliacs, iron deposits in tissues such as synovial membranes may form a high proportion of the body's total iron stores.

  2. Leasing the College Store.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Richard M.

    1986-01-01

    A survey of college administrators responsible for supervising college stores found that three factors are strongly considered in deciding whether to lease the college store: available management skills, service orientation, and financial resources. It also found that private and public institutions and large and small institutions rank the…

  3. Polarization dictates iron handling by inflammatory and alternatively activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Corna, Gianfranca; Campana, Lara; Pignatti, Emanuele; Castiglioni, Alessandra; Tagliafico, Enrico; Bosurgi, Lidia; Campanella, Alessandro; Brunelli, Silvia; Manfredi, Angelo A.; Apostoli, Pietro; Silvestri, Laura; Camaschella, Clara; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    Background Macrophages play a key role in iron homeostasis. In peripheral tissues, they are known to polarize into classically activated (or M1) macrophages and alternatively activated (or M2) macrophages. Little is known on whether the polarization program influences the ability of macrophages to store or recycle iron and the molecular machinery involved in the processes. Design and Methods Inflammatory/M1 and alternatively activated/M2 macrophages were propagated in vitro from mouse bone-marrow precursors and polarized in the presence of recombinant interferon-γ or interleukin-4. We characterized and compared their ability to handle radioactive iron, the characteristics of the intracellular iron pools and the expression of molecules involved in internalization, storage and export of the metal. Moreover we verified the influence of iron on the relative ability of polarized macrophages to activate antigen-specific T cells. Results M1 macrophages have low iron regulatory protein 1 and 2 binding activity, express high levels of ferritin H, low levels of transferrin receptor 1 and internalize – albeit with low efficiency -iron only when its extracellular concentration is high. In contrast, M2 macrophages have high iron regulatory protein binding activity, express low levels of ferritin H and high levels of transferrin receptor 1. M2 macrophages have a larger intracellular labile iron pool, effectively take up and spontaneously release iron at low concentrations and have limited storage ability. Iron export correlates with the expression of ferroportin, which is higher in M2 macrophages. M1 and M2 cells activate antigen-specific, MHC class II-restricted T cells. In the absence of the metal, only M1 macrophages are effective. Conclusions Cytokines that drive macrophage polarization ultimately control iron handling, leading to the differentiation of macrophages into a subset which has a relatively sealed intracellular iron content (M1) or into a subset endowed with

  4. Iatrogenic Iron Overload in Dialysis Patients at the Beginning of the 21st Century.

    PubMed

    Rostoker, Guy; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Fishbane, Steven

    2016-05-01

    Iron overload used to be considered rare in hemodialysis patients but its clinical frequency is now increasingly realized. The liver is the main site of iron storage and the liver iron concentration (LIC) is closely correlated with total iron stores in patients with secondary hemosideroses and genetic hemochromatosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is now the gold standard method for LIC estimation and monitoring in non-renal patients. Studies of LIC in hemodialysis patients by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic susceptometry have demonstrated a strong relation between the risk of iron overload and the use of intravenous (IV) iron products prescribed at doses determined by the iron biomarker cutoffs contained in current anemia management guidelines. These findings have challenged the validity of both iron biomarker cutoffs and current clinical guidelines, especially with respect to recommended IV iron doses. Three long-term observational studies have recently suggested that excessive IV iron doses may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events and death in hemodialysis patients. We postulate that iatrogenic iron overload in the era of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents may silently increase complications in dialysis patients without creating frank clinical signs and symptoms. High hepcidin-25 levels were recently linked to fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events in dialysis patients. It is therefore tempting to postulate that the main pathophysiological pathway leading to these events may involve the pleiotropic master hormone hepcidin (synergized by fibroblast growth factor 23), which regulates iron metabolism. Oxidative stress as a result of IV iron infusions and iron overload, by releasing labile non-transferrin-bound iron, might represent a 'second hit' on the vascular bed. Finally, iron deposition in the myocardium of patients with severe iron overload might also play a role in the pathogenesis of sudden death in some patients.

  5. Serum fibroblast growth factor 23, serum iron and bone mineral density in premenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Imel, Erik A.; Liu, Ziyue; McQueen, Amie K.; Acton, Dena; Acton, Anthony; Padgett, Leah R.; Peacock, Munro; Econs, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) circulates as active protein and inactive fragments. Low iron status increases FGF23 gene expression, and iron deficiency is common. We hypothesized that in healthy premenopausal women, serum iron influences C-terminal and intact FGF23 concentrations, and that iron and FGF23 associate with bone mineral density (BMD). Serum iron, iron binding capacity, percent iron saturation, phosphorus, and other biochemistries were measured in stored fasting samples from healthy premenopausal white (n=1898) and black women (n= 994), age 20–55 years. Serum C-terminal and intact FGF23 were measured in a subset (1631 white and 296 black women). BMD was measured at the lumbar spine and femur neck. Serum phosphorus, calcium, alkaline phosphatase and creatinine were lower in white women than black women (p<0.001). Serum iron (p<0.0001) and intact FGF23 (p< 0.01) were higher in white women. C-terminal FGF23 did not differ between races. Phosphorus correlated with intact FGF23 (white women, r=0.120, p<0.0001; black women r=0.163, p<0.01). However, phosphorus correlated with C-terminal FGF23 only in black women (r=0.157, p<0.01). Intact FGF23 did not correlate with iron. C-terminal FGF23 correlated inversely with iron (white women r=−0.134, p<0.0001; black women r=−0.188, p<0.01), having a steeper slope at iron <50 mcg/dl than >50 mcg/dl. Longitudinal changes in iron predicted changes in C-terminal FGF23. Spine BMD correlated with iron negatively (r=−0.076, p<0.01) in white women; femur neck BMD correlated with iron negatively (r=−0.119, p<0.0001) in black women. Both relationships were eliminated in weight-adjusted models. BMD did not correlate with FGF23. Serum iron did not relate to intact FGF23, but was inversely related to C-terminal FGF23. Intact FGF23 correlated with serum phosphorus. In weight-adjusted models, BMD was not related to intact FGF23, C-terminal FGF23 or iron. The influence of iron on FGF23 gene expression is not important

  6. Serum fibroblast growth factor 23, serum iron and bone mineral density in premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Imel, Erik A; Liu, Ziyue; McQueen, Amie K; Acton, Dena; Acton, Anthony; Padgett, Leah R; Peacock, Munro; Econs, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) circulates as active protein and inactive fragments. Low iron status increases FGF23 gene expression, and iron deficiency is common. We hypothesized that in healthy premenopausal women, serum iron influences C-terminal and intact FGF23 concentrations, and that iron and FGF23 associate with bone mineral density (BMD). Serum iron, iron binding capacity, percent iron saturation, phosphorus, and other biochemistries were measured in stored fasting samples from healthy premenopausal white (n=1898) and black women (n=994), age 20-55years. Serum C-terminal and intact FGF23 were measured in a subset (1631 white and 296 black women). BMD was measured at the lumbar spine and femur neck. Serum phosphorus, calcium, alkaline phosphatase and creatinine were lower in white women than black women (p<0.001). Serum iron (p<0.0001) and intact FGF23 (p<0.01) were higher in white women. C-terminal FGF23 did not differ between races. Phosphorus correlated with intact FGF23 (white women, r=0.120, p<0.0001; black women r=0.163, p<0.01). However, phosphorus correlated with C-terminal FGF23 only in black women (r=0.157, p<0.01). Intact FGF23 did not correlate with iron. C-terminal FGF23 correlated inversely with iron (white women r=-0.134, p<0.0001; black women r=-0.188, p<0.01), having a steeper slope at iron <50mcg/dl than ≥50mcg/dl. Longitudinal changes in iron predicted changes in C-terminal FGF23. Spine BMD correlated with iron negatively (r=-0.076, p<0.01) in white women; femur neck BMD correlated with iron negatively (r=-0.119, p<0.0001) in black women. Both relationships were eliminated in weight-adjusted models. BMD did not correlate with FGF23. Serum iron did not relate to intact FGF23, but was inversely related to C-terminal FGF23. Intact FGF23 correlated with serum phosphorus. In weight-adjusted models, BMD was not related to intact FGF23, C-terminal FGF23 or iron. The influence of iron on FGF23 gene expression is not important in

  7. Serum hepcidin measured by immunochemical and mass-spectrometric methods and their correlation with iron status indicators in healthy children aged 0.5-3 y.

    PubMed

    Uijterschout, Lieke; Swinkels, Dorine W; Domellöf, Magnus; Lagerqvist, Carina; Hudig, Cisca; Tjalsma, Harrold; Vos, Rimke; van Goudoever, Johannes B; Brus, Frank

    2014-10-01

    The diagnostic use of hepcidin is limited by the absence of standardization and lack of age-specific reference ranges in children in particular. The aim of this study was to determine reference ranges of serum hepcidin in healthy children aged 0.5-3 y using mass spectometry (MS) and a commercial immunochemical (IC) assay, and to investigate its association with other indicators of iron status and inflammation. We included 400 healthy children aged 0.5-3 y. We constructed reference ranges for MS-hepcidin and IC-hepcidin concentrations using the median, P2.5, and P97.5 in a normative population of 219 children with no anemia, no infection and/or inflammation, and no iron deficiency. Median concentrations (P2.5-P97.5) of MS-hepcidin and IC-hepcidin were 3.6 nmol/l (0.6-13.9 nmol/l) and 7.9 nmol/l (1.9-28.6 nmol/l), respectively. We found a good correlation between both methods. However, MS-hepcidin was consistently lower than IC-hepcidin. Hepcidin correlated with ferritin and C-reactive protein. We provide reference ranges for hepcidin for an MS and commercial IC method. Absolute values between assays differed significantly, but hepcidin concentrations obtained by MS and IC methods correlate with each other, and both correlate with ferritin and CRP.

  8. Storing Red Oak Acorns

    Treesearch

    F. T. Bonner

    1973-01-01

    Cherrybark, Shumard, and water oak acorns can be stored for 3 years or longer if kept at a moisture content of at least 30 percent of fresh weight and at a temperature of 37F. Polyethylene bags are good containers.

  9. Storing your medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000534.htm Storing your medicines To use the sharing features on this page, ... child latch or lock. Do not use Damaged Medicine Damaged medicine may make you sick. DO NOT ...

  10. The efficacy of tissue Doppler imaging in predicting myocardial iron load in patients with beta-thalassemia major: correlation with T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Aypar, Ebru; Alehan, Dursun; Hazirolan, Tuncay; Gümrük, Fatma

    2010-04-01

    Tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) can detect myocardial dysfunction related to iron load in patients with beta-thalassemia major (TM). We aimed to assess the efficacy of pulsed-wave TDI (PW-TDI) in predicting myocardial iron load in patients with TM using T2* magnetic resonance (MR) as the gold-standard non-invasive diagnostic test. 33 asymptomatic TM patients, mean aged 18 +/- 6 years (6-31) with normal left ventricular (LV) global systolic function were evaluated by conventional echocardiography and PW-TDI. Results were compared with 20 age and sex-matched controls. TDI measures included myocardial systolic (Sm), early (Em) and late (Am) diastolic velocities at basal and middle segments of septal and lateral LV wall. Myocardial iron deposition were measured in 29/33 patients by T2* MR. TM patients were also subgrouped according to those with iron load (T2* 20 ms). Mean T2* was 12.3 +/- 7.8 ms (4-31.3). Abnormal myocardial iron load (T2* < 20 ms) was found in 25/29 (86%) patients. The following TDI measures were lower in patients than in controls: basal septal Em (P < 0.001) and Am (P < 0.05), mid-septal Am (P < 0.05), mid-lateral LV wall Sm (P < 0.05) and Am (P < 0.05). Regional myocardial dysfunction were more prominent in patients with T2* correlated with mid-septal T2*(r = 0.44, P = 0.023 and r = 0.54, P = 0.004, respectively). The PW-TDI parameters and the cut-off values for predicting presence of myocardial iron load were determined. PW-TDI technique was found both sensitive and specific in predicting presence of myocardial iron load in TM patients with normal LV global systolic function. Therefore, it can be used for screening of TM patients.

  11. Correlation of iron deposition and change of gliocyte metabolism in the basal ganglia region evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging techniques: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haodi; Wang, Xiaoming

    2016-02-01

    We assessed the correlation between iron deposition and the change of gliocyte metabolism in healthy subjects' basal ganglia region, by using 3D-enhanced susceptibility weighted angiography (ESWAN) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS). Seventy-seven healthy volunteers (39 female and 38 male subjects; age range: 24-82 years old) were enrolled in the experiment including ESWAN and proton MRS sequences, consent for which was provided by themselves or their guardians. For each subject, the mean phase value gained by ESWAN was used to evaluate the iron deposition; choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) and mI/Cr ratios gained by (1)H-MRS were used to evaluate gliocyte metabolism in the basal ganglia region of both sides. The paired t test was used to test the difference between the two sides of the basal ganglia region. Linear regression was performed to evaluate the relation between mean phase value and age. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated to analyze the relationship between the result of ESWAN and (1)H-MRS. There was no difference between the two sides of the basal ganglia region in the mean phase value and Cho/Cr. But in mI/Cr the mean phase value of each nucleus in bilateral basal ganglia decreased with increasing age. There are 16 r-values between the mean phase value and Cho/Cr and mI/Cr in bilateral basal ganglia region. And each of all p-values is less than 0.001 (p < 0.001). Iron deposition in the bilateral basal ganglia is associated with the change of gliocyte metabolism with increasing age. Iron deposition in each nucleus of the basal ganglia region changes with age.

  12. Store Separation Methodology Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    memory for operation. (This also depends upon the program application .) The aircraft fuselage, separated store body, and adjacent stores are modeled...ORGANIZATION 6b. OFFICE SYMBOL 7a. NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION Naval Postgraduate School (If applicable ) Naval Postgraduate School 31 6c ADDRESS (City...SYMBOL 9 PROCUREMENT INSTRUMENT IDENTIFICATION NUMBER ORGANIZATION (If applicable ) 8c ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 10 SOURCE OF FUNDING

  13. Provenance Store Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, Patrick R.; Gibson, Tara D.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Stephan, Eric G.

    2008-03-01

    Requirements for the provenance store and access API are developed. Existing RDF stores and APIs are evaluated against the requirements and performance benchmarks. The team’s conclusion is to use MySQL as a database backend, with a possible move to Oracle in the near-term future. Both Jena and Sesame’s APIs will be supported, but new code will use the Jena API

  14. Cytoscape App Store

    PubMed Central

    Lotia, Samad; Montojo, Jason; Dong, Yue; Bader, Gary D.; Pico, Alexander R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Cytoscape is an open source software tool for biological network visualization and analysis, which can be extended with independently developed apps. We launched the Cytoscape App Store to highlight the important features that apps add to Cytoscape, enable researchers to find and install apps they need and help developers promote their apps. Availability: The App Store is available at http://apps.cytoscape.org. Contact: apico@gladstone.ucsf.edu PMID:23595664

  15. Health food stores investigation.

    PubMed

    Gourdine, S P; Traiger, W W; Cohen, D S

    1983-09-01

    In accordance with the New York City Department of Consumer Affairs' mandate to educate consumers and to prevent fraud and deception in the marketplace, the agency conducted a three-month investigation of city health food stores. Twenty-three health food businesses located throughout the five boroughs were visited from September through November 1982 in order to ascertain what those stores sold and how their merchandise compared, in quality and price, with items sold by other businesses.

  16. Evaluation of iron status in European adolescents through biochemical iron indicators: the HELENA Study.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, M; Mistura, L; Patterson, E; Sjöström, M; Díaz, L E; Stehle, P; Gonzalez-Gross, M; Kersting, M; Widhalm, K; Molnár, D; Gottrand, F; De Henauw, S; Manios, Y; Kafatos, A; Moreno, L A; Leclercq, C

    2011-03-01

    To assess the iron status among European adolescents through selected biochemical parameters in a cross-sectional study performed in 10 European cities. Iron status was defined utilising biochemical indicators. Iron depletion was defined as low serum ferritin (SF<15 μg/l). Iron deficiency (ID) was defined as high-soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR>8.5 mg/l) plus iron depletion. Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) was defined as ID with haemoglobin (Hb) below the WHO cutoff for age and sex: 12.0 g/dl for girls and for boys aged 12.5-14.99 years and 13.0 g/dl for boys aged ≥15 years. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used as analytical method for SF, sTfR and C-reactive protein (CRP). Subjects with indication of inflammation (CRP >5 mg/l) were excluded from the analyses. A total of 940 adolescents aged 12.5-17.49 years (438 boys and 502 girls) were involved. The percentage of iron depletion was 17.6%, significantly higher in girls (21.0%) compared with boys (13.8%). The overall percentage of ID and IDA was 4.7 and 1.3%, respectively, with no significant differences between boys and girls. A correlation was observed between log (SF) and Hb (r = 0.36, P < 0.01), and between log (sTfR) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin (r = -0.30, P < 0.01). Iron body stores were estimated on the basis of log (sTfR/SF). A higher percentage of negative values of body iron was recorded in girls (16.5%) with respect to boys (8.3%), and body iron values tended to increase with age in boys, whereas the values remained stable in girls. To ensure adequate iron stores, specific attention should be given to girls at European level to ensure that their dietary intake of iron is adequate.

  17. Evaluation of iron status in European adolescents through biochemical iron indicators: the HELENA Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, M; Mistura, L; Patterson, E; Sjöström, M; Díaz, L E; Stehle, P; Gonzalez-Gross, M; Kersting, M; Widhalm, K; Molnár, D; Gottrand, F; De Henauw, S; Manios, Y; Kafatos, A; Moreno, L A; Leclercq, C

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objectives: To assess the iron status among European adolescents through selected biochemical parameters in a cross-sectional study performed in 10 European cities. Subjects/Methods: Iron status was defined utilising biochemical indicators. Iron depletion was defined as low serum ferritin (SF<15 μg/l). Iron deficiency (ID) was defined as high-soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR>8.5 mg/l) plus iron depletion. Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) was defined as ID with haemoglobin (Hb) below the WHO cutoff for age and sex: 12.0 g/dl for girls and for boys aged 12.5–14.99 years and 13.0 g/dl for boys aged ⩾15 years. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used as analytical method for SF, sTfR and C-reactive protein (CRP). Subjects with indication of inflammation (CRP >5 mg/l) were excluded from the analyses. A total of 940 adolescents aged 12.5–17.49 years (438 boys and 502 girls) were involved. Results: The percentage of iron depletion was 17.6%, significantly higher in girls (21.0%) compared with boys (13.8%). The overall percentage of ID and IDA was 4.7 and 1.3%, respectively, with no significant differences between boys and girls. A correlation was observed between log (SF) and Hb (r=0.36, P<0.01), and between log (sTfR) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin (r=−0.30, P<0.01). Iron body stores were estimated on the basis of log (sTfR/SF). A higher percentage of negative values of body iron was recorded in girls (16.5%) with respect to boys (8.3%), and body iron values tended to increase with age in boys, whereas the values remained stable in girls. Conclusions: To ensure adequate iron stores, specific attention should be given to girls at European level to ensure that their dietary intake of iron is adequate. PMID:21245877

  18. [Morphology of soil iron oxides and its correlation with soil-forming process and forming conditions in a karst mountain].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Wei; Zhu, Zhang-Xiong; Fu, Wa-Li; Wen, Zhi-Lin

    2012-06-01

    The quantity and morphology of iron oxides are indicators of soil forming-process and forming conditions. In order to analyze the connection between soil iron oxides and soil forming conditions and degenerative process of karst ecosystem, we have chosen 14 soil profiles on the top and middle section of Jinfo Mountain, a typical karst slope in Chongqing, China. Morphology and contents of soil iron oxides were studied by using chemical selective extraction techniques. We draw conclusions: 1) total iron (Fe(t)) is mainly controlled by parent material and lithology. Significant difference of Fe(t) content exists between soils in Top Mountain (51.49 g x kg(-1), mean value from 5 profiles) and soils at the middle sector of North Slope (86.29 g x kg(-1), mean value of 9 profiles); 2) the results show low concentration of F(d) (29.16 g x kg(-1)) and low ratio of Fe(d) to Fe(t)(35.40%) in soil clay under conditions of high elevation and low temperature on Top Mountain. In contrast, the results indicate advanced weathering and soil-forming process at middle slope sites due to high temperature; this is supported by high mean values of Fe(d) (43.92 g x kg(-1)) and ratio of Fe(d)/Fe(t) in clay (60.41%); 3) long humid climatic setting and large numbers of soil organic matter on top of the mountain result in high activation degrees (F(o)/Fe(d)) and high complexation degrees (Fe(p)/Fe(d)); mean values of them are 73.51%, 17.21% respectively, which are higher than that of soils at middle slope sites (13.06%, 0.41%); 4) after degradation or deforestation of secondary forestland (pines massoniana among bushes) at middle section of the hillslope, soil free iron oxides (Fe(d)) and total iron oxides (Fe(t)) decrease as well as soil organic carbon and clay, because of progressively increasing of soil erosion. Average contents of Fe(t) and Fe(d) in clay from 2 shrub profiles are 98.25 g x kg(-1), 50.81 g x kg(-1) respectively. However, the four tillage soils we have studied reveal lower

  19. Iron and transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Waldvogel-Abramovski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Blood bankers have focused their energy to secure blood transfusion, and only recently have studies been published on the effect of blood donation on iron metabolism. In many facilities, hemoglobin measurement is only performed just before or even during blood donation, but the determination of iron stores is largely ignored. The 2013 paradox of transfusion medicine is due to the fact that blood donation may be harmful and leads to iron deficiency with or without anemia, but for other individuals, it may be a healthy measure preventing type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to discuss iron metabolism in the perspective of blood donation, notably regarding their possible genetic profiles that eventually will discriminate "good" iron absorbers from "bad" iron responders. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

  20. Intravenous Iron Repletion Does Not Significantly Decrease Platelet Counts in CKD Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Dossabhoy, Neville R.; Gascoyne, Rebecca; Turley, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We sought to investigate the effect of IV iron repletion on platelet (PLT) counts in CKD patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Methods. We conducted a retrospective chart review, including all patients with CKD and IDA who were treated with iron dextran total dose infusion (TDI) between 2002 and 2007. Patient demographics were noted, and laboratory values for creatinine, hemoglobin (Hgb), iron stores and PLT were recorded pre- and post-dose. Results. 153 patients received a total of 251 doses of TDI (mean ± SD = 971 ± 175 mg); age 69 ± 12 years and Creatinine 3.3 ± 1.9 mg/dL. All CKD stages were represented (stage 4 commonest). Hgb and Fe stores improved post-TDI (P ≪ 0.001). There was a very mild decrease in PLT (pre-TDI 255 versus post-TDI 244, P = 0.30). The mild reduction in PLT after TDI remained non-significant (P > 0.05) when data was stratified by molecular weight (MW) of iron dextran used (low versus high), as well as by dose administered (<1000 versus ≥1000 mg). Linear regression analysis between pre-dose PLT and Tsat and Fe showed R2 of 0.01 and 0.04, respectively. Conclusion. Correction of iron deficiency did not significantly lower PLT in CKD patients, regardless of MW or dose used. Correlation of PLT to severity of iron deficiency was very weak. PMID:23476772

  1. Intravenous Iron Repletion Does Not Significantly Decrease Platelet Counts in CKD Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Dossabhoy, Neville R; Gascoyne, Rebecca; Turley, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We sought to investigate the effect of IV iron repletion on platelet (PLT) counts in CKD patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Methods. We conducted a retrospective chart review, including all patients with CKD and IDA who were treated with iron dextran total dose infusion (TDI) between 2002 and 2007. Patient demographics were noted, and laboratory values for creatinine, hemoglobin (Hgb), iron stores and PLT were recorded pre- and post-dose. Results. 153 patients received a total of 251 doses of TDI (mean ± SD = 971 ± 175 mg); age 69 ± 12 years and Creatinine 3.3 ± 1.9 mg/dL. All CKD stages were represented (stage 4 commonest). Hgb and Fe stores improved post-TDI (P ≪ 0.001). There was a very mild decrease in PLT (pre-TDI 255 versus post-TDI 244, P = 0.30). The mild reduction in PLT after TDI remained non-significant (P > 0.05) when data was stratified by molecular weight (MW) of iron dextran used (low versus high), as well as by dose administered (<1000 versus ≥1000 mg). Linear regression analysis between pre-dose PLT and Tsat and Fe showed R2 of 0.01 and 0.04, respectively. Conclusion. Correction of iron deficiency did not significantly lower PLT in CKD patients, regardless of MW or dose used. Correlation of PLT to severity of iron deficiency was very weak.

  2. Iron status and its relations with oxidative damage and bone loss during long-duration space flight on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Sara R; Morgan, Jennifer L L; Smith, Scott M

    2013-07-01

    Increases in stored iron and dietary intake of iron during space flight have raised concern about the risk of excess iron and oxidative damage, particularly in bone. The objectives of this study were to perform a comprehensive assessment of iron status in men and women before, during, and after long-duration space flight and to quantify the association of iron status with oxidative damage and bone loss. Fasting blood and 24-h urine samples were collected from 23 crew members before, during, and after missions lasting 50 to 247 d to the International Space Station. Serum ferritin and body iron increased early in flight, and transferrin and transferrin receptors decreased later, which indicated that early increases in body iron stores occurred through the mobilization of iron to storage tissues. Acute phase proteins indicated no evidence of an inflammatory response during flight. Serum ferritin was positively correlated with the oxidative damage markers 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (r = 0.53, P < 0.001) and prostaglandin F2α (r = 0.26, P < 0.001), and the greater the area under the curve for ferritin during flight, the greater the decrease in bone mineral density in the total hip (P = 0.031), trochanter (P = 0.006), hip neck (P = 0.044), and pelvis (P = 0.049) after flight. Increased iron stores may be a risk factor for oxidative damage and bone resorption.

  3. School Store Operation and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barger, Bill J.

    Written to assist the teacher-sponsor responsible for operating a school store, this book offers a system developed specifically for the operation and control of such a store. It also shows ways in which a school store can be used for training students. Chapter 1 discusses a successful school store operated by students and a store record system…

  4. Fatal anaphylactic reaction to iron sucrose in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ajay; Dave, Nikhil; Viradiya, Kishor

    2013-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia in pregnancy can have serious deleterious effects for both mother and fetus. Parenteral iron therapy in iron-deficiency anemia is recommended in patients where oral iron therapy is ineffective due to malabsorption states and non-compliance. Compared to oral iron therapy, intravenous iron results in much more rapid resolution of iron-deficiency anemia with minimal adverse reactions. Iron sucrose has a favorable safety profile and is an alternative to other forms of parenteral iron therapy in correction of iron stores depletion. Immune mechanisms and iron agent releasing bioactive, partially unbound iron into the circulation, resulting in oxidative stress appears to cause severe adverse reactions. Although iron sucrose has a favorable safety profile in comparison to other parenteral iron preparations, this report highlights a fatal anaphylactic shock to iron sucrose in a pregnant woman with severe iron deficiency non-compliant to oral iron therapy.

  5. New rat models of iron sucrose-induced iron overload.

    PubMed

    Vu'o'ng Lê, Bá; Khorsi-Cauet, Hafida; Villegier, Anne-Sophie; Bach, Véronique; Gay-Quéheillard, Jérôme

    2011-07-01

    The majority of murine models of iron sucrose-induced iron overload were carried out in adult subjects. This cannot reflect the high risk of iron overload in children who have an increased need for iron. In this study, we developed four experimental iron overload models in young rats using iron sucrose and evaluated different markers of iron overload, tissue oxidative stress and inflammation as its consequences. Iron overload was observed in all iron-treated rats, as evidenced by significant increases in serum iron indices, expression of liver hepcidin gene and total tissue iron content compared with control rats. We also showed that total tissue iron content was mainly associated with the dose of iron whereas serum iron indices depended essentially on the duration of iron administration. However, no differences in tissue inflammatory and antioxidant parameters from controls were observed. Furthermore, only rats exposed to daily iron injection at a dose of 75 mg/kg body weight for one week revealed a significant increase in lipid peroxidation in iron-treated rats compared with their controls. The present results suggest a correlation between iron overload levels and the dose of iron, as well as the duration and frequency of iron injection and confirm that iron sucrose may not play a crucial role in inflammation and oxidative stress. This study provides important information about iron sucrose-induced iron overload in rats and may be useful for iron sucrose therapy for iron deficiency anemia as well as for the prevention and diagnosis of iron sucrose-induced iron overload in pediatric patients.

  6. Assessment of liver iron overload by T2-quantitative magnetic resonance imaging: correlation of T2-QMRI measurements with serum ferritin concentration and histologic grading of siderosis.

    PubMed

    Papakonstantinou, O G; Maris, T G; Kostaridou, V; Gouliamos, A D; Koutoulas, G K; Kalovidouris, A E; Papavassiliou, G B; Kordas, G; Kattamis, C; Vlahos, L J

    1995-01-01

    To correlate hepatic 1/T2 values obtained by means of a T2-Quantitative MRI (T2-QMRI) technique with three widely applied methods for the evaluation of hemosiderosis, i.e., (a) liver iron concentrations (LFeC) (b) serum ferritin (SF), and (c) histologic grading of siderosis. The impact of coexisting hepatitis was also considered. T2-QMRI measurements were compared with signal intensity (SI) ratio measurements on conventional SE images. Liver T2 relaxation times were calculated in 40 thalassemic patients, on a 0.5 T magnetic resonance imaging system using a multiple spin-echo sequence with parameters: TR = 2500 ms, TE = 12 ms in 20 symmetrically repeatable echoes. (a) 1/T2 values were well correlated (r = 0.97) with liver iron concentrations, which ranged from 2.32 to 18.0 mg/g dry weight (normal < 1.6 mg/g). (b) 1/T2 values were also correlated with serum ferritin levels (r = 0.84). At various 1/T2 values, serum ferritin levels were higher for the anti-HCV(+) patients than the anti-HCV(-) ones. (c) T2 values corresponding to successive grades of siderosis presented statistically significant differences. (d) SI ratio measurement assigned less statistically significant results, as compared to T2 values. T2-QMRI measurement of T2 relaxation time is more accurate than SI ratios in evaluating liver iron overload. It is particularly useful for hemosiderotic patients with coexisting hepatitis since, in this case, serum ferritin is not considered a reliable index of hemosiderosis.

  7. Local Correlation Effects on thes±- ands++-Wave Superconductivities Mediated by Magnetic and Orbital Fluctuations in the Five-Orbital Hubbard Model for Iron Pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, Jun; Yamada, Takemi; Yanagi, Yuki; Ōno, Yoshiaki

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the electronic state and the superconductivity in the 5-orbital Hubbard model for iron pnictides by using the dynamical mean-field theory in conjunction with the Eliashberg equation. The renormalization factor exhibits significant orbital dependence resulting in the large change in the band dispersion as observed in recent ARPES experiments. The critical interactions towards the magnetic, orbital and superconducting instabilities are suppressed as compared with those from the random phase approximation (RPA) due to local correlation effects. Remarkably, the s++-pairing phase due to the orbital fluctuation is largely expanded relative to the RPA result, while the s+--pairing phase due to the magnetic fluctuation is reduced.

  8. Genetic Variability, Genotype × Environment Interaction, Correlation, and GGE Biplot Analysis for Grain Iron and Zinc Concentration and Other Agronomic Traits in RIL Population of Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench)

    PubMed Central

    Phuke, Rahul M.; Anuradha, Kotla; Radhika, Kommineni; Jabeen, Farzana; Anuradha, Ghanta; Ramesh, Thatikunta; Hariprasanna, K.; Mehtre, Shivaji P.; Deshpande, Santosh P.; Anil, Gaddameedi; Das, Roma R.; Rathore, Abhishek; Hash, Tom; Reddy, Belum V. S.; Kumar, Are Ashok

    2017-01-01

    The low grain iron and zinc densities are well documented problems in food crops, affecting crop nutritional quality especially in cereals. Sorghum is a major source of energy and micronutrients for majority of population in Africa and central India. Understanding genetic variation, genotype × environment interaction and association between these traits is critical for development of improved cultivars with high iron and zinc. A total of 336 sorghum RILs (Recombinant Inbred Lines) were evaluated for grain iron and zinc concentration along with other agronomic traits for 2 years at three locations. The results showed that large variability exists in RIL population for both micronutrients (Iron = 10.8 to 76.4 mg kg−1 and Zinc = 10.2 to 58.7 mg kg−1, across environments) and agronomic traits. Genotype × environment interaction for both micronutrients (iron and zinc) was highly significant. GGE biplots comparison for grain iron and zinc showed greater variation across environments. The results also showed that G × E was substantial for grain iron and zinc, hence wider testing needed for taking care of G × E interaction to breed micronutrient rich sorghum lines. Iron and zinc concentration showed high significant positive correlation (across environment = 0.79; p < 0.01) indicating possibility of simultaneous effective selection for both the traits. The RIL population showed good variability and high heritabilities (>0.60, in individual environments) for Fe and Zn and other traits studied indicating its suitability to map QTL for iron and zinc. PMID:28529518

  9. Method and apparatus for storing hydrogen isotopes. [stored as uranium hydride in a block of copper

    DOEpatents

    McMullen, J.W.; Wheeler, M.G.; Cullingford, H.S.; Sherman, R.H.

    1982-08-10

    An improved method and apparatus for storing isotopes of hydrogen (especially tritium) are provided. The hydrogen gas is stored as hydrides of material (for example uranium) within boreholes in a block of copper. The mass of the block is critically important to the operation, as is the selection of copper, because no cooling pipes are used. Because no cooling pipes are used, there can be no failure due to cooling pipes. And because copper is used instead of stainless steel, a significantly higher temperature can be reached before the eutectic formation of uranium with copper occurs, (the eutectic of uranium with the iron in stainless steel forms at a significantly lower temperature).

  10. The use of skin Fe levels as a surrogate marker for organ Fe levels, to monitor treatment in cases of iron overload.

    PubMed

    Farquharson, M J; Bagshaw, A P; Porter, J B; Abeysinghe, R D

    2000-05-01

    A system based on the detection of K-shell x-ray fluorescence (XRF) has been used to investigate whether a correlation exists between the concentration of iron in the skin and the concentration of iron in the liver, as the degree of iron loading increases. The motivation behind this work is to develop a non-invasive method of determining the extent of the body's iron stores via measurements on the skin, in order to monitor the efficacy of chelation therapy administered to patients with beta-thalassaemia. Sprague-Dawley rats were iron loaded via injections of iron dextran and subsequently treated with the iron chelator CP94. The non-haem iron concentrations of the liver, heart and spleen were determined using bathophenanthroline sulphonate as the chromogen reagent. Samples of abdominal skin were taken and the iron concentrations determined using XRF. A strong correlation between the skin iron concentration and the liver iron concentration has been demonstrated (R2 = 0.86). Similar correlations exist for the heart and the spleen. These results show that this method holds great potential as a tool in the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary haemochromatosis and beta-thalassaemia.

  11. The use of skin Fe levels as a surrogate marker for organ Fe levels, to monitor treatment in cases of iron overload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Michael J.; Bagshaw, Andrew P.; Porter, John B.; Abeysinghe, R. D.

    2000-05-01

    A system based on the detection of K-shell x-ray fluorescence (XRF) has been used to investigate whether a correlation exists between the concentration of iron in the skin and the concentration of iron in the liver, as the degree of iron loading increases. The motivation behind this work is to develop a non-invasive method of determining the extent of the body's iron stores via measurements on the skin, in order to monitor the efficacy of chelation therapy administered to patients with β-thalassaemia. Sprague-Dawley rats were iron loaded via injections of iron dextran and subsequently treated with the iron chelator CP94. The non-haem iron concentrations of the liver, heart and spleen were determined using bathophenanthroline sulphonate as the chromogen reagent. Samples of abdominal skin were taken and the iron concentrations determined using XRF. A strong correlation between the skin iron concentration and the liver iron concentration has been demonstrated (R2 = 0.86). Similar correlations exist for the heart and the spleen. These results show that this method holds great potential as a tool in the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary haemochromatosis and β-thalassaemia.

  12. Iron homeostasis in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Erik R; Shah, Yatrik M

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient that is tightly regulated. A principal function of the liver is the regulation of iron homeostasis. The liver senses changes in systemic iron requirements and can regulate iron concentrations in a robust and rapid manner. The last 10 years have led to the discovery of several regulatory mechanisms in the liver which control the production of iron regulatory genes, storage capacity, and iron mobilization. Dysregulation of these functions leads to an imbalance of iron, which is the primary causes of iron-related disorders. Anemia and iron overload are two of the most prevalent disorders worldwide and affect over a billion people. Several mutations in liver-derived genes have been identified, demonstrating the central role of the liver in iron homeostasis. During conditions of excess iron, the liver increases iron storage and protects other tissues, namely the heart and pancreas from iron-induced cellular damage. However, a chronic increase in liver iron stores results in excess reactive oxygen species production and liver injury. Excess liver iron is one of the major mechanisms leading to increased steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:23720289

  13. An update on iron physiology

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Manuel; Villar, Isabel; García-Erce, José Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient, as it is required for adequate erythropoietic function, oxidative metabolism and cellular immune responses. Although the absorption of dietary iron (1-2 mg/d) is regulated tightly, it is just balanced with losses. Therefore, internal turnover of iron is essential to meet the requirements for erythropoiesis (20-30 mg/d). Increased iron requirements, limited external supply, and increased blood loss may lead to iron deficiency (ID) and iron-deficiency anemia. Hepcidin, which is made primarily in hepatocytes in response to liver iron levels, inflammation, hypoxia and anemia, is the main iron regulatory hormone. Once secreted into the circulation, hepcidin binds ferroportin on enterocytes and macrophages, which triggers its internalization and lysosomal degradation. Thus, in chronic inflammation, the excess of hepcidin decreases iron absorption and prevents iron recycling, which results in hypoferremia and iron-restricted erythropoiesis, despite normal iron stores (functional ID), and anemia of chronic disease (ACD), which can evolve to ACD plus true ID (ACD + ID). In contrast, low hepcidin expression may lead to iron overload, and vice versa. Laboratory tests provide evidence of iron depletion in the body, or reflect iron-deficient red cell production. The appropriate combination of these laboratory tests help to establish a correct diagnosis of ID status and anemia. PMID:19787824

  14. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment.

  15. The Store Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical and robotic technologies are merging to present a wonderful opportunity to develop artificial limbs and prosthetic devices for humans injured on the job, in the military, or due to disease. In this challenge, students will have the opportunity to design a store or online service that specifically dedicates itself to amputees. Described…

  16. Cooling of Stored Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, F.

    1986-06-10

    Beam cooling methods developed for the accumulation of antiprotons are being employed to assist in the performance of experiments in Nuclear and Particle Physics with ion beams stored in storage rings. The physics of beam cooling, and the ranges of utility of stochastic and electron cooling are discussed in this paper.

  17. Storing and transporting energy

    DOEpatents

    McClaine, Andrew W.; Brown, Kenneth

    2010-09-07

    Among other things, hydrogen is released from water at a first location using energy from a first energy source; the released hydrogen is stored in a metal hydride slurry; and the metal hydride slurry is transported to a second location remote from the first location.

  18. The Store Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical and robotic technologies are merging to present a wonderful opportunity to develop artificial limbs and prosthetic devices for humans injured on the job, in the military, or due to disease. In this challenge, students will have the opportunity to design a store or online service that specifically dedicates itself to amputees. Described…

  19. Intravenous iron therapy: well-tolerated, yet not harmless.

    PubMed

    Sengölge, G; Hörl, W H; Sunder-Plassmann, G

    2005-12-01

    In the majority of patients with chronic renal failure, it is essential to substitute erythropoietic agents and iron to maintain a haemoglobin level above 11 g dL-1. Intravenous iron is more effective than oral iron. Substitution of intravenous iron is mainly performed using iron(III)-hydroxide-sucrose complex (iron sucrose) and iron(III)-sodium-gluconate in sucrose (iron gluconate), and is, in general, well-tolerated. Nonetheless, intravenous iron therapy has effects on endothelial cells, polymorphonuclear leucocytes and cytokines which are most likely related to non-transferrin bound labile iron. These effects suggest a role of iron in infection or atherosclerosis. Yet, not all available data support the association of iron with infection and atherosclerosis. A recent trial showed that iron sucrose is safe when given as treatment for iron deficiency or for maintenance of iron stores. Nevertheless, iron therapy should be handled with caution but its use should not be feared whenever indicated.

  20. Iron Dextran Increases Hepatic Oxidative Stress and Alters Expression of Genes Related to Lipid Metabolism Contributing to Hyperlipidaemia in Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Maísa; Guerra, Joyce Ferreira da Costa; Sampaio, Ana Flávia Santos; de Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of iron dextran on lipid metabolism and to determine the involvement of oxidative stress. Fischer rats were divided into two groups: the standard group (S), which was fed the AIN-93M diet, and the standard plus iron group (SI), which was fed the same diet but also received iron dextran injections. Serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were higher in the SI group than in the S group. Iron dextran was associated with decreased mRNA levels of pparα, and its downstream gene cpt1a, which is involved in lipid oxidation. Iron dextran also increased mRNA levels of apoB-100, MTP, and L-FABP indicating alterations in lipid secretion. Carbonyl protein and TBARS were consistently higher in the liver of the iron-treated rats. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was found between oxidative stress products, lfabp expression, and iron stores. In addition, a negative correlation was found between pparα expression, TBARS, carbonyl protein, and iron stores. In conclusion, our results suggest that the increase observed in the transport of lipids in the bloodstream and the decreased fatty acid oxidation in rats, which was promoted by iron dextran, might be attributed to increased oxidative stress. PMID:25685776

  1. α-Lactalbumin and casein-glycomacropeptide do not affect iron absorption from formula in healthy term infants.

    PubMed

    Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A; Lönnerdal, Bo; Abrams, Steven A; Kvistgaard, Anne S; Domellöf, Magnus; Hernell, Olle

    2012-07-01

    Iron absorption from infant formula is relatively low. α-Lactalbumin and casein-glycomacropeptide have been suggested to enhance mineral absorption. We therefore assessed the effect of α-lactalbumin and casein-glycomacropeptide on iron absorption from infant formula in healthy term infants. Thirty-one infants were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 3 formulas (4 mg iron/L, 13.1 g protein/L) from 4-8 wk to 6 mo of age: commercially available whey-predominant standard infant formula (standard formula), α-lactalbumin-enriched infant formula (α-LAC), or α-lactalbumin-enriched/casein-glycomacropeptide-reduced infant formula (α-LAC/RGMP). Nine breast-fed infants served as a reference. At 5.5 mo of age, (58)Fe was administered to all infants in a meal. Blood samples were collected 14 d later for iron absorption and iron status indices. Iron deficiency was defined as depleted iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis, or iron deficiency anemia. Iron absorption (mean ± SD) was 10.3 ± 7.0% from standard formula, 8.6 ± 3.8% from α-LAC, 9.2 ± 6.5% from α-LAC/RGMP, and 12.9 ± 6.5% from breast milk, with no difference between the formula groups (P = 0.79) or all groups (P = 0.44). In the formula-fed infants only, iron absorption was negatively correlated with serum ferritin (r = -0.49; P = 0.005) and was higher (P = 0.023) in iron-deficient infants (16.4 ± 12.4%) compared with those with adequate iron status (8.6 ± 4.4%). Our findings indicate that α-lactalbumin and casein-glycomacropeptide do not affect iron absorption from infant formula in infants. Low serum ferritin concentrations are correlated with increased iron absorption from infant formula.

  2. Iron-borosilicate soft magnetic composites: The correlation between processing parameters and magnetic properties for high frequency applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheiratmand, T.; Madaah Hosseini, H. R.; Seyed Reihani, S. M.

    2017-05-01

    Iron-borosilicate soft magnetic composites are suitable magnetic materials for high temperature and high frequency applications. In this research two different techniques have been applied to fabricate these composites: uniaxial pressing following by sintering and spark plasma sintering. Different processing parameters including the content of borosilicate, the amount of compaction pressure and the size of iron particles have been evaluated through the study of microstructure and magnetic properties. The microstructural observations showed that the borosilicate is distributed on the iron grain boundaries enhancing the resistivity and causing the loss of eddy currents. Increasing the compaction pressure was led to the decrease of electrical resistivity. By increasing the frequency both real and imaginary parts of permeability decreased. The use of higher content of borosilicate resulted in the lower decreasing slop of permeability. Best combination of density, permeability and electrical resistivity was obtained in the sample with 2 wt% of borosilicate. In addition, the densification of powders with fine particles was more difficult than coarse particles due to the inter particles friction and bridging effects. Furthermore, as the particles size increases the size of open porosities before sintering where the borosilicate could aggregate enhances. This could yields to the increase in the electrical resistivity. The high ratio of surface to the volume in the powders with fine particles results in the developing the demagnetizing fields and subsequently, decreasing the permeability. The highest relative density (99.99% of theoretical density) with best distribution of borosilicate was achieved in the composites produced by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The relaxation frequency, obtained from imaginary part of permeability, was found as 340 Hz in the composites made by SPS.

  3. Iron deficiency: definition and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cook, J D; Skikne, B S

    1989-11-01

    There has been a continuous refinement over the past several decades of methods to detect iron deficiency and assess its magnitude. The optimal combination of measurements differs for clinical and epidemiological assessment. Clinically, the major problem is to distinguish true iron deficiency from other causes of iron-deficient erythropoiesis, such as the anaemia of chronic disease. Epidemiologically, techniques that provide quantified estimates of body iron are preferable. For both purposes, the serum ferritin is the focal point of the laboratory detection of iron deficiency. Serum ferritin measurements provide a reliable index of body iron stores in healthy individuals, a cost-effective method of screening for iron deficiency, and a useful alternative to bone marrow examinations in the evaluation of anaemic patients. Preliminary studies indicate that measurement of the serum transferrin receptor may be the most reliable way to assess deficits in tissue iron supply.

  4. [Iron and performance in elite athletes].

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Elisa; Cristani, Alessandro

    2006-09-01

    The negative relationship between performance and iron deficiency anemia is well known. There is still debate in the literature on the exercise-induced iron loss and if low iron store, even in the absence of frank anemia, can adversely affected performance of elite athletes. We analyse the physiologic changes induced by strong exercise, the diagnostic problems and therapeutic supplementation.

  5. Convenience Store Workplace Literacy Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Duzer, Carol; Mansoor, Inaam

    The Convenience Store Workplace Literacy Curriculum was developed for English-as-a-Second-Language classes offered by the Southland Corporation, 7-Eleven stores, through a national workplace literacy grant. It is based on an analysis of the tasks and interactions common to a convenience store worksite. Store employees, managers, field consultants,…

  6. How iron controls iron.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Lukas C

    2009-12-01

    Cells regulate iron homeostasis by posttranscriptional regulation of proteins responsible for iron uptake and storage. This requires RNA-binding activity of iron-regulatory proteins, IRP1 and IRP2. Two studies recently published in Science by Vashisht et al. (2009) and Salahudeen et al. (2009) reveal how cells adjust IRP2 activity.

  7. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in women.

    PubMed

    Coad, Jane; Pedley, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional problems in the world and disproportionately affects women and children. Stages of iron deficiency can be characterized as mild deficiency where iron stores become depleted, marginal deficiency where the production of many iron-dependent proteins is compromised but hemoglobin levels are normal and iron deficiency anemia where synthesis of hemoglobin is decreased and oxygen transport to the tissues is reduced. Iron deficiency anemia is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin levels but this approach lacks both specificity and sensitivity. Failure to identify and treat earlier stages of iron deficiency is concerning given the neurocognitive implications of iron deficiency without anemia. Most of the daily iron requirement is derived from recycling of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages; only 5-10 % comes from the diet. Iron absorption is affected by inhibitors and enhancers of iron absorption and by the physiological state. Inflammatory conditions, including obesity, can result in iron being retained in the enterocytes and macrophages causing hypoferremia as a strategic defense mechanism to restrict iron availability to pathogens. Premenopausal women usually have low iron status because of iron loss in menstrual blood. Conditions which further increase iron loss, compromise absorption or increase demand, such as frequent blood donation, gastrointestinal lesions, athletic activity and pregnancy, can exceed the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to upregulate iron absorption. Women of reproductive age are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency and its consequences however there is a controversial argument that evolutionary pressures have resulted in an iron deficient phenotype which protects against infection.

  8. Storing Blood Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute worked with Goddard Space Flight Center to propose a solution to the blood-cell freezing problem. White blood cells and bone marrow are stored for future use by leukemia patients as a result of Goddard and Jet Propulsion Laboratory expertise in electronics and cryogenics. White blood cell and bone marrow bank established using freezing unit. Freezing unit monitors temperature of cells themselves. Thermocouple placed against polyethylene container relays temperature signals to an electronic system which controls small heaters located outside container. Heaters allow liquid nitrogen to circulate at constant temperature and maintain consistent freezing rate. Ability to freeze, store, and thaw white cells and bone marrow without damage is important in leukemia treatment.

  9. Energy storing flywheel assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Vestermark, L. A.

    1985-08-06

    An energy storing flywheel assembly in which first and second reels are operatively connected by a flexible band, with the first and second reels capable of being rotated by first and second electric motors, and the second reel that can rotate either clockwise or counter clockwise through a clutch mechanism driving a flywheel. The flywheel that stores rotational energy is free to rotate independently of the second reel in a clockwise direction except when it is eccelerated to a predetermined maximum rate by the second reel. Acceleration of the flywheel occurs as the first motor drives the first reel at a constant rate to wind the band thereon. After the flywheel has reached the desired maximum rate of rotation the second reel is rotated to rewind the band thereon. Upon the rate of rotation of the flywheel decreasing to a predetermined minimum the above described operation is repeated.

  10. Predicting Commissary Store Success

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    military groups. 3. Authorized Goods and Pricing U.S. Code states that standard grocery items may be sold, as well as non-alcoholic beverages , non...analyzed the loyalty of consumers to a particular grocery chain based on a regression involving age, travel time and income. It concluded that both family...income and grocery expenditures of shoppers who were loyal to one store were significantly higher than those shoppers who had little loyalty to any

  11. Differential Roles of Iron Storage Proteins in Maintaining the Iron Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Khare, Garima; Nangpal, Prachi; Tyagi, Anil K

    2017-01-01

    Ferritins and bacterioferritins are iron storage proteins that represent key players in iron homeostasis. Several organisms possess both forms of ferritins, however, their relative physiological roles are less understood. Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses both ferritin (BfrB) and bacterioferritin (BfrA), playing an essential role in its pathogenesis as reported by us earlier. This study provides insights into the role of these two proteins in iron homeostasis by employing M. tuberculosis bfr mutants. Our data suggests that BfrA is required for efficient utilization of stored iron under low iron conditions while BfrB plays a crucial role as the major defense protein under excessive iron conditions. We show that these two proteins provide protection against oxidative stress and hypoxia. Iron incorporation study showed that BfrB has higher capacity for storing iron than BfrA, which augurs well for efficient iron quenching under iron excess conditions. Moreover, iron release assay demonstrated that BfrA has 3 times superior ability to release stored iron emphasizing its requirement for efficient iron release under low iron conditions, facilitated by the presence of heme. Thus, for the first time, our observations suggest that the importance of BfrA or BfrB separately might vary depending upon the iron situation faced by the cell.

  12. Differential Roles of Iron Storage Proteins in Maintaining the Iron Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Anil K.

    2017-01-01

    Ferritins and bacterioferritins are iron storage proteins that represent key players in iron homeostasis. Several organisms possess both forms of ferritins, however, their relative physiological roles are less understood. Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses both ferritin (BfrB) and bacterioferritin (BfrA), playing an essential role in its pathogenesis as reported by us earlier. This study provides insights into the role of these two proteins in iron homeostasis by employing M. tuberculosis bfr mutants. Our data suggests that BfrA is required for efficient utilization of stored iron under low iron conditions while BfrB plays a crucial role as the major defense protein under excessive iron conditions. We show that these two proteins provide protection against oxidative stress and hypoxia. Iron incorporation study showed that BfrB has higher capacity for storing iron than BfrA, which augurs well for efficient iron quenching under iron excess conditions. Moreover, iron release assay demonstrated that BfrA has 3 times superior ability to release stored iron emphasizing its requirement for efficient iron release under low iron conditions, facilitated by the presence of heme. Thus, for the first time, our observations suggest that the importance of BfrA or BfrB separately might vary depending upon the iron situation faced by the cell. PMID:28060867

  13. The differentiation of anaemia in rheumatoid arthritis: parameters of iron-deficiency in an Indian rheumatoid arthritis population.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Vinod; Jain, Sandeep; Mathur, Dinesh S

    2008-04-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is common in Indian patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We evaluated red blood cell indices, serum iron related and bone marrow iron stores measurements in diagnosing iron deficiency in patients with RA. Fifty consecutive anaemic patients with RA had their complete blood counts, red cell indices, serum iron, serum ferritin and serum total iron binding capacity (TIBC) measured and underwent posterior iliac crest bone marrow aspiration. Fixed smears were stained for iron with Perl's Prussian blue and patients who had no (grade 0) or minimal stainable iron (grade I) were regarded as iron deficient and rest iron replete (grade II-IV) and hence as having anaemia of chronic disease (ACD). To determine diagnostic power of tests used for diagnosing iron deficiency in addition to positive likelihood ratio, sensitivity, specificity and negative predictive values; receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were plotted and areas under the receiver-operating curves were compared. Eighteen patients (36%) had IDA and 32 (64%) had ACD. Correlation between the bone marrow iron stores and serum ferritin was poor in the IDA group (r = -0.09, P = 0.57) and significant in the ACD group (r = 0.79, P < 0.0001). Areas under the ROC curves for mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCV), serum iron, TIBC and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were relatively low (0.52, 0.71, 0.75 and 0.77, respectively) and these tests had low positive likelihood ratios (1.08, 2.13, 4.62 and 1.5, respectively). Both area under ROC curve [0.98, 95% confidence interval (0.94, 0.99)] and negative predictive value (97%) were highest when cut off serum ferritin was <82 microg/l. In patients with RA serum iron, TIBC, MCV and MCHC have limited value in diagnosing iron deficiency. In this study compared to American and European studies a much higher cut off value of serum ferritin had most diagnostic power for detecting iron deficiency. Bone marrow iron stores

  14. Regulation of cellular iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2011-01-01

    Iron is an essential but potentially hazardous biometal. Mammalian cells require sufficient amounts of iron to satisfy metabolic needs or to accomplish specialized functions. Iron is delivered to tissues by circulating transferrin, a transporter that captures iron released into the plasma mainly from intestinal enterocytes or reticuloendothelial macrophages. The binding of iron-laden transferrin to the cell-surface transferrin receptor 1 results in endocytosis and uptake of the metal cargo. Internalized iron is transported to mitochondria for the synthesis of haem or iron–sulfur clusters, which are integral parts of several metalloproteins, and excess iron is stored and detoxified in cytosolic ferritin. Iron metabolism is controlled at different levels and by diverse mechanisms. The present review summarizes basic concepts of iron transport, use and storage and focuses on the IRE (iron-responsive element)/IRP (iron-regulatory protein) system, a well known post-transcriptional regulatory circuit that not only maintains iron homoeostasis in various cell types, but also contributes to systemic iron balance. PMID:21348856

  15. Iron Chelation

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron overload and need treatment. What is iron overload? Iron chelation therapy is used when you have ... may want to perform: How quickly does iron overload happen? This is different for each person. It ...

  16. Study of maternal influences on fetal iron status at term using cord blood transferrin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, D; Savage, G; Tubman, T; Lappin, T; Halliday, H

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—To determine effects of maternal iron depletion and smoking on iron status of term babies using serum transferrin receptors (STfR) and their ratio to ferritin (TfR-F index) in cord blood.
METHODS—Iron, ferritin, STfR, and haemoglobin (Hb) concentration were measured and TfR-F index calculated in 67 cord /maternal blood pairs. Twenty six mothers were iron depleted (ferritin <10 µg/l) and 28 were smokers.
RESULTS—Maternal iron depletion was associated with decreased cord ferritin (113 v 171 µg/l) and Hb (156 v 168 g/l) but no change in STfR or TfR-F index. Smoking was associated with increased cord Hb (168 v 157 g/l) and TfR-F index (4.1 v 3.4), and decreased ferritin (123 v 190 µg/l). Cord TfR-F index and Hb were positively correlated (r = 0.48).
CONCLUSIONS—Maternal iron depletion is associated with reduced fetal iron stores but no change in free iron availability. Smoking is associated with increased fetal iron requirements for erythropoiesis.

 PMID:11124923

  17. Power-law-like correlation between condensation energy and superconducting transition temperatures in iron pnictide/chalcogenide superconductors: Beyond the BCS understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Jie; Li, Sheng; Zeng, Bin; Mu, Gang; Shen, Bing; Schneeloch, J.; Zhong, R. D.; Liu, T. S.; Gu, G. D.; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2014-04-01

    Superconducting condensation energy U0int has been determined by integrating the electronic entropy in various iron pnictide/chalcogenide superconducting systems. It is found that U0int∝Tcn with n =3-4, which is in sharp contrast to the simple BCS prediction U0BCS=1/2NFΔs2, with NF the quasiparticle density of states at the Fermi energy and Δs the superconducting gap. A similar correlation holds if we compute the condensation energy through U0cal=3γneffΔs2/4π2kB2, with γneff the effective normal state electronic specific heat coefficient. This indicates a general relationship γneff∝Tcm with m =1-2, which is not predicted by the BCS scheme. A picture based on quantum criticality is proposed to explain this phenomenon.

  18. Power-law-like correlation between condensation energy and superconducting transition temperatures in iron pnictide/chalcogenide superconductors: Beyond the BCS understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Jie; Li, Sheng; Zeng, Bin; Mu, Gang; Shen, Bing; Schneeloch, J.; Zhong, R. D.; Liu, T. S.; Gu, G. D.; Wen, Hai-Hu

    2015-03-01

    Superconducting condensation energy U0int has been determined by integrating the electronic entropy in various iron pnictide/chalcogenide superconducting systems. It is found that U0int ~Tcn with n = 3 to 4, which is in sharp contrast to the simple BCS prediction U0BCS = 1 / 2NFΔs2 , with NF the quasiparticle density of states at the Fermi energy and Δs the superconducting gap. A similar correlation holds if we compute the condensation energy through U0cal = 3γneff Δs2 / 4π2kB2 , with γneff the effective normal state electronic specific heat coefficient. This indicates a general relationship γneff ~Tcm with m = 1 to 2, which is not predicted by the BCS scheme. A picture based on quantum criticality is proposed to explain this phenomenon.

  19. The quantitative assessment of body iron.

    PubMed

    Cook, James D; Flowers, Carol H; Skikne, Barry S

    2003-05-01

    Current initiatives to reduce the high prevalence of nutritional iron deficiency have highlighted the need for reliable epidemiologic methods to assess iron status. The present report describes a method for estimating body iron based on the ratio of the serum transferrin receptor to serum ferritin. Analysis showed a single normal distribution of body iron stores in US men aged 20 to 65 years (mean +/- 1 SD, 9.82 +/- 2.82 mg/kg). A single normal distribution was also observed in pregnant Jamaican women (mean +/- 1 SD, 0.09 +/- 4.48 mg/kg). Distribution analysis in US women aged 20 to 45 years indicated 2 populations; 93% of women had body iron stores averaging 5.5 +/- 3.35 mg/kg (mean +/- 1 SD), whereas the remaining 7% of women had a mean tissue iron deficit of 3.87 +/- 3.23 mg/kg. Calculations of body iron in trials of iron supplementation in Jamaica and iron fortification in Vietnam demonstrated that the method can be used to calculate absorption of the added iron. Quantitative estimates of body iron greatly enhance the evaluation of iron status and the sensitivity of iron intervention trials in populations in which inflammation is uncommon or has been excluded by laboratory screening. The method is useful clinically for monitoring iron status in those who are highly susceptible to iron deficiency.

  20. Iron nutrition and premenopausal women: effects of poor iron status on physical and neuropsychological performance.

    PubMed

    McClung, James P; Murray-Kolb, Laura E

    2013-01-01

    Iron is a nutritionally essential trace element that functions through incorporation into proteins and enzymes, many of which contribute to physical and neuropsychological performance. Poor iron status, including iron deficiency (ID; diminished iron stores) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA; poor iron stores and diminished hemoglobin), affects billions of people worldwide. This review focuses on physical and neuropsychological outcomes associated with ID and IDA in premenopausal women, as the prevalence of ID and IDA is often greater in premenopausal women than other population demographics. Recent studies addressing the physiological effects of poor iron status on physical performance, including work productivity, voluntary activity, and athletic performance, are addressed. Similarly, the effects of iron status on neurological performance, including cognition, affect, and behavior, are summarized. Nutritional countermeasures for the prevention of poor iron status and the restoration of decrements in performance outcomes are described.

  1. Next-Generation Biomarkers for Iron Status.

    PubMed

    Drakesmith, Hal

    2016-01-01

    Iron is needed for oxygen transport, muscle activity, mitochondrial function, DNA synthesis, and sensing of hypoxia. The hierarchical master determinant of dietary iron absorption and iron distribution within the body is the peptide hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin itself is regulated by a combination of signals derived from iron stores, inflammation, and erythropoietic expansion. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are common and important conditions that can be treated with iron preparations. However, other factors besides iron deficiency can cause anemia, especially inflammation, which responds poorly to iron treatment, and inherited disorders of red blood cells, which are associated with accumulation of excess pathogenic iron. Assessment of iron status is challenging, and indices such as serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, and zinc protoporphyrin have specific weaknesses. Moreover, a diagnosis of iron deficiency or iron deficiency anemia is most useful if the diagnosis also leads to effective treatment. Low levels of hepcidin allow iron absorption and effective iron incorporation into red blood cells. The best 'biomarker' to guide treatment may therefore be the physiological 'determinant' of iron utilization. Iron is also important in transplantation medicine and influences clinical outcome of arterial pulmonary hypertension; here too, biomarkers including hepcidin may be useful to actively and beneficially manage iron status.

  2. Store manager performance and satisfaction: effects on store employee performance and satisfaction, store customer satisfaction, and store customer spending growth.

    PubMed

    Netemeyer, Richard G; Maxham, James G; Lichtenstein, Donald R

    2010-05-01

    Based on emotional contagion theory and the value-profit chain literatures, the present study posits a number of hypotheses that show how managers in the small store, small number of employees retail context may affect store employees, customers, and potentially store performance. With data from 306 store managers, 1,615 store customer-contact employees, and 57,656 customers of a single retail chain, the authors examined relationships among store manager job satisfaction and job performance, store customer-contact employee job satisfaction and job performance, customer satisfaction with the retailer, and a customer-spending-based store performance metric (customer spending growth over a 2-year period). Via path analysis, several hypothesized direct and interaction relations among these constructs are supported. The results suggest implications for academic researchers and retail managers.

  3. Readout method for stored information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, G. W.

    1976-01-01

    Readout technique increases density of stored information for projection onto facsimile reproduction. Data stored on line structures is scanned at 90 deg. angle over area larger than recorded format to ensure complete recovery of information.

  4. Ecophysiology of iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria in an iron oxyhydroxide mound in a shallow marine environment at Satsuma Iwo-jima, Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, T.; Kuratomi, T.; Morono, Y.; Hori, T.; Kiyokawa, S.; Inagaki, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Satsuma Iwo-Jima is a small volcanic island located 40 km south of the Kyusyu Island, Japan. In the Nagahama Bay of the island, venting hydrothermal fluids from iron oxyhydroxide mounds on the seafloor. Using a light microscopy, numerous twisted stalk structures in the deposits were observed, suggesting the presence of neutrophilic iron-oxidizing microbial communities. Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene-tagged fragments followed by correlation analysis showed that iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria inhabit the iron deposits in the vicinity of anaerobic iron-reducing bacteria, indicating the occurrence of iron cycling mediated by the microbial ecosystem. We successfully identified Zetaproteobacteria cells using CARD-FISH technique at the different depths of the cored sample, suggesting that the number of Zetaproteobacteria cells and the frequency of the twisted stalk structures are not always consistent. In stalk-abundant horizons that harbor relatively small Zetaproteobacteria populations, accumulation of polyphosphate within Zetaproteobacteria cells was clearly observed. This indicates that Zetaproteobacteria physiologically store energy and phosphorus substrates during the active iron oxidation. In marked contrast, in other horizons with fewer stalks and large populations of Zetaproteobacteria, polyphosphate was rarely observed in the cells, suggesting that Zetaproteobacteria have already used up the intracellular reservoir of energy and phosphorous substrates, and the iron-oxidizing activity is most likely lower than those cells inhabiting the redox interface.

  5. Parenteral iron dextran therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Burns, D L; Mascioli, E A; Bistrian, B R

    1995-01-01

    Iron dextran was introduced more than 30 yr ago for the parenteral treatment of iron deficiency anemia that is refractory to oral therapy. Iron dextran is a preparation of ferric hydroxide complexed with a low molecular weight fraction of dextran. Iron deficiency anemia is one of the most common nutritional deficiency diseases and occurs worldwide secondary to inadequate dietary iron, usually with excessive gastrointestinal blood losses. Repletion of iron stores is often complicated by intolerance to oral iron supplementation and may require parenteral iron. Parenteral iron can be administered via the intramuscular or intravenous route either directly or as an additive to total parenteral nutrition. Both routes of administration can cause various side effects and a test dose is recommended before therapeutic administration to assess the risk for anaphylaxis. Although the efficacy and safety of parenteral iron dextran have been convincingly demonstrated, supplementation may be contraindicated in the setting of infection.

  6. Are You Storing Food Safely?

    MedlinePlus

    ... leak. Newly purchased cans that appear to be leaking should be returned to the store for a refund or exchange. Otherwise, throw the cans away. Don't store food, such as potatoes and onions, under the sink. Leakage from the pipes can damage the food. Store potatoes and onions ...

  7. Iron and the liver.

    PubMed

    Corradini, Elena; Ferrara, Francesca; Pietrangelo, Antonello

    2004-12-01

    Iron is an important bio-catalyst of oxidation-reduction reactions in the cell and is essential for life. Paradoxically, it may also be lethal when the fraction of redox-active metal ions exceeds that sequestered in specialized proteins or cellular compartments, and uncontrolled production of free radical species may arise. The liver is the main body site for iron stores and central in the regulation of iron homeostasis. Important iron-proteins, such as hepcidin, the iron regulatory hormone, are specifically produced by the liver. Pathogenic mutations in hepatic iron transporters and regulators lead to hereditary iron overload diseases, including hemochromatosis. Iron toxicity depends on its excessive accumulation and is due to promotion of oxidant stress: free radicals and membrane oxidation by-products cause hepatocellular death by triggering organelle dysfunction, or by activating cells involved in hepatic inflammation and fibrogenesis, such as Kupffer cells and hepatic stellate cells. Xenobiotics and hepatotoxins as well as immunological and host defense mechanisms may cause subtle changes in the pool of redox-active metal ions and in metal compartmentalization that potentially contribute to hepatotoxic, inflammatory and fibrogenic events. The hepatotoxic and profibrogenic potential of metal ions, particularly iron, is dramatic at moderate levels of tissue metal overload in concomitance with other inciting insults, such as alcohol abuse and viral hepatitis. Removal of metal excess from the liver in iron overload diseases is beneficial and prevents progression toward cirrhosis. The development of drugs able to block catalytically active metals, particularly iron, may prove effective in other chronic liver diseases in which inflammatory, degenerative and fibrogenic processes are fueled by redox-active metal ions.

  8. Iron Induction of Ferritin Synthesis in Soybean Cell Suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Proudhon, Dominique; Briat, Jean-François; Lescure, Anne-Marie

    1989-01-01

    In animal cells specialized for iron storage, iron-induced accumulation of ferritin is known to result from a shift of stored mRNA from the ribonucleoprotein fraction to polysomes. Previous reports with bean leaves suggested that in plants iron induction of ferritin synthesis would result from a regulation at the transcriptional level (F van der Mark, F Bienfait, H van der Ende [1983] Biochem Biophys Res Commun 115:463-469). Soybean (Glycine max, cv Mandarin) cell suspension cultures have been used here to support these findings. Ferritin induction is obtained by addition of Fe-citrate to the culture medium. A good correlation is found between cellular iron content and the amount of ferritin accumulation. This protein accumulation corresponds to an increase of in vitro translatable ferritin mRNA. Addition of 4 micrograms actinomycin D per milliliter to the cultures inhibits completely in vivo RNA synthesis, whereas protein synthesis was poorly affected, at least for 24 hours. During the same time, this concentration of actinomycin D strongly inhibits the iron-induced synthesis of ferritin. These results show that in soybean cell cultures, the mechanism of regulation of ferritin synthesis in response to iron does not result from recruitment of preexisting mRNA. They confirm that in plant systems, ferritin synthesis results from increased transcription of the corresponding genes. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:16666812

  9. Iron deficiency in adolescent female dancers.

    PubMed Central

    Mahlamäki, E; Mahlamäki, S

    1988-01-01

    The iron balance of 25 adolescent dancers and 23 control females of the same age were studied. The concentrations of fasting blood haemoglobin, serum iron, serum transferrin and serum ferritin were determined. Iron supplementation (ferrous sulphate corresponding to 100 mg of elemental iron per day) was instigated if body iron stores were low (serum ferritin less than 30 micrograms.l-1). Blood samples were drawn again after ten weeks. Low haemoglobin concentration (blood haemoglobin less than 125 g.l-1) was more prevalent among dancers than among control subjects. Reduced iron stores as well as completely absent iron stores (serum ferritin concentration less than 12 micrograms.l-1) were equally common in both groups (25% of the subjects). Iron supplementation reduced the number of anaemic girls from 16 to 4 and the highly significant difference in haemoglobin level between the treated and untreated groups disappeared. Ten weeks of iron therapy was not, however, long enough to increase iron stores. PMID:3167502

  10. Rethinking Iron Regulation and Assessment in Iron Deficiency, Anemia of Chronic Disease, and Obesity: Introducing Hepcidin

    PubMed Central

    Tussing-Humphreys, Lisa; Pustacioglu, Cenk; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Braunschweig, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Adequate iron availability is essential to human development and overall health. Iron is a key component of oxygen-carrying proteins, has a pivotal role in cellular metabolism, and is essential to cell growth and differentiation. Inadequate dietary iron intake, chronic and acute inflammatory conditions, and obesity are each associated with alterations in iron homeostasis. Tight regulation of iron is necessary because iron is highly toxic and human beings can only excrete small amounts through sweat, skin and enterocyte sloughing, and fecal and menstrual blood loss. Hepcidin, a small peptide hormone produced mainly by the liver, acts as the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. Hepcidin controls movement of iron into plasma by regulating the activity of the sole known iron exporter ferroportin-1. Downregulation of the ferroportin-1 exporter results in sequestration of iron within intestinal enterocytes, hepatocytes, and iron-storing macrophages reducing iron bioavailability. Hepcidin expression is increased by higher body iron levels and inflammation and decreased by anemia and hypoxia. Importantly, existing data illustrate that hepcidin may play a significant role in the development of several iron-related disorders, including the anemia of chronic disease and the iron dysregulation observed in obesity. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to discuss iron regulation, with specific emphasis on systemic regulation by hepcidin, and examine the role of hepcidin within several disease states, including iron deficiency, anemia of chronic disease, and obesity. The relationship between obesity and iron depletion and the clinical assessment of iron status will also be reviewed. PMID:22717199

  11. Correlations in distribution and concentration of calcium, copper and iron with zinc in isolated extracellular deposits associated with age-related macular degeneration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flinn, Jane M; Kakalec, Peter; Tappero, Ryan; Jones, Blair F.; Lengyel, Imre

    2014-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is abundantly enriched in sub-retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) deposits, the hallmarks of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and is thought to play a role in the formation of these deposits. However, it is not known whether Zn is the only metal relevant for sub-RPE deposit formation. Because of their involvement in the pathogenesis of AMD, we determined the concentration and distribution of calcium (Ca), iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) and compared these with Zn in isolated and sectioned macular (MSD), equatorial (PHD) and far peripheral (FPD) sub-RPE deposits from an 86 year old donor eye with post mortem diagnosis of early AMD. The sections were mounted on Zn free microscopy slides and analyzed by microprobe synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (μSXRF). Metal concentrations were determined using spiked sectioned sheep brain matrix standards, prepared the same way as the samples. The heterogeneity of metal distributions was examined using pixel by pixel comparison. The orders of metal concentrations were Ca ⋙ Zn > Fe in all three types of deposits but Cu levels were not distinguishable from background values. Zinc and Ca were consistently present in all deposits but reached highest concentration in MSD. Iron was present in some but not all deposits and was especially enriched in FPD. Correlation analysis indicated considerable variation in metal distribution within and between sub-RPE deposits. The results suggest that Zn and Ca are the most likely contributors to deposit formation especially in MSD, the characteristic risk factor for the development of AMD in the human eye.

  12. Basal Ganglia Iron in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis Measured with 7T Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping Correlates with Inhibitory Control.

    PubMed

    Schmalbrock, P; Prakash, R S; Schirda, B; Janssen, A; Yang, G K; Russell, M; Knopp, M V; Boster, A; Nicholas, J A; Racke, M; Pitt, D

    2016-03-01

    T2 hypointensity in the basal ganglia of patients with MS has been associated with clinical progression and cognitive decline. Our objectives were the following: 1) to compare signal in T2WI, R2 (ie, 1/T2), and R2* (ie, 1/T2*) relaxation rates and quantitative susceptibility mapping; and 2) to investigate the associations among MR imaging, clinical scores, and cognitive measures of inhibitory control linked to basal ganglia functioning. Twenty-nine patients with MS underwent a battery of neuropsychological tests including the Flanker and Stroop tasks. 7T MR imaging included 3D gradient-echo and single-echo multishot spin-echo EPI. Quantitative susceptibility mapping images were calculated by using a Wiener filter deconvolution algorithm. T2WI signal was normalized to CSF. R2 and R2* were calculated by log-linear regression. Average MR imaging metrics for the globus pallidus, putamen, and caudate were computed from manually traced ROIs including the largest central part of each structure. Marked spatial variation was consistently visualized on quantitative susceptibility mapping and T2/T2*WI within each basal ganglia structure. MR imaging metrics correlated with each other for each basal ganglia structure individually. Notably, caudate and putamen quantitative susceptibility mapping metrics were similar, but the putamen R2 was larger than the caudate R2. This finding suggests that tissue features contribute differently to R2 and quantitative susceptibility mapping. Caudate and anterior putamen quantitative susceptibility mapping correlated with the Flanker but not Stroop measures; R2 did not correlate with inhibitory control measures. Putamen quantitative susceptibility mapping and caudate and putamen R2 correlated with the Expanded Disability Status Scale. Our study showed that quantitative susceptibility mapping and R2 may be complementary indicators for basal ganglia tissue changes in MS. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that decreased performance

  13. Duodenal expression of iron transport molecules in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis or iron deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Dostalikova-Cimburova, Marketa; Kratka, Karolina; Balusikova, Kamila; Chmelikova, Jitka; Hejda, Vaclav; Hnanicek, Jan; Neubauerova, Jitka; Vranova, Jana; Kovar, Jan; Horak, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Disturbances of iron metabolism are observed in chronic liver diseases. In the present study, we examined gene expression of duodenal iron transport molecules and hepcidin in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HHC) (treated and untreated), involving various genotypes (genotypes which represent risk for HHC were examined), and in patients with iron deficiency anaemia (IDA). Gene expressions of DMT1, ferroportin, Dcytb, hephaestin, HFE and TFR1 were measured in duodenal biopsies using real-time PCR and Western blot. Serum hepcidin levels were measured using ELISA. DMT1, ferroportin and TFR1 mRNA levels were significantly increased in post-phlebotomized hemochromatics relative to controls. mRNAs of all tested molecules were significantly increased in patients with IDA compared to controls. The protein expression of ferroportin was increased in both groups of patients but not significantly. Spearman rank correlations showed that DMT1 versus ferroportin, Dcytb versus hephaestin and DMT1 versus TFR1 mRNAs were positively correlated regardless of the underlying cause, similarly to protein levels of ferroportin versus Dcytb and ferroportin versus hephaestin. Serum ferritin was negatively correlated with DMT1 mRNA in investigated groups of patients, except for HHC group. A decrease of serum hepcidin was observed in IDA patients, but this was not statistically significant. Our data showed that although untreated HHC patients do not have increased mRNA levels of iron transport molecules when compared to normal subjects, the expression is relatively increased in relation to body iron stores. On the other hand, post-phlebotomized HHC patients had increased DMT1 and ferroportin mRNA levels possibly due to stimulated erythropoiesis after phlebotomy. PMID:21973163

  14. Iron-dependent erythropoiesis in women with excessive menstrual blood losses and women with normal menses.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Mariasanta; Dolce, Alberto; Celenza, Giuseppe; Grandone, Elvira; Perilli, Maria Grazia; Siragusa, Sergio; Carta, Gaspare; Orecchioni, Assunta; Mariani, Guglielmo

    2014-04-01

    In women of fertile age, iron loss consequent to excessive menstrual discharge is by far the most frequent cause of iron-deficient anemia. However, the relationship between menstrual discharge and iron loss is poorly understood. In this prospective study, total menstrual and iron losses were assayed in a large cohort of non-anemic women and women with excessive menstrual blood losses (menorrhagia) in order to provide data useful for intervention. One hundred and five Caucasian women aged 20-45 years were recruited. Blood cell count and serum ferritin (SF) levels were determined in each case before menses. Menstrual fluid losses (MFL) were determined using a standardized pads' weight method. Hematin concentration was assayed by a variant of the Alkaline Hematin Method from which iron concentration was calculated. Mean SF levels were 36.2 (range 8.6-100) ng/ml in healthy women and 6.4 (range 5-14) ng/ml in patients with menorrhagia. Median values of iron lost/cycle were 0.87 mg in healthy women and 5.2 mg in patients with menorrhagia (ranges 0.102-2.569 and 1.634-8.665 mg, respectively, p < 0.001). In women with menorrhagia, iron lost/cycle strongly correlated (0.789, p < 0.001) with MFL. In conclusion, healthy women with normal menses lose, on average, 1 mg iron/cycle. Average iron losses in patients with menorrhagia are, at least in our cohort, on average, five-to-six times higher than normal. Most women with menorrhagia had totally depleted iron stores. Indirect, quantitative evaluation of iron lost with menses may be useful to assess the risk of developing iron-deficient anemia in individual patients.

  15. Differential effects of iron overload on GST isoform expression in mouse liver and kidney and correlation between GSTA4 induction and overproduction of free radicles.

    PubMed

    Desmots, Fabienne; Rissel, Mary; Pigeon, Christelle; Loyer, Pascal; Loréal, Olivier; Guillouzo, André

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of iron overload on the expression of mouse GSTA1, A4, M1, and P1 in liver, the main iron storage site during iron overload, and in kidney. In iron-overloaded animals, mRNA and protein levels of GSTA1, A4, and M1 were increased in liver. In kidney, GSTA4 protein level was also increased while, unexpectedly, GSTA1 and M1 expression was strongly decreased. We showed, by immunohistochemistry, that GSTA4 was more abundant in hepatocytes of periportal areas and in convoluted proximal tubular cells in normal liver and kidney, respectively. In iron-overloaded mice, GSTA4 staining was more intense in cells that preferentially accumulated iron, and conjugation of 4-hydroxynonenal, a specific substrate of GSTA4, was enhanced in both organs. Moreover an acute exposure of primary cultures of mouse hepatocytes to iron-citrate strongly induced oxidative stress and cellular injury and resulted in an increase in GSTA4 expression, while cotreatment with iron-citrate and either desferrioxamine or vitamin E prevented both toxicity and GSTA4 induction. These data demonstrate that GSTA1 and M1 are differentially regulated in liver and kidney while GSTA4 is induced in both organs during iron overload. Moreover, they support the view that iron-induction of GSTA4 is related to an overproduction of free radicals.

  16. Correlation between airborne manganese concentration at the workstations in the iron foundry and manganese concentration in workers' blood.

    PubMed

    Mirmohammadi, Seyedtaghi; Moghaddasi, Yosef; Yazdani, Jamshid; Yousefinejad, Razyeh; Esfandyari, Yahya; Gorgani, Mohsen; Habibpour, Manijeh

    2017-06-27

    Manganese (Mn) used as raw material for melting process in the ferrous foundry is considered as hazardous neurotoxic substance because it accumulates in the central nervous system and may cause neurological disorders. The furnace-men and melting department workers are potentially exposed to manganese particles or fume in the workplace. The objective of the research has been to investigate the sources and levels of manganese exposure in the foundry by correlation of blood-manganese (B-Mn) and air-manganese (air-Mn) measurement. Air-Mn and Mn of blood serum were measured involving workers who worked in a big-sized foundry during 1 year. The standard method of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ID-121 was used for air and blood assessment and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was carried out for air and blood sample analysis. The air sampling results have revealed that there is a high exposure to manganese (4.5 mg/m3) in the workplace as compared to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's (NIOSH) time weighted average (the reference time-weighted average (TWA) = 1 mg/m3). The average blood serum Mn concentration was 2.745 μg/l for subjects working for shorter than 3 months and 274.85 μg/l for subjects working 3-12 months. Against the research hypothesis there was no correlation between the air-Mn concentration and the B-Mn (serum) level of manganese in the serum of the exposed subjects. It may be due to short time of air sampling of manganese airborne particles, and a real-time monitoring of airborne manganese particles is suggested for any future study. Med Pr 2017;68(4):449-458.

  17. Evaluating the use of in-store measures in retail food stores and restaurants in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Ana Clara; Lock, Karen; Latorre, Maria do Rosario D O; Jaime, Patricia Constante

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To assess inter-rater reliability, test-retest reliability, and construct validity of retail food store, open-air food market, and restaurant observation tools adapted to the Brazilian urban context. METHODS This study is part of a cross-sectional observation survey conducted in 13 districts across the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil in 2010-2011. Food store and restaurant observational tools were developed based on previously available tools, and then tested it. They included measures on the availability, variety, quality, pricing, and promotion of fruits and vegetables and ultra-processed foods. We used Kappa statistics and intra-class correlation coefficients to assess inter-rater and test-retest reliabilities in samples of 142 restaurants, 97 retail food stores (including open-air food markets), and of 62 restaurants and 45 retail food stores (including open-air food markets), respectively. Construct validity as the tool’s abilities to discriminate based on store types and different income contexts were assessed in the entire sample: 305 retail food stores, 8 fruits and vegetable markets, and 472 restaurants. RESULTS Inter-rater and test-retest reliability were generally high, with most Kappa values greater than 0.70 (range 0.49-1.00). Both tools discriminated between store types and neighborhoods with different median income. Fruits and vegetables were more likely to be found in middle to higher-income neighborhoods, while soda, fruit-flavored drink mixes, cookies, and chips were cheaper and more likely to be found in lower-income neighborhoods. CONCLUSIONS The measures were reliable and able to reveal significant differences across store types and different contexts. Although some items may require revision, results suggest that the tools may be used to reliably measure the food stores and restaurant food environment in urban settings of middle-income countries. Such studies can help .inform health promotion interventions and policies in these

  18. Evaluating the use of in-store measures in retail food stores and restaurants in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Duran, Ana Clara; Lock, Karen; Latorre, Maria do Rosario D O; Jaime, Patricia Constante

    2015-01-01

    To assess inter-rater reliability, test-retest reliability, and construct validity of retail food store, open-air food market, and restaurant observation tools adapted to the Brazilian urban context. This study is part of a cross-sectional observation survey conducted in 13 districts across the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil in 2010-2011. Food store and restaurant observational tools were developed based on previously available tools, and then tested it. They included measures on the availability, variety, quality, pricing, and promotion of fruits and vegetables and ultra-processed foods. We used Kappa statistics and intra-class correlation coefficients to assess inter-rater and test-retest reliabilities in samples of 142 restaurants, 97 retail food stores (including open-air food markets), and of 62 restaurants and 45 retail food stores (including open-air food markets), respectively. Construct validity as the tool's abilities to discriminate based on store types and different income contexts were assessed in the entire sample: 305 retail food stores, 8 fruits and vegetable markets, and 472 restaurants. Inter-rater and test-retest reliability were generally high, with most Kappa values greater than 0.70 (range 0.49-1.00). Both tools discriminated between store types and neighborhoods with different median income. Fruits and vegetables were more likely to be found in middle to higher-income neighborhoods, while soda, fruit-flavored drink mixes, cookies, and chips were cheaper and more likely to be found in lower-income neighborhoods. The measures were reliable and able to reveal significant differences across store types and different contexts. Although some items may require revision, results suggest that the tools may be used to reliably measure the food stores and restaurant food environment in urban settings of middle-income countries. Such studies can help .inform health promotion interventions and policies in these contexts.

  19. Tobacco advertising in retail stores.

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, K M; Sciandra, R; Lawrence, J

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies have described tobacco advertising in the print media, on billboards, and through sponsorship of cultural and sporting events. However, little attention has been given to another common and unavoidable source of tobacco advertising, that which is encountered in retail stores. In July 1987, we conducted a survey of 61 packaged goods retail stores in Buffalo, NY, to assess the prevalence and type of point-of-sale tobacco advertising. In addition, store owners or managers were surveyed to determine their store's policy regarding tobacco advertising, receipt of monetary incentives from distributors for displaying tobacco ads, and willingness to display antitobacco ads. Six types of stores were involved in the study: 10 supermarkets, 10 privately owned grocery stores, 9 chain convenience food stores that do not sell gasoline, 11 chain convenience food stores that sell gasoline, 11 chain pharmacies, and 10 private pharmacies. Two-thirds of the stores displayed tobacco posters, and 87 percent had promotional items advertising tobacco products, primarily cigarettes. Larger stores, and those that were privately owned, tended to display more posters and promotional items. Eighty percent of tobacco product displays were for cigarettes, 16 percent for smokeless tobacco products, and 4 percent for cigars and pipe tobacco. Convenience stores selling gasoline had the most separate tobacco product displays. Of tobacco product displays, 24 percent were located adjacent to candy and snack displays. Twenty-nine of the 61 store owners or managers indicated that their store had a policy regulating the display of tobacco ads and tobacco product displays.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1910192

  20. [Iron and invasive fungal infection].

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Florencio; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Aguado, José María

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential factor for both the growth and virulence of most of microorganisms. As a part of the innate (or nutritional) immune system, mammals have developed different mechanisms to store and transport this element in order to limit free iron bioavailability. To survive in this hostile environment, pathogenic fungi have specific uptake systems for host iron sources, one of the most important of which is based on the synthesis of siderophores-soluble, low-molecular-mass, high-affinity iron chelators. The increase in free iron that results from iron-overload conditions is a well-established risk factor for invasive fungal infection (IFI) such as mucormycosis or aspergillosis. Therefore, iron chelation may be an appealing therapeutic option for these infections. Nevertheless, deferoxamine -the first approved iron chelator- paradoxically increases the incidence of IFI, as it serves as a xeno-siderophore to Mucorales. On the contrary, the new oral iron chelators (deferiprone and deferasirox) have shown to exert a deleterious effect on fungal growth both in vitro and in animal models. The present review focuses on the role of iron metabolism in the pathogenesis of IFI and summarises the preclinical data, as well as the limited clinical experience so far, in the use of new iron chelators as treatment for mucormycosis and invasive aspergillosis.

  1. Iron status in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Fairweather-Tait, Susan J; Wawer, Anna A; Gillings, Rachel; Jennings, Amy; Myint, Phyo K

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is prevalent in older age, particularly after the age of 80. Serum ferritin concentrations also decline, although there is no evidence to suggest that changes in iron stores are an inevitable consequence of ageing. Chronic inflammation is a common condition in older people, making the measurement of iron status difficult, and it is likely that elevated levels of circulating hepcidin are responsible for changes in iron metabolism that result in systemic iron depletion. Other contributory factors are poor diet and some medications, such as aspirin. Anaemia in older age has undesirable health outcomes, including increased susceptibility to falling and depression. However, there are concerns about possible adverse effects of iron supplements, either in relation to pro-inflammatory effects in the gut or inappropriate tissue iron deposition. Brain iron levels are increased with age-related degenerative diseases, but it is not known if this is the cause or a consequence of the disease, and genetic factors are likely to play a role. In order to maintain body iron within the normal range a personalised approach is required, taking into account all of the factors that may affect iron metabolism and the available strategies for preventing iron deficiency or overload.

  2. Iron status in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Fairweather-Tait, Susan J.; Wawer, Anna A.; Gillings, Rachel; Jennings, Amy; Myint, Phyo K.

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is prevalent in older age, particularly after the age of 80. Serum ferritin concentrations also decline, although there is no evidence to suggest that changes in iron stores are an inevitable consequence of ageing. Chronic inflammation is a common condition in older people, making the measurement of iron status difficult, and it is likely that elevated levels of circulating hepcidin are responsible for changes in iron metabolism that result in systemic iron depletion. Other contributory factors are poor diet and some medications, such as aspirin. Anaemia in older age has undesirable health outcomes, including increased susceptibility to falling and depression. However, there are concerns about possible adverse effects of iron supplements, either in relation to pro-inflammatory effects in the gut or inappropriate tissue iron deposition. Brain iron levels are increased with age-related degenerative diseases, but it is not known if this is the cause or a consequence of the disease, and genetic factors are likely to play a role. In order to maintain body iron within the normal range a personalised approach is required, taking into account all of the factors that may affect iron metabolism and the available strategies for preventing iron deficiency or overload. PMID:24275120

  3. Tobacco advertising in retail stores.

    PubMed

    Cummings, K M; Sciandra, R; Lawrence, J

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies have described tobacco advertising in the print media, on billboards, and through sponsorship of cultural and sporting events. However, little attention has been given to another common and unavoidable source of tobacco advertising, that which is encountered in retail stores. In July 1987, we conducted a survey of 61 packaged goods retail stores in Buffalo, NY, to assess the prevalence and type of point-of-sale tobacco advertising. In addition, store owners or managers were surveyed to determine their store's policy regarding tobacco advertising, receipt of monetary incentives from distributors for displaying tobacco ads, and willingness to display antitobacco ads. Six types of stores were involved in the study: 10 supermarkets, 10 privately owned grocery stores, 9 chain convenience food stores that do not sell gasoline, 11 chain convenience food stores that sell gasoline, 11 chain pharmacies, and 10 private pharmacies. Two-thirds of the stores displayed tobacco posters, and 87 percent had promotional items advertising tobacco products, primarily cigarettes. Larger stores, and those that were privately owned, tended to display more posters and promotional items. Eighty percent of tobacco product displays were for cigarettes, 16 percent for smokeless tobacco products, and 4 percent for cigars and pipe tobacco. Convenience stores selling gasoline had the most separate tobacco product displays. Of tobacco product displays, 24 percent were located adjacent to candy and snack displays. Twenty-nine of the 61 store owners or managers indicated that their store had a policy regulating the display of tobacco ads and tobacco product displays. Policies dealt primarily with the location of tobacco posters (for example, no ads in the window) and number of product displays. Only 14 shop owners or managers indicated that they had previously displayed antitobacco information; more than half (31 of 61) said that they would be willing to display antitobaccoads.In many

  4. Observation of the weak electronic correlations in KFeCoAs2 (3d 6): an isoelectronic to the parent compounds of 122 series of iron pnictides BaFe2As2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. H.; Yaresko, A. N.; Li, Y.; Dai, P. C.; Zhang, H.; Büchner, B.; Lin, C. T.; Borisenko, S. V.

    2017-03-01

    Using the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and band structure calculations we study the electronic structure of KFeCoAs2, which is isoelectronic to the parent material of 122 series of iron-based superconductors BaFe2As2. Although band structure calculations predict nearly identical dispersions of the electronic states in both compounds, experiment reveals drastic differences in both the global renormalization and Fermi surfaces. On the basis of the comparison of electronic structures of these two isoelectronic compounds, we demonstrate local magnetic correlations as a vital role for the peculiar low-energy electron dynamics of iron-based superconductors.

  5. Iron Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... are used together to detect and help diagnose iron deficiency or iron overload. In people with anemia , these ... help determine whether the condition is due to iron deficiency or another cause, such as chronic blood loss ...

  6. Synthesis and characterization of quinoline-based thiosemicarbazones and correlation of cellular iron-binding efficacy to anti-tumor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Serda, Maciej; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Mrozek-Wilczkiewicz, Anna; Musiol, Robert; Szurko, Agnieszka; Ratuszna, Alicja; Pantarat, Namfon; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Merlot, Angelica M; Richardson, Des R; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2012-09-01

    Iron chelators have emerged as a potential anti-cancer treatment strategy. In this study, a series of novel thiosemicarbazone iron chelators containing a quinoline scaffold were synthesized and characterized. A number of analogs show markedly greater anti-cancer activity than the 'gold-standard' iron chelator, desferrioxamine. The anti-proliferative activity and iron chelation efficacy of several of these ligands (especially compound 1b), indicates that further investigation of this class of thiosemicarbazones is worthwhile. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnosis and clinical evaluation of iron overload.

    PubMed

    Kaltwasser, J P; Werner, E

    1989-04-01

    Diagnostic evaluation of the various forms of iron overload requires information about the total amount and distribution of iron stores. Direct information on the quantity of storage iron can be obtained only by its mobilization in response to repeated phlebotomy or after dilution of a labelled iron test dose in the total body iron pool. Both approaches are cumbersome and time-consuming and are suitable only for research purposes. Detailed information on the amount and distribution of tissue iron in iron overload can be obtained from biopsy specimens of the major iron storage organs such as the liver and bone marrow. However, the invasive nature of these procedures limits their clinical usefulness. Indirect measures, such as serum iron concentration, TIBC saturation, serum ferritin, chelate-induced urinary iron excretion or intestinal iron absorption, and ferrokinetic measurements may provide useful information on the amount of total body iron reserve. However, they all have important limitations in their diagnostic use for evaluating iron overload. The most suitable indirect storage iron index among these methods is the ferritin assay, which has a well established place in the diagnosis of iron overload and monitoring of the effect of therapy. Recent developments in physical methods such as CT, SQUID and NMR have significantly improved the applicability of these techniques for non-invasive measurement of liver iron. It is expected that quantitative measurement of hepatic iron stores will soon be integrated into the diagnostic procedures available by imaging techniques such as CT and NMR. In combination with screening parameters such as serum ferritin and TIBC saturation these new but expensive diagnostic tools may simplify and shorten the diagnostic process and may also be useful for monitoring the treatment of iron overload by phlebotomy or chelating drugs.

  8. Effects of Pregnancy and Lactation on Iron Metabolism in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Guofen; Liu, Shang-Yuan; Wang, Hui-Jie; Zhang, Tian-Wei; Yu, Peng; Duan, Xiang-Lin; Zhao, Shu-E; Chang, Yan-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    In female, inadequate iron supply is a highly prevalent problem that often leads to iron-deficiency anemia. This study aimed to understand the effects of pregnancy and lactation on iron metabolism. Rats with different days of gestation and lactation were used to determine the variations in iron stores and serum iron level and the changes in expression of iron metabolism-related proteins, including ferritin, ferroportin 1 (FPN1), ceruloplasmin (Cp), divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), and the major iron-regulatory molecule—hepcidin. We found that iron stores decline dramatically at late-pregnancy period, and the low iron store status persists throughout the lactation period. The significantly increased FPN1 level in small intestine facilitates digestive iron absorption, which maintains the serum iron concentration at a near-normal level to meet the increase of iron requirements. Moreover, a significant decrease of hepcidin expression is observed during late-pregnancy and early-lactation stages, suggesting the important regulatory role that hepcidin plays in iron metabolism during pregnancy and lactation. These results are fundamental to the understanding of iron homeostasis during pregnancy and lactation and may provide experimental bases for future studies to identify key molecules expressed during these special periods that regulate the expression of hepcidin, to eventually improve the iron-deficiency status. PMID:26788496

  9. Laboratory variables for assessing iron deficiency in REDS-II Iron Status Evaluation (RISE) blood donors.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Joseph E; Steele, Whitney R; Wright, David J; Mast, Alan E; Carey, Patricia M; Murphy, Edward L; Gottschall, Jerry L; Simon, Toby L; Cable, Ritchard G

    2013-11-01

    Iron deficiency is common in regular blood donors. We evaluated the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of red blood cell (RBC) hematology analyzer indices to assess iron status as a part of donor management. A total of 1659 male and female donors from the Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study-II (REDS-II) Donor Iron Status Evaluation (RISE) study who were either first-time/reactivated (FT/RA; no donations for 2 years) or frequent donors were recruited into a longitudinal study of regular donation of RBCs. Of these, 1002 donors returned 15 to 24 months later for a final assessment. Absent iron stores (AIS) was defined as plasma ferritin level of less than 12 μg/L. Logarithm of the ratio of soluble transferrin receptor to ferritin of at least 2.07 (≥97.5% in FT/RA males) was used to define iron-deficient erythropoiesis (IDE). Receiver operating characteristics analysis was performed to assess selected RBC indices (e.g., percentage of hypochromic mature RBCs, proportion of hypochromic mature RBCs [HYPOm], and hemoglobin [Hb] content of reticulocytes [CHr]) in identifying AIS and IDE. HYPOm and CHr detected IDE with comparable sensitivity, 72% versus 69%, but differed in specificity: HYPOm 68% and CHr 53%. For detecting AIS, sensitivity was improved to 85% for HYPOm and 81% for CHr but specificity was reduced for both. Venous Hb had high specificity but poor sensitivity for IDE and AIS. A plasma ferritin level of less than 26.7 μg/L was a good surrogate for assessing IDE. RBC indices correlate with AIS and IDE and are more informative than Hb measurement, but lack sufficient sensitivity and specificity to be used as diagnostic tools in blood donors at risk for iron deficiency. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  10. Laboratory variables for assessing iron deficiency in REDS-II Iron Status Evaluation (RISE) blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Joseph E.; Steele, Whitney R.; Wright, David J.; Mast, Alan E.; Carey, Patricia M.; Murphy, Edward L.; Gottschall, Jerry L.; Simon, Toby L.; Cable, Ritchard G.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Iron deficiency is common in regular blood donors. We evaluated the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of red blood cell (RBC) hematology analyzer indices to assess iron status as a part of donor management. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 1659 male and female donors from the Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study-II (REDS-II) Donor Iron Status Evaluation (RISE) study who were either first-time/reactivated (FT/ RA; no donations for 2 years) or frequent donors were recruited into a longitudinal study of regular donation of RBCs. Of these, 1002 donors returned 15 to 24 months later for a final assessment. Absent iron stores (AIS) was defined as plasma ferritin level of less than 12 µ.g/L. Logarithm of the ratio of soluble transferrin receptor to ferritin of at least 2.07 (≥97.5% in FT/RA males) was used to define iron-deficient erythropoiesis (IDE). Receiver operating characteristics analysis was performed to assess selected RBC indices (e.g., percentage of hypochromic mature RBCs, proportion of hypochromic mature RBCs [HYPOm], and hemoglobin [Hb] content of reticulocytes [CHr]) in identifying AIS and IDE. RESULTS HYPOm and CHr detected IDE with comparable sensitivity, 72% versus 69%, but differed in specificity: HYPOm 68% and CHr 53%. For detecting AIS, sensitivity was improved to 85% for HYPOm and 81% for CHr but specificity was reduced for both. Venous Hb had high specificity but poor sensitivity for IDE and AIS. A plasma ferritin level of less than 26.7 u.g/L was a good surrogate for assessing IDE. CONCLUSION RBC indices correlate with AIS and IDE and are more informative than Hb measurement, but lack sufficient sensitivity and specificity to be used as diagnostic tools in blood donors at risk for iron deficiency. PMID:23617531

  11. [Iron metabolism, overview and recent insights].

    PubMed

    Omar, S; Feki, M; Kaabachi, N

    2006-01-01

    The paper is an up to date overview of knowledge on iron metabolism that integrate recent findings in this field. Significant advances were made in understanding the implication of protein factors (transporters, enzymes and regulation factors) in iron metabolism, as well as related genetic abnormalities. The research highlighted the complexity of mechanisms in charge of maintaining equilibrium of Fe in the body. The iron is vital to the life of cells, but its presence in excess is rather toxic. Iron is mostly required for hemoglobin synthesis. It is recycled between reticulo-endothelial macrophages and bone marrow that is the main user of iron. Intestinal absorption is a key step in determining iron capital in the body. Its rate is tightly controlled by several factors that act under influence of signals of unknown nature, which indicate iron needs and storage. The IRP/IRE (iron regulatory protein/iron responsive element) system controls cellular uptake, stores and exportation of iron, and heme synthesis. Mitochondrion is a dynamo of iron metabolism, being vital for heme synthesis and iron sulphur cluster genesis. The recent discovery of several mitochondrial proteins involved in iron metabolism resulted in better understanding mitochondrial iron movement, storage and exchange. Nevertheless, much remains to be known on the role of some actors such as HFE protein, hepcidin, hemojuvelin and transferrin receptor 2, and to determine the nature and mechanisms of signals regulating iron level in the body.

  12. Iron homoeostasis in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Baker, Joshua F; Ghio, Andrew J

    2009-11-01

    Iron is critical in nearly all cell functions and the ability of a cell, tissue and organism to procure this metal is obligatory for survival. Iron is necessary for normal immune function, and relative iron deficiency is associated with mild immunosuppression. Concentrations of this metal in excess of those required for function can present both an oxidative stress and elevate risks for infection. As a result, the human has evolved to have a complex mechanism of regulating iron and limiting its availability. This homoeostasis can be disrupted. Autoimmune diseases and gout often present with abnormal iron homoeostasis, thus supporting a participation of the metal in these injuries. We review the role of iron in normal immune function and discuss both clinical evidence of altered iron homoeostasis in autoimmune diseases and gout as well as possible implications of both depletion and supplementation of this metal in this patient population. We conclude that altered iron homoeostasis may represent a purposeful response to inflammation that could have theoretical anti-inflammatory benefits. We encourage physicians to avoid routine iron supplementation in those without depleted iron stores.

  13. Current issues in iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Baynes, R D; Cook, J D

    1996-03-01

    This brief review of developments relating to iron deficiency during the past year covers three main areas: iron supplementation, the regulation of iron absorption, and the use of the serum transferrin receptor for the assessment of iron status. The intermittent administration of iron supplement once or twice weekly rather than daily has been advocated by international health agencies in recent years, but radioiron absorption studies in human subjects have failed to demonstrate any absorptive advantage of the intermittent schedule. The value of prophylactic iron supplementation in elderly blood donors was evaluated and shown to offer limited benefit in maintaining donation frequency. A recent model of the regulation of iron absorption involving erythropoietic and store regulators is discussed and a recent article indicating a potential non-hematopoietic effect of hematopoietic growth factors on iron absorption by the gastrointestinal mucosal cell is reviewed. A new measure of functional iron deficiency, namely the serum transferrin receptor, is discussed, with particular reference to its mechanism of production and its great value in distinguishing iron deficiency anemia from the anemia of chronic disease.

  14. Intravenous iron therapy: how far have we come?

    PubMed Central

    Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini; Muñoz, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) because of its effectiveness and low cost. But unfortunately in many iron deficient conditions, oral iron is a less than the ideal treatment mainly because of adverse events related to the gastrointestinal tract as well as the long course required to treat anemia and replenish body iron stores. The first iron product for intravenous use was high-molecular-weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to prescribe intravenous iron in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia for many years. In 1999 and 2001, two new intravenous iron preparations (ferric gluconate and iron sucrose) were introduced into the market as safer alternatives to iron dextran. Over the last five years, three new intravenous iron dextran-free preparations have been developed and have better safety profiles than the more traditional intravenous compounds, as none require test doses and all these products are promising in respect to a more rapid replacement of body iron stores (15-60 minutes/infusion) as they can be given at higher doses (from 500 mg to more than 1000 mg/infusion). The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, safety profile and toxicity of intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia. PMID:23049364

  15. Measurement of hair iron concentration as a marker of body iron content.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Cem; Pala, Cigdem; Kaynar, Leylagul; Torun, Yasemin Altuner; Cetin, Aysun; Kurnaz, Fatih; Sivgin, Serdar; Sahin, Fatih Serdar

    2015-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to define the possible association between blood parameters and hair iron concentration in patient groups showing a difference in body iron content. The study population comprised subjects with iron deficiency anaemia and transfusion-related anaemia with different body iron contents and a healthy control group. All the cases included in the study were examined with respect to hair iron concentration, serum iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), transferrin saturation and erythrocyte markers in the total blood count with ferritin values. Differences in hair iron concentration were evaluated between the groups. Correlation analysis was applied to define the association between the laboratory values used as markers of body iron content and hair iron concentration. A statistically significant difference was determined in hair iron (56)Fe and (57)Fe concentrations between the group with transfusion-related anaemia, the iron deficiency anaemia group and the healthy control group (P<0.001). In addition, a positive correlation was determined between hair iron (56)Fe and (57)Fe concentrations and serum iron, ferritin level, transferrin saturation, mean erythrocyte volume and mean erythrocyte haemoglobin values and a negative correlation with TIBC. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed a statistically significant difference in the hair iron concentrations of the patient groups with different body iron content and these values were correlated to the laboratory markers of body iron content.

  16. Molecular Mediators Governing Iron-Copper Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gulec, Sukru; Collins, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Given their similar physiochemical properties, it is a logical postulate that iron and copper metabolism are intertwined. Indeed, iron-copper interactions were first documented over a century ago, but the homeostatic effects of one on the other has not been elucidated at a molecular level to date. Recent experimental work has, however, begun to provide mechanistic insight into how copper influences iron metabolism. During iron deficiency, elevated copper levels are observed in the intestinal mucosa, liver, and blood. Copper accumulation and/or redistribution within enterocytes may influence iron transport, and high hepatic copper may enhance biosynthesis of a circulating ferroxidase, which potentiates iron release from stores. Moreover, emerging evidence has documented direct effects of copper on the expression and activity of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. This review summarizes current experimental work in this field, with a focus on molecular aspects of iron-copper interplay and how these interactions relate to various disease states. PMID:24995690

  17. Repeated phlebotomies decrease body iron storage in adult dogs.

    PubMed

    Chikazawa, Seishiro; Hoshi, Fumio; Kanai, Kazutaka

    2017-08-11

    The aim of the present study was to determine changes in body iron storage in adult dogs following phlebotomy. We performed repeated phlebotomies by removing 1% body weight (approximately 10% of the total blood volume) weekly for a total of 12 times using adult beagle dogs without an iron-restricted diet. After treatment, stored iron was decreased, as demonstrated by gradual reductions in serum ferritin levels and hepatic iron contents. Anemia and abnormalities in blood chemistry analysis were not observed; therefore, this method was considered safe and useful for control of stored iron levels in adult dogs.

  18. METABOLIC CAPACITY REGULATES IRON HOMEOSTATIS IN ENDOTHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sensitivity of endothelial cells to oxidative stress and the high concentrations of iron in mitochondria led us to test the hypotheses that (1) changes in respiratory capacity alter iron homeostasis, and (2) lack of aerobic metabolism decreases labile iron stores and attenuat...

  19. METABOLIC CAPACITY REGULATES IRON HOMEOSTATIS IN ENDOTHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sensitivity of endothelial cells to oxidative stress and the high concentrations of iron in mitochondria led us to test the hypotheses that (1) changes in respiratory capacity alter iron homeostasis, and (2) lack of aerobic metabolism decreases labile iron stores and attenuat...

  20. Ineffective erythropoiesis and regulation of iron status in iron loading anaemias.

    PubMed

    Camaschella, Clara; Nai, Antonella

    2016-02-01

    The definition 'iron loading anaemias' encompasses a group of inherited and acquired anaemias characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis, low hepcidin levels, excessive iron absorption and secondary iron overload. Non-transfusion-dependent β-thalassaemia is the paradigmatic example of these conditions that include dyserythropoietic and sideroblastic anaemias and some forms of myelodysplasia. Interrupting the vicious cycle between ineffective erythropoiesis and iron overload may be of therapeutic benefit in all these diseases. Induction of iron restriction by means of transferrin infusions, minihepcidins or manipulation of the hepcidin pathway prevents iron overload, redistributes iron from parenchymal cells to macrophage stores and partially controls anaemia in β-thalassaemic mice. Inhibition of ineffective erythropoiesis by activin ligand traps improves anaemia and iron overload in the same models. Targeting iron loading or ineffective erythropoiesis shows promise in preclinical studies; activin ligand traps are in clinical trials with promising results and may be useful in patients with ineffective erythropoiesis.

  1. Disorders of iron metabolism. Part 1: molecular basis of iron homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Manuel; García-Erce, José Antonio; Remacha, Angel Francisco

    2011-04-01

    IRON FUNCTIONS: Iron is an essential micronutrient, as it is required for satisfactory erythropoietic function, oxidative metabolism and cellular immune response. IRON PHYSIOLOGY: Absorption of dietary iron (1-2 mg/day) is tightly regulated and just balanced against iron loss because there are no active iron excretory mechanisms. Dietary iron is found in haem (10%) and non-haem (ionic, 90%) forms, and their absorption occurs at the apical surface of duodenal enterocytes via different mechanisms. Iron is exported by ferroportin 1 (the only putative iron exporter) across the basolateral membrane of the enterocyte into the circulation (absorbed iron), where it binds to transferrin and is transported to sites of use and storage. Transferrin-bound iron enters target cells-mainly erythroid cells, but also immune and hepatic cells-via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Senescent erythrocytes are phagocytosed by reticuloendothelial system macrophages, haem is metabolised by haem oxygenase, and the released iron is stored as ferritin. Iron will be later exported from macrophages to transferrin. This internal turnover of iron is essential to meet the requirements of erythropoiesis (20-30 mg/day). As transferrin becomes saturated in iron-overload states, excess iron is transported to the liver, the other main storage organ for iron, carrying the risk of free radical formation and tissue damage. REGULATION OF IRON HOMOEOSTASIS: Hepcidin, synthesised by hepatocytes in response to iron concentrations, inflammation, hypoxia and erythropoiesis, is the main iron-regulatory hormone. It binds ferroportin on enterocytes, macrophages and hepatocytes triggering its internalisation and lysosomal degradation. Inappropriate hepcidin secretion may lead to either iron deficiency or iron overload.

  2. Cellular pool of transient ferric iron, chelatable by deferoxamine and distinct from ferritin, that is involved in oxidative cell injury.

    PubMed

    Rothman, R J; Serroni, A; Farber, J L

    1992-10-01

    A cellular pool of transient ferric iron that is chelatable by deferoxamine, distinct from ferritin, and required for oxidative cell injury has been identified in cultured rat hepatocytes labeled with 59FeCl3. Pretreatment of hepatocytes with deferoxamine depleted the cellular pool of chelatable iron and protected the cells from an oxidative injury. Incubation of deferoxamine-pretreated hepatocytes in serum-free medium restored both the chelatable iron pool and the susceptibility to oxidative injury. Furthermore, inhibition of protein degradation with chymostatin prevented the restoration of both the chelatable pool and susceptibility to oxidative injury. The deferoxamine-chelatable iron pool was distinguished kinetically and immunochemically from the larger cellular pool of ferritin iron. The labeled iron in the deferoxamine-chelatable pool was transient, unlike either the total cellular uptake of 59Fe or its incorporation into ferritin, both of which increased with time of labeling. With pulse-chase labeling, the percentage of the total uptake of 59Fe that was represented by the deferoxamine-chelatable pool decreased. At the same time, the percentage represented by radioactivity immunoprecipitable as ferritin increased. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation of ferritin from the labeled lysates enriched the resulting immunosupernatants in deferoxamine-chelatable iron. The degree of enrichment for chelatable iron correlated with the percentage of the cellular label that was immunoprecipitable as ferritin. The deferoxamine-chelatable iron appears to represent a metabolically common pool of iron that is rapidly in transit through the cell. Extracellular iron entering the pool can be utilized for heme synthesis or stored in ferritin, whereas protein degradation releases storage iron into this pool.

  3. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Breymann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in obstetrics and perinatal care. Any hemoglobin below 10.5 g/dL can be regarded as true anemia regardless of gestational age. Reasons for anemia in pregnancy are mainly nutritional deficiencies, parasitic and bacterial diseases, and inborn red blood cell disorders such as thalassemias. The main cause of anemia in obstetrics is iron deficiency, which has a worldwide prevalence between estimated 20%-80% and consists of a primarily female population. Stages of iron deficiency are depletion of iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis without anemia, and iron deficiency anemia, the most pronounced form of iron deficiency. Pregnancy anemia can be aggravated by various conditions such as uterine or placental bleedings, gastrointestinal bleedings, and peripartum blood loss. In addition to the general consequences of anemia, there are specific risks during pregnancy for the mother and the fetus such as intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity, feto-placental miss ratio, and higher risk for peripartum blood transfusion. Besides the importance of prophylaxis of iron deficiency, the main therapy options for the treatment of pregnancy anemia are oral iron and intravenous iron preparations.

  4. [Iron deficiency and pica].

    PubMed

    Muñoz, J A; Marcos, J; Risueño, C E; de Cos, C; López, R; Capote, F J; Martín, M V; Gil, J L

    1998-02-01

    To study the relationship between pica and iron-lack anaemia in a series of iron-deficiency patients in order to establish the pathogenesis of such relationship. Four-hundred and thirty-three patients were analysed. Pica was studied by introducing certain diet queries into the clinical history. All patients received oral iron and were periodically controlled with the usual clinico-haematological procedures. Pica was present in 23 patients (5.3%). Eight nourishing (namely, coffee grains, almonds, chocolate, ice, lettuce, carrots, sunflower seeds and bread) and 2 non-nourishing (clay and paper) substances were involved. A second episode of pica appeared in 9 cases upon relapsing of iron deficiency. Both anaemia and pica were cured by etiologic and substitutive therapy in all instances. No clear correlation was found with either socio-economic status or pathogenetic causes of iron deficiency and pica, and no haematological differences were seen between patients with pica and those without this alteration. (1) The pathogenesis of pica is unclear, although it appears unrelated to the degree of iron deficiency. (2) According to the findings in this series, pica seems a consequence of iron deficiency rather than its cause. (3) Adequate therapy can cure both conditions, although pica may reappear upon relapse of iron deficiency.

  5. Iron and fibroblast growth factor 23 in X-linked hypophosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    Imel, Erik A.; Gray, Amie; Padgett, Leah; Econs, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Excess fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) causes hypophosphatemia in autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets (ADHR) and X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH). Iron status influences C-terminal FGF23 (incorporating fragments plus intact FGF23) in ADHR and healthy subjects, and intact FGF23 in ADHR. We hypothesized that in XLH serum iron would inversely correlate to C-terminal FGF23, but not to intact FGF23, mirroring the relationships in normal controls. Methods Subjects included 25 untreated outpatients with XLH at a tertiary medical center and 158 healthy adult controls. Serum iron and plasma intact FGF23 and C-terminal FGF23 were measured in stored samples. Results Intact FGF23 was greater than the control mean in 100% of XLH patients, and >2SD above the control mean in 88%, compared to 71% and 21% respectively for C-terminal FGF23. In XLH, iron correlated negatively to log-C-terminal FGF23 (r= −0.523, p<0.01), with a steeper slope than in controls (p<0.001). Iron was not related to log-intact FGF23 in either group. The log-ratio of intact FGF23 to C-terminal FGF23 was higher in XLH (0.00 ± 0.44) than controls (−0.28 ± 0.21, p<0.01), and correlated positively to serum iron (controls r= 0.276, p<0.001; XLH r= 0.428, p<0.05), with a steeper slope in XLH (p<0.01). Conclusion Like controls, serum iron in XLH is inversely related to C-terminal FGF23 but not intact FGF23. XLH patients are more likely to have elevated intact FGF23 than C-terminal FGF23. The relationships of iron to FGF23 in XLH suggest altered regulation of FGF23 cleaving may contribute to maintaining hypophosphatemia around an abnormal set-point. PMID:24325979

  6. Iron insufficiency and hypovitaminosis D in adolescents with chronic fatigue and orthostatic intolerance.

    PubMed

    Antiel, Ryan M; Caudill, Jonathan S; Burkhardt, Barbara E U; Brands, Chad K; Fischer, Philip R

    2011-08-01

    More than 10% of adolescents suffer from severe fatigue and/or orthostatic intolerance. Adult studies show correlations between iron insufficiency and fatigue as well as between hypovitaminosis D and non-specific pain. We sought to determine whether there were correlations between nutritional factors (iron status, and serum vitamin D levels) and chronic ill health. We reviewed records of 188 adolescents with symptoms of fatigue and/or orthostatic intolerance and who underwent autonomic reflex screening. Of the 188 patients, 130 patients (69%) had excessive postural tachycardia (PT) with a heart rate (HR) change of ≥30 bpm. 62 patients (47%, n = 131) had iron insufficiency with low iron stores, and 29 patients (22%, n = 131) were iron deficient. HR change did not correlate to ferritin level (P = 0.15). 21 patients (22%, n = 95) had hypovitaminosis D (25-hydroxyvitamin D ≤20 ng/mL). There was a significant association with hypovitaminosis D and orthostatic intolerance (P = 0.024). In patients presenting with chronic fatigue and/or orthostatic intolerance, low ferritin levels and hypovitaminosis D are common, especially in patients with PT.

  7. Method to predict external store carriage characteristics at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Bruce S.

    1988-01-01

    Development of a computational method for prediction of external store carriage characteristics at transonic speeds is described. The geometric flexibility required for treatment of pylon-mounted stores is achieved by computing finite difference solutions on a five-level embedded grid arrangement. A completely automated grid generation procedure facilitates applications. Store modeling capability consists of bodies of revolution with multiple fore and aft fins. A body-conforming grid improves the accuracy of the computed store body flow field. A nonlinear relaxation scheme developed specifically for modified transonic small disturbance flow equations enhances the method's numerical stability and accuracy. As a result, treatment of lower aspect ratio, more highly swept and tapered wings is possible. A limited supersonic freestream capability is also provided. Pressure, load distribution, and force/moment correlations show good agreement with experimental data for several test cases. A detailed computer program description for the Transonic Store Carriage Loads Prediction (TSCLP) Code is included.

  8. Laboratory and Genetic Assessment of Iron Deficiency in Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Over 9 million individuals donate blood annually in the US. Between 200 to 250 mg of iron is removed with each whole blood donation, reflecting losses from the hemoglobin in red blood cells. This amount represents approximately 25% of the average iron stores in men and almost 75% of the iron stores in women. Replenishment of iron stores takes many months, leading to a high rate of iron depletion, especially in frequent blood donors (e. g., more than 2 times per year). In large epidemiologic studies, donation frequency, female gender, and younger age (reflecting menstrual status), are particularly associated with iron depletion. Currently, a minimum capillary hemoglobin of 12.5 gm/dl is the sole requirement for donor qualification in the US as far as iron levels are concerned, yet it is known that hemoglobin level is a poor surrogate for low iron. In an effort to better identify and prevent iron deficiency, blood collection centers are now considering various strategies to manage donor iron loss, including changes in acceptable hemoglobin level, donation interval, donation frequency, testing of iron status, and iron supplementation. This chapter highlights laboratory and genetic tests to assess the iron status of blood donors and their applicability as screening tests for blood donation. PMID:25676373

  9. Infant iron status affects iron absorption in Peruvian breastfed infants at 2 and 5 mo of age.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Julia L; O'Brien, Kimberly O; Abrams, Steven A; Zavaleta, Nelly

    2013-12-01

    Effects of prenatal iron supplementation on maternal postpartum iron status and early infant iron homeostasis remain largely unknown. We examined iron absorption and growth in exclusively breastfed infants in relation to fetal iron exposure and iron status during early infancy. Longitudinal, paired iron-absorption (⁵⁸Fe) studies were conducted in 59 exclusively breastfed Peruvian infants at 2-3 mo of age (2M) and 5-6 mo of age (5M). Infants were born to women who received ≥ 5100 or ≤ 1320 mg supplemental prenatal Fe. Iron status was assessed in mothers and infants at 2M and 5M. Infant iron absorption from breast milk averaged 7.1% and 13.9% at 2M and 5M. Maternal iron status (at 2M) predicted infant iron deficiency (ID) at 5M. Although no infants were iron deficient at 2M, 28.6% of infants had depleted iron stores (ferritin concentration <12 μg/L) by 5M. Infant serum ferritin decreased (P < 0.0001), serum transferrin receptor (sTfR) increased (P < 0.0001), and serum iron decreased from 2M to 5M (P < 0.01). Higher infant sTfR (P < 0.01) and breast-milk copper (P < 0.01) predicted increased iron absorption at 5M. Prenatal iron supplementation had no effects on infant iron status or breast-milk nutrient concentrations at 2M or 5M. However, fetal iron exposure predicted increased infant length at 2M (P < 0.01) and 5M (P < 0.05). Fetal iron exposure affected early infant growth but did not significantly improve iron status or absorption. Young, exclusively breastfed infants upregulated iron absorption when iron stores were depleted at both 2M and 5M.

  10. Estimation of Energy Stores of Mentally Retarded Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litchford, Mary Demarest

    1987-01-01

    The study sought to identify reliable measurements for estimating energy stores of retarded adults (N=80) and possible correlations between energy intakes and obesity. Among results were a lack of significant correlations between caloric intake and anthropometric measures (e.g., tricepts skinfold). Body mass index is suggested as a more practical…

  11. VISUALIZING IRON IN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Bagnato, Francesca; Hametner, Simon; Welch, Edward Brian

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols that are designed to be sensitive to iron typically take advantage of (1) iron effects on the relaxation of water protons and/or (2) iron-induced local magnetic field susceptibility changes. Increasing evidence sustains the notion that imaging iron in brain of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) may add some specificity toward the identification of the disease pathology. The present review summarizes currently reported in vivo and post mortem MRI evidence of (1) iron detection in white matter and grey matter of MS brains, (2) pathological and physiological correlates of iron as disclosed by imaging and (3) relations between iron accumulation and disease progression as measured by clinical metrics. PMID:23347601

  12. Volatile organic compounds in fourteen U.S. retail stores.

    PubMed

    Nirlo, E L; Crain, N; Corsi, R L; Siegel, J A

    2014-10-01

    Retail buildings have a potential for both short-term (customer) and long-term (occupational) exposure to indoor pollutants. However, little is known about volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the retail sector and influencing factors, such as ventilation, in-store activities, and store type. We measured VOC concentrations and ventilation rates in 14 retail stores in Texas and Pennsylvania. With the exception of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, VOCs were present in retail stores at concentrations well below health guidelines. Indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 4.6 ppb to 67 ppb. The two mid-sized grocery stores in the sample had the highest levels of ethanol and acetaldehyde, with concentrations up to 2.6 ppm and 92 ppb, respectively, possibly due to the preparation of dough and baking activities. Indoor-to-outdoor concentration ratios indicated that indoor sources were the main contributors to indoor VOC concentrations for the majority of compounds. There was no strong correlation between ventilation and VOC concentrations across all stores. However, increasing the air exchange rates at two stores led to lower indoor VOC concentrations, suggesting that ventilation can be used to reduce concentrations for some specific stores. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The copper-iron connection: hereditary aceruloplasminemia.

    PubMed

    Nittis, Thalia; Gitlin, Jonathan D

    2002-10-01

    Hereditary aceruloplasminemia is an autosomal recessive disorder of iron homeostasis due to loss-of-function mutations in the ceruloplasmin gene. Affected individuals may present in adulthood with evidence of hepatic iron overload, diabetes, peripheral retinal degeneration, dystonia, dementia, or dysarthria. Laboratory studies demonstrate microcytic anemia, elevated serum ferritin, and a complete absence of serum ceruloplasmin ferroxidase activity. Consistent with the observed neurologic findings, magnetic resonance imaging reveals iron accumulation within the basal ganglia. Histologic studies detect abundant iron in hepatocytes, reticuloendothelial cells of the liver and spleen, beta cells of the pancreas, and astrocytes and neurons throughout the central nervous system. Characterization of this disorder reveals an essential role for ceruloplasmin in determining the rate of iron efflux from cells with mobilizable iron stores and provides new insights into the mechanisms of human iron metabolism.

  14. Ferrous versus ferric oral iron formulations for the treatment of iron deficiency: a clinical overview.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Palacios

    2012-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia represents a major public health problem, particularly in infants, young children, pregnant women, and females with heavy menses. Oral iron supplementation is a cheap, safe, and effective means of increasing haemoglobin levels and restoring iron stores to prevent and correct iron deficiency. Many preparations are available, varying widely in dosage, formulation (quick or prolonged release), and chemical state (ferrous or ferric form). The debate over the advantages of ferrous versus ferric formulations is ongoing. In this literature review, the tolerability and efficacy of ferrous versus ferric iron formulations are evaluated. We focused on studies comparing ferrous sulphate preparations with ferric iron polymaltose complex preparations, the two predominant forms of iron used. Current data show that slow-release ferrous sulphate preparations remain the established and standard treatment of iron deficiency, irrespective of the indication, given their good bioavailability, efficacy, and acceptable tolerability demonstrated in several large clinical studies.

  15. Breastfeeding FAQs: Safely Storing Breast Milk

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the Internet Breastfeeding FAQs: Safely Storing Breast Milk KidsHealth > For Parents > Breastfeeding FAQs: Safely Storing Breast ... may have. How do I store my breast milk? You can freeze and/or refrigerate your pumped ( ...

  16. Studying Irony Detection Beyond Ironic Criticism: Let's Include Ironic Praise

    PubMed Central

    Bruntsch, Richard; Ruch, Willibald

    2017-01-01

    Studies of irony detection have commonly used ironic criticisms (i.e., mock positive evaluation of negative circumstances) as stimulus materials. Another basic type of verbal irony, ironic praise (i.e., mock negative evaluation of positive circumstances) is largely absent from studies on individuals' aptitude to detect verbal irony. However, it can be argued that ironic praise needs to be considered in order to investigate the detection of irony in the variety of its facets. To explore whether the detection ironic praise has a benefit beyond ironic criticism, three studies were conducted. In Study 1, an instrument (Test of Verbal Irony Detection Aptitude; TOVIDA) was constructed and its factorial structure was tested using N = 311 subjects. The TOVIDA contains 26 scenario-based items and contains two scales for the detection of ironic criticism vs. ironic praise. To validate the measurement method, the two scales of the TOVIDA were experimentally evaluated with N = 154 subjects in Study 2. In Study 3, N = 183 subjects were tested to explore personality and ability correlates of the two TOVIDA scales. Results indicate that the co-variance between the ironic TOVIDA items was organized by two inter-correlated but distinct factors: one representing ironic praise detection aptitude and one representing ironic criticism detection aptitude. Experimental validation showed that the TOVIDA items truly contain irony and that item scores reflect irony detection. Trait bad mood and benevolent humor (as a facet of the sense of humor) were found as joint correlates for both ironic criticism and ironic praise detection scores. In contrast, intelligence, trait cheerfulness, and corrective humor were found as unique correlates of ironic praise detection scores, even when statistically controlling for the aptitude to detect ironic criticism. Our results indicate that the aptitude to detect ironic praise can be seen as distinct from the aptitude to detect ironic criticism. Generating

  17. Murine macrophages response to iron.

    PubMed

    Polati, Rita; Castagna, Annalisa; Bossi, Alessandra Maria; Alberio, Tiziana; De Domenico, Ivana; Kaplan, Jerry; Timperio, Anna Maria; Zolla, Lello; Gevi, Federica; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Brunch, Ryan; Olivieri, Oliviero; Girelli, Domenico

    2012-12-05

    Macrophages play a critical role at the crossroad between iron metabolism and immunity, being able to store and recycle iron derived from the phagocytosis of senescent erythrocytes. The way by which macrophages manage non-heme iron at physiological concentration is still not fully understood. We investigated protein changes in mouse bone marrow macrophages incubated with ferric ammonium citrate (FAC 10 μM iron). Differentially expressed spots were identified by nano RP-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Transcriptomic, metabolomics and western immunoblotting analyses complemented the proteomic approach. Pattern analysis was also used for identifying networks of proteins involved in iron homeostasis. FAC treatment resulted in higher abundance of several proteins including ferritins, cytoskeleton related proteins, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) at the membrane level, vimentin, arginase, galectin-3 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Interestingly, GAPDH has been recently proposed to act as an alternative transferrin receptor for iron acquisition through internalization of the GAPDH-transferrin complex into the early endosomes. FAC treatment also induced the up-regulation of oxidative stress-related proteins (PRDX), which was further confirmed at the metabolic level (increase in GSSG, 8-isoprostane and pentose phosphate pathway intermediates) through mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolomics approaches. This study represents an example of the potential usefulness of "integarated omics" in the field of iron biology, especially for the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis in normal and disease conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics.

  18. Iron speciation in beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) biofortified by common breeding.

    PubMed

    Hoppler, Matthias; Egli, Ines; Petry, Nicolai; Gille, Doreen; Zeder, Christophe; Walczyk, Thomas; Blair, Matthew W; Hurrell, Richard F

    2014-09-01

    The iron storage protein ferritin is a potential vehicle to enhance the iron content of biofortified crops. With the aim of evaluating the potential of ferritin iron in plant breeding, we used species-specific isotope dilution mass spectrometry to quantify ferritin iron in bean varieties with a wide range of total iron content. Zinc, phytic acid, and polyphenols were also measured. Total iron concentration in 21 bean varieties ranged from 32 to 115 ppm and was positively correlated with concentrations of zinc (P = 0.001) and nonferritin bound iron (P < 0.001). Ferritin iron ranged from 13% to 35% of total iron and increased only slightly in high iron beans (P = 0.007). Concentrations of nonferritin bound iron and phytic acid were correlated (P = 0.001), although phytic acid:iron molar ratio decreased with increasing iron concentration (P = 0.003). Most iron in high iron beans was present as nonferritin bound iron, which confirms our earlier finding showing that ferritin iron in beans was lower than previously published. As the range of ferritin iron content in beans is relatively narrow, there is less opportunity for breeders to breed for high ferritin. The relevance of these findings to the extent of iron absorption depends on resolving the question of whether ferritin iron is absorbed or not to a greater extent than nonferritin bound iron.

  19. The influence of storage age on iron status, oxidative stress and antioxidant protection in paediatric packed cell units.

    PubMed

    Collard, Keith; White, Desley; Copplestone, Adrian

    2014-04-01

    Receipt of blood transfusions is associated with the major consequences of prematurity such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Transfusion-mediated (iron-induced) oxidative damage, coupled with the limited ability of the premature baby to deal with enhanced iron and oxidative load may contribute to this. Adverse effects of transfusion may be related to duration of storage. This study examined the influence of storage on iron and oxidative status in paediatric packed red blood cell units. Paediatric packed red blood cell units were sampled 3 days post-donation, then at 7 days and weekly until day 35. The extracellular medium was separated and the following measured: total iron concentration, total iron binding capacity, non-transferrin-bound iron, haemoglobin, total and reduced ascorbate, glutathione and malondialdehyde. Measurable total and non-transferrin bound iron were present in the extracellular fluid of paediatric packs on day 3. Both parameters rose almost linearly to maximal values at 35 days. Haemoglobin and malondialdehyde levels rose gradually from day 3 to day 21, then more steeply to day 35. Ascorbate existed mainly in the oxidised form and fell rapidly towards the end of storage. Intracellular GSH fell throughout the period of storage. Strong correlations existed between biomarkers of oxidative damage and iron parameters. These data suggest that iron released following the initial preparation of packed red blood cell units may derive from free radical-mediated oxidative damage to the red blood cells and haemoglobin, rather than from extracellular haemoglobin. Iron continues to be released during storage as antioxidant protection declines. A cycle of free radical-mediated damage may initiate and then further exacerbate iron release during storage which, in turn, may mediate further free radical-mediated cellular damage. The potential consequences to recipients of older stored blood may be significant.

  20. The influence of storage age on iron status, oxidative stress and antioxidant protection in paediatric packed cell units

    PubMed Central

    Collard, Keith; White, Desley; Copplestone, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Background Receipt of blood transfusions is associated with the major consequences of prematurity such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Transfusion-mediated (iron-induced) oxidative damage, coupled with the limited ability of the premature baby to deal with enhanced iron and oxidative load may contribute to this. Adverse effects of transfusion may be related to duration of storage. This study examined the influence of storage on iron and oxidative status in paediatric packed red blood cell units. Materials and methods Paediatric packed red blood cell units were sampled 3 days post-donation, then at 7 days and weekly until day 35. The extracellular medium was separated and the following measured: total iron concentration, total iron binding capacity, non-transferrin-bound iron, haemoglobin, total and reduced ascorbate, glutathione and malondialdehyde. Results Measurable total and non-transferrin bound iron were present in the extracellular fluid of paediatric packs on day 3. Both parameters rose almost linearly to maximal values at 35 days. Haemoglobin and malondialdehyde levels rose gradually from day 3 to day 21, then more steeply to day 35. Ascorbate existed mainly in the oxidised form and fell rapidly towards the end of storage. Intracellular GSH fell throughout the period of storage. Strong correlations existed between biomarkers of oxidative damage and iron parameters. Discussion These data suggest that iron released following the initial preparation of packed red blood cell units may derive from free radical-mediated oxidative damage to the red blood cells and haemoglobin, rather than from extracellular haemoglobin. Iron continues to be released during storage as antioxidant protection declines. A cycle of free radical-mediated damage may initiate and then further exacerbate iron release during storage which, in turn, may mediate further free radical-mediated cellular damage. The potential consequences to recipients of older stored blood may be significant

  1. Prevalence of blood donor iron deficiency and feasibility ferritin-based iron replacement: a blood collection agency-based study.

    PubMed

    Gorlin, J; Katz, L; Elsmore, D; Kirbach, K; Erickson, Y; Hove, A; Black, C; Walsh-Jahnke, R

    2016-08-01

    Iron depletion is high in frequent whole-blood donors. It is of interest to blood centres to develop ways to mitigate this risk while maintaining the current blood supply. Our feasibility study shows that blood collection agencies can measure iron stores and safely offer iron replacement in frequent blood donors with low ferritin to reduce the risk of iron depletion and future donor deferrals for low haemoglobin. © 2016 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  2. Iron therapy in the pediatric hemodialysis population.

    PubMed

    Warady, Bradley A; Kausz, Annamaria; Lerner, Gary; Brewer, Eileen D; Chadha, Vimal; Brugnara, Carlo; Dahl, Naomi V; Watkins, Sandra L

    2004-06-01

    Iron therapy maintains iron stores and optimizes the response to recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEPO) in patients with end-stage renal failure. Information is limited, however, regarding the preferential route of iron administration in pediatric patients receiving hemodialysis. Therefore, we prospectively randomized 35 iron-replete patients (aged >1 to <20 years) to receive up to 16 weeks of maintenance i.v. ( n=17) or daily oral ( n=18) iron. Eligible patients had received hemodialysis for >2 months, had a baseline transferrin saturation [TSAT] >20%, and were receiving maintenance r-HuEPO. Treatment arms were evenly distributed with respect to baseline demographic and clinical characteristics, with no statistically significant differences in baseline hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), reticulocyte Hb content (CHr), serum ferritin (SF), TSAT, or r-HuEPO dose. In the 35 patients, i.v. iron dextran and not oral iron was associated with a significant increase (138.5 to 259.1 ng/ml, P=0.003) in SF. A comparison of the change in SF between the i.v. iron group and the oral iron group was also significant ( P=0.001). Whereas only i.v. iron was associated with a significant decrease in the dose of r-HuEPO (234.0 to 157.6 U/kg per week, P=0.046) and an increase of the CHr (29.2 to 30.1 pg, P=0.049), these changes were not significantly different from those experienced by patients in the oral iron group. In both groups, the Hct remained stable and in neither group was there a significant change in the TSAT. In summary, although both oral and i.v. iron maintained patients in an iron-replete state in this short-term study, only i.v. therapy allowed for a significant improvement in iron stores.

  3. Dietary iron intervention using a staple food product for improvement of iron status in female runners.

    PubMed

    Alaunyte, Ieva; Stojceska, Valentina; Plunkett, Andrew; Derbyshire, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Adequate nutrient intake is critically important for achieving optimal sports performance. Like all athletes, female runners require a nutritionally balanced diet to maintain daily activities and a successful training regime. This study investigates the effects of cereal product based dietary iron intervention on iron status of recreational female runners (n = 11; 32 ± 7yr; 239 ± 153 minutes exercise/week, of which 161 ± 150 minutes running activity/week; VO2max 38 ± 4 ml/kg/min). Participants completed a 6-week dietary intervention study. They were asked to replace their usual bread with iron-rich Teff bread as part of their daily diet. During this period, their dietary habits were assessed by multiple pass 24-hr recalls; iron status was determined by venous blood analysis for serum transferrin, serum transferrin receptor, serum ferritin, total iron-binding capacity and transferrin receptor/ferritin log index. Pre-intervention a cohort of 11 female runners reported inadequate daily dietary iron intake of 10.7 ± 2.7 mg/day, which was associated with overall compromised iron status. Over a third of all participants showed depleted bodily iron stores (serum ferritin <12 μg/L). Pre-intervention macronutrient assessment revealed adequate energy, protein and fibre intakes, whilst total fat and saturated fat intake was above the recommendations at the expense of carbohydrate intake. A 6-week dietary intervention resulted in significantly higher total iron intakes (18.5 mg/day, P < 0.05) and improved iron tissue supply but not enlarged iron stores. Improvements in heamatological indices were associated with compromised baseline iron status, prolonged intervention period and increase in dietary iron intake. Dietary iron interventions using a staple cereal product offer an alternative way of improving dietary iron intake and favourable affecting overall iron status in physically active females.

  4. Deranged iron status in psoriasis: the impact of low body mass

    PubMed Central

    Ponikowska, Malgorzata; Tupikowska, Malgorzata; Kasztura, Monika; Jankowska, Ewa A; Szepietowski, Jacek C

    2015-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency (ID) frequently complicates inflammatory-mediated chronic disorders, irrespective of anaemia. Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated skin disease with systemic pro-inflammatory activation; thus, these patients may be prone to develop ID. ID adversely affects immune cells function, which can further contribute to disease progression. This study investigates iron status in psoriasis. Methods Serum concentrations of ferritin, transferrin saturation (Tsat), soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and hepcidin were assessed as the biomarkers of iron status in 39 patients with psoriasis (17 men, age: 47 ± 10 years) and 44 healthy subjects (30 men, age: 53 ± 6 years). Results Compared with healthy controls, patients with psoriasis demonstrated similar haematologic status but deranged iron status as evidenced by decreased Tsat and elevated sTfR (negative tissue iron balance) and low levels of hepcidin (depleted iron stores) (all P < 0.05 vs. controls). In patients, the levels of interleukin-6 (level of pro-inflammatory activation) significantly correlated with hepcidin (R = 0.54), but not with ferritin, Tsat, and sTfR. Biomarkers reflecting ID were not associated with the severity of the disease (assessed with the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index) but significantly correlated low body mass index (BMI). Patients with BMI < 24 kg/m2 compared with those with BMI ≥ 24 kg/m2 demonstrated lower levels of ferritin (40 ± 30 vs. 186 ± 128 ng/mL, P < 0.001) and hepcidin (4.9 ± 2.3 vs. 10.7 ± 6.7 ng/mL, P = 0.03). Conclusion Psoriasis is associated with deranged iron status characterized by depleted iron stores with concomitant unmet cellular iron requirements. The magnitude of these abnormalities is particularly strong in patients with low body mass index. Whether iron deficiency may become a therapeutic target in psoriasis needs to be investigated. PMID:26673741

  5. Iron excess in recreational marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Mettler, S; Zimmermann, M B

    2010-05-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia may impair athletic performance, and iron supplements are commonly consumed by athletes. However, iron overload should be avoided because of the possible long-term adverse health effects. We investigated the iron status of 170 male and female recreational runners participating in the Zürich marathon. Iron deficiency was defined either as a plasma ferritin (PF) concentration <15 microg/l (iron depletion) or as the ratio of the concentrations of transferrin receptor (sTfR) to PF (sTfR:log(PF) index) of > or =4.5 (functional iron deficiency). After excluding subjects with elevated C-reactive protein concentrations, iron overload was defined as PF >200 microg/l. Iron depletion was found in only 2 out of 127 men (1.6% of the male study population) and in 12 out of 43 (28.0%) women. Functional iron deficiency was found in 5 (3.9%) and 11 (25.5%) male and female athletes, respectively. Body iron stores, calculated from the sTfR/PF ratio, were significantly higher (P<0.001) among male compared with female marathon runners. Median PF among males was 104 microg/l, and the upper limit of the PF distribution in males was 628 microg/l. Iron overload was found in 19 out of 127 (15.0%) men but only 2 out of 43 in women (4.7%). Gender (male sex), but not age, was a predictor of higher PF (P<0.001). Iron depletion was present in 28% of female runners but in <2% of males, whereas one in six male runners had signs of iron overload. Although iron supplements are widely used by athletes in an effort to increase performance, our findings indicate excess body iron may be common in male recreational runners and suggest supplements should only be used if tests of iron status indicate deficiency.

  6. Laboratory and genetic assessment of iron deficiency in blood donors.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Joseph E

    2015-03-01

    More than 9 million individuals donate blood annually in the United States. Between 200 and 250 mg of iron is removed with each whole blood donation, reflecting losses from the hemoglobin in red blood cells. Replenishment of iron stores takes many months, leading to a high rate of iron depletion. In an effort to better identify and prevent iron deficiency, blood collection centers are now considering various strategies to manage donor iron loss. This article highlights laboratory and genetic tests to assess the iron status of blood donors and their applicability as screening tests for blood donation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The diagnostic value of bone marrow iron.

    PubMed

    Wulfhekel, U; Düllmann, J

    1990-01-01

    The light and electronmicroscopic representation of non-haemiron in the bone-marrow provides the unique opportunity of extensively evaluating the iron metabolism. In the bone-marrow, macrophages represent the physiological place of iron storage. The iron in the cytoplasma is stored in them in the form of free ferritin molecules and lysomally as aggregated ferritin and/or haemosiderin in siderosomes. In an equal iron balance and unimpaired internal iron exchange only erythroblasts (sideroblasts) and erythrocytes (siderocytes) of the bone-marrow besides macrophages possess siderosomes. In addition to this physiological or orthotopic iron storage a heterotopic iron storage can be observed under pathological conditions, particularly with iron overloading of the organism, in the endothelial cells of sinusoids and plasma cells. In detail, the patterns of iron storage in the bone-marrow are described in the different stages of iron deficiency, disturbance of iron utilization in chronically inflammatory processes or tumour diseases, condition after intravenous iron administration, transfusion siderosis, hereditary haemochromatosis and sideroblastic anaemia.

  8. Fate of blood meal iron in mosquitos

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guoli; Kohlhepp, Pete; Geiser, Dawn; Frasquillo, Maria del Carmen; Vazquez-Moreno, Luz; Winzerling, Joy J.

    2007-01-01

    Iron is an essential element of living cells and organisms as a component of numerous metabolic pathways. Hemoglobin and ferric-transferrin in vertebrate host blood are the two major iron sources for female mosquitoes. We used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and radioisotope-labeling to quantify the fate of iron supplied from hemoglobin or as transferrin in Aedes aegypti. At the end of the first gonotrophic cycloe, ~87% of the ingested total meal heme iron was excreted, while 7% was distributed into the eggs and 6% was stored in different tissues. In contrast, ~8% of the iron provided as transferrin was excreted and of that absorbed, 77% was allocated to the eggs and 15% distributed in the tissues. Further analyses indicate that of the iron supplied in a blood meal, ~7% appears in the eggs and of this iron 98% is from hemoglobin and 2% from ferric-transferrin. Whereas of iron from a blood meal retained in body of the female, ~97% is from heme and <1 % is from transferrin. Evaluation of iron-binding proteins in hemolymph and egg following intake of 59Fe-transferrin revealed that ferritin is iron loaded in these animals, and indicate that this protein plays a critical role in meal iron transport and iron storage in eggs in A. aegypti. PMID:17689557

  9. Circulating Retinol-Binding Protein-4 Concentration Might Reflect Insulin Resistance–Associated Iron Overload

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Real, José Manuel; Moreno, José María; Ricart, Wifredo

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The mechanisms behind the association between retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP4) and insulin resistance are not well understood. An interaction between iron and vitamin A status, of which RBP4 is a surrogate, has long been recognized. We hypothesized that iron-associated insulin resistance could be behind the impaired insulin action caused by RBP4. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Serum ferritin and RBP4 concentration and insulin resistance were evaluated in a sample of middle-aged men (n = 132) and in a replication independent study. Serum RBP4 was also studied before and after iron depletion in patients with type 2 diabetes. Finally, the effect of iron on RBP4 release was evaluated in vitro in adipose tissue. RESULTS—A positive correlation between circulating RBP4 and log serum ferritin (r = 0.35 and r = 0.61, respectively; P < 0.0001) was observed in both independent studies. Serum RBP4 concentration was higher in men than women in parallel to increased ferritin levels. On multiple regression analyses to predict serum RBP4, log serum ferritin contributed significantly to RBP4 variance after controlling for BMI, age, and homeostasis model assessment value. Serum RBP4 concentration decreased after iron depletion in type 2 diabetic patients (percent mean difference −13.7 [95% CI −25.4 to −2.04]; P = 0.024). The iron donor lactoferrin led to increased dose-dependent adipose tissue release of RBP4 (2.4-fold, P = 0.005) and increased RBP4 expression, while apotransferrin and deferoxamine led to decreased RBP4 release. CONCLUSIONS—The relationship between circulating RBP4 and iron stores, both cross-sectional and after iron depletion, and in vitro findings suggest that iron could play a role in the RBP4–insulin resistance relationship. PMID:18426863

  10. Serum transferrin receptor: a quantitative measure of tissue iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Skikne, B S; Flowers, C H; Cook, J D

    1990-05-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the role of serum transferrin receptor measurements in the assessment of iron status. Repeated phlebotomies were performed in 14 normal volunteer subjects to obtain varying degrees of iron deficiency. Serial measurements of serum iron, total iron-binding capacity, mean cell volume (MCV), free erythrocyte protoporphyrin (FEP), red cell mean index, serum ferritin, and serum transferrin receptor were performed throughout the phlebotomy program. There was no change in receptor levels during the phase of storage iron depletion. When the serum ferritin level reached subnormal values there was an increase in serum receptor levels, which continued throughout the phlebotomy program. Functional iron deficiency was defined as a reduction in body iron beyond the point of depleted iron stores. The serum receptor level was a more sensitive and reliable guide to the degree of functional iron deficiency than either the FEP or MCV. Our studies indicate that the serum receptor measurement is of particular value in identifying mild iron deficiency of recent onset. The iron status of a population can be fully assessed by using serum ferritin as a measure of iron stores, serum receptor as a measure of mild tissue iron deficiency, and hemoglobin concentration as a measure of advanced iron deficiency.

  11. Iron biofortification of maize grain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mineral nutrient deficiencies are a worldwide problem that is directly correlated with poverty and food insecurity. The most common of these is iron deficiency; more than one-third of the world’s population suffers from iron deficiency-induced anemia, 80% of which are in developing countries. The co...

  12. Iron biofortification of maize grain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mineral nutrient deficiencies are a worldwide problem that is directly correlated with poverty and food insecurity. The most common of these is iron deficiency; more than one-third of the world’s population suffers from iron deficiency-induced anemia, 80% of which are in developing countries. The de...

  13. Storing Peanuts in Grain Bags

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was executed to determine the potential of storing farmers stock peanuts and shelled peanuts for crushing in hermetically sealed grain bags. The objectives of the study were to evaluate equipment for loading and unloading the grain bags, the capacity of the grain bags, and the changes in qu...

  14. Store Security: Internal Shrinkage Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everhardt, Richard M.

    The document presents a 10-week training program designed to provide helpful and proven methods for controlling internal shrinkage in retail stores. Shrinkage includes the three problems of shoplifting, employee theft, and errors, each of which is addressed by the course. Ohio's laws are also discussed. The format for the course content section is…

  15. SreA-mediated iron regulation in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Schrettl, Markus; Kim, H Stanley; Eisendle, Martin; Kragl, Claudia; Nierman, William C; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Werner, Ernst R; Jacobsen, Ilse; Illmer, Paul; Yi, Hyojeong; Brakhage, Axel A; Haas, Hubertus

    2008-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus, the most common airborne fungal pathogen of humans, employs two high-affinity iron uptake systems: iron uptake mediated by the extracellular siderophore triacetylfusarinine C and reductive iron assimilation. Furthermore, A. fumigatus utilizes two intracellular siderophores, ferricrocin and hydroxyferricrocin, to store iron. Siderophore biosynthesis, which is essential for virulence, is repressed by iron. Here we show that this control is mediated by the GATA factor SreA. During iron-replete conditions, SreA deficiency partially derepressed synthesis of triacetylfusarinine C and uptake of iron resulting in increased cellular accumulation of both iron and ferricrocin. Genome-wide DNA microarray analysis identified 49 genes that are repressed by iron in an SreA-dependent manner. This gene set, termed SreA regulon, includes all known genes involved in iron acquisition, putative novel siderophore biosynthetic genes, and also genes not directly linked to iron metabolism. SreA deficiency also caused upregulation of iron-dependent and antioxidative pathways, probably due to the increased iron content and iron-mediated oxidative stress. Consistently, the sreA disruption mutant displayed increased sensitivity to iron, menadion and phleomycin but retained wild-type virulence in a mouse model. As all detrimental effects of sreA disruption are restricted to iron-replete conditions these data underscore that A. fumigatus faces iron-depleted conditions during infection. PMID:18721228

  16. Iron deficiency: new insights into diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Camaschella, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are common conditions worldwide affecting especially children and young women. In developing countries, iron deficiency is caused by poor iron intake and/or parasitic infection, whereas vegetarian dietary choices, poor iron absorption, and chronic blood loss are common causes in high-income countries. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents can result in functional iron deficiency for erythropoiesis even when stores are iron-replete. Diagnosis of iron deficiency is straightforward, except when it occurs in the context of inflammatory disorders. Oral iron salts correct absolute iron deficiency in most patients, because low hepcidin levels facilitate iron absorption. Unfortunately frequent side effects limit oral iron efficacy. Intravenous iron is increasingly utilized, because currently available preparations allow rapid normalization of total body iron even with a single infusion and are effective also in functional iron deficiency and in iron deficiency associated with inflammatory disorders. The evidence is accumulating that these preparations are safe and effective. However, long-term safety issues of high doses of iron need to be further explored. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  17. Ecophysiology of Zetaproteobacteria Associated with Shallow Hydrothermal Iron-Oxyhydroxide Deposits in Nagahama Bay of Satsuma Iwo-Jima, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Kuratomi, Takashi; Morono, Yuki; Hori, Tomoyuki; Oiwane, Hisashi; Kiyokawa, Shoichi; Inagaki, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies of microbial communities in deep-sea hydrothermal ferric deposits have demonstrated that members of Zetaproteobacteria play significant ecological roles in biogeochemical iron-cycling. However, the ecophysiological characteristics and interaction between other microbial members in the habitat still remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated microbial communities in a core sample obtained from shallow hydrothermal iron-oxyhydroxide deposits at Nagahama Bay of Satsuma Iwo-Jima, Japan. Scanning electron microscopic observation showed numerous helical stalk structures, suggesting the occurrence of iron-oxidizing bacteria. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated the co-occurrence of iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria and iron-reducing bacteria such as the genera Deferrisoma and Desulfobulbus with strong correlations on the sequence abundance. CARD-FISH indicated that the numbers of Zetaproteobacteria were not always consistent to the frequency of stalk structures. In the stalk-abundant layers with relatively small numbers of Zetaproteobacteria cells, accumulation of polyphosphate was observed inside Zetaproteobacteria cells, whereas no polyphosphate grains were observed in the topmost layers with fewer stalks and abundant Zetaproteobacteria cells. These results suggest that Zetaproteobacteria store intracellular polyphosphates during active iron oxidation that contributes to the mineralogical growth and biogeochemical iron cycling. PMID:26793184

  18. Intravenous iron in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Manuel; Gómez-Ramírez, Susana; García-Erce, José Antonio

    2009-10-07

    The prevalence of anemia across studies on patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is high (30%). Both iron deficiency (ID) and anemia of chronic disease contribute most to the development of anemia in IBD. The prevalence of ID is even higher (45%). Anemia and ID negatively impact the patient's quality of life. Therefore, together with an adequate control of disease activity, iron replacement therapy should start as soon as anemia or ID is detected to attain a normal hemoglobin (Hb) and iron status. Many patients will respond to oral iron, but compliance may be poor, whereas intravenous (i.v.) compounds are safe, provide a faster Hb increase and iron store repletion, and presents a lower rate of treatment discontinuation. Absolute indications for i.v. iron treatment should include severe anemia, intolerance or inappropriate response to oral iron, severe intestinal disease activity, or use of an erythropoietic stimulating agent. Four different products are principally used in clinical practice, which differ in their pharmacokinetic properties and safety profiles: iron gluconate and iron sucrose (lower single doses), and iron dextran and ferric carboxymaltose (higher single doses). After the initial resolution of anemia and the repletion of iron stores, the patient's hematological and iron parameters should be carefully and periodically monitored, and maintenance iron treatment should be provided as required. New i.v. preparations that allow for giving 1000-1500 mg in a single session, thus facilitating patient management, provide an excellent tool to prevent or treat anemia and ID in this patient population, which in turn avoids allogeneic blood transfusion and improves their quality of life.

  19. Bigger Stores, More Stores, or No Stores: Paths of Retail Restructuring in Rural America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vias, Alexander C.

    2004-01-01

    Changes such as the development of large international retail chains, retail concentration, locational changes, technological innovation, new labor practices, and the increasing scale of individual stores, have revolutionized the retail sector. This broad restructuring will have profound impacts in rural America because employment in retail is a…

  20. Bigger Stores, More Stores, or No Stores: Paths of Retail Restructuring in Rural America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vias, Alexander C.

    2004-01-01

    Changes such as the development of large international retail chains, retail concentration, locational changes, technological innovation, new labor practices, and the increasing scale of individual stores, have revolutionized the retail sector. This broad restructuring will have profound impacts in rural America because employment in retail is a…

  1. Model/School Store Management Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota State Board for Vocational Education, Bismarck.

    This teacher-coordinator manual assists in planning, organizing, directing, and evaluating student learning experiences associated with either a model store, school store, or combination. (A model store in a marketing laboratory simulates marketing functions; the school store markets merchandise to fellow students, faculty, and/or the public.)…

  2. Bioavailability and stability of intravenous iron sucrose originator versus generic iron sucrose AZAD.

    PubMed

    Praschberger, Monika; Cornelius, Carolin; Schitegg, Markus; Goldenberg, Hans; Scheiber-Mojdehkar, Barbara; Sturm, Brigitte

    2015-03-01

    Severe iron deficiency requires intravenous iron supplementation to replenish iron stores. Intravenous iron sucrose has been used for decades for the treatment of anemia. New generic iron sucrose products are now marketed for the use in several countries and there is an ongoing discussion about the safety and efficacy of iron sucrose similars. In this study, we compared the iron sucrose originator Venofer® and the generic iron sucrose AZAD (ISA) regarding bioavailability, toxicity and stability in human THP-1 cells and HepG2 cells. The bioavailability of Venofer® and ISA was investigated in both cell types by a ferrozin-based assay. The release of incorporated iron was assayed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Ferritin content was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). HepG2 cells were used to investigate the intracellular labile iron pool (LIP), which was measured by the fluorescent calcein assay. The amount of redox-active iron within the iron formulations was assayed using fluorescent dichlorofluorescein. We found no significant differences in all parameters between Venofer® and ISA in regard of bioavailability, toxicity and stability in vitro. ISA shows identical physico-chemical features and identical bioavailability in vitro. This study is a profound basis for future clinical tests with generic iron sucrose compounds.

  3. Decoupler pylon: wing/store flutter suppressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, W. H., III (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A device for suspending a store from a support such as an aircraft wing and more specifically for increasing the flutter speed of an aircraft flying with attached store and reducing the sensitivity of flutter to changes in the pitch inertia and center of gravity location of the store is described. It comprises softspring where the store pitch mode is decoupled from support modes and a low frequency active control mechanism which maintains store alignment. A pneumatic suspension system both isolates the store in pitch and, under conditions of changing mean load, aligns the store with the wing to which it is attached.

  4. XPS investigation of thionyl chloride action on iron phthalocyanines and naphthalocyanines and on hydrogen phthalocyanine — Correlations with the activity of Li/SOCl 2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savy, Michel; Riga, Joseph; Verbist, Jacques J.

    1989-03-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements have been performed on iron phthalocyanines and naphthalocyanines, and hydrogen phthalocyanine powders, after dissolution in SOCl 2 and reprecipitation. The comparison of XPS results with catalytic activities observed in the lithium/thionyl chloride batteries during their discharge underlines the rôles of the central ion oxidation facility and ligand stability in the electrocatalysis of SOCl 2 reduction.

  5. SCRAP STEEL AND FOUNDRY SCRAP IRON, USED AS THE PRIMARY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SCRAP STEEL AND FOUNDRY SCRAP IRON, USED AS THE PRIMARY METAL SOURCES, ARE STORED IN THESE BINS AND LIFTED TO SCALES BY AN ELECTRIC MAGNET. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Melting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  6. Store-Operated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Store-operated calcium channels (SOCs) are a major pathway for calcium signaling in virtually all metozoan cells and serve a wide variety of functions ranging from gene expression, motility, and secretion to tissue and organ development and the immune response. SOCs are activated by the depletion of Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), triggered physiologically through stimulation of a diverse set of surface receptors. Over 15 years after the first characterization of SOCs through electrophysiology, the identification of the STIM proteins as ER Ca2+ sensors and the Orai proteins as store-operated channels has enabled rapid progress in understanding the unique mechanism of store-operate calcium entry (SOCE). Depletion of Ca2+ from the ER causes STIM to accumulate at ER-plasma membrane (PM) junctions where it traps and activates Orai channels diffusing in the closely apposed PM. Mutagenesis studies combined with recent structural insights about STIM and Orai proteins are now beginning to reveal the molecular underpinnings of these choreographic events. This review describes the major experimental advances underlying our current understanding of how ER Ca2+ depletion is coupled to the activation of SOCs. Particular emphasis is placed on the molecular mechanisms of STIM and Orai activation, Orai channel properties, modulation of STIM and Orai function, pharmacological inhibitors of SOCE, and the functions of STIM and Orai in physiology and disease. PMID:26400989

  7. Store-Operated Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Prakriya, Murali; Lewis, Richard S

    2015-10-01

    Store-operated calcium channels (SOCs) are a major pathway for calcium signaling in virtually all metozoan cells and serve a wide variety of functions ranging from gene expression, motility, and secretion to tissue and organ development and the immune response. SOCs are activated by the depletion of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), triggered physiologically through stimulation of a diverse set of surface receptors. Over 15 years after the first characterization of SOCs through electrophysiology, the identification of the STIM proteins as ER Ca(2+) sensors and the Orai proteins as store-operated channels has enabled rapid progress in understanding the unique mechanism of store-operate calcium entry (SOCE). Depletion of Ca(2+) from the ER causes STIM to accumulate at ER-plasma membrane (PM) junctions where it traps and activates Orai channels diffusing in the closely apposed PM. Mutagenesis studies combined with recent structural insights about STIM and Orai proteins are now beginning to reveal the molecular underpinnings of these choreographic events. This review describes the major experimental advances underlying our current understanding of how ER Ca(2+) depletion is coupled to the activation of SOCs. Particular emphasis is placed on the molecular mechanisms of STIM and Orai activation, Orai channel properties, modulation of STIM and Orai function, pharmacological inhibitors of SOCE, and the functions of STIM and Orai in physiology and disease.

  8. Mössbauer investigation of iron uptake in wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, K.; Kuzmann, E.; Fodor, F.; Cseh, E.; Homonnay, Z.; Vértes, A.

    2008-07-01

    Iron uptake and distribution in wheat roots were studied with 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Plants were grown both in iron sufficient and in iron deficient nutrient solutions. Mössbauer spectra of the frozen iron sufficient roots exhibited three iron(III) components with the typical average Mössbauer parameters of δ = 0.50 mm s - 1, Δ = 0.43 mm s - 1, δ = 0.50 mm s - 1, Δ = 0.75 mm s - 1 and δ = 0.50 mm s - 1, Δ = 1.20 mm s - 1 at 80 K. These doublets are very similar to those obtained earlier for cucumber [0], which allows us to suppose that iron is stored in a very similar way in different plants. No ferrous iron could be identified in any case, not even in the iron deficient roots, which confirms the mechanism proposed for iron uptake in the graminaceous plants.

  9. [The role of iron as a deficient element].

    PubMed

    Schümann, K

    1989-12-01

    Iron is an essential trace element. In its heme-form as well as in its non heme-form it is a part of enzymes and hemoproteins. For a safe and adequate dietary intake 10-18 mg of iron are recommended daily. Frequently, this quantity is not available: approximately 20% of the world population is iron-deficient. In this state the enteral transfer capacity for toxic metals, e.g., Cd and Pb, is increased and the adaptation to physical strain as well as the immunological responses are depressed. Alterations of body iron-stores are almost exclusively balanced by adequate adaptation of the enteral iron-transfer capacity. The mechanism of this adaptation process can neither be satisfactorily explained by the "mucosal block hypothesis", nor by the "mucosal transferrin hypothesis". When the time-course of iron storage and its relation to intestinal iron transfer was investigated after i.v. iron administration to iron-deficient rats, the results indicated that the process of adaptation is located in the intestinal mucosa. Intestinal iron loading is decreased in iron deficiency, whereas the iron transfer into the organism is increased. Further investigation is necessary to find out by which mechanism the iron manages to bypass existing mucosal storage capacity in this situation. The geographical distribution of iron deficiency is influenced by a variety of local factors. Still, the paramount causes of iron-deficiency are unbalanced iron losses and the lack of bioavailable iron in the diet. The bioavailability of non heme iron is influenced by the composition of the diet. The effect of promotors of iron absorption, such as meat, amino acids, polycarbonic acids and ascorbate is opposed by the influence of inhibitors, such as bran, soya products, vegetables and egg-dishes. Iron losses are mainly due to blood losses. Thus, the wide distribution of hookworm diseases in tropical areas contributes significantly to the endemic iron-deficiency in these regions. A more physiological loss

  10. Iron deficiency: the global perspective.

    PubMed

    Cook, J D; Skikne, B S; Baynes, R D

    1994-01-01

    about the risk of cancer and heart disease in individuals with high iron stores, there is an increasing reluctance to supply iron to individuals who do not require it. A more effective strategy is to fortify food vehicles that are targeted to segments of the population at greatest risk of iron deficiency such as infants and school children. Because of the strong inhibitory properties of diets in regions of the world where iron deficiency is most prevalent, the use of NaFeEDTA has important advantages for food fortification.

  11. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  12. Summary of External-Store Drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrout, B. L.; Kelly, T. C.

    1966-01-01

    The drag problems associated with the addition of external stores to airplanes are reviewed. Current analytic techniques for estimating drag penalties associated with the addition of stores in both subsonic and supersonic flight are discussed. In subsonic flight, the drag penalty caused by the addition of external stores is shown to be a function of the type of store installation. In supersonic flight, the drag is shown to be a function of the type of store installation and also of the location of the store installation with respect to the rest of the airplane components. Special store arrangements and attention to the design of the store itself can reduce the drag penalty of the store installation.

  13. Availability of Vending Machines and School Stores in California Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cisse-Egbuonye, Nafissatou; Liles, Sandy; Schmitz, Katharine E.; Kassem, Nada; Irvin, Veronica L.; Hovell, Melbourne F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study examined the availability of foods sold in vending machines and school stores in United States public and private schools, and associations of availability with students' food purchases and consumption. Methods: Descriptive analyses, chi-square tests, and Spearman product-moment correlations were conducted on data collected…

  14. Availability of Vending Machines and School Stores in California Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cisse-Egbuonye, Nafissatou; Liles, Sandy; Schmitz, Katharine E.; Kassem, Nada; Irvin, Veronica L.; Hovell, Melbourne F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study examined the availability of foods sold in vending machines and school stores in United States public and private schools, and associations of availability with students' food purchases and consumption. Methods: Descriptive analyses, chi-square tests, and Spearman product-moment correlations were conducted on data collected…

  15. Serum iron test

    MedlinePlus

    ... test if you have: Signs of low iron (iron deficiency) Signs of too much iron Anemia caused by ... Brittenham GM. Disorders of iron homeostasis: iron deficiency and ... Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  16. Ferric carboxymaltose: a review of its use in iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2015-01-01

    Ferric carboxymaltose (Ferinject(®), Injectafer(®)) is an intravenous iron preparation approved in numerous countries for the treatment of iron deficiency. A single high dose of ferric carboxymaltose (up to 750 mg of iron in the US and 1,000 mg of iron in the EU) can be infused in a short time frame (15 min). Consequently, fewer doses of ferric carboxymaltose may be needed to replenish iron stores compared with some other intravenous iron preparations (e.g. iron sucrose). Ferric carboxymaltose improved self-reported patient global assessment, New York Heart Association functional class and exercise capacity in patients with chronic heart failure and iron deficiency in two randomized, placebo-controlled trials (FAIR-HF and CONFIRM-HF). In other randomized controlled trials, ferric carboxymaltose replenished iron stores and corrected anaemia in various populations with iron-deficiency anaemia, including patients with chronic kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease or heavy uterine bleeding, postpartum iron-deficiency anaemia and perioperative anaemia. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose was generally well tolerated, with a low risk of hypersensitivity reactions. It was generally better tolerated than oral ferrous sulfate, mainly reflecting a lower incidence of gastrointestinal adverse effects. The most common laboratory abnormality seen in ferric carboxymaltose recipients was transient, asymptomatic hypophosphataemia. The higher acquisition cost of ferric carboxymaltose appeared to be offset by lower costs for other items, with the potential for cost savings. In conclusion, ferric carboxymaltose is an important option for the treatment of iron deficiency.

  17. Diagnosis and management of transfusion iron overload: The role of imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wood, John C.

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of iron stores is important to prevent and treat iron overload. Serum markers such as ferritin, serum iron, iron binding capacity, transferrin saturation, and nontransferrin-bound iron can be used to follow trends in iron status; however, variability in these markers limits predictive power for any given individual. Liver iron represents the best single marker of total iron balance. Measures of liver iron include biopsy, superconducting quantum interference device, computer tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI is the most accurate and widely available noninvasive tool to assess liver iron. The main advantages of MRI include a low-rate of variability between measurements and the ability to assess iron loading in endocrine tissues, the heart and the liver. This manuscript describes the principles, validation, and clinical utility of MRI for tissue iron estimation. PMID:17963249

  18. The relationship between the iron isotopic composition of human whole blood and iron status parameters.

    PubMed

    Van Heghe, Lana; Delanghe, Joris; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2013-11-01

    As the iron status of an individual cannot be adequately assessed on the basis of the (total) Fe concentration in whole blood or serum, in medicine a number of parameters, such as the serum concentrations of ferritin, transferrin and soluble transferrin receptor and the transferrin saturation, are routinely determined instead. As previous research has shown that also the isotopic composition of Fe in blood and tissues is dependent on the metabolism, the present study assessed whether Fe isotopic composition in whole blood provides information as to an individual's iron status. Fe isotopic analysis of whole blood samples from a reference population (healthy volunteers) was carried out using multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry (after chromatographic target element isolation) and the results obtained were investigated by statistical means as to their potential relation with the iron status parameters conventionally used in medicine. A low δ(56)Fe value was demonstrated to coincide with high iron status and a high δ(56)Fe value with low iron status, thus reflecting the response of the body to this iron status in terms of iron uptake, distribution between blood and stores and mobilization of storage iron. In a second phase, the iron isotopic composition in blood from patients treated for hemochromatosis type I and from patients with anemia of chronic disease (ACD) was determined. The results for hemochromatosis patients plotted with the values of low iron status, while those for ACD patients plotted with the values of high iron status. By taking a closer look at the aberrant iron metabolism that comes with these diseases, it can be seen that the patient samples confirm the conclusions drawn for the reference population. Patients with hemochromatosis type I have a strongly upregulated iron uptake, like healthy individuals with low iron status. The metabolism of patients suffering from ACD tries to remove iron from the circulation by downregulating the iron uptake

  19. Iron, Copper, and Zinc Concentration in Aβ Plaques in the APP/PS1 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease Correlates with Metal Levels in the Surrounding Neuropil.

    PubMed

    James, Simon A; Churches, Quentin I; de Jonge, Martin D; Birchall, Ian E; Streltsov, Victor; McColl, Gawain; Adlard, Paul A; Hare, Dominic J

    2017-03-15

    The metal ions of iron, copper, and zinc have long been associated with the aggregation of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in Alzheimer's disease; an interaction that has been suggested to promote increased oxidative stress and neuronal dysfunction. We examined plaque metal load in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice using X-ray fluorescence microscopy to assess how the anatomical location of Aβ plaques was influenced by the metal content of surrounding tissue. Immunohistochemical staining of Aβ plaques colocalized with areas of increased X-ray scattering power in unstained tissue sections, allowing direct X-ray based-assessment of plaque metal levels in sections subjected to minimal chemical fixation. We identified and mapped 48 individual plaques in four subregions of the hippocampus from four biological replicates. Iron, Cu, and Zn areal concentrations (ng cm(-2)) were increased in plaques compared to the surrounding neuropil. However, this elevation in metal load reflected the local metal makeup of the surrounding neuropil, where different brain regions are enriched for different metal ions. After correcting for tissue density, only Zn levels remained elevated in plaques. This study suggests that the in vivo binding of Zn to plaques is not simply due to increased protein deposition.

  20. Role of alcohol in the regulation of iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee

    2007-01-01

    Patients with alcoholic liver disease frequently exhibit increased body iron stores, as reflected by elevated serum iron indices (transferrin saturation, ferritin) and hepatic iron concentration. Even mild to moderate alcohol consumption has been shown to increase the prevalence of iron overload. Moreover, increased hepatic iron content is associated with greater mortality from alcoholic cirrhosis, suggesting a pathogenic role for iron in alcoholic liver disease. Alcohol increases the severity of disease in patients with genetic hemochromatosis, an iron overload disorder common in the Caucasian population. Both iron and alcohol individually cause oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, which culminates in liver injury. Despite these observations, the underlying mechanisms of iron accumulation and the source of the excess iron observed in alcoholic liver disease remain unclear. Over the last decade, several novel iron-regulatory proteins have been identified and these have greatly enhanced our understanding of iron metabolism. For example, hepcidin, a circulatory antimicrobial peptide synthesized by the hepatocytes of the liver is now known to play a central role in the regulation of iron homeostasis. This review attempts to describe the interaction of alcohol and iron-regulatory molecules. Understanding these molecular mechanisms is of considerable clinical importance because both alcoholic liver disease and genetic hemochromatosis are common diseases, in which alcohol and iron appear to act synergistically to cause liver injury. PMID:17854133

  1. Classification of the electronic correlation strength in the iron pnictides: The case of the parent compound BaFe2As2

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Electronic correlations in the Fe-pnictide BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are explored within LDA+DMFT, the combination of density functional theory with dynamical mean-field theory. While the correlated band structure is substantially renormalized there is only little transfer of spectral weight. The computed k-integrated and k-resolved spectral functions are in good agreement with photoemission spectroscopy (PES) and angular resolved PES experiments. Making use of a general classification scheme for the strength of electronic correlations we conclude that BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} is a moderately correlated system.

  2. Effects of repeated blood donations on iron status and hematologic variables of canine blood donors.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rui R F; Gopegui, Rafael R; Araujo, Maria Manuela R C; de Matos, Augusto J F

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate the bone marrow regenerative response and iron status of canine blood donors subjected to repeated blood collections for 1 year. Prospective cohort study. 57 blood donor dogs. Hematologic variables, including reticulocyte percentage, were evaluated before and 10 days after each blood collection in 16 dogs donating 13% of total blood volume (TBV) every 2 months (group 1), 16 dogs donating 13% of TBV every 3 months (group 2), and 25 dogs donating 15% of TBV every 3 months (group 3) for 1 year. Serum concentrations of iron, transferrin, and ferritin were analyzed before inclusion in the study and 10 days after the last donation. Significant increases in RBC distribution width, platelet count, WBC count, and reticulocyte percentage were detected after blood donation in all groups. Dogs of group 2 had a significantly higher serum ferritin concentration than did dogs of group 1; dogs of group 1 had a significant decrease in serum ferritin concentration. A positive correlation between the number of blood donations and both RBC distribution width and reticulocyte percentage was found for all groups. All blood donation regimens induced a bone marrow regenerative response, which was able to restore depleted blood cells within 10 days after blood donation while maintaining iron status within the calculated reference range. However, dogs donating 13% of TBV every 2 months had a significant decrease in iron stores, which suggested that iron-related variables must be monitored during prolonged blood donor programs.

  3. The stability of stored gari.

    PubMed

    Sanni, M O

    1996-02-01

    Gari is a widely consumed stored staple from cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz). Processing involves peeling, grating, fermentation, dewatering and roasting, resulting in a granular product. It is a shelf stable food consumed as processed or cooked. When retailed, it is subject to post-process contamination. Investigations were carried out to establish the stability of processed gari. Samples of various water activities (a(w)) were packaged in 250 gauge polyethylene bags with or without vacuum packaging and in nylon sacks. Initial and weekly determination of pH, a(w) and mycoflora were undertaken over 16 weeks. An initial pH of 4.3 +/- 0.1 was stable during the experiment. Nylon sack samples with initial a(w) of 0.40 and 0.55 showed an increase of a(w) to 0.65 at the end of the storage. Vacuum packed polyethylene bag samples with initial a(w) of 0.70, 0.55 and 0.40 recorded 30, 20 and 10%, respectively of the initial mycoflora after 16 weeks. A low mycological load, a(w) < 0.70 and vacuum sealed plastic packaging ensure physico-chemical and microbiological stability of stored gari.

  4. [Occupational risks in grocery stores].

    PubMed

    Graziosi, Francesca; Bonfiglioli, Roberta; Violante, Francesco S

    2014-01-01

    This work provides an overview of the spectrum of possible occupational risk factors in the retail grocery store/supermarket workplace. Literature on this theme, obtained consulting PubMed database and Google Scholar, was checked. We also exjlore results from the National bInstitute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). RESULTs: Contacts with objects, use of dangerous equipment (cutter, food slicer) and falls to the same level (slips, trips and falls) are the mainly described workplace hazards. Exposure to chemical (flour dust, components of detergents or disinfectants, volatile organic compounds and contact with nickel) and physical agents (cold exposure, nonionizing radiation and whole bpdy vibration) are reported by many authors. Relations between biomechanical and ergonomic risk factors and musculoskeletal disorders represent the main subjects of study. Few studies are found about biological agents (particularly among butchers). Data regarding psychosocial risks factors in this setting are still limited. Musculoskeletal disorders continue to be the most recurrent health problem between the grocery store workers (particularly low back pain and carpal tunnel syndrome among cashiers). Many technical documents and international Srecommendations are present to prevent these kinds of disorders. Psychosocial risk factors and risk of workplace violence should deserve further investigation.

  5. Hepatic iron deposition does not predict extrahepatic iron loading in mouse models of hereditary hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, V Nathan; McDonald, Cameron J; Ostini, Lesa; Lusby, Patricia E; Wockner, Leesa F; Ramm, Grant A; Wallace, Daniel F

    2012-10-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is characterized by tissue iron loading and associated organ damage. However, the phenotype can be highly variable. The relationship between iron loading of different organs and the temporal nature of its deposition is still not well understood. We examined the progression of tissue iron loading in three mouse models to advance our understanding of the natural history of iron deposition in hereditary hemochromatosis. Wild-type, Hfe(-/-), Tfr2(-/-), and Hfe(-/-)/Tfr2(-/-) mice were analyzed at 3, 5, 10, 26, and 52 weeks, respectively. Hepatic, splenic, cardiac, and pancreatic iron concentrations were determined. Expression of both iron-regulatory and fibrosis genes was determined by quantitative real-time PCR in livers and hearts of 52-week-old mice. In all models, hepatic iron increased rapidly, plateauing before 10 weeks at different levels, depending on the genotype. Iron deposition in the pancreas and heart occurred after maximal iron loading of the liver was reached and was most marked in the Hfe(-/-)/Tfr2(-/-) mice. Although a significant positive correlation was identified between pancreatic and cardiac iron in all models at 52 weeks, there was no correlation between hepatic and either pancreatic or cardiac iron. There is variability in the timing and extent of tissue iron loading within a genotype, suggesting that hepatic iron levels in hereditary hemochromatosis may not accurately predict the iron content of other organs. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Distinct Mechanisms of Ferritin Delivery to Lysosomes in Iron-Depleted and Iron-Replete Cells ▿

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Takeshi; Komatsu, Masaaki; Yamaguchi-Iwai, Yuko; Ishikawa, Fuyuki; Mizushima, Noboru; Iwai, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Ferritin is a cytosolic protein that stores excess iron, thereby protecting cells from iron toxicity. Ferritin-stored iron is believed to be utilized when cells become iron deficient; however, the mechanisms underlying the extraction of iron from ferritin have yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that ferritin is degraded in the lysosome under iron-depleted conditions and that the acidic environment of the lysosome is crucial for iron extraction from ferritin and utilization by cells. Ferritin was targeted for degradation in the lysosome even under iron-replete conditions in primary cells; however, the mechanisms underlying lysosomal targeting of ferritin were distinct under depleted and replete conditions. In iron-depleted cells, ferritin was targeted to the lysosome via a mechanism that involved autophagy. In contrast, lysosomal targeting of ferritin in iron-replete cells did not involve autophagy. The autophagy-independent pathway of ferritin delivery to lysosomes was deficient in several cancer-derived cells, and cancer-derived cell lines are more resistant to iron toxicity than primary cells. Collectively, these results suggest that ferritin trafficking may be differentially regulated by cell type and that loss of ferritin delivery to the lysosome under iron-replete conditions may be related to oncogenic cellular transformation. PMID:21444722

  7. Iron Status in Toddlerhood Predicts Sensitivity to Psychostimulants in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Catharyn A.; Xie, Diqiong; Zimmerman, Bridget M.; Calarge, Chadi A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Iron deficiency is associated with impaired dopaminergic signaling and externalizing behavior. The authors examine, whether iron stores in toddlerhood influence later response to psychostimulants. Method: Youth participating in a study monitoring the long-term safety of risperidone were included in this analysis if they had received…

  8. Iron Status in Toddlerhood Predicts Sensitivity to Psychostimulants in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Catharyn A.; Xie, Diqiong; Zimmerman, Bridget M.; Calarge, Chadi A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Iron deficiency is associated with impaired dopaminergic signaling and externalizing behavior. The authors examine, whether iron stores in toddlerhood influence later response to psychostimulants. Method: Youth participating in a study monitoring the long-term safety of risperidone were included in this analysis if they had received…

  9. The Optimal Climate in Department Stores

    PubMed Central

    Snellen, J. W.

    1962-01-01

    The optimal effective temperature for department stores was obtained by collecting temperature and humidity data in six such stores during one full year and by asking several members of the sales staff to give their preference at different periods of the year. Four of the stores gave very good agreement regarding the desirable effective temperature. One store had a different optimum, probably due to local differences in preference, and one store failed to indicate an optimum. This failure could be interpreted in terms of the average optimum derived from the other department stores. Recommendations for optimal effective temperatures for department stores are given. The evaluation of the store climate by the customers did not appear to differ greatly from that of the sales personnel. PMID:13914578

  10. Method of monitoring stored nuclear fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Borloo, E.; Buergers, W.; Crutzen, S.; Vinche, C.

    1983-05-24

    To monitor a nuclear fuel element or fuel elements located in a store, e.g. a pond in a swimming pool reactor, the store is illuminated ultrasonically using one or more transducers transmitting ultrasonic signals in one or more predetermined directions to obtain an output which, because it depends on the number and relative location of the fuel elements in the store, and the structure of the store itself is distinctive to the fuel elements or elements stored therein. From this distinctive output is derived an identity unique to the stored fuel element or elements and a reference signal indicative of the whole structure when intact, the reference signal and identity being recorded. Subsequent ultrasonic testing of the store and its contents under identical operating conditions produces a signal which is compared to the recorded reference signal and if different therefrom reveals the occurrence of tampering with the store and/or the fuel element or elements.

  11. Comparison of two doses of elemental iron in the treatment of latent iron deficiency: efficacy, side effects and blinding capabilities.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Alecia J; Chalmers, Kerry A; Collins, Clare E; Patterson, Amanda J

    2014-04-04

    Adherence to iron supplementation can be compromised due to side effects, and these limit blinding in studies of iron deficiency. No studies have reported an efficacious iron dose that allows participants to remain blinded. This pilot study aimed to determine a ferrous sulfate dose that improves iron stores, while minimising side effects and enabling blinding. A double-blinded RCT was conducted in 32 women (18-35 years): 24 with latent iron deficiency (serum ferritin < 20 µg/L) and 8 iron sufficient controls. Participants with latent iron deficiency were randomised to 60 mg or 80 mg elemental iron or to placebo, for 16 weeks. The iron sufficient control group took placebo. Treatment groups (60 mg n = 7 and 80 mg n = 6) had significantly higher ferritin change scores than placebo groups (iron deficient n = 5 and iron sufficient n = 6), F(1, 23) = 8.46, p ≤ 0.01. Of the 24 who completed the trial, 10 participants (77%) on iron reported side effects, compared with 5 (45%) on placebo, but there were no differences in side effects (p = 0.29), or compliance (p = 0.60) between iron groups. Nine (69%) participants on iron, and 11 (56%) on placebo correctly guessed their treatment allocation. Both iron doses were equally effective in normalising ferritin levels. Although reported side-effects were similar for both groups, a majority of participants correctly guessed their treatment group.

  12. There's more to food store choice than proximity: a questionnaire development study.

    PubMed

    Krukowski, Rebecca A; Sparks, Carla; DiCarlo, Marisha; McSweeney, Jean; West, Delia Smith

    2013-06-17

    Proximity of food stores is associated with dietary intake and obesity; however, individuals frequently shop at stores that are not the most proximal. Little is known about other factors that influence food store choice. The current research describes the development of the Food Store Selection Questionnaire (FSSQ) and describes preliminary results of field testing the questionnaire. Development of the FSSQ involved a multidisciplinary literature review, qualitative analysis of focus group transcripts, and expert and community reviews. Field testing consisted of 100 primary household food shoppers (93% female, 64% African American), in rural and urban Arkansas communities, rating FSSQ items as to their importance in store choice and indicating their top two reasons. After eliminating 14 items due to low mean importance scores and high correlations with other items, the final FSSQ questionnaire consists of 49 items. Items rated highest in importance were: meat freshness; store maintenance; store cleanliness; meat varieties; and store safety. Items most commonly rated as top reasons were: low prices; proximity to home; fruit/vegetable freshness; fruit/vegetable variety; and store cleanliness. The FSSQ is a comprehensive questionnaire for detailing key reasons in food store choice. Although proximity to home was a consideration for participants, there were clearly other key factors in their choice of a food store. Understanding the relative importance of these different dimensions driving food store choice in specific communities may be beneficial in informing policies and programs designed to support healthy dietary intake and obesity prevention.

  13. There’s more to food store choice than proximity: a questionnaire development study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Proximity of food stores is associated with dietary intake and obesity; however, individuals frequently shop at stores that are not the most proximal. Little is known about other factors that influence food store choice. The current research describes the development of the Food Store Selection Questionnaire (FSSQ) and describes preliminary results of field testing the questionnaire. Methods Development of the FSSQ involved a multidisciplinary literature review, qualitative analysis of focus group transcripts, and expert and community reviews. Field testing consisted of 100 primary household food shoppers (93% female, 64% African American), in rural and urban Arkansas communities, rating FSSQ items as to their importance in store choice and indicating their top two reasons. After eliminating 14 items due to low mean importance scores and high correlations with other items, the final FSSQ questionnaire consists of 49 items. Results Items rated highest in importance were: meat freshness; store maintenance; store cleanliness; meat varieties; and store safety. Items most commonly rated as top reasons were: low prices; proximity to home; fruit/vegetable freshness; fruit/vegetable variety; and store cleanliness. Conclusions The FSSQ is a comprehensive questionnaire for detailing key reasons in food store choice. Although proximity to home was a consideration for participants, there were clearly other key factors in their choice of a food store. Understanding the relative importance of these different dimensions driving food store choice in specific communities may be beneficial in informing policies and programs designed to support healthy dietary intake and obesity prevention. PMID:23773428

  14. Serum iron, total iron binding capacity, plasma copper and hemoglobin types in anemic and poikilocytic calves.

    PubMed Central

    McGillivray, S R; Searcy, G P; Hirsch, V M

    1985-01-01

    Ninety-eight calves were studied to determine if anemia and poikilocytosis were related to iron or copper status or hemoglobin type. No significant differences were found in serum iron, total iron binding capacity, marrow iron, plasma copper or hemoglobin type between affected and normal calves. Poikilocytes were strongly inversely correlated (-0.9177) with age. Calves less than six weeks of age had more poikilocytes, lower serum iron, higher total iron binding capacity, less adult hemoglobin and more neonatal and fetal hemoglobin than calves greater than six weeks of age. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2412677

  15. Corner stores: the perspective of urban youth.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Sandra; Grode, Gabrielle; McCoy, Tara; Vander Veur, Stephanie S; Wojtanowski, Alexis; Sandoval, Brianna Almaguer; Foster, Gary D

    2015-02-01

    We examined the perspectives of low-income, urban youth about the corner store experience to inform the development of corner store interventions. Focus groups were conducted to understand youth perceptions regarding their early shopping experiences, the process of store selection, reasons for shopping in a corner store, parental guidance about corner stores, and what their ideal, or "dream corner store" would look like. Thematic analysis was employed to identify themes using ATLAS.ti (version 6.1, 2010, ATLAS.ti GmbH) and Excel (version 2010, Microsoft Corp). Focus groups were conducted in nine kindergarten-through-grade 8 (K-8) public schools in low-income neighborhoods with 40 fourth- to sixth-graders with a mean age of 10.9±0.8 years. Youth report going to corner stores with family members at an early age. By second and third grades, a growing number of youth reported shopping unaccompanied by an older sibling or adult. Youth reported that the products sold in stores were the key reason they choose a specific store. A small number of youth said their parents offered guidance on their corner store purchases. When youth were asked what their dream corner store would look like, they mentioned wanting a combination of healthy and less-healthy foods. These data suggest that, among low-income, urban youth, corner store shopping starts at a very young age and that product, price, and location are key factors that affect corner store selection. The data also suggest that few parents offer guidance about corner store purchases, and youth are receptive to having healthier items in corner stores. Corner store intervention efforts should target young children and their parents/caregivers and aim to increase the availability of affordable, healthier products. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 7 CFR 1170.6 - Store.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PRODUCT MANDATORY REPORTING § 1170.6 Store. (a) Store... of 50 degrees Fahrenheit or lower and hold these dairy products for 30 days or more; or (b) Store..., or shipment in transit. Dairy Product Reporting Programs...

  17. [SQUID-biosusceptometry in iron overloaded patients with hematologic diseases].

    PubMed

    Nielsen, P; Kordes, U; Fischer, R; Engelhardt, R; Janka, G E

    2002-01-01

    For the long-term survival of iron-loaded patients, early and well adjusted treatment with iron chelators is of crucial importance, especially in children. Basis of the adequate treatment are appropriate diagnostic parameters which are capable to monitor the range of the individual iron burden. In the time period between 1989 and 2001, the status of iron loading was investigated in 1112 patients with post transfusion siderosis. The iron concentration in liver and spleen was quantified by SQUID-biosusceptometry. Using these values, the whole body iron stores were calculated. Based on a large number of patients with secondary siderosis, the benefit of SQUID-biosusceptometry for non-invasive liver iron quantification was evaluated retrospectively. In patients under treatment with deferoxamin, a new therapeutic DFO-index was defined which respects liver iron concentration instead of serum ferritin. This results in a more reliable information about DFO overdosing in a given patient.

  18. The ground states of iron(III) porphines: role of entropy-enthalpy compensation, Fermi correlation, dispersion, and zero-point energies.

    PubMed

    Kepp, Kasper P

    2011-10-01

    Porphyrins are much studied due to their biochemical relevance and many applications. The density functional TPSSh has previously accurately described the energy of close-lying electronic states of transition metal systems such as porphyrins. However, a recent study questioned this conclusion based on calculations of five iron(III) porphines. Here, we compute the geometries of 80 different electronic configurations and the free energies of the most stable configurations with the functionals TPSSh, TPSS, and B3LYP. Zero-point energies and entropy favor high-spin by ~4kJ/mol and 0-10kJ/mol, respectively. When these effects are included, and all electronic configurations are evaluated, TPSSh correctly predicts the spin of all the four difficult phenylporphine cases and is within the lower bound of uncertainty of any known theoretical method for the fifth, iron(III) chloroporphine. Dispersion computed with DFT-D3 favors low-spin by 3-53kJ/mol (TPSSh) or 4-15kJ/mol (B3LYP) due to the attractive r(-6) term and the shorter distances in low-spin. The very large and diverse corrections from TPSS and TPSSh seem less consistent with the similarity of the systems than when calculated from B3LYP. If the functional-specific corrections are used, B3LYP and TPSSh are of equal accuracy, and TPSS is much worse, whereas if the physically reasonable B3LYP-computed dispersion effect is used for all functionals, TPSSh is accurate for all systems. B3LYP is significantly more accurate when dispersion is added, confirming previous results.

  19. Stopping and storing light coherently

    SciTech Connect

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih; Fan Shanhui

    2005-01-01

    We present a general analysis for the criteria to stop and store light coherently. We show that a light pulse can be stopped in any physical system, provided that (i) the system bandwidth can be compressed to zero; (ii) the system has sufficient degrees of freedom to accommodate the pulse, and the bandwidth compression occurs while the pulse is in the system; and (iii) the bandwidth compression is done reversibly in an adiabatic fashion that preserves the phase space and the information in the original photon pulse during the entire duration of the stopping process. Based upon this general criterion, we present a brief discussion of stopping-light schemes using atomic resonances, and a detailed analysis of the all-optical scheme that we recently proposed. We show that the all-optical scheme can achieve arbitrarily small group velocities for large bandwidth pulses, and opens up new opportunities in both fundamental sciences and technological applications.

  20. Increased dietary iron and radiation in rats promote oxidative stress, induce localized and systemic immune system responses, and alter colon mucosal environment.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jennifer L L; Ritchie, Lauren E; Crucian, Brian E; Theriot, Corey; Wu, Honglu; Sams, Clarence; Smith, Scott M; Turner, Nancy D; Zwart, Sara R

    2014-03-01

    Astronauts are exposed to increased body iron stores and radiation, both of which can cause oxidative damage leading to negative health effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate combined effects of high dietary iron (650 mg/kg diet) and radiation exposure (0.375 Gy cesium-137 every other day for 16 d) on markers of oxidative stress, immune system function, and colon mucosal environment in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8/group). Control rats consumed adequate iron (45 mg/kg diet) and were not irradiated. Combined treatments increased liver glutathione peroxidase, serum catalase, and colon myeloperoxidase while decreasing total fecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations. The high-iron diet alone increased leukocyte count. Radiation decreased the T-cell CD4:CD8 ratio. Plasma iron was negatively correlated with cytokine production in activated monocytes. Genes involved in colon microbial signaling, immune response, and injury repair were altered by radiation. Genes involved with injury repair and pathogen recognition changed with dietary iron. These data demonstrate that dietary iron and radiation, alone and combined, contribute to oxidative stress that is related to immune system alterations in circulation and the colon. The model presented may help us better understand the changes to these systems that have been identified among astronauts.

  1. Limiting mycotoxins in stored wheat.

    PubMed

    Magan, Naresh; Aldred, David; Mylona, Kalliopi; Lambert, Ronald J W

    2010-05-01

    The quality of harvested wheat grain can deteriorate markedly during the post-harvest management stages. Biotic factors, such as grain type and ripeness, coupled with the prevailing abiotic factors, such as water content and temperature, and also preservative concentration will influence the safe storage life and the level of contamination with mycotoxins. These mycotoxins include deoxynivalenol (DON) produced pre-harvest and zearalenone (ZEA) produced post-harvest by Fusarium graminearum and Fusarium poae, respectively, ochratoxin (OTA) produced by Penicillium verrucosum post-harvest in cool damp northern European climates, and perhaps T-2 and HT-2 toxins produced by Fusarium langsethiae. This review presents recent data on the relationship between dry matter losses caused by F. graminearum under different environmental regimes (water activities, temperatures) and the level of contamination with DON. This is important as poor post-harvest drying and storage management may exacerbate DON contamination already present pre-harvest. It is thus critical to relate the environmental factors in stored wheat grain during storage, especially of intergranular relative humidity (RH) and temperature, to safe storage periods without spoilage or risk from increased DON contamination. The growth/no growth and DON/no DON (F. graminearum) and OTA/no toxin production (P. verrucosum) have been used to build a model with a simple interface to link temperature and RH values to the potential risk level which may allow growth or toxin production. This paper also considers the use of modified atmospheres, preservatives and biocontrol to minimise DON and OTA in moist wheat grain. These approaches together with clear monitoring criteria and hygiene could contribute to better post-harvest management of stored temperate cereals and ensure that mycotoxin contamination is minimised during this key phase in the food/feed chain.

  2. The evaluation of iron deficiency and anemia in male blood donors with other related factors

    PubMed Central

    Yousefinejad, Vahid; Darvishi, Nazila; Arabzadeh, Masoumeh; Soori, Masoumeh; Magsudlu, Mahtab; Shafiayan, Madjid

    2010-01-01

    Aims and Background: Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional disorders worldwide and blood donation may cause iron depletion. Limited studies with large sample size have been done on male donors. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among male donors in the Kurdistan Organization of Blood Transfusion in Iran. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Sample size was 1184 blood donors selected by systematic random sampling. Hemoglobin, serum iron, serum ferritin, total iron banding capacity (TIBC) and transferin saturation were measured in donors. Iron depletion, lack of iron stores, iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia and anemia were evaluated among them. Data was analyzed with SPSS software and X2, one-way ANOVA, and LSD test. Results: Iron deficiency, anemia, iron deficiency anemia, iron depletion and lack of iron resources were seen in 2.3, 4.08, 2.14, 22.76 and 4.66 percent respectively. There was a significant relationship of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia with instances of donation and interval from last donation (P < 0.05). A significant relationship was seen between iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among blood donors with more than ten times blood donation (P < 0.05). Conclusions: This study showed regular male donors require especial attention. Therefore, serum ferritin is recommended as a more adequate index to use for iron deficiency screening and planning purposes for iron supplementation among them. PMID:20859513

  3. Pressure-induced phase transitions and correlation between structure and superconductivity in iron-based superconductor Ce(O(0.84)F(0.16))FeAs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jinggeng; Liu, Haozhe; Ehm, Lars; Dong, Dawei; Chen, Zhiqiang; Liu, Qingqing; Hu, Wanzheng; Wang, Nanlin; Jin, Changqing

    2013-07-15

    High-pressure angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction experiments on iron-based superconductor Ce(O(0.84)F(0.16))FeAs were performed up to 54.9 GPa at room temperature. A tetragonal to tetragonal isostructural phase transition starts at about 13.9 GPa, and a new high-pressure phase has been found above 33.8 GPa. At pressures above 19.9 GPa, Ce(O(0.84)F(0.16))FeAs completely transforms to a high-pressure tetragonal phase, which remains in the same tetragonal structure with a larger a-axis and smaller c-axis than those of the low-pressure tetragonal phase. The structure analysis shows a discontinuity in the pressure dependences of the Fe-As and Ce-(O, F) bond distances, as well as the As-Fe-As and Ce-(O, F)-Ce bond angles in the transition region, which correlates with the change in T(c) of this compound upon compression. The isostructural phase transition in Ce(O(0.84)F(0.16))FeAs leads to a drastic drop in the superconducting transition temperature T(c) and restricts the superconductivity at low temperature. For the 1111-type iron-based superconductors, the structure evolution and following superconductivity changes under compression are related to the radius of lanthanide cations in the charge reservoir layer.

  4. Oral Iron Supplementation After Blood Donation

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Joseph E.; Brambilla, Donald; Glynn, Simone A.; Mast, Alan E.; Spencer, Bryan R.; Stone, Mars; Kleinman, Steven H.; Cable, Ritchard G.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Although blood donation is allowed every 8 weeks in the United States, recovery of hemoglobin to the currently accepted standard (12.5 g/dL) is frequently delayed, and some donors become anemic. OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of oral iron supplementation on hemoglobin recovery time (days to recovery of 80% of hemoglobin removed) and recovery of iron stores in iron-depleted (“low ferritin,” ≤26 ng/mL) and iron-replete (“higher ferritin,” >26 ng/mL) blood donors. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Randomized, nonblinded clinical trial of blood donors stratified by ferritin level, sex, and age conducted in 4 regional blood centers in the United States in 2012. Included were 215 eligible participants aged 18 to 79 years who had not donated whole blood or red blood cells within 4 months. INTERVENTIONS One tablet of ferrous gluconate (37.5 mg of elemental iron) daily or no iron for 24 weeks (168 days) after donating a unit of whole blood (500 mL). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Time to recovery of 80% of the postdonation decrease in hemoglobin and recovery of ferritin level to baseline as a measure of iron stores. RESULTS The mean baseline hemoglobin levels were comparable in the iron and no-iron groups and declined from a mean (SD) of 13.4 (1.1) g/dL to 12.0 (1.2) g/dL after donation in the low-ferritin group and from 14.2 (1.1) g/dL to 12.9 (1.2) g/dL in the higher-ferritin group. Compared with participants who did not receive iron supplementation, those who received iron supplementation had shortened time to 80% hemoglobin recovery in both the low-ferritin and higher-ferritin groups. Recovery of iron stores in all participants who received supplements took a median of 76 days (IQR, 20–126); for participants not taking iron, median recovery time was longer than 168 days (IQR, 147->168 days; P < .001). Without iron supplements, 67% of participants did not recover iron stores by 168 days. Low-Ferritin Group (≤26 ng/mL) Higher-Ferritin Group (>26 ng

  5. The effect of nutrition knowledge and dietary iron intake on iron status in young women.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Alecia J; Chalmers, Kerry A; Collins, Clare E; Patterson, Amanda J

    2014-10-01

    Previous research on the relationships between general nutrition knowledge and dietary intake, and dietary iron intake and iron status has produced inconsistent results. Currently, no study has focused on knowledge of dietary iron and its effect on dietary iron intake. This study aimed to determine whether nutrition knowledge of iron is related to dietary iron intake in young women, and subsequently whether greater knowledge and intake translates into better iron status. A cross-sectional assessment of nutrition knowledge of iron, dietary iron intake and iron status was conducted in women aged 18-35 years living in Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Iron status was assessed by serum ferritin, haemoglobin, soluble transferrin receptor and alpha-1-glycoprotein. One hundred and seven women (27.8 ± 4.7 years) completed the nutrition knowledge questionnaire and FFQ. Of these, 74 (70%) also had biomarkers of iron status measured. Mean iron intake was 11.2 ± 3.8 mg/day. There was no association between nutrition knowledge score and whether the women met the RDI for iron (F (1, 102) = .40, P = .53). A positive correlation was shown between nutrition knowledge score and iron intake (mg/day) (r = 0.25, P = .01). Serum ferritin was positively associated with the frequency of flesh food intake (r = .27 P = .02). Vegetarians (including partial vegetarians) had significantly lower serum ferritin levels than non-vegetarians (F (1, 71) = 7.44, P = .01). Significant positive correlations found between higher flesh food intake and biomarkers of iron status suggest that educating non-vegetarians about the benefits of increased flesh food consumption and vegetarians about dietary iron enhancers and inhibitors may have potential for addressing the high rates of iron deficiency among young women. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dysregulation of iron and copper homeostasis in nonalcoholic fatty liver

    PubMed Central

    Aigner, Elmar; Weiss, Günter; Datz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Elevated iron stores as indicated by hyperferritinemia with normal or mildly elevated transferrin saturation and mostly mild hepatic iron deposition are a characteristic finding in subjects with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Excess iron is observed in approximately one third of NAFLD patients and is commonly referred to as the “dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome”. Clinical evidence suggests that elevated body iron stores aggravate the clinical course of NAFLD with regard to liver-related and extrahepatic disease complications which relates to the fact that excess iron catalyses the formation of toxic hydroxyl-radicals subsequently resulting in cellular damage. Iron removal improves insulin sensitivity, delays the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus, improves pathologic liver function tests and likewise ameliorates NAFLD histology. Several mechanisms contribute to pathologic iron accumulation in NAFLD. These include impaired iron export from hepatocytes and mesenchymal Kupffer cells as a consequence of imbalances in the concentrations of iron regulatory factors, such as hepcidin, cytokines, copper or other dietary factors. This review summarizes the knowledge about iron homeostasis in NAFLD and the rationale for its therapeutic implications. PMID:25729473

  7. Iron status determination in pregnancy using the Thomas plot.

    PubMed

    Weyers, R; Coetzee, M J; Nel, M

    2016-04-01

    Physiological changes during pregnancy affect routine tests for iron deficiency. The reticulocyte haemoglobin equivalent (RET-He) and serum-soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) assay are newer diagnostic parameters for the detection of iron deficiency, combined in the Thomas diagnostic plot. We used this plot to determine the iron status of pregnant women presenting for their first visit to an antenatal clinic in Bloemfontein, South Africa. Routine laboratory tests (serum ferritin, full blood count and C-reactive protein) and RET-He and sTfR were performed. The iron status was determined using the Thomas plot. For this study, 103 pregnant women were recruited. According to the Thomas plot, 72.8% of the participants had normal iron stores and erythropoiesis. Iron-deficient erythropoiesis was detected in 12.6%. A third of participants were anaemic. Serum ferritin showed excellent sensitivity but poor specificity for detecting depleted iron stores. HIV status had no influence on the iron status of the participants. Our findings reiterate that causes other than iron deficiency should be considered in anaemic individuals. When compared with the Thomas plot, a low serum ferritin is a sensitive but nonspecific indicator of iron deficiency. The Thomas plot may provide useful information to identify pregnant individuals in whom haematologic parameters indicate limited iron availability for erythropoiesis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A comparison of physical properties, screening procedures and a human efficacy trial for predicting the bioavailability of commercial elemental iron powders used for food fortification.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Sean R; Bothwell, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    Elemental iron powders are widely used to fortify staple foods. Experimental evidence indicates that there is considerable variation in the bioavailability of different products. For some powders, it may be too low to permit a significant impact on iron status. This study was designed to evaluate possible approaches to screening commercial iron powders for predicted bioavailability, to identify products that have the potential to improve iron status, and to ascertain whether bioavailability is related to the method of manufacture. Nine commercial iron powders were allocated to one of five types based on the production process; carbonyl, electrolytic, hydrogen-reduced (H-reduced), carbon monoxide-reduced (CO-reduced), and other reduced. Structure by scanning electron microscopy and physical properties (pycnometric and apparent density, particle size distribution, Fisher subsieve size, and surface area) were determined on all samples. Selected samples (one or more of each type depending on the cost of the assay) were then subjected to five screening procedures that have previously been advocated for predicting bioavailability in humans--issolution rate in 0.1 mol/L HCl, dialyzability and Caco-2 cell iron uptake, both after simulated in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, relative bioavailability (RBV) with respect to ferrous sulfate by the AOAC rat hemoglobin repletion method, and plasma iron tolerance tests in human volunteers. The results for particle size distribution, surface area, Fisher subsieve size, dissolution rate in 0.1 mol/L HCl, and RBV in rats were significantly correlated and consistent for powders of the same type. However, values for different powder types were significantly different. There was no correlation between either dialyzability or Caco-2 cell uptake and the predicted bioavailability estimates based on the physical properties, dissolution rates, RBV in rats, or human efficacy data. Although human plasma iron tolerance tests were in general

  9. Iron homeostasis and pulmonary hypertension: iron deficiency leads to pulmonary vascular remodeling in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cotroneo, Emanuele; Ashek, Ali; Wang, Lei; Wharton, John; Dubois, Olivier; Bozorgi, Sophie; Busbridge, Mark; Alavian, Kambiz N; Wilkins, Martin R; Zhao, Lan

    2015-05-08

    Iron deficiency without anemia is prevalent in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and associated with reduced exercise capacity and survival. We hypothesized that iron deficiency is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension and iron replacement is a possible therapeutic strategy. Rats were fed an iron-deficient diet (IDD, 7 mg/kg) and investigated for 4 weeks. Iron deficiency was evident from depleted iron stores (decreased liver, serum iron, and ferritin), reduced erythropoiesis, and significantly decreased transferrin saturation and lung iron stores after 2 weeks IDD. IDD rats exhibited profound pulmonary vascular remodeling with prominent muscularization, medial hypertrophy, and perivascular inflammatory cell infiltration, associated with raised pulmonary artery pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy. IDD rat lungs demonstrated increased expression of hypoxia-induced factor-1α and hypoxia-induced factor-2α, nuclear factor of activated T cells and survivin, and signal transducers and activators of transcription-3 activation, which promote vascular cell proliferation and resistance to apoptosis. Biochemical examination showed reduced mitochondrial complex I activity and mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization in mitochondria from IDD rat pulmonary arteries. Along with upregulation of the glucose transporter, glucose transporter 1, and glycolytic genes, hk1 and pdk1, lung fluorine-18-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ligand uptake was significantly increased in IDD rats. The hemodynamic and pulmonary vascular remodeling were reversed by iron replacement (ferric carboxymaltose, 75 mg/kg) and attenuated in the presence of iron deficiency by dichloroacetate and imatinib, 2 putative treatments explored for pulmonary arterial hypertension that target aerobic glycolysis and proliferation, respectively. These data suggest a major role for iron in pulmonary vascular homeostasis and support the clinical evaluation of iron replacement

  10. Iron, phytoplankton growth, and the carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Street, Joseph H; Paytan, Adina

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all living organisms. Iron is required for the synthesis of chlorophyll and of several photosynthetic electron transport proteins and for the reduction of CO2, SO4(2-), and NO3(-) during the photosynthetic production of organic compounds. Iron concentrations in vast areas of the ocean are very low (<1 nM) due to the low solubility of iron in oxic seawater. Low iron concentrations have been shown to limit primary production rates, biomass accumulation, and ecosystem structure in a variety of open-ocean environments, including the equatorial Pacific, the subarctic Pacific and the Southern Ocean and even in some coastal areas. Oceanic primary production, the transfer of carbon dioxide into organic carbon by photosynthetic plankton (phytoplankton), is one process by which atmospheric CO2 can be transferred to the deep ocean and sequestered for long periods of time. Accordingly, iron limitation of primary producers likely plays a major role in the global carbon cycle. It has been suggested that variations in oceanic primary productivity, spurred by changes in the deposition of iron in atmospheric dust, control atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and hence global climate, over glacial-interglacial timescales. A contemporary application of this "iron hypothesis" promotes the large-scale iron fertilization of ocean regions as a means of enhancing the ability of the ocean to store anthropogenic CO2 and mitigate 21st century climate change. Recent in situ iron enrichment experiments in the HNLC regions, however, cast doubt on the efficacy and advisability of iron fertilization schemes. The experiments have confirmed the role of iron in regulating primary productivity, but resulted in only small carbon export fluxes to the depths necessary for long-term sequestration. Above all, these experiments and other studies of iron biogeochemistry over the last two decades have begun to illustrate the great complexity of the ocean system. Attempts to

  11. Iron bioavailability in low phytate pea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Field pea (Pisum sativum L.) seeds have high nutritional value but also contain potential anti-nutritional factors, such as phytate and polyphenols. Phytate can store up to 80% of the phosphorus in seeds. In the seed and during digestion it can complex minerals such as iron and zinc and make them un...

  12. Iron, lactoferrin and iron regulatory protein activity in the synovium; relative importance of iron loading and the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Guillen, C; McInnes, I; Kruger, H; Brock, J

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To determine the ability of lactoferrin in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial fluid to bind "free" iron, and to study the regulatory mechanisms therein that control iron homeostasis.
METHODS—"Free" iron was determined by the bleomycin assay and lactoferrin concentrations by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The activities of iron regulatory protein (IRP) and NF-κB in synovial fluid cells were assayed by mobility shift assay.
RESULTS—30% of synovial fluids contained "free" iron and in these, lactoferrin concentrations were significantly lower than in those with no "free" iron (p<0.01). Addition of exogenous lactoferrin consistently reduced the amount of "free" iron in positive synovial fluids. IRP activity in synovial cells did not correlate with synovial fluid iron concentrations but did correlate with NF-κB activation and with serum C reactive protein.
CONCLUSION—Lactoferrin may prevent iron mediated tissue damage in RA by reducing "free" synovial iron concentration when inflammatory stimuli have disregulated IRP mediated iron homeostasis.

 Keywords: lactoferrin; rheumatoid arthritis; inflammation PMID:9741316

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging and different levels of iron overload in chronic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, E; Cassanelli, M; Borghi, A; Paolillo, F; Pradelli, M; Casalgrandi, G; Burani, A; Gallo, E

    1993-06-01

    The need for accurate and noninvasive evaluation of liver iron stores prompted us to evaluate the reliability of high-field magnetic resonance imaging equipment in liver patients with low or moderate siderosis, given the poor results obtained using systems operating at low field strength in such cases. Twenty patients with sporadic porphyria cutanea tarda and 28 with comparable chronic liver diseases (chronic hepatitis or cirrhosis) and moderate siderosis were compared with 10 patients with idiopathic or secondary hemochromatosis and 10 healthy controls. Plasma iron profile, ferritin concentration and liver iron concentration, determined with atomic absorption spectroscopy, were matched with the magnetic resonance parameters-namely, transverse relaxation time and the signal intensity for a given proton amount, obtained with equipment operating at a field strength of 1.5 T. Hemochromatosis patients with mean liver iron concentrations of 550 mumol/gm dry wt (vs. 10 mumol of controls) exhibited an impressive reduction in the signal intensity with respect to the other three groups, and this reduction prevented any further comparison with the same porphyria cutanea tarda and chronic liver disease groups, whose liver iron level was twice that of the controls. The signal intensity remained almost unchanged in the latter groups, whereas the transverse relaxation time was significantly reduced. Moreover, correlation with liver iron was significantly inverse in the case of the transverse relaxation time (n = 17, r = 0.62, p = 0.008) and direct in the case of the transverse relaxation rate. The transverse relaxation time values returned to normal in five patients who had completed an iron-depletion program.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Measurement of liver iron overload by magnetic induction using a planar gradiometer: preliminary human results.

    PubMed

    Casañas, R; Scharfetter, H; Altes, A; Remacha, A; Sarda, P; Sierra, J; Merwa, R; Hollaus, K; Rosell, J

    2004-02-01

    The measurement of hepatic iron overload is of particular interest in cases of hereditary hemochromatosis or in patients subject to periodic blood transfusion. The measurement of plasma ferritin provides an indirect estimate but the usefulness of this method is limited by many common clinical conditions (inflammation, infection, etc). Liver biopsy provides the most quantitative direct measurement of iron content in the liver but the risk of the procedure limits its acceptability. This work studies the feasibility of a magnetic induction (MI) low-cost system to measure liver iron overload. The excitation magnetic field (B0, frequency: 28 kHz) was produced by a coil, the perturbation produced by the object (deltaB) was detected using a planar gradiometer. We measured ten patients and seven volunteers in supine and prone positions. Each subject was moved in a plane parallel to the gradiometer several times to estimate measurement repeatability. The real and imaginary parts of deltaB/B0 were measured. Plastic tanks filled with water, saline and ferric solutions were measured for calibration purposes. We used a finite element model to evaluate the experimental results. To estimate the iron content we used the ratio between the maximum values for real and imaginary parts of deltaB/B0 and the area formed by the Nyquist plot divided by the maximum imaginary part. Measurements in humans showed that the contribution of the permittivity is stronger than the contribution of the permeability produced by iron stores in the liver. Defined iron estimators show a limited correlation with expected iron content in patients (R < or = 0.56). A more precise control of geometry and position of the subjects and measurements at multiple frequencies would improve the method.

  15. Modeling of the humidity effects on the oxygen absorption by iron-based scavengers.

    PubMed

    Polyakov, Vladimir A; Miltz, Joseph

    2010-03-01

    It has been reported in the scientific literature that moisture is required for oxygen absorption by iron-based scavengers. The rate of oxygen absorption is crucial in oxygen-sensitive foods. However, no quantitative correlations between the relative humidity and the oxygen absorption by these scavengers have been found in the scientific literature. The humidity level, the O(2) concentration, and the gas composition inside the package are the major factors determining the isothermal O(2) absorption kinetics. In the present study, the effect of RH on the oxygen absorption of an iron powder taken from an oxygen scavenger was investigated. This process was modeled, and correlations have been developed and compared to experimental results. The developed models describe well the effect of humidity on the oxygen absorption by the iron powder. It was found that an increase in the rate of oxygen absorption results in a decrease in the porosity, an increase in the specific surface area of the iron powder's corrosion products, and a decrease in the O(2) diffusivity through the particles. The heat evolved during the exothermic reaction leads to a decrease in the amount of water adsorbed on the corrosion products. The results of the present study elucidate the effect of moisture on the O(2) absorption by iron-based oxygen scavengers and can be used for a proper design of packages intended for storage of foods and fruits and vegetables of intermediate and high water activity. Since humidity has an important role in determining the rate of oxygen absorption kinetics by iron-based oxygen scavengers, using the models derived and presented in the present publication can bring upon a better understanding of the oxygen absorption process and a more efficient way of using oxygen scavengers in the packaging and storing of different oxygen sensitive foods.

  16. Robbery characteristics and employee injuries in convenience stores.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, K A; Landsittel, D P; Hendricks, S A

    2001-12-01

    Each year approximately 30,000 convenience store employees are at risk for injuries related to robberies and many are fatal. A prospective cohort study of 460 convenience store robberies from 1 February 1995 to 30 September 1996 was conducted to uncover possible associations between injury and pertinent robbery circumstances and work environments. Data collection sources included police reports, employee interviews, store evaluations, and relevant Census data. Rate ratios and correlation statistics were calculated to identify associations with injury and relationships between variables. Injury risk was strongly associated with the following characteristics: employee resistance, robberies without firearms or money taken, daytime and merchandise robberies, stores with limited escape routes and no cash policy or drop safe, older clerks, and surrounding areas with lower valued buildings, less expensive rent, more vacant structures, and younger residents. Numerous intercorrelations between these characteristics were identified. Training opportunities, store procedures, and environmental designs are important factors to consider in reducing robbery-related injuries. Published 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  17. Dietary iron intake and serum ferritin concentration in 213 patients homozygous for the HFEC282Y hemochromatosis mutation

    PubMed Central

    Gordeuk, Victor R; Lovato, Laura; Barton, James C; Vitolins, Mara; McLaren, Gordon; Acton, Ronald T; McLaren, Christine; Harris, Emily L; Speechley, Mark; Eckfeldt, John H; Diaz, Sharmin; Sholinsky, Phyliss; Adams, Paul

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: HFEC282Y homozygotes have an increased risk for developing increased iron stores and related disorders. It is controversial whether dietary iron restrictions should be recommended to such individuals. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether dietary iron content influences iron stores in HFEC282Y homozygotes as assessed by serum ferritin concentration. DESIGN: Serum ferritin concentration was measured and a dietary iron questionnaire was completed as part of the evaluation of 213 HFEC282Y homozygotes who were identified through screening of >100,000 primary care patients at five HEmochromatosis and IRon Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study Field Centers in the United States and Canada. RESULTS: No significant relationships between serum ferritin concentration and dietary heme iron content, dietary nonheme iron content or reports of supplemental iron use were found. CONCLUSION: These results do not support recommending dietary heme or nonheme iron restrictions for HFEC282Y homozygotes diagnosed through screening in North America. PMID:22720276

  18. Increased duodenal DMT-1 expression and unchanged HFE mRNA levels in HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis and iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Byrnes, V; Barrett, S; Ryan, E; Kelleher, T; O'Keane, C; Coughlan, B; Crowe, J

    2002-01-01

    HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis is characterized by imbalances of iron homeostasis and alterations in intestinal iron absorption. The identification of the HFE gene and the apical iron transporter divalent metal transporter-1, DMT-1, provide a direct method to address the mechanisms of iron overload in this disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the regulation of duodenal HFE and DMT-1 gene expression in HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis. Small bowel biopsies and serum iron indices were obtained from a total of 33 patients. The study population comprised 13 patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (C282Y homozygous), 10 patients with iron deficiency anemia, and 10 apparently healthy controls, all of whom were genotyped for the two common mutations in the HFE gene (C282Y and H63D). Total RNA was isolated from tissue and amplified via RT-PCR for HFE, DMT-1, and the internal control GAPDH. DMT-1 protein expression was additionally assessed by immunohistochemistry. Levels of HFE mRNA did not differ significantly between patient groups (P = 0.09), specifically between C282Y homozygotes and iron deficiency anemic patients, when compared to controls (P = 0.09, P = 0.9, respectively). In contrast, DMT-1 mRNA levels were at least twofold greater in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis and iron deficiency anemia when compared to controls (P = 0.02, P = 0.01, respectively). Heightened DMT-1 protein expression correlated with mRNA levels in all patients. Loss of HFE function in hereditary hemochromatosis is not derived from inhibition of its gene expression. DMT-1 expression in C282Y homozygote subjects is consistent with the hypothesis of a "paradoxical" duodenal iron deficiency in hereditary hemochromatosis. The observed twofold upregulation of the DMT-1 is consistent with the slow but steady increase in body iron stores observed in those presenting with clinical features of hereditary hemochromatosis.

  19. Stress hardening under long-term cadmium treatment is correlated with the activation of antioxidative defence and iron acquisition of chloroplasts in Populus.

    PubMed

    Solti, Ádám; Sárvári, Éva; Szöllősi, Erzsébet; Tóth, Brigitta; Mészáros, Ilona; Fodor, Ferenc; Szigeti, Zoltán

    2016-09-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a highly toxic heavy metal affects growth and metabolic pathways in plants, including photosynthesis. Though Cd is a transition metal with no redox capacity, it generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) indirectly and causes oxidative stress. Nevertheless, the mechanisms involved in long-term Cd tolerance of poplar, candidate for Cd phytoremediation, are not well known. Hydroponically cultured poplar (Populus jacquemontiana var. glauca cv. 'Kopeczkii') plants were treated with 10 μM Cd for 4 weeks. Following a period of functional decline, the plants performed acclimation to the Cd induced oxidative stress as indicated by the decreased leaf malondialdehyde (MDA) content and the recovery of most photosynthetic parameters. The increased activity of peroxidases (PODs) could have a great impact on the elimination of hydrogen peroxide, and thus the recovery of photosynthesis, while the function of superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoforms seemed to be less important. Re-distribution of the iron content of leaf mesophyll cells into the chloroplasts contributed to the biosynthesis of the photosynthetic apparatus and some antioxidative enzymes. The delayed increase in photosynthetic activity in relation to the decline in the level of lipid peroxidation indicates that elimination of oxidative stress damage by acclimation mechanisms is required for the restoration of the photosynthetic apparatus during long-term Cd treatment.

  20. The formation mechanism of iron oxide nanoparticles within the microwave-assisted solvothermal synthesis and its correlation with the structural and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Kozakova, Z; Kuritka, I; Kazantseva, N E; Babayan, V; Pastorek, M; Machovsky, M; Bazant, P; Saha, P

    2015-12-28

    Magnetic nanoparticles based on Fe3O4 were prepared by a facile and rapid one-pot solvothermal synthesis using FeCl3·6H2O as a source of iron ions, ethylene glycol as a solvent and NH4Ac, (NH4)2CO3, NH4HCO3 or aqueous NH3 as precipitating and nucleating agents. In contrast to previous reports we reduce the synthesis time to 30 minutes using a pressurized microwave reactor without the requirement of further post-treatments such as calcination. Dramatically reduced synthesis time prevents particle growth via Ostwald ripening thus the obtained particles have dimensions in the range of 20 to 130 nm, they are uniform in shape and exhibit magnetic properties with saturation magnetization ranging from 8 to 76 emu g(-1). The suggested method allows simple particle size and crystallinity tuning resulting in improved magnetic properties by changing the synthesis parameters, i.e. temperature and nucleating agents. Moreover, efficiency of conversion of raw material into the product is almost 100%.

  1. Second international round robin for the quantification of serum non-transferrin-bound iron and labile plasma iron in patients with iron-overload disorders.

    PubMed

    de Swart, Louise; Hendriks, Jan C M; van der Vorm, Lisa N; Cabantchik, Z Ioav; Evans, Patricia J; Hod, Eldad A; Brittenham, Gary M; Furman, Yael; Wojczyk, Boguslaw; Janssen, Mirian C H; Porter, John B; Mattijssen, Vera E J M; Biemond, Bart J; MacKenzie, Marius A; Origa, Raffaella; Galanello, Renzo; Hider, Robert C; Swinkels, Dorine W

    2016-01-01

    Non-transferrin-bound iron and its labile (redox active) plasma iron component are thought to be potentially toxic forms of iron originally identified in the serum of patients with iron overload. We compared ten worldwide leading assays (6 for non-transferrin-bound iron and 4 for labile plasma iron) as part of an international inter-laboratory study. Serum samples from 60 patients with four different iron-overload disorders in various treatment phases were coded and sent in duplicate for analysis to five different laboratories worldwide. Some laboratories provided multiple assays. Overall, highest assay levels were observed for patients with untreated hereditary hemochromatosis and β-thalassemia intermedia, patients with transfusion-dependent myelodysplastic syndromes and patients with transfusion-dependent and chelated β-thalassemia major. Absolute levels differed considerably between assays and were lower for labile plasma iron than for non-transferrin-bound iron. Four assays also reported negative values. Assays were reproducible with high between-sample and low within-sample variation. Assays correlated and correlations were highest within the group of non-transferrin-bound iron assays and within that of labile plasma iron assays. Increased transferrin saturation, but not ferritin, was a good indicator of the presence of forms of circulating non-transferrin-bound iron. The possibility of using non-transferrin-bound iron and labile plasma iron measures as clinical indicators of overt iron overload and/or of treatment efficacy would largely depend on the rigorous validation and standardization of assays.

  2. Availability of vending machines and school stores in California schools

    PubMed Central

    Liles, Sandy; Schmitz, Katharine E.; Kassem, Nada O.F; Irvin, Veronica L; Hovell, Melbourne F.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study examined the availability of foods sold in vending machines and school stores in US public and private schools, and associations of availability with students' food purchases and consumption. Methods Descriptive analyses, chi-square tests, and Spearman product-moment correlations were conducted on data collected from 521 students aged 8 to15 years recruited from orthodontic offices in California. Results Vending machines were more common in private schools than in public schools, while school stores were common in both private and public schools. The food items most commonly available in both vending machines and school stores in all schools were predominately foods of minimal nutritional value (FMNV). Participant report of availability of food items in vending machines and/or school stores was significantly correlated with: (1) participant purchase of each item from those sources, except for energy drinks, milk, fruits, and vegetables; and (2) participants' friends' consumption of items at lunch, for two categories of FMNV (candy, cookies, or cake; soda or sports drinks). Conclusions Despite the Child Nutrition and WIC reauthorization Act of 2004, FMNV were still available in schools, and may be contributing to unhealthy dietary choices and ultimately to health risks. PMID:26645420

  3. Availability of Vending Machines and School Stores in California Schools.

    PubMed

    Cisse-Egbuonye, Nafissatou; Liles, Sandy; Schmitz, Katharine E; Kassem, Nada; Irvin, Veronica L; Hovell, Melbourne F

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the availability of foods sold in vending machines and school stores in United States public and private schools, and associations of availability with students' food purchases and consumption. Descriptive analyses, chi-square tests, and Spearman product-moment correlations were conducted on data collected from 521 students aged 8 to 15 years recruited from orthodontic offices in California. Vending machines were more common in private schools than in public schools, whereas school stores were common in both private and public schools. The food items most commonly available in both vending machines and school stores in all schools were predominately foods of minimal nutritional value (FMNV). Participant report of availability of food items in vending machines and/or school stores was significantly correlated with (1) participant purchase of each item from those sources, except for energy drinks, milk, fruits, and vegetables; and (2) participants' friends' consumption of items at lunch, for 2 categories of FMNV (candy, cookies, or cake; soda or sports drinks). Despite the Child Nutrition and Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Reauthorization Act of 2004, FMNV were still available in schools, and may be contributing to unhealthy dietary choices and ultimately to health risks. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  4. A Randomized Control Study to Evaluate Effects of Short-term Oral Iron Supplementation in Regular Voluntary Blood Donors.

    PubMed

    Dara, Ravi Chandrabhan; Marwaha, Neelam; Khetan, Dheeraj; Patidar, Gopal Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Regular blood donation can lead to iron deficiency anaemia. Early recognition and reversal of excessive iron loss by iron supplementation may avoid symptomatic iron store depletion in blood donors. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of iron supplementation in maintaining the iron stores of voluntary blood donors. A total of 200 regular volunteers who donated twice in previous year were randomly divided into two groups. Iron: oral iron supplementation tablets of elemental iron as ferrous fumarate. Placebo group: glucose containing capsules, to be taken once daily for 21 days after one unit of blood donation. Their hemogram, serum ferritin, red cell indices and red cell distribution width were determined at baseline and after 1 month and at the time of next blood donation. Out of 200 volunteers enrolled 98 were assigned to iron group and rest 102 into placebo group. Total of 37 % donors dropped out, yielding a dropout rate of 35 % in iron group and 39 % in the placebo group. The haemoglobin and ferritin levels showed significant improvement in iron group compared to placebo group (p < 0.05). Three weeks of oral iron therapy (98.6 mg elemental iron/day) was able to maintain iron stores at 1 month after donation but was not sufficient to sustain the iron stores over a period of 3 months. Thus there is need to evaluate increased dosage or duration of iron supplementation in maintaining the iron stores.

  5. Calibration of myocardial T2 and T1 against iron concentration

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The assessment of myocardial iron using T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has been validated and calibrated, and is in clinical use. However, there is very limited data assessing the relaxation parameters T1 and T2 for measurement of human myocardial iron. Methods Twelve hearts were examined from transfusion-dependent patients: 11 with end-stage heart failure, either following death (n = 7) or cardiac transplantation (n = 4), and 1 heart from a patient who died from a stroke with no cardiac iron loading. Ex-vivo R1 and R2 measurements (R1 = 1/T1 and R2 = 1/T2) at 1.5 Tesla were compared with myocardial iron concentration measured using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Results From a single myocardial slice in formalin which was repeatedly examined, a modest decrease in T2 was observed with time, from mean (±SD) 23.7 ± 0.93 ms at baseline (13 days after death and formalin fixation) to 18.5 ± 1.41 ms at day 566 (p < 0.001). Raw T2 values were therefore adjusted to correct for this fall over time. Myocardial R2 was correlated with iron concentration [Fe] (R2 0.566, p < 0.001), but the correlation was stronger between LnR2 and Ln[Fe] (R2 0.790, p < 0.001). The relation was [Fe] = 5081•(T2)-2.22 between T2 (ms) and myocardial iron (mg/g dry weight). Analysis of T1 proved challenging with a dichotomous distribution of T1, with very short T1 (mean 72.3 ± 25.8 ms) that was independent of iron concentration in all hearts stored in formalin for greater than 12 months. In the remaining hearts stored for <10 weeks prior to scanning, LnR1 and iron concentration were correlated but with marked scatter (R2 0.517, p < 0.001). A linear relationship was present between T1 and T2 in the hearts stored for a short period (R2 0.657, p < 0.001). Conclusion Myocardial T2 correlates well with myocardial iron concentration, which raises the possibility that T2 may provide additive

  6. Effect of dietary iron and copper on performance and oxidative stability in broiler leg meat.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J A; Pérez-Vendrell, A M; Esteve-Garcia, E

    2000-05-01

    1. An experiment was carried out to determine the effect of removal of supplemental iron and copper from broiler diets during the last 3 weeks before slaughter on broiler performance, tissue vitamin E concentrations and oxidation values in raw; cooked and stored broiler leg meat. 2. Removal of supplemental iron and copper from the diet slightly decreased food efficiency; the differences were significant only when both minerals were removed simultaneously 3. Effect of iron withdrawal on iron concentration in tissue was low. However, total copper concentration in tissue was reduced in animals deprived of iron or both minerals simultaneously. 4. Removal of dietary iron and copper did not affect vitamin E concentration in raw and cooked meat, while stored meat showed lower concentrations in animals deprived of iron and copper simultaneously. 5. The removal of iron and copper from the diet reduced oxidation values in cooked broiler leg meat as measured by the thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances method (TBARS).

  7. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15mg/kg; maximum of 1000mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia.

  8. Role of iron in the pathogenesis of respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Khadem; Kim, Richard Y; Karim, Rafia; Mayall, Jemma R; Martin, Kristy L; Shahandeh, Ali; Abbasian, Firouz; Starkey, Malcolm R; Loustaud-Ratti, Veronique; Johnstone, Daniel; Milward, Elizabeth A; Hansbro, Philip M; Horvat, Jay C

    2017-07-01

    Iron is essential for many biological processes, however, too much or too little iron can result in a wide variety of pathological consequences, depending on the organ system, tissue or cell type affected. In order to reduce pathogenesis, iron levels are tightly controlled in throughout the body by regulatory systems that control iron absorption, systemic transport and cellular uptake and storage. Altered iron levels and/or dysregulated homeostasis have been associated with several lung diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung cancer, cystic fibrosis, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and asthma. However, the mechanisms that underpin these associations and whether iron plays a key role in the pathogenesis of lung disease are yet to be fully elucidated. Furthermore, in order to survive and replicate, pathogenic micro-organisms have evolved strategies to source host iron, including freeing iron from cells and proteins that store and transport iron. To counter these microbial strategies, mammals have evolved immune-mediated defence mechanisms that reduce iron availability to pathogens. This interplay between iron, infection and immunity has important ramifications for the pathogenesis and management of human respiratory infections and diseases. An increased understanding of the role that iron plays in the pathogenesis of lung disease and respiratory infections may help inform novel therapeutic strategies. Here we review the clinical and experimental evidence that highlights the potential importance of iron in respiratory diseases and infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Acquisition, transport, and storage of iron by pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Howard, D H

    1999-07-01

    Iron is required by most living systems. A great variety of means of acquisition, avenues of uptake, and methods of storage are used by pathogenic fungi to ensure a supply of the essential metal. Solubilization of insoluble iron polymers is the first step in iron assimilation. The two methods most commonly used by microorganisms for solubilization of iron are reduction and chelation. Reduction of ferric iron to ferrous iron by enzymatic or nonenzymatic means is a common mechanism among pathogenic yeasts. Under conditions of iron starvation, many fungi synthesize iron chelators known as siderophores. Two classes of compounds that function in iron gathering are commonly observed: hydroxamates and polycarboxylates. Two major responses to iron stress in fungi are a high-affinity ferric iron reductase and siderophore synthesis. Regulation of these two mechanisms at the molecular level has received attention. Uptake of siderophores is a diverse process, which varies among the different classes of compounds. Since free iron is toxic, it must be stored for further metabolic use. Polyphosphates, ferritins, and siderophores themselves have been described as storage molecules. The iron-gathering mechanisms used by a pathogen in an infected host are largely unknown and can only be posited on the basis of in vitro studies at present.

  10. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia with Ferro-Folgamma.

    PubMed

    Ghinea, Mihaela Maria

    2004-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a hypochromic anemia in which hemoglobin poor synthesis is due to a decrease in the amount of iron in the body. The decrease of iron quantity has many causes: insufficient intake of aliments rich in iron (meat, viscera, green vegetables), increased necessities during growth period, pregnancy, erythrocytes hyperregeneration, high-performance sportsmen, increased loss by digestive way, genito-urinary way, respiratory, hemorrhagic syndromes. Clinically, symptoms and signs specific to all types of anemia and those specific to lack of iron occur besides the symptoms and signs of the underlying disease: atrophic glositis, angular stomatitis, sideropenic dysphagia, pica, skin and nails changes. Laboratory investigations useful for diagnosis are: microcytic, hypochromic anemia, decreased serum iron level, total capacity of iron binding increased, medullar iron store absent, good response to iron therapy. Ferro-Folgamma is one of the most indicated medicines in iron deficiency anemia. Due to its components this medicine has many indications: insufficient alimentary intake concerning iron, folic acid, B12 vitamin, vegetarian alimentation, increased needs during growth period, iron deficiency anaemia secondary to chronic hemorrhages, malnutrition, anemias associated with chronic alcohol intake, preventive treatment of iron deficiency anemia and megaloblastic anemia during pregnancy and lactation.

  11. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15 mg/kg; maximum of 1000 mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  12. Disposal of iron by a mutant form of lipocalin 2

    PubMed Central

    Barasch, Jonathan; Hollmen, Maria; Deng, Rong; Hod, Eldad A.; Rupert, Peter B.; Abergel, Rebecca J.; Allred, Benjamin E.; Xu, Katherine; Darrah, Shaun F.; Tekabe, Yared; Perlstein, Alan; Wax, Rebecca; Bruck, Efrat; Stauber, Jacob; Corbin, Kaitlyn A.; Buchen, Charles; Slavkovich, Vesna; Graziano, Joseph; Spitalnik, Steven L.; Bao, Guanhu; Strong, Roland K.; Qiu, Andong

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload damages many organs. Unfortunately, therapeutic iron chelators also have undesired toxicity and may deliver iron to microbes. Here we show that a mutant form (K3Cys) of endogenous lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is filtered by the kidney but can bypass sites of megalin-dependent recapture, resulting in urinary excretion. Because K3Cys maintains recognition of its cognate ligand, the iron siderophore enterochelin, this protein can capture and transport iron even in the acidic conditions of urine. Mutant LCN2 strips iron from transferrin and citrate, and delivers it into the urine. In addition, it removes iron from iron overloaded mice, including models of acquired (iron-dextran or stored red blood cells) and primary (Hfe−/−) iron overload. In each case, the mutants reduce redox activity typical of non-transferrin-bound iron. In summary, we present a non-toxic strategy for iron chelation and urinary elimination, based on manipulating an endogenous protein:siderophore:iron clearance pathway. PMID:27796299

  13. Total iron binding capacity

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron supplies are low. This can occur with: Iron deficiency anemia Pregnancy (late) Lower-than-normal TIBC may ... Brittenham GM. Disorders of iron homeostasis: iron deficiency and ... Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  14. Cellular distribution of orally and intramuscularly administered iron dextran in newborn piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Thorén-Tolling, K; Jönsson, L

    1977-01-01

    Histochemical studies were performed on tissues from piglets of different ages treated orally with iron dextran soon after birth. The mucosal cells in the distal region of the small intestine were heavily laden with stainable iron granules during the first three days after the iron administration. The absorptive epithelial cells are desquamated within seven to ten days after birth. Consequently, the number of iron granules gradually diminishes during the first seven days after treatment and no iron granules are demonstrated 12 days after the administration of iron. The iron dextran complex is pinocytosed in newborn piglets and then transported via the lymphatic system. Thus the sinusoidal lining cells of the body and mesenteric lymph nodes are already heavily laden with iron granules 24 hours after oral treatment. This iron store is released only slowing during the first weeks of life. Great amounts of iron granules are demonstrated in the liver and spleen macrophages during the first week after the administration of iron. Due to the rapid utilization of iron in growing piglets these iron stores diminish sharply during the weeks following birth. The distribution of stainable iron in the lymph nodes, liver and spleen seven days after intramuscular injection of iron dextran in newborn piglets was comparable to that for oral administration at that stage of the experiment. Images Fig. 1a-e. Fig. 2a-e. Fig. 3a-d. Fig. 4a-d. Fig. 5a-d. PMID:907907

  15. Energy-storing prosthetic feet.

    PubMed

    Wing, D C; Hittenberger, D A

    1989-04-01

    At least six brands of energy-storing prosthetic feet (ESPF) are now commercially available in the US. These are designed to permit lower extremity amputees to participate in a wide variety of activities, such as running and jumping sports, as well as vigorous walking. Although kinesiologic studies of these devices have not been completed, clinical experience suggests that the Flex-Foot provides the highest performance, followed by the Carbon Copy II and the Seattle Foot. The S.A.F.E. Foot, the STEN Foot, and the Dynamic Foot provide less energy storage and may be suitable for less active patients or those with special needs such as walking on uneven ground. All of the ESPF except the Flex-Foot may be attached to a realigned conventional prosthesis. The Flex-Foot incorporates a pylon and foot in one unit and requires special fabrication technologies. The additional cost of most of the ESPF (compared to a Solid Ankle Cushion Heel Foot) may add little to the cost of a finished prosthesis although it provides greatly increased function. The Flex-Foot, however, is significantly more expensive. Advances in kinesiology and materials science are being applied in the design of prosthetic components that are lighter, stronger, and more resilient. Clinicians can now choose from a variety of innovative commercially available devices but have been hampered by a lack of published information. This paper will review the design philosophy, materials, and applications of ESPF, and will supplement the information available from individual manufacturers and the prosthetic literature.

  16. Iron deficiency in frequent and first time female blood donors.

    PubMed

    Boulahriss, M; Benchemsi, N

    2008-12-01

    Blood donation has a marked influence on the body iron stores especially in female blood donors. Iron deficiency anaemia is an important limiting factor for the number of donations in female regular blood donors. This study was conducted to evaluate the frequency of iron deficiency and relevant factors in frequent and first time female blood donors at Casablanca blood transfusion centre, Morocco. Between November 2005 and April 2006, twenty-one female first time and twenty-one frequent female blood donors were selected randomly. In frequent blood donors, only females with at least 10 donations were included. Haemoglobin concentration. serum ferritin, serum iron and total transferrine binding capacity were measured and analysed. The results of haemoglobin concentration, serum ferritin, serum iron were significant lower in frequent female blood donors when compared with the results of same parameters in first time female blood donors. The results show that the frequency of iron deficiency in frequent female blood donors is 43% and in the first time female blood donors is 14%. Iron deficiency is very common in regular female blood donors at Casablanca's transfusion centre. Frequent blood donation has marked influence on the body iron stores in frequent female blood donors. It is therefore recommended that blood transfusion centres focused on maintaining iron balance by measuring serum ferritin and total transferrine binding capacity in frequent female blood donors. They have also to educate the donors about iron supplementation and yearly ferritin checking.

  17. Study of Military Commissary Stores. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    prepare hamburger patties and other cuts not only for grocery stores but exchange cafeterias and snack bars as well. Centralized meat processing plants...of government owned buildings 7B-6 capable of being utilized as regional distribution centers, must be investigated. Central meat processing plants...store location. (5) Use of central meat processing plants to serve stores within regions or complexes. (6) Use of central plants for produce purchasing

  18. Signature-based store checking buffer

    DOEpatents

    Sridharan, Vilas; Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    2015-06-02

    A system and method for optimizing redundant output verification, are provided. A hardware-based store fingerprint buffer receives multiple instances of output from multiple instances of computation. The store fingerprint buffer generates a signature from the content included in the multiple instances of output. When a barrier is reached, the store fingerprint buffer uses the signature to verify the content is error-free.

  19. Supplementary iron dose in pregnancy anemia prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Reddaiah, V P; Raj, P P; Ramachandran, K; Nath, L M; Sood, S K; Madan, N; Rusia, U

    1989-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the optimum dose of supplemental iron for prophylaxis against pregnancy anemia. One hundred and ten pregnant women were randomly allocated to three groups: Group A receiving equivalent of 60 mg, group B 120 mg and Group C 240 mg, elemental iron as ferrous sulphate daily; the content of folic acid was constant in all the three groups (0.5 mg). These women had at least consumed 90 tablets in 100 +/- 10 days. Blood was drawn at the beginning and at the end of the treatment. Fifty percent were anemic (less than 11 g/100 ml). The hemoglobin levels rose similarly in all groups and the differences were statistically not significant. Fifty-six percent had depleted iron stores (serum ferritin value less than 12 micrograms/l) at the beginning of the study. Following therapy a statistically significant increase in iron stores was observed in group B and C as compared to group A. The difference between group B and C was not significant. The side effects increased with increasing doses of iron; 32.4%, 40.3% and 72% in group A, B and C respectively. Based on these findings, the authors advocate that optimum dose of iron should be 120 mg instead of 60 mg as is currently being used in the National Nutritional Anemia Prophylaxis Programme.

  20. Iron status of women is associated with the iron concentration of potable groundwater in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Rebecca D; Shamim, Abu Ahmed; Ali, Hasmot; Jahan, Nusrat; Labrique, Alain B; Schulze, Kerry; Christian, Parul; West, Keith P

    2011-05-01

    Women of reproductive age are at a high risk of iron deficiency, often as a result of diets low in bioavailable iron. In some settings, the iron content of domestic groundwater sources is high, yet its contribution to iron intake and status has not been examined. In a rural Bangladeshi population of women deficient in dietary iron, we evaluated the association between groundwater iron intake and iron status. In 2008, participants (n = 209 with complete data) were visited to collect data on 7-d food frequency, 7-d morbidity history, 24-h drinking water intake, and rice preparation, and to measure the groundwater iron concentration. Blood was collected to assess iron and infection status. Plasma ferritin (μg/L) and body iron (mg/kg) concentrations were [median (IQR)] 67 (46, 99) and 10.4 ± 2.6, respectively, and the prevalence of iron deficiency (ferritin < 12 μg/L) was 0%. Daily iron intake from water [42 mg (18, 71)] was positively correlated with plasma ferritin (r = 0.36) and total body iron (r = 0.35) (P < 0.001 for both). In adjusted linear regression analyses, plasma ferritin increased by 6.1% (95% CI: 3.8, 8.4%) and body iron by 0.3 mg/kg (0.2, 0.4) for every 10-mg increase in iron intake from water (P < 0.001). In this rural area of northern Bangladesh, women of reproductive age had no iron deficiency likely attributable to iron consumed from drinking groundwater, which contributed substantially to dietary intake. These findings suggest that iron intake from water should be included in dietary assessments in such settings.

  1. Distributed energy store railgun; The limiting case

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, R.A. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that when the limiting case of a distributed energy store railgun is analyzed, i.e., the case where the space between adjacent energy stores become indefinitely small, three important results are obtained. First, the shape of the current pulse delivered by each store is sinusoidal and an exponential tail. Second, the rail-to-rail voltage behind the rear-most active store approaches zero. Third, it is not possible to choose parameters in such a way that capacitor crowbars can be eliminated.

  2. Iron and alloys of iron. [lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastri, Sankar

    1992-01-01

    All lunar soil contains iron in the metallic form, mostly as an iron-nickel alloy in concentrations of a few tenths of 1 percent. Some of this free iron can be easily separated by magnetic means. It is estimated that the magnetic separation of 100,000 tons of lunar soil would yield 150-200 tons of iron. Agglutinates contain metallic iron which could be extracted by melting and made into powder metallurgy products. The characteristics and potential uses of the pure-iron and iron-alloy lunar products are discussed. Processes for working iron that might be used in a nonterrestrial facility are also addressed.

  3. Iron homeostasis: a new job for macrophages in adipose tissue?

    PubMed Central

    Hubler, Merla J.; Peterson, Kristin R.; Hasty, Alyssa H.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated serum ferritin and increased cellular iron concentrations are risk factors for diabetes; however, the etiology of this association is unclear. Metabolic tissues such as pancreas, liver, and adipose tissue (AT), as well as the immune cells resident in these tissues, may be involved. Recent studies demonstrate that the polarization status of macrophages has important relevance to their iron handling capabilities. Furthermore, a subset of macrophages in AT have elevated iron concentrations and a gene expression profile indicative of iron handling, a capacity diminished in obesity. Because iron overload in adipocytes increases systemic insulin resistance, iron handling by AT macrophages may have relevance not only to adipocyte iron stores but also to local and systemic insulin sensitivity. PMID:25600948

  4. Control of marrow production by the level of iron supply

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Robert S.; Henderson, Perry A.

    1969-01-01

    The level of erythroid marrow production varies widely in different erythropoietic disorders. In part, this reflects the level of erythropoietin stimulation as determined by the severity of the anemia. However, iron supply plays an equally important role in the control of erythropoiesis. As demonstrated in normal individuals subjected to prolonged periods of phlebotomy-induced anemia, the erythroid marrow will increase production by as little as twice to as much as eight times normal, depending on the iron supply available from different iron pools. Whereas the iron delivered from normal reticuloendothelial stores or orally administered iron is sufficient for a marrow production response of only two to three times normal, the increased iron supply from nonviable red cells, hemolysis, or iron dextran infusions permits marrow production to rise acutely to levels of four to eight times normal. PMID:5773083

  5. Moving toward a plant-based diet: are iron and zinc at risk?

    PubMed

    Hunt, Janet R

    2002-05-01

    With reduced intake of meat and increased intake of phytate-containing legumes and whole grains, movement toward plant-based diets reduces dietary iron and zinc absorption. Although vegetarians have lower iron stores, adverse health effects of lower iron and zinc absorption have not been demonstrated with varied, plant-based diets consumed in developed countries. Improved assessment methods and monitoring are needed to detect and prevent possible iron and zinc deficiency with plant-based diets.

  6. Non-Fermi-liquid to Fermi-liquid transports in iron-pnictide Ba(Fe1-x Co x )2As2 and the electronic correlation strength in superconductors newly probed by the normal-state Hall angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. M.; Wang, Chih-Yi; Zen, Sha-Min; Chang, Jin-Yuan; Kuo, C. N.; Lue, C. S.; Chang, L. J.; Su, Y.; Wolf, Th; Adelmann, P.

    2017-03-01

    Electrical transports in iron-pnictide Ba(Fe1-x Co x )2As2 (BFCA) single crystals are heavily debated in terms of the hidden Fermi-liquid (HFL) and holographic theories. Both HFL and holographic theories provide consistent physic pictures and propose a universal expression of resistivity to describe the crossover of transports from the non-Fermi-liquid (FL) to FL behavior in these so-called ‘strange metal’ systems. The deduced spin exchange energy J and model-dependent energy scale W in BFCA are almost the same, or are of the same order of several hundred Kelvin for over-doped BFCA, which is in agreement with the HFL theory. Moreover, a drawn line of W/3.5 for BFCA in the higher-doping region up to the right demonstrates the crossover from non-FL-like behavior to FL-like behavior at high doping, and shows a new phase diagram of BFCA. The electronic correlation strength in superconductors has been newly probed by the normal-state Hall angle, which found that, for the first time, correlation strength can be characterized by the ratios of T c to the Fermi temperature T F, J/T F, and the transverse mass to longitudinal mass.

  7. Directional Solidification of Nodular Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Cerium enhances formation of graphite nodules. Preliminary experiments in directional solidification of cast iron shows quantitative correlation of graphite microstructure with growth rate and thermal gradient, with sufficient spheroidizing element to form spheroidal graphite under proper thermal conditions. Experimental approach enables use of directional solidification to study solidification of spheriodal-graphite cast iron in low gravity. Possible to form new structural materials from nodular cast iron.

  8. [Iron Deficiency in Chronic Heart Failure: Diagnostic Algorithm and Present-Day Therapeutic Options].

    PubMed

    Doehner, Wolfram; Blankenberg, Stefan; Erdmann, Erland; Ertl, Georg; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Landmesser, Ulf; Pieske, Burkert; Schieffer, Bernhard; Schunkert, Heribert; von Haehling, Stephan; Zeiher, Andreas; Anker, Stefan D

    2017-05-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) occurs in up to 50% of patients with heart failure (HF). Even without presence of anaemia ID contributes to more severe symptoms, increased hospitalization and mortality. A number of randomized controlled trials demonstrated the clinical benefit of replenishment of iron stores with improvement of symptoms and fewer hospitalizations. Assessment of iron status should therefore become routine assessment in newly diagnosed and in symptomatic patients with HF. ID can be identified with simple and straightforward diagnostic steps. Assessment of Ferritin (indicating iron stores) and transferrin saturation (TSAT, indication capability to mobilise internal iron stores) are sufficient to detect ID. In this review a plain diagnostic algorithm for ID is suggested. Confounding factors for diagnosis and adequate treatment of ID in HF are discussed. A regular workup for iron deficiency parameters may benefit patients with heart failure by providing symptomatic improvements and fewer hospitalizations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. The heritability of hemolysis in stored human red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    van ‘t Erve, Thomas J.; Wagner, Brett A.; Martin, Sean M.; Knudson, C. Michael; Blendowski, Robyn; Keaton, Mignon; Holt, Tracy; Hess, John R.; Buettner, Garry R.; Ryckman, Kelli K.; Darbro, Benjamin W.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Raife, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) with maximum therapeutic efficacy is a major goal in transfusion medicine. One of the criteria used in determining stored RBC quality is end of storage hemolysis. Between donors, a wide range of hemolysis is observed under identical storage conditions. Here, a potential mechanism for this wide range is investigated. We hypothesize that the magnitude of hemolysis is a heritable trait. Also, we investigated correlations between hemolysis and RBC metabolites; this will establish pathways influencing hemolysis as future targets for genetic analysis. Study Design and Methods Units of RBCs from identical and non-identical twins were collected and stored under standard conditions for 56 days. Hemolysis, ATP, and total glutathione were measured throughout storage. Non-targeted metabolic analyses were performed on RBCs that had been stored for 28 days. Heritability was determined by comparing values between identical and non-identical twins. Results Hemolysis was found to be heritable (mean >45 %) throughout the storage period. Correlations were observed between hemolysis and metabolites from the amino acid, sugar, and purine metabolism, lipid metabolism and transport, and glycolysis pathways. Three metabolites also exhibited heritability (> 20%). No correlation was found with ATP or total glutathione. Conclusion The susceptibility of RBCs to lysis during storage is partly determined by inheritance. We have also uncovered several pathways that are candidate targets for future genome wide association studies. These findings will aid in the design of better storage solutions and the development of donor screening tools that minimize hemolysis during storage. PMID:25644965

  10. Comparison of food habits, iron intake and iron status in adolescents before and after the withdrawal of the general iron fortification in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, A; Hulthén, L

    2015-04-01

    Sifted flour was fortified with carbonyl iron for 50 years in Sweden. This study evaluates changes in food habits, intake of iron, factors affecting iron absorption and iron status after the discontinuation of the general iron fortification in adolescents with the highest requirements. A total of 2285 15- to 16-year-old students in 1994 (634 girls and 611 boys) and in 2000 (534 girls and 486 boys) in 13 schools in Gothenburg, Sweden, were included in two cross-sectional surveys assessing food habits with diet history interviews and iron deficiency defined with serum ferritin stores ⩽ 15 μg/l and no preceding infection. In girls, iron deficiency increased from 37 to 45%, while in boys, it was stable at 23%. Total iron intake decreased from 15.7 to 9.5 mg/day and 22.5 to 13.9 mg/day in girls and boys, respectively. Cereals were the main iron source. Among girls, the increase of fish and decrease of calcium intake may not counteract the effect of decreased intake of fortification iron. Among boys, more meat, less calcium and more vitamin C may have favoured the bioavailability of iron. The discontinuation of the general iron fortification resulted in a 39% decrease in total iron intake and iron deficiency increased substantially in girls. However, in boys no change in iron deficiency was observed. Whether this was a result of changed bioavailability of dietary iron or simultaneous changes of non-dietary factors remains to be explored.

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF ERYTHROFERRONE AS AN ERYTHROID REGULATOR OF IRON METABOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Kautz, Léon; Jung, Grace; Valore, Erika V.; Rivella, Stefano; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Recovery from blood loss requires a greatly enhanced supply of iron to support expanded erythropoiesis. After hemorrhage, suppression of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin allows increased iron absorption and mobilization from stores. We identified a new hormone, erythroferrone (ERFE), which mediates hepcidin suppression during stress erythropoiesis. ERFE is produced by erythroblasts in response to erythropoietin. ERFE-deficient mice fail to suppress hepcidin rapidly after hemorrhage and exhibit a delay in recovery from blood loss. ERFE expression is greatly increased in murine HbbTh3/+ thalassemia intermedia where it contributes to the suppression of hepcidin and systemic iron overload characteristic of this disease. PMID:24880340

  12. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many type