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Sample records for irradiated babesia bovis

  1. Optimizacion of Babesia bovis transfection methods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The tick borne Babesia parasites remain an important limitation for development of cattle industries worldwide. A stable transfection of Babesia bovis will be useful for functional analysis of the recently sequenced B. bovis genome and to design improved methods to control Babesia infections. In thi...

  2. Molecular detection and identification of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina in cattle in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shinuo; Aboge, Gabriel Oluga; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Yu, Longzheng; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Luo, Yuzi; Li, Yan; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Yamagishi, Junya; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Igarashi, Ikuo; Maeda, Ryuichiro; Inpankaew, Tawin; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Xuan, Xuenan

    2012-09-01

    Although Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina infections cause economic losses in the cattle industry in northern Thailand, there is inadequate information on Babesia isolates present in the area. Therefore, to determine the prevalence and genetic relationship between Babesia isolates, we screened 200 blood samples of cattle from Chiang Rai, Chiang Mai, and Lumpang provinces of northern Thailand. A nested polymerase chain reaction using primers targeting B. bovis spherical body protein 2 (BboSBP2) and B. bigemina rhoptry-associated protein 1a (BbiRAP-1a) genes revealed a prevalence of 12 and 21 % for B. bovis and B. bigemina, respectively, while that of mixed infections was 6.5 % samples. The prevalences of B. bovis in Chiang Rai, Chiang Mai, and Lumpang were 9.5, 3.7, and 25.5 %, respectively. For B. bigemina, the prevalences were 15.8, 12.9, and 39.2 % in Chiang Rai, Chiang Mai, and Lumpang, respectively. Mixed infections with B. bovis and B. bigemina were 6.3 % in Chiang Rai, 1.9 % in Chiang Mai, and 13.7 % in Lumpang. The identical sequences of either BboSBP2 gene or BbiRAP-1a gene were shared among the Babesia isolates in the three provinces of northern Thailand. Further analysis using the internal transcribed spacer gene revealed at least four genotypes for B. bovis and five genotypes for B. bigemina in northern Thailand, while the sequences present great genetic diversities in the different isolates. Overall, we have demonstrated a high prevalence and polymorphism of Babesia parasites in northern Thailand calling for the need to design effective control programs for bovine babesiosis.

  3. [Molecular characterization of Babesia bovis msa-2c gene].

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Ahmet; İnci, Abdullah; Düzlü, Önder; Bişkin, Zuhal; Yıldırım, Alparslan

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the molecular characterization of msa-2c gene of one Babesia bovis isolate from cattle in the Aegean Region and to compare identities with similar isolates from the World and Turkey. Between 2008-2010 blood samples were collected from a total of 235 cattle localized in 9 provinces of the Marmara and Aegean Regions. Smears were prepared, genomic DNA's were extracted from the blood samples and investigated for Babesia species by RLB. PCR was performed on one sample determined as B. bovis, the obtained amplicon was purified, sequenced and deposited to GenBank. Identities with similar isolates from Turkey and the World were investigated. Bovine babesiosis was not determined in the microscopic examination. According to the RLB results there was no B. bovis positivity in cattle from the Marmara Region, while only one B. bovis positivity was detected in cattle from the Aegean Region. The molecular prevalence of B. bovis was determined as 0.42% in the total of the examined 235 cattle. The sequenced B. bovis isolate shared 91-92% and 89-96% identities with the isolates from Turkey and the World, respectively. Molecular characterization of msa-2c gene region of B. bovis detected from cattle in the Aegean Region was carried out in this study.

  4. Babesia bovis infection in cattle in the southwestern Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luciana G; Rocha, Rodrigo B; Barbieri, Fábio da S; Ribeiro, Elisana S; Vendrami, Fabiano B; Souza, Gislaine C R; Giglioti, Rodrigo; Regitano, Luciana C A; Falcoski, Thaís O R S; Tizioto, Polyana C; Oliveira, Márcia C S

    2013-02-01

    The present study provides the first epidemiological data on infection with Babesia bovis in cattle raised in the southwestern Brazilian Amazon. Blood clot samples were filtered through nylon cloth before being submitted to DNA extraction. PCR and nested-PCR were applied to assess the frequency of infection with B. bovis in calves with ages from 4 to 12 months bred in 4 microregions each in the states of Rondônia and Acre. After the DNA was extracted from the samples, the infection in cattle was investigated by amplification of the "rap1" gene from B. bovis. The DNA amplification results revealed a frequency of infection with B. bovis of 95.1% (272/286) in the samples from Rondônia and 96.1% (195/203) in those from Acre. The high frequency of B. bovis infection in the animals with ages from 4 to 12 months indicates a situation of enzootic stability in the regions studied. The infection rates are comparable to those detected by immunodiagnostic techniques in other endemic regions of Brazil. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Targeted surface expression of an exogenous antigen in stably transfected babesia bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Babesia bovis is a tick-borne intraerythocytic protozoan responsible for acute disease in cattle which can be controlled by vaccination with attenuated B. bovis strains. Emerging B. bovis transfection technologies may increase the usefulness of these live vaccines. Here we propose using transfected ...

  6. An impedance spectroscopy method for the detection and evaluation of Babesia bovis antibodies in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An immunosensor method for diagnosis of Babesia bovis in cattle based on impedance measurement is presented in this study. The method probes the interaction between serum antibodies against B. bovis infected cattle and recombinant protein, RAP-1, with C-terminal obtained from a Portuguese B. bovis s...

  7. Molecular Characterization of Babesia bovis M17 Leucine Aminopeptidase and Inhibition of Babesia Growth by Bestatin.

    PubMed

    Aboge, Gabriel Oluga; Cao, Shinuo; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Masatani, Tatsunori; Goo, Younkyoung; AbouLaila, Mahmoud; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Igarashi, Ikuo; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Xuan, Xuenan

    2015-10-01

    The M17 leucine aminopeptidase (M17LAP) enzymes of the other apicomplexan parasites have been characterized and shown to be inhibited by bestatin. Though Babesia bovis also belongs to the apicomplexan group, it is not known whether its M17LAP could display similar biochemical properties as well as inhibition profile. To unravel this uncertainty, a B. bovis M17LAP (BbM17LAP) gene was expressed in Escherichia coli , and activity of the recombinant enzyme as well as its inhibition by bestatin were evaluated. The inhibitory effect of the compound on growths of B. bovis and Babesia gibsoni in vitro was also determined. The expression of the gene fused with glutathione S-transferase (GST) yielded approximately 81-kDa recombinant BbM17LAP (rBbM17LAP). On probing with mouse anti-rBbM17LAP serum, a green fluorescence was observed on the parasite cytosol on confocal laser microscopy, and a specific band greater than the predicted molecular mass was seen on Western blotting. The Km and Vmax values of the recombinant enzyme were 139.3 ± 30.25 and 64.83 ± 4.6 μM, respectively, while the Ki was 2210 ± 358 μM after the inhibition. Bestatin was a more potent inhibitor of the growth of B. bovis [IC50 (50% inhibition concentration) = 131.7 ± 51.43 μM] than B. gibsoni [IC50 = 460.8 ± 114.45 μM] in vitro. The modest inhibition of both the rBbM17LAP activity and Babesia parasites' growth in vitro suggests that this inhibition may involve the endogenous enzyme in live parasites. Therefore, BbM17LAP may be a target of bestatin, though more studies with other aminopeptidase inhibitors are required to confirm this.

  8. Inhibitory effect of cyclophilin A from the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis on the growth of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hiroki; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Kusakisako, Kodai; Galay, Remil Linggatong; Aung, Kyaw Min; Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; Mochizuki, Masami; Fujisaki, Kozo; Tanaka, Tetsuya

    2013-06-01

    Haemaphysalis longicornis is known as one of the most important ticks transmitting Babesia parasites in East Asian countries, including Babesia ovata and Babesia gibsoni, as well as Theileria parasites. H. longicornis is not the natural vector of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina. Vector ticks and transmitted parasites are thought to have established unique host-parasite interaction for their survival, meaning that vector ticks may have defensive molecules for the growth control of parasites in their bodies. However, the precise adaptation mechanism of tick-Babesia parasites is still unknown. Recently, cyclophilin A (CyPA) was reported to be important for the development of Babesia parasites in ticks. To reveal a part of their adaptation mechanism, the current study was conducted. An injection of B. bovis-infected RBCs into adult female H. longicornis ticks was found to upregulate the expression profiles of the gene and protein of CyPA in H. longicornis (HlCyPA). In addition, recombinant HlCyPA (rHlCyPA) purified from Escherichia coli exhibited significant inhibitory growth effects on B. bovis and B. bigemina cultivated in vitro, without any hemolytic effect on bovine RBCs at all concentrations used. In conclusion, our results suggest that HlCyPA might play an important role in the growth regulation of Babesia parasites in H. longicornis ticks, during natural acquisition from an infected host. Furthermore, rHlCyPA may be a potential alternative chemotherapeutic agent against babesiosis.

  9. Tick Passage Results in Enhanced Attenuation of Babesia bovis

    PubMed Central

    McElwain, Terry F.; Ueti, Massaro W.; Scoles, Glen A.; Reif, Kathryn E.; Lau, Audrey O. T.

    2014-01-01

    Serial blood passage of virulent Babesia bovis in splenectomized cattle results in attenuated derivatives that do not cause neurologic disease. Tick transmissibility can be lost with attenuation, but when retained, attenuated B. bovis can revert to virulence following tick passage. This study provides data showing that tick passage of the partially attenuated B. bovis T2Bo derivative strain further decreased virulence compared with intravenous inoculation of the same strain in infected animals. Ticks that acquired virulent or attenuated parasites by feeding on infected cattle were transmission fed on naive, splenectomized animals. While there was no significant difference between groups in the number of parasites in the midgut, hemolymph, or eggs of replete female ticks after acquisition feeding, animals infected with the attenuated parasites after tick transmission showed no clinical signs of babesiosis, unlike those receiving intravenous challenge with the same attenuated strain prior to tick passage. Additionally, there were significantly fewer parasites in blood and tissues of animals infected with tick-passaged attenuated parasites. Sequencing analysis of select B. bovis genes before and after tick passage showed significant differences in parasite genotypes in both peripheral blood and cerebral samples. These results provide evidence that not only is tick transmissibility retained by the attenuated T2Bo strain, but also it results in enhanced attenuation and is accompanied by expansion of parasite subpopulations during tick passage that may be associated with the change in disease phenotype. PMID:25114111

  10. Tick passage results in enhanced attenuation of Babesia bovis.

    PubMed

    Sondgeroth, Kerry S; McElwain, Terry F; Ueti, Massaro W; Scoles, Glen A; Reif, Kathryn E; Lau, Audrey O T

    2014-10-01

    Serial blood passage of virulent Babesia bovis in splenectomized cattle results in attenuated derivatives that do not cause neurologic disease. Tick transmissibility can be lost with attenuation, but when retained, attenuated B. bovis can revert to virulence following tick passage. This study provides data showing that tick passage of the partially attenuated B. bovis T2Bo derivative strain further decreased virulence compared with intravenous inoculation of the same strain in infected animals. Ticks that acquired virulent or attenuated parasites by feeding on infected cattle were transmission fed on naive, splenectomized animals. While there was no significant difference between groups in the number of parasites in the midgut, hemolymph, or eggs of replete female ticks after acquisition feeding, animals infected with the attenuated parasites after tick transmission showed no clinical signs of babesiosis, unlike those receiving intravenous challenge with the same attenuated strain prior to tick passage. Additionally, there were significantly fewer parasites in blood and tissues of animals infected with tick-passaged attenuated parasites. Sequencing analysis of select B. bovis genes before and after tick passage showed significant differences in parasite genotypes in both peripheral blood and cerebral samples. These results provide evidence that not only is tick transmissibility retained by the attenuated T2Bo strain, but also it results in enhanced attenuation and is accompanied by expansion of parasite subpopulations during tick passage that may be associated with the change in disease phenotype. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Expression of 6-Cys gene superfamily defines babesia bovis sexual stage development within rhipicephalus microplus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Babesia bovis, an intra-erythrocytic tick-borne apicomplexan protozoan, is one of the agents of bovine babesiosis. Its life cycle includes sexual reproduction within cattle fever ticks, Rhipicephalus spp. Six B. bovis 6-Cys gene superfamily members were previously identified (A, B, C, D, E, F) and t...

  12. Population genetic analysis and sub-structuring in Babesia bovis.

    PubMed

    Simuunza, Martin; Bilgic, Huseyin; Karagenc, Tulin; Syakalima, Michelo; Shiels, Brian; Tait, Andy; Weir, William

    2011-06-01

    The tick-borne protozoan parasite, Babesia bovis is one of the causes of bovine babesiosis, an economically important disease of cattle in tropical and sub-tropical countries. Using the recently published genome sequence of the parasite, we developed a panel of eight mini- and micro-satellite markers and used these to investigate the role of genetic exchange in the population structure and diversity of the parasite using isolates from Zambia and Turkey. This population genetic analysis showed that genetic exchange occurs and that there are high levels of genetic diversity, with geographical sub-structuring quantified using Wright's F Index. Linkage disequilibrium was observed when isolates from both countries were treated as one population, but when isolates from Zambia were analysed separately linkage equilibrium was observed. The Turkish isolates were sub-structured, containing two genetically distinct sub-groups, both of which appeared to be in linkage equilibrium. The results of the Zambian study suggest that a sub-set of the parasite population is responsible for the westward spread of babesiosis into the previously disease-free central region of the country. The Zambian isolates had a significantly higher number of genotypes per sample than those from Turkey and age was found to be a significant predictor of the multiplicity of infection. The high levels of diversity seen in the Zambian and Turkish B. bovis populations have implications in the development of subunit vaccines against the disease and the spread of drug resistance.

  13. Development of a tandem repeat-based multilocus typing system distinguishing Babesia bovis geographic isolates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mini and microsatellite sequences have proven to be excellent tools for the differentiation of strains and populations in several protozoan parasites due to their high variability. In the present work we have searched the genome of the tick-transmitted bovine hemoprotozoon Babesia bovis for tandem r...

  14. A virulent babesia bovis strain failed to infect white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wildlife are an important component in the vector-host-pathogen triangle of livestock diseases, as they maintain biological vectors that transmit pathogens and can serve as reservoirs for such infectious pathogens. Babesia bovis is a tick-borne pathogen, vectored by cattle fever ticks, Rhipicephalus...

  15. Analysis of Babesia bovis-induced gene expression changes in the cattle tick, Rhipcephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Boophilus ticks are vectors of Babesia bovis, the protozoan causative agent of cattle fever, a disease which is responsible for significant production losses to cattle producers in much of Africa, Central and South America and Australia. We utilized subtractive cDNA library synthesis techniques to o...

  16. Geno- and phenotypic characteristics of a transfected babesia bovis 6-Cys-E knockout clonal line

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Babesia bovis is an intra-erythrocytic tick transmitted apicomplexan protozoan parasite. It has a complex life style including asexual replication in the mammalian host and sexual replication occurring in the midgut of host tick vector, typically, Rhipicephalus microplus. Previous evidence showed th...

  17. Babesia bovis expresses a neutralization-sensitive antigen that contains a microneme adhesive repeat (MAR) domain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A gene coding for a protein with sequence similarity to the Toxoplasma gondii micronemal 1 (MIC1) protein that contains a copy of a domain described as a sialic acid-binding micronemal adhesive repeat was identified in the Babesia bovis genome. The single copy gene, located in chromosome 3, contains...

  18. The glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein repertoire of babesia bovis and its significance for erythrocyte invasion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glycosylphosphatidyl-anchored proteins are particularly abundant on the surface of pathogenic protozoans and might play an important role for parasite survival. In the present work the relevance of GPI-anchored proteins for erythrocyte invasion of Babesia bovis, one of the tick-transmitted causative...

  19. Transfected babesia bovis expressing a tick GST as a live vector vaccine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Rhipicephalus microplus tick is a notorious blood-feeding ectoparasite of livestock, especially cattle, responsible for massive losses in animal production. It is the main vector for transmission of pathogenic bacteria and parasites, including Babesia bovis, an intraerythrocytic apicomplexan pro...

  20. Genome Sequence of Babesia bovis and Camparative Analysis of Apicomplexan Hemoprotozoa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Babesia bovis is an apicomplexan tick-transmitted pathogen of cattle imposing a global risk and severe constraints to livestock health and economic development. The complete genome sequence was undertaken to facilitate vaccine antigen discovery, and to allow for comparative analysis with the related...

  1. Molecular and serological prevalence of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina in water buffaloes in the north region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jenevaldo Barbosa; André, Marcos Rogério; da Fonseca, Adivaldo Henrique; de Albuquerque Lopes, Cinthia Távora; da Silva Lima, Danillo Henrique; de Andrade, Stefano Juliano Tavares; Oliveira, Carlos Magno Chaves; Barbosa, José Diomedes

    2013-11-08

    Bovine babesiosis is a tick-borne disease caused mainly by Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina, which are associated to considerable economic losses in cattle herds worldwide. Approximately 60% of buffalo herds in South America are located in Northern Brazil. Little is known about the impact of babesiosis on buffalo herds in Brazil. The present work aimed to verify the occurrence of B. bovis and B. bigemina in 542 water buffaloes in the state of Pará, Northern Brazil, using molecular and serological techniques. The percentage of seropositive animals for B. bovis and B. bigemina was 41.2% and 19.0%, respectively, by ELISA. B. bovis and B. bigemina DNA were detected in 15 and 16% of sampled buffaloes, respectively. A high correlation (Kappa index of 0.9) between serological and molecular tests suggests that the combination of the utilized techniques in the present study is suitable for babesiosis diagnosis in an endemic unstable area. Significantly difference of positivity for serological and molecular assays was verified to localities and reproductive status of sampled animals, but not between buffalo breeds. The immune status of sampled buffaloes associated to the circulation of babesiosis agents in sampled population suggests that the studied area is at risk to clinical babesiosis outbreaks. Furthermore, this study demonstrated that this region can be classified as endemically unstable. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular and serological prevalence of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina in water buffaloes in the northeast region of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Huyen, Nguyen Xuan; Shinuo, Cao; Inpankaew, Tawin; Maklon, Khuanwalai; Aboulaila, Mahmoud; Ueno, Akio; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Xuan, Xuenan; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2011-06-10

    Bovine babesiosis is a tick-transmitted hemoprotozoan disease that is mainly caused by Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina and is characterized by significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. The disease is widespread in the northeastern region of Thailand, where an increasingly large part of the livestock is composed of water buffaloes. The present study was therefore conducted to investigate the epidemiological distribution of B. bovis and B. bigemina in water buffaloes in the northeastern region of Thailand. A total of 305 buffalo blood samples were randomly collected from five provinces and simultaneously analyzed by the nested PCR (nPCR) assay, ELISA, and IFAT techniques. The overall prevalence of B. bovis and B. bigemina was 11.2% and 3.6% by nPCR, 14.7% and 5.9% by ELISA, and 16.8% and 5.6% by IFAT, respectively. The high concordance between the molecular and the serological detection tests revealed the specificity and sensitivity of the diagnostic assays used for the detection of infection as well as the endemic stability status of the parasites in the surveyed areas. Statistically significant differences in the prevalence of the two infections were observed on the basis of age and location but not gender. Our data provide valuable information regarding the epidemiology of B. bovis and B. bigemina infection in water buffaloes in the northeastern region of Thailand which will likely be very beneficial for management and control programs of this disease.

  3. Epizootiology of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina in free-ranging white-tailed deer in northeastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cantu-C, Antonio; Ortega-S, J Alfonso; García-Vázquez, Zeferino; Mosqueda, Juan; Henke, Scott E; George, John E

    2009-06-01

    Species of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) ticks are the vectors of babesiosis (cattle fever tick), which are distributed worldwide. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are important secondary hosts for the cattle fever ticks, Rhipicephalus (B.) annulatus and Rhipicephalus (B.) microplus. White-tailed deer are capable of sustaining Boophilus spp. tick populations in the presence or absence of cattle. The objectives of this study were to determine the frequency of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina and the prevalence of antibodies to them and identify possible risk factors for bovine babesiosis in white-tailed deer in 3 northeastern states of México. Whole blood and serum samples (n = 457) were collected from white-tailed deer in the states of Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas during the spring of 2004. Samples were tested for B. bovis and B. bigemina by nested polymerase chain reaction (n-PCR) (the primers for B. bovis identified the gene Rap-1 and B. bigemina were specific primers) and by an indirect immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT). A questionnaire was given to each ranch to obtain information about management practices. Logistic regression methods were used to test the association between management factors and the dependent variable of positive n-PCR or IFAT. Nineteen (4.2%) samples were positive to B. bigemina and 6 (1.7%) were positive to B. bovis by n-PCR. Serological testing showed 59.9% (n = 274) of deer sampled were positive to B. bovis and 5.4% (n = 25) were positive to B. bigemina antibodies. The logistic model varied with different dependent variables. With positive n-PCR and B. bigemina as the dependent variable, 3 factors were associated: habitat (presence of brush and exotic grasses; odds ratio (OR), 3.3; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.3-8.5), grazing system (continuous grazing OR 4.0; CI, 1.3-12.2), and tick treatment frequency (3-4 mo; OR 7.0, CI 1.4-34.3; 5-6 mo; OR, 11.0; CI, 1.9-62.7; > 6 mo; OR, 4.6; CI, 0.9-23.3). These findings

  4. A Babesia bovis gene syntenic to Theileria parva p67 is expressed in blood and tick stage parasites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Completion of the Babesia bovis (T2Bo strain) genome provides detailed data concerning the predicted proteome of this parasite, and allows for a bioinformatics approach to gene discovery. Comparative genomics of the hemoprotozoan parasites B. bovis and Theileria parva revealed a highly conserved syn...

  5. Molecular and serologic evidence for Babesia bovis-like parasites in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in south Texas.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Christina M; Cooper, Susan M; Holman, Patricia J

    2010-09-20

    The current study was undertaken to determine if white-tailed deer in south Texas harbor Babesia bovis, a causative agent of bovine babesiosis. Blood samples from free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) on two ranches in LaSalle and Webb Counties were screened for B. bovis and other hemoparasites by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect the piroplasm 18S rDNA. Serology was conducted on selected samples to detect antibody activity to B. bovis by the immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT). PCR revealed that 16% of the LaSalle County samples and 4% of the Webb County samples were positive for B. bovis. Five of the LaSalle County and the two Webb County B. bovis 18S rDNA amplicons were cloned and sequenced. The resulting clones shared 99% identity to B. bovis 18S rRNA gene sequences derived from cattle isolates. Weak seroreactivity to B. bovis was shown by the IFAT. The samples were also screened for additional hemoparasites of deer including Theileria cervi, Babesia odocoilei and other Babesia spp. A genotypically unique Theileria sp. was found, along with T. cervi and B. odocoilei. The finding of putative B. bovis in white-tailed deer necessitates further study to determine if deer may act as a transient host or even a reservoir of infection for B. bovis pathogenic to cattle.

  6. Calcium ions are involved in egress of Babesia bovis merozoites from bovine erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    MOSSAAD, Ehab; ASADA, Masahito; NAKATANI, Daichi; INOUE, Noboru; YOKOYAMA, Naoaki; KANEKO, Osamu; KAWAZU, Shin-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Bovine babesiosis is a livestock disease known to cause economic losses in endemic areas. The apicomplexan parasite Babesia bovis is able to invade and destroy the host’s erythrocytes leading to the serious pathologies of the disease, such as anemia and hemoglobinuria. Understanding the egress mechanisms of this parasite is therefore a key step to develop new therapeutic strategies. In this study, the possible involvement of Ca2+ in the egress of B. bovis merozoites from infected erythrocytes was investigated. Egress was artificially induced in vitro using calcium ionophore A23187 and thapsigargin to increase Ca2+ concentration in the cytosol of the parasite cells. The increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration following these treatments was confirmed using live cell Ca2+ imaging with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Based on our findings, we suggest a Ca2+ signalling pathway in the egress of B. bovis merozoites. PMID:25298241

  7. Babesia bovis expresses Bbo-6cys-E, a member of a novel gene family that is homologous to the 6-cys family of Plasmodium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A novel Babesia bovis gene family encoding proteins with similarities to the Plasmodium 6cys protein family was identified by TBLASTN searches of the Babesia bovis genome using the sequence of the P. falciparum PFS230 protein as query, and was termed Bbo-6cys gene family. The Bbo-cys6 gene family co...

  8. Development of a tandem repeat-based multilocus typing system distinguishing Babesia bovis geographic isolates.

    PubMed

    Perez-Llaneza, Agustina; Caballero, Marina; Baravalle, Eugenia; Mesplet, Maria; Mosqueda, Juan; Suarez, Carlos E; Echaide, Ignacio; Katzer, Frank; Pacheco, Gabriela M; Florin-Christensen, Monica; Schnittger, Leonhard

    2010-02-10

    Mini- and microsatellite sequences have proven to be excellent tools for the differentiation of strains and populations in several protozoan parasites due to their high variability. In the present work we have searched the genome of the tick-transmitted bovine hemoprotozoon Babesia bovis for tandem repeats (TRs) that could be useful for a multilocus typing system. Hundred and nineteen sequences were shortlisted and tested in five common B. bovis reference isolates originating from distinct geographic locations of North and South America: Texas, USA (T2Bo), Mexico (RAD and Mo7), and Santa Fe and Salta, Argentina (R1A and S2P, respectively). Satellite sequences were PCR-amplified using specific primers, separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, visualized by silver staining and sized. Fourteen TR sequences could be reliably amplified in all isolates and displayed length polymorphism. All primers used were specific for B. bovis and did not amplify genomic DNA from the bovine host or from Babesia bigemina, the principal co-infecting bovine parasite in the Americas, allowing their future use in field surveys. The 14 satellite markers identified are distributed throughout the four chromosomes of B. bovis as follows: chromosome 1 (n=3), chromosome 2 (n=2), chromosome 3 (n=5), and chromosome 4 (n=4). Within the five B. bovis isolates we identified nine satellite marker loci with two alleles, three with three alleles, one with four and another with five alleles. In comparison to Theileria parva, a bovine hemoprotozoan that pertains to the same piroplasmida order and own a genome of similar size, the number of polymorphic TRs and the average number of alleles per TR locus seem to be significantly reduced in the B. bovis genome. Furthermore, the ratio of micro- to minisatellites in both B. bovis and T. parva is considerably lower than in other eukaryotes, as confirmed by bioinformatic analysis. The multilocus genotype of the five B. bovis isolates was assessed and the

  9. Molecular and biochemical characterization of methionine aminopeptidase of Babesia bovis as a potent drug target.

    PubMed

    Munkhjargal, Tserendorj; Ishizaki, Takahiro; Guswanto, Azirwan; Takemae, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2016-05-15

    Aminopeptidases are increasingly being investigated as therapeutic targets in various diseases. In this study, we cloned, expressed, and biochemically characterized a member of the methionine aminopeptidase (MAP) family from Babesia bovis (B. bovis) to develop a potential molecular drug target. Recombinant B. bovis MAP (rBvMAP) was expressed in Escherichia coli (E. coli) as a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fusion protein, and we found that it was antigenic. An antiserum against the rBvMAP protein was generated in mice, and then a native B. bovis MAP was identified in B. bovis by Western blot assay. Further, an immunolocalization assay showed that MAP is present in the cytoplasm of the B. bovis merozoite. Analysis of the biochemical properties of rBvMAP revealed that it was enzymatically active, with optimum activity at pH 7.5. Enhanced enzymatic activity was observed in the presence of divalent manganese cations and was effectively inhibited by a metal chelator, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Moreover, the enzymatic activity of BvMAP was inhibited by amastatin and bestatin as inhibitors of MAP (MAPi) in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, MAPi was also found to significantly inhibit the growth of Babesia parasites both in vitro and in vivo; additionally, they induced high levels of cytokines and immunoglobulin (IgG) titers in the host. Therefore, our results suggest that BvMAP is a molecular target of amastatin and bestatin, and those inhibitors may be drug candidates for the treatment of babesiosis, though more studies are required to confirm this.

  10. Molecular and serological detection of Babesia bovis- and Babesiabigemina-infection in bovines and water buffaloes raised jointly in anendemic field

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    tBabesia bovis and Babesia bigemina are causative agents of bovine babesiosis, a tick-borne disease of cattlein tropical and subtropical regions. Babesia spp. infection adversely affects cattle health and can be fatalresulting in considerable economic loss worldwide. Under endemic stability conditio...

  11. A Virulent Babesia bovis Strain Failed to Infect White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Ueti, Massaro W; Olafson, Pia U; Freeman, Jeanne M; Johnson, Wendell C; Scoles, Glen A

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife are an important component in the vector-host-pathogen triangle of livestock diseases, as they maintain biological vectors that transmit pathogens and can serve as reservoirs for such infectious pathogens. Babesia bovis is a tick-borne pathogen, vectored by cattle fever ticks, Rhipicephalus spp., that can cause up to 90% mortality in naive adult cattle. While cattle are the primary host for cattle fever ticks, wild and exotic ungulates, including white-tailed deer (WTD), are known to be viable alternative hosts. The presence of cattle fever tick populations resistant to acaricides raises concerns regarding the possibility of these alternative hosts introducing tick-borne babesial parasites into areas free of infection. Understanding the B. bovis reservoir competence of these alternative hosts is critical to mitigating the risk of introduction. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that WTD are susceptible to infection with a B. bovis strain lethal to cattle. Two groups of deer were inoculated intravenously with either B. bovis blood stabilate or a larval extract supernatant containing sporozoites from infected R. microplus larvae. The collective data demonstrated that WTD are neither a transient host nor reservoir of B. bovis. This conclusion is supported by the failure of B. bovis to establish an infection in deer regardless of inoculum. Although specific antibody was detected for a short period in the WTD, the PCR results were consistently negative at multiple time points throughout the experiment and blood from WTD that had been exposed to parasite, transferred into naïve recipient susceptible calves, failed to establish infection. In contrast, naïve steers inoculated intravenously with either B. bovis blood stabilate or the larval extract supernatant containing sporozoites rapidly succumbed to disease. These findings provide evidence that WTD are not an epidemiological component in the maintenance of B. bovis infectivity to livestock.

  12. First survey for Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina infection in cattle from Central and Southern regions of Portugal using serological and DNA detection methods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Incidence of bovine babesiosis in Portugal is currently unknown. In this study, a first survey of Babesia bovis and B. bigemina infection in cattle was carried out using blood samples from 406 clinically healthy individuals from different districts from Central and Southern regions of Portugal and a...

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of Mexican Babesia bovis isolates using msa and ssrRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Genis, Alma D; Mosqueda, Juan J; Borgonio, Verónica M; Falcón, Alfonso; Alvarez, Antonio; Camacho, Minerva; de Lourdes Muñoz, Maria; Figueroa, Julio V

    2008-12-01

    Variable merozoite surface antigens of Babesia bovis are exposed glycoproteins having a role in erythrocyte invasion. Members of this gene family include msa-1 and msa-2 (msa-2c, msa-2a(1), msa-2a(2), and msa-2b). Small subunit ribosomal (ssr)RNA gene is subject to evolutive pressure and has been used in phylogenetic studies. To determine the phylogenetic relationship among B. bovis Mexican isolates using different genetic markers, PCR amplicons, corresponding to msa-1, msa-2c, msa-2b, and ssrRNA genes, were cloned and plasmids carrying the corresponding inserts were sequenced. Comparative analysis of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences revealed distinct degrees of variability and identity among the coding gene sequences obtained from 12 geographically different B. bovis isolates and a reference strain. Overall sequence identities of 47.7%, 72.3%, 87.7%, and 94% were determined for msa-1, msa-2b, msa-2c, and ssrRNA, respectively. A robust phylogenetic tree was obtained with msa-2b sequences. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that Mexican B. bovis isolates group in clades not concordant with the Mexican geography. However, the Mexican isolates group together in an American clade separated from the Australian clade. Sequence heterogeneity in msa-1, msa-2b, and msa-2c coding regions of Mexican B. bovis isolates present in different geographical regions can be a result of either differential evolutive pressure or cattle movement from commercial trade.

  14. Inhibitor-bound complexes of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase from Babesia bovis

    PubMed Central

    Begley, Darren W.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Raymond, Amy C.; Smith, Eric R.; Hartley, Robert C.; Abendroth, Jan; Sankaran, Banumathi; Lorimer, Donald D.; Myler, Peter J.; Staker, Bart L.; Stewart, Lance J.

    2011-01-01

    Babesiosis is a tick-borne disease caused by eukaryotic Babesia parasites which are morphologically similar to Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of malaria in humans. Like Plasmodium, different species of Babesia are tuned to infect different mammalian hosts, including rats, dogs, horses and cattle. Most species of Plasmodium and Babesia possess an essential bifunctional enzyme for nucleotide synthesis and folate metabolism: dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase. Although thymidylate synthase is highly conserved across organisms, the bifunctional form of this enzyme is relatively uncommon in nature. The structural characterization of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase in Babesia bovis, the causative agent of babesiosis in livestock cattle, is reported here. The apo state is compared with structures that contain dUMP, NADP and two different antifolate inhibitors: pemetrexed and raltitrexed. The complexes reveal modes of binding similar to that seen in drug-resistant malaria strains and point to the utility of applying structural studies with proven cancer chemotherapies towards infectious disease research. PMID:21904052

  15. Gliding Motility of Babesia bovis Merozoites Visualized by Time-Lapse Video Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Asada, Masahito; Goto, Yasuyuki; Yahata, Kazuhide; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Kawai, Satoru; Inoue, Noboru; Kaneko, Osamu; Kawazu, Shin-ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Background Babesia bovis is an apicomplexan intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite that induces babesiosis in cattle after transmission by ticks. During specific stages of the apicomplexan parasite lifecycle, such as the sporozoites of Plasmodium falciparum and tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii, host cells are targeted for invasion using a unique, active process termed “gliding motility”. However, it is not thoroughly understood how the merozoites of B. bovis target and invade host red blood cells (RBCs), and gliding motility has so far not been observed in the parasite. Methodology/Principal Findings Gliding motility of B. bovis merozoites was revealed by time-lapse video microscopy. The recorded images revealed that the process included egress of the merozoites from the infected RBC, gliding motility, and subsequent invasion into new RBCs. The gliding motility of B. bovis merozoites was similar to the helical gliding of Toxoplasma tachyzoites. The trails left by the merozoites were detected by indirect immunofluorescence assay using antiserum against B. bovis merozoite surface antigen 1. Inhibition of gliding motility by actin filament polymerization or depolymerization indicated that the gliding motility was driven by actomyosin dependent process. In addition, we revealed the timing of breakdown of the parasitophorous vacuole. Time-lapse image analysis of membrane-stained bovine RBCs showed formation and breakdown of the parasitophorous vacuole within ten minutes of invasion. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report of the gliding motility of B. bovis. Since merozoites of Plasmodium parasites do not glide on a substrate, the gliding motility of B. bovis merozoites is a notable finding. PMID:22506073

  16. Geno- and phenotypic characteristics of a transfected Babesia bovis 6-Cys-E knockout clonal line.

    PubMed

    Alzan, Heba F; Silva, Marta G; Davis, William C; Herndon, David R; Schneider, David A; Suarez, Carlos E

    2017-05-02

    Babesia bovis is an intra-erythrocytic tick-transmitted apicomplexan protozoan parasite. It has a complex lifestyle including asexual replication in the mammalian host and sexual replication occurring in the midgut of host tick vector, typically, Rhipicephalus microplus. Previous evidence showed that certain B. bovis genes, including members of 6-Cys gene family, are differentially expressed during tick and mammalian stages of the parasite's life cycle. Moreover, the 6-Cys E gene is differentially expressed in the T3Bo strain of B. bovis tick stages, and anti 6-Cys E antibodies were shown to be able to inhibit in vitro growth of the phenotypically distinct B. bovis Mo7clonal line. In this study, the 6-Cys E gene of B. bovis T3Bo strain was disrupted by transfection using a plasmid containing 6-Cys gene E 5' and 3' regions to guide homologous recombination, and the egfp-bsd fusion gene under control of a ef-1α promoter, yielding a B. bovis clonal line designated 6-Cys EKO-cln. Full genome sequencing of 6-Cys EKO-cln parasites was performed and in vitro inhibition assays using anti 6-Cys E antibodies. Full genome sequencing of 6-Cys EKO-cln B. bovis demonstrated single insertion of egfp-bsd gene that disrupts the integrity of 6-Cys gene E. Undistinguishable growth rate of 6-Cys EKO-cln line compared to wild-type 6-Cys E intact T3Bo B. bovis strain in in vitro cultures indicates that expression of gene 6-Cys E is not essential for blood stage replication in this strain. In vitro inhibition assays confirmed the ability of anti-6 Cys E antibodies to inhibit the growth of the wild-type Mo7 and T3Bo B. bovis parasites, but no significant inhibition was found for 6-Cys EKO-cln line parasites. Overall, the data suggest that the anti-6 Cys E antibody neutralising effect on the wild type strains is likely due to mechanical hindrance, or cross-reactivity, rather than due to functional requirements of 6-Cys gene E product for survival and development of the erythrocyte stages

  17. Transfected Babesia bovis Expressing a Tick GST as a Live Vector Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Oldiges, Daiane P.; Laughery, Jacob M.; Tagliari, Nelson Junior; Leite Filho, Ronaldo Viana; Davis, William C.; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Termignoni, Carlos; Knowles, Donald P.; Suarez, Carlos E.

    2016-01-01

    The Rhipicephalus microplus tick is a notorious blood-feeding ectoparasite of livestock, especially cattle, responsible for massive losses in animal production. It is the main vector for transmission of pathogenic bacteria and parasites, including Babesia bovis, an intraerythrocytic apicomplexan protozoan parasite responsible for bovine Babesiosis. This study describes the development and testing of a live B. bovis vaccine expressing the protective tick antigen glutathione-S-transferase from Haemaphysalis longicornis (HlGST). The B. bovis S74-T3B parasites were electroporated with a plasmid containing the bidirectional Ef-1α (elongation factor 1 alpha) promoter of B. bovis controlling expression of two independent genes, the selectable marker GFP-BSD (green fluorescent protein–blasticidin deaminase), and HlGST fused to the MSA-1 (merozoite surface antigen 1) signal peptide from B. bovis. Electroporation followed by blasticidin selection resulted in the emergence of a mixed B. bovis transfected line (termed HlGST) in in vitro cultures, containing parasites with distinct patterns of insertion of both exogenous genes, either in or outside the Ef-1α locus. A B. bovis clonal line termed HlGST-Cln expressing intracellular GFP and HlGST in the surface of merozoites was then derived from the mixed parasite line HlGST using a fluorescent activated cell sorter. Two independent calf immunization trials were performed via intravenous inoculation of the HlGST-Cln and a previously described control consisting of an irrelevant transfected clonal line of B. bovis designated GFP-Cln. The control GFP-Cln line contains a copy of the GFP-BSD gene inserted into the Ef-1α locus of B. bovis in an identical fashion as the HIGST-Cln parasites. All animals inoculated with the HlGST-Cln and GFP-Cln transfected parasites developed mild babesiosis. Tick egg fertility and fully engorged female tick weight was reduced significantly in R. microplus feeding on HlGST-Cln-immunized calves

  18. Monitoring Babesia bovis infections in cattle by using PCR-based tests.

    PubMed Central

    Calder, J A; Reddy, G R; Chieves, L; Courtney, C H; Littell, R; Livengood, J R; Norval, R A; Smith, C; Dame, J B

    1996-01-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of PCR tests based on the small-subunit rRNA gene sequence of Babesia bovis were compared in a blind study of experimentally infected cattle with the corresponding parameters of the complement fixation (CF) test currently used in the United States to screen for bovine babesiosis. Cattle were experimentally infected with a single inoculum of a cloned laboratory strain of B. bovis. Blood samples were collected and tested over a period covering from the day of infection to 10 months postinfection. The level of parasitemia (percent infected erythrocytes) present in each sample was estimated from test results and was plotted as a function of time postinfection. These data are the first describing the course of infection by methods capable of detecting parasitemias in the range of 10(-7)%, which frequently occur in the carrier state. Parasitemias in the samples tested strongly influenced the sensitivity and negative predictive value of the PCR-based tests which varied with time postinfection. The average sensitivities of the three PCR-based tests for B. bovis ranged from 58 to 70% for a single determination, while the sensitivity of the CF test was only 6%. Both PCR-based and CF tests for B. bovis had high specificity values ranging from 96 to 100%. PMID:8897177

  19. Genetic diversity and antigenicity variation of Babesia bovis merozoite surface antigen-1 (MSA-1) in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Takemae, Hitoshi; Simking, Pacharathon; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2016-07-01

    Babesia bovis, an intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite, causes severe clinical disease in cattle worldwide. The genetic diversity of parasite antigens often results in different immune profiles in infected animals, hindering efforts to develop immune control methodologies against the B. bovis infection. In this study, we analyzed the genetic diversity of the merozoite surface antigen-1 (msa-1) gene using 162 B. bovis-positive blood DNA samples sourced from cattle populations reared in different geographical regions of Thailand. The identity scores shared among 93 msa-1 gene sequences isolated by PCR amplification were 43.5-100%, and the similarity values among the translated amino acid sequences were 42.8-100%. Of 23 total clades detected in our phylogenetic analysis, Thai msa-1 gene sequences occurred in 18 clades; seven among them were composed of sequences exclusively from Thailand. To investigate differential antigenicity of isolated MSA-1 proteins, we expressed and purified eight recombinant MSA-1 (rMSA-1) proteins, including an rMSA-1 from B. bovis Texas (T2Bo) strain and seven rMSA-1 proteins based on the Thai msa-1 sequences. When these antigens were analyzed in a western blot assay, anti-T2Bo cattle serum strongly reacted with the rMSA-1 from T2Bo, as well as with three other rMSA-1 proteins that shared 54.9-68.4% sequence similarity with T2Bo MSA-1. In contrast, no or weak reactivity was observed for the remaining rMSA-1 proteins, which shared low sequence similarity (35.0-39.7%) with T2Bo MSA-1. While demonstrating the high genetic diversity of the B. bovis msa-1 gene in Thailand, the present findings suggest that the genetic diversity results in antigenicity variations among the MSA-1 antigens of B. bovis in Thailand.

  20. A novel neutralization sensitive and subdominant RAP-1-related antigen (RRA) is expressed by babesia bovis merozoites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective: The Babesia bovis genome encodes a rap-1 related gene denominated RAP-1 related antigen (RRA). In this study, we analyzed the pattern of expression, immunogenicity and functional relevance of RRA. Methods: Phylogenetic analysis was performed using the program Phylip. Expression of rra wa...

  1. Evaluation of the growth-inhibitory effect of trifluralin analogues on in vitro cultured babesia bovis parasites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Babesia bovis caused bovine babesiosis is a world tick borne hemoprotozoan disease leading to fever, anemia, weight losses and ultimately death. Several babesicidal drugs that have been in use in cattle for years have proven to be partially ineffective and the development of alternative highly speci...

  2. The Ovarian transcriptome of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, feeding upon a bovine host infected with Babesia bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Cattle babesiosis is a tick-borne disease of cattle with the most severe form of the disease caused by the apicomplexan, Babesia bovis. Babesiosis is transmitted to cattle through the bite of infected cattle ticks of the genus Rhipicephalus. The most prevalent species is Rhipicephalus (B...

  3. Expression and strain variation of the novel “Small Open Reading Frame” 3 (smorf) multigene family in Babesia bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Small open reading frame (smorf) genes comprise the second largest Babesia bovis multigene family. All known 44 variant smorf genes are located in close chromosomal proximity to ves1 genes, which encode proteins that mediate cytoadhesion and contribute to immune evasion. In this study, we characte...

  4. Molecular detection of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from Tom Green County in central Texas.

    PubMed

    Holman, Patricia J; Carroll, Juliette E; Pugh, Roberta; Davis, Donald S

    2011-05-11

    Serologic and molecular evidence suggest that white-tailed deer in South Texas and North Mexico carry the agents of bovine babesiosis, Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina. To determine if white-tailed deer in central Texas, which is outside the known occurrence of the vector tick at this time, harbor these parasites, blood samples from free-ranging and captive white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Tom Green County were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays for B. bovis and B. bigemina 18S rDNA. Of the 25 samples tested, three (12%) were positive by nested PCR for B. bovis. This identity was confirmed by sequence analysis of the cloned 18S rDNA PCR product. Further confirmation was made by sequence analysis of the rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1, 5.8S rRNA gene, and ITS 2 genomic region in two (representing samples from two different ranches) of the B. bovis positive samples. Three samples were positive by B. bigemina nested PCR, but sequencing of the cloned products confirmed only one animal positive for B. bigemina; Theileria spp. DNA was amplified from the other two animal samples. In addition to Theileria spp., two genotypically unique Babesia species sequences were identified among the cloned sequences produced by the B. bigemina primers in one sample. Phylogenetic analysis showed no separation of the deer B. bovis or B. bigemina 18S rDNA, or deer B. bovis ITS region sequences from those of bovine origin. Clarification of the possible role of white-tailed deer as reservoir hosts in maintaining these important pathogens of cattle is critical to understanding whether or not deer contribute to the epidemiology of bovine babesiosis. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Diversity of Babesia bovis merozoite surface antigen genes in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Ybanez, Adrian Patalinghug; Ybanez, Rochelle Haidee Daclan; Perez, Zandro Obligado; Guswanto, Azirwan; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2014-02-01

    Babesia bovis is the causative agent of fatal babesiosis in cattle. In the present study, we investigated the genetic diversity of B. bovis among Philippine cattle, based on the genes that encode merozoite surface antigens (MSAs). Forty-one B. bovis-positive blood DNA samples from cattle were used to amplify the msa-1, msa-2b, and msa-2c genes. In phylogenetic analyses, the msa-1, msa-2b, and msa-2c gene sequences generated from Philippine B. bovis-positive DNA samples were found in six, three, and four different clades, respectively. All of the msa-1 and most of the msa-2b sequences were found in clades that were formed only by Philippine msa sequences in the respective phylograms. While all the msa-1 sequences from the Philippines showed similarity to those formed by Australian msa-1 sequences, the msa-2b sequences showed similarity to either Australian or Mexican msa-2b sequences. In contrast, msa-2c sequences from the Philippines were distributed across all the clades of the phylogram, although one clade was formed exclusively by Philippine msa-2c sequences. Similarities among the deduced amino acid sequences of MSA-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c from the Philippines were 62.2-100, 73.1-100, and 67.3-100%, respectively. The present findings demonstrate that B. bovis populations are genetically diverse in the Philippines. This information will provide a good foundation for the future design and implementation of improved immunological preventive methodologies against bovine babesiosis in the Philippines. The study has also generated a set of data that will be useful for futher understanding of the global genetic diversity of this important parasite. © 2013.

  6. Using msa-2b as a molecular marker for genotyping Mexican isolates of Babesia bovis.

    PubMed

    Genis, Alma D; Perez, Jocelin; Mosqueda, Juan J; Alvarez, Antonio; Camacho, Minerva; Muñoz, Maria de Lourdes; Rojas, Carmen; Figueroa, Julio V

    2009-12-01

    Variable merozoite surface antigens of Babesia bovis are exposed glycoproteins having a role in erythrocyte invasion. Members of this gene family include msa-1 and msa-2 (msa-2c, msa-2a(1), msa-2a(2) and msa-2b). To determine the sequence variation among B. bovis Mexican isolates using msa-2b as a genetic marker, PCR amplicons corresponding to msa-2b were cloned and plasmids carrying the corresponding inserts were purified and sequenced. Comparative analysis of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences revealed distinct degrees of variability and identity among the coding gene sequences obtained from 16 geographically different Mexican B. bovis isolates and a reference strain. Clustal-W multiple alignments of the MSA-2b deduced amino acid sequences performed with the 17 B. bovis Mexican isolates, revealed the identification of three genotypes with a distinct set each of amino acid residues present at the variable region: Genotype I represented by the MO7 strain (in vitro culture-derived from the Mexico isolate) as well as RAD, Chiapas-1, Tabasco and Veracruz-3 isolates; Genotype II, represented by the Jalisco, Mexico and Veracruz-2 isolates; and Genotype III comprising the sequences from most of the isolates studied, Tamaulipas-1, Chiapas-2, Guerrero-1, Nayarit, Quintana Roo, Nuevo Leon, Tamaulipas-2, Yucatan and Guerrero-2. Moreover, these three genotypes could be discriminated against each other by using a PCR-RFLP approach. The results suggest that occurrence of indels within the variable region of msa-2b sequences can be useful markers for identifying a particular genotype present in field populations of B. bovis isolated from infected cattle in Mexico.

  7. Putrescine: Essential factor for in vitro proliferation of Babesia bovis.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Martínez, C; Rodríguez-Vivas, R I; Figueroa Millán, J V; Acosta Viana, K Y; Gutiérrez Ruiz, E J; Álvarez Martínez, J A

    2017-04-01

    This study reports the effect of putrescine addition, either alone or in combination with insulin, transferrin and selenite (ITS), to serum-free Advanced DMEM/F12 (A-DMEM/F12) medium, on the in vitro culture of Babesia bovis and using a perfusion bioreactor to improve efficiency of the process. A B. bovis strain previously adapted to proliferate in serum-free medium (Bbovis-SF) was evaluated using eight increasing concentrations of putrescine. The percentage of parasitized erythrocytes (PPE) obtained from cultures supplemented with 0.101 mg/L was 6.23% compared with 2.3% for control cultures with M199 with Earle's salts (M199) and 40% serum. The combination of putrescine (0.101 mg/L) and a mixture of ITS (2000, 1100, and 1.34 mg/L, respectively) (Pu-ITS), in A-DMEM/F12 culture medium without serum yielded a maximum PPE of 17.26% compared to 2.58% in the control medium. This new formulation of culture medium, together with the use of a hollow-fiber perfusion bioreactor system (HFPBS), caused a substantial increase in the proliferation of B. bovis, yielding a maximum cumulative PPE of 118.8% after five days, compared to 58.6% in cultures treated with control medium M199 and 40% serum. We concluded that the addition of the ITS mixture and putrescine to the culture medium stimulated the proliferation of B. bovis in vitro. This new medium formulation, used in a HFPBS culture system, can be an effective, automated-prone system that can induce massive proliferation of B. bovis for use as a source of parasite antigens and immunogens.

  8. Molecular and serological prevalence of Babesia bigemina and Babesia bovis in cattle and water buffalos under small-scale dairy farming in Beheira and Faiyum Provinces, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hany M; Adjou Moumouni, Paul F; Mohammed-Geba, Khaled; Sheir, Sherin K; Hashem, Ihab S Y; Cao, Shinuo; Terkawi, Mohamad A; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Xuan, Xuenan

    2013-11-15

    In order to determine the molecular and serological prevalence of Babesia bigemina and Babesia bovis, a total of 247 blood samples were collected from cattle and water buffalos in Beheira and Faiyum Provinces in Egypt and examined by nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In cattle, the prevalence of B. bigemina and B. bovis was 5.30% and 3.97% by nPCR and 10.60% and 9.27% by ELISA, respectively, whereas those of water buffalos were 10.42% and 4.17% by nPCR and 15.63% and 11.46% by ELISA, respectively. Statistically significant differences in the prevalence of the two infections were observed on the basis of age and health status. Sequencing analysis revealed two genotypes for B. bovis spherical body protein-4. In conclusion, the current data provide valuable information regarding the epidemiology of B. bigemina and B. bovis infections in cattle and water buffalos from Egypt, which can be employed in developing future strategies for disease management and control.

  9. Molecular and serological detection of Babesia bovis- and Babesia bigemina-infection in bovines and water buffaloes raised jointly in an endemic field.

    PubMed

    Romero-Salas, Dora; Mira, Anabela; Mosqueda, Juan; García-Vázquez, Zeferino; Hidalgo-Ruiz, Mario; Vela, Noot Aditya Ortiz; de León, Adalberto Angel Perez; Florin-Christensen, Monica; Schnittger, Leonhard

    2016-02-15

    Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina are causative agents of bovine babesiosis, a tick-borne disease of cattle in tropical and subtropical regions. Babesia spp. infection adversely affects cattle health and can be fatal resulting in considerable economic loss worldwide. Under endemic stability conditions, herds contain high numbers of chronically infected, asymptomatic carrier animals, in which no parasitemia is detected by microscopic blood smear examination. In addition to bovines, also water buffaloes are infected by both Babesia spp. commonly leading to a subclinical infection. The infection rate (by nPCR) and herd exposure (by IFAT) of bovines and water buffaloes reared under similar field conditions in an area of endemic stability were determined and compared. In order to optimize direct parasite detection, highly sensitive nPCR assays were developed and applied, allowing the detection of as little as 0.1 fg DNA of each Babesia pathogen. Significantly lower percentages (p<0.001) of seropositive water buffaloes compared to bovines were observed for B. bovis (71.4% vs. 98%) and B. bigemina (85% vs. 100%). Interestingly, in comparison, differences noticed between water buffaloes and bovines were considerably larger with direct parasite detection by nPCR (16.2% vs. 82.3% and 24% vs. 94.1% for B. bovis and B. bigemina, respectively). As expected, bovines subjected to monthly acaricide applications exhibited a significant lower infection rate as determined by nPCR than bovines not subjected to these measures (B. bovis 33.3% vs. 90.7%, p<0.001; B. bigemina 80% vs. 96.5%, p<0.001, for treated vs. untreated animals). Interestingly no differences between these groups were observed with respect to seropositivity, suggesting similar rates of parasite exposure (B. bovis 100% vs. 97.7%, p<0.001; B. bigemina 100% vs. 100%, p<0.001). Importantly, a significantly higher number of water buffaloes as determined by nPCR were infected when reared jointly with bovines not subjected

  10. Transfection of babesia bovis by double selection with WR99210 and blasticidin-S and its application for functional analysis of thioredoxin peroxidase-1

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic manipulation is an essential technique to analyze gene function; however, limited methods are available for Babesia bovis, a causative pathogen of the globally important cattle disease, bovine babesiosis. To date, two stable transfection systems have been developed for B. bovis, using select...

  11. A novel modified-indirect ELISA based on spherical body protein 4 for detecting antibody during acute and long-term infections with diverse babesia bovis strains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Cattle persistently infected with Babesia bovis are reservoirs for intra- and inter-herd transmission. Since B. bovis is considered a persistent infection, developing a reliable, high-throughput assay that detects antibody during all stages of the infection could be pivotal for establish...

  12. A novel neutralization sensitive and subdominant RAP-1-related antigen (RRA) is expressed by Babesia bovis merozoites.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Carlos E; Laughery, Jacob M; Bastos, Reginaldo G; Johnson, Wendell C; Norimine, Junzo; Asenzo, Gustavo; Brown, Wendy C; Florin-Christensen, Monica; Goff, Will L

    2011-06-01

    The Babesia bovis genome encodes a rap-1 related gene denominated RAP-1 related antigen (RRA). In this study, we analysed the pattern of expression, immunogenicity and functional relevance of RRA. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using the program Phylip. Expression of rra was analysed by Northern blots, RT-PCR, immunoprecipitation, Western blots and immunofluorescence. RRA antigenicity was tested by T-cell proliferation and Western blot analysis, and functional relevance was determined in an in vitro neutralization assay. RRA is more closely related to RAP-1b of Babesia bigemina than to B. bovis RAP-1, and it is highly conserved among distinct strains. Transcriptional analysis suggests lower numbers of rra transcripts compared to rap-1. Immunoprecipitation of metabolically labelled B. bovis proteins with antibodies against synthetic peptides representing predicted antigenic regions of RRA confirmed the expression of a ∼43 kDa RRA in cultured merozoites. Antibodies present in B. bovis hyperimmune sera, but not in field-infected cattle sera, reacted weakly with recombinant RRA, and no significant stimulation was obtained using recombinant RRA as antigen in T-cell proliferation assays, indicating that RRA is a subdominant antigen. Antibodies against RRA synthetic peptides reacted with merozoites using immunofluorescence, and were able to significantly inhibit erythrocyte invasion in in vitro neutralization tests, suggesting functional relevance for parasite survival. B. bovis express a novel subdominant RAP-1-like molecule that may contribute to erythrocyte invasion and/or egression by the parasite.

  13. Analysis of Babesia bovis infection-induced gene expression changes in larvae from the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cattle babesiosis is a tick-borne disease of cattle that has severe economic impact on cattle producers throughout the world’s tropical and subtropical countries. The most severe form of the disease is caused by the apicomplexan, Babesia bovis, and transmitted to cattle through the bite of infected cattle ticks of the genus Rhipicephalus, with the most prevalent species being Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. We studied the reaction of the R. microplus larval transcriptome in response to infection by B. bovis. Methods Total RNA was isolated for both uninfected and Babesia bovis-infected larval samples. Subtracted libraries were prepared by subtracting the B. bovis-infected material with the uninfected material, thus enriching for expressed genes in the B. bovis-infected sample. Expressed sequence tags from the subtracted library were generated, assembled, and sequenced. To complement the subtracted library method, differential transcript expression between samples was also measured using custom high-density microarrays. The microarray probes were fabricated using oligonucleotides derived from the Bmi Gene Index database (Version 2). Array results were verified for three target genes by real-time PCR. Results Ticks were allowed to feed on a B. bovis-infected splenectomized calf and on an uninfected control calf. RNA was purified in duplicate from whole larvae and subtracted cDNA libraries were synthesized from Babesia-infected larval RNA, subtracting with the corresponding uninfected larval RNA. One thousand ESTs were sequenced from the larval library and the transcripts were annotated. We used a R. microplus microarray designed from a R. microplus gene index, BmiGI Version 2, to look for changes in gene expression that were associated with infection of R. microplus larvae. We found 24 transcripts were expressed at a statistically significant higher level in ticks feeding upon a B. bovis-infected calf contrasted to ticks feeding on an uninfected calf

  14. Identification, characterization and manipulation of Babesia-bovis-infected red blood cells using microfluidics technology.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, E; Silva, T; Oliva, A

    2007-05-01

    Nowadays numerous microfluidic systems are being developed to address a variety of clinical problems. Latest advances in microfluidic technology are promising to revolutionize the detection of pathogens in vivo through the development of integrated lab-on-chip devices. Such microfabricated systems will undertake all steps in sample analysis from collection and preparation to molecular detection. Micro total analysis systems are suitable candidates for point of care diagnostics due to small size, low cost production and enabled portability. The work here presented aimed the use of microfluidic platforms to identify and manipulate bovine red blood cells infected by the protozoan parasite Babesia bovis. A microfabricated device based on impedance spectroscopy was used for single cell discrimination and its sensitivity and applicability as a diagnostic method for bovine babesiosis was studied. Furthermore, manipulation and sorting of normal and infected red blood cells was performed on a dielectrophoresis based microfabricated cell cytometer. Single cell analysis of normal and B. bovis infected red blood cells was performed by electrorotation and dielectric parameters such as permittivities and conductivities of the cellular membrane and cytoplasm were determined.

  15. Genetic diversity of merozoite surface antigens in Babesia bovis detected from Sri Lankan cattle.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Okubo, Kazuhiro; Igarashi, Ikuo; de Silva, Weligodage Kumarawansa; Kothalawala, Hemal; Silva, Seekkuge Susil Priyantha; Vimalakumar, Singarayar Caniciyas; Meewewa, Asela Sanjeewa; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2013-10-01

    Babesia bovis, the causative agent of severe bovine babesiosis, is endemic in Sri Lanka. The live attenuated vaccine (K-strain), which was introduced in the early 1990s, has been used to immunize cattle populations in endemic areas of the country. The present study was undertaken to determine the genetic diversity of merozoite surface antigens (MSAs) in B. bovis isolates from Sri Lankan cattle, and to compare the gene sequences obtained from such isolates against those of the K-strain. Forty-four bovine blood samples isolated from different geographical regions of Sri Lanka and judged to be B. bovis-positive by PCR screening were used to amplify MSAs (MSA-1, MSA-2c, MSA-2a1, MSA-2a2, and MSA-2b), AMA-1, and 12D3 genes from parasite DNA. Although the AMA-1 and 12D3 gene sequences were highly conserved among the Sri Lankan isolates, the MSA gene sequences from the same isolates were highly diverse. Sri Lankan MSA-1, MSA-2c, MSA-2a1, MSA-2a2, and MSA-2b sequences clustered within 5, 2, 4, 1, and 9 different clades in the gene phylograms, respectively, while the minimum similarity values among the deduced amino acid sequences of these genes were 36.8%, 68.7%, 80.3%, 100%, and 68.3%, respectively. In the phylograms, none of the Sri Lankan sequences fell within clades containing the respective K-strain sequences. Additionally, the similarity values for MSA-1 and MSA-2c were 40-61.8% and 90.9-93.2% between the Sri Lankan isolates and the K-strain, respectively, while the K-strain MSA-2a/b sequence shared 64.5-69.8%, 69.3%, and 70.5-80.3% similarities with the Sri Lankan MSA-2a1, MSA-2a2, and MSA-2b sequences, respectively. The present study has shown that genetic diversity among MSAs of Sri Lankan B. bovis isolates is very high, and that the sequences of field isolates diverged genetically from the K-strain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Failure of vaccine strains of Babesia bovis to regain infectivity for ticks during long-standing infections in cattle.

    PubMed

    Dalgliesh, R J; Stewart, N P

    1977-09-01

    Two strains of Babesia bovis that were known to have lost infectivity for the normal tick vector, Boophilus microplus, due to repeated blood passaging in cattle, were studied to determine whether the strains would regain infectivity for ticks during longstanding infections. Parasitaemias were monitored in 4 chronically infected calves that were regularly infested with ticks. Two strains of ticks known to be susceptible to infection with unmodified strains of B. bovis were used. Adult female ticks that dropped from the calves on days that a parasitaemia was evident were tested for B. bovis infection. Sixty-six batches of ticks collected up to 279 days after infection of the calves produced 14 pools of larvae, none of which transmitted infection. Primary infections established from the chronic infections by subinoculation at 200, 259 and 333 days after infection of the calves were also not transmitted by ticks.

  17. Genotypic diversity in Babesia bovis field isolates and vaccine strains from South Africa.

    PubMed

    Combrink, M P; Troskie, P C; Pienaar, R; Latif, A A; Mans, B J

    2014-01-31

    Genotypic diversity in Babesia bovis (cause of Asiatic redwater in cattle) vaccine strains and field isolates from South Africa were investigated using the Bv80 gene as well as microsatellites. The S11 vaccine strain possessed both A and B alleles of the Bv80 gene, as well as genotypic diversity within each allele type as defined by repeat variation resulting in different amplicon sizes. Rapid serial passage of vaccine strain from passage S10 to S24 resulted in loss of genotypic diversity that yielded a single allele A genotype with an amplicon size of 558 bp. This suggested that clonal selection occurred during rapid passaging. Extensive genotypic diversity exists in 44 field isolates characterized with both Bv80 A and B alleles, but can be readily distinguished from the S24 vaccine strain using either the Bv80 allele specific PCR assays or using multi-locus micro-satellite typing. This indicated that no recent documented clinical cases of Asiatic redwater were caused by the reversion to virulence of the current vaccine strain.

  18. The molecular prevalence and MSA-2b gene-based genetic diversity of Babesia bovis in dairy cattle in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Simking, Pacharathon; Saengow, Sinsamuth; Bangphoomi, Kunan; Sarataphan, Nachai; Wongnarkpet, Sirichai; Inpankaew, Tawin; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Munkhjargal, Tserendorj; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2013-11-08

    Bovine babesiosis is an economically significant disease that affects dairy farming operations in Thailand. In the present study, 1824 blood-DNA samples prepared from cattle bred in 4 different regions of the country (North, Northeast, Central, and South) were screened using a nested PCR for the specific detection of Babesia bovis. While the overall prevalence of B. bovis was 8.8%, the Central region of Thailand was found to be a high-risk area of the country, as the prevalence of the parasite was 15.0%. The positive rate was relatively higher among the animals of 1-5 years of age. The genetic diversity among the B. bovis parasites was also studied based on their MSA-2b gene, and the findings showed that the Thai sequences were dispersed across 8 of 13 total clades observed in the phylogram. Three of these clades were formed only of Thai sequences. Similarity among the deduced MSA-2b amino acid sequences determined in the present study was 68.3-100%. In conclusion, the present study found that all the locations surveyed were infected with B. bovis and that the parasite populations in Thailand were genetically diverse. Our findings highlight the need for further studies in Thailand to generate more information before a sound control strategy could be implemented against B. bovis.

  19. Evaluation of immunochromatographic test (ICT) strips for the serological detection of Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina infection in cattle from Western Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Guswanto, Azirwan; Allamanda, Puttik; Mariamah, Euis Siti; Munkjargal, Tserendorf; Tuvshintulga, Bumduuren; Takemae, Hitoshi; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; AbouLaila, Mahmoud; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2017-05-30

    Three types of immunochromatographic test (ICT) strips were prepared for the detection of an antibody response against spherical body protein 4 (SBP-4) of Babesia bovis (bovICT), C-terminal-truncated rhoptry-associated protein 1 (rRAP1/CT17) of B. bigemina (bigICT), and the combination of both proteins (dual-ICT). The evaluation of their performance was conducted using a confirmed positive and negative serum panel for B. bovis and B. bigemina. Together with ELISA, the ICT strips were applied to determine the seroprevalence of bovine babesiosis in Western Java, Indonesia. Among 991 serum samples, 28.4%, 25.3%, and 24.5% of cattle were detected to be seropositive to B. bovis infection using ELISA, bovICT, and dual-ICT, respectively. B. bigemina seropositive was detected in 27.1%, 24.2%, and 22.8% of samples using ELISA, bigICT, and dual-ICT, respectively. The comparison of ICT strips and ELISA results using field serum samples showed good agreement with Kappa values >0.7 between all methods The application of ICT strips is preferable in the field situations where rapid diagnosis is required. Furthermore, the data showed the current seroprevalence of bovine babesiosis in Western Java, Indonesia, and efficient control strategies are needed to reduce economic losses due to the disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Reduction in pathogenicity of Babesia bovis for its tick vector, Boophilus microplus, after rapid blood passage in splenectomized calves.

    PubMed

    Dalgliesh, R J; Stewart, N P; Duncalfe, F

    1981-01-01

    Two strains of Babesia bovis that had been serially blood passaged in splenectomized calves 27 to 33 times, a procedure known to have reduced their virulence for normal cattle, were shown to have low pathogenicity for replete, female Boophilus microplus. In comparison with a strain of B. bovis unmodified by repeated blood passage, the two modified strains infected higher proportions of ticks and produced comparable numbers of morphologically similar parasites in their haemolymph, but killed significantly fewer of them. Red discolouration of haemolymph was observed in many ticks infected with the unmodified strain, but in none of those infected with the modified strains. It is suggested that the modified strains have lost a quality causing pathological effects on the gut cells of infected ticks.

  1. Molecular detection of Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma bovis, Anaplasma platys, Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii and Babesia canis vogeli in ticks from Israel.

    PubMed

    Harrus, S; Perlman-Avrahami, A; Mumcuoglu, K Y; Morick, D; Eyal, O; Baneth, G

    2011-03-01

    : Ticks are vectors of important pathogens of human and animals. Therefore, their microbial carriage capacity is constantly being investigated. The aim of this study was to characterize the diversity of domestic animal pathogens in ticks collected from vegetation and the ground, from different parts of Israel. Non-engorged questing adult ticks were collected from 13 localities. A total of 1196 ticks in 131 pools-83 pools of Rhipicephalus turanicus and 48 of Rhipicephalus sanguineus (with two to ten ticks per pool)-were included in this study. In addition, 13 single free-roaming Hyalomma spp. ticks were collected. Screening by molecular techniques revealed the presence of Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys, Anaplasma bovis and Babesia canis vogeli DNA in R. turanicus ticks. E. canis, A. bovis, B. canis vogeli and Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii DNA sequences were detected in R. sanguineus ticks. Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii DNA was also detected in Hyalomma spp. ticks. Neither Hepatozoon spp. nor Bartonella spp. DNA was detected in any of the ticks examined. This study describes the first detection of E. canis in the tick R. turanicus, which may serve as a vector of this canine pathogen; E. canis was the most common pathogen detected in the collected questing ticks. It also describes the first detection of A. bovis and Candidatus Midichloria mitochondrii in Israel. To the best of the author's knowledge, this is the first report describing the detection of DNA of the latter two pathogens in R. sanguineus, and of A. bovis in R. turanicus.

  2. Identification of interchangeable cross-species function of elongation factor-1 alpha promoters in babesia bigemina and babesia bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Tick borne Babesia bigemina is responsible for acute and potentially lethal hemolytic disease in cattle. The development of genetic manipulation tools necessary to the better understanding of parasite biology is currently limited by the lack of a complete parasite genome and experimental...

  3. Expressed gene sequences from adult ovary and adult female gut genes over-expressed upon Babesia bovis infection of Rhipcephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Boophilus ticks are vectors of Babesia bovis, the protozoan causative agent of cattle fever, a disease which is responsible for significant production losses to cattle producers in much of Africa, Central and South America and Australia. We utilized subtractive cDNA library synthesis techniques to o...

  4. Microarray analysis of expressed genes from Rhipcephalus (Boophilus) microplus larvae, adult ovary, and adult female gut associated with Babesia bovis infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Boophilus ticks are vectors of Babesia bovis, the protozoan causative agent of cattle fever, a disease which is responsible for significant production losses to cattle producers in much of Africa, Central and South America and Australia. We utilized R. microplus microarrays, which contained over 13,...

  5. msa-1 and msa-2c gene analysis and common epitopes assessment in Mexican Babesia bovis isolates.

    PubMed

    Borgonio, Veronica; Mosqueda, Juan; Genis, Alma D; Falcon, Alfonso; Alvarez, J Antonio; Camacho, Minerva; Figueroa, Julio V

    2008-12-01

    Babesia bovis msa-1 and msa-2c genes belong to the variable merozoite surface antigen gene family. These genes code for antigenic proteins present on the merozoite surface (MSA) and are involved in the parasite invasion to the bovine erythrocyte. Previous studies carried out on MSA-1 have evidenced antigen allelic variation in B. bovis isolates from similar endemic regions, as well as in isolates from different geographic regions of the world (Argentina, Australia, Israel). Studies conducted on MSA-2c, however, have shown that this antigen is widely conserved on isolates from distinct geographic regions. In this study, it was hypothesized that MSA-1 and MSA-2c antigens would contain common epitopes despite the presence of nucleotide sequence differences found in 13 B. bovis isolates and strains collected in geographically distant regions of Mexico. Bioinformatics analysis of the primary structure from DNA fragments derived from PCR amplification, cloning, and sequencing of msa-1 and msa-2c genes from the 13 B. bovis populations revealed that the msa-1 gene product present in the various isolates tested is less conserved among isolates obtained within a similar geographic region in Mexico (51-99.7% sequence identity). Results obtained by immunoblot analysis of B. bovis protein extracts reacted with a monoclonal antibody to MSA-1 42-kDa antigen, conclusively showed cross-reactive common epitopes only in Mexican isolates having high sequence identity (>/=99%, eight isolates). Sequence analysis and multiple alignment of deduced MSA-2c demonstrated a high degree of sequence identity (90-100%) among the Mexican B. bovis isolates and strains. Immunoblot results using a polyclonal antibody to MSA-2c reacted against the protein extracts recognized conserved epitopes in at least nine of the B. bovis isolates. The results obtained in this study agree with those previously reported by other researchers and confirm that, based in sequence identity conservation in Mexican B

  6. The ovarian transcriptome of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, feeding upon a bovine host infected with Babesia bovis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cattle babesiosis is a tick-borne disease of cattle with the most severe form of the disease caused by the apicomplexan, Babesia bovis. Babesiosis is transmitted to cattle through the bite of infected cattle ticks of the genus Rhipicephalus. The most prevalent species is Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, which is distributed throughout the tropical and subtropical countries of the world. The transmission of B. bovis is transovarian and a previous study of the R. microplus ovarian proteome identified several R. microplus proteins that were differentially expressed in response to infection. Through various approaches, we studied the reaction of the R. microplus ovarian transcriptome in response to infection by B. bovis. Methods A group of ticks were allowed to feed on a B. bovis-infected splenectomized calf while a second group fed on an uninfected splenectomized control calf. RNA was purified from dissected adult female ovaries of both infected and uninfected ticks and a subtracted B. bovis-infected cDNA library was synthesized, subtracting with the uninfected ovarian RNA. Four thousand ESTs were sequenced from the ovary subtracted library and annotated. Results The subtracted library dataset assembled into 727 unique contigs and 2,161 singletons for a total of 2,888 unigenes, Microarray experiments designed to detect B. bovis-induced gene expression changes indicated at least 15 transcripts were expressed at a higher level in ovaries from ticks feeding upon the B. bovis-infected calf as compared with ovaries from ticks feeding on an uninfected calf. We did not detect any transcripts from these microarray experiments that were expressed at a lower level in the infected ovaries compared with the uninfected ovaries. Using the technique called serial analysis of gene expression, 41 ovarian transcripts from infected ticks were differentially expressed when compared with transcripts of controls. Conclusion Collectively, our experimental approaches provide

  7. Genetic variations in merozoite surface antigen genes of Babesia bovis detected in Vietnamese cattle and water buffaloes.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Naoaki; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Tuvshintulga, Bumduuren; Hayashida, Kyoko; Igarashi, Ikuo; Inoue, Noboru; Long, Phung Thang; Lan, Dinh Thi Bich

    2015-03-01

    The genes that encode merozoite surface antigens (MSAs) in Babesia bovis are genetically diverse. In this study, we analyzed the genetic diversity of B. bovis MSA-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c genes in Vietnamese cattle and water buffaloes. Blood DNA samples from 258 cattle and 49 water buffaloes reared in the Thua Thien Hue province of Vietnam were screened with a B. bovis-specific diagnostic PCR assay. The B. bovis-positive DNA samples (23 cattle and 16 water buffaloes) were then subjected to PCR assays to amplify the MSA-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c genes. Sequencing analyses showed that the Vietnamese MSA-1 and MSA-2b sequences are genetically diverse, whereas MSA-2c is relatively conserved. The nucleotide identity values for these MSA gene sequences were similar in the cattle and water buffaloes. Consistent with the sequencing data, the Vietnamese MSA-1 and MSA-2b sequences were dispersed across several clades in the corresponding phylogenetic trees, whereas the MSA-2c sequences occurred in a single clade. Cattle- and water-buffalo-derived sequences also often clustered together on the phylogenetic trees. The Vietnamese MSA-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c sequences were then screened for recombination with automated methods. Of the seven recombination events detected, five and two were associated with the MSA-2b and MSA-2c recombinant sequences, respectively, whereas no MSA-1 recombinants were detected among the sequences analyzed. Recombination between the sequences derived from cattle and water buffaloes was very common, and the resultant recombinant sequences were found in both host animals. These data indicate that the genetic diversity of the MSA sequences does not differ between cattle and water buffaloes in Vietnam. They also suggest that recombination between the B. bovis MSA sequences in both cattle and water buffaloes might contribute to the genetic variation in these genes in Vietnam. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Integration of a transfected gene into the genome of Babesia bovis occurs by legitimate homologous recombination mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Carlos E; Johnson, Wendell C; Herndon, David R; Laughery, Jacob M; Davis, William C

    2015-08-01

    This study examines the patterns of gene integration of gfp-bsd upon stable transfection into the T3Bo strain of Babesia bovis using a plasmid designed to integrate homologous sequences of the parasite's two identical ef-1α A and B genes. While the transfected BboTf-149-6 cell line displayed two distinct patterns of gene integration, clonal lines derived from this strain by cell sorting contained only single gfp-bsd insertions. Whole genome sequencing of two selected clonal lines, E9 and C6, indicated two distinct patterns of gfp-bsd insertion occurring by legitimate homologous recombination mechanisms: one into the expected ef-1α orf B, and another into the ef-1α B promoter. The data suggest that expression of the ef-1α orf B is not required for development of B. bovis in cultured erythrocyte stages. Use of legitimate homologous recombination mechanisms in transfected B. bovis supports the future use of transfection methods for developing efficient gene function assignment experiments using gene knockout techniques. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Validation and Field Evaluation of a Competitive Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Diagnosis of Babesia bovis Infections in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Mariana; Echaide, Ignacio; de Echaide, Susana Torioni; Wilkowsky, Silvina; Zabal, Osvaldo; Mosqueda, Juan J.; Schnittger, Leonhard

    2012-01-01

    Infections by Babesia bovis limit cattle production and cause important economic losses in tropical and subtropical areas around the world. Monitoring of calf sera can be used to detect unprotected cattle herds and to decide on strategic control measures, as well as for epidemiological studies. Merozoite surface antigen 2c (MSA-2c) is an immunodominant surface protein expressed in B. bovis merozoites and sporozoites and contains B-cell epitopes that are conserved among geographic isolates. A monoclonal antibody against recombinant MSA-2c (rMSA-2c) was previously shown to inhibit the binding of anti-B. bovis antibodies to a parasite B-cell epitope in a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) format. In the work at hand, the parameters of this cELISA were reevaluated and adjusted when necessary, and a cutoff value was determined by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis of a total of 357 bovine sera of known reactivity, as assessed by indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFAT). The established rMSA-2c cELISA demonstrated a specificity of 98% and a sensitivity of 96.2%. An additional set of 303 field bovine sera from regions where ticks are endemic and tick-free regions of Argentina was tested by both rMSA-2c cELISA and IFAT, and the results were shown to be in very good agreement (kappa index, 0.8325). The performance shown by rMSA-2c cELISA in the detection of B. bovis-specific antibodies and its suitability for standardization and large-scale production, as well as the possibility of its application in most veterinary diagnostic laboratories, make the assay a powerful tool for the surveillance of herd immunity as a strategic measure for the control of bovine babesiosis. PMID:22492742

  10. Type-specific PCR assays for Babesia bovis msa-1 genotypes in Asia: Revisiting the genetic diversity in Sri Lanka, Mongolia, and Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Liyanagunawardena, Nilukshi; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Kothalawala, Hemal; Silva, Seekkuge Susil Priyantha; Battsetseg, Badgar; Lan, Dinh Thi Bich; Inoue, Noboru; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2016-01-01

    Babesia bovis is the most virulent Babesia organism, resulting in a high mortality rate in cattle. The genetic diversity of B. bovis merozoite surface antigens (MSAs), such as MSA-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c, might be linked to altered immune profiles in the host animals. The present study aimed to develop type-specific PCR assays for Asian msa-1 genotypes, thereby re-analyzing the genetic diversity of msa-1 in Sri Lanka, Mongolia, and Vietnam. Specific primers were designed for nine Asian msa-1 genotypes, which had been detected based on the phylogeny constructed using msa-1 gene sequences retrieved from the GenBank database. Specificity of the type-specific PCR assays was confirmed using plasmids containing the inserts of msa-1 gene fragments that represent Asian genotypes. Furthermore, no amplicons were observed by these PCR assays when DNA samples of Babesia bigemina, Babesia ovata, Theileria annulata, Theileria orientalis, Trypanosoma evansi, Trypanosoma theileri, Anaplasma marginale, and Anaplasma bovis, and non-infected bovine blood were analyzed. In total, 109 B. bovis-positive blood DNA samples sourced from Sri Lanka (44 cattle), Mongolia (26 cattle), and Vietnam (23 cattle and 16 water buffaloes) were then screened by the type-specific PCR assays. The sequences derived from all of the PCR amplicons were phylogenetically analyzed. Out of 109 DNA samples, 23 (20 from cattle and 3 from water buffaloes) were positive for at least one genotype. In agreement with previous studies, five and four different genotypes were detected among the DNA samples from Sri Lanka and Vietnam, respectively. In contrast, four genotypes, including three novel genotypes, were detected from Mongolia. Five DNA samples were found to be co-infected with multiple genotypes. The sequences of the PCR amplicons clustered phylogenetically within the corresponding clades. These findings indicated that the type-specific PCR assays described herein are useful for the determination of genotypic

  11. Babesia bovis (argentina): components of the cryofibrinogen complex and their contribution to pathophysiology of infection in splenectomized calves.

    PubMed

    Goodger, B V; Wright, I G; Mahoney, D F; McKenna, R V

    1978-12-21

    A cryofibrinogen complex, found in the plasma of cattle acutely infected with Babesia bovis (argentina), was characterized. The fibrinogen-like proteins of the complex were isolated and the structure of their polypeptide chains analysed. In general, the chain structure was similar to that of soluble non-crosslinked fibrin (fibrinogen) although chains indicating some degree of fibrin crosslinking were often detected. Only rarely did the chain structure suggest that fibrinolysis occurred. It was concluded that the complex was produced by activation of the coagulation system but that fibrinolysis did not occur to any marked degree. The complex was implicated in assistance to the sludging of erythrocytes in the internal organs which is a feature of the pathogenesis of the disease.

  12. Delivery of recombinant vaccines against bovine herpesvirus type 1 gD and Babesia bovis MSA-2c to mice using liposomes derived from egg yolk lipids.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Anabel E; Zamorano, Patricia; Wilkowsky, Silvina; Torrá, Florencia; Ferreri, Lucas; Dominguez, Mariana; Florin-Christensen, Mónica

    2013-06-01

    Liposomes prepared from total egg yolk lipid extracts were used to deliver experimental DNA vaccines to mice consisting of pCI-neo plasmids encoding bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) gD or Babesia bovis MSA-2c. A significantly higher proportion of mice in the B. bovis MSA-2c group, but not those in the BoHV-1 gD group, developed detectable immunoglobulin G responses when vaccinated with liposome encapsulated DNA in comparison with mice vaccinated with naked DNA. In both groups, antibody titres were similar between mice vaccinated with liposome encapsulated DNA and naked DNA.

  13. Bioinformatic prediction of the exportome of Babesia bovis and identification of novel proteins in parasite-infected red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Gohil, Sejal; Kats, Lev M; Seemann, Torsten; Fernandez, Kate M; Siddiqui, Ghizal; Cooke, Brian M

    2013-04-01

    Babesia bovis is a pathogen of considerable economic significance to the livestock industry worldwide but the precise mechanisms by which this parasite causes disease in susceptible cattle remain poorly understood. It is clear, however, that alterations to the structure and function of red blood cells in which the parasites reside and replicate play an important role in pathogenesis and that these are secondary to the export of numerous, currently unknown and uncharacterised parasite-encoded proteins. Using a rational bioinformatic approach, we have identified a set of 362 proteins (117 of which are hypothetical) that we predict encompasses the B. bovis exportome. These exported proteins are likely to be trafficked to various cellular locations, with a subset destined for the red blood cell cytosol or the red blood cell cytoskeleton. These proteins are likely to play important roles in mediating the pathogenesis of babesiosis. We have selected three novel proteins and confirmed their predicted export and localisation within the host red blood cell by immunofluorescence using specific antibodies raised against these proteins. Complete characterisation of these novel exported parasite proteins will help elucidate their function within the host red blood cell and assist in identification of new therapeutic targets for babesiosis.

  14. Immunization of Bos taurus steers with Babesia bovis recombinant antigens MSA-1, MSA-2c and 12D3.

    PubMed

    Antonio Alvarez, J; Lopez, U; Rojas, C; Borgonio, V M; Sanchez, V; Castañeda, R; Vargas, P; Figueroa, J V

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the recombinant proteins MSA-1, MSA-2c and 12D3 as a combined immunogen for cattle. Fifteen steers were randomly assigned into three groups of five animals each (I, II and III). On day 0, cattle in group I were injected with 50 microg each of rMSA-1, rMSA-2c and r12D3 with the adjuvant Montanide 75; cattle in Group II received adjuvant-PBS, and Group III were untreated controls. On day 14, cattle in Group I received a second injection of the three recombinant proteins in adjuvant and cattle in Group II again received adjuvant alone. On day 28, all groups of cattle were challenged with a field strain of Babesia bovis. After challenge, the experimental cattle were clinically and serologically monitored. Three of the five steers immunized with the combined recombinant B. bovis proteins seroconverted on day 14 post-immunization (P.I.) and the maximum titre was 1 : 1600. All five immunized steers presented strong seropositivity to B. bovis antigens at day 21 P.I. The prepatent periods of vaccinated cattle were delayed until day 10 post-challenge exposure versus 8 and 7 days in Groups II and III, respectively. Cattle in all groups had fever above 41 degrees C; the reduction in packed cell volume was not significantly different (P > 0.05) in vaccinated group I compared with Groups II and III (29% versus 26% and 31%, respectively). Treatment was required for one steer in the control group. During the period of the study, the weight of cattle in Groups I and II increased an average of 9 and 7 kg, whereas the weight of the control cattle was reduced on average 4 kg. Immunization with rMSA-1-rMSA-2c-r12D3 proteins was not sufficient to prevent clinical symptoms against challenge, but the immunologic response was sufficient to protect steers against a mild virulent strain of B. bovis.

  15. Diagnostic methods used to monitor an outbreak of babesiosis (Babesia bovis) in a herd of feral cattle in New Caledonia.

    PubMed

    Hüe, T; Graille, M; Mortelecque, A; Desoutter, D; Delathière, J M; Marchal, C; Teurlai, M; Barré, N

    2013-06-01

    In December 2007, Babesia bovis was introduced to New Caledonia through the importation of cattle vaccinated with a live tick fever (babesiosis and anaplasmosis) vaccine. Medical measures, acaricide and antiprotozoal treatments, and quarantine restrictions were implemented with success on all the farms involved, but the disease spread to one of the neighbouring properties where feral cattle were present. To circumscribe and eliminate this outbreak, the authorities decided to slaughter all animals on the neighbouring property. To monitor the spread of babesiosis in naïve cattle and to compare the usefulness of PCR, ELISA and brain smear for disease detection in monitoring this outbreak. Blood and brain samples of slaughtered animals were analysed over time throughout the eradication campaign using serology, PCR and brain smears. In addition, field numbers of Rhipicephalus microplus tick larvae were assessed and Babesia infection of the larvae analysed using PCR. This study showed the natural spread of babesiosis in a naïve herd without pharmacological control measures. Prevalence reached 80% within a year of introduction. ELISA and PCR tests performed similarly in detecting disease in cattle and both were superior to brain smears. Nevertheless, specific tests or combinations of tests may be preferable, depending on the specific requirements of any future disease situation. In cattle, ELISA and PCR appear to be suitable tools for monitoring the evolution of a babesiosis outbreak, with brain smears as a useful adjunct. PCR was not suitable for detecting infection in tick larvae. © 2013 The Authors. Australian Veterinary Journal © 2013 Australian Veterinary Association.

  16. Co-immunization of cattle with a vaccine against babesiosis and Lactobacillus casei increases specific IgG1 levels to Babesia bovis and B. bigemina.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Garfias, Carlos Ramón; Lozano, Astrid Rodríguez; Martínez, Carmen Rojas; Martínez, Jesús Antonio Álvarez; Millán, Julio Vicente Figueroa; García, Gustavo Román Reyes; Castañeda-Arriola, Roberto; Aguilar-Figueroa, Blanca Rosa

    2015-10-01

    The effect of Lactobacillus casei administered along with a live attenuated vaccine vs. bovine babesiosis (VAC) on induction of IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies to Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina was assessed by the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) in bovines of an endemic babesiosis area before (day 0) and after vaccination (days 15 and 30). We previously reported that L. casei increases the efficiency of VAC under controlled conditions and under extreme conditions in the field; however, the levels of IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies to B. bovis and B. bigemina are not known in vaccinated animals. Twenty-one dairy cows were allocated into three groups (seven animals per group): unvaccinated, vaccinated with VAC and vaccinated simultaneously with VAC and L. casei (VAC-LC). All animals were kept in a babesiosis endemic area at Tlalixcoyan, Veracruz. At days 15 and 30 after vaccination, the average levels of IgG1 to B. bovis and to B. bigemina were significantly higher in VAC-LC group than levels observed in VAC and control groups (P<0.01). Levels of IgG2 were similar in VAC and VAC-LC groups but higher than in the control group (P<0.01). When tested in in vitro cultures of B. bovis, sera from VAC-LC group significantly inhibited parasite growth as compared with the sera of the other two groups. It is suggested that the efficiency improvement of VAC, in part, is due to the L. casei boost of IgG1 over IgG2 antibodies to B. bovis and B. bigemina when the bacteria is co-inoculated with this vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Phylogenetic relationships of Mongolian Babesia bovis isolates based on the merozoite surface antigen (MSA)-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c genes.

    PubMed

    Altangerel, Khukhuu; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Battsetseg, Badgar; Battur, Banzragch; Ueno, Akio; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2012-03-23

    We conducted a molecular epidemiological study on Babesia bovis in Mongolia. Three hundred blood samples collected from cattle grazed in seven different districts were initially screened using a previously established diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of B. bovis-specific DNA. Positive samples were then used to amplify and sequence the hyper-variable regions of three B. bovis genes encoding the merozoite surface antigen (MSA)-1, MSA-2b, and MSA-2c. The diagnostic PCR assay detected B. bovis among cattle populations of all districts surveyed (4.4-26.0%). Sequences of each of the three genes were highly homologous among the Mongolian isolates, and found in a single phylogenetic cluster. In particular, a separate branch was formed only by the Mongolian isolates in the MSA-2b gene-based phylogenetic tree. Our findings indicate that effective preventative and control strategies are essential to control B. bovis infection in Mongolian cattle populations, and suggest that a careful approach must be adopted when using immunization techniques.

  18. In vitro culture of Babesia bovis in a bovine serum-free culture medium supplemented with insulin, transferrin, and selenite.

    PubMed

    Rojas Martínez, C; Rodríguez-Vivas, R I; Figueroa Millán, J V; Acosta Viana, K Y; Gutiérrez Ruiz, E J; Álvarez Martínez, J A

    2016-11-01

    Bovine serum is an important factor for the optimal growth of Babesia bovis in vitro. This protozoan can be cultured in M-199 with Earle's salts medium (M-199) supplemented with 40% bovine serum (BS). In the present study, four media were assessed along with the control medium M-199. The effect on the proliferation of B. bovis in vitro was tested when these media were combined with insulin (Ins), transferrin (Trans) and selenite (Sel) in the absence of bovine serum. Treatment with Advanced DMEM/F12 medium (A-DMEM/F12) achieved the highest percentage of parasitized erythrocytes (PPE), reaching a maximum value of 9.59%. A-DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with a mixture of Ins (2000 mg/L), Trans (1100 mg/L), and Sel (1.34 mg/L) allowed for the adaptation and proliferation of B. bovis without bovine serum, showed a constant increase in PPE, and reached a maximum value of 9.7% during seven cycles of in vitro culture. It was concluded that continuous proliferation of B. bovis in vitro could be achieved using A-DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with Ins-Trans-Sel, without bovine serum. After adaptation for proliferation in serum-free medium, the B. bovis strain of parasites could have future use in the study of this economically important protozoan species that affects cattle.

  19. Transfection of Babesia bovis by Double Selection with WR99210 and Blasticidin-S and Its Application for Functional Analysis of Thioredoxin Peroxidase-1

    PubMed Central

    Asada, Masahito; Yahata, Kazuhide; Hakimi, Hassan; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo; Kaneko, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic manipulation is an essential technique to analyze gene function; however, limited methods are available for Babesia bovis, a causative pathogen of the globally important cattle disease, bovine babesiosis. To date, two stable transfection systems have been developed for B. bovis, using selectable markers blasticidin-S deaminase (bsd) or human dihydrofolate reductase (hdhfr). In this work, we combine these two selectable markers in a sequential transfection system. Specifically, a parent transgenic B. bovis line which episomally expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) and human dihydrofolate reductase (hDHFR), was transfected with a plasmid encoding a fusion protein consisting of red fluorescent protein (RFP) and blasticidin-S deaminase (BSD). Selection with WR99210 and blasticidin-S resulted in the emergence of parasites double positive for GFP and RFP. We then applied this method to complement gene function in a parasite line in which thioredoxin peroxidase-1 (Bbtpx-1) gene was knocked out using hDHFR as a selectable marker. A plasmid was constructed harboring both RFP-BSD and Bbtpx-1 expression cassettes, and transfected into a Bbtpx-1 knockout (KO) parasite. Transfectants were independently obtained by two transfection methods, episomal transfection and genome integration. Complementation of Bbtpx-1 resulted in full recovery of resistance to nitrosative stress, via the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside, which was impaired in the Bbtpx-1 KO parasites. In conclusion, we developed a sequential transfection method in B. bovis and subsequently applied this technique in a gene complementation study. This method will enable broader genetic manipulation of Babesia toward enhancing our understanding of the biology of this parasite. PMID:25962142

  20. Co-transmission of the non-transmissible South African Babesia bovis S24 vaccine strain during mixed infection with a field isolate.

    PubMed

    Combrink, M P; Troskie, P C; de Klerk, D G; Pienaar, R; Latif, A A; Mans, B J

    2015-03-01

    The South African Babesia bovis live blood vaccine, originating from a field isolate attenuated by 23 serial syringe passages in splenectomized calves, has lost the ability to infect the natural vector Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus. In this study, infection with mixed parasites from the vaccine strain and a field isolate, resulted in transmission of both genotype populations. Comparing the field isolate and transmitted combination indicated no significant difference in their virulence, while challenge of vaccinated cattle with these isolates showed the ability of the vaccine to protect against both. Limiting dilution of the transmitted combination, followed by infection of splenectomized cattle (n=34) yielded no single infections for the vaccine strain genotype, seven clonal lines of the field isolate and one mixture of vaccine strain and field isolate. Only one of two field isolate clonal lines selected for vector transmission study was transmitted. Showing that B. bovis isolates can contain both tick transmissible and non-transmissible subpopulations. The findings of this study also indicate the probability of vaccine co-infection transmission occurring in the field, which may result in new genotype populations of B. bovis. However, the impact of this recombination with field isolates is considered negligible since a genotypically diverse population of B. bovis is already present in South Africa.

  1. The genetic diversity of merozoite surface antigen 1 (MSA-1) among Babesia bovis detected from cattle populations in Thailand, Brazil and Ghana.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Daisuke; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; De De Macedo, Alane Caine Costa; Inpankaew, Tawin; Alhassan, Andy; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, we screened blood DNA samples obtained from cattle bred in Brazil (n=164) and Ghana (n=80) for Babesia bovis using a diagnostic PCR assay and found prevalences of 14.6% and 46.3%, respectively. Subsequently, the genetic diversity of B. bovis in Thailand, Brazil and Ghana was analyzed, based on the DNA sequence of merozoite surface antigen-1 (MSA-1). In Thailand, MSA-1 sequences were relatively conserved and found in a single clade of the phylogram, while Brazilian MSA-1 sequences showed high genetic diversity and were dispersed across three different clades. In contrast, the sequences from Ghanaian samples were detected in two different clades, one of which contained only a single Ghanaian sequence. The identities among the MSA-1 sequences from Thailand, Brazil and Ghana were 99.0-100%, 57.5-99.4% and 60.3-100%, respectively, while the similarities among the deduced MSA-1 amino acid sequences within the respective countries were 98.4-100%, 59.4-99.7% and 58.7-100%, respectively. These observations suggested that the genetic diversity of B. bovis based on MSA-1 sequences was higher in Brazil and Ghana than in Thailand. The current data highlight the importance of conducting extensive studies on the genetic diversity of B. bovis before designing immune control strategies in each surveyed country.

  2. Genetic polymorphism of Babesia bovis merozoite surface antigens-2 (MSA-2) isolates from bovine blood and Rhipicephalus annulatus ticks in Israel.

    PubMed

    Molad, T; Fleiderovitz, L; Leibovich, B; Wolkomirsky, R; Erster, O; Roth, A; Mazuz, M L; Markovics, A; Shkap, V

    2014-09-15

    This study demonstrated the genetic diversity among MSA-2c, MSA-2a1 and MSA-2b proteins of Babesia bovis isolates obtained from bovine blood and Rhipicephalus annulatus tick samples. The least identities that were observed among the deduced amino acid sequences of MSA-2c, MSA-2a1 and MSA-2b were 55, 63, and 71%, respectively. During the study four B. bovis calves, aged about 1 month, were found to be infected with virulent field strains and developed babesiosis. Probably, the calves had received insufficient antibodies, or the antibodies raised against the vaccine strain did not cross-protect against virulent field isolates. The complete msa-2 locus from the Israeli B. bovis vaccine strain and two field isolates were characterized. Similarly to the Australian strains and isolates, the msa-2 loci of the examined Israeli strain and isolates had only two msa-2 genes - msa-2c and msa-2a/b - located between msa-2c and orfB. Several of the examined samples, contained different MSA-2 genotypes concurrently. No obvious geographical relationships among isolates from various regions of Israel were established. Moreover, in the phylogenetic analyses, the Israeli deduced MSA-2 amino acid sequences of the three examined genes were clustered together with sequences derived from other countries, proving that the msa-2 gene sequences of B. bovis shared the same genetic characters worldwide. The present study clearly showed that the MSA-2 proteins of B. bovis isolates from Israel were genetically distinct from the vaccine strains. Thus, further research will be needed in order to understand the genetic diversity mechanisms of B. bovis, and the immunological responses of the infected animals.

  3. Vaccine strategies against Babesia bovis based on prime-boost immunizations in mice with modified vaccinia Ankara vector and recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo Ortiz, José Manuel; Del Médico Zajac, María Paula; Zanetti, Flavia Adriana; Molinari, María Paula; Gravisaco, María José; Calamante, Gabriela; Wilkowsky, Silvina Elizabeth

    2014-08-06

    In this study, a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara vector expressing a chimeric multi-antigen was obtained and evaluated as a candidate vaccine in homologous and heterologous prime-boost immunizations with a recombinant protein cocktail. The chimeric multi-antigen comprises immunodominant B and T cell regions of three Babesia bovis proteins. Humoral and cellular immune responses were evaluated in mice to compare the immunogenicity induced by different immunization schemes. The best vaccination scheme was achieved with a prime of protein cocktail and a boost with the recombinant virus. This scheme induced high level of specific IgG antibodies and secreted IFN and a high degree of activation of IFNγ(+) CD4(+) and CD8(+) specific T cells. This is the first report in which a novel vaccine candidate was constructed based on a rationally designed multi-antigen and evaluated in a prime-boost regime, optimizing the immune response necessary for protection against bovine babesiosis.

  4. Differences in the life cycles between a vaccine strain and an unmodified strain of Babesia bovis (Babes, 1889) in the tick Boophilus microplus (Canestrini).

    PubMed

    Stewart, N P

    1978-11-01

    Developmental forms of 2 strains of Babesia bovis (Babes) were studied in the tick vector Boophilus microplus (Canestrini). One strain (designated T) was shown to be infective for the tick, and the other (NT) to have lost infectivity for the tick, because of repeated blood passaging in cattle. Parasites of the 2 strains in gut contents of adult female ticks were similar during the first 16 h post-repletion (PR), but thereafter their structure differed. From 16-64 h PR, the majority of T strain parasites were spherical and without processes. During the next 32 h elongate forms and vermicules developed. Fission bodies were seen within epithelial cells of the gut by 96 h PR. T-strain parasites in gut contents decreased in number from approximately 96 h and were difficult to find at 144 h, the time of the final observation. In contrast, NT strains parasites were plentiful throughout the period of observation. They were predominantly spherical, ranging in diameter from 1.5 to 15 micron. Forms with obvious processes measuring up to 81 micron in length were seen in large numbers at seemingly regular intervals from 16-44 h PR, suggesting that a process of development and divisions was being repeated. No vermicules or fission bodies were seen. T-strain, but not NT strain parasites, were seen in hemolymph and ova of the ticks and in their larval progeny. It is suggested that continuous blood passaging of the NT strain had resulted in selection of parasites incapable of penetrating gut epithelial cells of the tick.

  5. The Babesia bovis VESA1 virulence factor subunit 1b is encoded by the 1beta branch of the ves multigene family.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yu-Ping; Al-Khedery, Basima; Allred, David R

    2010-06-01

    Babesia bovis, an intraerythrocytic parasite of cattle, establishes persistent infections of extreme duration. This is accomplished, at least in part, through rapid antigenic variation of a heterodimeric virulence factor, the variant erythrocyte surface antigen-1 (VESA1) protein. Previously, the VESA1a subunit was demonstrated to be encoded by a 1alpha member of the ves multigene family. Since its discovery the 1beta branch of this multigene family has been hypothesized to encode the VESA1b polypeptide, but formal evidence for this connection has been lacking. Here, we provide evidence that products of ves1beta genes are rapidly variant in antigenicity and size-polymorphic, matching known VESA1b polypeptides. Importantly, the ves1beta-encoded antigens are co-precipitated with VESA1a during immunoprecipitation with anti-VESA1a monoclonal antibodies, and antisera to ves1beta polypeptide co-precipitate VESA1a. Further, the ves1beta-encoded antigens significantly co-localize with VESA1a on the infected-erythrocyte membrane surface of live cells. These characteristics all match known properties of VESA1b, allowing us to conclude that the ves1beta gene divergently apposing the ves1beta gene within the locus of active ves transcription (LAT) encodes the 1b subunit of the VESA1 cytoadhesion ligand. However, the extent and stoichiometry of VESA1a and 1b co-localization on the surface of individual cells is quite variable, implicating competing effects on transcription, translation, or trafficking of the two subunits. These results provide essential information facilitating further investigation into this parasite virulence factor. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Involvement of TLR6 in the induction of COX-2, PGE2 and IL-10 in macrophages by lipids from virulent S2P and attenuated R1A Babesia bovis strains.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, G; Belaunzarán, M L; Magalhães, K G; Poncini, C V; Lammel, E M; González Cappa, S M; Bozza, P T; Isola, E L D

    2016-06-15

    Toll like receptors (TLRs) are involved in the modulation of diverse host genes expression through a complex network of signalling events that allow for an appropriate response to a microbial pathogen. In the present work we used TLR6KO mice in order to study the role of TLR6 in the immune discrimination of lipids from two Babesia bovis strains, attenuated R1A (LA) and virulent S2P (LV), and the consequent macrophage activation. We demonstrated that TLR6 is required for lipid body induction in murine peritoneal macrophages by both LA and LV. Interestingly, as regards IL-10 and COX-2/PGE2 pathway induction by LA and LV, we observed differences in the biological effects produced by these lipid extracts. Our results indicate a role of TLR6 in the down-modulation of these immunoregulators only in the case of LA, whereas this receptor was not implicated in pro-inflammatory TNFα, IL-6 and KC release induced by LA. Remarkably, LV did not exert the down-modulatory effect observed for LA, supporting the notion that LA and LV possess different lipid composition that could correlate with the polar pathogenic effect of both B. bovis strains.

  7. A recombinant multi-antigen vaccine formulation containing Babesia bovis merozoite surface antigens MSA-2a1, MSA-2b and MSA-2c elicits invasion-inhibitory antibodies and IFN-γ producing cells.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Alba Marina; Françoso, Katia S; Ersching, Jonatan; Icimoto, Marcelo Y; Oliveira, Vitor; Rodriguez, Anabel E; Schnittger, Leonhard; Florin-Christensen, Monica; Rodrigues, Mauricio M; Soares, Irene S

    2016-11-14

    Babesia bovis is a tick-transmitted protozoan hemoparasite and the causative agent of bovine babesiosis, a potential risk to more than 500 million cattle worldwide. The vaccines currently available are based on attenuated parasites, which are difficult to produce, and are only recommended for use in bovines under one year of age. When used in older animals, these vaccines may cause life-threatening clinical symptoms and eventually death. The development of a multi-subunit recombinant vaccine against B. bovis would be attractive from an economic standpoint and, most importantly, could be recommended for animals of any age. In the present study, recombinant ectodomains of MSA-2a1, MSA-2b and MSA-2c antigens were expressed in Pichia pastoris yeast as secreted soluble peptides. The antigens were purified to homogeneity, and biochemically and immunologically characterized. A vaccine formulation was obtained by emulsifying a mixture of the three peptides with the adjuvant Montanide ISA 720, which elicited high IgG antibody titers against each of the above antigens. IgG antibodies generated against each MSA-antigen recognized merozoites and significantly inhibited the invasion of bovine erythrocytes. Cellular immune responses were also detected, which were characterized by splenic and lymph node CD4(+) T cells producing IFN-γ and TNF-α upon stimulation with the antigens MSA-2a1 or MSA-2c. These data strongly suggest the high protective potential of the presented formulation, and we propose that it could be tested in vaccination trials of bovines challenged with B. bovis.

  8. Conservation of Babesia bovis small heat shock protein (Hsp20) among strains and definition of T helper cell epitopes recognized by cattle with diverse major histocompatibility complex class II haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Norimine, Junzo; Mosqueda, Juan; Palmer, Guy H; Lewin, Harris A; Brown, Wendy C

    2004-02-01

    Babesia bovis small heat shock protein (Hsp20) is recognized by CD4+ T lymphocytes from cattle that have recovered from infection and are immune to challenge. This candidate vaccine antigen is related to a protective antigen of Toxoplasma gondii, Hsp30/bag1, and both are members of the alpha-crystallin family of proteins that can serve as molecular chaperones. In the present study, immunofluorescence microscopy determined that Hsp20 is expressed intracellularly in all merozoites. Importantly, Hsp20 is also expressed by tick larval stages, including sporozoites, so that natural tick-transmitted infection could boost a vaccine-induced response. The predicted amino acid sequence of Hsp20 from merozoites is completely conserved among different B. bovis strains. To define the location of CD4+ T-cell epitopes for inclusion in a multiepitope peptide or minigene vaccine construct, truncated recombinant Hsp20 proteins and overlapping peptides were tested for their ability to stimulate T cells from immune cattle. Both amino-terminal (amino acids [aa] 1 to 105) and carboxy-terminal (aa 48 to 177) regions were immunogenic for the majority of cattle in the study, stimulating strong proliferation and IFN-gamma production. T-cell lines from all individuals with distinct DRB3 haplotypes responded to aa 11 to 62 of Hsp20, which contained one or more immunodominant epitopes for each animal. One epitope, DEQTGLPIKS (aa 17 to 26), was identified by T-cell clones. The presence of strain-conserved T helper cell epitopes in aa 11 to 62 of the ubiquitously expressed Hsp20 that are presented by major histocompatibility complex class II molecules represented broadly in the Holstein breed supports the inclusion of this region in vaccine constructs to be tested in cattle.

  9. Comparative bioinformatics analysis of transcription factor genes suggests conservation of key regulatory domains among babesia bovis, B. microti and theileria equi.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Apicomplexa tick borne hemoparasites including B. bovis, B. microti, and Theileria equi are responsible for bovine and human babesiosis and equine theileriosis respectively. These neglected parasites of vast medical, epidemiological, and economic impact have complex life cycles in their vertebrate a...

  10. Stable expression of a GFP-BSD fusion protein in transfected and blasticidin-selected B. bovis merozoites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Babesia bovis is a tick-borne apicomplexan parasite that causes an acute disease in cattle. This study describes stable expression of an exogenous gfp-bsd gene in B. bovis transformed parasites. Cultured B. bovis infected erythrocytes of the biologically cloned Mo7 strain were transfected by electro...

  11. Observations on cattle schistosomiasis in the Sudan, a study in comparative medicine. III. Field testing of an irradiated Schistosoma bovis vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Majid, A.A.; Bushera, H.O.; Saad, A.M.; Hussein, M.F.; Taylor, M.G.; Dargie, J.D.; Marshall, T.F.; Nelson, G.S.

    1980-05-29

    Previous work has shown that cattle can acquire a strong resistance to Schistosoma bovis infection following repeated natural exposure. Partial resistance to a laboratory challenge with S. bovis has also been demonstrated in calves after immunization with an irradiated schistosomular or cercarial vaccine. The aim of the present study was to see whether this type of caccine could protect calves under the very different conditions of natural exposure to S. bovis in the field. Thirty 6- to 9-month-old calves were each immunized with 10,000 irradiated S. bovis schistosomula by intramuscular injection and 8 weeks later were released into an enzootic area along with 30 unvaccinated animals. The calves were followed up for 10 months, during which period protection was evidenced by a lower mortality rate, a slower rate of acquisition of infection, and lower fecal egg counts in the vaccinated calves. Necropsy of the survivors showed 60 to 70% reductions in worm and tissue egg counts of the vaccinated calves as compared to those not vaccinated.

  12. Evaluation of the inhibitory effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on Babesia and Theileria parasites.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Mohamed Abdo; El-Sayed, Shimaa Abd El-Salam; AbouLaila, Mahmoud; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2017-08-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine is known to have antibacterial, antiviral, antimalarial, and antioxidant activities. Therefore, the in vitro inhibitory effect of this hit was evaluated in the present study on the growth of Babesia and Theileria parasites. The in vitro growth of Babesia bovis, Babesia bigemina, Babesia divergens, Theileria equi, and Babesia caballi that were tested was significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) by micromolar concentrations of N-acetyl-L-cysteine. The inhibitory effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine was synergistically potentiated when used in combination with diminazene aceturate on B. bovis and B. caballi cultures. These results indicate that N-acetyl-L-cysteine might be used as a drug for the treatment of babesiosis, especially when used in combination with diminazene aceturate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhibition of the in vitro growth of babesia bigemina, babesia caballi and theileria equi parasites by trifluralin analogues

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Bovine and equine babesiosis caused by Babesia bovis, B. bigemina and B. caballi, and equine theileriosis caused by Theileria equi are global tick borne hemoprotozoan diseases characterized by fever, anemia, weight losses and abortions. A common feature of these diseases are transition f...

  14. Inhibitory effect of allicin on the growth of Babesia and Theileria equi parasites.

    PubMed

    Salama, Akram Ahmed; AbouLaila, Mahmoud; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Mousa, Ahmed; El-Sify, Ahmed; Allaam, Mahmoud; Zaghawa, Ahmed; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2014-01-01

    Allicin is an active ingredient of garlic that has antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and antiprotozoal activity. However, the inhibitory effects of allicin on Babesia parasites have not yet been examined. In the present study, allicin was tested as a potent inhibitor against the in vitro growth of bovine and equine Babesia parasites and the in vivo growth of Babesia microti in a mouse model. The in vitro growth of Babesia bovis, Babesia bigemina, Babesia caballi, or Theileria equi was inhibited by allicin in a dose-dependent manner and had IC50 values of 818, 675, 470, and 742 μM, respectively. Moreover, allicin significantly inhibited (P < 0.001) invasion of B. bovis, B. bigemina, B. caballi, and T. equi into the host erythrocyte. Furthermore, mice treated with 30 mg/kg of allicin for 5 days significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the parasitemia of B. microti over the period of the study. To further examine the potential synergism of allicin with diminazene aceturate, growth inhibitory assays were performed in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, combinations of diminazene aceturate with allicin synergistically potentiated its inhibitory effects in vitro and in vivo. These results indicate that allicin might be beneficial for the treatment of babesiosis, particularly when used in combination with diminazene aceturate.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis based on 28S rRNA of Babesia spp. in ruminants in China.

    PubMed

    Gou, Huitian; Guan, Guiquan; Ma, Miling; Liu, Aihong; Liu, Zhijie; Ren, Qiaoyun; Li, Youquan; Yang, Jifei; Chen, Ze; Yin, Hong; Luo, Jianxun

    2013-04-01

    Molecular phylogenetic analyses are mainly based on the small ribosomal RNA subunit (18S rRNA), internal transcribed spacer regions, and other molecular markers. We compared the phylogenetic relationships of Babesia spp. using large subunit ribosomal RNA, i.e., 28S rRNA, and the united 28S + 18S rRNA sequence fragments from 11 isolates of Babesia spp. collected in China. Due to sequence length and variability, the 28S rRNA gene contained more information than the 18S rRNA gene and could be used to elucidate the phlyogenetic relationships of B. motasi, B. major, and B. bovis. Thus, 28S rRNA is another candidate marker that can be used for the phylogenetic analysis of Babesia spp. However, the united fragment (28S + 18S) analysis provided better supported phylogenetic relationships than single genes for Babesia spp. in China.

  16. A Molecular Survey of Babesia Species and Detection of a New Babesia Species by DNA Related to B. venatorum from White Yaks in Tianzhu, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Junlong; Guan, Guiquan; Li, Youquan; Liu, Aihong; Luo, Jianxun; Yin, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Bovine babesiosis is a tick-transmitted disease caused by different species of Babesia. The white yak is a unique yak breed that lives only in Tianzhu in the Tibetan Autonomous County, Gansu Province, in northwestern China. Previous research using the ELISA method has confirmed that the white yak could become infected with B. bigemina. The objective of this study was the molecular detection and identification of Babesia species in white yaks. A total of 409 white yak blood samples were collected from 11 areas of the Tianzhu Tibetan Autonomous County in Northwest China from April to August, 2015. The V4 hypervariable region of Babesia 18S rRNA was amplified from extracted genomic DNA using nested PCR and sequenced. The nearly full-length sequence of 18S rRNA including the V4 region from the newly discovered Babesia was amplified and sequenced with Sanger method. PCR detection and sequencing indicated that 4/409 samples were positive for B. bigemina, 3/409 samples were positive for B. bovis, and 5/409 samples were positive for B. ovata. Additionally, a new Babesia species was found in 4/409 white yaks. A unique sequence of 1,627 bp was obtained from two of the four samples. The sequence was similar to Babesia species Akita (98.5%) found in Ixodes ovatus and B. venatorum (98%) and shared a 98% identity with B. divergens and a 98.1% identity with B. odocoilei. This study provides new data about Babesia infections in white yaks in northwestern China, and a new Babesia species similar to B. venatorum was identified in white yaks for the first time. PMID:28352260

  17. A Molecular Survey of Babesia Species and Detection of a New Babesia Species by DNA Related to B. venatorum from White Yaks in Tianzhu, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junlong; Guan, Guiquan; Li, Youquan; Liu, Aihong; Luo, Jianxun; Yin, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Bovine babesiosis is a tick-transmitted disease caused by different species of Babesia. The white yak is a unique yak breed that lives only in Tianzhu in the Tibetan Autonomous County, Gansu Province, in northwestern China. Previous research using the ELISA method has confirmed that the white yak could become infected with B. bigemina. The objective of this study was the molecular detection and identification of Babesia species in white yaks. A total of 409 white yak blood samples were collected from 11 areas of the Tianzhu Tibetan Autonomous County in Northwest China from April to August, 2015. The V4 hypervariable region of Babesia 18S rRNA was amplified from extracted genomic DNA using nested PCR and sequenced. The nearly full-length sequence of 18S rRNA including the V4 region from the newly discovered Babesia was amplified and sequenced with Sanger method. PCR detection and sequencing indicated that 4/409 samples were positive for B. bigemina, 3/409 samples were positive for B. bovis, and 5/409 samples were positive for B. ovata. Additionally, a new Babesia species was found in 4/409 white yaks. A unique sequence of 1,627 bp was obtained from two of the four samples. The sequence was similar to Babesia species Akita (98.5%) found in Ixodes ovatus and B. venatorum (98%) and shared a 98% identity with B. divergens and a 98.1% identity with B. odocoilei. This study provides new data about Babesia infections in white yaks in northwestern China, and a new Babesia species similar to B. venatorum was identified in white yaks for the first time.

  18. Molecular and Parasitological Survey of Bovine Piroplasms in the Black Sea Region, Including the First Report of Babesiosis Associated with Babesia divergens in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aktas, M; Ozubek, S

    2015-11-01

    Clinical cases of babesiosis were evaluated, and the frequency of bovine Babesia and Theileria parasites was determined in cattle. Blood samples and thin blood smears were collected from 23 cattle exhibiting clinical signs of babesiosis. In addition, tick and blood samples were collected from 100 apparently healthy cattle cograzing from the same area. Egg masses obtained from fully engorged female ticks were included. DNA isolated from blood and tick samples was screened for Babesia and Theileria by reverse line blot assay. Piroplasms compatible with Babesia spp. were observed microscopically for symptomatic cattle as circular, oval, elongated, or pear-shaped bodies. Parasitemia ranged from 0.08 to 0.9% for Babesia bovis, 2.5 to 15.4% for Babesia bigemina, and 7.4% for Babesia divergens. Reverse line blot showed positivity in 13 (13%) of the sampled clinically normal cattle and revealed the presence of three Babesia species. Babesia bovis was the most prevalent (9/100, 9%), followed by Babesia occultans (3/100, 3%) and B. bigemina (1/100, 1%). One animal infected with B. bigemina was also infected with B. bovis. The single animal infected with B. divergens showed symptoms of babesiosis. Ticks were identified as Rhipicephalus annulatus, Rhipicephalus turanicus, and Ixodes ricinus. One female R. annulatus and its egg mass were infected with B. bigemina. Neither Theileria annulata nor Theileria buffeli/orientalis infections were observed in cattle or ticks. This is the first report of clinical babesiosis caused by B. divergens in cattle from Turkey. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Inhibition of the in vitro growth of Babesia bigemina, Babesia caballi and Theileria equi parasites by trifluralin analogues.

    PubMed

    G Silva, Marta; Knowles, Donald P; Antunes, Sandra; Domingos, Ana; Esteves, Maria A; Suarez, Carlos E

    2017-06-01

    Bovine and equine babesiosis caused by Babesia bovis, Babesia bigemina and Babesia caballi, along with equine theileriosis caused by Theileria equi are global tick-borne hemoprotozoan diseases characterized by fever, anemia, weight losses and abortions. A common feature of these diseases are transition from acute to chronic phases, in which parasites may persist in the hosts for life. Antiprotozoal drugs are important for managing infection and disease. Previous research demonstrated that trifluralin analogues, designated (TFLAs) 1-15, which specifically bind to regions of alpha-tubulin protein in plants and protozoan parasites, have the ability to inhibit the in vitro growth of B. bovis. The inhibitory activity of TFLAs 1-15 minus TFLA 5 was tested in vitro against cultured B. bigemina, B. caballi and T. equi. The four TFLAs with greatest inhibitory activity were then analyzed for hemolytic activity and toxicity against erythrocytes. All TFLAs tested in the study showed inhibitory effects against the three parasite species. TFLA 2, TFLA 11, TFLA 13 and TFLA 14 were the most effective inhibitors for the three species tested, with estimated IC50 between 5.1 and 10.1μM at 72h. The drug's solvent (DMSO/ethanol) did not statistically affect the growth of the parasites nor cause hemolysis. Also, TFLA 2, 13 and 14 did not cause statistically significant hemolytic activity on bovine and equine erythrocytes at 15μM, and TFLA 2, 11 and 13 had no detectable toxic effects on bovine and equine erythrocytes at 15μM, suggesting that these drugs do not compromise erythrocyte viability. The demonstrated ability of the trifluralin analogues to inhibit in vitro growth of Babesia spp. and Theileria equi, and their lack of toxic effects on erythrocytes supports further in vivo testing and eventually their development as novel alternatives for the treatment of babesiosis and theileriosis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic characterization of Babesia and Theileria parasites in water buffaloes in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Fukushi, Shintaro; Hayashida, Kyoko; Kothalawala, Hemal; Silva, Seekkuge Susil Priyantha; Vimalakumar, Singarayar Caniciyas; Kanagaratnam, Ratnam; Meewewa, Asela Sanjeewa; Suthaharan, Kalpana; Puvirajan, Thamotharampillai; de Silva, Weligodage Kumarawansa; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2014-02-24

    Water buffaloes are thought to be the reservoir hosts for several hemoprotozoan parasites that infect cattle. In the present study, we surveyed Sri Lankan bred water buffaloes for infections with Babesia bovis, Babesia bigemina, Theileria annulata, and Theileria orientalis using parasite-specific PCR assays. When 320 blood-derived DNA samples from water buffaloes reared in three different districts (Polonnaruwa, Mannar, and Mullaitivu) of Sri Lanka were PCR screened, B. bovis, B. bigemina, and T. orientalis were detected. While T. orientalis was the predominant parasite (82.5%), low PCR-positive rates were observed for B. bovis (1.9%) and B. bigemina (1.6%). Amplicons of the gene sequences of the Rhoptry Associated Protein-1 (RAP-1) of B. bovis, the Apical Membrane Antigen-1 (AMA-1) of B. bigemina, and the Major Piroplasm Surface Protein (MPSP) of T. orientalis were compared with those characterized previously in Sri Lankan cattle. While the B. bigemina AMA-1 sequences from water buffaloes shared high identity values with those from cattle, B. bovis RAP-1 sequences from water buffaloes diverged genetically from those of cattle. For T. orientalis, none of the MPSP sequence types reported previously in Sri Lankan cattle (types 1, 3, 5, and 7) were detected in the water buffaloes, and the MPSP sequences analyzed in the present study belonged to types N1 or N2. In summary, in addition to reporting the first PCR-based survey of Babesia and Theileria parasites in water buffaloes in Sri Lanka, the present study found that the predominant variants of water buffalo-derived B. bovis RAP-1 and T. orientalis MPSP sequences were different from those previously described from cattle in this country. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of Babesia bigemina 200 kDa recombinant antigen in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Altangerel, Khukhuu; Alhassan, Andy; Iseki, Hiroshi; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2009-07-01

    A truncated fragment of the gene encoding the 200-kDa protein (P200) of Babesia bigemina was cloned into a plasmid vector, pGEX-4 T-1 and expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione-S-transferase fused protein. An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using the rp200/CT detected specific antibodies in cattle experimentally infected with B. bigemina. Furthermore, the antigen did not cross-react with antibodies to Babesia bovis, a closely related Babesia parasite indicating that rp200/CT is a specific antigen for the diagnosis of B. bigemina infection. Additionally, ELISA using p200/CT and polymerase chain reaction were conducted on serum and corresponding DNA samples obtained from field cattle to evaluate the diagnostic utility of the p200/CT antigen. Results from the current study suggest that p200/CT ELISA is a sensitive and specific method for improved serodiagnosis of B. bigemina infection.

  2. Molecular survey of Babesia infections in cattle from different areas of Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Bawm, Saw; Htun, Lat Lat; Maw, Ni Ni; Ngwe, Tin; Tosa, Yusuke; Kon, Tomoyuki; Kaneko, Chiho; Nakao, Ryo; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Kato, Hirotomo; Katakura, Ken

    2016-02-01

    Cattle babesiosis is one of the most important tick-borne diseases worldwide. The present study reports a molecular survey of Babesia infections in cattle in Myanmar. Nested PCR assays based on the Babesia bigemina apical membrane antigen-1 gene (AMA-1) and B. bovis rhoptry associated protein-1 gene (RAP-1) revealed that the overall percentage of B. bigemina and B. bovis infection were 9.8% (70/713) and 17.1% (122/713), respectively. A mixed infection was detected in 4.6% (33/713) of animals. Animals <1 year (OR=13.66, CI=5.15-36.26) and 1-5 years of age (OR=3.91, CI=1.50-10.17) were identified as potential risk factors for B. bigemina infection. For B. bovis infection, age <1 year (OR=3.06, CI=1.63-5.75) and 1-5 years (OR=2.08, CI=1.21-3.57), Friesian-Zebu crossbreeds (OR=2.04, CI=1.26-3.30) and grazing (OR=1.59, CI=1.06-2.38) were identified as potential risk factors. This is the first report on a nationwide survey of bovine Babesia infections in Myanmar, providing useful information for the management and control of the disease.

  3. Evaluation of in vitro inhibitory effect of enoxacin on Babesia and Theileria parasites.

    PubMed

    Omar, Mosaab A; Salama, Akram; Elsify, Ahmed; Rizk, Mohamed Abdo; Al-Aboody, Mohammad Saleh; AbouLaila, Mahmoud; El-Sayed, Shimaa Abd El-Salam; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2016-02-01

    Enoxacin is a broad-spectrum 6-fluoronaphthyridinone antibacterial agent (fluoroquinolones) structurally related to nalidixic acid used mainly in the treatment of urinary tract infections and gonorrhea. Also it has been shown recently that it may have cancer inhibiting effect. The primary antibabesial effect of Enoxacin is due to inhibition of DNA gyrase subunit A, and DNA topoisomerase. In the present study, enoxacin was tested as a potent inhibitor against the in vitro growth of bovine and equine Piroplasms. The in vitro growth of five Babesia species that were tested was significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) by micro molar concentrations of enoxacin (IC50 values = 33.5, 15.2, 7.5 and 23.2 μM for Babesia bovis, Babesia bigemina, Babesia caballi, and Theileria equi, respectively). Enoxacin IC50 values for Babesia and Theileria parasites were satisfactory as the drug is potent antibacterial drug with minimum side effects. Therefore, enoxacin might be used for treatment of Babesiosis and Theileriosis especially in case of mixed infections with bacterial diseases or incase of animal sensitivity against diminazin toxicity.

  4. Plasmids containing small subunit ribosomal RNA gene fragments from Babesia bovis and Babesia bigemina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BEI Resources was developed by NIAID as a centralized biological resource center for research reagents to the scientific community (http://www.beiresources.org/). They have a considerable amount of reagents and isolates for parasitologists working with Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia, Toxoplasma, and...

  5. In silico predicted conserved B-cell epitopes in the Merozoite Surface Antigen -2 family of B. bovis are neutralization-sensitive

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Merozoite Surface Antigens-2 of Babesia bovis conform a family of GPI-anchored glycoproteins located at the parasite cell surface, that contain neutralization-sensitive B-cell epitopes, thus constituting putative vaccine candidates for bovine babesiosis. It was previously shown that (i) the MSA-...

  6. Inhibitory effects of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate from green tea on the growth of Babesia parasites.

    PubMed

    Aboulaila, M; Yokoyama, N; Igarashi, I

    2010-04-01

    (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the major tea catechin and accounts for 50-80% of the total catechin in green tea. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, anti-cancer, and anti-trypanocidal activities. This report describes the inhibitory effect of (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate on the in vitro growth of bovine Babesia parasites and the in vivo growth of the mouse-adapted rodent babesia B. microti. The in vitro growth of the Babesia species was significantly (P<0.05) inhibited in the presence of micromolar concentrations of EGCG (IC50 values=18 and 25 microM for B. bovis, and B. bigemina, respectively). The parasites showed no re-growth at 25 microM for B. bovis and B. bigemina in the subsequent viability test. The drug significantly (P<0.05) inhibited the growth of B. microti at doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg body weight, and the parasites completely cleared on day 14 and 16 post-inoculation in the 5 and 10 mg/kg treated groups, respectively. These findings highlight the potentiality of (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate as a chemotherapeutic drug for the treatment of babesiosis.

  7. Molecular cloning, phylogenetic analysis and heat shock response of Babesia gibsoni heat shock protein 90

    PubMed Central

    YAMASAKI, Masahiro; TSUBOI, Yoshihiro; TANIYAMA, Yusuke; UCHIDA, Naohiro; SATO, Reeko; NAKAMURA, Kensuke; OHTA, Hiroshi; TAKIGUCHI, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The Babesia gibsoni heat shock protein 90 (BgHSP90) gene was cloned and sequenced. The length of the gene was 2,610 bp with two introns. This gene was amplified from cDNA corresponding to full length coding sequence (CDS) with an open reading frame of 2,148 bp. A phylogenetic analysis of the CDS of HSP90 gene showed that B. gibsoni was most closely related to B. bovis and Babesia sp. BQ1/Lintan and lies within a phylogenetic cluster of protozoa. Moreover, mRNA transcription profile for BgHSP90 exposed to high temperature were examined by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. BgHSP90 levels were elevated when the parasites were incubated at 43°C for 1 hr. PMID:27149891

  8. Mycobacterium bovis in Panama, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Fermín; Chernyaeva, Ekatherina; Mendoza, Libardo; Sambrano, Dilcia; Correa, Ricardo; Rotkevich, Mikhail; Tarté, Miroslava; Hernández, Humberto; Velazco, Bredio; de Escobar, Cecilia; de Waard, Jacobus H.

    2015-01-01

    Panama remains free of zoonotic tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis. However, DNA fingerprinting of 7 M. bovis isolates from a 2013 bovine tuberculosis outbreak indicated minimal homology with strains previously circulating in Panama. M. bovis dispersion into Panama highlights the need for enhanced genotype testing to track zoonotic infections. PMID:25988479

  9. An epidemiological survey of bovine Babesia and Theileria parasites in cattle, buffaloes, and sheep in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Elsify, Ahmed; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Nayel, Mohammed; Salama, Akram; Elkhtam, Ahmed; Rizk, Mohamed; Mosaab, Omar; Sultan, Khaled; Elsayed, Shimaa; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2015-02-01

    Cattle, buffaloes, and sheep are the main sources of meat and milk in Egypt, but their productivity is thought to be greatly reduced by hemoprotozoan parasitic diseases. In this study, we analyzed the infection rates of Babesia bovis, Babesia bigemina, Theileria annulata, and Theileria orientalis, using parasite-specific PCR assays in blood-DNA samples sourced from cattle (n=439), buffaloes (n=50), and sheep (n=105) reared in Menoufia, Behera, Giza, and Sohag provinces of Egypt. In cattle, the positive rates of B. bovis, B. bigemina, T. annulata, and T. orientalis were 3.18%, 7.97%, 9.56%, and 0.68%, respectively. On the other hand, B. bovis and T. orientalis were the only parasites detected in buffaloes and each of these parasites was only found in two individual DNA samples (both 2%), while one (0.95%) and two (1.90%) of the sheep samples were positive for B. bovis and B. bigemina, respectively. Sequence analysis showed that the B. bovis Rhoptry Associated Protein-1 and the B. bigemina Apical Membrane Antigen-1 genes were highly conserved among the samples, with 99.3-100% and 95.3-100% sequence identity values, respectively. In contrast, the Egyptian T. annulata merozoite surface antigen-1 gene sequences were relatively diverse (87.8-100% identity values), dispersing themselves across several clades in the phylogenetic tree containing sequences from other countries. Additionally, the T. orientalis Major Piroplasm Surface Protein (MPSP) gene sequences were classified as types 1 and 2. This is the first report of T. orientalis in Egypt, and of type 2 MPSP in buffaloes. Detection of MPSP type 2, which is considered a relatively virulent genotype, suggests that T. orientalis infection may have veterinary and economic significance in Egypt. In conclusion, the present study, which analyzed multiple species of Babesia and Theileria parasites in different livestock animals, may shed an additional light on the epidemiology of hemoprotozoan parasites in Egypt. Copyright

  10. Inhibition of Babesia spp. by plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Timms, P

    1981-01-01

    Five commercially available plastic containers were compared with glass for toxicity toward Babesia rodhaini and Babesia bigemina. Comparisons were made by using infectivity tests in mice (B. rodhaini) and cattle (B. bigemina). Low-density polypropylene and polystyrene containers were not toxic, but two of the three polyvinyl chloride containers tested significantly reduced the viability of both species of Babesia. Plasticizer present in various amounts on the surface of the toxic containers was most likely the inhibitory material. Images PMID:7224620

  11. Molecular epidemiology of bovine Babesia spp. and Theileria orientalis parasites in beef cattle from northern and northeastern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Jirapattharasate, Charoonluk; Adjou Moumouni, Paul Franck; Cao, Shinuo; Iguchi, Aiko; Liu, Mingming; Wang, Guanbo; Zhou, Mo; Vudriko, Patrick; Changbunjong, Tanasak; Sungpradit, Sivapong; Ratanakorn, Parntep; Moonarmart, Walasinee; Sedwisai, Poonyapat; Weluwanarak, Thekhawet; Wongsawang, Witsanu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Xuan, Xuenan

    2016-02-01

    Beef cattle production represents the largest cattle population in Thailand. Their productivity is constrained by tick-borne diseases such as babesiosis and theileriosis. In this study, we determined the prevalence of Babesia bigemina, Babesia bovis and Theileria orientalis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The genetic markers that were used for detection of the above parasites were sequenced to determine identities and similarity for Babesia spp. and genetic diversity of T. orientalis. Furthermore the risk factors for the occurrence of the above protozoan parasites in beef cattle from northern and northeastern parts of Thailand were assessed. A total of 329 blood samples were collected from beef cattle in 6 provinces. The study revealed that T. orientalis was the most prevalent (30.1%) parasite in beef cattle followed by B. bigemina (13.1%) and B. bovis (5.5%). Overall, 78.7% of the cattle screened were infected with at least one of the above parasites. Co-infection with Babesia spp. and T. orientalis was 30.1%. B. bigemina and T. orientalis were the most prevalent (15.1%) co-infection although triple infection with the three parasites was observed in 3.0% of the samples. Sequencing analysis revealed that B. bigemina RAP1 gene and B. bovis SBP2 gene were conserved among the parasites from different cattle samples. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the T. orientalis MPSP gene from parasites isolated from cattle in north and northeast Thailand was classified into types 5 and 7 as reported previously. Lack of tick control program was the universal risk factor of the occurrence of Babesia spp. and T. orientalis infection in beef cattle in northern and northeastern Thailand. We therefore recommend training of farmers on appropriate tick control strategies and further research on potential vectors for T. orientalis and elucidate the effect of co-infection with Babesia spp. on the pathogenicity of T. orientalis infection on beef in northern and northeastern Thailand

  12. Mycoplasma bovis research update

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycoplasma bovis in bison is a newly emerging and potentially devastating threat to the bison industry. This bacterium is increasingly being identified, both in the United States and Canada, as the cause of severe respiratory disease outbreaks with devastating consequences for the health of the ani...

  13. Mycoplasma bovis research update

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Research conducted at the USDA/ARS/National Animal Disease Center in Ames, Iowa, reveals that ELISAs designed for detection of M. bovis-specific serum IgG in cattle may not be optimal for identification of seropositive bison, particularly those with low to moderate levels of antibody. In a study so...

  14. Natural Babesia infection sought in black and Norway rats trapped in five Egyptian Governorates.

    PubMed

    el Bahrawy, A F; Nafei, S M; Morsy, T A; Farrag, A M

    1993-08-01

    Babesiosis is a protozoal disease caused by members of the genus Babesia transmitted by the ixodid ticks. It is a parasite of various mammalian hosts as bovine (B. bovis), equine (B. equi), rodent (B. microti), canine (B. canis) and others. Human cases of babesiosis have been reported from several countries including Egypt. It is now well established that man may become infected (Fulminating or Subclinical) with several species of Babesia without prior splenectomy. In this paper, a total of 398 Rattus rattus and 90 R. norvegicus were trapped in Suez, Ismailia, Port Said, North Sinai and South Sinai Governorates. Blood films were taken from the atil after a simple cut of its end. The films were fixed in acetone free methyl alcohol and stained with Giemsa stain as usual. The results showed that all rats trapped in Ismailia had Babesia infection, then decreased in North Sinai, Port Said, South Sinai and was zero in Suez. As double infection. Trypanosoma lewisi was found in rats trapped in Port Said, North Sinai and South Sinai. But none had Theileria infection. The medical and veterinary importance of these results were discussed.

  15. Inhibitory effects of pepstatin A and mefloquine on the growth of Babesia parasites.

    PubMed

    Munkhjargal, Tserendorj; AbouLaila, Mahmoud; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Ichikawa, Madoka; Davaasuren, Batdorj; Nyamjargal, Tserendorj; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2012-10-01

    We evaluated the inhibitory effects of pepstatin A and mefloquine on the in vitro and in vivo growths of Babesia parasites. The in vitro growth of Babesia bovis, B. bigemina, B. caballi, and B. equi was significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) by micromolar concentrations of pepstatin A (50% inhibitory concentrations = 38.5, 36.5, 17.6, and 18.1 μM, respectively) and mefloquine (50% inhibitory concentrations = 59.7, 56.7, 20.7, and 4 μM, respectively). Furthermore, both reagents either alone at a concentration of 5 mg/kg or in combinations (2.5/2.5 and 5/5 mg/kg) for 10 days significantly inhibited the in vivo growth of B. microti in mice. Mefloquine treatment was highly effective and the combination treatments were less effective than other treatments. Therefore, mefloquine may antagonize the actions of pepstatin A against babesiosis and aspartic proteases may play an important role in the asexual growth cycle of Babesia parasites.

  16. Clofazimine Inhibits the Growth of Babesia and Theileria Parasites In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tuvshintulga, Bumduuren; AbouLaila, Mahmoud; Davaasuren, Batdorj; Ishiyama, Aki; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Iwatsuki, Masato; Otoguro, Kazuhiko; Ōmura, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the growth-inhibitory effects of clofazimine, currently used for treating leprosy, against Babesia bovis, B. bigemina, B. caballi, and Theileria equi in in vitro culture and against Babesia microti in mice. The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of clofazimine against the in vitro growth of B. bovis, B. bigemina, B. caballi, and T. equi were 4.5, 3, 4.3, and 0.29 μM, respectively. In mice infected with B. microti, treatment with 20 mg/kg of body weight of clofazimine administered orally resulted in a significantly lower peak parasitemia (5.3%) than that in the control group (45.9%), which was comparable to the subcutaneous administration of 25 mg/kg diminazene aceturate, the most widely used treatment for animal piroplasmosis. Although slight anemia was observed in both clofazimine- and diminazene aceturate-treated infected mice, the level and duration of anemia were lower and shorter, respectively, than those in untreated infected mice. Using blood transfusions and PCR, we also examined whether clofazimine completely killed B. microti. On day 40 postinfection, when blood analysis was performed, parasites were not found in blood smears; however, the DNA of B. microti was detected in the blood of clofazimine-treated animals and in several tissues of clofazimine- and diminazene aceturate-treated mice by PCR. The growth of parasites was observed in mice after blood transfusions from clofazimine-treated mice. In conclusion, clofazimine showed excellent inhibitory effects against Babesia and Theileria in vitro and in vivo, and further study on clofazimine is required for the future development of a novel chemotherapy with high efficacy and safety against animal piroplasmosis and, possibly, human babesiosis. PMID:26883713

  17. Molecular detection and genetic diversity of bovine Babesia spp., Theileria orientalis, and Anaplasma marginale in beef cattle in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Jirapattharasate, Charoonluk; Adjou Moumouni, Paul Franck; Cao, Shinuo; Iguchi, Aiko; Liu, Mingming; Wang, Guanbo; Zhou, Mo; Vudriko, Patrick; Efstratiou, Artemis; Changbunjong, Tanasak; Sungpradit, Sivapong; Ratanakorn, Parntep; Moonarmart, Walasinee; Sedwisai, Poonyapat; Weluwanarak, Thekhawet; Wongsawang, Witsanu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Xuan, Xuenan

    2017-02-01

    Babesia spp., Theileria orientalis, and Anaplasma marginale are significant tick-borne pathogens that affect the health and productivity of cattle in tropical and subtropical areas. In this study, we used PCR to detect the presence of Babesia bovis, Babesia bigemina, and T. orientalis in 279 beef cattle from Western Thailand and A. marginale in 608 beef cattle from the north, northeastern, and western regions. The PCRs were performed using species-specific primers based on the B. bovis spherical body protein 2 (BboSBP2), B. bigemina rhoptry-associated protein 1a (BbiRAP-1a), T. orientalis major piroplasm surface protein (ToMPSP), and A. marginale major surface protein 4 (AmMSP4) genes. To determine the genetic diversity of the above parasites, amplicons of B. bovis and B. bigemina ITS1-5.8s rRNA gene-ITS2 regions (B. bovis ITS, B. bigemina ITS), ToMPSP, and AmMSP4 genes were sequenced for phylogenetic analysis. PCR results revealed that the prevalence of B. bovis, B. bigemina, T. orientalis, and A. marginale in the Western region was 11.1, 12.5, 7.8, and 39.1 %, respectively. Coinfections of two or three parasites were observed in 17.9 % of the animals sampled. The study revealed that the prevalence of A. marginale in the western region was higher than in the north and northeastern regions (7 %). Sequence analysis showed the BboSBP2 gene to be more conserved than B. bovis ITS in the different isolates and, similarly, the BbiRAP-1a was more conserved than B. bigemina ITS. In the phylogenetic analysis, T. orientalis MPSP sequences were classified into types 3, 5, and 7 as previously reported. A. marginale MSP4 gene sequences shared high identity and similarity with each other and clustered with isolates from other countries. This study provides information on the prevalence and genetic diversity of tick-borne pathogens in beef cattle and highlights the need for effective strategies to control these pathogens in Thailand.

  18. Babesia species in questing Ixodes ricinus, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Maria E; Andersson, Martin O

    2016-02-01

    Babesiosis is an emerging tick-transmitted zoonosis in large parts of the world. In Sweden, the occurrence and diversity of Babesia species is largely unknown. In order to estimate the exposure to Babesia from infected ticks, we collected questing Ixodes ricinus from several sites across southern Sweden during two consecutive field seasons and investigated the occurrence of Babesia species. We report for the first time the occurrence of the zoonotic species Babesia venatorum in Swedish ticks, with a prevalence of 1%. We also detected B. microti (prevalence 3.2%) and B. divergens (prevalence 0.2%). The incidence of Babesia in questing ticks is substantially lower than that of several other tick-borne diseases in Sweden. Nevertheless, babesiosis should not be neglected as a possible diagnosis following tick bites in humans and animals in Sweden.

  19. Canine babesiosis in Romania due to Babesia canis and Babesia vogeli: a molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Ionita, Mariana; Mitrea, Ioan Liviu; Pfister, Kurt; Hamel, Dietmar; Buzatu, Catalin Marius; Silaghi, Cornelia

    2012-05-01

    Canine babesiosis is a tick-borne disease caused by the protozoa Babesia spp. that affects dogs worldwide. In Romania, canine babesiosis has become quite frequent in the last few years, with a wide variety of clinical signs, ranging from mild, nonspecific illness to peracute collapse, and even death. Traditionally, a Babesia infection in dogs is diagnosed based on the morphologic appearance of the intraerythrocytic piroplasms observed in peripheral blood smears. To date, no data on genetic characterization of Babesia species in dogs has been documented for Romania. Therefore, a molecular survey on natural Babesia infections of dogs in Romania using polymerase chain reaction and genetic sequence analysis of a fragment of the ssRNA gene was performed. A total number of 16 blood samples were tested for the presence of Babesia DNA. Blood samples were collected from 11 dogs with symptoms of babesiosis and microscopically proven positive for Babesia and from a group of five asymptomatic dogs, not tested microscopically for Babesia, which were included in the study for comparative analysis. The piroplasm-specific PCR amplifying the partial 18S rRNA gene confirmed Babesia spp. infection in all 11 samples from dogs with clinical babesiosis, and in one of the clinically normal dogs. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of Babesia canis in all clinically affected dogs and Babesia vogeli in one clinically normal dog. This is the first molecular evidence of B. canis and B. vogeli in dogs from Romania. The results of the study provide basic information toward a better understanding of the epidemiology of canine babesiosis in Romania and will help to promote an effective control program.

  20. Detection of Theileria and Babesia in brown brocket deer (Mazama gouazoubira) and marsh deer (Blastocerus dichotomus) in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Júlia A G; Rabelo, Elida M L; Ribeiro, Múcio F B

    2011-04-19

    Intraerythrocytic protozoan species of the genera Theileria and Babesia are known to infect both wild and domestic animals, and both are transmitted by hard-ticks of the family Ixodidae. The prevalences of hemoprotozoa and ectoparasites in 15 free-living Mazama gouazoubira, two captive M. gouazoubira and four captive Blastocerus dichotomus from the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil, have been determined through the examination of blood smears and the use of nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR). The cervid population was inspected for the presence of ticks and any specimens encountered were identified alive under the stereomicroscope. Blood samples were collected from all 21 animals, following which blood smears were prepared, subjected to quick Romanowsky staining and examined under the optical microscope. DNA was extracted with the aid of commercial kits from cervid blood samples and from tick salivary glands. The nPCR assay comprised two amplification reactions: the first was conducted using primers specific for a 1700 bp segment of the 18S rRNA gene of Babesia and Theileria species, whilst the second employed primers designed to amplify a common 420 bp Babesia 18S rRNA fragment identified by aligning sequences from Babesia spp. available at GenBank. The ticks Amblyomma cajennense, Rhipicephalus microplus and Dermacentor nitens were identified in various of the cervids examined. Of the animals investigated, 71.4% (15/21) were infected with hemoprotozoa, including Theileria cervi (47.6%), Theileria sp. (14.3%), Babesia bovis (4.8%) and Babesia bigemina (4.8%). However, only one of the infected wild cervids exhibited accentuated anaemia (PCV=17%). This is first report concerning the occurrence of Theileria spp. in Brazilian cervids.

  1. Differential expression of three members of the multidomain adhesion CCp family in babesia bigemina, babesia bovis and theileria equi

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Members of the CCp protein family have been previously described to be expressed on gametocytes of apicomplexan Plasmodium parasites. Knocking out Plasmodium CCp genes blocks the development of the parasite in the mosquito vector, making the CCp proteins potential targets for the development of a tr...

  2. The evolutionary dynamics of variant antigen genes in Babesia reveal a history of genomic innovation underlying host–parasite interaction

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Andrew P.; Otto, Thomas D.; Darby, Alistair; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Xia, Dong; Echaide, Ignacio Eduardo; Farber, Marisa; Gahlot, Sunayna; Gamble, John; Gupta, Dinesh; Gupta, Yask; Jackson, Louise; Malandrin, Laurence; Malas, Tareq B.; Moussa, Ehab; Nair, Mridul; Reid, Adam J.; Sanders, Mandy; Sharma, Jyotsna; Tracey, Alan; Quail, Mike A.; Weir, William; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Hall, Neil; Willadsen, Peter; Lingelbach, Klaus; Shiels, Brian; Tait, Andy; Berriman, Matt; Allred, David R.; Pain, Arnab

    2014-01-01

    Babesia spp. are tick-borne, intraerythrocytic hemoparasites that use antigenic variation to resist host immunity, through sequential modification of the parasite-derived variant erythrocyte surface antigen (VESA) expressed on the infected red blood cell surface. We identified the genomic processes driving antigenic diversity in genes encoding VESA (ves1) through comparative analysis within and between three Babesia species, (B. bigemina, B. divergens and B. bovis). Ves1 structure diverges rapidly after speciation, notably through the evolution of shortened forms (ves2) from 5′ ends of canonical ves1 genes. Phylogenetic analyses show that ves1 genes are transposed between loci routinely, whereas ves2 genes are not. Similarly, analysis of sequence mosaicism shows that recombination drives variation in ves1 sequences, but less so for ves2, indicating the adoption of different mechanisms for variation of the two families. Proteomic analysis of the B. bigemina PR isolate shows that two dominant VESA1 proteins are expressed in the population, whereas numerous VESA2 proteins are co-expressed, consistent with differential transcriptional regulation of each family. Hence, VESA2 proteins are abundant and previously unrecognized elements of Babesia biology, with evolutionary dynamics consistently different to those of VESA1, suggesting that their functions are distinct. PMID:24799432

  3. Molecular detection of Babesia capreoli and Babesia venatorum in wild Swedish roe deer, Capreolus capreolus.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Martin O; Bergvall, Ulrika A; Chirico, Jan; Christensson, Madeleine; Lindgren, Per-Eric; Nordström, Jonas; Kjellander, Petter

    2016-04-19

    The epidemiology of the zoonotic tick-transmitted parasite Babesia spp. and its occurrence in wild reservoir hosts in Sweden is unclear. In European deer, several parasite species, including Babesia capreoli and the zoonotic B. venatorum and B. divergens has been reported previously. The European roe deer, Capreolus capreolus, is an important and common part of the indigenous fauna in Europe, as well as an important host for Ixodes ricinus ticks, the vector of several Babesia spp. in Europe. Here, we aimed to investigate the occurrence of Babesia spp. in roe deer in Sweden. Roe deer (n = 77) were caught and sampled for blood. Babesia spp. was detected with a PCR assay targeting the 18S rRNA gene. The prevalence of Babesia spp. was 52%, and two species were detected; B. capreoli and B. venatorum in 44 and 7.8% of the individuals, respectively. Infection occurred both in summer and winter. We showed that roe deer in Sweden, close to the edge of their northern inland distributional range, are infected with Babesia spp. The occurrence of B. venatorum in roe deer imply that it is established in Sweden and the zoonotic implication of this finding should be regarded to a greater extent in future.

  4. Emergence of Babesia canis in southern England.

    PubMed

    de Marco, Maria Del Mar Fernández; Hernández-Triana, Luis M; Phipps, L Paul; Hansford, Kayleigh; Mitchell, E Sian; Cull, Ben; Swainsbury, Clive S; Fooks, Anthony R; Medlock, Jolyon M; Johnson, Nicholas

    2017-05-17

    The United Kingdom is considered free of autochthonous transmission of canine babesiosis although cases are reported in dogs associated with recent travel abroad. During the winter months of 2015/16, a cluster of cases of disease in dogs with signs suggestive of canine babesiosis were reported in Harlow, Essex. Babesia species were detected in dog blood samples by Giemsa staining of blood smears and by pan-piroplasm PCRs. Babesia species were also detected in extracts of tick DNA using pan-piroplasm PCRs. DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis was used to confirm the species of Babesia present in dog blood and tick samples. Tick species were identified by PCR-sequencing based on amplification of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit one (cox1) gene. Dermacentor reticulatus ticks were sampled from field sites in England and Wales. Blood smear analysis on samples taken from some of the affected dogs confirmed the presence of a large Babesia species within erythrocytes. A tick recovered from one of these cases was identified as Dermacentor reticulatus, a species with a limited distribution in England and Wales, but a known vector of canine babesiosis in continental Europe. Babesia canis was subsequently identified in blood samples obtained from three clinical cases (all dogs) within the area and from ticks associated with these dogs. A field survey detected 17 adult D. reticulatus ticks from one area visited by the affected dogs. Fourteen of these ticks were shown to be positive for the B. canis parasite, implicating them as a potential source for babesiosis in Harlow. In order to assess whether the parasite is present in more than one tick population, D. reticulatus ticks from across England and Wales were screened for the presence of Babesia species. In addition to the Harlow site, a further five locations where D. reticulatus is present were screened for Babesia species. Babesia was not detected from most sites tested but one tick from a single location in Wales was

  5. Comparative infectivity of Babesia divergens and a zoonotic Babesia divergens-like parasite in cattle.

    PubMed

    Holman, Patricia J; Spencer, Angela M; Telford, Sam R; Goethert, Heidi K; Allen, Andrew J; Knowles, Donald P; Goff, Will L

    2005-11-01

    Babesia divergens-like parasites identified in human babesiosis cases in Missouri and Kentucky and in eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) on Nantucket Island, Massachusetts, share identical small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences. This sequence is 99.8% identical to that of Babesia divergens, suggesting that the U.S. parasite may be B. divergens, a causative agent of human and bovine babesiosis in Europe. Holstein-Friesian calves were inoculated with cultured Nantucket Island Babesia sp. (NR831) and B. divergens parasites and monitored by clinical signs, Giemsa-stained blood films, PCR, and culture. The NR831 recipients did not exhibit clinical signs of infection and remained negative for all assays. The B. divergens recipients developed clinical infections and became positive by all assays. NR831 recipients were fully susceptible upon challenge inoculation with B. divergens. This study confirms that the Nantucket Island Babesia sp. is not conspecific with B. divergens based on host specificity for cattle.

  6. Babesia Species Occurring in Austrian Ixodes ricinus Ticks▿

    PubMed Central

    Blaschitz, Marion; Narodoslavsky-Gföller, Melanie; Kanzler, Michaela; Stanek, Gerold; Walochnik, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Babesiosis is a tick-transmitted disease of veterinary and medical importance. The first Austrian case of human babesiosis was recently recorded. In the current study, ticks at all life cycle stages (instars), including 853 Ixodes ricinus and 11 Haemaphysalis concinna ticks, from sampling sites throughout Austria were examined for the presence of Babesia spp. by using 18S rRNA gene PCR and sequencing, and the overall mean infection rate was 51.04%. The infection rates for sampling sites were highly variable, ranging from 0% to almost 100%. Different instars and different sexes were infected almost equally. Babesia isolates occurring in Austrian ticks were identified as Babesia divergens, Babesia divergens-like, and Babesia sp. strain DD by sequencing a fragment of the heat shock protein 70 gene and internal transcribed spacer regions 1 and 2. To our knowledge, this is the first investigation of Babesia spp. in Austrian ticks. PMID:18539787

  7. Molecular evidence of a new Babesia sp. in goats.

    PubMed

    Ozubek, Sezayi; Aktas, Munir

    2017-01-15

    In this study, a novel Babesia sp. infecting goats was detected and its phylogenetic relationship to related species was determined. A total of 200 blood samples collected from sheep (n=78) and goats (n=122) were examined in the study. The V4 hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene of the novel Babesia sp. was amplified by PCR and analysed using a reverse line blot hybridization assay adapted for small ruminants. Samples from seven goats hybridized to Theileria/Babesia catch-all and Babesia catch-all probes and did not hybridize to any species-specific probe tested, suggesting the presence of an unrecognized Babesia species or genotype. Sequencing results showed the isolate to clearly differ from ovine Babesia species and genotypes currently available in the GenBank database. The isolate showed 90.9%, 93.5%, and 93.4% identity to B. ovis, B. motasi, and B. crassa, respectively and 91-93% similarity to Babesia genotypes recently described in small ruminants. The highest homology (∼96-97%) observed was with Babesia odocoilei, Babesia sp. EU1, and Babesia divergens. The new isolate was provisionally designated Babesia sp. The study contributes to better insight into the distribution and phylogenetic diversity of piroplasms in small ruminants. The survey indicated a high prevalence of piroplasms in small ruminants (21.5%). Of those detected, T. ovis was the most prevalent (17%), followed by Babesia sp. (3.5%), and B. ovis (2%). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Babesia microti: an unusual travel-related disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human babesiosis is a rare tick-borne infectious disease. The clinical presentation ranges from an asymptomatic form to a life threatening infection with severe hemolysis. Human babesiosis due to Babesia microti is the most common and is endemic in North America. Case presentation We report a European patient with severe pancytopenia and reactive hemophagocytosis related to a Babesia microti infection. Babesia infection was acquired during a travel in the USA. Conclusion Babesiosis should be considered in patients who traveled in endemic areas, especially North America for the most common agent Babesia microti. PMID:23432953

  9. Analysis of stage specific protein expression during babesia bovis development within rhipicephalus microplus female ticks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Arthropod borne pathogens have a complex life cycle that includes asexual reproduction of haploid stages in mammalian erythrocytes and development of diploid stages in the vector. Transition of Apicomplexan pathogens between the mammalian host and the arthropod vector is critical for ongoing transmi...

  10. Characterization of acyl carrier protein and LytB in Babesia bovis apicoplast

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The apicoplast is a highly specialized organelle that mediates required functions in the growth and replication of apicomplexan parasites. Despite structural conservation of the apicoplast among different parasite genera and species, there are also critical differences in the metabolic requirements ...

  11. The novel protein BboRhop68 is expressed by intraerytrhocytic stages of Babesia bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The apical complex of intracellular hemoparasites contains organelles like micronemes and rhoptries, specialized structures required for adherence and invasion of host cells. Several molecules discharged from rhoptries have been identified from Plasmodium spp., but only a single rhoptry associated p...

  12. Severe human Babesia divergens infection in Norway.

    PubMed

    Mørch, K; Holmaas, G; Frolander, P S; Kristoffersen, E K

    2015-04-01

    Human babesiosis is a rare but potentially life-threatening parasitic disease transmitted by ixodid ticks, and has not previously been reported in Norway. We report a case of severe babesiosis that occurred in Norway in 2007. The patient had previously undergone a splenectomy. He was frequently exposed to tick bites in an area endemic for bovine babesiosis in the west of Norway. The patient presented with severe haemolysis and multiorgan failure. Giemsa-stained blood smears revealed 30% parasitaemia with Babesia spp. He was treated with quinine in combination with clindamycin, apheresis, and supportive treatment with ventilatory support and haemofiltration, and made a complete recovery. This is the first case reported in Norway; however Babesia divergens seroprevalence in cattle in Norway is high, as is the risk of Ixodes ricinus tick bite in the general population. Babesiosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained febrile haemolytic disease.

  13. Babesia ovata: Taxonomy, phylogeny and epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2016-10-15

    Babesia ovata, which is transmitted by Haemaphysalis longicornis, is an intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite of cattle. Based on its morphology, B. ovata is classified as a large-type Babesia. The developmental stages of B. ovata have been described both in cattle and the tick vector. In infected adult female ticks, the parasite is transovarially transmitted to the tick eggs. The sexual reproduction of B. ovata has been demonstrated in the tick midgut. The diagnostic tools that are currently available for the specific detection of B. ovata in cattle include microscopy and polymerase chain reaction assays. The development of improved molecular and serological diagnostic tools has been constrained by the limited availability of genetic data. B. ovata has been reported in cattle populations in Japan, Korea, China, Mongolia and Thailand. B. ovata was thought to be a benign parasite; however, infections in immuno compromised or Theileria orientalis-infected animals are clinically significant. Thus, control strategies aimed at minimizing the prevalence of B. ovata are vital. The taxonomy of B. ovata is unclear, and the phylogenetic position has not been well defined. Consequently, non-B. ovata species have sometimes been classified as B. ovata. In this review, we provide an outline of the lifecycle, geographical distribution, and control of B. ovata, and critically discuss the taxonomy and phylogeny of this bovine Babesia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. An unidentified Babesia of the domestic cat (Felis domesticus).

    PubMed

    Stewart, C G; Hackett, K J; Collett, M G

    1980-12-01

    An unidentified Babesia was seen in a blood smear from a cat showing signs of anaemia. The cat responded to treatment with diminazene (Berenil). The morphology of the parasite is described and a comparison is made with other Babesia which have been described from the domestic cat and wild felids. This parasite most closely resembled B. herpailuri described from a jaguarundi in South America.

  15. Epidemiology of Babesia, Anaplasma and Trypanosoma species using a new expanded reverse line blot hybridization assay.

    PubMed

    Paoletta, Martina Soledad; López Arias, Ludmila; de la Fournière, Sofía; Guillemi, Eliana Carolina; Luciani, Carlos; Sarmiento, Néstor Fabián; Mosqueda, Juan; Farber, Marisa Diana; Wilkowsky, Silvina Elizabeth

    2017-09-01

    Vector-borne hemoparasitic infections are a major problem that affects livestock industries worldwide, particularly in tropical and subtropical regions. In this work, a reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was developed for the simultaneous detection and identification of Anaplasma, Babesia and bovine trypanosomes, encompassing in this way the most relevant hemoparasites that affect cattle. A total of 186 bovine blood samples collected from two different ecoepidemiological regions of northeast Argentina, with and without tick control, were analyzed with this new RLB. High diversity of parasites, such as Babesia bovis, B. bigemina, Anaplasma marginale and three different Trypanosoma species, was found. High rates of coinfections were also detected, and significant differences were observed not only in the prevalence of parasites but also in the level of coinfections between the two analyzed areas. Regarding the Trypanosoma genus, we provide molecular evidence of the presence of T. vivax and T. theileri for the first time in Argentina. Besides, since the RLB is a prospective tool, it allowed the identification of a yet unknown bovine trypanosome which could not be assigned to any of the bovine species known so far. In the present study we provide new insights on the prevalence of several pathogens that directly impact on livestock production in Argentina. The RLB assay developed here allows to identify simultaneously numerous pathogenic species which can also be easily expanded to detect other blood borne pathogens. These characteristics make the RLB hybridization assay an essential tool for epidemiological survey of all vector-borne pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Production and Evaluation of Antibodies and Phage Display-Derived Peptide Ligands for Immunomagnetic Separation of Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Linda D.; McNair, James; McCallan, Lyanne; Thompson, Suzan; Kulakov, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the development and optimization of an immunomagnetic separation (IMS) method to isolate Mycobacterium bovis cells from lymph node tissues. Gamma-irradiated whole M. bovis AF2122/97 cells and ethanol-extracted surface antigens of such cells were used to produce M. bovis-specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in rabbits and mice. They were also used to generate M. bovis-specific peptide ligands by phage display biopanning. The various antibodies and peptide ligands obtained were used to coat MyOne tosyl-activated Dynabeads (Life Technologies), singly or in combination, and evaluated for IMS. Initially, M. bovis capture from Middlebrook 7H9 broth suspensions (concentration range, 10 to 105 CFU/ml) was evaluated by IMS combined with an M. bovis-specific touchdown PCR. IMS-PCR results and, subsequently, IMS-culture results indicated that the beads with greatest immunocapture capability for M. bovis in broth were those coated simultaneously with a monoclonal antibody and a biotinylated 12-mer peptide. These dually coated beads exhibited minimal capture (mean of 0.36% recovery) of 12 other Mycobacterium spp. occasionally encountered in veterinary tuberculosis (TB) diagnostic laboratories. When the optimized IMS method was applied to various M. bovis-spiked lymph node matrices, it demonstrated excellent detection sensitivities (50% limits of detection of 3.16 and 57.7 CFU/ml of lymph node tissue homogenate for IMS-PCR and IMS-culture, respectively). The optimized IMS method therefore has the potential to improve isolation of M. bovis from lymph nodes and hence the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis. PMID:22322353

  17. Detection of Babesia bigemina-infected carriers by polymerase chain reaction amplification.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, J V; Chieves, L P; Johnson, G S; Buening, G M

    1992-01-01

    A SpeI-AvaI fragment (0.3 kbp) from pBbi16 (a pBR322 derivative containing a 6.3-kbp Babesia bigemina DNA insert) was subcloned into the pBluescript phagemid vector and was sequenced by the dideoxy-mediated chain termination method. Two sets of primers were designed for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Primer set IA-IB was used to amplify a 278-bp DNA fragment, and primer set IAN-IBN was used to prepare a probe directed to a site within the PCR-amplified target DNA. Digoxigenin-dUTP was incorporated into the probe during the amplification reaction. PCR amplification of target DNA obtained from in vitro-cultured B. bigemina and nucleic acid hybridization of amplified product with the nonradioactive DNA probe showed that a 278-bp fragment could be detected when as little as 100 fg of parasite genomic DNA was used in the assay. A fragment of similar size was amplified from genomic DNAs from several B. bigemina isolates but not from DNAs from Babesia bovis, Anaplasma marginale, or six species of bacteria or bovine leukocytes. Similarly, the PCR product could be detected in DNA samples purified from 200 microliters of blood with a parasitemia of as low as 1 in 10(8) cells and which contained an estimated 30 B. bigemina-infected erythrocytes. By a direct PCR method, B. bigemina DNA was amplified from 20 microliters of packed erythrocytes with a calculated parasitemia of 1 in 10(9) cells. With the analytical sensitivity level of the PCR-DNA probe assay, six cattle with inapparent, 11-month chronic B. bigemina infection were found to be positive. No PCR product was observed in bovine blood samples collected from a splenectomized, A. marginale-infected bovine, a 4-year chronic B. bovis-infected animal, or 20 uninfected cattle from Missouri which were subjected to amplification. The PCR-DNA probe assay was shown to be sensitive in detecting latently infected cattle. The specificity and high analytical sensitivity of the test provide valuable tools for performing

  18. Babesia canis canis, Babesia canis vogeli, Babesia canis rossi: differentiation of the three subspecies by a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis on amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Carret, C; Walas, F; Carcy, B; Grande, N; Précigout, E; Moubri, K; Schetters, T P; Gorenflot, A

    1999-01-01

    The parasites Babesia canis and Babesia gibsoni (phylum Apicomplexa) are responsible for canine babesiosis throughout the world. Babesia canis was previously described as a group of three biologically different subspecies, namely B. canis canis, B. canis vogeli, and B. canis rossi. We report partial sequences of small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (ssu-rDNA) of each subspecies amplified in vitro with primers derived from a semi-conserved region of the ssu-rDNA genes in other Babesia species. The polymerase chain reaction combined with a restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, using HinfI and TaqI restriction enzymes, confirmed the separation of B. canis into three subspecies. These sequences were compared with previously published sequences of other Babesia species. A phylogenetic approach showed that the three subspecies of B. canis belong to the clade of Babesia species sensu stricto where B. canis canis clusters with B. canis rossi whereas B. canis vogeli might form a monophyletic group with the cluster B. divergens and B. odocoilei. Our results show that the three subspecies of B. canis can readily be differentiated at the molecular level and suggest that they might be considered as true species.

  19. Characterization of a papain-like cysteine protease essential for the survival of Babesia ovis merozoites.

    PubMed

    Carletti, Tamara; Barreto, Carmo; Mesplet, Maria; Mira, Anabela; Weir, William; Shiels, Brian; Oliva, Abel Gonzalez; Schnittger, Leonhard; Florin-Christensen, Monica

    2016-02-01

    Babesia ovis, a tick-transmitted intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite, causes severe infections in small ruminants from Southern Europe, Middle East, and Northern Africa. With the aim of finding potential targets for the development of control methods against this parasite, sequence analysis of its genome led to the identification of four putative cysteine proteases of the C1A family. Orthology between B. ovis, B. bovis, T. annulata, and T. parva sequences showed that each B. ovis C1A peptidase sequence clustered within one of the four ortholog groups previously reported for these piroplasmids. The ortholog of bovipain-2 of B. bovis and falcipain-2 of Plasmodium falciparum, respectively, was designated "ovipain-2" and further characterized. In silico analysis showed that ovipain-2 has the typical topology of papain-like cysteine peptidases and a highly similar predicted three dimensional structure to bovipain-2 and falcipain-2, suggesting susceptibility to similar inhibitors. Immunoblotting using antibodies raised against a recombinant form of ovipain-2 (r-ovipain-2) demonstrated expression of ovipain-2 in in vitro cultured B. ovis merozoites. By immunofluorescence, these antibodies reacted with merozoites and stained the cytoplasm of infected erythrocytes. This suggests that ovipain-2 is secreted by the parasite and could be involved in intra- and extracellular digestion of hemoglobin and/or cleavage of erythrocyte proteins facilitating parasite egress. A significant reduction in the percentage of parasitized erythrocytes was obtained upon incubation of B. ovis in vitro cultures with anti-r-ovipain-2 antibodies, indicating an important functional role for ovipain-2 in the intra erythrocytic development cycle of this parasite. Finally, studies of the reactivity of sera from B. ovis-positive and negative sheep against r-ovipain-2 showed that this protease is expressed in vivo, and can be recognized by host antibodies. The results of this study suggest that ovipain-2

  20. Establishment of a novel tick-Babesia experimental infection model

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Hiroki; Hatta, Takeshi; Alim, M Abdul; Tsubokawa, Daigo; Mikami, Fusako; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Miyoshi, Takeharu; Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; Kawazu, Shin-ichiro; Igarashi, Ikuo; Mochizuki, Masami; Tsuji, Naotoshi; Tanaka, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Ticks are potent vectors of many deadly human and animal pathogens. Tick-borne babesiosis is a well-recognized malaria-like disease that occurs worldwide and recently has attracted increased attention as an emerging zoonosis. Although the proliferation of Babesia organisms is essential in the vectors, their detailed lifecycle with time information for migration in ticks remains unknown. A novel study model for the elucidation of the migration speed of Babesia parasites in their vector tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis, has been developed using an artificial feeding system with quantitative PCR method. The detectable DNA of Babesia parasites gradually disappeared in the tick midgut at 1 day post engorgement (DPE), and in contrary increased in other organs. The results indicated that the Babesia parasite passed the H. longicornis midgut within 24 hours post engorgement, migrated to the hemolymph, and then proliferated in the organs except the midgut. This time point may be an important curfew for Babesia parasites to migrate in the tick lumen. We also visualized the Babesia parasites in the experimentally infected ticks and in their eggs using IFAT for detecting their cytoskeletal structure, which suggested the successful tick infection and transovarial transmission of the parasite. This model will shed light on the further understanding of tick-Babesia interactions. PMID:27841321

  1. Natural history of Zoonotic Babesia: Role of wildlife reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Yabsley, Michael J.; Shock, Barbara C.

    2012-01-01

    Babesiosis is an emerging zoonotic disease on all inhabited continents and various wildlife species are the principal reservoir hosts for zoonotic Babesia species. The primary vectors of Babesia are Ixodid ticks, with the majority of zoonotic species being transmitted by species in the genus Ixodes. Species of Babesia vary in their infectivity, virulence and pathogenicity for people. Various factors (e.g., increased interactions between people and the environment, increased immunosuppression, changes in landscape and climate, and shifts in host and vector species abundance and community structures) have led to an increase in tick-borne diseases in people, including babesiosis. Furthermore, because babesiosis is now a reportable disease in several states in the United States, and it is the most common blood transfusion-associated parasite, recognized infections are expected to increase. Because of the zoonotic nature of these parasites, it is essential that we understand the natural history (especially reservoirs and vectors) so that appropriate control and prevention measures can be implemented. Considerable work has been conducted on the ecology of Babesia microti and Babesia divergens, the two most common causes of babesiosis in the United States and Europe, respectively. However, unfortunately, for many of the zoonotic Babesia species, the reservoir(s) and/or tick vector(s) are unknown. We review the current knowledge regarding the ecology of Babesia among their reservoir and tick hosts with an emphasis of the role on wildlife as reservoirs. We hope to encourage the molecular characterization of Babesia from potential reservoirs and vectors as well from people. These data are necessary so that informed decisions can be made regarding potential vectors and the potential role of wildlife in the ecology of a novel Babesia when it is detected in a human patient. PMID:24533312

  2. Revisiting the Evolution of Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Mostowy, Serge; Inwald, Jackie; Gordon, Steve; Martin, Carlos; Warren, Rob; Kremer, Kristin; Cousins, Debby; Behr, Marcel A.

    2005-01-01

    Though careful consideration has been placed towards genetic characterization of tubercle bacillus isolates causing disease in humans, those causing disease predominantly among wild and domesticated mammals have received less attention. In contrast to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, whose host range is largely specific to humans, M. bovis and “M bovis-like” organisms infect a broad range of animal species beyond their most prominent host in cattle. To determine whether strains of variable genomic content are associated with distinct distributions of disease, the DNA contents of M. bovis or M. bovis-like isolates from a variety of hosts were investigated via Affymetrix GeneChip. Consistent with previous genomic analysis of the M. tuberculosis complex (MTC), large sequence polymorphisms of putative diagnostic and biological consequence were able to unambiguously distinguish interrogated isolates. The distribution of deleted regions indicates organisms genomically removed from M. bovis and also points to structured genomic variability within M. bovis. Certain genomic profiles spanned a variety of hosts but were clustered by geography, while others associated primarily with host type. In contrast to the prevailing assumption that M. bovis has broad host capacity, genomic profiles suggest that distinct MTC lineages differentially infect a variety of mammals. From this, a phylogenetic stratification of genotypes offers a predictive framework upon which to base future genetic and phenotypic studies of the MTC. PMID:16159772

  3. The complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Thierry; Eiglmeier, Karin; Camus, Jean-Christophe; Medina, Nadine; Mansoor, Huma; Pryor, Melinda; Duthoy, Stephanie; Grondin, Sophie; Lacroix, Celine; Monsempe, Christel; Simon, Sylvie; Harris, Barbara; Atkin, Rebecca; Doggett, Jon; Mayes, Rebecca; Keating, Lisa; Wheeler, Paul R.; Parkhill, Julian; Barrell, Bart G.; Cole, Stewart T.; Gordon, Stephen V.; Hewinson, R. Glyn

    2003-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of tuberculosis in a range of animal species and man, with worldwide annual losses to agriculture of $3 billion. The human burden of tuberculosis caused by the bovine tubercle bacillus is still largely unknown. M. bovis was also the progenitor for the M. bovis bacillus Calmette–Guérin vaccine strain, the most widely used human vaccine. Here we describe the 4,345,492-bp genome sequence of M. bovis AF2122/97 and its comparison with the genomes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium leprae. Strikingly, the genome sequence of M. bovis is >99.95% identical to that of M. tuberculosis, but deletion of genetic information has led to a reduced genome size. Comparison with M. leprae reveals a number of common gene losses, suggesting the removal of functional redundancy. Cell wall components and secreted proteins show the greatest variation, indicating their potential role in host–bacillus interactions or immune evasion. Furthermore, there are no genes unique to M. bovis, implying that differential gene expression may be the key to the host tropisms of human and bovine bacilli. The genome sequence therefore offers major insight on the evolution, host preference, and pathobiology of M. bovis. PMID:12788972

  4. A new PCR assay for the detection and differentiation of Babesia canis and Babesia vogeli.

    PubMed

    Annoscia, Giada; Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Olivieri, Emanuela; Manfredi, Maria Teresa; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Otranto, Domenico

    2017-10-01

    Babesia spp. are globally distributed tick-borne protozoan parasites that infect the red blood cells of a wide range of vertebrate hosts, including humans. Diagnosis of babesiosis is often impeded by the transient presence of the parasites in peripheral blood, as well as by their pleomorphic nature. Given the reports of an expanding and, in some cases, sympatric geographical distribution of Babesia canis and Babesia vogeli in dogs and associated vectors, in Europe, the development of time-efficient and cost-effective diagnostic tools to detect and differentiate these two species is warranted. In this study, we designed and developed a novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting the parasite cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene, for the simultaneous detection and differentiation of B. canis and B. vogeli. The analytical sensitivity of the PCR was evaluated using serial dilutions of genomic DNA extracted from individual and artificially mixed canine blood samples infected by B. canis (3×10(2) infected erythrocytes/ml, ie/ml) and B. vogeli (2.1×10(1) ie/ml). The analytical specificity of the assay was assessed using blood samples positive for Hepatozoon canis, Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma platys, Babesia microti, Babesia rossi and Theileria annae (syn. Babesia vulpes). The clinical specificity of the PCR assay was evaluated on 147 blood samples from dogs and 128 tick specimens (Dermacentor reticulatus and Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato). Species-specific bands of the expected sizes (i.e., 750bp for B. canis and 450bp for B. vogeli), and two bands in the mixed blood samples were obtained. The PCR assay developed herein detected a low number of infected erythrocytes (i.e., 3×10(-2)B. canis, 2.1×10(-2)B. vogeli ie/ml). Of the 147 blood samples, nine (6.1%) were positive for B. canis and six (4.1%) for B. vogeli, whereas only one tick (D. reticulatus) was positive for B. canis. This PCR assay represents a rapid and reliable tool for the diagnosis of

  5. Schistosoma bovis in western Uganda.

    PubMed

    Stothard, J R; Lockyer, A E; Kabatereine, N B; Tukahebwa, E M; Kazibwe, F; Rollinson, D; Fenwick, A

    2004-09-01

    During routine parasitological surveillance and monitoring activities within a National Control Programme for control of human schistosomiasis in Uganda, it was noted that cattle grazing in a water meadow immediately adjacent to Tonya primary school, where the prevalence of intestinal schistosomiasis in children was in excess of 90%, were unusually emaciated. To test the hypothesis that there may have been an anthropozoonotic focus of Schistosoma mansoni within the local herd, a young female heifer, clearly emaciated and c. 8 months old, was slaughtered from which schistosome worms were later recovered by dissection. As female worms inspected by microscopy were not gravid, morphological identification proved inconclusive but analysis of cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and small subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA sequences from these worms identified them as Schistosoma bovis Sonsino, 1876. This is the first substantiated report of S. bovis from Lake Albert, western Uganda. Further epidemiological surveys are needed to clarify the extent of bovine schistosomiasis within this region, particularly so since this lakeside plain has been earmarked as a future game reserve.

  6. Babesia bigemina: in vitro cultivation and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Vega Y Murguia, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    An in vitro model for the continuous replication of Babesia bigemina was developed and this model was used to study the parasite's biology. Initially, infected erythrocytes from a calf inoculated with a strain of B. bigemina was suspended with normal bovine erythrocytes and the parasite propagated in vitro. The cultured organism was inoculated into another calf and reproduced the disease with typical signs. Babesia bigemina was reisolated in pure culture in vitro. The animal recovered after receiving specific treatment. A procedure was developed to cryopreserve infected erythrocytes and merozoites to initiate in vitro cultures. Homogeneous parasite populations were obtained by cloning by limiting dilution. Parasitic growth was detected between 16-28 days after dilutions were made. Three primary clones were selected for recloning. Infected erythrocytes from the original isolate nd the clones were concentrated by Percoll density gradients. Density values for paired and single infected cells were determined. Enzymatic content of concentrated infected cells was analyzed by starch gel electrophoresis. Enzymes LDH, GPI, and GDH were detected, but polymorphism among clones was not observed. The enzyme 6-PDG was not associated with the parasite. Separation of labelled proteins was done by SDS-PAGE. The separation patterns were similar for all samples. a 43 Kd polypeptide was detected in the B. bigemina culture supernatant.

  7. Mycobacterium bovis (Bovine Tuberculosis) in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... be consumed: although M. bovis infection in U.S. domestic cattle is substantially reduced compared to the past, ... their health care providers are aware that they work in close contact with animals. Additional Information • • U.S. ...

  8. Characterization of strains of Corynebacterium bovis.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, B W; Barnum, D A

    1984-01-01

    The biochemical and morphological characteristics of 104 strains of Corynebacterium bovis isolated from bovine milk samples and the C. bovis reference strain were found to be uniform. Valuable criteria for identification were presence of catalase and oxidase, production of acid from glucose and fructose and a requirement for enriched basal media. Six strains of human and three strains of bovine origin were found to be inconsistent with the reference strain. PMID:6722650

  9. Mycobacterium bovis: characteristics of wildlife reservoir hosts.

    PubMed

    Palmer, M V

    2013-11-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the cause of tuberculosis in animals and sometimes humans. Many developed nations have long-standing programmes to eradicate tuberculosis in livestock, principally cattle. As disease prevalence in cattle decreases these efforts are sometimes impeded by passage of M. bovis from wildlife to cattle. In epidemiological terms, disease can persist in some wildlife species, creating disease reservoirs, if the basic reproduction rate (R0) and critical community size (CCS) thresholds are achieved. Recognized wildlife reservoir hosts of M. bovis include the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) in New Zealand, European badger (Meles meles) in Great Britain and Ireland, African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in South Africa, wild boar (Sus scrofa) in the Iberian Peninsula and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Michigan, USA. The epidemiological concepts of R0 and CCS are related to more tangible disease/pathogen characteristics such as prevalence, pathogen-induced pathology, host behaviour and ecology. An understanding of both epidemiological and disease/pathogen characteristics is necessary to identify wildlife reservoirs of M. bovis. In some cases, there is a single wildlife reservoir host involved in transmission of M. bovis to cattle. Complexity increases, however, in multihost systems where multiple potential reservoir hosts exist. Bovine tuberculosis eradication efforts require elimination of M. bovis transmission between wildlife reservoirs and cattle. For successful eradication identification of true wildlife reservoirs is critical, as disease control efforts are most effective when directed towards true reservoirs.

  10. Abortion associated with Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) in a bison (Bison bison) herd

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) has recently emerged as a significant health threat in bison and is an increasing concern and source of economic loss for producers. Clinical manifestations of infection documented in bison include pneumonia, respiratory distress and polyarthritis. The current study des...

  11. Ultrastructure of the Babesia divergens free merozoite.

    PubMed

    Del Carmen Terrón, María; González-Camacho, Fernando; González, Luis Miguel; Luque, Daniel; Montero, Estrella

    2016-10-01

    The invasive form of the apicomplexan parasite Babesia divergens, the free merozoite, invades the erythrocytes of host vertebrates, leading to significant pathology. Although invasion is an active process critical for parasite survival, it is not yet entirely understood. Using techniques to isolate the viable free merozoite, as well as electron microscopy, we undertook a detailed morphological study and explored the sub-cellular structure of the invasive B. divergens free merozoite after it had left the host cell. We examined characteristic apicomplexan features such as the apicoplast, the inner and discontinuous double membrane complex, and the apical complex; some aspects of erythrocyte entry by B. divergens were also defined by electron microscopy. This study adds to our understanding of B. divergens free merozoites and their invasion of human erythrocytes.

  12. Identification of a New Type of Babesia Species in Wild Rats (Bandicota indica) in Chiang Mai Province, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Dantrakool, Anchalee; Somboon, Pradya; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Saito-Ito, Atsuko

    2004-01-01

    A new type of rodent babesia, which resembled Babesia microti but was phylogenetically placed closest, with the highest level of statistical support, to Babesia canis, a canine babesia, was identified in Thai Bandicota indica in Thai provinces to which malaria is endemic. Close watch should be kept on human babesiosis in Thailand. PMID:14766871

  13. Identification of Streptococcus bovis and Streptococcus salivarius in clinical laboratories.

    PubMed

    Ruoff, K L; Ferraro, M J; Holden, J; Kunz, L J

    1984-08-01

    Streptococci identified as Streptococcus bovis, S. bovis variant, and Streptococcus salivarius were examined with respect to physiological and serological characteristics and cellular fatty acid content. Similarities in physiological reactions and problems encountered in serological analysis were noted, suggesting that an expanded battery of physiological tests is needed to definitively identify these streptococci. Cellular fatty acid analysis provided an accurate method for distinguishing S. salivarius from S. bovis and S. bovis variant.

  14. Mycoplasam Bovis - an emerging pathogen of ranched bison

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) is an emerging bacterial pathogen that has caused severe disease among ranched bison (Bison bison) herds in North America. Unlike cattle, M. bovis in bison seems to be a primary pathogen, affecting animals in feedlots as well as breeding-age cows on pasture. Mortality r...

  15. Efficacy and Immunogenicity of Mycobacterium bovis Delta RD1 against Aerosol M. bovis Infection in Neonatal Calves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An attenuated Mycobacterium bovis RD1 knockout (Delta RD1) vaccine administered to calves at 2 weeks of age provided similar efficacy as M. bovis bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) against low dose, aerosol challenge with virulent M. bovis at 3.5m of age. Approximately 4.5 months after challenge, both De...

  16. Observation of a novel Babesia spp. in Eastern Grey Kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Dawood, Kaiser E.; Morgan, Jess A.T.; Busfield, Frances; Srivastava, Mukesh; Fletcher, Taryn I.; Sambono, Jacqueline; Jackson, Louise A.; Venus, Bronwyn; Philbey, Adrian W.; Lew-Tabor, Ala E.

    2012-01-01

    The roles and epidemiological features of tick-borne protozoans are not well elicited in wildlife. Babesia spp. are documented in many domestic animals, including cattle, horses, pigs, dogs and cats. Three cases affecting eastern grey kangaroos are described. The kangaroos exhibited neurological signs, depression and marked anaemia, and microscopic examination of blood smears revealed intraerythrocytic piroplasms. One to seven intraerythrocytic spherical, oval, pyriform and irregularly-shaped parasites consistent with Babesia spp. were seen in the blood smears and the percentage of infected erythrocytes was estimated to be approximately 7% in each case. Data suggest that the tick vector for this kangaroo Babesia sp. is a Haemaphysalis species. For Case 2, ultrastructural examination of the erythrocytes of the renal capillaries showed parasites resembling Babesia spp. and 18 of 33 erythrocytes were infected. DNA sequencing of the amplified 18S rDNA confirmed that the observed intraerythrocytic piroplasms belong to the genus Babesia. The phylogenetic position of this new kangaroo Babesia sp. (de novo Babesia macropus), as a sister species to the new Australian woylie Babesia sp., suggests a close affinity to the described Afro–Eurasian species Babesia orientalis and Babesia occultans suggesting perhaps a common ancestor for the Babesia in kangaroos. PMID:24533316

  17. Lack of transplacental transmission of Bartonella bovis.

    PubMed

    Chastant-Maillard, S; Boulouis, H-J; Reynaud, K; Thoumire, S; Gandoin, C; Bouillin, C; Cordonnier, N; Maillard, R

    2015-02-01

    Transplacental transmission of Bartonella spp. has been reported for rodents, but not for cats and has never been investigated in cattle. The objective of this study was to assess vertical transmission of Bartonella in cattle. Fifty-six cow-calf pairs were tested before (cows) and after (calves) caesarean section for Bartonella bacteremia and/or serology, and the cotyledons were checked for gross lesions and presence of the bacteria. None of the 29 (52%) bacteremic cows gave birth to bacteremic calves, and all calves were seronegative at birth. Neither placentitis nor vasculitis were observed in all collected cotyledons. Bartonella bovis was not detected in placental cotyledons. Therefore, transplacental transmission of B. bovis and multiplication of the bacteria in the placenta do not seem likely. The lack of transplacental transmission may be associated with the particular structure of the placenta in ruminants or to a poor affinity/agressiveness of B. bovis for this tissue.

  18. Detection of Babesia caballi and Babesia equi in Dermacentor nuttalli adult ticks.

    PubMed

    Battsetseg, B; Xuan, X; Ikadai, H; Bautista, J L; Byambaa, B; Boldbaatar, D; Battur, B; Battsetseg, G; Batsukh, Z; Igarashi, I; Nagasawa, H; Mikami, T; Fujisaki, K

    2001-04-01

    Ticks play an important role in human and veterinary medicine particularly due to their ability to transmit protozoan pathogens. In this study we have demonstrated that polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nested PCR methods enabled detection of Babesia caballi and Babesia equi in field isolates of Dermacentor nuttalli adult ticks from Mongolia. Primers specific for 218 bp fragment merozoite antigen 1 (EMA-1) gene of B. equi successfully amplified products from all samples of D. nuttalli adult ticks while primers for the 430 bp fragment product from BC48 gene of B. caballi amplified products from seven of the 54 samples. Using PCR and nested PCR methods we have found mixed infections with B. equi and B. caballi in the tick vector. The amplified DNA fragment from D. nuttalli ticks was inserted into the EcoRV site of pBluescript SK and sequenced. The sequence of the 430 bp fragment was completely identical to the nucleotide sequence of the USDA strain of B. caballi. These results suggest that D. nuttalli may play an important role as a vector of both B. caballi and B. equi and also may be important in maintaining endemicity of equine piroplasmosis in Mongolia.

  19. First record of Babesia sp. in Antarctic penguins.

    PubMed

    Montero, Estrella; González, Luis Miguel; Chaparro, Alberto; Benzal, Jesús; Bertellotti, Marcelo; Masero, José A; Colominas-Ciuró, Roger; Vidal, Virginia; Barbosa, Andrés

    2016-04-01

    This is the first reported case of Babesia sp. in Antarctic penguins, specifically a population of Chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarctica) in the Vapour Col penguin rookery in Deception Island, South Shetlands, Antarctica. We collected peripheral blood from 50 adult and 30 chick Chinstrap penguins. Examination of the samples by microscopy showed intraerythrocytic forms morphologically similar to other avian Babesia species in 12 Chinstrap penguin adults and seven chicks. The estimated parasitaemias ranged from 0.25×10(-2)% to 0.75×10(-2)%. Despite the low number of parasites found in blood smears, semi-nested PCR assays yielded a 274 bp fragment in 12 of the 19 positive blood samples found by microscopy. Sequencing revealed that the fragment was 97% similar to Babesia sp. 18S rRNA from Australian Little Penguins (Eudyptula minor) confirming presence of the parasite. Parasite prevalence estimated by microscopy in adults and chicks was higher (24% vs. 23.3%, respectively) than found by semi-nested PCR (16% vs. 13.3% respectively). Although sampled penguins were apparently healthy, the effect of Babesia infection in these penguins is unknown. The identification of Babesia sp. in Antarctic penguins is an important finding. Ixodes uriae, as the only tick species present in the Antarctic Peninsula, is the key to understanding the natural history of this parasite. Future work should address the transmission dynamics and pathogenicity of Babesia sp. in Chinstrap penguin as well as in other penguin species, such as Gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) and Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae), present within the tick distribution range in the Antarctic Peninsula.

  20. Babesia divergens–like Infection, Washington State

    PubMed Central

    Herwaldt, Barbara L.; de Bruyn, Guy; Pieniazek, Norman J.; Homer, Mary; Lofy, Kathryn H.; Slemenda, Susan B.; Fritsche, Thomas R.; Persing, David H.

    2004-01-01

    Most reported U.S. zoonotic cases of babesiosis have occurred in the Northeast and been caused by Babesia microti. In Washington State, three cases of babesiosis have been reported previously, which were caused by WA1 (for “Washington 1”)-type parasites. We investigated a case of babesiosis in Washington in an 82–year-old man whose spleen had been removed and whose parasitemia level was 41.4%. The complete 18S ribosomal RNA gene of the parasite was amplified from specimens of his whole blood by polymerase chain reaction. Phylogenetic analysis showed the parasite is most closely related, but not identical, to B. divergens (similarity score, 99.5%), a bovine parasite in Europe. By indirect fluorescent-antibody testing, his serum reacted to B. divergens but not to B. microti or WA1 antigens. This case demonstrates that babesiosis can be caused by novel parasites detectable by manual examination of blood smears but not by serologic or molecular testing for B. microti or WA1-type parasites. PMID:15200851

  1. Ecology and pathogenicity of gastrointestinal Streptococcus bovis.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Paul; Kwon, Young Min; Ricke, Steven C

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis is an indigenous resident in the gastrointestinal tracts of both humans and animals. S. bovis is one of the major causes of bacterial endocarditis and has been implicated in the incidence of human colon cancer, possibly due to chronic inflammatory response at the site of intestinal colonization. Certain feeding regimens in ruminants can lead to overgrowth of S. bovis in the rumen, resulting in the over-production of lactate and capsular polysaccharide causing acute ruminal acidosis and bloat, respectively. There are multiple strategies in controlling acute lactic acidosis and bloat. The incidence of the two diseases may be controlled by strict dietary management. Gradual introduction of grain-based diets and the feeding of coarsely chopped roughage decrease the incidence of the two disease entities. Ionophores, which have been used to enhance feed conversion and growth rate in cattle, have been shown to inhibit the growth of lactic acid bacteria in the rumen. Other methods of controlling lactic acid bacteria in the ruminal environment (dietary supplementation of long-chain fatty acids, induction of passive and active immune responses to the bacteria, and the use of lytic bacteriophages) have also been investigated. It is anticipated that through continued in-depth ecological analysis of S. bovis the characteristics responsible for human and animal pathogenesis would be sufficiently identified to a point where more effective control strategies for the control of this bacteria can be developed.

  2. Immunopathogenesis of Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aerosol and intratracheal inoculation routes are commonly used for experimental biology purposes to infect cattle with virulent Mycobacterium bovis, each resulting primarily in a respiratory tract infection including lungs and lung-associated lymph nodes. Disease severity is dose and time dependent...

  3. Detection and experimental transmission of a novel Babesia isolate in captive olive baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis).

    PubMed

    Reichard, Mason V; Gray, Kristene M; Van den Bussche, Ronald A; d'Offay, Jean M; White, Gary L; Simecka, Christine M; Wolf, Roman F

    2011-07-01

    Babesia spp. are tick-transmitted apicomplexan hemoparasites that infect mammalian red blood cells. Our purpose was to determine the prevalence of Babesia infection in a colony of captive baboons and to evaluate potential experimental routes of the transmission of the hemoparasite. DNA was extracted from the blood of baboons and tested for infection with Babesia by PCR and primers that amplify the 18s rRNA gene of the parasite. The overall prevalence of infection of Babesia in the baboon population was 8.8% (73 of 830). Phylogenetic analysis of the sequenced DNA from 2 baboons revealed that the Babesia isolate found in captive baboons was a novel species most closely related (97% to 99%) to B. leo. Blood from a Babesia-infected donor baboon was inoculated intravenously, intramuscularly, or subcutaneously into 3 naive baboons. The intravenously inoculated baboon was PCR-positive at 7 d after inoculation; the 2 baboons inoculated by other routes became PCR-positive at 10 d after inoculation. All 3 baboons remained PCR-positive for Babesia through day 31. Baboons experimentally inoculated with the new Babesia isolate did not exhibit clinical signs of babesiosis during the experiments. We demonstrated that captive baboons are infected with a novel Babesia isolate. In addition we showed that Babesia can be transmitted in the absence of the organism's definitive host (ticks) by transfer of infected blood through intravenous, intramuscular, and subcutaneous routes to naive baboons.

  4. Detection and Experimental Transmission of a Novel Babesia Isolate in Captive Olive Baboons (Papio cynocephalus anubis)

    PubMed Central

    Reichard, Mason V; Gray, Kristene M; Van Den Bussche, Ronald A; d'Offay, Jean M; White, Gary L; Simecka, Christine M; Wolf, Roman F

    2011-01-01

    Babesia spp. are tick-transmitted apicomplexan hemoparasites that infect mammalian red blood cells. Our purpose was to determine the prevalence of Babesia infection in a colony of captive baboons and to evaluate potential experimental routes of the transmission of the hemoparasite. DNA was extracted from the blood of baboons and tested for infection with Babesia by PCR and primers that amplify the 18s rRNA gene of the parasite. The overall prevalence of infection of Babesia in the baboon population was 8.8% (73 of 830). Phylogenetic analysis of the sequenced DNA from 2 baboons revealed that the Babesia isolate found in captive baboons was a novel species most closely related (97% to 99%) to B. leo. Blood from a Babesia-infected donor baboon was inoculated intravenously, intramuscularly, or subcutaneously into 3 naive baboons. The intravenously inoculated baboon was PCR-positive at 7 d after inoculation; the 2 baboons inoculated by other routes became PCR-positive at 10 d after inoculation. All 3 baboons remained PCR-positive for Babesia through day 31. Baboons experimentally inoculated with the new Babesia isolate did not exhibit clinical signs of babesiosis during the experiments. We demonstrated that captive baboons are infected with a novel Babesia isolate. In addition we showed that Babesia can be transmitted in the absence of the organism's definitive host (ticks) by transfer of infected blood through intravenous, intramuscular, and subcutaneous routes to naive baboons. PMID:21838979

  5. Bovine NK cells acquire cytotoxic activity and produce IFN-gamma after stimulation by Mycobacterium bovis BCG- or Babesia bovis-exposed splenic dendritic cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Early interactions of innate immune cell populations such as DC, monocytes/macrophages and NK cells, can affect the ability of the acquired immune response to control infection of intracellular microorganisms. In this study, we investigated the activation of bovine NK cells by CD13+ splenic DC or CD...

  6. Babesia microti in rodents and raccoons from northeast Florida.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kerry; Savick, Kyla; Butler, Joseph

    2012-12-01

    Human babesiosis in the United States is caused most commonly by the intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite, Babesia microti . Although a few reports have described evidence of Babesia species in animals in Florida, to date Babesia microti specifically has not been reported from Florida or most other southern states. To determine if the organism is present in vertebrates in the region, small mammals were trapped and sampled at 2 sites in northeastern Florida, and DNA extracts from blood samples were screened for B. microti DNA via PCR assays targeting portions of the nuclear small subunit rRNA (18S rDNA) and beta-tubulin genes. Amplified fragments from representative samples of PCR-positive hosts were sequenced and compared phylogenetically to reference strains of Babesia species. The B. microti strains found in cotton rats ( Sigmodon hispidus ) most closely resembles B. microti sensu stricto strains that are pathogenic to humans, and strains found in raccoons ( Procyon lotor ) most closely resembles previously described raccoon-related strains of B. microti sensu lato. The results of this study suggest that B. microti is prevalent among cotton rats and raccoons at some sites in northeast Florida and may pose a risk to humans in the region.

  7. First Report of Babesia microti-Caused Babesiosis in Spain.

    PubMed

    Arsuaga, Marta; Gonzalez, Luis M; Lobo, Cheryl A; de la Calle, Fernando; Bautista, Jose M; Azcárate, Isabel G; Puente, Sabino; Montero, Estrella

    2016-10-01

    Babesiosis is an emerging zoonosis now found in several areas of the world. Using PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assay, we have diagnosed the first case of human babesiosis caused by Babesia microti in Spain. Diagnosis was delayed because of the nonspecific clinical symptoms that occurred in an immunocompetent patient.

  8. First Report of Babesia microti-Caused Babesiosis in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Arsuaga, Marta; Gonzalez, Luis M.; Lobo, Cheryl A.; de la Calle, Fernando; Bautista, Jose M.; Azcárate, Isabel G.; Puente, Sabino

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Babesiosis is an emerging zoonosis now found in several areas of the world. Using PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assay, we have diagnosed the first case of human babesiosis caused by Babesia microti in Spain. Diagnosis was delayed because of the nonspecific clinical symptoms that occurred in an immunocompetent patient. PMID:27560451

  9. Artificial feeding of Rhipicephalus microplus female ticks with anti calreticulin serum do not influence tick and Babesia bigemina acquisition.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Sandra; Merino, Octávio; Lérias, Joana; Domingues, Nuno; Mosqueda, Juan; de la Fuente, José; Domingos, Ana

    2015-02-01

    Ticks are obligate haematophagous ectoparasites considered the principal vectors of disease among animals. Rhipicephalus microplus and R. annulatus ticks are the most important vectors for Babesia bigemina and B. bovis, two of the most important intraerythrocytic protozoan parasites species in cattle, responsible for babesiosis which together with anaplasmosis account for substantial economic losses in the livestock industry worldwide. Anti-tick vaccines are a proved alternative to traditional tick and tick borne diseases control methods but are still limited primarily due to the lack of effective antigens. Subsequently to the identification of antigens the validation is a laborious work often expensive. Tick artificial feeding, is a low cost alternative to test antigens allowing achieving critical data. Herein, R. microplus females were successfully artificially fed using capillary tubes. Calreticulin (CRT) protein, which in a previous study has been identified as being involved in B. bigemina infection in R. annulatus ticks, was expressed as recombinant protein (rCRT) in an E. coli expression system and antibodies raised against rCRT. Anti-rCRT serum was supplemented to a blood meal, offered to partially engorged R. microplus females and their effect in feeding process as well as infection by B. bigemina was analyzed. No significant reductions in tick and egg weight were observed when ticks fed with anti-rCRT serum. Furthermore, B. bigemina infection levels did not show a statistically significant decrease when ticks fed with anti-rCRT antibodies. Results suggest that CRT is not a suitable candidate for cattle vaccination trials.

  10. Assessment of primers designed for the subspecies-specific discrimination among Babesia canis canis, Babesia canis vogeli and Babesia canis rossi by PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Sabrina Castilho; Linhares, Guido Fontgalland Coelho; Romanowsky, Tatiana Nunes; da Silveira Neto, Osvaldo José; Borges, Ligia Miranda Ferreira

    2008-03-25

    Canine babesiosis is an infectious disease caused by either Babesia gibsoni or Babesia canis protozoans. The latter is also classified under three different phylogenetic groups, referred to as subspecies B. canis canis, B. canis vogeli and B. canis rossi. The objective of the present study was to validate and standardize a PCR assay to discriminate the organisms at the subspecies level. First, the reference sequences of the 18S rRNA, 5.8S rRNA and 28S rRNA genes, including the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) and 2 (ITS2) of the most common species and subspecies of the genus Babesia were retrieved from the GenBank database. Subspecies-specific primers (BAB3, BAB4 and BAB5) and one genus-specific primer were designed from the alignment of the sequences. The PCR assays were evaluated in three different combinations of primer pairs in order to assure complete specificity for each reaction. The results of the tests had demonstrated effectiveness of the novel primer pairs BAB1/BAB3, BAB1/BAB4 and BAB1/BAB5 for the amplification of the subspecies-specific target fragments of 746 bp (B. c. canis), 546 bp (B. c. vogeli) and 342 bp (B. c. rossi) by PCR. The original enzymatic amplification assays with novel primers reported in this paper were confirmed to be a reliable tool for the specific discrimination among B. canis subspecies by single-step PCR assays.

  11. Molecular cloning, characterization and antigenicity of Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan) (Babesia cf. motasi) apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1).

    PubMed

    Niu, Qingli; Liu, Zhijie; Yang, Jifei; Guan, Guiquan; Pan, Yuping; Luo, Jianxun; Yin, Hong

    2017-04-01

    Apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) has been described as a potential vaccine candidate in apicomplexan parasites. Here we characterize the ama-1 gene. The full-length ama-1 gene of Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan) (BLTAMA-1) is 1785 bp, which contains an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 65-kDa protein of 594 amino acid residues; by definition, the 5' UTR precedes the first methionine of the ORF. Phylogenetic analysis based on AMA-1 amino acid sequences clearly separated Piroplasmida from other Apicomplexa parasites. The Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan) AMA-1 sequence is most closely associated with that of B. ovata and B. bigemina, with high bootstrap value. A recombinant protein encoding a conserved region and containing ectodomains I and II of BLTAMA-1 was constructed. BLTrAMA-1-DI/DII proteins were tested for reactivity with sera from sheep infected by Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan). In Western-blot analysis, native Babesia sp. BQ1 (Lintan) AMA-1 proteins were recognized by antibodies raised in rabbits against BLTrAMA-1 in vitro. The results of this study are discussed in terms of gene characterization, taxonomy and antigenicity.

  12. Mycoplasma bovis: Mechanisms of Resistance and Trends in Antimicrobial Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Lysnyansky, Inna; Ayling, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma bovis is a cell-wall-less bacterium and belongs to the class Mollicutes. It is the most important etiological agent of bovine mycoplasmoses in North America and Europe, causing respiratory disease, mastitis, otitis media, arthritis, and reproductive disease. Clinical disease associated with M. bovis is often chronic, debilitating, and poorly responsive to antimicrobial therapy, resulting in significant economic loss, the full extent of which is difficult to estimate. Until M. bovis vaccines are universally available, sanitary control measures and antimicrobial treatment are the only approaches that can be used in attempts to control M. bovis infections. However, in vitro studies show that many of the current M. bovis isolates circulating in Europe have high minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) for many of the commercially available antimicrobials. In this review we summarize the current MIC trends indicating the development of antimicrobial resistance in M. bovis as well as the known molecular mechanisms by which resistance is acquired. PMID:27199926

  13. A field study of Mycoplasma bovis infection in cattle.

    PubMed

    Feenstra, A; Bisgaard Madsen, E; Friis, N F; Meyling, A; Ahrens, P

    1991-05-01

    After an outbreak of mastitis in cattle caused by Mycoplasma bovis a study was made in 5 herds with recent cases (principal herds) and in 4 control herds. In the principal herds, M. bovis was isolated from milk samples, nasal swabs, and from one vaginal swab. M. bovis was also isolated from nasal swabs of calves in 2 of the 4 control herds, whereas all milk samples and vaginal swabs from the control herds were negative. Evaluation of serum antibody titres to M. bovis among non-mastitic animals of 3 principal herds and 1 control herd showed no difference in distribution of the titre values, which generally were low. However, cows excreting M. bovis in the milk had high antibody titres. The way of introduction to the herds and the spread of the infection within the herds could not be established by the study, which was supplemented by a DNA restriction fragment analysis of a number of M. bovis isolates.

  14. Molecular detection and characterization of Cytauxzoon felis and a Babesia species in cougars from Florida.

    PubMed

    Yabsley, Michael J; Murphy, Staci M; Cunningham, Mark W

    2006-04-01

    Piroplasms, morphologically indistinguishable from Cytauxzoon felis, previously were detected in 36% of cougars in Florida. We utilized a nested 18S rRNA assay, which amplifies DNA from all piroplasms, to screen blood samples collected from 41 cougars from Florida (39 native Florida panthers [Puma concolor coryi] and two translocated Texas cougars [P. c. stanleyana]) from 1989-2005. Thirty-nine of the 41 cougars (95%) were positive for piroplasms; however, sequence analysis and restriction enzyme digestion revealed that only five were positive for C. felis. Samples from 32 cougars were positive for a Babesia sp. Two cougars were co-infected with both C. felis and the Babesia sp. Phylogenetic analysis of 18S rRNA gene sequence indicated that the Florida panther Babesia sp. was most closely related to a Babesia sp. reported from Ixodes ovatus from Japan, Babesia divergens, and Babesia odocoilei. This study indicates that Florida panthers harbor two distinct piroplasms, C. felis and a Babesia sp., and that some individuals are infected with both organisms. The infectivity and pathogenicity of this Babesia sp. for domestic cats is unknown. This represents the first report of a feline Babesia sp. in North America.

  15. Increased prevalence of Mycoplasma bovis in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    ter Laak, E A; Wentink, G H; Zimmer, G M

    1992-01-01

    The epidemiology, therapy, and prevention of M. bovis infections are briefly reviewed. In a survey begun in 1982, M. bovis was found frequently in the respiratory tract [corrected] of veal calves and beef cattle with respiratory problems. In replacement calves infected with respiratory disease in dairy herds, however, the organism has only been detected since 1986. Respiratory tract specimens collected from calves with respiratory disease were submitted for examination for M. bovis from 1986 to 1991 and originated from 83 herds. Mycoplasma bovis was detected in specimens from 59 of the herds, 20% of which were dairy herds and 80% fattening herds. Arthritis caused by M. bovis was observed in 12 herds until July 1991. Since 1976 when the first mastitis outbreak caused by M. bovis was diagnosed, M. bovis has caused 14 more outbreaks. The number of diseased cattle varied from 1 tot 16 per farm, and clinical signs of mastitis varied from mild to severe. In all instances the infection has been eradicated from the herds. Because M. bovis can cause great losses in intensively reared cattle herds, it is advisable to separate purchased veal calves and beef cattle from dairy cattle to prevent further spread of M. bovis.

  16. Mycobacterium bovis in coyotes from Michigan.

    PubMed

    Bruning-Fann, C S; Schmitt, S M; Fitzgerald, S D; Payeur, J B; Whipple, D L; Cooley, T M; Carlson, T; Friedrich, P

    1998-07-01

    During a survey for tuberculosis in wild carnivores and omnivores, Mycobacterium bovis was cultured from pooled lymph nodes of three adult female coyotes (Canis latrans) harvested by hunters in Michigan (USA). No gross or histologic lesions suggestive of tuberculosis were seen in these animals. One coyote was taken from Montmorency county and two coyotes from Alcona county located in the north-eastern portion of Michigan's Lower Peninsula where free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) have been found infected with bovine tuberculosis. It is thought that these coyotes became infected with M. bovis through the consumption of tuberculous deer. Other species included in the survey were the opossum (Didelphis virginiana), raccoon (Procyon lotor), red fox (Vulpes vulpes), bobcat (Felis rufus), and badger (Taxidea taxus).

  17. Mycoplasma bovis arthritis and pneumonia in calves.

    PubMed

    2017-03-18

    Mycoplasma bovis arthritis and pneumonia in six-month-old calvesSudden deaths in housed suckler cows due to hypomagnesaemiaBovine respiratory syncytial virus infection in two-year-old heifersBovine abortion associated with Parachlamydia speciesFibrinous pericarditis due to Aeromonas hydrophila in weaner pigsThese are among matters discussed in the disease surveillance report for December 2016 from SAC Consulting: Veterinary Services (SAC C VS). British Veterinary Association.

  18. Babesia bovis: a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of plastid-encoded genes supports green algal origin of apicoplasts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Apicomplexan parasites commonly contain a unique, non-photosynthetic plastid-like organelle termed the apicoplast. Previous analyses of other plastid-containing organisms suggest that apicoplasts were derived from a red algal ancestor. In this report, we present an extensive phylogenetic study of ap...

  19. Dynamics of bovine spleen cell populations during the response to acute Babesia bovis infection: an immunohistological study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The spleen is the critical organ in defense against hemoparasitic diseases like babesiosis, responding to the pathogen in blood as it passes through the organ. As a lymphoid organ, the spleen is composed of cells whose role it is to orchestrate the engagement of infected erythrocytes and free parasi...

  20. Transmission of Babesia microti Parasites by Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Herwaldt, Barbara L.; Kazmierczak, James J.; Weiss, John W.; Klein, Christina L.; Leith, Catherine P.; He, Rong; Oberley, Matthew J.; Tonnetti, Laura; Wilkins, Patricia P.; Gauthier, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Babesia microti, an intraerythrocytic parasite, is tickborne in nature. In contrast to transmission by blood transfusion, which has been well documented, transmission associated with solid organ transplantation has not been reported. We describe parasitologically confirmed cases of babesiosis diagnosed ≈8 weeks posttransplantation in 2 recipients of renal allografts from an organ donor who was multiply transfused on the day he died from traumatic injuries. The organ donor and recipients had no identified risk factors for tickborne infection. Antibodies against B. microti parasites were not detected by serologic testing of archived pretransplant specimens. However, 1 of the organ donor’s blood donors was seropositive when tested postdonation and had risk factors for tick exposure. The organ donor probably served as a conduit of Babesia parasites from the seropositive blood donor to both kidney recipients. Babesiosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of unexplained fever and hemolytic anemia after blood transfusion or organ transplantation. PMID:27767010

  1. Transmission of Babesia microti Parasites by Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Meghan B; Herwaldt, Barbara L; Kazmierczak, James J; Weiss, John W; Klein, Christina L; Leith, Catherine P; He, Rong; Oberley, Matthew J; Tonnetti, Laura; Wilkins, Patricia P; Gauthier, Gregory M

    2016-11-01

    Babesia microti, an intraerythrocytic parasite, is tickborne in nature. In contrast to transmission by blood transfusion, which has been well documented, transmission associated with solid organ transplantation has not been reported. We describe parasitologically confirmed cases of babesiosis diagnosed ≈8 weeks posttransplantation in 2 recipients of renal allografts from an organ donor who was multiply transfused on the day he died from traumatic injuries. The organ donor and recipients had no identified risk factors for tickborne infection. Antibodies against B. microti parasites were not detected by serologic testing of archived pretransplant specimens. However, 1 of the organ donor's blood donors was seropositive when tested postdonation and had risk factors for tick exposure. The organ donor probably served as a conduit of Babesia parasites from the seropositive blood donor to both kidney recipients. Babesiosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of unexplained fever and hemolytic anemia after blood transfusion or organ transplantation.

  2. Autochthonous canine babesiosis caused by Babesia canis canis in Latvia.

    PubMed

    Berzina, Inese; Capligina, Valentina; Baumanis, Viesturs; Ranka, Renate; Cirule, Dina; Matise, Ilze

    2013-09-23

    This is the first report of confirmed canine babesiosis in Latvia supporting the observed geographical expansion of this disease. Between 2009 and 2011 three dogs which have not traveled outside of Latvia were diagnosed with babesiosis. Hematological analysis and serological tests for granulocytic anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis and borreliosis were negative (Idexx SNAP 4Dx test). Peripheral blood erythrocytes of the three dogs contained large Babesia that were identified as Babesia canis canis by PCR. Sequences of partial 18S rRNA gene were 98-100% similar to the sequences of B. canis canis isolated from dogs in other European countries. We conclude that these are the first autochthonous canine babesiosis cases reported from Latvia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Theileria (Babesia) equi and Babesia caballi infections in horses in Galicia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Camacho, A T; Guitian, F J; Pallas, E; Gestal, J J; Olmeda, A S; Habela, M A; Telford, S R; Spielman, A

    2005-05-01

    The control of equine piroplasmosis is becoming increasingly important to maintain the international market open to the horse industry. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the occurrence of equine piroplasmosis (Theileria equi and Babesia caballi) in Galicia, north-west Spain, and to compare haematological and serum biochemistry parameters between non-parasitaemic horses and horses parasitaemic with T. equi and B. caballi. Sixty serum samples (control group) were taken from healthy horses pastured on two farms, and examined for evidence of equine T. equi and B. caballi infection by indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT). Of the 60 samples, 24 (40%) and 17 (28.3%) samples were positive for T. equi and B. caballi, respectively. Twelve (20%) samples were positive for both parasites. Haematology and serum biochemistry were compared between controls and a series of 36 horses clinically affected by T. equi (25) or B. caballi (11). Compared with the healthy group, there was a 43% and 37% decrease in the haematocrit for T. equi and B. caballi infection, respectively. Parasitaemic horses presented an intense anaemia and serum biochemistry signs of liver damage. The anaemia was more severe in T. equi-infected than in B. caballi-infected horses. Our results suggest that equine piroplasmosis is widespread in the region and is a cause for concern.

  4. Babesial Vector Tick Defensin against Babesia sp. Parasites▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Naotoshi; Battsetseg, Badgar; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Miyoshi, Takeharu; Xuan, Xuenan; Oliver, James H.; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2007-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are major components of host innate immunity, a well-conserved, evolutionarily ancient defensive mechanism. Infectious disease-bearing vector ticks are thought to possess specific defense molecules against the transmitted pathogens that have been acquired during their evolution. We found in the tick Haemaphysalis longicornis a novel parasiticidal peptide named longicin that may have evolved from a common ancestral peptide resembling spider and scorpion toxins. H. longicornis is the primary vector for Babesia sp. parasites in Japan. Longicin also displayed bactericidal and fungicidal properties that resemble those of defensin homologues from invertebrates and vertebrates. Longicin showed a remarkable ability to inhibit the proliferation of merozoites, an erythrocyte blood stage of equine Babesia equi, by killing the parasites. Longicin was localized at the surface of the Babesia sp. parasites, as demonstrated by confocal microscopic analysis. In an in vivo experiment, longicin induced significant reduction of parasitemia in animals infected with the zoonotic and murine B. microti. Moreover, RNA interference data demonstrated that endogenous longicin is able to directly kill the canine B. gibsoni, thus indicating that it may play a role in regulating the vectorial capacity in the vector tick H. longicornis. Theoretically, longicin may serve as a model for the development of chemotherapeutic compounds against tick-borne disease organisms. PMID:17485458

  5. Babesial vector tick defensin against Babesia sp. parasites.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Naotoshi; Battsetseg, Badgar; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Miyoshi, Takeharu; Xuan, Xuenan; Oliver, James H; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2007-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are major components of host innate immunity, a well-conserved, evolutionarily ancient defensive mechanism. Infectious disease-bearing vector ticks are thought to possess specific defense molecules against the transmitted pathogens that have been acquired during their evolution. We found in the tick Haemaphysalis longicornis a novel parasiticidal peptide named longicin that may have evolved from a common ancestral peptide resembling spider and scorpion toxins. H. longicornis is the primary vector for Babesia sp. parasites in Japan. Longicin also displayed bactericidal and fungicidal properties that resemble those of defensin homologues from invertebrates and vertebrates. Longicin showed a remarkable ability to inhibit the proliferation of merozoites, an erythrocyte blood stage of equine Babesia equi, by killing the parasites. Longicin was localized at the surface of the Babesia sp. parasites, as demonstrated by confocal microscopic analysis. In an in vivo experiment, longicin induced significant reduction of parasitemia in animals infected with the zoonotic and murine B. microti. Moreover, RNA interference data demonstrated that endogenous longicin is able to directly kill the canine B. gibsoni, thus indicating that it may play a role in regulating the vectorial capacity in the vector tick H. longicornis. Theoretically, longicin may serve as a model for the development of chemotherapeutic compounds against tick-borne disease organisms.

  6. Mycobacterium bovis hip bursitis in a lung transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Dan, J M; Crespo, M; Silveira, F P; Kaplan, R; Aslam, S

    2016-02-01

    We present a report of extrapulmonary Mycobacterium bovis infection in a lung transplant recipient. M. bovis is acquired predominantly by zoonotic transmission, particularly from consumption of unpasteurized foods. We discuss epidemiologic exposure, especially as relates to the Mexico-US border, clinical characteristics, resistance profile, and treatment.

  7. Tuberculosis in alpacas (Lama pacos) caused by Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    García-Bocanegra, I; Barranco, I; Rodríguez-Gómez, I M; Pérez, B; Gómez-Laguna, J; Rodríguez, S; Ruiz-Villamayor, E; Perea, A

    2010-05-01

    We report three cases of tuberculosis in alpacas from Spain caused by Mycobacterium bovis. The animals revealed two different lesional patterns. Mycobacterial culture and PCR assay yielded positive results for M. bovis. Molecular typing of the isolates identified spoligotype SB0295 and identical variable-number tandem repeat (VNTR) allele sizes.

  8. Streptococcus bovis septicemia and meningitis associated with chronic radiation enterocolitis

    SciTech Connect

    Jadeja, L.; Kantarjian, H.; Bolivar, R.

    1983-12-01

    We describe the first patient with simultaneous S bovis septicemia and meningitis associated with chronic radiation enterocolitis. This case underlines the value of a thorough gastrointestinal evaluation of all patients with S bovis infection, and the need for a neurologic investigation even with minor neurologic manifestations.

  9. Identification of Mycobacterium bovis Isolates by a multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Figueiredo, Eduardo Eustáquio; Silvestre, Flávia Galindo; Campos, Wilma Neres; Furlanetto, Leone Vinícius; Medeiros, Luciana; Lilenbaum, Walter; Fonseca, Leila Sousa; Silva, Joab Trajano; Paschoalin, Vânia Margaret Flosi

    2009-01-01

    Isolates from suggestive bovine tuberculosis lesions were tested by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (m-PCR) targeting for RvD1Rv2031c and IS6110 sequences, specific for M. bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex respectively. The m-PCR successfully identified as M. bovis 88.24% of the isolates. PMID:24031349

  10. Mycobacterium bovis Shuttles between Domestic Animals and Wildlife

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the early 20th century there were large numbers of tuberculous cattle in many countries. An association was made between the number of M. bovis infected humans and the prevalence of tuberculosis in cattle. Mandatory pasteurization of milk caused the prevalence of human tuberculosis due to M. bovi...

  11. Streptococcus bovis as a Silage Inoculant, a Second Chance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous research indicated that Streptococcus bovis, a lactate producing ruminal bacterium, was similar or better than commercial silage inoculants. This study assessed the potential of two S. bovis strains, JB1 (a bacteriocin negative strain) and HC5 (a bacteriocin producing strain). Four treatmen...

  12. Selection and application of Streptococcus bovis as a silage inoculant.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, B A; Muck, R E; Ricke, S C

    1991-01-01

    Three strains of Streptococcus bovis, a homolactic bacterium capable of utilizing starch, were evaluated for growth kinetics and ability to decrease the pH of alfalfa silage. A selected strain was evaluated for its competitiveness as an inoculant with Enterococcus faecium, an organism used in inoculants, and for its ability to enhance the effect of a commercial inoculant. Testing was completed over three studies using wilted alfalfa (28 to 34% dry matter) ensiled into laboratory silos. Treatments were control, E. faecium, E. faecium and commercial inoculant, S. bovis, and S. bovis and commercial inoculant. Replicate silos were emptied and analyzed at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 40 days for pH, fermentation products, and nitrogen fractions. S. bovis alone lowered the pH quicker and improved silage parameters early in the fermentation compared with E. faecium, the commercial inoculant, and control treatments. When combined with a commercial inoculant, S. bovis lowered pH more quickly than the commercial inoculant alone and E. faecium plus commercial inoculant. At 40 days, S. bovis combination had lower pH and ammonia nitrogen and acetate contents than the E. faecium combination. Starch in the silage was not utilized by S. bovis as had been anticipated. Results indicate that S. bovis was more effective than E. faecium as a silage inoculant and could enhance a commercial inoculant on low-dry-matter alfalfa. PMID:1746960

  13. Sensitivity of Mycobacterium bovis to common beef processing interventions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Objective. Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis, a relevant zoonosis that can spread to humans through inhalation or by ingestion. M. bovis multiplies slowly, so infected animals may be sent to slaughter during the early stages of the disease before diagnosis and when ...

  14. Mycoplasma bovis: an emerging pathogen of ranched bison

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) is an emerging, primary pathogen of ranched bison (Bison bison) in North America. It causes severe disease among animals in feedlots as well as breeding-age cows and bulls on pasture. Mortality in adult bison is as high as 25 percent, resulting in significant economic l...

  15. The first detection of species of Babesia Starcovici, 1893 in moose, Alces alces (Linnaeus), in Norway.

    PubMed

    Puraite, Irma; Rosef, Olav; Radzijevskaja, Jana; Lipatova, Indre; Paulauskas, Algimantas

    2016-04-01

    Babesiosis is an emerging zoonotic disease and various wildlife species are reservoir hosts for zoonotic species of Babesia Starcovici, 1893. The objective of the present study was to investigate the presence and prevalence of Babesia spp. in moose Alces alces (Linnaeus) in two regions of Norway. A total of 99 spleen samples were collected from animals of various ages from an area with the occurrence of the tick Ixodes ricinus (Linnaeus, 1758), and from an area where the ticks are known to be absent. Infection was detected by the amplification of different regions of the 18S rRNA gene by using two different PCR primer sets specific of Babesia. Babesia spp. were found in the spleen samples of four moose. All Babesia-infected animals were from an area where ticks occur, with an infection rate of 6% (4 of 70). Babesia-positive samples were obtained from a five-month old moose calf and three adults. Two Babesia species, Babesia capreoli (Enigk et Friedhoff, 1962) and a B. odocoilei-like, were identified. Co-infection with Anaplasma phagocytophilum was obtained in two animals. This is the first report of the occurrence of B. capreoli and B. odocoilei-like species in moose.

  16. Babesia ugwidiensis, a new species of Avian piroplasm from Phalacrocoracidae in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Peirce, M.A.; Parsons, N.J.

    2012-01-01

    A new species of haematozoa, Babesia ugwidiensis sp. nov. from a cormorant is described. This is the first species of piroplasm to be recorded from the Phalacrocoracidae and the relationship of this parasite to other Babesia spp. from marine hosts is discussed. PMID:23193522

  17. Molecular typing of Mycobacterium bovis isolates: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Daniela Fernandes; Tavares, Lucas; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; Dellagostin, Odir Antônio

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the main causative agent of animal tuberculosis (TB) and it may cause TB in humans. Molecular typing of M. bovis isolates provides precise epidemiological data on issues of inter- or intra-herd transmission and wildlife reservoirs. Techniques used for typing M. bovis have evolved over the last 2 decades, and PCR-based methods such as spoligotyping and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) have been extensively used. These techniques can provide epidemiological information about isolates of M. Bovis that may help control bovine TB by indicating possible links between diseased animals, detecting and sampling outbreaks, and even demonstrating cases of laboratory cross-contamination between samples. This review will focus on techniques used for the molecular typing of M. bovis and discuss their general aspects and applications. PMID:25242917

  18. Tuberculosis Caused by Mycobacterium bovis in a Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris).

    PubMed

    Mol, J P S; Carvalho, T F; Fonseca, A A; Sales, E B; Issa, M A; Rezende, L C; Hodon, M A; Tinoco, H P; Malta, M C C; Pessanha, A T; Pierezan, F; Mota, P M P C; Paixão, T A; Santos, R L

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis, associated with Mycobacterium bovis, was diagnosed post mortem in an adult female capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris), kept at the Pampulha Ecological Park, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, in a large metropolitan area. On post-mortem examination, there were numerous firm white nodules scattered throughout all lobes of both lungs. Tissue samples were collected for histological and microbiological examination. Microscopically, the pulmonary nodules were multifocal to coalescing granulomas and intralesional acid-fast bacilli were evident in Ziehl-Neelsen-stained sections of the lung and spleen. Colonies with morphological features of Mycobacterium spp. were isolated from lung samples and conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with genomic DNA from the isolates was positive for M. bovis; sequencing indicated 100% identity with the region of difference 4 (RD4) of M. bovis. In addition, M. bovis DNA was detected in the lung by quantitative PCR. The finding of M. bovis in a capybara indicates a potential public health risk in a zoological collection.

  19. Seroprevalence of Babesia microti in blood donors from Babesia-endemic areas of the northeastern United States: 2000 through 2007.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Stephanie T; Cable, Ritchard G; Tonnetti, Laura; Spencer, Bryan; Rios, Jorge; Leiby, David A

    2009-12-01

    Current estimates of 70 cases of transfusion-transmitted Babesia microti, with 12 associated deaths, suggest that Babesia is a growing blood safety concern. The extent of Babesia infections among blood donors has not been well defined. To determine how common exposure to B. microti is among blood donors, a seroprevalence study was undertaken in the American Red Cross Northeast Division. Blood donations at selected blood drives in Connecticut and Massachusetts (2000 through 2007) were tested for the presence of immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies to B. microti using immunofluorescence assay. Geographic and temporal trends of B. microti seroprevalence were estimated for donor's zip code of residence. Overall, a 1.1% seroprevalence was identified in Connecticut, with the highest levels found in two Southeastern counties (Middlesex and New London). Observed seroprevalence for offshore islands of Massachusetts was 1.4%. Seropositive donations were identified from donors residing in all eight counties in Connecticut and three counties in Massachusetts. Although a seasonal peak was found between July and September, seropositive donations were identified in every month of the year. Foci of statistically higher B. microti seroprevalence among blood donors were observed; however, B. microti transfusion transmission risk exists for blood collected throughout Connecticut and portions of Massachusetts. Similarly, a seasonal peak was identified; nevertheless, seropositive donations were found year-round. Thus, geographic and/or seasonal exclusion methods are insufficient to fully safeguard the blood supply from Babesia transmission. Steps should be taken to reduce risk of transfusion-transmitted B. microti, perhaps through implementation of year-round, regional testing.

  20. Anatomical distribution of Mycobacterium bovis genotypes in experimentally infected white-tailed deer

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) causes tuberculosis in white-tailed deer (WTD). Natural infection of WTD with M. bovis is most closely mimicked by instilling inoculum into palatine tonsilar crypts. One hundred fifty days after intratonsilar inoculation, M. bovis was cultured from 30 tissues originati...

  1. Babesia lengau sp. nov., a Novel Babesia Species in Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus, Schreber, 1775) Populations in South Africa ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bosman, Anna-Mari; Oosthuizen, Marinda C.; Peirce, Michael A.; Venter, Estelle H.; Penzhorn, Barend L.

    2010-01-01

    In a previous paper, we reported on a large number of cheetah blood specimens that gave positive signals only for Babesia and/or Theileria genus-specific probes on the reverse line blot (RLB) assay, indicating the presence of a novel species or variant of an existing species. Some of these specimens were investigated further by microscopic, serological, sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses. The near-full-length 18S rRNA genes of 13 samples, as well as the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) region, were amplified, cloned, and sequenced. A species-specific RLB probe, designed to target the hypervariable V4 region of the 18S rRNA gene for detection of the novel Babesia sp., was used to screen an additional 137 cheetah blood specimens for the presence of the species. The prevalence of infection was 28.5%. Here we describe the morphology and phylogenetic relationships of the novel species, which we have named Babesia lengau sp. nov. PMID:20519464

  2. Babesia lengau sp. nov., a novel Babesia species in cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus, Schreber, 1775) populations in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Bosman, Anna-Mari; Oosthuizen, Marinda C; Peirce, Michael A; Venter, Estelle H; Penzhorn, Barend L

    2010-08-01

    In a previous paper, we reported on a large number of cheetah blood specimens that gave positive signals only for Babesia and/or Theileria genus-specific probes on the reverse line blot (RLB) assay, indicating the presence of a novel species or variant of an existing species. Some of these specimens were investigated further by microscopic, serological, sequencing, and phylogenetic analyses. The near-full-length 18S rRNA genes of 13 samples, as well as the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) region, were amplified, cloned, and sequenced. A species-specific RLB probe, designed to target the hypervariable V4 region of the 18S rRNA gene for detection of the novel Babesia sp., was used to screen an additional 137 cheetah blood specimens for the presence of the species. The prevalence of infection was 28.5%. Here we describe the morphology and phylogenetic relationships of the novel species, which we have named Babesia lengau sp. nov.

  3. Isolation and characterization of Babesia pecorum sp. nov. from farmed red deer (Cervus elaphus).

    PubMed

    Jouglin, Maggy; Fernández-de-Mera, Isabel G; de la Cotte, Nathalie; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco; Gortázar, Christian; Moreau, Emmanuelle; Bastian, Suzanne; de la Fuente, José; Malandrin, Laurence

    2014-08-26

    The diversity of Babesia species infecting cervids in parts of central and southern Spain was analyzed by collecting blood from farmed red deer (Cervus elaphus). Babesia sp. was isolated in vitro from two red deer herds in Cádiz and Ciudad Real. The number of Babesia sp. carriers differed between the two herds: 36/77 in Cádiz and 1/35 in Ciudad Real. Hyalomma lusitanicum was the most prevalent tick species identified on the Cádiz farm vegetation and on sampled animals, and is therefore a candidate vector. The molecular characteristics of 21 isolates were determined by complete (8 isolates) or partial (13 isolates) 18S rRNA gene sequencing. The sequences were highly similar (over 99.4% identity) and 6 sequence types were identified at the level of one herd only, demonstrating a rather high genetic diversity. They formed a monophyletic clade, and members of the three main sequence types shared a similar morphology and the same erythrocyte susceptibility pattern. This clade also included Babesia sp. Xinjiang isolated from sheep in China and Babesia sp. identified in giraffe in South Africa, with identities higher than 98.3% and statistically relevant phylogenetic support. None of the biological properties analyzed for both Babesia from red deer and Babesia sp. Xinjiang allowed their differentiation (ability to develop in vitro in erythrocytes from cattle and sheep, as well as in erythrocytes from different cervids, unsuccessful infection of calves). We propose the Babesia isolated from red deer as a new species named B. pecorum. Whether Babesia sp. Xinjiang and the Babesia characterized in South Africa belong to the same species is debated.

  4. Mycobacterium bovis BCG mycobacteria--new application.

    PubMed

    Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Pestel, Joël; Biet, Franck; Locht, Camille; Tonnel, André-Bernard; Druszczyńska, Magdalena; Rudnicka, Wiesława

    2006-01-01

    The polarized response of T helper-2 (Th2) lymphocytes to an allergen is considered to be the main cause of the pathogenesis of asthma. In this study, we asked a question whether M. bovis BCG mycobacteria which are known for the preferential stimulation of T helper-1 (Th1) immunity, diminish the effector functions of Th2 cells from allergic patients upon stimulation with a common house dust mite Der p-1 allergen. Our results allow a positive answer to this question. We demonstrate that BCG modulates the dendritic cell-dependent allergen presentation process and switches naive T lymphocytes towards an anti-allergic Th1 profile.

  5. [Tuberculous epididymitis caused by Mycobacterium bovis].

    PubMed

    Mateos Colino, Alfonso; Sousa Escandón, Manuel Alejandro; Golpe Gómez, Rafael; García Figueras, Roberto; Pérez Valcarcel, Javier; Fernández, María Armesto

    2003-03-01

    To focus on the need of including tuberculosis among differential diagnoses of any epidymo-testicular mass, especially if its evolution is torpid. A 73-year-old man who presented with scrotum abscess underwent surgical drainage and antibiotic treatment, but suppuration relapsed through cutaneous fistulae. A epipidymectomy was then performed, which demonstrated tuberculous granulomas. Torax Rx showed a cystic apical pulmonary wound which was treated with 3 antituberculostatics for 12 months. Sputum culture was positive for Micobacterium Bovis. Aspirative punction under sonographic control is a valuable technique to avoid mutilating surgeries and to permit an almost always effective treatment, before the appearance of permanent lesions which lead to sterility.

  6. Strong conservation of rhoptry-associated-protein-1 (RAP-1) locus organization and sequence among Babesia isolates infecting sheep from China (Babesia motasi-like phylogenetic group).

    PubMed

    Niu, Qingli; Valentin, Charlotte; Bonsergent, Claire; Malandrin, Laurence

    2014-12-01

    Rhoptry-associated-protein 1 (RAP-1) is considered as a potential vaccine candidate due to its involvement in red blood cell invasion by parasites in the genus Babesia. We examined its value as a vaccine candidate by studying RAP-1 conservation in isolates of Babesia sp. BQ1 Ningxian, Babesia sp. Tianzhu and Babesia sp. Hebei, responsible for ovine babesiosis in different regions of China. The rap-1 locus in these isolates has very similar features to those described for Babesia sp. BQ1 Lintan, another Chinese isolate also in the B. motasi-like phylogenetic group, namely the presence of three types of rap-1 genes (rap-1a, rap-1b and rap-1c), multiple conserved rap-1b copies (5) interspaced with more or less variable rap-1a copies (6), and the 3' localization of one rap-1c. The isolates Babesia sp. Tianzhu, Babesia sp. BQ1 Lintan and Ningxian were almost identical (average nucleotide identity of 99.9%) over a putative locus of about 31 Kb, including the intergenic regions. Babesia sp. Hebei showed a similar locus organization but differed in the rap-1 locus sequence, for each gene and intergenic region, with an average nucleotide identity of 78%. Our results are in agreement with 18S rDNA phylogenetic studies performed on these isolates. However, in extremely closely related isolates the rap-1 locus seems more conserved (99.9%) than the 18S rDNA (98.7%), whereas in still closely related isolates the identities are much lower (78%) compared with the 18S rDNA (97.7%). The particularities of the rap-1 locus in terms of evolution, phylogeny, diagnosis and vaccine development are discussed. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mycobacterium bovis subsp. caprae Caused One-Third of Human M. bovis-Associated Tuberculosis Cases Reported in Germany between 1999 and 2001

    PubMed Central

    Kubica, Tanja; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Niemann, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    The prevalence of the Mycobacterium bovis subsp. caprae and M. bovis subsp. bovis among German tuberculosis cases caused by the bovine tubercle bacillus from 1999 to 2001 was determined. Isolates from 166 patients living in Germany and 10 animals were analyzed by conventional laboratory procedures, spoligotyping, and partly by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the gyrB gene. By spoligotyping, 55 of 176 isolates (31%) could be identified as M. bovis subsp. caprae, and 121 (69%) were confirmed as M. bovis subsp. bovis. In general, a low variability of spoligotypes with 59 distinct patterns and a cluster rate of 77% (136 isolates/19 clusters) was determined. About half of all isolates were grouped in the three main clusters with 29, 30, and 35 isolates, respectively. Differences in age and gender between the patient groups infected with M. bovis subsp. bovis and M. bovis subsp. caprae did not reach statistical significance. However, marked differences in the geographical prevalence of M. bovis subsp. caprae were observed, ranging from fewer than 10% of all M. bovis isolates in the north up to more than 80% of isolates in the south of Germany. In conclusion, M. bovis subsp. caprae accounts for a high ratio of human M. bovis-associated tuberculosis cases in Germany and was more frequently found in the southern part. PMID:12843046

  8. Molecular assays reveal the presence of Theileria spp. and Babesia spp. in Asian water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis, Linnaeus, 1758) in the Amazon region of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Júlia A G; de Oliveira, Cairo H S; Silvestre, Bruna T; Albernaz, Tatiana T; Leite, Rômulo C; Barbosa, José D; Oliveira, Carlos M C; Ribeiro, Múcio F B

    2016-07-01

    Approximately 50% of buffalo herds in Brazil are located in Pará state in northern Brazil. There are several properties where cattle and buffalo live and graze together, and thus, buffalo pathogens may threaten the health of cattle and vice versa. Therefore, knowledge of infectious agents of buffalo is essential for maintaining healthy livestock. Clinical disease caused by Theileria and Babesia parasites in the Asian water buffalo is not common, although these animals may act as reservoir hosts, and the detection of these hemoparasites in buffaloes is as important as it is in cattle. Studies of the infection of buffaloes by hemoparasites in Brazil are scarce. The objective of the present study was to investigate the occurrence of Piroplasmida parasites in Asian water buffaloes in the state of Pará in the Amazon region of Brazil using nested PCR assays and phylogenetic analysis. The 18S rRNA gene and ITS complete region were amplified from DNA extracted from blood samples collected from 308 apparently healthy buffaloes bred on six properties in the state of Pará, Brazil. The prevalence of positive buffalo samples was 4.2% (13/308) for Theileria spp., 3.6% (11/308) for Babesia bovis and 1% (3/308) for Babesia bigemina. Animals infected with Theileria were detected in 50% (3/6) of the assessed properties. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the Theileria species detected in this study were closely related to Theileria buffeli, Theileria orientalis and Theileria sinensis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Theileria in Asian water buffaloes in the Americas. The majority of Theileria-positive buffaloes (11/13) belong to a property that has a history of animals presenting lymphoproliferative disease of unknown etiology. Therefore, the present research suggests that this disorder can be associated with Theileria infection in this property. Our results provide new insights on the distribution and biological aspects of hemoparasites transmissible from

  9. Persistence of Eimeria bovis in soil.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Brian; Lepik, Triin; Bangoura, Berit

    2013-07-01

    Eimeriosis is a disease that occurs globally and often affects cattle grazing on pastures contaminated with oocysts of the pathogenic species Eimeria bovis, Eimeria zuernii or Eimeria alabamensis, respectively. Nonetheless, little is understood regarding oocyst persistence on the pasture. The study was performed in the temperate climate zone. Soil samples were spiked with 100,000 E. bovis oocysts in July 2010 or with 50,000 oocysts in October 2010, respectively, both either with our without addition of cattle faeces. The soil samples were exposed to natural environmental conditions until April 2011. A subset of the samples was analysed immediately after spiking as positive control. The oocysts were recovered by a flotation method and counted in a reading chamber. On average, 23 % of the oocysts could be recovered from the positive control. The recovery of oocysts dropped to 0.30 % of the original level in the samples prepared in July independent of the addition of faeces, whereas the oocyst count was higher in the samples prepared in October, both without (2.05 %) and with (2.64 %) faecal material. No differences were observed between presence of oocysts or oocyst counts recovered in the presence or absence of faeces. Presence of faeces had a positive influence on oocyst integrity. During the winter season, the number of oocysts in the soil was lowered under the detection limit in most samples. On the other hand, the comparatively short 3-month summer period had a significant influence on the number of persisting oocysts too.

  10. Molecular characterization of Babesia species in wild animals and their ticks in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Orkun, Ömer; Karaer, Zafer

    2017-08-26

    To date, no study has investigated Babesia ecology in wild boars, hares or foxes in Turkey. This study aimed to determine and characterize Babesia spp. in wild animals and their ticks. We identified a novel Babesia genotype and four known Babesia species in wild animals and their ticks. We detected Babesia spp. molecularly in hares for the first time. In addition, we identified B. vulpes in foxes for the first time in Turkey. The presence of B. rossi, B. crassa and B. occultans was also revealed in ticks collected from wild boars and hares. This is only the second report of B. rossi in ticks outside of Africa and suggests that B. rossi is circulating in ticks in Turkey. Therefore B. rossi poses a significant threat to domestic dogs. Here we demonstrate the role of wild animals in the life cycle of Babesia species in Turkey and contribute to Babesia ecological and taxonomic information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Transport of Babesia venatorum-infected Ixodes ricinus to Norway by northward migrating passerine birds

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bovine babesiosis is regarded as a limited health problem for Norwegian cows, and the incidence has decreased markedly since the 1930s. Rare cases of babesiosis in splenectomised humans from infection with Babesia divergens and B.venatorum have been described. The objective of this study was to determine whether birds can introduce Babesia-infected ticks. There are between 30 and 85 million passerine birds that migrate to Norway every spring. Methods Passerine birds were examined for ticks at four bird observatories along the southern Norwegian coast during the spring migrations of 2003, 2004 and 2005. The presence of Babesia was detected in the nymphs of Ixodes ricinus by real-time PCR. Positive samples were confirmed using PCR, cloning and phylogenetic analyses. Results Of 512 ticks examined, real-time PCR revealed five to be positive (1.0%). Of these, four generated products that indicated the presence of Babesia spp.; each of these were confirmed to be from Babesia venatorum (EU1). Two of the four B. venatorum-positive ticks were caught from birds having an eastern migratory route (P< 0.001). Conclusions Birds transport millions of ticks across the North Sea, the Skagerrak and the Kattegat every year. Thus, even with the low prevalence of Babesia-infected ticks, a substantial number of infected ticks will be transported into Norway each year. Therefore, there is a continuous risk for introduction of new Babesia spp. into areas where I. ricinus can survive. PMID:21699719

  12. Identification of a novel Babesia sp. from a sable antelope (Hippotragus niger Harris, 1838).

    PubMed

    Oosthuizen, Marinda C; Zweygarth, Erich; Collins, Nicola E; Troskie, Milana; Penzhorn, Banie L

    2008-07-01

    Babesiosis in a sable antelope (Hippotragus niger Harris, 1838) was first reported in 1930; the parasite was named Babesia irvinesmithi. Recently, specimens from an adult sable that presented with a sudden onset of disease and that subsequently died during immobilization were submitted for molecular characterization. Microscopic examination of thin blood smears revealed the presence of small piroplasms. DNA was extracted from blood samples; the V4 variable region of the 18S rRNA gene was amplified and analyzed using the reverse line blot (RLB) assay. Amplicons did not hybridize with any of the Babesia or Theileria species-specific probes present on the blot and hybridized only with a Babesia or Theileria genus-specific probe, suggesting the presence of a novel species. The full-length 18S rRNA gene sequence was obtained and aligned with published sequences of related genera, and phylogenetic trees were constructed. Sequence similarity analyses indicated that a Babesia species, designated Babesia sp. (sable), was present. The sequence showed its highest similarity to B. orientalis and to an unnamed Babesia species previously detected in bovine samples. The latter was later established to be Babesia occultans. A Babesia sp. (sable)-specific RLB oligonucleotide probe was designed and used to screen 200 South African sable samples, but so far, no other sample has been found to be positive for the presence of Babesia sp. (sable) DNA. In summary, we identified a novel piroplasm parasite from a sable antelope that died from an unknown illness. While the parasite was observed in blood smears, there is no direct evidence that it was the cause of death.

  13. Detection of Babesia EU1 in Ixodes ricinus ticks in northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Cassini, Rudi; Bonoli, Cristina; Montarsi, Fabrizio; Tessarin, Cinzia; Marcer, Federica; Galuppi, Roberta

    2010-07-15

    Babesia EU1, a potentially important emerging zoonotic pathogen, already detected in ticks and wild ruminants of different European Countries, was found in three pools of Ixodes ricinus nymphs in three different sites located in a single District of north-eastern Italy. Totally 356 ticks (60 pools) were collected from the environment during a surveillance activity in the year 2006. Babesia EU1 estimated individual tick prevalence in the area is 0.85%. The finding that also in northern Italy the tick population is carrying Babesia EU1 suggests a wide geographical spreading of this zoonotic pathogen in Europe. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic characterization and molecular survey of Babesia sp. Xinjiang infection in small ruminants and ixodid ticks in China.

    PubMed

    Niu, Qingli; Liu, Zhijie; Yang, Jifei; Gao, Shandian; Pan, Yuping; Guan, Guiquan; Luo, Jianxun; Yin, Hong

    2017-04-01

    Babesia sp. Xinjiang is a large ovine Babesia species that was recently isolated in China. Compared with other ovine Babesia species, it has different morphological features, pathogenicity and vector tick species. The known transmitting vector is Hyalomma anatolicum. In this study, the distribution and the presence of Babesia sp. Xinjiang in small ruminants and ixodid ticks in China were assessed by specific nested-PCR assay based on the rap-1a gene. A total of 978 blood samples from sheep or goats from 15 provinces and 797 tick specimens from vegetation from 10 provinces were collected and analysed for the presence of the Babesia sp. Xinjiang. Full-length and partial rap-1a of Babesia sp. Xinjiang were amplified from field samples. The PCR results were further confirmed by DNA sequencing. Overall, 38 (3.89%) blood samples and 51 (6.4%) tick samples were positive for Babesia sp. Xinjiang infection. The highest presence (26.92%) was found in blood samples from Yunnan province, while H. qinghaiensis ticks with the highest presence of infection (21.3%) were from Gansu province. This study identified for the first time Babesia sp. Xinjiang infection in H. longicornis tick species. The rap-1a sequences of Babesia sp. Xinjiang from field blood and tick samples indicated 100% identity. The presence of Babesia sp. Xinjiang infection may increase in China. Novel potential transmitting vectors might be more extensive than previously thought.

  15. Sequence Analysis of the Direct Repeat Region in Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Caimi, Karina; Romano, Maria I.; Alito, Alicia; Zumarraga, Martin; Bigi, Fabiana; Cataldi, Angel

    2001-01-01

    Spoligotyping is a major tool for molecular typing of Mycobacterium bovis. This technique is based on the polymorphism of spacers that separate direct repeats (DRs) in the M. tuberculosis complex DR region. Numerous M. bovis strains show a lack of several spacers which appears as a gap in the spoligotyping pattern. To determine whether these gaps contain alternative spacers not included in the spoligotyping membrane, PCRs using primers that hybridize to the spacers adjacent to the gaps were performed. Comparing the sizes of products obtained by PCR with those deduced from spoligotyping patterns, fragments were selected and sequenced to look for alternative spacers. Upon analysis of the sequences, five alternative spacers were detected, although deletions of spacers are mainly responsible for the observed gaps. The alternative spacers, which are more frequent in M. bovis than in M. tuberculosis, may contribute to increased M. bovis differentiation. PMID:11230428

  16. Biochemical characteristics among Mycobacterium bovis BCG substrains.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Daisuke; Takii, Takemasa; Mukai, Tetsu; Makino, Masahiko; Yasuda, Emi; Horita, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Ryuji; Fujiwara, Akiko; Kanai, Keita; Kondo, Maki; Kawarazaki, Aya; Yano, Ikuya; Yamamoto, Saburo; Onozaki, Kikuo

    2010-05-01

    In order to evaluate the biochemical characteristics of 14 substrains of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) - Russia, Moreau, Japan, Sweden, Birkhaug, Danish, Glaxo, Mexico, Tice, Connaught, Montreal, Phipps, Australia and Pasteur - we performed eight different biochemical tests, including those for nitrate reduction, catalase, niacin accumulation, urease, Tween 80 hydrolysis, pyrazinamidase, p-amino salicylate degradation and resistance to thiophene 2-carboxylic acid hydrazide. Catalase activities of the substrains were all low. Data for nitrate reduction, niacin accumulation, Tween 80 hydrolysis, susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide and nitrate, and optimal pH for growth were all variable among these substrains. These findings suggest that the heterogeneities of biochemical characteristics are relevant to the differences in resistance of BCG substrains to environmental stress. The study also contributes to the re-evaluation of BCG substrains for use as vaccines.

  17. Delayed-type hypersensitivity to Babesia microti-infected erythrocytes in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebush, M.J.; Troutman, E.H.; Kennedy, D.A.

    1986-04-01

    Strong delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to Babesia microti was elicited when intraerythrocytic parasites (IEP) were inoculated subcutaneously into the flank of normal mice 6 to 14 days before challenge in the ipsilateral footpad with 10(8) IEP. Intraperitoneal or intravenous administration of antigen did not sensitize mice for DTH. When challenge was given 21 days after immunization, the response was approximately half of the maximum and then rose again slowly over the next 3 weeks to levels that were not significantly different from those maximal values. The response was classified as a true DTH reaction on the basis of kinetics, histology, and the transfer of responsiveness with immune T lymphocytes of the Ly 1+ phenotype, but not with serum. The reaction was specific for IEP since control groups given two injections of red blood cells from uninfected syngeneic mice (NRBC) or one injection of NRBC or sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and one of IEP never developed significant footpad swelling. Freed parasites obtained by osmotic rupture, density gradient sedimentation, and lethally irradiated IEP were also effective for elicitation of DTH. Anti-IEP DTH was expressed in a dose-dependent fashion with 10(6), 10(7), or 10(8) parasites sufficing for immunizing inoculum as long as 10(8) parasites were used as the challenge dose. Mice immunized and challenged with 10(8) lethally irradiated IEP (60 krad, 60Co), were protected against subsequent intraperitoneal challenge with 10(8) viable IEP. If mice were infected intraperitoneally with 10(8) IEP at any time between 21 days before immunization to 2 hr after challenge, their ability to respond to immunization and challenge was profoundly depressed. Development of a strong anti-parasite DTH response can occur in parallel with resistance to infection, but is not a rapid sequela of bloodborne infection.

  18. Imidocarb dipropionate clears persistent Babesia caballi infection with elimination of transmission potential

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antimicrobial treatment of persistent infection to eliminate transmission risk represents a specific challenge requiring compelling evidence of complete pathogen clearance. The limited repertoire of antimicrobial agents targeted at protozoal parasites magnifies this challenge. Using Babesia cabal...

  19. Detection of Babesia microti parasites by highly sensitive 18S rRNA reverse transcription PCR.

    PubMed

    Hanron, Amelia E; Billman, Zachary P; Seilie, Annette M; Chang, Ming; Murphy, Sean C

    2017-03-01

    Babesia are increasingly appreciated as a cause of transfusion-transmitted infection. Sensitive methods are needed to screen blood products. We report herein that B. microti 18S rRNA is over 1,000-fold more abundant than its coding genes, making reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) much more sensitive than PCR. Babesia 18S rRNA may be useful for screening the blood supply. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Multiple co-infections of rodents with hantaviruses, Leptospira, and Babesia in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Tadin, Ante; Turk, Nenad; Korva, Miša; Margaletić, Josip; Beck, Relja; Vucelja, Marko; Habuš, Josipa; Svoboda, Petra; Zupanc, Tatjana Avšič; Henttonen, Heikki; Markotić, Alemka

    2012-05-01

    Hantaviruses, Leptospira spp., and Babesia spp. are rodent-borne pathogens present worldwide. We studied multiple co-infections of small rodents in Croatia with all three pathogens. Twenty-eight Apodemus flavicollis and 16 Myodes glareolus were tested for the presence of hantavirus RNA by real-time RT-PCR, Leptospira strains by renoculture method and Babesia DNA by PCR. Anti-hantavirus antibodies and anti-Leptospira antibodies were detected by serological methods. Very high infection rates with each pathogen were found in A. flavicollis: 20 of 28 rodents (71%) were infected with Dobrava virus, 13 rodents (46%) were infected with Leptospira, and 5 rodents (18%) were infected with Babesia. Multiple co-infections with all three pathogens were found in 3 of 28 (11%) A. flavicollis animals, suggesting that the same rodent host can be infected with several pathogens at the same time. Dual infections with both hantaviruses and Leptospira were found in 7 of 44 rodents (16%), with hantaviruses and Babesia in 2 rodents (5%), and double infection with both Leptospira and Babesia were found in 1 rodent (2%). Since hantaviruses, Leptospira, and Babesia have similar geographical distributions, it is to be expected that in other parts of the world multiple co-infections, representing a serious threat to public health, can be found.

  1. Babesia (Theileria) annae in a red fox (Vulpes vulpes) from Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Clancey, Noel; Horney, Barbara; Burton, Shelley; Birkenheuer, Adam; McBurney, Scott; Tefft, Karen

    2010-04-01

    A 4-6-mo-old female red fox (Vulpes vulpes) was presented to the Atlantic Veterinary College (AVC) Teaching Hospital, Prince Edward Island, Canada. On presentation, the fox was weak and had pale mucous membranes. A complete blood count and a serum biochemistry profile were performed. Blood smear examination revealed low numbers of erythrocytes containing centrally to paracentrally located, single, rarely multiple, approximately 1 x 2 microm, oval to round organisms with morphology similar to Babesia microti. Polymerase chain reaction testing and DNA sequencing of the Babesia species 18S rRNA gene were performed on DNA extracted from whole blood. Results were positive for a Babesia microti-like parasite genetically identical to Babesia (Theileria) annae. The fox was euthanized due to poor prognosis for recovery. Necropsy examination revealed multifocal to locally extensive subacute nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis, an eosinophilic broncho-pneumonia, a moderate diffuse vacuolar hepatopathy, and lesions associated with blunt trauma to the left abdominal region. This is the first reported case of a red fox in Canada infected with a piroplasm. It remains uncertain whether the presence of this hemoparasite in this fox was pathogenic or an incidental finding. The potential for competent vectors of Babesia species on Prince Edward Island, the potential for this Babesia microti-like parasite to infect other wild and domestic canids, and the significance of this parasite to the health of infected individuals are yet to be determined.

  2. Molecular characterization of a Babesia species identified in a North American raccoon.

    PubMed

    Birkenheuer, Adam J; Whittington, Julia; Neel, Jennifer; Large, Edward; Barger, Anne; Levy, Michael G; Breitschwerdt, Edward B

    2006-04-01

    Piroplasmosis was first described in raccoons (Procyon lotor) in 1926, and the official description of a small piroplasm as Babesia lotori was done in 1981. Babesia microti-like gene sequences have been characterized in raccoons in both North American and Japan. It is well documented that the microscopic appearance of piroplasms does not always accurately predict the genotype and phylogenetic classification. Discrepancies using phenotype to predict genotype have been reported most frequently when evaluating small piroplasms. We amplified and sequenced the full-length 18S rRNA gene from a small piroplasm identified in a raccoon and used this sequence for phylogenetic analyses. Based on these analyses, the organism was placed in the Babesia sensu stricto clade, confirming that it is a true Babesia sp. This documents that at least two Babesia spp. can infect raccoons. The data generated in this study can be used to design molecular diagnostic tests for detection of this Babesia sp., which will be useful for epidemiologic and comparative phylogenetic studies. As piroplasmosis has been documented with increased frequency in humans in recent years, the results of this study will aid in the recognition of zoonotic babesiosis.

  3. Detection and molecular identification of Hepatozoon canis and Babesia vogeli from domestic dogs in Palestine.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Kifaya; Al-Jawabreh, Amer; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Abdelkader, Ahmad; Zaid, Taher; Ereqat, Suheir; Sawalha, Samer S; Baneth, Gad; Abdeen, Ziad

    2017-04-01

    Dogs serve as hosts for a great number of parasites, which may affect their health and wellbeing. This study aimed to observe tick borne pathogens in dogs from Palestine including Hepatozoon canis and Babesia species. The prevalence of both H. canis and Babesia species infections in apparently healthy dogs, from ten districts of the West Bank was surveyed. DNA was extracted from blood samples obtained from dogs (n = 362) and ticks (n = 213) collected from dogs (n = 77). A primer set that amplifies a partial sequence of the Babesia and Hepatozoon 18S rRNA gene was used for PCR and the DNA sequences of the PCR products of all samples were determined. Twenty-nine (8·0%) of the dogs were found infected including 20 with H. canis (5·5%), seven with Babesia vogeli (1·9%) and two with undefined Babesia spp. (0·6%). Twelve Rhipicephalus sanguineus s.l ticks were pathogen-positive, including ten with H. canis (4·7%), one with B. vogeli (0·5%), and one with Hepatozoon felis (0·5%). The results indicated that a wide range of tick borne pathogens is circulating in the canine population in the surveyed region. This study is the first report on the prevalence of H. canis, B. vogeli and Babesia spp. in dogs in Palestine and its results will assist in the management of diseases associated with these blood parasites.

  4. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Babesia sp. NV-1 detected from wild American Mink ( Neovison vison ) in Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Haruyuki; Ishinabe, Satoki; Jinnai, Michio; Asakawa, Mitsuhiko; Ishihara, Chiaki

    2013-04-01

    Babesiosis is a tick-borne protozoan disease affecting many mammalian species worldwide, caused by the intraerythrocytic multiplication of Babesia spp. The present study aimed to detect the presence of Babesia sp. in 13 American mink from Hokkaido, Japan. One of 13 animals was positive, as indicated by nested PCR targeting the 18S ribosomal RNA (SSU rDNA) and subunit 7 (eta) of the chaperonin-containing t-complex polypeptide 1 (CCT7) genes from species of Babesia and Theileria. Sequencing of the PCR product of SSU rDNA revealed 99% homology to the isolates of Babesia sp. SAP#131 found in raccoons in Hokkaido, whereas that of the CCT7 gene showed 80% homology to the isolates of Babesia gibsoni in dogs as determined by BLAST analysis. We refer to the cognate sequence as Babesia sp. NV-1. Phylogenetic analyses of SSU rDNA and CCT7 genes from Babesia sp. NV-1 revealed them to be most closely related to the Babesia sp. SAP#131 from a raccoon in Hokkaido and to canine B. gibsoni, respectively. Here, we provide the first molecular evidence of the Babesia sp. NV-1 parasite in feral American mink ( Neovison vison ) in Hokkaido, Japan.

  5. Prevalence and diversity of Babesia, Hepatozoon, Ehrlichia, and Bartonella in wild and domestic carnivores from Zambia, Africa.

    PubMed

    Williams, Brianna M; Berentsen, Are; Shock, Barbara C; Teixiera, Maria; Dunbar, Michael R; Becker, Matthew S; Yabsley, Michael J

    2014-03-01

    A molecular survey was conducted for several hemoparasites of domestic dogs and three species of wild carnivores from two sites in Zambia. Three Babesia spp. were detected including Babesia felis and Babesia leo in lions (Panthera leo) and a Babesia sp. (similar to Babesia lengau) in spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) and a single lion. All wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) and domestic dogs were negative for Babesia. High prevalences for Hepatozoon were noted in all three wild carnivores (38-61%) and in domestic dogs (13%). Significantly higher prevalences were noted in hyenas and wild dogs compared with domestic dogs and lions. All carnivores were PCR negative for Ehrlichia canis, Ehrlichia ewingii, and Bartonella spp. Overall, high prevalences and diversity of Babesia and Hepatozoon were noted in wild carnivores from Zambia. This study is the first molecular characterization of Babesia from any hyena species and is the first report of a Babesia sp. closely related to B. lengau, a parasite previously only reported from cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus), in lions and hyenas. Although usually benign in wild carnivores, these hemoparasites can be pathogenic under certain circumstances. Importantly, data on vectors for these parasites are lacking, so studies are needed to identify vectors as well as determine transmission routes, infection dynamics, and host specificity of these hemoparasites in wildlife in Africa and also the risk of transmission between domestic animals and wildlife.

  6. Immune Responses in Cattle Inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or Mycobacterium kansasii

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cattle were inoculated with Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, or Mycobacterium kansasii to compare antigen-specific immune responses to varied patterns of mycobacterial disease. Disease expression ranged from colonization with associated pathology (M. bovis), colonization without path...

  7. In vitro evaluation of drug susceptibilities of Babesia divergens isolates.

    PubMed

    Brasseur, P; Lecoublet, S; Kapel, N; Favennec, L; Ballet, J J

    1998-04-01

    The susceptibilities of three bovine and two human Babesia divergens isolates to antimicrobial agents were evaluated in vitro by a tritiated hypoxanthine incorporation assay. The MICs at which 50% of isolates are inhibited (MIC50s) for mefloquine (chlorhydrate), chloroquine (sulfate), quinine (chlorhydrate), clindamycin (phosphate), pentamidine (isethionate), phenamidine (isethionate) plus oxomemazine (chlorhydrate), lincomycin (chlorhydrate monohydrate), and imidocarb (dipropionate) were determined. Except for imidocarb, the MIC50s observed for the different isolates were close. Imidocarb and the combination of phenamidine plus oxomemazine exhibited the highest in vitro activity, while antimalarial agents such as mefloquine, choroquine, and quinine were inactive. Other drugs had intermediate activities. The data support further in vitro evaluation of antimicrobial agents active against B. divergens for the improvement of therapeutic strategies.

  8. Reservoir Competence of Wildlife Host Species for Babesia microti

    PubMed Central

    Tibbetts, Michael; Strauss, Mia; Ostfeld, Richard S.; Keesing, Felicia

    2012-01-01

    Human babesiosis is an increasing health concern in the northeastern United States, where the causal agent, Babesia microti, is spread through the bite of infected Ixodes scapularis ticks. We sampled 10 mammal and 4 bird species within a vertebrate host community in southeastern New York to quantify reservoir competence (mean percentage of ticks infected by an individual host) using real-time PCR. We found reservoir competence levels >17% in white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus), raccoons (Procyon lotor), short-tailed shrews (Blarina brevicauda), and eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus), and <6% but >0% in all other species, including all 4 bird species. Data on the relative contributions of multiple host species to tick infection with B. microti and level of genetic differentiation between B. microti strains transmitted by different hosts will help advance understanding of the spread of human babesiosis. PMID:23171673

  9. In Vitro Evaluation of Drug Susceptibilities of Babesia divergens Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Brasseur, Philippe; Lecoublet, Sophie; Kapel, Nathalie; Favennec, Loic; Ballet, Jean J.

    1998-01-01

    The susceptibilities of three bovine and two human Babesia divergens isolates to antimicrobial agents were evaluated in vitro by a tritiated hypoxanthine incorporation assay. The MICs at which 50% of isolates are inhibited (MIC50s) for mefloquine (chlorhydrate), chloroquine (sulfate), quinine (chlorhydrate), clindamycin (phosphate), pentamidine (isethionate), phenamidine (isethionate) plus oxomemazine (chlorhydrate), lincomycin (chlorhydrate monohydrate), and imidocarb (dipropionate) were determined. Except for imidocarb, the MIC50s observed for the different isolates were close. Imidocarb and the combination of phenamidine plus oxomemazine exhibited the highest in vitro activity, while antimalarial agents such as mefloquine, choroquine, and quinine were inactive. Other drugs had intermediate activities. The data support further in vitro evaluation of antimicrobial agents active against B. divergens for the improvement of therapeutic strategies. PMID:9559789

  10. Novel foci of Dermacentor reticulatus ticks infected with Babesia canis and Babesia caballi in the Netherlands and in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Jongejan, Frans; Ringenier, Moniek; Putting, Michael; Berger, Laura; Burgers, Stefan; Kortekaas, Reinier; Lenssen, Jesse; van Roessel, Marleen; Wijnveld, Michiel; Madder, Maxime

    2015-04-17

    Autochthonous populations of Dermacentor reticulatus ticks in the Netherlands were discovered after fatal cases of babesiosis occurred in resident dogs in 2004. The presence of D. reticulatus in the Netherlands has also linked with the emergence of piroplasmosis in the resident horse population. The aim of this study was to put together results of continued surveillance of field sites and hosts for this tick in the Netherlands and also in Belgium and determine their infection status for Babesia and Theileria species. Ticks were collected from the vegetation at 11 locations between 2011 and 2013. D. reticulatus ticks were also collected from different hosts between 2007 and 2013. Ticks were screened by PCR and reverse line blot (RLB). A total of 1368 D. reticulatus ticks were collected from 4 previously known field locations and from 5 new locations in the Netherlands and from 2 sites in Belgium (one old and one new location). A total of 855 ticks collected from 8 locations in the Netherlands and 2 locations in Belgium were tested. Fourteen ticks (1,64%) collected at 4 field locations (Dintelse Gorzen, Rozenburg, Slikken van de Heen and St. Philipsland) were positive for Babesia canis, whereas two ticks were positive for Babesia caballi, one tick in the Dintelse Gorzen in the Netherlands and one tick was found positive in De Panne in Belgium. A further 1092 D. reticulatus ticks were collected between 2007 and 2013 from 40 dogs (132 ticks), two ticks from two humans, 51 ticks from 15 horses, two ticks from two cats, one tick from a roe deer, whereas most ticks (904) were collected from cattle (n = 25). Ticks were found throughout the year on dogs in nearly all provinces of the Netherlands. None of the ticks collected from these hosts were infected. D. reticulatus is continuing its spread into novel areas. The finding that some autochthonous ticks are infected with B. canis and B. caballi poses a threat to the resident dog and horse population and justifies year

  11. 9 CFR 311.23 - Tapeworm cysts (cysticercus bovis) in cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tapeworm cysts (cysticercus bovis) in... PARTS § 311.23 Tapeworm cysts (cysticercus bovis) in cattle. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of... humerus. (2) Carcasses of cattle showing one or more tapeworm lesions of cysticercus bovis but not so...

  12. 9 CFR 311.23 - Tapeworm cysts (cysticercus bovis) in cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tapeworm cysts (cysticercus bovis) in... PARTS § 311.23 Tapeworm cysts (cysticercus bovis) in cattle. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of... humerus. (2) Carcasses of cattle showing one or more tapeworm lesions of cysticercus bovis but not so...

  13. 9 CFR 311.23 - Tapeworm cysts (cysticercus bovis) in cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tapeworm cysts (cysticercus bovis) in... PARTS § 311.23 Tapeworm cysts (cysticercus bovis) in cattle. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of... humerus. (2) Carcasses of cattle showing one or more tapeworm lesions of cysticercus bovis but not so...

  14. 9 CFR 311.23 - Tapeworm cysts (cysticercus bovis) in cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tapeworm cysts (cysticercus bovis) in... PARTS § 311.23 Tapeworm cysts (cysticercus bovis) in cattle. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of... humerus. (2) Carcasses of cattle showing one or more tapeworm lesions of cysticercus bovis but not so...

  15. 9 CFR 311.23 - Tapeworm cysts (cysticercus bovis) in cattle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tapeworm cysts (cysticercus bovis) in... PARTS § 311.23 Tapeworm cysts (cysticercus bovis) in cattle. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of... humerus. (2) Carcasses of cattle showing one or more tapeworm lesions of cysticercus bovis but not so...

  16. Mycobacterium bovis infection in humans and cats in same household, Texas, USA, 2012

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium bovis infection of cats is exceedingly rare in non-endemic regions for bovine tuberculosis. This case study describes the diagnosis and clinical management of pulmonary M. bovis infection in two indoor-housed cats and their association with at least one M. bovis-infected human in Texas...

  17. Necrotic pharyngitis associated with Mycoplasma bovis infections in American bison (Bison bison)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) has recently emerged as a significant and costly infectious disease problem in bison, generally presenting as severe, caseonecrotic pneumonia. Here we describe three diagnostic cases in which M. bovis is strongly implicated as a causative agent of necrotic pharyngitis. ...

  18. Experimentally induced bovine abortion with Mycoplasma agalactiae subsp bovis.

    PubMed

    Stalheim, O H; Proctor, S J

    1976-08-01

    Two pregnant cows aborted 11 and 18 days after Mycoplasma agalactiae subsp bovis was inoculated into the amniotic fluids. The placentas were retained. The fetuses (approx 100 and 150 days of age) were decomposed; M agalactiae subsp bovis was recovered from several tissues of the fetuses, the placentas, and fetal fluids. The same organism was given by intraperitoneal injection to 2 other pregnant (130 and 180 days, respectively) cows. At necropsy of the latter 36 days later, placentitis was severe; M agalactiae subsp bovis was recovered from the placentas of both cows and from the fetus of 1 cow. Control cows given sterile mycoplasma cultural medium by intraamnion or intraperitoneal injection did not abort and were not infected. When first recovered from the bovine placenta and fetus, M agalactiae subsp bovis grew slowly in liquid medium and assumed bizarre colonial morphology on solidified medium. Colonies were small (0.1 to 0.5 mm) and dark and lacked halos, but they reacted specifically in the direct fluorescent antibody test with equine M agalactiae subsp bovis antiserum. After 1 or 2 subcultures, the isolates grew at a normal rate and displayed their usual colonial morphology.

  19. Elimination of Babesia microti Is Dependent on Intraerythrocytic Killing and CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Skariah, Sini; Arnaboldi, Paul; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Sultan, Ali A; Gaylets, Corey; Walwyn, Odaelys; Mulhall, Hannah; Wu, Xia; Dargham, Soha R; Mordue, Dana G

    2017-07-15

    Babesiosis is a tick-borne zoonosis caused by protozoans of the genus Babesia, apicomplexan parasites that replicate within erythrocytes. However, unlike related Plasmodium species, the pathogenesis of Babesia infection remains poorly understood. The primary etiological agent of babesiosis in the United States is B. microti. In healthy individuals, tick-transmitted infection with Babesia causes no specific clinical manifestations, with many having no symptoms at all. However, even in asymptomatic people, a Babesia carriage state can be established that can last up to a year or more. Current blood bank screening methods do not identify infected donors, and Babesia parasites survive blood-banking procedures and storage. Thus, Babesia can also be transmitted by infected blood, and it is currently the number one cause of reportable transfusion-transmitted infection in the United States. Despite a significant impact on human health, B. microti remains understudied. In this study, we evaluated the course of Babesia infection in three strains of mice, C57BL/6J, BALB/cJ, and C3H-HeJ, and examined the contribution of multiple immune parameters, including TLRs, B cells, CD4(+) cells, IFN-γ, and NO, on the level of parasitemia and parasite clearance during acute babesiosis. We found that B. microti reaches high parasitemia levels during the first week of infection in all three mice strains before resolving spontaneously. Our results indicate that resolution of babesiosis requires CD4 T cells and a novel mechanism of parasite killing within infected erythrocytes. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Mycobacterium bovis meningitis in young Nigerian-born male.

    PubMed

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Lillebaek, Troels; Nielsen, Ming-Yuan; Nielsen, Susanne Dam

    2014-10-01

    In Denmark, tuberculous meningitis is rare. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement with Mycobacterium bovis is even rarer and has only been seen three times since 1992. We present a case of M. bovis meningitis in a previously healthy young Nigerian-born male, who had been exposed to unpasteurized dairy products in Nigeria but had no known contact with larger mammals. Before the development of meningitis, the patient had several contacts with the health system due to fever and non-specific symptoms. Finally, upon hospital admission, the patient was diagnosed with M. tuberculosis complex meningitis and treated empirically. After 13 days he was discharged without neurological sequelae. Later, the culture revealed M. bovis and treatment was adjusted accordingly.

  1. Mechanism of adhesion of Alysiella bovis to glass surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, R T; To, M; Costerton, J W

    1984-01-01

    Alysiella bovis adheres to surfaces by means of short, ruthenium red-staining, rod-like fimbriae. The fimbriae remain associated with the cell envelope of A. bovis, even when sonicated or exposed sequentially to toluene, Triton X-100, lysozyme, ribonuclease, and deoxyribonuclease. Adhesion of outer membrane-derived cell wall ghosts of A. bovis to glass was inhibited by IO4-, sodium dodecyl sulfate, urea, pronase, and trypsin. Protease treatment digested the fimbriae from the distal end, and exposure to sodium dodecyl sulfate depolymerized the fimbriae. Exposure of ghosts to 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate preferentially solubilized a 16,500-dalton protein which was subsequently purified by gel filtration and demonstrated to be a glycoprotein (ca. 17% carbohydrate). Antibodies raised against the 16,500-dalton glycoprotein agglutinated whole cells and inhibited adhesion of ghosts to glass. Images PMID:6209260

  2. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis in Humans and Cattle.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, A; El-Shannat, S; Kamel, M; Castañeda-Vazquez, M A; Castañeda-Vazquez, H

    2016-06-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB), caused by Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), is a serious re-emerging disease in both animals and humans. The evolution of the Multi- and Extensively drug-resistant M. bovis strains (MDR-TB and XDR-TB) represents a global threat to public health. Worldwide, the disease is responsible for great economic losses in the veterinary field, serious threat to the ecosystem, and about 3.1% of human TB cases, up to 16% in Tanzania. Only thorough investigation to understand the pathogen's epidemiology can help in controlling the disease and minimizing its threat. For this purpose, various tools have been developed for use in advanced molecular epidemiological studies of bTB, either alone or in combination with standard conventional epidemiological approaches. These techniques enable the analysis of the intra- and inter-species transmission dynamics of bTB. The delivered data can reveal detailed insights into the source of infection, correlations among human and bovine isolates, strain diversity and evolution, spread, geographical localization, host preference, tracing of certain virulence factors such as antibiotic resistance genes, and finally the risk factors for the maintenance and spread of M. bovis. They also allow for the determination of epidemic and endemic strains. This, in turn, has a significant diagnostic impact and helps in vaccine development for bTB eradication programs. The present review discusses many topics including the aetiology, epidemiology and importance of M. bovis, the prevalence of bTB in humans and animals in various countries, the molecular epidemiology of M. bovis, and finally applied molecular epidemiological techniques. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Human multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium bovis infection in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Chacon, Carlos A; Martínez-Guarneros, Armando; Couvin, David; González-Y-Merchand, Jorge A; Rivera-Gutierrez, Sandra; Escobar-Gutierrez, Alejandro; De-la-Cruz López, Juan J; Gomez-Bustamante, Adriana; Gonzalez-Macal, Gabriela A; Gonçalves Rossi, Livia Maria; Muñiz-Salazar, Raquel; Rastogi, Nalin; Vaughan, Gilberto

    2015-12-01

    Here, we describe the molecular characterization of six human Mycobacterium bovis clinical isolates, including three multidrug resistant (MDR) strains, collected in Mexico through the National Survey on Tuberculosis Drug Resistance (ENTB-2008), a nationally representative survey conducted during 2008-2009 in nine states with a stratified cluster sampling design. The genetic background of bovine M. bovis strains identified in three different states of Mexico was studied in parallel to assess molecular relatedness of bovine and human strains. Additionally, resistance to first and second line anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs and molecular identification of mutations conferring drug resistance was also performed. All strains were characterized by spoligotyping and 24-loci MIRU-VNTRs, and analyzed using the SITVIT2 (n = 112,000 strains) and SITVITBovis (n = 25,000 strains) proprietary databases of Institut Pasteur de la Guadeloupe. Furthermore, data from this study (n = 55 isolates), were also compared with genotypes recorded for M. bovis from USA (n = 203), Argentina (n = 726), as well as other isolates from Mexico (independent from the present study; n = 147), to determine any evidence for genetic relatedness between circulating M. bovis strains. The results showed that all human M. bovis cases were not genetically related between them or to any bovine strain. Interestingly, a high degree of genetic variability was observed among bovine strains. Several autochthonous and presumably imported strains were identified. The emergence of drug-resistant M. bovis is an important public health problem that jeopardizes the success of TB control programs in the region.

  4. Streptococcus bovis endocarditis and colon cancer: myth or reality? A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Galdy, Salvatore; Nastasi, Giuseppe

    2012-12-05

    A relationship between infective endocarditis and colon cancer was established in 1950, and Streptococcus bovis was successfully isolated in 1970. However, this association and its pathogenesis still remain unclear. In this paper, we describe the clinical case of a patient with a history of colon cancer and infective endocarditis caused by Streptococcus bovis. The role of S bovis as an aetiological agent in the development of colon cancer is intriguing but uncertain. S bovis infection should be considered a silent sign of gastrointestinal malignancy or hepatic disease. We believe that in order to demonstrate the presence of colon cancer, all patients with S bovis infection require an endoscopic investigation of the colon.

  5. Serological characterization of strains of Moraxella bovis using double immunodiffusion.

    PubMed

    Gil-Turnes, C; de Araujo, F L

    1982-04-01

    Sera were produced in rabbits against nine Moraxella bovis strains isolated in Brazil and three in the United States. Antigens were prepared for double immunodiffusion tests by thawing concentrated suspensions of the strains. Sera were tested against homologous and heterologous antigen preparations by the double immunodiffusion method. Sera showing precipitin bands with heterologous antigens were absorbed. Antigenic differences were detected between the strains and a provisional grouping of strains of M. bovis was suggested on the basis of antigenic composition. Differences between isolates from different geographical locations were found and some strains appeared antigenically more complex than others. The relevance of this work to vaccine production was suggested.

  6. Serological characterization of strains of Moraxella bovis using double immunodiffusion.

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Turnes, C; de Araujo, F L

    1982-01-01

    Sera were produced in rabbits against nine Moraxella bovis strains isolated in Brazil and three in the United States. Antigens were prepared for double immunodiffusion tests by thawing concentrated suspensions of the strains. Sera were tested against homologous and heterologous antigen preparations by the double immunodiffusion method. Sera showing precipitin bands with heterologous antigens were absorbed. Antigenic differences were detected between the strains and a provisional grouping of strains of M. bovis was suggested on the basis of antigenic composition. Differences between isolates from different geographical locations were found and some strains appeared antigenically more complex than others. The relevance of this work to vaccine production was suggested. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6178487

  7. Moraxella bovis hemagglutinins: effect of carbohydrates, heating and erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Turnes, C; Ribeiro, G A

    1985-01-01

    Several properties of the adhesins of eight isolates of Moraxella bovis recovered from cattle suffering from infectious keratoconjunctivitis, were studied. Adhesions were detected through autoagglutination in saline and hemagglutination. Autoagglutinating strains agglutinated red blood cells of the chicken, rabbit, sheep and swine, but not those of the guinea pig. The adhesins were not inhibited by D-mannose or D-galactose and resisted heating at 100 degrees C for 15 minutes. Magnesium chloride at a final concentration of 10% inhibited autoagglutination and hemagglutination. The value of the hemagglutination test for monitoring synthesis of fimbriae by M. bovis, is discussed. PMID:3986674

  8. First record of locally acquired human babesiosis in Canada caused by Babesia duncani: a case report.

    PubMed

    Scott, John D

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this clinical assessment was to ascertain whether a 70-year-old Canadian patient, who had no history of out-of-country travel, had contracted a Babesia infection. The adult human male developed constitutional symptoms, which included sweats, chills, and immobilizing fatigue, and was screened for human babesiosis. Subsequent testing included a complete Babesia panel that consisted of B. microti immunoflourescent antibody IgM and IgG, B. duncani immunofluorescent antibody IgM and IgG, Babesia PCR, and Babesia fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) test. Both the IgM serology and the molecular FISH RNA probe were positive for B. duncani; all tests for B. microti were negative. Based on clinical symptoms and laboratory tests, the patient was diagnosed with human babesiosis. Interestingly, the patient's wife also was confirmed positive using serological and molecular testing. This is the first report of a locally acquired case of human babesiosis in Canada caused by Babesia duncani. The geographical distribution of B. duncani in North America is much greater than previously anticipated, especially north of the Canada-United States border. Since the patient was bitten by a blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis, a carrier of multiple zoonotic pathogens, the author suggests that this tick species is a vector of B. duncani. Health-care providers must be aware that B. duncani is present in Canada, and poses a public health risk.

  9. Detection of Kobe-type and Otsu-type Babesia microti in wild rodents in China's Yunnan province.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin-Rong; Ye, L I; Fan, Jun-Wen; Li, Chang; Tang, Fang; Liu, Wei; Ren, Lin-Zhu; Bai, Jie-Ying

    2017-10-01

    Babesiosis is an emerging tick-transmitted zoonosis prevalent in large parts of the world. This study was designed to determine the rates of Babesia microti infection among small rodents in Yunnan province, where human cases of babesiosis have been reported. Currently, distribution of Babesia in its endemic regions is largely unknown. In this study, we cataloged 1672 small wild rodents, comprising 4 orders, from nine areas in western Yunnan province between 2009 and 2011. Babesia microti DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in 4·3% (72/1672) of the rodents analyzed. The most frequently infected rodent species included Apodemus chevrieri and Niviventer fulvescens. Rodents from forests and shrublands had significantly higher Babesia infection rates. Genetic comparisons revealed that Babesia was most similar to the Kobe- and Otsu-type strains identified in Japan. A variety of rodent species might be involved in the enzootic maintenance and transmission of B. microti, supporting the need for further serological investigations in humans.

  10. Babesia and its hosts: adaptation to long-lasting interactions as a way to achieve efficient transmission

    PubMed Central

    Chauvin, Alain; Moreau, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Sarah; Plantard, Olivier; Malandrin, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    Babesia, the causal agent of babesiosis, are tick-borne apicomplexan protozoa. True babesiae (Babesia genus sensu stricto) are biologically characterized by direct development in erythrocytes and by transovarial transmission in the tick. A large number of true Babesia species have been described in various vertebrate and tick hosts. This review presents the genus then discusses specific adaptations of Babesia spp. to their hosts to achieve efficient transmission. The main adaptations lead to long-lasting interactions which result in the induction of two reservoirs: in the vertebrate host during low long-term parasitemia and throughout the life cycle of the tick host as a result of transovarial and transstadial transmission. The molecular bases of these adaptations in vertebrate hosts are partially known but few of the tick-host interaction mechanisms have been elucidated. PMID:19379662

  11. Serosurvey of antiBabesia antibodies in stray dogs and American pit bull terriers and American staffordshire terriers from North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Birkenheuer, Adam J; Levy, Michael G; Stebbins, Martha; Poore, Matthew; Breitschwerdt, Edward

    2003-01-01

    Stray dogs (n=359) and kennel dogs (n=149) from North Carolina were tested for evidence of antiBabesia antibodies. AntiBabesia antibodies were detected in 21/359 and 22/149 of the stray and kennel dogs, respectively. A total of 57 dogs from both groups were tested for babesiasis by light microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Babesia deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was detected in 3/28 of the stray dogs and 14/29 of the kennel dogs. When Babesia DNA was detected by PCR, the species-specific PCR results differed from the Babesia species antibody titer results in 6/17 of the PCR-positive dogs. There was no association between antiBabesia antibodies and the presence of ticks. There are currently Babesia gibsoni epizootics affecting American pit bull terrier kennels.

  12. Pathology of Mycobacterium bovis infection in wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Drewe, J A; Foote, A K; Sutcliffe, R L; Pearce, G P

    2009-01-01

    Pathological lesions associated with Mycobacterium bovis infection (bovine tuberculosis; bTB) in free-living meerkats (Suricata suricatta) in the Kalahari Desert of South Africa are described. The pathology of bTB in meerkats was determined through detailed post-mortem examinations of 57 animals (52 meerkats showing clinical signs of bTB, and five not showing signs of disease). Lymph nodes and tissue lesions thought to be associated with bTB were cultured for mycobacteria. All 52 bTB-infected meerkats showed gross or microscopical granulomatous lesions, but M. bovis was cultured from only 42% (22/52) of these animals. The majority (96%, 50/52) of diseased meerkats had lesions in multiple sites, the pattern of which suggested haematogenous spread of M. bovis infection in this species. The histological characteristics of the tuberculous lesions, together with the gross pathology and the wide range of body systems affected, indicate that infection in meerkats is acquired principally via the respiratory and oral routes, whereas excretion is most likely via the respiratory tract and suppurating skin wounds. Urine and faeces appear to be unlikely sources of infection. The findings of this study provide information on the transmission, pathogenesis and epidemiology of bTB in meerkats that is likely to be relevant to the understanding of M. bovis infection in other social mammal species such as the European badger (Meles meles).

  13. 9 CFR 113.409 - Tuberculin-PPD Bovis, Intradermic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... required for the Reference PPD Tuberculin. Allowance should be made for deaths during the sensitization period. (2) Sensitization of guinea pigs. (i) Sensitize one group of guinea pigs to M. bovis. Inject each... the same sensitization and the same PPD tuberculin injection, then divide by the number of animals in...

  14. Tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium caprae in sheep.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Mendoza, Marta; Juan, Lucía de; Menéndez, Santiago; Ocampo, Antón; Mourelo, Jorge; Sáez, José L; Domínguez, Lucas; Gortázar, Christian; García Marín, Juan F; Balseiro, Ana

    2012-02-01

    Tuberculosis was diagnosed in three flocks of sheep in Galicia, Spain, in 2009 and 2010. Two flocks were infected with Mycobacterium bovis and one flock was infected with Mycobacterium caprae. Infection was confirmed by the comparative intradermal tuberculin test, bacteriology, molecular analysis and histopathology. Sheep have the potential to act as a reservoir for tuberculosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hemagglutination, autoagglutination and pathogenicity of Moraxella bovis strains.

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Turnes, C

    1983-01-01

    Three isolates of Moraxella bovis, recovered from cattle with signs of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis, were tested for autoagglutinating activity, hemagglutinating activity and pathogenicity in young calves. Only the autoagglutinating and hemagglutinating isolates were pathogenic in calves. Treatment of the pathogenic isolates with magnesium chloride eliminated their pathogenic effects. PMID:6667436

  16. Pulmonary Tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis in Captive Siberian Tiger

    PubMed Central

    Lantos, Ákos; Niemann, Stefan; Mezősi, László; Sós, Endre; Erdélyi, Károly; Dávid, Sándor; Parsons, Linda M.; Kubica, Tanja; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine

    2003-01-01

    We report the first case of pulmonary tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis subsp. caprae in a captive Siberian tiger, an endangered feline. The pathogen was isolated from a tracheal aspirate obtained by bronchoscopy. This procedure provided a reliable in vivo diagnostic method in conjunction with conventional and molecular tests for the detection of mycobacteria. PMID:14718093

  17. PMN-mediated immune reactions against Eimeria bovis.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Jan Hillern; Hermosilla, Carlos; Hardt, Martin; Failing, Klaus; Zahner, Horst; Taubert, Anja

    2008-02-14

    For successful in vivo infection, Eimeria bovis sporozoites have to traverse the mucosal layer of the ileum to infect lymphatic endothelial cells and may, thereby, be exposed to the interstitial fluid and to the lymph representing potential targets for leukocytes. To mimic this situation in vitro, we exposed E. bovis sporozoites to bovine PMN and found enhanced elimination of the parasites. Addition of immune serum clearly increased these reactions, whereas neonatal calf serum had no effect, thus proposing a PMN-derived antibody-dependent cytotoxicity. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed PMN engulfing sporozoites or extending filopodia towards them and occasionally incorporating the parasites. PMN reacted with enhanced transcription of IL-6, MCP-1, GROalpha, TNF-alpha, and iNOS genes after exposure to sporozoites while stimulation with merozoite-antigen, in addition, upregulated IL-8, IP-10 and IL-12 gene transcription. Furthermore, enhanced in vitro oxidative burst and phagocytic activities were observed after contact of PMN with viable sporozoites. To verify the potential role of PMN in the in vivo situation, we analysed the general phagocytic and oxidative burst activities of PMN obtained ex vivo from E. bovis experimentally infected calves. Enhanced levels of both activities were found early p.i. (1-5 days) and towards the end of the first schizogony (days 13-22 p.i.) underlining the in vitro data. Our results suggest that PMN-mediated, innate immune reactions play an important role in the early immune response to E. bovis infections in calves.

  18. [A case of pulmonary multiresistant Mycobacterium bovis tuberculosis in Madagascar].

    PubMed

    Ramarokoto, H; Andrianasolo, D; Rasolonavalona, T; Ramaroson, F; Razafitsiarovana, I; Vincent, V; Ratsimba, L; Rasolofo Razanamparany, V

    2003-01-01

    We report a chronic case of pulmonary tuberculosis in a Malagasy citizen from Antsohihy (West of Madagascar), who was infected with a multi-drug resistant Mycobacterium bovis strain. This is the first case reported of the isolation of such a strain in Madagascar.

  19. Sensitivity of Mycobacterium bovis to common beef processing interventions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction. Cattle infected with Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis and a relevant zoonosis to humans, may be sent to slaughter before diagnosis of infection because of slow multiplication of the pathogen. Purpose. This study evaluates multiple processing interventi...

  20. The effect of low-power GaAlAs laser radiation on Mycobacterium bovis infection in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, Yashar; Golmaii, Poone; Rabiee, Atoosa; Samadpoor, Ali; Shahverdi, Nooshin; Nikbin, Behrooz

    2003-12-01

    The effects of laser on the immune system have not been extensively characterized. Low power laser sources, such as GaAlAs laser have been found to produce photo biological effects with evidence of interference with immunological functions. We have investigated the effects of GaAlAs laser irradiation on the immune response due to Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection in mice. BALB/C mice were exposed on the abdomen skin to GaAlAs laser radiation (810 nm) for 3 consequent days (Days = -2, -1, 0) before infection with 1 x 106 live units of Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) in the footpad. 21 days later groups of mice were tested for a delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to the purified protein derivative (PPD) of tubercle bacilli and the course of infection was monitored by measuring the size of the infected footpad. In the mice treated by laser, the DTH response to PPD was significantly suppressed (P-value<0.045) compared to unirradiated mice, when tested 21 days after BCG infection. When laser irradiated 13 days after BCG infection (Days: +13, +14, +15) BALB/C mice did not show a significant decrease in their DTH response to PPD indicating that the laser-induced suppression of BCG occurs only at the induction stage of the immune response. Thus mice exposed to the laser radiation before BCG infection showed an impaired DTH response to Mycobacterium, whereas mice exposed to the laser irradiation after BCG did not. These studies demonstrate that a systemic effect of laser irradiation can suppress the development and expression of immunity to pathogenic bacteria in mice. This suppression could be at the induction stage of the immune response (DTH) but not the elicitation stage. Also it seems that laser radiation, potentially, could have side effects for the immune system, on the basis of suppression effects it has shown on DTH response.

  1. Molecular characterization of Babesia and Cytauxzoon species in wild South-African meerkats.

    PubMed

    Leclaire, Sarah; Menard, Sandie; Berry, Antoine

    2015-04-01

    Piroplasms, including Babesia, Cytauxzoon and Theileria species, frequently infect domestic and wild mammals. At present, there is no information on the occurrence and molecular identity of these tick-borne blood parasites in the meerkat, one of South Africa's most endearing wildlife celebrities. Meerkats live in territorial groups, which may occur on ranchland in close proximity to humans, pets and livestock. Blood collected from 46 healthy meerkats living in the South-African Kalahari desert was screened by microscopy and molecular methods, using PCR and DNA sequencing of 18S rRNA and ITS1 genes. We found that meerkats were infected by 2 species: one species related to Babesia sp. and one species related to Cytauxzoon sp. Ninety one percent of the meerkats were infected by the Cytauxzoon and/or the Babesia species. Co-infection occurred in 46% of meerkats. The pathogenicity and vectors of these two piroplasm species remains to be determined.

  2. Characterization of a leucine aminopeptidase of Babesia gibsoni.

    PubMed

    Jia, H; Terkawi, M A; Aboge, G O; Goo, Y-K; Luo, Y; Li, Y; Yamagishi, J; Nishikawa, Y; Igarashi, I; Sugimoto, C; Fujisaki, K; Xuan, X

    2009-08-01

    Peptidases of parasitic protozoa are currently under intense investigation in order to identify novel virulence factors, drug targets, and vaccine candidates, except in Babesia. Leucine aminopeptidases in protozoa, such as Plasmodium and Leishmania, have been identified to be involved in free amino acid regulation. We report here the molecular and enzymatic characterization, as well as the localization of a leucine aminopeptidase, a member of the M17 cytosolic aminopeptidase family, from B. gibsoni (BgLAP). A functional recombinant BgLAP (rBgLAP) expressed in Escherichia coli efficiently hydrolysed synthetic substrates for aminopeptidase, a leucine substrate. Enzyme activity of the rBgLAP was found to be optimum at pH 8.0 and at 37 degrees C. The substrate profile was slightly different from its homologue in P. falciprum. The activity was also strongly dependent on metal divalent cations, and was inhibited by bestatin, which is a specific inhibitor for metalloprotease. These results indicated that BgLAP played an important role in free amino acid regulation.

  3. First report of Babesia divergens infection in an HIV patient.

    PubMed

    González, Luis M; Castro, Emma; Lobo, Cheryl A; Richart, Alberto; Ramiro, Raquel; González-Camacho, Fernando; Luque, Daniel; Velasco, Aurelio C; Montero, Estrella

    2015-04-01

    Human babesiosis is a zoonosis primarily transmitted through Ixodes ticks and alternatively by routes such as blood transfusions from asymptomatic donors. We report the first case of human babesiosis caused by Babesia divergens in a patient with HIV. This study also focuses on elucidating the possible transmission route of infection in this patient, who received numerous blood transfusions but showed patent symptoms only after splenectomy. A battery of detection tools along with a novel Western-Blot Assay and Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay using the major surface protein of B. divergens (Bd37) as a target were used to evaluate the presence of B. divergens or antibodies against the parasite in samples from the patient and the blood donors involved in this case. A retrospective study of the humoral status against the parasite revealed B. divergens IgG antibodies in one of the implicated donors, but also showed that the patient had been already exposed to the parasite before any transfusion. Thus, this analysis of natural and transfusion transmission routes suggests a pre-existing subclinical babesiosis in the patient.

  4. Babesia gibsoni infection in a dog from indiana.

    PubMed

    Irizarry-Rovira, Armando R.; Stephens, Julie; Christian, John; Kjemtrup, Anne; DeNicola, Dennis B.; Widmer, William R.; Conrad, Patricia A.

    2001-01-01

    A 10-year-old spayed female mixed-breed dog was presented to the Purdue University Veterinary Teaching Hospital (PUVTH) with complaints of persistent anemia with occasional exacerbations, anorexia, and lethargy. The dog had been presented to the referring veterinarian 2 months prior with multiple bite wounds received during a fight with 3 Pit Bull Terriers. The dog was discharged after the wounds were cleaned and surgically closed. Upon admission to the PUVTH, blood was collected for a complete blood count and biochemical analysis. Microscopic examination of peripheral blood smears revealed intraerythrocytic protozoal parasites consistent with Babesia gibsoni. Molecular analysis confirmed that the organism was B. gibsoni and that its 18S ribosomal RNA sequence was identical to that of other B. gibsoni isolates from Oklahoma, North Carolina, and Okinawa, Japan. Hematologic changes included moderately severe, regenerative, macrocytic, normochromic anemia, with poikilocytosis, polychromasia, anisocytosis, and a marked increase in nucleated RBCs. Biochemical changes included increased serum alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase activities. The dog was treated with imidocarb, but despite initial clinical improvement, the dog died 2 weeks after the first dose. A necropsy was not performed. The infection in this dog is the first reported case of B. gibsoni infection in Indiana. Because of the widespread geographical distribution of the organism, veterinarians and veterinary clinical pathologists throughout the United States should carefully examine Romanowsky-stained blood smears from patients with acute hemolytic anemia for small intraerythrocytic babesial parasites.

  5. Corynebacterium bovis: epizootiologic features and environmental contamination in an enzootically infected rodent room.

    PubMed

    Burr, Holly N; Wolf, Felix R; Lipman, Neil S

    2012-03-01

    Corynebacterium bovis is a common pathogen in athymic nude mouse colonies. Control and eradication of the organism are challenging because depopulation and restricted colony access are often not options within vivaria. We evaluated potential sources and dissemination routes of C. bovis in an enzootically infected colony. Immunocompetent mice and personnel were evaluated for their potential to carry C. bovis, and husbandry and sanitation methods were evaluated for their efficacy in preventing cross-contamination. C. bovis was detected in furred immunocompetent mice previously exposed to infected athymic nude mice and in the nasopharynx of humans. Microisolation cages were not effective in maintaining athymic nude mice C. bovis-free when they were housed in a room known to contain immunodeficient mice with C. bovis infections. A tunnel washer that provided a ≥180 °F final rinse provided effective elimination of C. bovis from cage components. Passive and active air sampling techniques showed airborne dispersal of C. bovis despite the use of individually ventilated caging systems and stringent operational standards. Bacterial growth was not observed in settle plates placed inside autoclaved individually ventilated microisolation cages on various ventilated racks for 24-h periods. C. bovis aerosolization was shown to be a means of spread of the bacterium during cage-change procedures inside a class II type A2 biosafety cabinet. Our findings indicate that C. bovis can be a pervasive environmental contaminant in infected rodent holding rooms and successful eradication strategies must include environmental decontamination and attention to air quality.

  6. Taurine as a marker for the identification of natural Calculus Bovis and its substitutes.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kayoko; Azuma, Yuko; Kawase, Masaya; Takahashi, Toshiharu; Schaffer, Stephen W; Takahashi, Kyoko

    2013-01-01

    Calculus Bovis (C. Bovis) is a commonly used animal-derived therapeutic preparation. To meet the increasing clinical demand for the preparation, two artificial substitutes for Bos Taurus have been introduced in China: artificial C. Bovis and in vitro cultured C. Bovis. However, information on their efficacy and safety is inadequate. Therefore, we investigated the biological differences between the commonly used natural preparation and its two substitutes, with the aim of not only identifying the differences but also providing a procedure to distinguish between the different preparations.In the study, we prepared 9 natural C. Bovis, 2 artificial C. Bovis, and 2 in vitro cultured C. Bovis preparations for evaluation. Differences were noted between the three preparations relative to their effect on viability of cardiac fibroblasts from 1-day-old Wistar rats. Although natural C. Bovis had no effect on cell viability, 1-h treatment of the cells with 0.25 mg/ml of the substitutes significantly reduced cell viability, as detected by the MTS assay. Based on liquid chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, the preparations also differed in composition. Indeed, the substitutes contained more taurine, cholic acid, iron, magnesium, and calcium than the natural preparations. They also differed spectroscopically.The present results reveal significant biological differences between natural C. Bovis and two of its substitutes. Since the substitutes appear to contain more taurine, cholic acid, and elements, these constituents may serve as markers to distinguish between natural C. Bovis and its substitutes.

  7. Spontaneous splenic rupture due to Babesia microti infection: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Usatii, Natalia; Khachatrian, Aelita; Stratidis, John

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the case of spontaneous splenic rupture as a rare complication of infection with Babesia species. We will discuss the symptomatology that this disease could present along with both surgical and non-surgical management approaches. Babesia infection often presents with mild to moderate symptoms, but can rapidly progress to significant injury including splenic rupture. The first case reported in a medical journal was in 2007. Treatment usually involves a two-drug regimen; clindamycin plus quinine, or atovaquone plus azithromycin (as in our patient). If hemodynamic stability is present, a primary non-surgical treatment may be especially beneficial since splenectomy may worsen optimal immunologic function and the infection itself.

  8. The efficacy of artemisinin, artemether, and lumefantrine against Babesia gibsoni in vitro.

    PubMed

    Iguchi, Aiko; Matsuu, Aya; Matsuyama, Kazuyoshi; Hikasa, Yoshiaki

    2015-04-01

    Artemisinin has many derivatives, and it is effective against Plasmodium spp. However, only a limited number of reports have confirmed the efficacy of artemisinin derivatives against Babesia spp. In this study, whether artemisinin and artemether could inhibit the growth of Babesia gibsoni was evaluated in vitro. In addition, the interaction between artemether and lumefantrine was evaluated. These drugs inhibited the growth of B. gibsoni, but artemisinin and artemether showed lower sensitivity against atovaquone-resistant B. gibsoni than against wild-type B. gibsoni. The interaction between artemether and lumefantrine showed synergism against B. gibsoni. Although further study is needed, the combination of artemisinin derivatives could be useful for babesiosis.

  9. Fecal volatile organic compound profiles from white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) as indicators of Mycobacterium bovis exposure or Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) serve as a reservoir for bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, and can be a source of infection in cattle. Vaccination with M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is being considered for management of bovine tuberculosis in deer. Presently, no...

  10. Vaccination with Mycobacterium bovis BCG Strains Danish and Pasteur in White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) Experimentally Challenged with Mycobacterium bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wildlife reservoirs of Mycobacterium bovis represent serious obstacles to the eradication of tuberculosis in domestic livestock. The cause for many faltering eradication programs is the presence of wildlife reservoirs of M. bovis. One approach in dealing with this wildlife reservoir is to vaccinate ...

  11. Stable expression of Mycobacterium bovis antigen 85B in auxotrophic M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin

    PubMed Central

    Rizzi, Caroline; Peiter, Ana Carolina; Oliveira, Thaís Larré; Seixas, Amilton Clair Pinto; Leal, Karen Silva; Hartwig, Daiane Drawanz; Seixas, Fabiana Kommling; Borsuk, Sibele; Dellagostin, Odir Antônio

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Bovine tuberculosis (TB) is a zoonotic disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis, responsible for causing major losses in livestock. A cost effective alternative to control the disease could be herd vaccination. The bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine has a limited efficacy against bovine TB, but can improved by over-expression of protective antigens. The M. bovis antigen 85B demonstrates ability to induce protective immune response against bovine TB in animal models. However, current systems for the construction of recombinant BCG expressing multiple copies of the gene result in strains of low genetic stability that rapidly lose the plasmid in vivo. Employing antibiotic resistance as selective markers, these systems also compromise vaccine safety. We previously reported the construction of a stable BCG expression system using auxotrophic complementation as a selectable marker. OBJECTIVES The fundamental aim of this study was to construct strains of M. bovis BCG Pasteur and the auxotrophic M. bovis BCG ΔleuD expressing Ag85B and determine their stability in vivo. METHODS Employing the auxotrophic system, we constructed rBCG strains that expressed M. bovis Ag85B and compared their stability with a conventional BCG strain in mice. Stability was measured in terms of bacterial growth on the selective medium and retention of antigen expression. FINDINGS The auxotrophic complementation system was highly stable after 18 weeks, even during in vivo growth, as the selective pressure and expression of antigen were maintained comparing to the conventional vector. MAIN CONCLUSION The Ag85B continuous expression within the host may generate a stronger and long-lasting immune response compared to conventional systems. PMID:28177046

  12. Babesia parasites develop and are transmitted by the non-vector soft tick Ornithodoros moubata (Acari: Argasidae).

    PubMed

    Battsetseg, B; Matsuo, T; Xuan, X; Boldbaatar, D; Chee, S H; Umemiya, R; Sakaguchi, T; Hatta, T; Zhou, J; Verdida, A R; Taylor, D; Fujisaki, K

    2007-01-01

    Ornithodoros moubata ticks were fed on blood infected with Babesia equi. However, the parasites were quickly cleared as evidenced by the disappearance of B. equi-specific ribosomal RNA from the ticks. We hypothesized that if the Babesia parasite can escape midgut-associated barriers a non-vector tick can become infected with Babesia. To test this hypothesis, B. equi parasite-infected blood from in vitro culture was injected into the haemocoel of ticks. B. equi-specific rRNA was surprisingly detected 45 days after injection even in the eggs. Babesia-free dogs were infested with O. moubata ticks that were infected by inoculation with B. gibsoni-infected red blood cells. Parasitaemia and antibody production against Bg-TRAP of B. gibsoni increased gradually. These results indicate that O. moubata may be a useful vector model for Babesia parasites and also a very important tool for studies on tick immunity against Babesia parasites and tick-Babesia interactions.

  13. Immunity of Babesia divergens in the rat. Histology of the infected liver and its possible role in removing PRBC's.

    PubMed

    Ben Musa, Najla; Dawoud, Hamdy A

    2004-12-01

    The ability of immune rats to resist challenge with Babesia divergens depends upon mechanisms which are largely spleen independent. The possible removal of B. divergens PREC's by the livers of immune splenectomised rats was investigated. The clearance of Cr51 labeled B. divergens infected erythrocytes was followed in splenectomised rats to test whether Cr51 labeled PREC's are cleared from the circulation of immune rats through uptake and phagocytosis by the liver. No significant difference was observed between the clearance radioactivity from the circulation as well as the liver uptake in the immune rats from the controls. The uptake of infected erythrocytes by the liver is unlikely to happen in immune rats. Other unknown mechanisms appear to take part in clearing the parasitaemia in these rats. This might depend upon antibody inhibition of merozoite invasion. The injection of irradiated parasites into the same rats showed that they were able to clear PRBC's from the blood stream and that immunity was not specifically directed at merozoites. It is speculated that parasites inside red cells are removed by lysis or phagocytosis. Histological studies on livers collected from immune rats showed that lymphocytes are accumulated in the Liver and these consisted of B & T cells leukocytes accumulating in the liver might therefore be very important in the development of acquired immunity to B. divergens in splenectomised rats.

  14. Characterization of exochelins of the Mycobacterium bovis type strain and BCG substrains.

    PubMed

    Gobin, J; Wong, D K; Gibson, B W; Horwitz, M A

    1999-04-01

    Pathogenic mycobacteria must acquire iron in the host in order to multiply and cause disease. To do so, they release abundant quantities of siderophores called exochelins, which have the capacity to scavenge iron from host iron-binding proteins and deliver it to the mycobacteria. In this study, we have characterized the exochelins of Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine and occasionally of human tuberculosis, and the highly attenuated descendant of M. bovis, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), widely used as a vaccine against human tuberculosis. The M. bovis type strain, five substrains of M. bovis BCG (Copenhagen, Glaxo, Japanese, Pasteur, and Tice), and two strains of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis all produce the same set of exochelins, although the relative amounts of individual exochelins may differ. Among these mycobacteria, the total amount of exochelins produced is greatest in M. tuberculosis, intermediate in M. bovis, and smallest in M. bovis BCG.

  15. Multiplex-PCR for differentiation of Mycobacterium bovis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Spositto, F L E; Campanerut, P A Z; Ghiraldi, L D; Leite, C Q F; Hirata, M H; Hirata, R D C; Siqueira, V L D; Cardoso, R Fressatti

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated a multiplex-PCR to differentiate Mycobacterium bovis from M. tuberculosis Complex (MTC) by one step amplification based on simultaneous detection of pncA 169 C > G change in M. bovis and the IS6110 present in MTC species. Our findings showed the proposed multiplex-PCR is a very useful tool for complementation in differentiating M. bovis from other cultured MTC species.

  16. Seroprevalence of Babesia microti in Individuals with Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Curcio, Sabino R; Tria, Laurel P; Gucwa, Azad L

    2016-12-01

    Babesiosis is an emerging tick-borne disease (TBD) caused by Babesia microti, an intracellular parasite of red blood cells. Currently, it is the highest ranked pathogen transmitted by blood transfusion. Most healthy individuals infected with B. microti are asymptomatic, but may be at risk for chronic infection. Similar to Lyme disease transmitted by Borrelia burgdorferi, B. microti is spread by Ixodes scapularis ticks. The rate of coinfection with these TBDs in humans is unclear as most studies have focused their prevalence in ticks or rodent reservoirs. In this study, we aimed to determine the seroprevalence of B. microti infection in individuals who tested positive for Lyme disease. Serum samples obtained from 130 subjects in New York were tested by immunofluorescence assay (IFA) for the presence of IgM and IgG antibodies against B. microti. Overall, 26.9% of the serum samples tested were positive for IgM and IgG antibodies against B. microti, suggesting exposure to TBD. Individuals who tested positive for Lyme disease as determined by two-tiered serological testing and the presence of both IgM and IgG antibodies directed against B. burgdorferi, were significantly increased for antibodies directed against B. microti (28.6%; p < 0.05), suggesting the possibility of coinfection with both TBDs. In contrast, the Lyme disease-negative control group had only 6.7% of samples seropositive for B. microti. These findings suggest the need for more extensive studies investigating infection rates with multiple TBDs in areas where they are endemic and further support for the need to implement an FDA-approved screening test for blood products to help prevent transfusion-transmitted babesiosis.

  17. PCR detection of Babesia ovata from questing ticks in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Okubo, Kazuhiro; Suganuma, Keisuke; Hayashida, Kyoko; Igarashi, Ikuo; Zakimi, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Inokuma, Hisashi; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2014-04-01

    Babesia ovata is a tick-transmitted hemoprotozoan parasite of cattle. In the present study, we analyzed tick DNA samples (n=1459) prepared from questing ticks collected from various cattle pastures in Hokkaido (Shibecha, Taiki, Otofuke, Memuro, and Shin-Hidaka districts) and Okinawa (Yonaguni Island) prefectures of Japan for B. ovata. When all the tick DNA samples were screened by a previously described B. ovata-specific apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) gene-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, none of the DNA samples was positive. Therefore, we developed a PCR assay based on the protozoan beta-tubulin (β-tubulin) gene to detect B. ovata from ticks in Japan. In the specificity test, the PCR assay amplified the expected 444-bp target gene fragment from B. ovata DNA. No PCR products were amplified from DNA samples from other blood pathogens, bovine blood, or ticks. In addition, the PCR assay detected 100 fg of B. ovata-genomic DNA extracted from an in vitro culture of the parasites. Subsequently, when all the tick DNA samples were screened by this new PCR assay, 18 were positive for B. ovata. Positive samples were found only in the Yonaguni and Memuro areas. In Okinawa, where all the ticks were identified as Haemaphysalis longicornis, 9.7% of the samples were PCR-positive, while a single tick (Ixodes ovatus) from Memuro was infected with B. ovata. When the nucleotide sequences of the PCR amplicons were phylogenetically analyzed, they formed a separate clade containing a previously described β-tubulin gene sequence from B. ovata (Miyake strain), confirming that the PCR assay had detected only B. ovata from the tick DNA samples. This is the first report that describes the PCR detection of B. ovata in ticks. The findings warrant transmission experiments to evaluate I. ovatus as a potential vector of B. ovata. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular and serological detection of Ehrlichia canis and Babesia vogeli in dogs in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Hernández, G; André, M R; Faria, J L M; Munhoz, T D; Hernandez-Rodriguez, M; Machado, R Z; Tinucci-Costa, M

    2012-05-25

    Ehrlichiosis and babesiosis are tick-borne diseases, caused mainly by Ehrlichia canis and Babesia canis, respectively, with a worldwide occurrence in dogs, whose main vector is the brown-dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus. The present work aimed to detect the presence of E. canis and Babesia sp. in 91 dog blood samples in Colombia, by molecular and serological techniques. We also performed sequence alignment to indicate the identity of the parasite species infecting these animals. The present work shows the first molecular detection of E. canis and B. vogeli in dogs from Colombia. Immunoglobulin-G (IgG) antibodies to E. canis and Babesia vogeli were found in 75 (82.4%) and 47 (51.6%) sampled dogs, respectively. Thirty-seven (40.6%) and 5 (5.5%) dogs were positive in PCR for E. canis and Babesia sp., respectively. After sequencing, amplicons showed 99% of identity with isolates of E. canis and B. vogeli. The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA-Anaplasmataceae sequences and 18S rRNA-piroplasmid sequences supported the identity of the found E. canis and B. vogeli DNAs, respectively. The present work shows the first molecular detection of E. canis and B. vogeli in dogs in Colombia.

  19. In vitro cultivation of a newly recognized Babesia sp. in dogs in North Carolina

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A novel large Babesia sp. from an infected dog was cultivated in vitro by microaerophilous stationary phase culture methodology. uRPMI-1640 medium supplemented with 40% canine serum, Albumax, hypoxanthine and thymidine with antibiotics and buffered with HEPES supported the primary culture of the pa...

  20. Epidemiology and molecular phylogeny of Babesia sp. in Little Penguins Eudyptula minor in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Vanstreels, Ralph Eric Thijl; Woehler, Eric J.; Ruoppolo, Valeria; Vertigan, Peter; Carlile, Nicholas; Priddel, David; Finger, Annett; Dann, Peter; Herrin, Kimberly Vinette; Thompson, Paul; Ferreira Junior, Francisco C.; Braga, Érika M.; Hurtado, Renata; Epiphanio, Sabrina; Catão-Dias, José Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Blood parasites are potential threats to the health of penguins and to their conservation and management. Little penguins Eudyptula minor are native to Australia and New Zealand, and are susceptible to piroplasmids (Babesia), hemosporidians (Haemoproteus, Leucocytozoon, Plasmodium) and kinetoplastids (Trypanosoma). We studied a total of 263 wild little penguins at 20 sites along the Australian southeastern coast, in addition to 16 captive-bred little penguins. Babesia sp. was identified in seven wild little penguins, with positive individuals recorded in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania. True prevalence was estimated between 3.4% and 4.5%. Only round forms of the parasite were observed, and gene sequencing confirmed the identity of the parasite and demonstrated it is closely related to Babesia poelea from boobies (Sula spp.) and B. uriae from murres (Uria aalge). None of the Babesia-positive penguins presented signs of disease, confirming earlier suggestions that chronic infections by these parasites are not substantially problematic to otherwise healthy little penguins. We searched also for kinetoplastids, and despite targeted sampling of little penguins near the location where Trypanosoma eudyptulae was originally reported, this parasite was not detected. PMID:25853053

  1. First report on Babesia cf. microti infection of red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from Hungary.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Róbert; Takács, Nóra; Hornyák, Ákos; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit; Hornok, Sándor; Baneth, Gad

    2015-01-27

    To date, only one report of a small Babesia infection based on microscopic observation which caused babesiosis in two dogs in Hungary has been published. Babesiosis due to Babesia canis - which is endemic in the local dogs - has only been detected in captive grey wolves. No information is available on babesial/theilerial infections in red foxes in Hungary. The aim of the study was to screen red foxes in Hungary for babesial parasites by PCR and to compare their partial 18S rRNA gene sequences to those parasites of domestic dogs and wild canids from other countries. Blood samples of 404 red foxes originating from 316 locations representing all 19 Hungarian counties were screened in Hungary for babesial parasites by PCR and the partial 18S rRNA gene sequences were compared to those parasites of domestic dogs and wild canids from other countries. Altogether 81 red foxes out of 404 (20.0%; 95% CI: 16.4-24.2%) shot in 74 locations and in 17 of the 19 Hungarian counties were found to be infected with Babesia cf. microti by PCR. This is the first report to demonstrate the occurrence of Babesia cf. microti in Hungary, and its widespread presence in the fox population throughout the country. Further studies are needed to identify the tick species involved in its transmission, and whether other mechanisms of transmission are involved in its spread in fox populations.

  2. Screening of five drugs for efficacy against Babesia felis in experimentally infected cats.

    PubMed

    Penzhorn, B L; Lewis, B D; López-Rebollar, L M; Swan, G E

    2000-03-01

    The efficacy of 5 drugs was tested against experimental Babesia felis infection in domestic cats. Two of the drugs, rifampicin and a sulphadiazine-trimethoprim combination, appeared to have an anti-parasitic effect, but were inferior to primaquine. The other 3 drugs, buparvaquone, enrofloxacin and danofloxacin, had no significant anti-babesial effect.

  3. Frequency of Piroplasms Babesia microti and Cytauxzoon felis in Stray Cats from Northern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Spada, Eva; Proverbio, Daniela; Galluzzo, Paola; Perego, Roberta; Roggero, Nora; Caracappa, Santo

    2014-01-01

    Emerging diseases caused by piroplasms pose a health risk for man and other animals, and domestic cats have been proposed as potential reservoirs for some piroplasm infections. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of the piroplasms Babesia microti and Cytauxzoon felis in stray cats from northern Italy and to identify possible risk factors associated with these infections. Blood samples from 260 stray cats enrolled in a trap-neuter-release (TNR) program in northern Italy were examined with conventional PCR for the presence of Babesia microti and Cytauxzoon felis DNA. No sample (0.0%) tested positive for C. felis, whilst B. microti DNA was detected in two samples (0.8%). Both infected cats were in good clinical condition and recovered well from the neutering surgery. One of these two cats had a triple coinfection with Babesia microti, Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Evidence presented in this study indicates that the blood borne protozoans Babesia microti and Cytauxzoon felis are not widely distributed in stray cat populations in Milan, northern Italy, and that the significance of cats as a reservoir host for B. microti in this area is limited. PMID:24895629

  4. Mycobacterium bovis infection in a wild sow (Sus scrofa): the first case in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Myung; Jang, Young-Boo; Jang, Yunho; Yu, So Yoon; Kim, Jiro; Moon, Oun Kyung; Jung, Suk Chan; Lee, Min Kwon; Jeong, Tae Nam

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium (M.) bovis causes tuberculosis and has a broad host range, including humans, livestock, and wild animals. M. bovis infection of wild boar has been reported in several European countries. We report here the first case of M. bovis infection in a domesticated wild sow in Korea. Granulomatous and necrotizing lesions with small numbers of acid-fast bacilli were observed in nodules of the lung of wild sow. Furthermore, the M. bovis isolate from the wild sow had spoligotype SB0140 and a novel MIRU-VNTR allelic profile, which is not found in cattle and deer in Korea. PMID:26726026

  5. Distribution of a Specific 500-Base-Pair Fragment in Mycobacterium bovis Isolates from Sardinian Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Sechi, Leonardo A.; Duprè, Ilaria; Leori, Guido; Fadda, Giovanni; Zanetti, Stefania

    2000-01-01

    Amplification of a specific, 500-bp fragment from Mycobacterium bovis isolates and use of the fragment to differentiate between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. bovis was previously reported (J. G. Rodriguez, G. A. Meja, P. Del Portillo, M. E. Patarroyo, and L. A. Murillo, Microbiology 141:2131–2138, 1995). In the present study, 30 M. bovis isolates from Sardinian cattle were examined for the presence of this 500-bp fragment; 4 of the 30 isolates lacked the fragment. This result indicates that identification of M. bovis strains by amplification of the 500-bp sequence may lead to false-negative results. PMID:11015414

  6. Impact of temperature and soil type on Mycobacterium bovis survival in the environment.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Elodie; Rochelet, Murielle; Gal, Laurent; Boschiroli, Maria Laura; Hartmann, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of the bovine tuberculosis (bTB), mainly affects cattle, its natural reservoir, but also a wide range of domestic and wild mammals. Besides direct transmission via contaminated aerosols, indirect transmission of the M. bovis between wildlife and livestock might occur by inhalation or ingestion of environmental substrates contaminated through infected animal shedding. We monitored the survival of M. bovis in two soil samples chosen for their contrasted physical and-chemical properties (i.e. pH, clay content). The population of M. bovis spiked in sterile soils was enumerated by a culture-based method after 14, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 days of incubation at 4°C and 22°C. A qPCR based assay targeting the IS1561' locus was also performed to monitor M. bovis in both sterile and biotic spiked soils. The analysis of survival profiles using culture-based method showed that M. bovis survived longer at lower temperature (4°C versus 22°C) whereas the impact of soil characteristics on M. bovis persistence was not obvious. Furthermore, qPCR-based assay detected M. bovis for a longer period of time than the culture based method with higher gene copy numbers observed in sterile soils than in biotic ones. Impact of soil type on M. bovis persistence need to be deepened in order to fill the gap of knowledge concerning indirect transmission of the disease.

  7. Patterns of antimicrobial susceptibility in Michigan wildlife and bovine isolates of Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Daly, Meighan; Diegel, Kelly L; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Schooley, Angie; Berry, Dale E; Kaneene, John B

    2006-07-01

    The state of Michigan has recognized the presence of Mycobacterium bovis in its free-ranging white-tailed deer population since 1994. This endemic infection is primarily located in a 12-county area in the northeastern lower peninsula of Michigan. A statewide surveillance and eradication program of the disease has been in effect since 1994. Worldwide, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms have a known predilection toward development of antimicrobial resistance. The objective of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility of M. bovis isolates from white-tailed deer in Michigan and detect any changes in susceptibility over time. M. bovis isolates from 2 fall hunting seasons (1999 and 2004) were used in this study. The fall season of 2004 marked the first documented case of direct transmission of M. bovis from a wild deer to a human in Michigan. Since M. bovis is a zoonotic disease, knowledge of susceptibility can expedite treatment options in humans. M. bovis isolates were obtained from 58 deer, 4 coyotes, 3 cattle, 2 raccoons, and 1 human case from the 2 years combined. Methods of susceptibility testing included 1% proportion agar plates and Bactec radiometric broth testing. M. bovis was found to be uniformly resistant to the antibiotic pyrazinamide; this resistance is common to all M. bovis isolates. No other antimicrobial resistance was found in any of the tested M. bovis isolates, which may be, in part, attributed to the lack of any significant treatment pressure in wildlife.

  8. Mycobacterium bovis in Argentina: isolates from cats typified by spoligotyping.

    PubMed

    Zumárraga, M J; Vivot, M Martínez; Marticorena, D; Bernardelli, A; Fasán, R; Iachini, R; Cataldi, A A

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, 19 Mycobacterium bovis isolates from different cats were typified by spoligotyping. We detected nine spoligotypes. There was only one cluster, which grouped 11 of the isolates (57.9%), showing the main spoligotype from cattle from Argentina. The rest of the spoligotypes presented only one isolate each. Five of them were not found in cattle, and were unique and exclusive of cats. The isolates studied show that tuberculosis of bovine origin in cats constitutes a potential public health problem in Buenos Aires region. The identification of genotypes from non-natural hosts could contribute to understand the spread of bovine tuberculosis. This is the first report showing genetic profiles of M. bovis isolates in felines from Argentina.

  9. Mycobacterium bovis in Swine: Spoligotyping of Isolates from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Barandiaran, Soledad; Martínez Vivot, Marcela; Moras, Eduardo Vicente; Cataldi, Angel Adrián; Zumárraga, Martín José

    2011-01-01

    A total of 143 Mycobacterium bovis isolates of pigs, from the most productive swine area in Argentina, were typed by spoligotyping. Twenty-two different spoligotypes were identified, and 133 (93%) isolates were grouped into 12 clusters. One of them, designed SB0140, was the most frequent because it held 83 (58%) isolates. This spoligotype also grouped 362 (43%) out of 841 isolates from previously typed cattle and, thus, constitutes the most frequent in our country. In addition, 135 (94%) isolates revealed spoligotypes identical to those of cattle, showing an epidemiological link. On the other hand, there were seven novel spoligotypes, six of which were also unique since they had only one isolate each. This study aimed to identify the spoligotypes of M. bovis isolated from pigs to contribute to a better understanding of the distribution of bovine tuberculosis in the main productive area of Argentina. PMID:21547236

  10. Structural definition of arabinomannans from Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Nigou, J; Gilleron, M; Brando, T; Vercellone, A; Puzo, G

    1999-06-01

    The structures of the hydrophilic parietal and cellular arabinomannans isolated from Mycobacterium bovis BCG cell wall [Nigou et al. (1997) J Biol Chem 272: 23094-103] were investigated. Their molecular mass as determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was around 16 kDa. Concerning cap structure, capillary electrophoresis analysis demonstrated that dimannoside (Manpalpha1-->2Manp) was the most abundant motif (65-75%). Using two-dimensional 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy, the mannan core was unambiguously demonstrated to be composed of -->6Manpalpha1--> backbone substituted at some O-2 by a single Manp unit. The branching degree was determined as 84%. Finally, arabinomannans were found to be devoid of the phosphatidyl-myo-inositol anchor and, by aminonaphthalene disulfonate tagging, the mannan core was shown to contain a reducing end. This constitutes the main difference between arabinomannans and lipoarabinomannans from Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

  11. Streptococcus bovis new taxonomy: does subspecies distinction matter?

    PubMed

    Ben-Chetrit, E; Wiener-Well, Y; Kashat, L; Yinnon, A M; Assous, M V

    2017-02-01

    Bacteremia with Streptococcus bovis/equinus complex strains is associated with hepatobiliary disease, colorectal lesions (CL), and infective endocarditis (IE). This study addressed the clinical significance of subspecies distinction of previously designated S. bovis blood culture isolates according to the updated nomenclature. During 2002-2013, all blood culture isolates previously designated as S. bovis were recultured and identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and MALDI-TOF (Bruker BioTyper and Vitek MS, bioMérieux). Clinical data of patients aged ≥18 years were reviewed. A review of four recent case series was performed as well. Forty blood isolates were identified using 16S rRNA sequencing. Twenty-six bacteremic patients had S. gallolyticus ssp. pasteurianus, six had S. gallolyticus ssp. gallolyticus, two had S. gallolyticus ssp. macedonicus, and six had S. infantarius bacteremia. Species diagnosis using Vitek and bioMérieux MALDI-TOF technology was applicable in 37 and 36 samples, respectively, and was successful in all samples (100 %). Subspecies identification was confirmed in 30 (83 %) samples (as compared with 16S rRNA sequencing detection). IE was diagnosed in 22 (59 %) patients and CL in 8 (20 %) patients. Both complications were associated with all subspecies. Combining our results with those of four recent series resulted in, overall, 320 bacteremic cases, of which 88 (28 %) had CL and 66 (21 %) had IE. All 'bovis/equinus' complex subspecies were associated with CL or IE. From a clinical point of view, species diagnosis using MALDI-TOF MS should suffice to warrant consideration of transesophageal echocardiography and colonoscopy.

  12. [Investigation of Mycobacterium bovis subsp. bovis among the strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolated in Düzce Province, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Cihadiye Elif; Şahin, İdris; Öksüz, Şükrü; Kılıç, Nida; Kılınçel, Özge; Aydın, Leyla; Atik, Dursun; Afşin, Emine

    2016-07-01

    Throughout the history of mankind, tuberculosis (TB) has caused serious illness and still continues to do so. Archaeobiological studies indicated that TB in humans dates back to 4000-8000 BC, and cases were shown to be due to Mycobacterium bovis subsp.bovis rather than Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Moreover, this situation was thought to begin with domestication of animals, consumption of their milk, and living together in the same environment with them. Over time, with the consumption of boiled milk and with the establishment of separate animal shelters, M.bovis subsp. bovis infection began to be seen rarely. Today, M.bovis infection is mostly transmitted from animals to humans and very rarely from humans to other humans. The most significant means of transmission of the infection are to the gastrointestinal tract via consumption of raw milk and to the respiratory system via droplet infection from the animals with disease. In this study, it was planned to investigate the cause of occurrence of TB in cattles in Düzce in the past few years along with the presence of bovine type TB in cases of human tuberculosis. We aimed to carry out subtype determination of the M.tuberculosis complex (MTBC) strains isolated in our mycobacteriology laboratory between the years 2004-2014, and evaluate the clinical and sociodemographic data of patients in whom M.bovis subsp. bovis was detected. The strains that were selected for the study have been isolated from radiometric BACTEC™ 12B broth and/or Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) media between 2004-2009, and BACTEC™ MGIT™ (Mycobacteria Growth Indicator Tube) and/or LJ media between 2009-2014 periods. The GenoType MTBC Kit (Hain-Lifescience GmbH, Germany) was used in the study for determination of the subspecies. Extraction and amplification of DNA and hybridizations were performed according to test procedure in order to investigate the presence of subtypes of the MTBC species in skimmed milk from collections stored at -20°C. In the

  13. Identification and Characterization of the Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 in Babesia divergens and B. microti

    PubMed Central

    Ord, Rosalynn L.; Rodriguez, Marilis; Cursino-Santos, Jeny R.; Hong, Hyunryung; Singh, Manpreet; Gray, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites include those of the genera Plasmodium, Cryptosporidium, and Toxoplasma and those of the relatively understudied zoonotic genus Babesia. In humans, babesiosis, particularly transfusion-transmitted babesiosis, has been emerging as a major threat to public health. Like malaria, the disease pathology is a consequence of the parasitemia which develops through cyclical replication of Babesia parasites in host erythrocytes. However, there are no exoerythrocytic stages in Babesia, so targeting of the blood stage and associated proteins to directly prevent parasite invasion is the most desirable option for effective disease control. Especially promising among such molecules are the rhoptry neck proteins (RONs), whose homologs have been identified in many apicomplexan parasites. RONs are involved in the formation of the moving junction, along with AMA1, but no RON has been identified and characterized in any Babesia spp. Here we identify the RON2 proteins of Babesia divergens (BdRON2) and B. microti (BmRON2) and show that they are localized apically and that anti-BdRON2 antibodies are significant inhibitors of parasite invasion in vitro. Neither protein is immunodominant, as both proteins react only marginally with sera from infected animals. Further characterization of the direct role of both BdRON2 and BmRON2 in parasite invasion is required, but knowledge of the level of conformity of RON2 proteins within the apicomplexan phylum, particularly that of the AMA1-RON2 complex at the moving junction, along with the availability of an animal model for B. microti studies, provides a key to target this complex with a goal of preventing the erythrocytic invasion of these parasites and to further our understanding of the role of these conserved ligands in invasion. PMID:26953328

  14. Continuous in vitro cultivation of a recently identified Babesia that infects small ruminants in China.

    PubMed

    Guan, Guiquan; Ma, Miling; Liu, Aihong; Du, Pengfei; Ren, Qiaoyun; Li, Youquan; Wang, Jinming; Liu, Zhijie; Yin, Hong; Luo, Jianxun

    2012-07-06

    Babesia sp. Xinjiang was isolated from a splenectomised sheep infested by Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Hylomma anatolicum anatolicum, collected from sheep and cattle in Xinjiang province. It was considered to be a novel ovine Babesia species on the basis of its morphology, pathogenicity, vector tick species and alignments of 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) and internal transcribed spacers (ITS) gene sequences. Continuous in vitro cultures of the ovine parasite were established using infected sheep blood. In RPMI 1640 medium with 7.5% sheep red blood cells (RBCs) maintained in an incubator at 37 °C and 5% CO(2), the percentage of parasitized erythrocytes (PPE) peaked at 10% in 24- and 6-well plates. It increased to 20-50% with the same culture medium but with 2.5% RBC in 75 cm(2) flasks. Two clonal lines of Babesia sp. Xinjiang were screened using the limiting dilution method. Growth characteristics of these lines in vitro were measured by a microtiter-based spectrophotometric method and from the PPE. The generation time in sheep erythrocytes was between 15.20 h and 16.27 h. Furthermore, the host range of parasite was identified with in vitro culture and in vivo infection. Erythrocytes of sheep, cattle, sika deer and humans could be invaded into by lines in vitro, but the parasites could not propagate in human erythrocytes. The parasites could not enter erythrocytes from goats in vitro. However, in vivo, only sheep could be infected by lines. Finally, a Babesia sp. Xinjiang-like parasite (which shared 99.5% identity with the original strain of Babesia sp. Xinjiang) was isolated using this in vitro culture system from 1 of 19 sheep blood samples collected from western Gansu province, China.

  15. Guillain-Barré syndrome associated with Mycobacterium bovis lymphadenitis.

    PubMed

    Vergnon-Miszczycha, Delphine; Suy, Florence; Robert, Florence; Carricajo, Anne; Fresard, Anne; Cazorla, Céline; Guglielminotti, Claire; Lucht, Frédéric; Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an autoimmune disease that can be triggered by different infectious agents. Here we report the case of a 26-year-old Algerian woman who developed GBS associated with a Mycobacterium bovis cervical lymphadenitis. Following intravenous immunoglobulin therapy, the patient's neurologic state returned to normal after 3 months. The lymphadenitis responded more slowly to the antituberculous treatment and an excision of necrotic cervical lymph nodes had to be performed four times. Antibiotics were administered for 16 months: ethambutol was stopped after 2 months, and rifampicin and isoniazid pursued for 14 months. An extensive etiological investigation showed that, in this case, the only likely infectious trigger GBS was the concomitant M. bovis infection. To our knowledge, this is the first report of GBS triggered by M. bovis. We performed a literature review revealing that the association between tuberculosis and Guillain-Barré syndrome is very rare (only seven cases previously reported) but is not coincidental. Physicians should be aware that tuberculosis can be a cause of GBS.

  16. [Infection due to Mycobacterium bovis in common variable immunodeficiency].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Sánchez, Diana Andrea; Castilla-Rodríguez, Jaisel Luz; Castrejón-Vázquez, María Isabel; Vargas-Camaño, María Eugenia; Medina-Torres, Edgar Alejandro; Blancas-Galicia, Lizbeth; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara Elva

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is an heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by impaired antibody production. It shows a wide spectrum of manifestations including severe and recurrent respiratory infections (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus) and gastrointestinal (Campylobacter jejuni, rotavirus and Giardia lamblia). Viral infections caused by herpes zoster, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and hepatitis C are rare. The opportunistic agents such as CMV, Pneumocystis jirovecii, cryptococcus and atypical mycobacteria have been reported as isolated cases. This paper reports the case of a 38-year-old female patient, who began six years before with weight loss of 7 kg in six months, fatigue, weakness, sweating, fever and abdominal pain. Furthermore, patient had intestinal obstruction and abdominal CT showed mesenteric lymph growth. The mesenteric lymph node biopsy revealed positives Mycobacterium PCR, Ziehl-Neelsen staining and culture for M. bovis. In the laparotomy postoperative period was complicated with nosocomial pneumonia, requiring mechanical ventilation and tracheostomy. Two years later, she developed right renal abscess that required surgical drainage, once again with a positive culture for Mycobacterium bovis. She was referred to highly specialized hospital and we documented panhypogammaglobulinemia and lymphopenia. Secondary causes of hypogammaglobulinemia were ruled out and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) was confirmed, we started IVIG replacement. Four years later she developed mixed cellularity Hodgkin's lymphoma. Until today she continues with IVIG and chemotherapy. This report of a patient with CVID and Mycobacterium bovis infection, a unusual association, shows the cellular immunity susceptibility in this immunodeficiency, additional to the humoral defect.

  17. Eimeria bovis: an update on parasite-host cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Carlos; Ruiz, Antonio; Taubert, Anja

    2012-10-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are obligate intracellular protozoans and are well recognized modulators of the host cell machinery on varying levels such as host cell metabolism, MHC expression, cell cycle, or apoptosis in order to guarantee their intracellular development and survival. One of the most thoroughly examined apicomplexan pathogens demonstrating a potent manipulative capacity with respect to various host cell functions is Toxoplasma gondii, a protozoon exhibiting rapid intracellular development with small meronts in any nucleated cell, almost irrespective of the cell type or host origin. In contrast, Eimeria bovis merogony I is host- and cell type-restricted and occurs exclusively in bovine endothelial host cells. Furthermore, as a peculiarity, intracellular E. bovis meront I development is a long-lasting process (up to 3 weeks), leading to the formation of huge macromeronts of up to 300 μm in size, containing up to 120,000 merozoites I as offspring. In consequence, the necessity for intense host cell modulation to support this particular development appears even more pressing than in other apicomplexan parasite cases. Here we review the data currently available on E. bovis-host cell interactions, indicating the intriguing capacity of this protozoan to exploit and utilize its host cell for its own benefit.

  18. Bovine Tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) in Wildlife in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Aranaz, Alicia; de Juan, Lucía; Montero, Natalia; Sánchez, Celia; Galka, Margarita; Delso, Consuelo; Álvarez, Julio; Romero, Beatriz; Bezos, Javier; Vela, Ana I.; Briones, Victor; Mateos, Ana; Domínguez, Lucas

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis infection in wildlife and feral species is a potential source of infection for livestock and a threat to protected and endangered species. The aim of this study was to identify Spanish wild animal species infected with M. bovis through bacteriological culture and spacer oligonucleotide typing (spoligotyping) of isolates for epidemiological purposes. This study included samples from red deer (Cervus elaphus), fallow deer (Dama dama), wild boar (Sus scrofa), Iberian lynx (Lynx pardina), hare (Lepus europaeus), and cattle (Bos taurus). They were collected in several geographical areas that were selected for their unique ecological value and/or known relationships between wildlife and livestock. In the areas included in this survey, M. bovis strains with the same spoligotyping pattern were found infecting several wild species and livestock, which indicates an epidemiological link. A locally predominant spoligotype was found in these areas. Better understanding of the transmission and distribution of disease in these populations will permit more precise targeting of control measures. PMID:15184440

  19. Infection by Mycobacterium bovis in a dog from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Vivianne Cambuí Figueiredo; Figueiredo, Salomão Cambuí de; Rosales, Cesar Alejandro Rodriguez; Porto, Camila Dias; Sequeira, Julio Lopes; Neto, José Soares Ferreira; Paes, Antônio Carlos; Salgado, Vanessa Riesz

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a chronic disease caused by bacteria belonging to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MtbC). This disease rarely affects dogs. Canine infections are usually caused by M. tuberculosis. Mycobacterium bovis infections are rare in dogs and associated with consumption of raw milk or contaminated products. Here, we report a Boxer dog who had a M. bovis infection and was admitted to a Brazilian veterinary hospital with a presumptive diagnosis of chronic ehrlichiosis. Despite receiving treatment for chronic ehrlichiosis, it progressed to death. TB was diagnosed during post-mortem examinations using histopathological analysis. Ziehl-Neelsen staining revealed acid-fast bacilli in the kidneys, liver, mesentery, and a mass adhered to the liver. Further, PCR-restriction analysis was performed to identify mycobacteria in the samples. A restriction profile compatible with MtbC was found in the lungs. In addition, PCR-based MtbC typing deletions at different loci of chromosome 9 enabled the identification of M. bovis in the lungs. Therefore, it is very essential to perform differential diagnosis of TB in dogs with non-specific clinical signs and who do not respond to treatment, particularly those who had been in contact with TB-infected cattle or owners. Further, we highlight the use of molecular methods for the identification of bacilli, improving the diagnosis and aiding epidemiological studies.

  20. Confirmation of occurrence of Babesia vogeli in a dog in Windhoek, central Namibia.

    PubMed

    Penzhorn, Barend L; Vorster, Ilse; Redecker, Gernot; Oosthuizen, Marinda C

    2016-10-26

    Although there is evidence of high seroprevalence of antibodies to Babesia spp. in dogs in central Namibia, clinical babesiosis is rarely diagnosed. Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, the vector of Babesia vogeli, is common in Namibia while Haemaphysalis elliptica, the vector of the highly virulent but morphologically indistinguishable Babesia rossi, has rarely been recorded, mainly in northern Namibia. On the basis of vector occurrence, clinical cases of canine babesiosis in Windhoek, central Namibia, have been ascribed to B. vogeli. DNA extracted from a blood smear made from a sick dog was subjected to the reverse line blot hybridisation assay. The polymerase chain reaction amplicons hybridised with the B. vogeli-specific probe, but not with the Babesia canis- and B. rossi-specific probes. Although attempts at cloning and sequencing of the full-length 18S rRNA gene were unsuccessful, we can confirm that B. vogeli occurs in central Namibia.

  1. 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis distinguishes biotypes of Streptococcus bovis: Streptococcus bovis Biotype II/2 is a separate genospecies and the predominant clinical isolate in adult males.

    PubMed

    Clarridge, J E; Attorri, S M; Zhang, Q; Bartell, J

    2001-04-01

    We characterized 22 human clinical strains of Streptococcus bovis by genotypic (16S rRNA gene sequence analysis [MicroSeq]; Applied Biosystems, Foster City, Calif.) and phenotypic (API 20 Strep and Rapid ID32 Strep systems (bioMerieux Vitek, Hazelton, Mo.) methods. The strains, isolated from blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and urine, formed two distinct 16S ribosomal DNA sequence clusters. Three strains which were associated with endocarditis urinary tract infection (UTI), and sepsis clustered with the S. bovis type strain ATCC 33317 (cluster 1); other closely related type strains were S. equinus and S. infantarius. Nineteen strains clustered at a distance of about 2.5% dissimilarity to the S. bovis type strain (cluster 2) and were associated with central nervous system (CNS) disease in addition to endocarditis, UTI, and sepsis. All strains were distinct from S. gallolyticus. Within cluster 2, a single strain grouped with ATCC strain 43143 (cluster 2a) and may be phenotypically distinct. All the other strains formed a second subgroup (cluster 2b) that was biochemically similar to S. bovis biotype II/2 (mannitol negative and beta galactosidase, alpha galactosidase, beta glucuronidase, and trehalose positive). The API 20 Strep system identified isolates of cluster 2b as S. bovis biotype II/2, those of cluster 1 as S. bovis biotype II/1, and that of cluster 2a as S. bovis biotype I. There was an excellent correlation of biotype and genotype: S. bovis biotype II/2 isolates form a separate genospecies distinct from the S. bovis, S. gallolyticus, and S. infantarius type strains and are the most common isolates in adult males.

  2. Piroplasmosis in wildlife: Babesia and Theileria affecting free-ranging ungulates and carnivores in the Italian Alps.

    PubMed

    Zanet, Stefania; Trisciuoglio, Anna; Bottero, Elisa; de Mera, Isabel Garcia Fernández; Gortazar, Christian; Carpignano, Maria Grazia; Ferroglio, Ezio

    2014-02-17

    Piroplasmosis are among the most relevant diseases of domestic animals. Babesia is emerging as cause of tick-borne zoonosis worldwide and free-living animals are reservoir hosts of several zoonotic Babesia species. We investigated the epidemiology of Babesia spp. and Theileria spp. in wild ungulates and carnivores from Northern Italy to determine which of these apicomplexan species circulate in wildlife and their prevalence of infection. PCR amplification of the V4 hyper-variable region of the 18S rDNA of Babesia sp./Theileria sp was carried out on spleen samples of 1036 wild animals: Roe deer Capreolus capreolus (n = 462), Red deer Cervus elaphus (n = 52), Alpine Chamois Rupicapra rupicapra (n = 36), Fallow deer Dama dama (n = 17), Wild boar Sus scrofa (n = 257), Red fox Vulpes vulpes (n = 205) and Wolf Canis lupus (n = 7). Selected positive samples were sequenced to determine the species of amplified Babesia/Theileria DNA. Babesia/Theileria DNA was found with a mean prevalence of 9.94% (IC95% 8.27-11.91). The only piroplasms found in carnivores was Theileria annae, which was detected in two foxes (0.98%; IC95% 0.27-3.49). Red deer showed the highest prevalence of infection (44.23%; IC95% 31.6-57.66), followed by Alpine chamois (22.22%; IC95% 11.71-38.08), Roe deer (12.55%; IC95% 9.84-15.89), and Wild boar (4.67%; IC95% 2.69-7.98). Genetic analysis identified Babesia capreoli as the most prevalent piroplasmid found in Alpine chamois, Roe deer and Red deer, followed by Babesia bigemina (found in Roe deer, Red deer and Wild boar), and the zoonotic Babesia venatorum (formerly Babesia sp. EU1) isolated from 2 Roe deer. Piroplasmids of the genus Theileria were identified in Wild boar and Red deer. The present study offers novel insights into the role of wildlife in Babesia/Theileria epidemiology, as well as relevant information on genetic variability of piroplasmids infecting wild ungulates and carnivores.

  3. Piroplasmosis in wildlife: Babesia and Theileria affecting free-ranging ungulates and carnivores in the Italian Alps

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Piroplasmosis are among the most relevant diseases of domestic animals. Babesia is emerging as cause of tick-borne zoonosis worldwide and free-living animals are reservoir hosts of several zoonotic Babesia species. We investigated the epidemiology of Babesia spp. and Theileria spp. in wild ungulates and carnivores from Northern Italy to determine which of these apicomplexan species circulate in wildlife and their prevalence of infection. Methods PCR amplification of the V4 hyper-variable region of the 18S rDNA of Babesia sp./Theileria sp was carried out on spleen samples of 1036 wild animals: Roe deer Capreolus capreolus (n = 462), Red deer Cervus elaphus (n = 52), Alpine Chamois Rupicapra rupicapra (n = 36), Fallow deer Dama dama (n = 17), Wild boar Sus scrofa (n = 257), Red fox Vulpes vulpes (n = 205) and Wolf Canis lupus (n = 7). Selected positive samples were sequenced to determine the species of amplified Babesia/Theileria DNA. Results Babesia/Theileria DNA was found with a mean prevalence of 9.94% (IC95% 8.27-11.91). The only piroplasms found in carnivores was Theileria annae, which was detected in two foxes (0.98%; IC95% 0.27-3.49). Red deer showed the highest prevalence of infection (44.23%; IC95% 31.6-57.66), followed by Alpine chamois (22.22%; IC95% 11.71-38.08), Roe deer (12.55%; IC95% 9.84-15.89), and Wild boar (4.67%; IC95% 2.69-7.98). Genetic analysis identified Babesia capreoli as the most prevalent piroplasmid found in Alpine chamois, Roe deer and Red deer, followed by Babesia bigemina (found in Roe deer, Red deer and Wild boar), and the zoonotic Babesia venatorum (formerly Babesia sp. EU1) isolated from 2 Roe deer. Piroplasmids of the genus Theileria were identified in Wild boar and Red deer. Conclusions The present study offers novel insights into the role of wildlife in Babesia/Theileria epidemiology, as well as relevant information on genetic variability of piroplasmids infecting wild ungulates and

  4. The transmission of Babesia canis to the wild dog Lycaon pictus (Temminck) and black-backed jackal Canis mesomelas Schreber.

    PubMed

    Van Heerden, J

    1980-06-01

    Babesia canis was successfully transmitted from the domestic dog to 3 wild dogs Lycaon pictus and 4 black-backed jackals Canis mesomelas. Both wild dogs and black-backed jackals showed no clinical signs or clinical pathological evidence of disease. Trophozoites of Babesia canis were found in peripheral blood smears from all experimental animals. The disease was also successfully transmitted from both black-backed jackals and wild dogs to the domestic dog.

  5. Genetic variability of Babesia parasites in Haemaphysalis spp. and Ixodes persulcatus ticks in the Baikal region and Far East of Russia.

    PubMed

    Rar, V A; Epikhina, T I; Suntsova, O V; Kozlova, I V; Lisak, O V; Pukhovskaya, N M; Vysochina, N P; Ivanov, L I; Tikunova, N V

    2014-12-01

    To study Babesia diversity in Ixodid ticks in Russia, Ixodes persulcatus, Haemaphysalis japonica, Haemaphysalisconcinna, Dermacentor silvarum, and Dermacentor nuttalli ticks collected in the Far East and Baikal region were assayed for the presence of Babesia spp. using nested PCR. In total, Babesia DNA was detected in 30 of the 1125 (2.7%) I. persulcatus, 17 of the 573 (3.0%) H. concinna, and 12 of the 543 (2.2%) H. japonica but was undetectable in any of the 294 analyzed Dermacentor spp. Partial 18S rRNA gene sequences were determined for all of the positive samples. Among the positive ticks, nine I. persulcatus were infected by Babesia microti 'US'-type, five I. persulcatus were infected by Babesia divergens-like parasites, and 11 I. persulcatus were infected by Babesia venatorum. For all three of these species, the determined 18S rRNA gene sequences were identical to those of the Babesia genetic variants found previously in I. persulcatus in Russia. In addition, five I. persulcatus from the Baikal region and all of the positive Haemaphysalis spp. ticks carried 13 different sequence variants of Babesia sensu stricto belonging to distinct phylogenetic clusters. Babesia spp. from 29 ticks of different species collected in distinct locations belonged to the cluster of cattle and ovine parasites (Babesia crassa, Babesiamajor, Babesiamotasi, Babesiabigemina, etc.). Babesia spp. from four H. japonica ticks in the Far East belonged to the cluster formed by parasites of carnivores. One more Babesia sequence variant detected in an I. persulcatus tick from the Baikal region belonged to the cluster formed by parasites of cattle and wild cervids (B. divergens, Babesiacapreoli, B. venatorum, Babesiaodocoilei, etc.). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular evidence for the presence of new Babesia species in feral raccoons (Procyon lotor) in Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Jinnai, Michio; Kawabuchi-Kurata, Takako; Tsuji, Masayoshi; Nakajima, Rui; Fujisawa, Kohei; Nagata, Shogo; Koide, Hikaru; Matoba, Yohei; Asakawa, Mitsuhiko; Takahashi, Kazuo; Ishihara, Chiaki

    2009-06-10

    We recently reported that feral raccoons (Procyon lotor) with splenomegaly native to Japan were carriers of a Babesia microti-like parasite identical to that found in the United States, which was likely introduced to Japan from North America via raccoons imported as pets. Thus, we attempted extensive molecular survey for piroplasma infections of feral raccoon with normal spleen in Hokkaido, Japan using nested PCR that target broadly to 18S ribosomal RNA gene (SSU-rDNA) of all the parasites in the genus Babesia, Theileria, Cytauxzoon and B. microti group. Of the 348 raccoon samples analyzed, 9 gave positive signals. Cloning and phylogenetic analysis on SSU-rDNA sequences revealed that six of nine positives were found to be infected with Babesia and the remaining three with previously unreported Sarcocystis. Babesia sequences were further separated into two distantly related groups, those that reside in a novel phylogenetic group were consisted solely of four parasites found in this study, while those which included one identical sequence found in the three of our specimens were assembled together with both Babesia parasites of tick's in Japan and of raccoon's in U.S. These results may indicate that not only a B. microti-like parasite but also at least two yet undescribed Babesia species are being established in their new life cycles in the feral raccoon populations in Japan.

  7. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Mycobacterium bovis Strains Isolated from Beef Cattle in Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Sanabria, Lidia; Lagrave, Lorena; Nishibe, Christiane; Ribas, Augusto C A; Zumárraga, Martín J; Almeida, Nalvo F; Araújo, Flábio R

    2017-07-13

    This work reports the draft genome sequences of the Mycobacterium bovis strains M1009 and M1010, isolated from the lymph nodes of two infected cows on a beef farm in Paraguay. Comparative genomics between these strains and other regional strains may provide more insights regarding M. bovis epidemiology in South America. Copyright © 2017 Sanabria et al.

  8. Multilocus sequence typing of Mycoplasma bovis reveals host-specific genotypes in cattle versus bison

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycoplasma bovis is a primary agent of mastitis, pneumonia and arthritis in cattle and is the bacterium isolated most frequently from the polymicrobial syndrome known as bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). Recently, M. bovis has emerged as a significant health problem in bison, causing necro...

  9. A multilocus sequence typing method and curated database for Mycoplasma bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycoplasma bovis is a primary agent of mastitis, pneumonia and arthritis in cattle and is the bacterium isolated most frequently from the polymicrobial syndrome known as bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC). Recently, M. bovis has emerged as a significant problem in bison, causing necrotic pha...

  10. In situ cytokine expression in pulmonary granulomas of cattle experimentally infected by aerosolized Mycobacterium bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium bovis is the cause of tuberculosis in most animal species, including cattle and is a serious zoonotic pathogen. In humans, M. bovis infection can result in disease clinically indistinguishable from that caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of most tuberculosis in humans. Reg...

  11. Effect of skin test on serum antibody responses to Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recently, several serologic tests designed to detect immunodominant antibodies to M. bovis antigens (e.g., MPB83, MPB70, ESAT-6, and CFP10) have emerged for potential use with samples from cattle. Of these, a commercial ELISA to MPB83/MPB70 (M. bovis antibody ELISA) has gained approval for use in ca...

  12. Complete Genome Sequences of Field Isolates of Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium caprae

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Vicente, Joaquín; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Manrique, Marina; Tobes, Raquel; López, Vladimir; Romero, Beatriz; Domínguez, Lucas; Garrido, Joseba M.; Gortazar, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the complete genome sequences of field isolates of Mycobacterium bovis and the related mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium caprae. The genomes of three M. bovis (MB1, MB3, MB4) and one M. caprae (MB2) field isolates with different virulence, prevalence, and host distribution phenotypes were sequenced. PMID:26112781

  13. Patterns and processes of Mycobacterium bovis evolution revealed by phylogenomic analyses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium bovis is an important animal pathogen worldwide that parasitizes wild and domesticated vertebrate livestock as well as humans. A comparison of the five M. bovis complete genomes from UK, South Korea, Brazil and USA revealed four novel large-scale structural variations of at least 2,000...

  14. Polymorphisms of twenty regulatory proteins between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis are responsible for tuberculosis in humans or animals, respectively. Both species are closely related and belong to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). M. tuberculosis is the most ancient species from which M. bovis and the other members o...

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium bovis Strain D-10-02315 Isolated from Wild Boar

    PubMed Central

    Branger, Maxime; Hauer, Amandine; Michelet, Lorraine; Karoui, Claudine; Cochard, Thierry; De Cruz, Krystel; Henault, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the etiologic agent of bovine tuberculosis, a chronic infectious disease, affecting livestock, wild animals, and sometimes humans. We report the draft genome sequence of a Mycobacterium bovis strain isolated from wild boar of spoligotype SB0120 (or BCG-like) also present in wildlife-livestock multi-host systems. PMID:27834714

  16. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Mycobacterium bovis Strains Isolated from Beef Cattle in Paraguay

    PubMed Central

    Sanabria, Lidia; Lagrave, Lorena; Nishibe, Christiane; Ribas, Augusto C. A.; Zumárraga, Martín J.; Araújo, Flábio R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT This work reports the draft genome sequences of the Mycobacterium bovis strains M1009 and M1010, isolated from the lymph nodes of two infected cows on a beef farm in Paraguay. Comparative genomics between these strains and other regional strains may provide more insights regarding M. bovis epidemiology in South America. PMID:28705977

  17. Clinical Mycoplasma bovis mastitis in prepubertal heifers on 2 dairy herds

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Lawrence K.; Muller, Fredrick J.; Wedam, Michael L.; Schneider, Christopher S.; Biddle, Mary Kate

    2008-01-01

    Findings of herd investigations of heifers with prepubertal mastitis are presented. Mycoplasma bovis was isolated from lacteal secretions and tissue samples of necropsied heifers; the same strain infected dams and herd mates. Vertical transmission is suggested in this first report of intramammary infections of M. bovis in peripubertal heifers. PMID:19183734

  18. Molecular characterization of Mycobacterium bovis strains isolated from cattle slaughtered at two abattoirs in Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Sahraoui, Naima; Müller, Borna; Guetarni, Djamel; Boulahbal, Fadéla; Yala, Djamel; Ouzrout, Rachid; Berg, Stefan; Smith, Noel H; Zinsstag, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    Background Bovine Tuberculosis is prevalent in Algeria despite governmental attempts to control the disease. The objective of this study was to conduct, for the first time, molecular characterization of a population sample of Mycobacterium bovis strains isolated from slaughter cattle in Algeria. Between August and November 2007, 7250 animals were consecutively screened at the abattoirs of Algiers and Blida. In 260 animals, gross visible granulomatous lesions were detected and put into culture. Bacterial isolates were subsequently analysed by molecular methods. Results Altogether, 101 bacterial strains from 100 animals were subjected to molecular characterization. M. bovis was isolated from 88 animals. Other bacteria isolated included one strain of M. caprae, four Rhodococcus equi strains, three Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) and five strains of other bacterial species. The M. bovis strains isolated showed 22 different spoligotype patterns; four of them had not been previously reported. The majority of M. bovis strains (89%) showed spoligotype patterns that were previously observed in strains from European cattle. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR) typing supported a link between M. bovis strains from Algeria and France. One spoligotype pattern has also been shown to be frequent in M. bovis strains from Mali although the VNTR pattern of the Algerian strains differed from the Malian strains. Conclusion M. bovis infections account for a high amount of granulomatous lesions detected in Algerian slaughter cattle during standard meat inspection at Algiers and Blida abattoir. Molecular typing results suggested a link between Algerian and European strains of M. bovis. PMID:19173726

  19. Complete Genome Sequences of Field Isolates of Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium caprae.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, José; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Vicente, Joaquín; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Manrique, Marina; Tobes, Raquel; López, Vladimir; Romero, Beatriz; Domínguez, Lucas; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramón; Gortazar, Christian

    2015-06-25

    Here we report the complete genome sequences of field isolates of Mycobacterium bovis and the related mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium caprae. The genomes of three M. bovis (MB1, MB3, MB4) and one M. caprae (MB2) field isolates with different virulence, prevalence, and host distribution phenotypes were sequenced. Copyright © 2015 de la Fuente et al.

  20. Detection and Elimination of Corynebacterium bovis from Barrier Rooms by Using an Environmental Sampling Surveillance Program.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Christopher; Pugazhenthi, Umarani; Spiegel, Shannon; Leszczynski, Jori

    2017-02-16

    Rodent health-monitoring programs based on sampling an IVC system's exhaust air dust (EAD) has enhanced and evenreplaced traditional sentinels for some rodent pathogens. EAD testing by qPCR assay is an optimal surveillance methodfor the rapid detection of Corynebacterium bovis-infected immunodeficient mice. Here we demonstrate that an active EADsurveillance program for C. bovis can be used to maintain nude mice C. bovis-free after the transition from historically enzootically infected colonies. During 3 events over 3 y, rapid detection of infection, elimination of infected mice, aggressivequarantine measures, and local decontamination prevented the spread of C. bovis within 2 barrier rooms. In total, 4 cages ofinfected nude mice were identified and removed, preventing the spread of infection to 469 other cages of immunodeficientmice. In addition, we present data regarding a refinement to EAD testing which enables row-specific surveillance of an IVCrack. This technique systemically decreases the amount of testing required to locate an individually infected cage. Due to ourability to rapidly detect and localize an infected cage, we were able to investigate the route of C. bovis introduction into ourbarrier rooms. Our epidemiologic investigation suggested that the transmission of C. bovis occurred through contaminated,cryopreserved, patient-derived xenograft tumor tissue. This previously unknown source of C. bovis can infect mice used topropagate these tumors. Together, these data demonstrate that a remediation program that combines rapid detection, testand-cull, and local decontamination under quarantine conditions can eliminate C. bovis from a mouse colony.

  1. Vaccination of White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) with Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wildlife reservoirs of Mycobacterium bovis represent serious obstacles to the eradication of tuberculosis in domestic livestock. In Michigan, USA tuberculous white-tailed deer transmit M. bovis to cattle. One approach in dealing with this wildlife reservoir is to vaccinate deer in order to interrupt...

  2. Cytotoxic T-cell responses to Mycobacterium bovis during experimental infection of cattle with bovine tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Margot A; Parlane, Natalie; McCarthy, Allison; Buddle, Bryce M

    2003-01-01

    Cytotoxic T-cell responses are thought to play a significant role in the host defence against mycobacterial infections. Little is understood about such responses of cattle to Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis. The work described in this report demonstrates the activity of cytotoxic cells during experimental infection of cattle with M. bovis. The cytotoxic cells were found to have the ability to specifically lyse macrophages infected with M. bovis and were detected in peripheral blood lymphocytes after in vitro re-exposure to M. bovis. Cytotoxic activity was detected 4 weeks after experimental infection with M. bovis; a similar level of activity was maintained during the infection and it was mediated by both WC1+γδ and CD8+ T cells. In addition, inhibition of the growth of M. bovis within infected macrophages was detected when they were exposed to cultures containing M. bovis-specific cytotoxic cells. The ability to detect cytotoxic cells after infection of cattle with M. bovis will allow their activity to be measured during vaccination trials. Correlation of cytotoxic activity with disease outcome may aid in the design of new vaccines and vaccination strategies. PMID:14511237

  3. An observational study of Corynebacterium bovis in selected Ontario dairy herds.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, B W; Barnum, D A; Meek, A H

    1983-01-01

    An observational study of Corynebacterium bovis was conducted in 74 Ontario dairy herds. The levels of infection with C. bovis were 19.9, 36.2 and 85.6% at the quarter, cow and herd level, respectively. Teat disinfection was found to be the variable best able to distinguish between herds with a high or low C. bovis quarter infection rate. Mean total milk somatic cell counts for 1103 quarters and 107 cows infected with only C. bovis ranged between 150,000 and 200,000/mL and were significantly higher than for uninfected quarters or cows. The rate of infection with mastitis pathogens was not significantly different in quarters previously colonized with only C. bovis compared to previously uninfected quarters. PMID:6831308

  4. The role of Mycoplasma bovis in bovine respiratory disease outbreaks in veal calf feedlots.

    PubMed

    Arcangioli, Marie-Anne; Duet, Arnaud; Meyer, Gilles; Dernburg, Ann; Bézille, Pierre; Poumarat, François; Le Grand, Dominique

    2008-07-01

    To assess the prevalence and relative importance of Mycoplasma bovis among the pathological agents implicated in bovine respiratory disease (BRD), we surveyed 135 veal calves from nine feedlots in eastern France during naturally occurring outbreaks of respiratory disease. Occurrence of respiratory pathogens, M. bovis, bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) virus, bovine respiratory syncytial (BRS) virus and parainfluenza-3 (PI3) virus was investigated by seroconversion and isolation of bacteria and viruses from broncho-alveolar fluids. M. bovis and pathogenic respiratory bacteria were isolated in eight of the nine feedlots, and from 106 and 32, respectively, of the 135 tested animals. Seroconversion to PI3 virus occurred in four lots. BVD and BRS viruses were detected in eight and one lot, respectively. M. bovis was the most frequently isolated aetiologic agent in these BRD outbreaks, spreading early and widely throughout the affected units (60-100% rate of isolation and seroconversion). These results stress the importance of M. bovis in the BRD complex.

  5. Molecular epidemiological studies of Mycobacterium bovis infections in humans and animals in Sweden.

    PubMed Central

    Szewzyk, R; Svenson, S B; Hoffner, S E; Bölske, G; Wahlström, H; Englund, L; Engvall, A; Källenius, G

    1995-01-01

    Forty-nine isolates of Mycobacterium bovis from humans and animals in Sweden were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns probed by the insertion element IS6110. Most isolates had patterns indicating the presence of only one or two genomic copies of the IS6110 insertion element. This simple type of pattern was found in all human isolates. In contrast, isolates from M. bovis infections in five herds of farmed deer in Sweden showed a specific RFLP pattern with seven bands, indicating seven copies of the IS6110 sequence. In 1958, Sweden was declared free from M. bovis in cattle. However, in 1987, M. bovis was reintroduced with imported farmed deer, and since 1991, 11 outbreaks in deer herds, but not in other livestock or wildlife, have been diagnosed. Continued RFLP studies of the new Swedish M. bovis isolates can reveal possible transmission of this deer strain to other animals or humans. PMID:8586698

  6. Detection of Babesia annae DNA in lung exudate samples from Red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Paul M; Hamilton, Clare; Wilson, Cari; Innes, Elisabeth A; Katzer, Frank

    2016-02-12

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of Babesia species DNA in lung exudate samples collected from red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from across Great Britain. Babesia are small piroplasmid parasites which are mainly transmitted through the bite of infected ticks of the family Ixodidae. Babesia can cause potentially fatal disease in a wide-range of mammalian species including humans, dogs and cattle, making them of significant economic importance to both the medical and veterinary fields. DNA was extracted from lung exudate samples of 316 foxes. A semi-nested PCR was used to initially screen samples, using universal Babesia-Theileria primers which target the 18S rRNA gene. A selection of positive PCR amplicons were purified and sequenced. Subsequently specific primers were designed to detect Babesia annae and used to screen all 316 DNA samples. Randomly selected positive samples were purified and sequenced (GenBank accession KT580786). Clones spanning a 1717 bp region of the 18S rRNA gene were generated from 2 positive samples, the resultant consensus sequence was submitted to GenBank (KT580785). Sequence KT580785 was used in the phylogenetic analysis Babesia annae DNA was detected in the fox samples, in total 46/316 (14.6%) of samples tested positive for the presence of Babesia annae DNA. The central region of England had the highest prevalence at 36.7%, while no positive samples were found from Wales, though only 12 samples were tested from this region. Male foxes were found to have a higher prevalence of Babesia annae DNA than females in all regions of Britain. Phylogenetic and sequence analysis of the GenBank submissions (Accession numbers KT580785 and KT580786) showed 100% identity to Babesia sp.-'Spanish Dog' (AY534602, EU583387 and AF188001). This is the first time that Babesia annae DNA has been reported in red foxes in Great Britain with positive samples being found across England and Scotland indicating that this parasite is well established within the

  7. [Single and combining effects of Calculus Bovis and zolpidem on inhibitive neurotransmitter of rat striatum corpora].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; He, Xinrong; Guo, Mei

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the correlation effects between single or combined administration of Calculus Bovis or zolpidem and changes of inhibitive neurotransmitter in rat striatum corpora. Sampling from rat striatum corpora was carried out through microdialysis. The content of two inhibitive neurotransmitters in rat corpus striatum- glycine (Gly) and gama aminobutyric acid (GABA), was determined by HPLC, which involved pre-column derivation with orthophthaladehyde, reversed-phase gradient elution and fluorescence detection. GABA content of rat striatum corpora in Calculus Bovis group was significantly increased compared with saline group (P < 0.01). GABA content of zolpidem group and Calculus Boris plus zolpidem group were increased largely compared with saline group as well (P < 0.05). GABA content of Calculus Bovis group was higher than combination group (P < 0.05). GABA content of zolpidem group was not significantly different from combination group. Gly content of Calculus Bovis or zolpidem group was markedly increased compared with saline group or combination group (P < 0.05). Contents of two inhibitive neurotransmitters in rat striatum corpora were all significantly increased in Calculus Bovis group, zolpidem group and combination group. The magnitude of increase was lower in combination group than in Calculus Bovis group and Zolpidem group, suggesting that Calculus Bovis promoted encephalon inhibition is more powerful than zolpidem. The increase in two inhibitive neurotransmitters did not show reinforcing effect in combination group, suggesting that Calculus Bovis and zolpidem may compete the same receptors. Therefore, combination of Calculus Bovis containing drugs and zolpidem has no clinical significance. Calculus Bovis shouldn't as an aperture-opening drugs be used for resuscitation therapy.

  8. Detection of Babesia gibsoni and the canine small Babesia 'Spanish isolate' in blood samples obtained from dogs confiscated from dogfighting operations.

    PubMed

    Yeagley, Todd J; Reichard, Mason V; Hempstead, Julie E; Allen, Kelly E; Parsons, Lindsey M; White, Mellanie A; Little, Susan E; Meinkoth, James H

    2009-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of Babesia gibsoni infection in dogs that were confiscated from dogfighting operations. Cross-sectional study. 157 pit bull-type dogs that were confiscated as part of dogfighting prosecution cases in Iowa, Michigan, Mississippi, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Washington and 218 randomly selected animal shelter dogs with no known history of dogfighting. Blood samples collected from confiscated dogs were tested for infection with B gibsoni by use of a nested PCR assay. Samples that yielded positive results underwent DNA sequencing to confirm infection with B gibsoni. Control blood samples collected from 218 randomly selected dogs in animal shelters (ie, dogs that had no known involvement in dogfighting events) were also analyzed. Results of nested PCR assays indicated that 53 of 157 (33.8%) confiscated dogs were infected with B gibsoni; 1 (0.6%) dog was infected with the canine small Babesia 'Spanish isolate' (also known as Theileria annae). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of infection with this small Babesia 'Spanish isolate' in a North American dog. Dogs with scars (indicative of fighting) on the face, head, and forelimbs were 5.5 times as likely to be infected with B gibsoni as were dogs without scars. Of the control dogs, 1 (0.5%) pit bull-type dog was infected with B gibsoni. Results indicated that B gibsoni is a common parasite of dogs confiscated from dogfighting operations and suggested that dogs with a history of fighting should be evaluated for infection with B gibsoni.

  9. Oral vaccination of guinea pigs with a Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccine in a lipid matrix protects against aerosol infection with virulent M. bovis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Simon; Cross, Martin L; Nadian, Allan; Vipond, Julia; Court, Pinar; Williams, Ann; Hewinson, R Glyn; Aldwell, Frank E; Chambers, Mark A

    2008-08-01

    Increased incidence of bovine tuberculosis (TB) in the United Kingdom caused by infection with Mycobacterium bovis is a cause of considerable economic loss to farmers and the government. The Eurasian badger (Meles meles) represents a wildlife source of recurrent M. bovis infections of cattle in the United Kingdom, and its vaccination against TB with M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is an attractive disease control option. Delivery of BCG in oral bait holds the best prospect for vaccinating badgers over a wide geographical area. Using a guinea pig pulmonary challenge model, we evaluated the protective efficacy of candidate badger oral vaccines, based on broth-grown or ball-milled BCG, delivered either as aqueous suspensions or formulated in two lipids with differing fatty acid profiles (one being animal derived and the other being vegetable derived). Protection was determined in terms of increasing body weight after aerosol challenge with virulent M. bovis, reduced dissemination of M. bovis to the spleen, and, in the case of one oral formulation, restricted growth of M. bovis in the lungs. Only oral BCG formulated in lipid gave significant protection. These data point to the potential of the BCG-lipid formulation for further development as a tool for controlling tuberculosis in badgers.

  10. High-resolution melting PCR assay, applicable for diagnostics and screening studies, allowing detection and differentiation of several Babesia spp. infecting humans and animals.

    PubMed

    Rozej-Bielicka, Wioletta; Masny, Aleksander; Golab, Elzbieta

    2017-08-10

    The goal of the study was to design a single tube PCR test for detection and differentiation of Babesia species in DNA samples obtained from diverse biological materials. A multiplex, single tube PCR test was designed for amplification of approximately 400 bp region of the Babesia 18S rRNA gene. Universal primers were designed to match DNA of multiple Babesia spp. and to have low levels of similarity to DNA sequences of other intracellular protozoa and Babesia hosts. The PCR products amplified from Babesia DNA isolated from human, dog, rodent, deer, and tick samples were subjected to high-resolution melting analysis for Babesia species identification. The designed test allowed detection and differentiation of four Babesia species, three zoonotic (B. microti, B. divergens, B. venatorum) and one that is generally not considered zoonotic-Babesia canis. Both detection and identification of all four species were possible based on the HRM curves of the PCR products in samples obtained from the following: humans, dogs, rodents, and ticks. No cross-reactivity with DNA of Babesia hosts or Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii was observed. The lack of cross-reactivity with P. falciparum DNA might allow using the assay in endemic malaria areas. The designed assay is the first PCR-based test for detection and differentiation of several Babesia spp. of medical and veterinary importance, in a single tube reaction. The results of the study show that the designed assay for Babesia detection and identification could be a practical and inexpensive tool for diagnostics and screening studies of diverse biological materials.

  11. Experimental infection of horses with Bartonella henselae and Bartonella bovis.

    PubMed

    Palmero, J; Pusterla, N; Cherry, N A; Kasten, R W; Mapes, S; Boulouis, H J; Breitschwerdt, E B; Chomel, B B

    2012-01-01

    Experimental infection of horses with Bartonella species is not documented. Determine clinical signs, hematologic changes, duration of bacteremia, and pattern of seroconversion in Bartonella henselae or Bartonella bovis-inoculated horses. Twelve (2 groups of 6) randomly selected healthy adult horses seronegative and culture negative for Bartonella spp. Experimental/observational study: Group I: B. henselae or saline control was inoculated intradermally into 4 naïve and 2 sentinel horses, respectively. Group II: same design was followed by means of B. bovis. Daily physical examinations, once weekly CBC, immunofluorescent antibody assay serology, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and twice weekly blood cultures were performed for 6 weeks and at postinoculation day 80 and 139. Bartonella alpha-Proteobacteria growth medium (BAPGM) enrichment blood culture was performed for horses that seroconverted to B. henselae antigens. Transient clinical signs consistent with bartonellosis occurred in some Bartonella-inoculated horses, but hematological alterations did not occur. Three B. henselae-inoculated horses seroconverted, whereas 1 B. bovis-inoculated horse was weakly seropositive. In Group I, B. henselae was amplified and sequenced from BAPGM blood culture as well as a subculture isolate from 1 horse, blood from a 2nd horse, and BAPGM blood culture from a 3rd horse although a subculture isolate was not obtained. All sentinels remained PCR, culture, and serology negative. Detection of Bartonella sp. in blood after experimental inoculation supports bacteremia and seroconversion. Culture with BAPGM may be required to detect Bartonella sp. Although mild clinical signs followed acute infection, no long-term effects were noted for 2 years postinoculation. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. Monocyte- and macrophage-mediated immune reactions against Eimeria bovis.

    PubMed

    Taubert, Anja; Behrendt, Jan Hillern; Sühwold, Anke; Zahner, Horst; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2009-10-14

    Innate immune reactions conducted by macrophages may affect the outcome of primary infections and are crucial for the transition to adaptive immune responses. In bovine coccidiosis little is known on early monocyte/macrophage-mediated responses. We therefore investigated in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo reactions of monocytes and macrophages against Eimeria bovis, one of the most pathogenic Eimeria species in cattle. Macrophages significantly infiltrate the gut mucosa of E. bovis-infected calves, particularly after challenge infection. Furthermore, peripheral monocytes of infected animals, as precursor cells of macrophages, exhibited enhanced ex vivo phagocytic and oxidative burst activities. Enhanced levels of both activities were found early after infection and towards the end of first merogony. In vitro exposure of macrophages to sporozoites led to phagocytosis of the pathogen, whilst monocytes failed to do so. Phagocytosis occurred independently of the viability of the sporozoites, indicating that active invasion by the parasites was negligible. Phagocytosis occurred in the absence of immune serum, but could clearly be enhanced by addition of immune serum, suggesting macrophage-derived antibody-dependent cytotoxicity. Furthermore, co-culture of macrophages with sporozoites and stimulation with merozoite I antigen induced distinct levels of cytokine and chemokine gene transcription. Thus, the transcription of genes encoding for IFN-gamma, IL-12, TNF-alpha, IL-6, CXCL1, CXCL8, CXCL10 and COX-2 was upregulated after sporozoite encounter. In contrast, soluble merozoite I antigen only induced the gene transcription of IL-6 and IL-12 and failed to upregulate IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha gene transcripts. In monocytes, IFN-gamma and CXCL10 were found upregulated, all other immunoregulatory molecules tested were not affected. In summary, our results strongly suggest that macrophage-mediated, innate immune reactions play an important role in the early immune response to E

  13. Inhibition of host cell apoptosis by Eimeria bovis sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Lang, Mirjam; Kann, Michael; Zahner, Horst; Taubert, Anja; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2009-03-09

    Sophisticated evasion strategies of obligate intracellular parasites, in particular prevention of host cell apoptosis, are necessary to ensure successful replication. To study the ability of Eimeria bovis in this regard, in vitro experiments were performed applying bovine foetal gastrointestinal cells (BFGC), bovine umbilical vein endothelial cells (BUVEC) and African green monkey kidney cells (VERO) as host cells. BUVEC and BFGC allow maturation of sporozoites to macromeronts, in VERO cells sporozoites survive for weeks without showing further development. In highly infected BUVEC monolayers, infected cells survived until merozoite release whereas uninfected cells underwent apoptosis. Light microscopy and TUNEL assays performed 3-10 days p.i. showed that, within infected BFGC and VERO cell monolayers, uninfected cells underwent programmed cell death after application of various inducers of apoptosis, whereas infected cells survived. Incidentally, the anti-apoptotic efficacies in infected cells were independent of the drugs and the host cell type. We could not demonstrate significant differences between infected and uninfected cells after colchicin treatment in terms of translation of phosphatidylserines to the host cell surface, caspase 3 activity and cytochrome c release, probably since obtainable infection rates were too low. However, we could show by laser scanning confocal microscopy on single cell levels that the expression of the anti-apoptotic factors cellular Flice inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) and cellular inhibition of apoptosis protein 1 (c-IAP1) were enhanced in E. bovis infected cells after application of colchicin, in the latter case also in non-infected cells directly neighbouring infected ones. Our data show that E. bovis protects its host cell from apoptosis by increasing expression of c-IAP1 and c-FLIP.

  14. Molecular phylogeny of Babesia poelea from brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) from Johnston Atoll, Central Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yabsley, Michael J.; Work, Thierry M.; Rameyer, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationship of avian Babesia with other piroplasms remains unclear, mainly because of a lack of objective criteria such as molecular phylogenetics. In this study, our objective was to sequence the entire 18S, ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2 regions of the rRNA gene and partial ß-tubulin gene of B. poelea, first described from brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) from the central Pacific, and compare them to those of other piroplasms. Phylogenetic analyses of the entire 18S rRNA gene sequence revealed that B. poelea belonged to the clade of piroplasms previously detected in humans, domestic dogs, and wild ungulates in the western United States. The entire ITS-1, 5.8S, ITS-2, and partial ß-tubulin gene sequence shared conserved regions with previously described Babesia and Theileria species. The intron of the ß-tubulin gene was 45 bp. This is the first molecular characterization of an avian piroplasm.

  15. Molecular phylogeny of Babesia poelea from brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) from Johnston Atoll, central Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yabsley, M.J.; Work, T.M.; Rameyer, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationship of avian Babesia with other piroplasms remains unclear, mainly because of a lack of objective criteria such as molecular phylogenetics. In this study, our objective was to sequence the entire 18S, ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2 regions of the rRNA gene and partial ??-tubulin gene of B. poelea, first described from brown boobies (Sula leucogaster) from the central Pacific, and compare them to those of other piroplasms. Phylogenetic analyses of the entire 18S rRNA gene sequence revealed that B. poelea belonged to the clade of piroplasms previously detected in humans, domestic dogs, and wild ungulates in the western United States. The entire ITS-1, 5.8S, ITS-2, and partial ??-tubulin gene sequence shared conserved regions with previously described Babesia and Theileria species. The intron of the ??-tubulin gene was 45 bp. This is the first molecular characterization of an avian piroplasm. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2006.

  16. First report on Babesia vogeli infection in dogs in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Ybañez, Adrian P; Ybañez, Rochelle Haidee D; Talle, MaxFrancis G; Liu, Mingming; Moumouni, Paul Franck Adjou; Xuan, Xuenan

    2017-02-01

    Babesia vogeli is a tick-borne protozoal pathogen that infects erythrocytes. In Southeast Asia, this pathogen has only been reported in Thailand. In this study, nine dogs presented at three different veterinary clinics in Cebu City, Philippines were found positive for B. vogeli. DNA was extracted from blood samples and tested using a PCR for genus Babesia and a PCR specific for B. vogeli (both based on the 18S rRNA gene). Blood smears (triplicate) from each sample were found negative. All positive amplicons were sequenced and were found to be 99.4% identical to registered B. vogeli sequences at Genbank. Phylogenetic analysis revealed monophyletic grouping of Philippine sequences with the registered A. platys Genbank sequences. This is the first report of B. vogeli infection in dogs in the Philippines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular analysis of Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Babesia divergens in red deer (Cervus elaphus) in Western Austria.

    PubMed

    Cézanne, Rita; Mrowietz, Naike; Eigner, Barbara; Duscher, Georg Gerhard; Glawischnig, Walter; Fuehrer, Hans-Peter

    2017-02-01

    Wild ungulates may act as reservoirs of various vector borne pathogens that can infect humans and domestic animals. In the present study, blood samples from 196 red deer (Cervus elaphus) from Western Austria (Vorarlberg, Tyrol and Salzburg) were collected on filter paper and tested for Anaplasmataceae, Piroplasmida, Rickettsia and filarioid helminths using molecular tools. Babesia divergens was detected in ten (5.1%) and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in three (1.5%) of the 196 samples. Filarioid helminths, Rickettsia spp. and Theileria spp. were not detected. These findings indicate that red deer may serve as reservoirs of Babesia divergens and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in Western Austria. Further investigations are needed to assess the presence of these pathogens in ticks in this geographical region, and the significance of these pathogens in both animals and humans.

  18. Spontaneous splenic rupture due to Babesia microti infection: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Usatii, Natalia; Khachatrian, Aelita; Stratidis, John

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the case of spontaneous splenic rupture as a rare complication of infection with Babesia species. We will discuss the symptomatology that this disease could present along with both surgical and non-surgical management approaches. Babesia infection often presents with mild to moderate symptoms, but can rapidly progress to significant injury including splenic rupture. The first case reported in a medical journal was in 2007. Treatment usually involves a two-drug regimen; clindamycin plus quinine, or atovaquone plus azithromycin (as in our patient). If hemodynamic stability is present, a primary non-surgical treatment may be especially beneficial since splenectomy may worsen optimal immunologic function and the infection itself. PMID:26839774

  19. An Effort to Isolate Mycobacterium bovis from Environmental Substrates during Investigations of Bovine Tuberculosis Transmission Sites (Cattle Farms and Wildlife Areas) in Michigan, USA

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Amanda E.; O'Brien, Daniel J.; Winterstein, Scott R.; Kaneene, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Deer movements on cattle farms, wildlife feeding, and livestock management practices in Michigan are thought to create opportunities for indirect transmission of Mycobacterium bovis via environmental substrates. To confirm the presence of viable M. bovis in the environment, substrates were collected from 13 farms with culture-confirmed M. bovis in cattle and 5 sites with high prevalence of M. bovis in free-ranging deer. None of the samples processed for mycobacterial culture were positive for M. bovis. Agent, host, and landscape-level factors decrease the probability of detecting M. bovis in the environment using conventional mycobacterial culture. Molecular techniques that increase the probability of M. bovis detection in environmental substrates should be applied to known sites of M. bovis transmission in Michigan. In the interim, epidemiological investigations informed by experimental studies will be most effective in characterizing M. bovis persistence in the environment and its role in the indirect interspecies transmission of M. bovis. PMID:23738108

  20. [In vitro antibiotic sensitivity of French strains of Mycoplasma bovis].

    PubMed

    Poumarat, F; Martel, J L

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro activity of 15 antibiotics was tested with 30-90 Mycoplasma bovis representative strains of bovine lung pathology in France. The distribution of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) is homogeneous with low values for spectinomycin, lincomycin, tylosin, gentamicin and baytril, intermediate for chloramphenicol and neomycin, high for nalidixic acid, Flumequine and erythromycin. The MIC distribution is heterogeneous with intermediate values for spiramycin and tetracyclines, and high values for streptomycin. For the later antibiotics, the heterogeneity of the susceptibility suggests a mechanism of acquired resistance.

  1. Zoonotic tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Cosivi, O.; Grange, J. M.; Daborn, C. J.; Raviglione, M. C.; Fujikura, T.; Cousins, D.; Robinson, R. A.; Huchzermeyer, H. F.; de Kantor, I.; Meslin, F. X.

    1998-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that human tuberculosis (TB) incidence and deaths for 1990 to 1999 will be 88 million and 30 million, respectively, with most cases in developing countries. Zoonotic TB (caused by Mycobacterium bovis) is present in animals in most developing countries where surveillance and control activities are often inadequate or unavailable; therefore, many epidemiologic and public health aspects of infection remain largely unknown. We review available information on zoonotic TB in developing countries, analyze risk factors that may play a role in the disease, review recent WHO activities, and recommend actions to assess the magnitude of the problem and control the disease in humans and animals. PMID:9452399

  2. Neglected intravascular pathogens, Babesia vulpes and haemotropic Mycoplasma spp. in European red fox (Vulpes vulpes) population.

    PubMed

    Koneval, Martina; Miterpáková, Martina; Hurníková, Zuzana; Blaňarová, Lucia; Víchová, Bronislava

    2017-08-30

    Wild animals, especially canids, are important reservoirs of vector-borne pathogens, that are transmitted by the ticks and other bloodsucking arthropods. In total, 300 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), shot by the hunters in eastern and northern Slovakia, were screened for the presence of vector-borne pathogens by PCR-based methods Blood samples were obtained from nine red foxes and tissue samples originated from 291 animals (the liver tissue samples from 49 foxes and spleen samples from 242 red foxes). Babesia vulpes and haemotropic Mycoplasma species were identified by amplification and sequencing of 18S rRNA and 16S rRNA gene fragments, respectively. Overall, the presence of these pathogens was recorded in 12.3% of screened DNA samples. Altogether 9.7% (29/300) of investigated foxes carried DNA of Babesia spp. In total, 12 out of 29 Babesia spp. PCR - positive amplicons were further sequenced and identified as B. vulpes (41.4%; 12/29), remaining 17 samples are referred as Babesia sp. (58.6%; 17/29). Overall prevalence of B. vulpes reached 4.0% (n=300). Thirteen (4.3%) samples tested positive for distinct Mycoplasma species. To the best of our knowledge, this study brings the first information on B. vulpes infection in red foxes in Slovakia, and the first data on the prevalence and diversity of haemotropic Mycoplasma spp. in European red fox population. Moreover, co-infections with B. vulpes and Mycoplasma spp. were confirmed in 1.7% of tested DNA samples. The relatively high rates of blood pathogen' prevalence and species diversity in wild foxes indicate the role of the fox population in the maintenance of the parasites in sylvatic cycles and strengthen the assumption that foxes play an important role in spreading of infectious microorganisms within and outside the natural foci. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultrastructure of Babesia WA1 (Apicomplexa: Piroplasma) during infection of erythrocytes in a hamster model.

    PubMed

    Braga, W; Venasco, J; Willard, L; Moro, M H

    2006-10-01

    Babesia Washington-1 (WA1) is a newly identified intraerythrocyte infectious agent of human babesiosis in the western United States. The purpose of the present study is to describe the ultrastructural changes in affected erythrocytes during the infectious process in a susceptible animal model, the golden Syrian hamster. Two, 1-mo-old female hamsters were inoculated intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 1.8 x 10(9) Babesia WA1-infected erythrocytes originally isolated from a human case and serially passaged in hamsters. Saphenous vein blood samples (20 microl) were collected at 0, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, and 96 hr postinoculation (PI). Parasitemia was determined at each time interval by quick staining of blood smears showing 0, 2.5, 5, 10, 12.5, 22.5, 70, and almost 100% parasitemic erythrocytes at the corresponding PI time interval, respectively. Animals showed weakness and dehydration 72 hr PI inoculation, and were killed by 96 hr PI. Selected blood samples from 0, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hr were fixed in cacodylate buffer, dehydrated in ethanol gradients, resin embedded, and then thin sectioned and stained with uranyl acetate and lead citrate for transmission electron microscopy or gold-coated for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Shape and surface membrane changes in erythrocytes were demonstrated by SEM and were more evident at 72 and 96 hr PI. Infected erythrocytes underwent changes in shape 24 hr PI, from few protrusions to several perforations, some of them resembling a "swiss cheese" appearance 96 hr PI. Several erythrocytes had irregular surface membranes and Babesia WA1 organisms were seen at different stages of development within erythrocytes, from single trophozoites to several merozoites (young trophozoites), some of them dividing to form typical tetrads. In general, Babesia WAI induced severe morphological changes in the erythrocytes, and these changes were more evident in almost all infected cells 96 hr PI.

  4. Vertical Transmission of Babesia microti in BALB/c Mice: Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Bednarska, Malgorzata; Bajer, Anna; Drozdowska, Anna; Mierzejewska, Ewa J.; Tolkacz, Katarzyna; Welc-Falęciak, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Babesia spp. (Apicomplexa, Piroplasmida) are obligate parasites of many species of mammals, causing a malaria-like infection- babesiosis. Three routes of Babesia infection have been recognized to date. The main route is by a tick bite, the second is via blood transfusion. The third, vertical route of infection is poorly recognized and understood. Our study focused on vertical transmission of B. microti in a well-established mouse model. We assessed the success of this route of infection in BALB/c mice with acute and chronic infections of B. microti. In experimental groups, females were mated on the 1st day of Babesia infection (Group G0); on the 28th day post infection (dpi) in the post- acute phase of the parasite infection (G28); and on the 90th and 150th dpi (G90 and G150 group, respectively), in the chronic phase of the parasite infection. Pups were obtained from 58% of females mated in the post-acute phase (G28) and from 33% of females in groups G90 and G150. Mice mated in the pre-acute phase of infection (G0) did not deliver pups. Congenital B. microti infections were detected by PCR amplification of Babesia 18S rDNA in almost all pups (96%) from the experimental groups G28, G90 and G150. Parasitaemia in the F1 generation was low and varied between 0.01–0.001%. Vertical transmission of B. microti was demonstrated for the first time in BALB/c mice. PMID:26372043

  5. Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia microti, and Borrelia burgdorferi in Ixodes scapularis, Southern Coastal Maine

    PubMed Central

    Caporale, Diane A.; Goldberg, John; Lacombe, Eleanor; Lubelczyk, Charles; Rand, Peter W.; Smith, Robert P.

    2004-01-01

    Ixodes scapularis (deer ticks) from Maine were tested for multiple infections by polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence. In 1995, 29.5%, 9.5%, and 1.9% of deer ticks were infected with Borrelia burgdorferi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Babesia microti, respectively. In 1996 and 1997, the number of A. phagocytophilum-infected ticks markedly declined. In 1995 through 1996, 4 (1.3%) of 301 were co-infected. PMID:15200875

  6. Prevalence and molecular heterogeneity of Bartonella bovis in cattle and Haemaphysalis bispinosa ticks in Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Kho, Kai-Ling; Koh, Fui-Xian; Jaafar, Tariq; Nizam, Quaza Nizamuddin Hassan; Tay, Sun-Tee

    2015-07-16

    Bartonellosis is an emerging zoonotic infection responsible for a variety of clinical syndromes in humans and animals. Members of the genus Bartonella exhibit high degrees of genetic diversity and ecologic plasticity. The infection is usually transmitted to animals and humans through blood-feeding arthropod vectors such as fleas, lice, ticks and sandflies. This study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of Bartonella species in 184 beef cattle, 40 dairy cattle, 40 sheep and 40 goats in eight animal farms across Peninsular Malaysia. Bartonella-specific PCR assays and sequence analysis of partial fragments of the citrate synthase gene were used for detection and identification of B. bovis. Isolation of B. bovis was attempted from PCR-positive blood samples. Molecular heterogeneity of the isolates was investigated based on sequence analysis of gltA, ITS, rpoB genes, ERIC-PCR, as well as using an established multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method. The carriage rate of B. bovis in ticks was also determined in this study. B. bovis was detected using Bartonella gltA-PCR assays from ten (4.5 %) of 224 cattle blood samples, of which three (1.3 %) were from beef cattle and seven (3.1 %) were from dairy cattle. None of the blood samples from the sheep and goats understudied were positive for B. bovis. Haemaphysalis bispinosa and Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus were the predominant tick species identified in this study. B. bovis was detected from eight of 200 H. bispinosa ticks and none from the R. microplus ticks. Isolation of B. bovis was successful from all PCR-positive cattle blood samples, except one. Strain differentiation of B. bovis isolates was attempted based on sequence analysis of gltA, ITS, rpoB, and ERIC-PCR assay. B. bovis isolates were differentiated into six genotypes using the approach. The genetic heterogeneity of the isolates was confirmed using MLST method. Of the six MLST sequence types identified, five were designated new sequence types (ST

  7. Detection of Babesia vogeli in stray cats of metropolitan Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Simking, Patcharathorn; Wongnakphet, Sirichai; Stich, Roger W; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn

    2010-10-11

    The combination of a rapidly growing stray animal population and the lack of animal control in Bangkok has resulted in a unique opportunity to evaluate the potential role of companion animals as sentinels and reservoirs of infectious diseases, including several of those caused by vector-borne parasites. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with the distribution of Babesia species infections among stray cats in Bangkok. Blood samples were collected from 1490 stray cats residing in 140 monasteries of 50 metropolitan districts of Bangkok, and assayed with light microscopy and PCR for evidence of Babesia spp. Pear-shaped merozoites were observed microscopically from two (0.13%) of these cats, while a nested 18S rDNA-based PCR assay detected babesial infections in 21 (1.4%) of the cats tested. The prevalence of infection was significantly different between sexes (p<0.05), and PCR-positive cats were found in 30% (15/50) of the districts surveyed. All 21 amplicon sequences were identical, and were determined to be closest to that reported for B. vogeli (98% identity). These results represent the first molecular confirmation that a Babesia sp. is enzootic among stray cat populations in Thailand, and suggest that the presence of pet companion animals could be a risk factor for exposure of stray cats to vector-borne parasites.

  8. A Cysteine Protease Is Critical for Babesia spp. Transmission in Haemaphysalis Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Naotoshi; Miyoshi, Takeharu; Battsetseg, Badger; Matsuo, Tomohide; Xuan, Xuenan; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2008-01-01

    Vector ticks possess a unique system that enables them to digest large amounts of host blood and to transmit various animal and human pathogens, suggesting the existence of evolutionally acquired proteolytic mechanisms. We report here the molecular and reverse genetic characterization of a multifunctional cysteine protease, longipain, from the babesial parasite vector tick Haemaphysalis longicornis. Longipain shares structural similarity with papain-family cysteine proteases obtained from invertebrates and vertebrates. Endogenous longipain was mainly expressed in the midgut epithelium and was specifically localized at lysosomal vacuoles and possibly released into the lumen. Its expression was up-regulated by host blood feeding. Enzymatic functional assays using in vitro and in vivo substrates revealed that longipain hydrolysis occurs over a broad range of pH and temperature. Haemoparasiticidal assays showed that longipain dose-dependently killed tick-borne Babesia parasites, and its babesiacidal effect occurred via specific adherence to the parasite membranes. Disruption of endogenous longipain by RNA interference revealed that longipain is involved in the digestion of the host blood meal. In addition, the knockdown ticks contained an increased number of parasites, suggesting that longipain exerts a killing effect against the midgut-stage Babesia parasites in ticks. Our results suggest that longipain is essential for tick survival, and may have a role in controlling the transmission of tick-transmittable Babesia parasites. PMID:18483546

  9. Identification and Characterization of the RouenBd1987 Babesia divergens Rhopty-Associated Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Marilis; Alhassan, Andy; Ord, Rosalynn L.; Cursino-Santos, Jeny R.; Singh, Manpreet; Gray, Jeremy; Lobo, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    Human babesiosis is caused by one of several babesial species transmitted by ixodid ticks that have distinct geographical distributions based on the presence of competent animal hosts. The pathology of babesiosis, like malaria, is a consequence of the parasitaemia which develops through the cyclical replication of Babesia parasites in a patient's red blood cells, though symptoms typically are nonspecific. We have identified the gene encoding Rhoptry-Associated Protein −1 (RAP-1) from a human isolate of B. divergens, Rouen1987 and characterized its protein product at the molecular and cellular level. Consistent with other Babesia RAP-1 homologues, BdRAP-1 is expressed as a 46 kDa protein in the parasite rhoptries, suggesting a possible role in red cell invasion. Native BdRAP-1 binds to an unidentified red cell receptor(s) that appears to be non-sialylated and non-proteinacious in nature, but we do not find significant reduction in growth with anti-rRAP1 antibodies in vitro, highlighting the possibility the B. divergens is able to use alternative pathways for invasion, or there is an alternative, complementary, role for BdRAP-1 during the invasion process. As it is the parasite's ability to recognize and then invade host cells which is central to clinical disease, characterising and understanding the role of Babesia-derived proteins involved in these steps are of great interest for the development of an effective prophylaxis. PMID:25226276

  10. Prevalence of Babesia microti-like infection in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from Portugal.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, L; Cortes, H C E; Reis, A; Rodrigues, P; Simões, M; Lopes, A P; Vila-Viçosa, M J; Talmi-Frank, D; Eyal, O; Solano-Gallego, L; Baneth, G

    2013-09-01

    The prevalence of piroplasm (order Piroplasmida) infection was assessed in blood and bone marrow samples from 91 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) from northern, central and southern Portugal by means of molecular methods. PCR for the 18S rRNA gene of Babesia spp. followed by sequencing revealed 63 foxes positive for the Babesia microti-like piroplasm (syn. Theileria annae) (69.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 58.7-78.5%) and one fox positive for Babesia canis (1.1%; 95% CI: 0.0-6.0%). Positivity to the B. microti-like piroplasm or B. canis in 43 blood samples (83.7%) was significantly higher (p<0.001) than in 43 paired bone marrow samples (20.9%). There were no statistically significant differences in the prevalence of infection between genders (p=0.219) or age groups (<2 years vs. ≥ 2 years) (p=1.0). This is the first report of the B. microti-like piroplasm in foxes from Portugal as well as the first report on detection by PCR and genotyping of B. canis in a red fox worldwide. A natural cycle of the B. microti-like piroplasm is suggested in red fox populations based on the high prevalence of the protozoan. Red foxes might be a reservoir of the B. microti-like piroplasm and a source of infection to dogs.

  11. Proteomic profile of culture filtrate from the Brazilian vaccine strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG Moreau compared to M. bovis BCG Pasteur

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is currently the only available vaccine against tuberculosis (TB) and comprises a heterogeneous family of sub-strains with genotypic and phenotypic differences. The World Health Organization (WHO) affirms that the characterization of BCG sub-strains, both on genomic and proteomic levels, is crucial for a better comprehension of the vaccine. In addition, these studies can contribute in the development of a more efficient vaccine against TB. Here, we combine two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) and mass spectrometry to analyse the proteomic profile of culture filtrate proteins (CFPs) from M. bovis BCG Moreau, the Brazilian vaccine strain, comparing it to that of BCG Pasteur. CFPs are considered of great importance given their dominant immunogenicity and role in pathogenesis, being available for interaction with host cells since early infection. Results The 2DE proteomic map of M. bovis BCG Moreau CFPs in the pH range 3 - 8 allowed the identification of 158 spots corresponding to 101 different proteins, identified by MS/MS. Comparison to BCG Pasteur highlights the great similarity between these BCG strains. However, quantitative analysis shows a higher expression of immunogenic proteins such as Rv1860 (BCG1896, Apa), Rv1926c (BCG1965c, Mpb63) and Rv1886c (BCG1923c, Ag85B) in BCG Moreau when compared to BCG Pasteur, while some heat shock proteins, such as Rv0440 (BCG0479, GroEL2) and Rv0350 (BCG0389, DnaK), show the opposite pattern. Conclusions Here we report the detailed 2DE profile of CFPs from M. bovis BCG Moreau and its comparison to BCG Pasteur, identifying differences that may provide relevant information on vaccine efficacy. These findings contribute to the detailed characterization of the Brazilian vaccine strain against TB, revealing aspects that may lead to a better understanding of the factors leading to BCG's variable protective efficacy against TB. PMID:21507239

  12. Transmission of Babesia caballi by Dermacentor nitens (Acari: Ixodidae) Is Restricted to One Generation in the Absense of Alimentary Reinfection on a Susceptible Equine Host

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The tropical horse tick, Dermacentor nitens, is the natural vector of Babesia caballi in the Americas; the distribution of this tick in the United States is limited to the southernmost parts of Florida and Texas. Babesia caballi, one of the etiologic agents of equine babesiosis, occurs widely throug...

  13. African 2, a Clonal Complex of Mycobacterium bovis Epidemiologically Important in East Africa▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Stefan; Garcia-Pelayo, M. Carmen; Müller, Borna; Hailu, Elena; Asiimwe, Benon; Kremer, Kristin; Dale, James; Boniotti, M. Beatrice; Rodriguez, Sabrina; Hilty, Markus; Rigouts, Leen; Firdessa, Rebuma; Machado, Adelina; Mucavele, Custodia; Ngandolo, Bongo Nare Richard; Bruchfeld, Judith; Boschiroli, Laura; Müller, Annélle; Sahraoui, Naima; Pacciarini, Maria; Cadmus, Simeon; Joloba, Moses; van Soolingen, Dick; Michel, Anita L.; Djønne, Berit; Aranaz, Alicia; Zinsstag, Jakob; van Helden, Paul; Portaels, Françoise; Kazwala, Rudovick; Källenius, Gunilla; Hewinson, R. Glyn; Aseffa, Abraham; Gordon, Stephen V.; Smith, Noel H.

    2011-01-01

    We have identified a clonal complex of Mycobacterium bovis isolated at high frequency from cattle in Uganda, Burundi, Tanzania, and Ethiopia. We have named this related group of M. bovis strains the African 2 (Af2) clonal complex of M. bovis. Af2 strains are defined by a specific chromosomal deletion (RDAf2) and can be identified by the absence of spacers 3 to 7 in their spoligotype patterns. Deletion analysis of M. bovis isolates from Algeria, Mali, Chad, Nigeria, Cameroon, South Africa, and Mozambique did not identify any strains of the Af2 clonal complex, suggesting that this clonal complex of M. bovis is localized in East Africa. The specific spoligotype pattern of the Af2 clonal complex was rarely identified among isolates from outside Africa, and the few isolates that were found and tested were intact at the RDAf2 locus. We conclude that the Af2 clonal complex is localized to cattle in East Africa. We found that strains of the Af2 clonal complex of M. bovis have, in general, four or more copies of the insertion sequence IS6110, in contrast to the majority of M. bovis strains isolated from cattle, which are thought to carry only one or a few copies. PMID:21097608

  14. In vitro gene expression profile of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells in early Mycobacterium bovis infection

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, YAFEN; CHOU, CHUNG-HSI; TSAI, HSIANG-JUNG

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) causes tuberculosis in cattle and humans. Understanding the interactions between M. bovis and host cells is essential in developing tools for the prevention, detection, and treatment of M. bovis infection. Gene expression profiles provide a large amount of information regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying these interactions. The present study analyzed changes in gene expression in bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) at 0, 4 and 24 h following exposure to M. bovis. Using bovine whole-genome microarrays, a total of 420 genes were identified that exhibited significant alterations in expression (≥2-fold). Significantly enriched genes were identified using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database, of which the highest differentially expressed genes were associated with the immune system, signal transduction, endocytosis, cellular transport, inflammation, and apoptosis. Of the genes associated with the immune system, 84.85% displayed downregulation. These findings support the view that M. bovis inhibits signaling pathways of antimycobacterial host defense in bovine PBMCs. These in vitro data demonstrated that molecular alterations underlying the pathogenesis of tuberculosis begin early, during the initial 24 h following M. bovis infection. PMID:26668602

  15. Social group size affects Mycobacterium bovis infection in European badgers (Meles meles).

    PubMed

    Woodroffe, Rosie; Donnelly, Christl A; Wei, Gao; Cox, D R; Bourne, F John; Burke, Terry; Butlin, Roger K; Cheeseman, C L; Gettinby, George; Gilks, Peter; Hedges, Simon; Jenkins, Helen E; Johnston, W Thomas; McInerney, John P; Morrison, W Ivan; Pope, Lisa C

    2009-07-01

    1. In most social animals, the prevalence of directly transmitted pathogens increases in larger groups and at higher population densities. Such patterns are predicted by models of Mycobacterium bovis infection in European badgers (Meles meles). 2. We investigated the relationship between badger abundance and M. bovis prevalence, using data on 2696 adult badgers in 10 populations sampled at the start of the Randomized Badger Culling Trial. 3. M. bovis prevalence was consistently higher at low badger densities and in small social groups. M. bovis prevalence was also higher among badgers whose genetic profiles suggested that they had immigrated into their assigned social groups. 4. The association between high M. bovis prevalence and small badger group size appeared not to have been caused by previous small-scale culling in study areas, which had been suspended, on average, 5 years before the start of the current study. 5. The observed pattern of prevalence might occur through badgers in smaller groups interacting more frequently with members of neighbouring groups; detailed behavioural data are needed to test this hypothesis. Likewise, longitudinal data are needed to determine whether the size of infected groups might be suppressed by disease-related mortality. 6. Although M. bovis prevalence was lower at high population densities, the absolute number of infected badgers was higher. However, this does not necessarily mean that the risk of M. bovis transmission to cattle is highest at high badger densities, since transmission risk depends on badger behaviour as well as on badger density.

  16. Spatial relationship between Mycobacterium bovis strains in cattle and badgers in four areas in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Olea-Popelka, F J; Flynn, O; Costello, E; McGrath, G; Collins, J D; O'keeffe, J; Kelton, D F; Berke, O; Martin, S W

    2005-09-30

    We investigated whether strains (restriction fragment length polymorphism, RFLP-types) of Mycobacterium bovis isolated from badgers and from cattle clustered among and within four areas in Ireland. The spatial scan test and nearest-neighbor analysis were used as the spatial cluster-detection techniques. In addition, for each of the major strains, associations between the distance to badger setts and the "centroid" of the cattle farm were assessed in a logistic model. Overall, between September 1997 and May 2000, 316 and 287 M. bovis samples, from badgers and cattle, respectively, were strain-typed. The distribution of strains in badgers, and separately in cattle, differed among areas. Within each of the four large areas, badgers and cattle tended to have similar strains; this is consistent with the sharing of M. bovis strains within an area. In more detailed within-area analyses, some spatial clusters of M. bovis strains were detected, separately, in both cattle and badgers. Almost half of the infected badger setts with a specific strain were located outside of the "detected" clusters. There was no association between the number of infected badgers with a specific M. bovis strain within 2 or 5 km distances to cattle herds, and the risk of the same strain in cattle. We speculate about the dynamic nature of badger movements, as an explanation for the absence of more clusters of most of the strains of M. bovis isolated from badgers, and its impact on trying to study transmission of M. bovis between cattle and badger.

  17. Procedure for Horizontal Transfer of Patient-Derived Xenograft Tumors to Eliminate Corynebacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Christopher; Bagby, Stacey; Reisinger, Julie; Pugazhenthi, Umarani; Pitts, Todd; Keysar, Stephen; Arcaroli, John; Leszczynski, Jori

    2017-02-16

    Human patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumors, propagated in immunodeficient mice, are rapidly growing in use as amodelfor cancer research. Horizontal transfer between mice, without in vitro cell culture, allows these tumors to retainmany of their unique characteristics from their individual patient of origin. However, the immunodeficient mouse strainsused to grow these tumors are susceptible to numerous opportunistic pathogens, including Corynebacterium bovis. At ourinstitution, 2 in vivo tumor banks of PDX tumors had been maintained within nude mouse colonies enzootically infectedwith C. bovis. Elimination of C. bovis from these colonies required the aseptic harvest and horizontal transfer of tumor tissue between infected and naïve recipient mice without cross-contamination. Out of necessity, we developed a standard operating procedure using enhancements to traditional aseptic surgical technique with concurrent application of both procedural and physical barriers to prevent C. bovis transmission. By using these methods, all 61 unique PDX tumor models were successfullyharvested from C. bovis-infected mice and transferred into recipient mice without transmission of infection. Our datademonstrate that, in situations where C. bovis-free colonies can be established and maintained, this procedure can successfullybe used to eliminate C. bovis from an in vivo tumor bank of valuable PDX tumors.

  18. Procedure for Horizontal Transfer of Patient-Derived Xenograft Tumors to Eliminate Corynebacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Christopher A; Bagby, Stacey M; Reisinger, Julie A; Pugazhenthi, Umarani; Pitts, Todd M; Keysar, Stephen B; Arcaroli, John J; Leszczynski, Jori K

    2017-03-01

    Human patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumors, propagated in immunodeficient mice, are rapidly growing in use as a model for cancer research. Horizontal transfer between mice, without in vitro cell culture, allows these tumors to retain many of their unique characteristics from their individual patient of origin. However, the immunodeficient mouse strains used to grow these tumors are susceptible to numerous opportunistic pathogens, including Corynebacterium bovis. At our institution, 2 in vivo tumor banks of PDX tumors had been maintained within nude mouse colonies enzootically infected with C. bovis. Elimination of C. bovis from these colonies required the aseptic harvest and horizontal transfer of tumor tissue between infected and naïve recipient mice without cross-contamination. Out of necessity, we developed a standard operating procedure using enhancements to traditional aseptic surgical technique with concurrent application of both procedural and physical barriers to prevent C. bovis transmission. By using these methods, all 61 unique PDX tumor models were successfully harvested from C. bovis-infected mice and transferred into recipient mice without transmission of infection. Our data demonstrate that, in situations where C. bovis-free colonies can be established and maintained, this procedure can successfully be used to eliminate C. bovis from an in vivo tumor bank of valuable PDX tumors.

  19. Critical analysis of vector-borne infections in dogs: Babesia vogeli, Babesia gibsoni, Ehrlichia canis and Hepatozoon canis in Punjab, India.

    PubMed

    Singla, Lachhman Das; Sumbria, Deepak; Mandhotra, Ajay; Bal, M S; Kaur, Paramjit

    2016-12-01

    There are few published studies on various vector borne diseases of dogs in India and most depict clinical infection in dogs, diagnosed by observation of the haemopathogens in stained blood smears. This study provides the first report regarding molecular confirmation and ancestral relationship analysis of blood smears positive cases of assorted haemopathogens in Punjab province of India. On blood smear examination, haemopathogens were observed in 124 out of 778 (15.95%, 95% CI: 13.53- 18.68) blood smears. Further polymerase chain reactions (PCR) was used on bloods smear positive cases to validate the results. Out of 778 blood samples, Babesia gibsoni was most common parasite infecting dogs (15.04%, 95% CI: 12.7-17.72), followed by Ehrlichia canis (0.39%, 95% CI: 0.0-1.13), infection of Babesia vogeli and Hepatozoon canis was same (0.26%, 95% CI: 0.0-0.9). Among various risk factors studied (age, sex, season), prevalence of infection was non-significantly higher in 1-2 year of age group (19.88%, 95% CI: 14.45-26.71), regarding sex same prevalence was recorded (15.94%), and chances of infection was highest in pre-monsoon i.e. summer (18.26%, 95% CI: 14.49-22.76). Phylogenetic analysis revealed ancestral background of Ludhiana isolates of B. vogeli, B. gibsoni, H. canis, and E. canis with the isolates of Philippines, Mongolia and Tunisia.

  20. Genetic relatedness among Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. bovis.

    PubMed

    Labidi, A; Thoen, C O

    1989-01-01

    Total DNA from two slowly-growing pathogenic mycobacterial species propagated in vitro was isolated, digested with each of 34 restriction endonucleases and analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The most resolved patterns for M. tuberculosis (ATCC 27294) and for M. bovis (ATCC 19210) were obtained respectively using (BamHI, DraI, ClaI, EcoRI, EcoRV, HindIII, HpaI, SalI, SmaI, XbaI and XmaI). The patterns produced for these strains were reproducible and distinguishable from each other respectively using (HindIII, DraI, EcoRI, MboI, Sau3AI and AvaI). However, with several enzymes (SalI, AsuI, Sau96I, MspI and HpaII) the patterns for M. tuberculosis and M. bovis were similar. Evidence was obtained for the presence of dam and dcmI methylations in the DNA of each mycobacterial species respectively using (MboI, Sau3AI, EcoRII, BstNI, Sau96I and AsuI).

  1. The cell-bound α-amylases of Streptococcus bovis

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Gwen J.

    1965-01-01

    1. The cell-bound α-amylase of Streptococcus bovis has been isolated from other carbohydrases in the cell extract by chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. The enzyme has been compared with the extracellular α-amylase produced by this organism. 2. The two amylases had similar action patterns on amylose, the main product being maltotriose with smaller amounts of maltose and a little glucose. 3. The cell-bound amylase hydrolysed maltopentaose and maltohexaose at a similar rate to the hydrolysis of amylose. Maltotetraose was hydrolysed six times more slowly, and maltotriose 280 times more slowly, than amylose. 4. Studies with end-labelled maltodextrins revealed that the cell-bound α-amylase preferentially hydrolysed the third linkage from the non-reducing end, liberating maltotriose. The linkage at the reducing end of maltotriose was more easily hydrolysed than the other. 5. Egg-white lysozyme and the extracellular enzymes of Streptomyces albus lysed the cell walls of Streptococcus bovis, releasing amylase into the medium. In the presence of 0·6 m-sucrose 10% of the maximal amylase activity was released by lysozyme. Suspension of the spheroplasts in dilute buffer caused the rupture of the cytoplasmic membrane and the liberation of amylase. 6. A sensitive method for determining the ability of amylases to degrade starch granules is described. PMID:14346085

  2. Alternative activation modifies macrophage resistance to Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Velázquez, Uziel; Aranday-Cortés, Elihú; Gutiérrez-Pabello, José A

    2011-07-05

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of macrophage alternative activation in the intracellular pathogen natural disease resistance phenotype of the host. Macrophage monolayers from resistant (R) (3) or susceptible (S) (3) cattle donors were treated with 10 ng/ml of bovine recombinant IL-4 (rbIL-4), and infected with virulent and avirulent Mycobacterium bovis (MOI 10:1). Bactericidal assays were performed to assess the bacterial phagocytic index and intracellular survival. Total RNA was reverse transcribed and used to analyze the relative changes in gene expression of IL-10, IL-12, IL-18 IL-1β, TNF-α, MCP-1, MCP-2, IL-6, MIP-1, MIP-3, iNOS, ARGII and SLAM by real time PCR. Cell supernatants were collected and nitric oxide and arginase production was assessed. Apoptosis induction was measured by TUNEL. IL-4 treatment increased the phagocytic index in both R and S macrophages; however intracellular survival was augmented mainly in S macrophages. Alternative activation decreased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide production and DNA fragmentation mainly in R macrophages. On the other hand, arginase production was not different between R and S macrophages. Alternative activation modifies the macrophage response against M. bovis. IL-4 treatment minimized the functional differences that exist between R and S macrophages. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Surveillance of a Ventilated Rack System for Corynebacterium bovis by Sampling Exhaust-Air Manifolds

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Christopher A; Pugazhenthi, Umarani; Leszczynski, Jori K

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium bovis causes an opportunistic infection of nude (Foxn1, nu/nu) mice, leading to nude mouse hyperkeratotic dermatitis (scaly skin disease). Enzootic in many nude mouse colonies, C. bovis spreads rapidly to naive nude mice, despite modern husbandry practices, and is very difficult to eradicate. To facilitate rapid detection in support of eradication efforts, we investigated a surveillance method based on quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) evaluation of swabs collected from the horizontal exhaust manifold (HEM) of an IVC rack system. We first evaluated the efficacy of rack sanitation methods for removing C. bovis DNA from the HEM of racks housing endemic colonies of infected nude mice. Pressurized water used to flush the racks’ air exhaust system followed by a standard rack-washer cycle was ineffective in eliminating C. bovis DNA. Only after autoclaving did all sanitized racks test negative for C. bovis DNA. We then measured the effects of stage of infection (early or established), cage density, and cage location on the rack on time-to-detection at the HEM. Stage of infection significantly affected time-to-detection, independent of cage location. Early infections required 7.3 ± 1.2 d whereas established infections required 1 ± 0 d for detection of C. bovis at the HEM. Cage density influenced the quantity of C. bovis DNA detected but not time-to-detection. The location of the cage on the rack affected the time-to-detection only during early C. bovis infections. We suggest that qPCR swabs of HEM are useful during the routine surveillance of nude mouse colonies for C. bovis infection. PMID:26817981

  4. Iron modulates the replication of virulent Mycobacterium bovis in resting and activated bovine and possum macrophages.

    PubMed

    Denis, Michel; Buddle, Bryce M

    2005-09-15

    Bovine and possum macrophages were infected in vitro with a virulent strain of Mycobacterium bovis, and mycobacterial replication was measured in the infected macrophages cultured under a variety of conditions. Virulent M. bovis replicated substantially in alveolar possum macrophages as well as in bovine blood monocyte-derived macrophages. Addition of recombinant bovine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) with low concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) rendered bovine macrophages significantly more resistant to M. bovis replication. Disruption of iron levels in infected macrophages by addition of apotransferrin or bovine lactoferrin blocked replication of M. bovis in both bovine and possum macrophages. On the other hand, addition of exogenous iron, either in the form of iron citrate or iron-saturated transferrin, rendered macrophages of both species much more permissive for the replication of M. bovis. The impact of iron deprivation/loading on the mycobacteriostatic activity of cells was independent of nitric-oxide release, as well as independent of the generation of oxygen radical species in both possum and bovine macrophages. Exogenous iron was shown to reverse the ability of IFN-gamma/LPS pulsed bovine macrophages to restrict M. bovis replication. When autologous possum lymphocytes from animals vaccinated with M. bovis strain BCG were added to infected macrophages, they rendered the macrophages less permissive for virulent M. bovis replication. Loading the cells with iron prior to this macrophage-lymphocyte interaction, reversed this immune effect induced by sensitized cells. We conclude that, in two important animal species, intracellular iron level plays an important role in M. bovis replication in macrophages, irrespective of their activation status.

  5. Surveillance of a Ventilated Rack System for Corynebacterium bovis by Sampling Exhaust-Air Manifolds.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Christopher A; Pugazhenthi, Umarani; Leszczynski, Jori K

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium bovis causes an opportunistic infection of nude (Foxn1, nu/nu) mice, leading to nude mouse hyperkeratotic dermatitis (scaly skin disease). Enzootic in many nude mouse colonies, C. bovis spreads rapidly to naive nude mice, despite modern husbandry practices, and is very difficult to eradicate. To facilitate rapid detection in support of eradication efforts, we investigated a surveillance method based on quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) evaluation of swabs collected from the horizontal exhaust manifold (HEM) of an IVC rack system. We first evaluated the efficacy of rack sanitation methods for removing C. bovis DNA from the HEM of racks housing endemic colonies of infected nude mice. Pressurized water used to flush the racks' air exhaust system followed by a standard rack-washer cycle was ineffective in eliminating C. bovis DNA. Only after autoclaving did all sanitized racks test negative for C. bovis DNA. We then measured the effects of stage of infection (early or established), cage density, and cage location on the rack on time-to-detection at the HEM. Stage of infection significantly affected time-to-detection, independent of cage location. Early infections required 7.3 ± 1.2 d whereas established infections required 1 ± 0 d for detection of C. bovis at the HEM. Cage density influenced the quantity of C. bovis DNA detected but not time-to-detection. The location of the cage on the rack affected the time-to-detection only during early C. bovis infections. We suggest that qPCR swabs of HEM are useful during the routine surveillance of nude mouse colonies for C. bovis infection.

  6. Rangelia vitalii, Babesia spp. and Ehrlichia spp. in dogs in Passo Fundo, state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Juliana; André, Marcos Rogério; Soares, João Fábio; Gonçalves, Luiz Ricardo; Tonial de Oliveira, Mateus; Costa, Marcio Machado; Labruna, Marcelo Bahia; Bortolini, Carlos Eduardo; Machado, Rosangela Zacarias; Vieira, Maria Isabel Botelho

    2016-06-14

    Pathogens transmitted by ticks are an emerging problem worldwide, this study aimed to diagnose the causal agents of infection in dogs presenting suspected hemoparasitoses. Fifty-eight dogs with clinical signs such as depression, hemorrhagic diathesis and fever were evaluated regarding clinical presentation, hemogram, blood smears and serological tests, using the indirect immunofluorescence method for the agents Babesia vogeli and Ehrlichia canis and conventional PCR for Babesia spp. (gene 18S rRNA), Rangelia vitalii (gene 18S rRNA) and Ehrlichia spp. (gene dsb). Five (8.6%) of the 58 dogs were serologically positive for Babesia spp. and three (5.1%) for E. canis. Four dogs (6.8%) were positive for R. vitalii through the molecular diagnosis. The PCR products were sequenced and the DNA from R. vitalii was found to be 99% genetically identical to samples of R. vitalii that had been isolated in Brazil. No presence of Babesia spp. or E. canis was observed through PCR on the dogs evaluated here. The results indicate the presence of R. vitalii and exposure to Babesia spp. and Ehrlichia spp. among the dogs analyzed.

  7. Immune responses to Mycoplasma bovis vaccination and experimental infection in the bovine mammary gland.

    PubMed Central

    Boothby, J T; Schore, C E; Jasper, D E; Osburn, B I; Thomas, C B

    1988-01-01

    This study characterized the immune responses in four vaccinated and four control cows in response to vaccination and experimental intramammary inoculation with Mycoplasma bovis. Specific antibody responses occurred in serum and milk in response to vaccination and experimental infection. Lymphocytes from peripheral blood, but not from the mammary gland of vaccinated cows had increased responsiveness to mitogens. No lymphocytes tested were responsive to M. bovis antigen. Both vaccination and experimental infection resulted in skin test reactivity. These results imply that vaccination results in immune responses which may alter the course of experimental M. bovis mastitis, but may contribute to cellular inflammation. PMID:3167718

  8. Nasal prevalence of Mycoplasma bovis and IHA titers in young dairy animals.

    PubMed

    Bennett, R H; Jasper, D E

    1977-07-01

    Serologic and cultural observations were made in three herds with and three herds without histories of mycoplasma mastitis. Nasal swabs and sera were collected from dairy animals of various ages over an eight month peiod. The overall prevalence of Myocopalsma bovis in the nares was 34% in diseased herds and 6% in the non-diseased herds without mastitis. Mycoplasma bovis was isolated in the highest prevalence in those young animals fed infected milk. Slight serologic differences were seen in these animals. Nasal prevalence of M. bovis was low but readily detectable in non diseased herds as well as in prepartum heifers in the diseased herds with mycoplasma mastitis.

  9. Detection of Corynebacterium bovis infection in athymic nude mice from a research animal facility in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hyoun; Kim, Dong-Su; Han, Ju-Hee; Chang, Seo-Na; Kim, Kyung-Sul; Seok, Seung-Hyeok; Kim, Dong-Jae; Park, Jong-Hwan; Park, Jae-Hak

    2014-12-01

    Corynebacterium (C.) bovis infection in nude mice causes hyperkeratosis and weight loss and has been reported worldwide but not in Korea. In 2011, nude mice from an animal facility in Korea were found to have white flakes on their dorsal skin. Histopathological testing revealed that the mice had hyperkeratosis and Gram-positive bacteria were found in the skin. We identified isolated bacteria from the skin lesions as C. bovis using PCR and 16S rRNA sequencing. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of C. bovis infection in nude mice from Korea.

  10. Optimization of modified Middlebrook 7H11 agar for isolation of Mycobacterium bovis from raw milk cheese.

    PubMed

    Forgrave, R; Donaghy, J A; Fisher, A; Rowe, M T

    2014-10-01

    Reports have highlighted the absence of contemporary peer reviewed publications pertaining to Mycobacterium bovis culture from raw milk and cheese. By replicating traditional methods, cheese-making methodology and equipment were devised to produce Cheddar (n = 6) and Caerphilly (n = 3) artificially contaminated with M. bovis (three genotypes) under stringent laboratory-containment guidelines for handling hazardous microbiological material. Middlebrook 7H11, modified for M. bovis isolation, was assessed for capacity to enumerate M. bovis despite changing cheese microflora and prolonged M. bovis exposure to the cheese matrix using maturing cheese test portions (n = 63; up to 16 weeks). Malachite green (MG) containing media isolated M. bovis at significantly (P < 0·05) lower levels than unmodified Middlebrook 7H11 agar despite MG being a common adjunct of Middlebrook 7H11 agar modified for M. bovis growth. Subsequently, a selective MG-free Middlebrook 7H11 agar modified using haemolysed red cells and calf serum was demonstrated as the best performing (P < 0·05) medium for recovery of M. bovis from typical UK cheese types, Cheddar and Caerphilly. Significance and impact of the study: Following increased M. bovis infection of UK cattle, the risk posed to consumers from consumption of unpasteurized milk and dairy products has changed. Furthermore, published methods for the culture and molecular detection of M. bovis in raw milk products are limited. Cheese-making protocols and M. bovis culture media reported here provide tools for further investigation of M. bovis survival during all stages of cheese manufacture and could inform future assessment of the risk to consumers from M. bovis contamination of unpasteurized dairy products.

  11. Molecular characterisation of Babesia gibsoni infection from a pit-bull terrier pup recently imported into South Africa.

    PubMed

    Matjila, P T; Penzhorn, B L; Leisewitz, A L; Bhoora, R; Barker, R

    2007-03-01

    Canine babesiosis caused by Babesia gibsoni was diagnosed in a 3-month-old Pit-bull pup during a routine clinical examination. Diagnosis was confirmed by way of smear examination, PCR, Reverse Line Blot (RLB) and sequence analysis which showed 100% homology with B. gibsoni (Japan AB118032) and Babesia sp. (Oklahoma) (AF205636). Haematology showed moderate anaemia and severe thrombocytopenia. Treatment was initiated with diminazene aceturate (Berenil RTU) followed by 2 doses of imidocarb diproprionate (Forray-65) 3 days and 14 days later, respectively. Babesia gibsoni DNA was still detectable 2 weeks post-treatment on the PCR/RLB test. A 10-day course of combination drug therapy using atovaquone and azithromycin was initiated. Blood samples taken on Day 1 and Day 40 after completion of treatment were negative for B. gibsoni DNA on PCR/RLB test. The implications of a possible introduction of B. gibsoni into South Africa are discussed.

  12. An improved loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for the detection of Mycoplasma bovis

    PubMed Central

    HIGA, Yumiko; UEMURA, Ryoko; YAMAZAKI, Wataru; GOTO, Shinya; GOTO, Yoshitaka; SUEYOSHI, Masuo

    2016-01-01

    We improved a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay permitting sensitive and rapid Mycoplasma bovis detection. A total of 55 bacterial strains were examined in this study, including 33 M. bovis strains, 14 non-M. bovis mycoplasmas and eight non-mycoplasma bacterial strains. M. bovis was successfully detected by the LAMP assay within 60 min without cross-reaction to any other bacteria. Furthermore, a total of 135 nasal swab samples were tested directly using our LAMP assays, the previously reported LAMP assay, conventional PCR assay without pre-culture and comparing standard culture methods. The improved LAMP assay showed sensitivity and specificity of 97.2% and 90.9%, respectively (with a kappa coefficient of 0.8231), and the sensitivity of our revised LAMP assay was increased compared to existing methods. PMID:27109067

  13. Multinucleated giant cell cytokine expression in pulmonary granulomas of cattle experimentally infected with Mycobacterium bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pathogenic mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex such as Mycobacterium bovis, induce a characteristic lesion known as a granulomas. Granulomas represent a specific host response to chronic antigenic stimuli, such as foreign bodies, certain bacterial components, or persistent pathoge...

  14. Circulating Mycobacterium bovis peptides and host response proteins as biomarkers for unambiguous detection of subclinical infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Bovine tuberculosis remains one of the most damaging zoonotic diseases. A critical need exists for rapid and inexpensive diagnostics capable of detecting and differentiating M. bovis infection from other pathogenic and environmental mycobacteria at multiple surveillance levels. Method...

  15. Epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis Disease in Humans in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, 2002-2014.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Jennifer A; Loutet, Miranda G; O'Connor, Catherine; Kearns, Cathriona; Smith, Robert M M; Lalor, Maeve K; Thomas, H Lucy; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Zenner, Dominik

    2017-03-01

    Despite control efforts, Mycobacterium bovis incidence among cattle remains high in parts of England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, attracting political and public health interest in potential spread from animals to humans. To determine incidence among humans and to identify associated factors, we conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of human M. bovis cases in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland during 2002-2014. We identified 357 cases and observed increased annual case numbers (from 17 to 35) and rates. Most patients were >65 years of age and born in the United Kingdom. The median age of UK-born patients decreased over time. For 74% of patients, exposure to risk factors accounting for M. bovis acquisition, most frequently consumption of unpasteurized milk, was known. Despite the small increase in case numbers and reduction in patient age, M. bovis infection of humans in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland remains rare.

  16. Epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis Disease in Humans in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, 2002–2014

    PubMed Central

    Loutet, Miranda G.; O’Connor, Catherine; Kearns, Cathriona; Smith, Robert M.M.; Lalor, Maeve K.; Thomas, H. Lucy; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Zenner, Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Despite control efforts, Mycobacterium bovis incidence among cattle remains high in parts of England, Wales, and Northern Ireland, attracting political and public health interest in potential spread from animals to humans. To determine incidence among humans and to identify associated factors, we conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of human M. bovis cases in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland during 2002–2014. We identified 357 cases and observed increased annual case numbers (from 17 to 35) and rates. Most patients were >65 years of age and born in the United Kingdom. The median age of UK-born patients decreased over time. For 74% of patients, exposure to risk factors accounting for M. bovis acquisition, most frequently consumption of unpasteurized milk, was known. Despite the small increase in case numbers and reduction in patient age, M. bovis infection of humans in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland remains rare. PMID:28220748

  17. Development of one-tube multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detecting Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Quan, Zhang; Haiming, Tan; Xiaoyao, Cai; Weifeng, Yuan; Hong, Jia; Hongfei, Zhu

    2017-01-10

    A multiplex PCR (m-PCR) with primers targeting the 16S rRNA, Rv3873 and a 12.7-kb fragment in the genomes of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex was designed for the differential diagnosis of M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. bovis BCG and non-tuberculosis Mycobacterium (NTM). The specificity of this assay was 100%, and the detection limit was 15 pg of genomic DNA. Of the 206 blinded clinical samples, the detection rate of M. bovis infection by m-PCR was lower than that of the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) release assay; however, the false-positive rate by the tuberculin skin test and false-negative samples in the IFN-γ release assay were reduced. Our findings indicated that our m-PCR method is a useful tool for complementation to differentiate M. bovis from M. tuberculosis and NTM species.

  18. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the Mycobacterium bovis genome resolve phylogenetic relationships

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycobacterium bovis isolates carry restricted allelic variation yet exhibit a range of disease phenotypes and host preferences. Conventional genotyping methods target small hyper-variable regions of their genome and provide anonymous biallelic information insufficient to develop phylogeny. To resolv...

  19. Phenolic glycolipids of Mycobacterium bovis: new structures and synthesis of a corresponding seroreactive neoglycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, D; Bozic, C M; Knisley, C; Cho, S N; Brennan, P J

    1989-01-01

    The glycolipid that characterizes the majority of isolates of Mycobacterium bovis and that has come to be known as M. bovis-identifying lipid is the phenolic glycolipid mycoside B described in the literature by others. However, when mycoside B obtained from M. bovis BCG, field isolates, and infected tissues was examined in detail, it was shown to be different from that described in the literature in some important respects. In particular, the glycosyl substituent is 2-O-methyl-alpha-L-rhamnopyranose rather than 2-O-methyl-beta-D-rhamnopyranose. With this information, a seroreactive neoglycoprotein (neoantigen) containing the 2-O-methyl-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl substituent suitable for the serodiagnosis of bovine tuberculosis was synthesized. M. bovis also contains other minor seroreactive phenolic glycolipids, one of which is a deacylated form of mycoside B and another of which contains an alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl unit rather than 2-O-methyl-alpha-L-rhamnopyranose. Images PMID:2643563

  20. Current knowledge and pending challenges in zoonosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis: a review.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Lago, Laura; Navarro, Yurena; García-de-Viedma, Darío

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is both the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis (TB) and a zoonotic pathogen. In humans, considerably fewer cases of TB are caused by M. bovis than M. tuberculosis; nevertheless, diagnostic limitations mean that currently available data on prevalence grossly underestimate the true dimension of the problem. The routes of transmission from animals to humans are well known and include direct exposure to infected animals or consumption of contaminated animal products. Application of fingerprinting tools facilitates analysis of the molecular epidemiology of M. bovis in animal-to-human and human-to-human transmission. Apart from cattle and M. bovis, other animal species and members within the M. tuberculosis complex can contribute to the zoonosis. Improvements in diagnostic techniques, application of more advanced discriminatory genotyping tools, and collaboration between veterinary and human health care researchers are key to our understanding of this zoonosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Classification of Babesia canis strains in Europe based on polymorphism of the Bc28.1-gene from the Babesia canis Bc28 multigene family.

    PubMed

    Carcy, B; Randazzo, S; Depoix, D; Adaszek, L; Cardoso, L; Baneth, G; Gorenflot, A; Schetters, T P

    2015-07-30

    The vast majority of clinical babesiosis cases in dogs in Europe is caused by Babesia canis. Although dogs can be vaccinated, the level of protection is highly variable, which might be due to genetic diversity of B. canis strains. One of the major merozoite surface antigens of B. canis is a protein with a Mr of 28 kDa that belongs to the Bc28 multigene family, that comprises at least two genes, Bc28.1 and a homologous Bc28.2 gene. The two genes are relatively conserved but they are very distinct in their 3' ends, enabling the design of specific primers. Sequencing of the Bc28.1 genes from 4 genetically distinct B. canis laboratory strains (A8, B, 34.01 and G) revealed 20 mutations at conserved positions of which three allowed the classification of B. canis strains into three main groups (A, B and 34.01/G) by RFLP. This assay was subsequently used to analyze blood samples of 394 dogs suspected of clinical babesiosis from nine countries in Europe. All blood samples were first analyzed with a previously described assay that allowed detection of the different Babesia species that infect dogs. Sixty one percent of the samples contained detectable levels of Babesia DNA. Of these, 98.3% were positive for B. canis, the remaining cases were positive for B. vogeli. Analysis of the Bc28.1 gene, performed on 178 of the B. canis samples, revealed an overall dominance of genotype B (62.4%), followed by genotypes A (37.1%) and 34 (11.8%). Interestingly, a great variation in the geographical distribution and prevalence of the three B. canis genotypes was observed; in the North-East genotype A predominated (72.1% A against 27.9% B), in contrast to the South-West where genotype B predominated (10.3% A against 89.7% B). In the central part of Europe intermediate levels were found (26.0-42.9% A against 74.0-57.1% B, from West to East). Genotype 34 was only identified in France (26.9% among 78 samples) and mostly as co-infection with genotypes A or B (61.9%). A comparative analysis of

  2. Molecular Typing of Mycobacterium bovis from Cattle Reared in Midwest Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Ricardo César Tavares; Vasconcellos, Sidra Ezidio Gonçalves; Issa, Marina de Azevedo; Soares Filho, Paulo Martins; Mota, Pedro Moacyr Pinto Coelho; de Araújo, Flábio Ribeiro; Carvalho, Ana Carolina da Silva; Gomes, Harrison Magdinier; Suffys, Philip Noel; Paschoalin, Vânia Margaret Flosi

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis (BTB), the pathogen responsible for serious economic impact on the livestock sector. In order to obtain data on isolated M. bovis strains and assist in the control and eradication program for BTB, a cross sectional descriptive molecular epidemiology study in the Brazilian Midwest was conducted. Through spoligotyping and 24-loci MIRU-VNTR methods, 37 clinical isolates of M. bovis circulating in the region were analyzed, 10 isolated from the state of Mato Grosso, 12 from the state of Mato Grosso do Sul and 15 from the state of Goiás. The spoligotyping analysis identified 10 distinct M. bovis profiles (SB0121 n = 14, SB0295 n = 6, SB0140 n = 6, SB0881 n = 3, SB1144 n = 2, SB1145 n = 2, SB0134 n = 1, SB1050 n = 1, SB1055 n = 1, SB1136 n = 1) grouped in six clusters and four orphan patterns. The MIRU-VNTR 24-loci grouped the same isolates in six clusters and 22 unique orphan patterns, showing higher discriminatory power than spoligotyping. When associating the results of both techniques, the isolates were grouped in five clusters and 24 unique M. bovis profiles. Among the 24-loci MIRU-VNTR evaluated, two, ETR-A and QUB 11b loci, showed high discriminatory ability (h = ≥ 0.50), while MIRU 16, MIRU 27, ETR-B, ETR-C, Mtub21 and QUB 26 loci showed moderate ability (h = 0.33 or h = 0.49) and were the most effective in evaluating the genotypic similarities among the clinical M. bovis isolate samples. Herein, the 29 patterns found amongst the 37 isolates of M. bovis circulating in the Brazilian Midwest can be due to the animal movement between regions, municipalities and farms, thus causing the spread of various M. bovis strains in herds from Midwest Brazil. PMID:27631383

  3. Detection and Elimination of Corynebacterium bovis from Barrier Rooms by Using an Environmental Sampling Surveillance Program

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Christopher A; Pugazhenthi, Umarani; Spiegel, Shannon P; Leszczynski, Jori K

    2017-01-01

    Rodent health-monitoring programs based on sampling an IVC system's exhaust air dust (EAD) has enhanced and even replaced traditional sentinels for some rodent pathogens. EAD testing by qPCR assay is an optimal surveillance method for the rapid detection of Corynebacterium bovis-infected immunodeficient mice. Here we demonstrate that an active EAD surveillance program for C. bovis can be used to maintain nude mice C. bovis-free after the transition from historically enzootically infected colonies. During 3 events over 3 y, rapid detection of infection, elimination of infected mice, aggressive quarantine measures, and local decontamination prevented the spread of C. bovis within 2 barrier rooms. In total, 4 cages of infected nude mice were identified and removed, preventing the spread of infection to 469 other cages of immunodeficient mice. In addition, we present data regarding a refinement to EAD testing which enables row-specific surveillance of an IVC rack. This technique systemically decreases the amount of testing required to locate an individually infected cage. Due to our ability to rapidly detect and localize an infected cage, we were able to investigate the route of C. bovis introduction into our barrier rooms. Our epidemiologic investigation suggested that the transmission of C. bovis occurred through contaminated, cryopreserved, patient-derived xenograft tumor tissue. This previously unknown source of C. bovis can infect mice used to propagate these tumors. Together, these data demonstrate that a remediation program that combines rapid detection, test-and-cull, and local decontamination under quarantine conditions can eliminate C. bovis from a mouse colony. PMID:28315652

  4. Protection against Tuberculosis in Eurasian Wild Boar Vaccinated with Heat-Inactivated Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Joseba M.; Sevilla, Iker A.; Beltrán-Beck, Beatriz; Minguijón, Esmeralda; Ballesteros, Cristina; Galindo, Ruth C.; Boadella, Mariana; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.; Romero, Beatriz; Geijo, Maria Victoria; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco; Aranaz, Alicia; Juste, Ramón A.; Vicente, Joaquín; de la Fuente, José; Gortázar, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium bovis and closely related members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex continues to affect humans and animals worldwide and its control requires vaccination of wildlife reservoir species such as Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa). Vaccination efforts for TB control in wildlife have been based primarily on oral live BCG formulations. However, this is the first report of the use of oral inactivated vaccines for controlling TB in wildlife. In this study, four groups of 5 wild boar each were vaccinated with inactivated M. bovis by the oral and intramuscular routes, vaccinated with oral BCG or left unvaccinated as controls. All groups were later challenged with a field strain of M. bovis. The results of the IFN-gamma response, serum antibody levels, M. bovis culture, TB lesion scores, and the expression of C3 and MUT genes were compared between these four groups. The results suggested that vaccination with heat-inactivated M. bovis or BCG protect wild boar from TB. These results also encouraged testing combinations of BCG and inactivated M. bovis to vaccinate wild boar against TB. Vaccine formulations using heat-inactivated M. bovis for TB control in wildlife would have the advantage of being environmentally safe and more stable under field conditions when compared to live BCG vaccines. The antibody response and MUT expression levels can help differentiating between vaccinated and infected wild boar and as correlates of protective response in vaccinated animals. These results suggest that vaccine studies in free-living wild boar are now possible to reveal the full potential of protecting against TB using oral M. bovis inactivated and BCG vaccines. PMID:21935486

  5. Detection and Elimination of Corynebacterium bovis from Barrier Rooms by Using an Environmental Sampling Surveillance Program.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Christopher A; Pugazhenthi, Umarani; Spiegel, Shannon P; Leszczynski, Jori K

    2017-03-01

    Rodent health-monitoring programs based on sampling an IVC system's exhaust air dust (EAD) has enhanced and even replaced traditional sentinels for some rodent pathogens. EAD testing by qPCR assay is an optimal surveillance method for the rapid detection of Corynebacterium bovis-infected immunodeficient mice. Here we demonstrate that an active EAD surveillance program for C. bovis can be used to maintain nude mice C. bovis-free after the transition from historically enzootically infected colonies. During 3 events over 3 y, rapid detection of infection, elimination of infected mice, aggressive quarantine measures, and local decontamination prevented the spread of C. bovis within 2 barrier rooms. In total, 4 cages of infected nude mice were identified and removed, preventing the spread of infection to 469 other cages of immunodeficient mice. In addition, we present data regarding a refinement to EAD testing which enables row-specific surveillance of an IVC rack. This technique systemically decreases the amount of testing required to locate an individually infected cage. Due to our ability to rapidly detect and localize an infected cage, we were able to investigate the route of C. bovis introduction into our barrier rooms. Our epidemiologic investigation suggested that the transmission of C. bovis occurred through contaminated, cryopreserved, patient-derived xenograft tumor tissue. This previously unknown source of C. bovis can infect mice used to propagate these tumors. Together, these data demonstrate that a remediation program that combines rapid detection, test-and-cull, and local decontamination under quarantine conditions can eliminate C. bovis from a mouse colony.

  6. Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG as an HIV Vaccine Vector

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Rosamund; Chege, Gerald; Shephard, Enid; Stutz, Helen; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 has resulted in a devastating AIDS pandemic. An effective HIV/AIDS vaccine that can be used to either, prevent HIV infection, control infection or prevent progression of the disease to AIDS is needed. In this review we discuss the use of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the tuberculosis vaccine, as a vaccine vector for an HIV vaccine. Numerous features make BCG an attractive vehicle to deliver HIV antigens. It has a good safety profile, elicits long-lasting cellular immune responses and in addition manufacturing costs are affordable, a necessary consideration for developing countries. In this review we discuss the numerous factors that influence generation of a genetically stable recombinant BCG vaccine for HIV. PMID:20353397

  7. Transcontinental spread of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Long, R; Nobert, E; Chomyc, S; van Embden, J; McNamee, C; Duran, R R; Talbot, J; Fanning, A

    1999-06-01

    Globally, the proportion of all cases of tuberculosis (TB) caused by drug-resistant strains is increasing. We report the case of a Canadian citizen who acquired a highly drug-resistant strain of Mycobacterium bovis while visiting a relative with AIDS-related tuberculosis in Spain. The origin of the strain was traced using spoligotyping, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based fingerprint technology, and the European DNA database. The level of primary drug resistance-all five first-line drugs and 19 of 21 second-line drugs-in this case was unprecedented in Canada. Isolation of this strain from a Canadian citizen represents the first report of its appearance in this hemisphere. The infection was contained and combined medical-surgical treatment delivered.

  8. Comparative study of Mycobacterium bovis primary isolation methods.

    PubMed

    de Azevedo Issa, Marina; Martins Soares Filho, Paulo; Fonseca Júnior, Antônio Augusto; Arrais Hodon, Mikael; Cristian Dos Santos, Lílian; Karlisson Pimenta Dos Reis, Jenner; Cerqueira Leite, Rômulo

    For the definitive diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis, isolation of the etiologic agent is required. However, there is no consensus on the best methodology for isolation of Mycobacterium bovis in Brazil. This study evaluated the most used decontaminants and culture media in the country, in order to identify the best combination for the Brazilian samples. Three decontaminants - 2% sodium hydroxide (w/v), 0.75% hexadecylpiridinium chloride (w/v) and 5% sulphuric acid (v/v) and four culture media - 7H11 Middlebrook with additives and OADC supplement "A" (7H11 A), the same media with another supplement trademark (7H11 B), tuberculosis blood agar (B83) and Stonebrink's medium were compared. Regarding the isolation, there were no significant differences between the decontaminants and media combinations, except 7H11A combined to any decontaminant. However, the mean colonies score was significantly greater when the samples were decontaminated with 5% sulphuric acid and inoculated in 7H11 B or SB, without significant difference between them, although colonies appeared earlier on 7H11B than on SB. The trademark of OADC supplement influenced the isolation rate and the number of isolated colonies in Middlebrook 7H11. An incubation time of four weeks was required to detect all positive samples in 7H11 B after decontamination with 5% sulphuric acid but there was an increase in the number of colonies until the sixth week of incubation. Overall, the best strategy for the primary isolation of M. bovis from Brazilian samples was the decontamination with 5% sulphuric acid (final concentration) and inoculation in Middlebrook 7H11 medium formulated with OADC supplement "B".

  9. The distribution of Mycobacterium bovis infection in naturally infected badgers.

    PubMed

    Corner, Leigh A L; O'Meara, D; Costello, E; Lesellier, S; Gormley, E

    2012-11-01

    Populations of Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) with tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis infection) are a significant reservoir of infection for cattle in Ireland and the United Kingdom. In this study the distribution of infection, histological lesions and gross lesions was determined in a sample of 132 culled badgers from naturally-infected wild populations. Badgers were culled when an epidemiological investigation following a tuberculosis breakdown in a cattle herd implicated badgers as the probable source of infection. The definition of tuberculosis infection was based on the isolation of M. bovis from tissues or clinical samples. An accurate diagnosis of infection was achieved by culturing a wide range of lymph nodes (LN) and organ tissues (mean 32.1) and clinical samples (faeces and urine) from each badger. Infection was detected in 57/132 badgers (43.2%). Histological lesions consistent with tuberculosis were seen in 39/57 (68.4%) culture-positive and 7/75 (9.3%) culture-negative animals. Gross lesions were seen in only 30/57 (52.6%) infected badgers, leaving a high proportion (47.4%) of infected animals with latent infection (no grossly visible lesions). The most frequently infected tissues were the lungs and axillary LN, followed by the deep cervical LN, parotid LN and tracheobronchial LN. The data support the hypotheses that in badgers there are only two significant routes of infection, namely, the lower respiratory tract and bite wounds, and that badgers are very susceptible to infection but resistant to the development and progression of the disease. At all levels of disease severity, infection was found in widely dispersed anatomical locations suggesting that there is early dissemination of infection in the period preceding the development of active immunity.

  10. A Study of the Persistence of Mycobacterium bovis in the Environment under Natural Weather Conditions in Michigan, USA

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Amanda E.; Bolin, Carole A.; Gardiner, Joseph C.; Kaneene, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Reisolation of Mycobacterium bovis from inoculated substrates was used to follow the persistence of viable M. bovis bacteria exposed to natural weather conditions over a 12-month period. Environmental factors were recorded continuously, and factors affecting M. bovis persistence (i.e., temperature, season, and substrate) were studied using survival analysis and Cox's proportional hazards regression. Persistence of M. bovis in the environment was significantly shorter in the spring/summer season, characterized by the highest average daily temperatures over the 12-month period. M. bovis persisted up to 88 days in soil, 58 days in water and hay, and 43 days on corn. These studies demonstrate that M. bovis bacteria persist long enough to represent a risk of exposure for cattle and/or wildlife and strengthen evidence that suggests cattle farm biosecurity and efforts to eliminate supplemental feeding of white-tailed deer will decrease the risk of bovine TB transmission among and between cattle and deer populations. PMID:21547222

  11. Streptococcus bovis bacteraemia revisited: clinical and microbiological correlates in a contemporary series of 59 patients.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Villar-Silva, Julia; Llenas-García, Jara; Caurcel-Díaz, Luis; Vila-Santos, Juan; Sanz-Sanz, Francisca; Chaves, Fernando; Guerra-Vales, Juan Manuel

    2010-10-01

    To characterise the clinical features, associations and outcome in a contemporary series of patients with Streptococcus bovis bacteraemia (SBB). Retrospective analysis of all episodes of SBB at the University Hospital 12 de Octubre (Madrid, Spain) between January 1997 and November 2008 was performed. Patient data were reviewed, focusing on clinical and microbiological associations with the different biotypes of S. bovis. Fifty-nine episodes of SBB were documented in 59 adult patients (30 males; mean age: 70.9 ± 15.0 years). Chronic liver disease was identified in 20 patients (33.9%). Sixteen patients (27.1%) presented infective endocarditis (IE) and 14 (23.7%) had a biliary source of bacteraemia. Thirty-three patients (55.9%) underwent colonic evaluation, adenomatous polyps being the most common finding (21 patients). Malignancy was diagnosed following SBB in 9 cases, including 6 patients with colorectal carcinoma (18.2% of those who underwent colonic evaluation). Of 22 isolates biotyped, 12 were S. bovis biotype I and 10 were S. bovis biotype II. IE was more frequent among patients with S. bovis biotype I (P =0.010), whereas bacteraemia due to biotype II species was more likely to be of biliary origin (P=0.078). S. bovis biotyping identifies some clinically relevant associations. Copyright © 2010 The British Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma bovis isolates from veal calves and dairy cattle in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Heuvelink, Annet; Reugebrink, Constance; Mars, Jet

    2016-06-30

    Control of Mycoplasma bovis infections depends on good husbandry practices and antibiotic treatment. To allow more prudent use of antimicrobial drugs, there is a need for information on the susceptibility profile of this pathogen. The objective of the present study was to analyse the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical M. bovis isolates in the Netherlands. The collection comprised 95 bovine isolates, originating from lungs (n=56), mastitis milk (n=27), and synovial fluid (n=12), collected between 2008 and 2014. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were assessed by broth microdilution, both by using in-house prepared MIC plates and by using commercially available MIC plates. For each antimicrobial agent, the range of MIC results, the MIC50, and MIC90 values were calculated. M. bovis strains recently isolated in the Netherlands appeared to be characterized by relatively high MIC values for antimicrobial agents that, until now, have been recommended by the Dutch Association of Veterinarians for treating pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma species. Fluoroquinolones appeared to be the most efficacious in inhibiting M. bovis growth, followed by tulathromycin and oxytetracycline. The highest MIC values were obtained for erythromycin, tilmicosin, and tylosin. Future studies should be done on determining M. bovis specific clinical breakpoints, standardization of methods to determine MIC values as well as molecular studies on detection of antimicrobial resistance mechanisms of M. bovis isolates to develop PCR assays for determining resistance.

  13. An overview of Mycoplasma bovis mastitis in Israel (2004-2014).

    PubMed

    Lysnyansky, Inna; Freed, Mor; Rosales, Ruben S; Mikula, Inna; Khateb, Nihaya; Gerchman, Irena; van Straten, Michael; Levisohn, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of Mycoplasma bovis in milk samples submitted to the Israeli National Service for Udder Health and Milk Quality was determined during the period 2004-2014 and the genetic pattern of the obtained isolates was assessed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Mycoplasma spp. were identified in 66 herds including M. bovis (n = 60), M. cottewii (n = 3), M. bovigenitalium (n = 2), M. alkalescens (n = 2) and M. yeatsii (n = 1). The proportion of M. bovis infected herds was relatively low (0-0.68%) in 2004-2007, increased to 3.77% during the 2008 outbreak, and ranged from 0.77 to 2.77% during the 2009-2014 period. Since 2008, about eight M. bovis positive dairy herds have been identified in Israel annually, with six of which on average being newly infected. MLST of 57 M. bovis isolates revealed that sequence type 10 was the dominant genotype identified in 60% of the herds. In conclusion, these data show that M. bovis is the main mycoplasmal mastitic pathogen in Israel.

  14. Study on bioactive compounds of in vitro cultured Calculus Suis and natural Calculus Bovis.

    PubMed

    Wan, Tien-Chun; Cheng, Fu-Yuan; Liu, Yu-Tse; Lin, Liang-Chuan; Sakata, Ryoichi

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate bioactive compounds of in vitro cultured Calculus Suis and natural Calculus Bovis obtained as valuable by-products from animals used for meat production. The results showed that the components of natural Calculus Bovis were rich in bilirubin and biliverdin and had higher content of essential amino acids. The major amino acids of in vitro cultured Calculus Suis were identified as glycine, alanine, glutamic acid and aspartic acid, and those for natural Calculus Bovis were found to be glutamic acid, aspartic acid, proline, and arginine. The methionine and cysteine contents of precursors for glutathione in natural Calculus Bovis were significantly higher than those of in vitro cultured Calculus Suis. The mineral contents of zinc, iron and manganese of natural Calculus Bovis were significantly higher than those of in vitro cultured Calculus Suis. The major bile acids in both products were cholic acid and dehydrocholic acid, respectively. The chenodeoxycholic and ursodeoxycholic acid content of in vitro cultured Calculus Suis was significantly higher than that of natural Calculus Bovis.

  15. Human tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium bovis in the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    de Kantor, I N; LoBue, P A; Thoen, C O

    2010-11-01

    Human tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium bovis appears to be rare in most of the region of the Americas, although some localities have reported an unusually high prevalence of M. bovis among human TB cases (e.g., San Diego, CA, USA; parts of Mexico). As surveillance data are lacking in many countries, there is substantial uncertainty regarding actual incidence. M. bovis is most often not identified, as the diagnosis of TB is made by smear microscopy alone or using egg-containing culture media lacking pyruvate. Where human M. bovis cases have been studied in the region, they appear to be associated with ingestion of unpasteurized dairy products, or with airborne acquired infection in animal keepers and meat industry workers from countries where bovine TB remains a problem. Human-to-human transmission of M. bovis does occur, but appears to account for a very small proportion of cases. Efforts to eradicate M. bovis in humans in the Americas should therefore be directed at eradicating the disease in cattle, increasing pasteurization of dairy products and providing education about the dangers of consuming unpasteurized dairy products.

  16. Fecal Volatile Organic Ccompound Profiles from White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) as Indicators of Mycobacterium bovis Exposure or Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Randal S; Ellis, Christine K; Nol, Pauline; Waters, W Ray; Palmer, Mitchell; VerCauteren, Kurt C

    2015-01-01

    White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) serve as a reservoir for bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, and can be a source of infection in cattle. Vaccination with M. bovis Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) is being considered for management of bovine tuberculosis in deer. Presently, no method exists to non-invasively monitor the presence of bovine tuberculosis in deer. In this study, volatile organic compound profiles of BCG-vaccinated and non-vaccinated deer, before and after experimental challenge with M. bovis strain 95-1315, were generated using solid phase microextraction fiber head-space sampling over suspended fecal pellets with analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Chromatograms were processed using XCMS Online to characterize ion variation among treatment groups. The principal component scores resulting from significant (α = 0.05) ion responses were used to build linear discriminant analysis models. The sensitivity and specificity of these models were used to evaluate the feasibility of using this analytical approach to distinguish within group comparisons between pre- and post-M. bovis challenge: non-vaccinated male or female deer, BCG-vaccinated male deer, and the mixed gender non-vaccinated deer data. Seventeen compounds were identified in this analysis. The peak areas for these compounds were used to build a linear discriminant classification model based on principal component analysis scores to evaluate the feasibility of discriminating between fecal samples from M. bovis challenged deer, irrespective of vaccination status. The model best representing the data had a sensitivity of 78.6% and a specificity of 91.4%. The fecal head-space sampling approach presented in this pilot study provides a non-invasive method to discriminate between M. bovis challenged deer and BCG-vaccinated deer. Additionally, the technique may prove invaluable for BCG efficacy studies with free-ranging deer as well as for use as a non

  17. Fecal Volatile Organic Ccompound Profiles from White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) as Indicators of Mycobacterium bovis Exposure or Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Randal S.; Ellis, Christine K.; Nol, Pauline; Waters, W. Ray; Palmer, Mitchell; VerCauteren, Kurt C.

    2015-01-01

    White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) serve as a reservoir for bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, and can be a source of infection in cattle. Vaccination with M. bovis Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) is being considered for management of bovine tuberculosis in deer. Presently, no method exists to non-invasively monitor the presence of bovine tuberculosis in deer. In this study, volatile organic compound profiles of BCG-vaccinated and non-vaccinated deer, before and after experimental challenge with M. bovis strain 95–1315, were generated using solid phase microextraction fiber head-space sampling over suspended fecal pellets with analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Chromatograms were processed using XCMS Online to characterize ion variation among treatment groups. The principal component scores resulting from significant (α = 0.05) ion responses were used to build linear discriminant analysis models. The sensitivity and specificity of these models were used to evaluate the feasibility of using this analytical approach to distinguish within group comparisons between pre- and post-M. bovis challenge: non-vaccinated male or female deer, BCG-vaccinated male deer, and the mixed gender non-vaccinated deer data. Seventeen compounds were identified in this analysis. The peak areas for these compounds were used to build a linear discriminant classification model based on principal component analysis scores to evaluate the feasibility of discriminating between fecal samples from M. bovis challenged deer, irrespective of vaccination status. The model best representing the data had a sensitivity of 78.6% and a specificity of 91.4%. The fecal head-space sampling approach presented in this pilot study provides a non-invasive method to discriminate between M. bovis challenged deer and BCG-vaccinated deer. Additionally, the technique may prove invaluable for BCG efficacy studies with free-ranging deer as well as for use as a non

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Mycobacterium bovis BZ 31150 and Mycobacterium bovis B2 7505, Pathogenic Bacteria Isolated from Archived Captive Animal Bronchial Washes and Human Sputum Samples in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Wanzala, Sylvia I; Nakavuma, Jesca; Travis, Dominic A; Kia, Praiscillia; Ogwang, Sam; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2015-10-08

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB), a zoonotic infection of cattle caused by Mycobacterium bovis, results in losses of $3 billion to the global agricultural industry and represents the fourth most important livestock disease worldwide. M. bovis as a source of human infection is likely underreported due to the culture medium conditions used to isolate the organism from sputum or other sample sources. We report here the draft genome sequences of M. bovis BZ 31150, isolated from a bronchial washing from a captive chimpanzee, and M. bovis B2 7505, isolated from a human sputum sample in Uganda.

  19. Prevalence of Babesia spp., Ehrlichia spp., and Tick Infestations in Oklahoma Black Bears (Ursus americanus).

    PubMed

    Skinner, Delaina; Mitcham, Jessica R; Starkey, Lindsay A; Noden, Bruce H; Fairbanks, W Sue; Little, Susan E

    2017-06-28

    American black bears (Ursus americanus) are commonly infested with ticks throughout their range, but there are few surveys for tick-borne disease agents in bears. To characterize tick infestations and determine the prevalence of current infection with Babesia spp. and past or current infection with Ehrlichia spp. in newly re-established populations of black bears in east central and southeastern Oklahoma, we identified adult (n=1,048) and immature (n=107) ticks recovered from bears (n=62). We evaluated serum and whole blood samples from a subset (n=49) for antibodies reactive to, and characteristic DNA fragments of Ehrlichia spp. as well as characteristic DNA fragments of Babesia spp. Amblyomma americanum, the most common tick identified, was found on a majority (56/62; 90%) of bears and accounted for 697/1,048 (66.5%) of all ticks recovered. Other ticks included Dermacentor variabilis (338/1,048; 32.3%) from 36 bears, Amblyomma maculatum (9/1,048; 0.9%) from three bears, and Ixodes scapularis (4/1,048; 0.4%) from three bears. Antibodies reactive to Ehrlichia spp. were detected in every bear tested (49/49; 100%); maximum inverse titers to Ehrlichia chaffeensis ranged from 64-4,096 (geometric mean titer 1,525). However, PCR failed to identify active infection with E. chaffeensis, Ehrlichia ewingii, or an Ehrlichia ruminantium-like agent. Infection with Babesia spp. was detected by PCR in 3/49 (6%) bears. Together these data confirm that tick infestations and infection with tick-borne disease agents are common in bears in the southern US. The significance of these infestations and infections to the health of bears, if any, and the identity of the Ehrlichia spp. responsible for the antibody reactivity seen, warrant further evaluation.

  20. Distribution patterns of Babesia gibsoni infection in hunting dogs from nine Japanese islands.

    PubMed

    El-Dakhly, Khaled Mohamed; Goto, Minami; Noishiki, Kaori; El-Nahass, El-Shaymaa; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma; Takashima, Yasuhiro

    2015-04-01

    Canine babesiosis constitutes a major global veterinary medical problem caused by tick-borne hemoparasites Babesia gibsoni and Babesia canis. Babesia gibsoni induces more severe clinical signs and is mainly transmitted by the ixodid Haemaphysalis longicornis. In Japan, B. gibsoni is primarily found in the western districts, with few records in the eastern parts. The aim of the current investigation was to evaluate distribution patterns of B. gibsoni infection in 9 Japanese islands and peninsulas using direct microscopy and PCR. Therefore, 196 hunting dogs were randomly sampled during the period from March to September 2011. Ages and sexes of dogs were identified. Direct microscopy of Giemsa-stained blood smear revealed pear-shaped piroplasms of B. gibsoni in 3 (1.6%) dogs. PCR was done initially with the universal primer set (B18S-F and B18S-R) amplifying the 1,665-bp portion of the 18S rRNA gene, followed by the specific primer set (Bg18F1 and Bg18R2) amplifying 2,363-bp fragments of the same gene. Accordingly, 84 (42.9%) and 8 (4.1%) dogs were positive, respectively. The current investigation shows that canine babesiosis was recorded in all islands except for Sado Island, Atsumi Peninsula, and Tanegashima Island. The highest infection rate was detected in the main island of Okinawa, while the lowest was on Ishigaki Island. Both sexes were non-significantly infected. However, the diversity of infection in islands was significantly different (P < 0.05). Although B. gibsoni has been previously found in western and eastern Japan, the present work highlights the prevalence of infection in many Japanese districts, including islands and peninsulas, giving realistic data that can facilitate treatment and control.

  1. Tick vitellogenin receptor reveals critical role in oocyte development and transovarial transmission of Babesia parasite.

    PubMed

    Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Battsetseg, Badgar; Matsuo, Tomohide; Hatta, Takeshi; Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; Xuan, Xuenan; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2008-08-01

    A cDNA encoding the vitellogenin receptor of the ixodid tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis Neumann (HlVgR) was cloned and characterized. The full-length cDNA is 5631 bp, including an intact ORF encoding an expected protein with 1782 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of the HlVgR cDNA revealed two ligand-binding domains with four class A cysteine-rich repeats in the first domain and eight in the second domain similar to those of insect VgRs. The immunoblot analysis detected approximately 197 kDa protein in both tick ovary and egg. The developmental expression profile demonstrated that HlVgR mRNA exists throughout the ovarian development, and the transcriptional level is especially high in the previtellogenic period. Immuno electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that the localization of HlVgR is detected on the external surface of oocyte plasma membrane. RNAi showed that eggs of HlVgR dsRNA-injected adult ticks had not developed into fully mature oocytes and laid abnormal eggs. The Babesia parasite DNA was not detected in the eggs of HlVgR dsRNA-injected tick that fed on Babesia gibsoni infected dog, whereas it was detected in the eggs of PBS-injected ticks and noninjected ticks. Expression of HlVgR was increased by the vitellogenic hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone. These results indicate that HlVgR, which is produced by the developing oocytes, is essential for Vg uptake, egg development in the H. longicornis tick, and transovarial transmission of Babesia parasites.

  2. Molecular detection of Theileria, Babesia, and Hepatozoon spp. in ixodid ticks from Palestine.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Kifaya; Ereqat, Suheir; Nasereddin, Abedelmajeed; Al-Jawabreh, Amer; Baneth, Gad; Abdeen, Ziad

    2016-07-01

    Ixodid ticks transmit various infectious agents that cause disease in humans and livestock worldwide. A cross-sectional survey on the presence of protozoan pathogens in ticks was carried out to assess the impact of tick-borne protozoa on domestic animals in Palestine. Ticks were collected from herds with sheep, goats and dogs in different geographic districts and their species were determined using morphological keys. The presence of piroplasms and Hepatozoon spp. was determined by PCR amplification of a 460-540bp fragment of the 18S rRNA gene followed by RFLP or DNA sequencing. A PCR-RFLP method based on the 18S rRNA was used in order to detect and to identify Hepatozoon, Babesia and Theileria spp. A total of 516 ticks were collected from animals in six Palestinian localities. Five tick species were found: Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, Rhipicephalus turanicus, Rhipicephalus bursa, Haemaphysalis parva and Haemaphysalis adleri. PCR-based analyses of the ticks revealed Theileria ovis (5.4%), Hepatozoon canis (4.3%), Babesia ovis (0.6%), and Babesia vogeli (0.4%). Theileria ovis was significantly associated with ticks from sheep and with R. turanicus ticks (p<0.01). H. canis was detected only in R. sanguineus s.l. and was significantly associated with ticks from dogs (p<0.01). To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the presence of these pathogens in ticks collected from Palestine. Communicating these findings with health and veterinary professionals will increase their awareness, and contribute to improved diagnosis and treatment of tick-borne diseases.

  3. Primary Babesia rodhaini infection followed by recovery confers protective immunity against B. rodhaini reinfection and Babesia microti challenge infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanbo; Efstratiou, Artemis; Adjou Moumouni, Paul Franck; Liu, Mingming; Jirapattharasate, Charoonluk; Guo, Huanping; Gao, Yang; Cao, Shinuo; Zhou, Mo; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Igarashi, Ikuo; Xuan, Xuenan

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, we investigated the protective immunity against challenge infections with Babesia rodhaini and Babesia microti in the mice recovered from B. rodhaini infection. Six groups with 5 test mice in each group were used in this study, and were intraperitoneally immunized with alive and dead B. rodhaini. The challenge infections with B. rodhaini or B. microti were performed using different time courses. Our results showed that the mice recovered from primary B. rodhaini infection exhibited low parasitemia and no mortalities after the challenge infections, whereas mock mice which had received no primary infection showed a rapid increase of parasitemia and died within 7 days after the challenge with B. rodhaini. Mice immunized with dead B. rodhaini were not protected against either B. rodhaini or B. microti challenge infections, although high titers of antibody response were induced. These results indicate that only mice immunized with alive B. rodhaini could acquire protective immunity against B. rodhaini or B. microti challenge infection. Moreover, the test mice produced high levels of antibody response and low levels of cytokines (INF-γ, IL-4, IL-12, IL-10) against B. rodhaini or B. microti after challenge infection. Mock mice, however, showed rapid increases of these cytokines, which means disordered cytokines secretion occurred during the acute stage of challenge infection. The above results proved that mice immunized with alive B. rodhaini could acquire protective immunity against B. rodhaini and B. microti infections.

  4. Characterizations of individual mouse red blood cells parasitized by Babesia microti using 3-D holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, HyunJoo; Hong, Sung-Hee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Won-Ja; Kim, Youngchan; Lee, Sang-Eun; Park, YongKeun

    2015-06-03

    Babesia microti causes "emergency" human babesiosis. However, little is known about the alterations in B. microti invaded red blood cells (Bm-RBCs) at the individual cell level. Through quantitative phase imaging techniques based on laser interferometry, we present the simultaneous measurements of structural, chemical, and mechanical modifications in individual mouse Bm-RBCs. 3-D refractive index maps of individual RBCs and in situ parasite vacuoles are imaged, from which total contents and concentration of dry mass are also precisely quantified. In addition, we examine the dynamic membrane fluctuation of Bm-RBCs, which provide information on cell membrane deformability.

  5. Evaluations of buparvaquone as a treatment for equine babesiosis (Babesia equi).

    PubMed

    Zaugg, J L; Lane, V M

    1989-05-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of buparvaquone in eliminating Babesia equi of European origin in carrier horses and in experimentally infected splenectomized ponies. When administered at the rate of 2.5 mg/kg of body weight, IM, 4 times at 96-hour intervals, buparvaquone was effective in eliminating B equi carrier infection in 1 horse. Such results could not be repeated at the same dosage or at 3.5 or 5 mg/kg, IM. Buparvaquone given at the rate of 4 to 6 mg/kg IV and/or IM was therapeutically effective in 4 of 5 acute B equi infections in splenectomized ponies. The treated ponies became carriers.

  6. Characterizations of individual mouse red blood cells parasitized by Babesia microti using 3-D holographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, HyunJoo; Hong, Sung-Hee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Won-Ja; Kim, Youngchan; Lee, Sang-Eun; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    Babesia microti causes “emergency” human babesiosis. However, little is known about the alterations in B. microti invaded red blood cells (Bm-RBCs) at the individual cell level. Through quantitative phase imaging techniques based on laser interferometry, we present the simultaneous measurements of structural, chemical, and mechanical modifications in individual mouse Bm-RBCs. 3-D refractive index maps of individual RBCs and in situ parasite vacuoles are imaged, from which total contents and concentration of dry mass are also precisely quantified. In addition, we examine the dynamic membrane fluctuation of Bm-RBCs, which provide information on cell membrane deformability. PMID:26039793

  7. Genetic characterization and phylogenetic relationships based on 18S rRNA and ITS1 region of small form of canine Babesia spp. from India.

    PubMed

    Mandal, M; Banerjee, P S; Garg, Rajat; Ram, Hira; Kundu, K; Kumar, Saroj; Kumar, G V P P S Ravi

    2014-10-01

    Canine babesiosis is a vector borne disease caused by intra-erythrocytic apicomplexan parasites Babesia canis (large form) and Babesia gibsoni (small form), throughout the globe. Apart from few sporadic reports on the occurrence of B. gibsoni infection in dogs, no attempt has been made to characterize Babesia spp. of dogs in India. Fifteen canine blood samples, positive for small form of Babesia, collected from northern to eastern parts of India, were used for amplification of 18S rRNA gene (∼1665bp) of Babesia sp. and partial ITS1 region (∼254bp) of B. gibsoni Asian genotype. Cloning and sequencing of the amplified products of each sample was performed separately. Based on sequences and phylogenetic analysis of 18S rRNA and ITS1 sequences, 13 were considered to be B. gibsoni. These thirteen isolates shared high sequence identity with each other and with B. gibsoni Asian genotype. The other two isolates could not be assigned to any particular species because of the difference(s) in 18S rRNA sequence with B. gibsoni and closer identity with Babesiaoccultans and Babesiaorientalis. In the phylogenetic tree, all the isolates of B. gibsoni Asian genotype formed a separate major clade named as Babesia spp. sensu stricto clade with high bootstrap support. The two unnamed Babesia sp. (Malbazar and Ludhiana isolates) clustered close together with B. orientalis, Babesia sp. (Kashi 1 isolate) and B. occultans of bovines. It can be inferred from this study that 18S rRNA gene and ITS1 region are highly conserved among 13 B. gibsoni isolates from India. It is the maiden attempt of genetic characterization by sequencing of 18S rRNA gene and ITS1 region of B. gibsoni from India and is also the first record on the occurrence of an unknown Babesia sp. of dogs from south and south-east Asia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Incidence and transmission of Mycoplasma bovis mastitis in Holstein dairy cows in a hospital pen: A case study.

    PubMed

    Punyapornwithaya, V; Fox, L K; Hancock, D D; Gay, J M; Wenz, J R; Alldredge, J R

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to determine the incidence and transmission of mycoplasma mastitis in the hospital pen in a dairy herd of 650 lactating cows after a hospital pen was established following an outbreak of this disease. Mycoplasma mastitis status was monitored for 3 months through repeated collection of milk samples from cows with clinical mastitis (CM) and from bulk tank milk. During the outbreak 13 cows were diagnosed with Mycoplasma bovis CM, 1 cow with Mycoplasma sp. mastitis and 8 cows showed signs of arthritis, 3 of which were confirmed as having M. bovis arthritis. M. bovis isolates from cows with CM, arthritis and bulk tank milk had indistinguishable chromosomal digest pattern fingerprints. Incidence rates of M. bovis CM cases in the milking and hospital pens were 0.01 and 1.7 cases per 100 cow-days at risk. Approximately 70% of cows with M. bovis CM became infected within 12 days of entering the hospital pen. Transmission of M. bovis in the hospital pen occurred as 3 episodes. Each episode corresponded to the introduction of a cow with M. bovis CM from a milking pen. Evidence indicates that cows with M. bovis CM from milking pens were the source of transmission of the disease in the hospital pen and thus their presence in the hospital pen appeared to be a risk factor for transmission of M. bovis mastitis in this single case study herd.

  9. Molecular detection and characterization of potentially new Babesia and Theileria species/variants in wild felids from Kenya.

    PubMed

    Githaka, Naftaly; Konnai, Satoru; Kariuki, Edward; Kanduma, Esther; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2012-10-01

    Piroplasms frequently infect domestic and wild carnivores. At present, there is limited information on the occurrence and molecular identity of these tick-borne parasites in wild felids in Kenya. In 2009, a pair of captive lions (Panthare leo) was diagnosed with suspected babesiosis and mineral deficiency at an animal orphanage on the outskirts of Nairobi, Kenya. Blood smears indicated presences of haemoparasites in the erythrocytes, however, no further investigations were conducted to identify the infecting agent. The animals recovered completely following diet supplementation and treatment with anti-parasite drug. In this report, we extracted and detected parasite DNA from the two lions and seven other asymptomatic feline samples; two leopards (Panthera pardus) and five cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus). Reverse line blot with probes specific for Babesia spp. of felines indicated the presence of new Babesia species or genotypes in the lions and leopards, and unknown Theileria sp. in the cheetahs. Phylogenetic analyses using partial sequences of 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene showed that the parasite infecting the lions belong to the Babesia canis complex, and the parasite variant detected in the leopards clusters in a clade bearing other Babesia spp. reported in wild felids from Africa. The cheetah isolates falls in the Theileria sensu stricto group. Our findings indicate the occurrence of potentially new species or genotypes of piroplams in all three feline species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular characterization of Babesia and Theileria species in ticks collected in the outskirt of Monte Romano, Lazio Region, Central Italy.

    PubMed

    Toma, Luciano; Di Luca, Marco; Mancini, Fabiola; Severini, Francesco; Mariano, Carmela; Nicolai, Giancarlo; Laghezza Masci, Valentina; Ciervo, Alessandra; Fausto, Anna Maria; Cacciò, Simone Mario

    2017-01-01

    In 2012-2013, an investigation was carried out in the Viterbo province, Lazio region, on ticks and tick-borne Apicomplexan protozoa of the Babesia and Theileria genera. This followed the reporting of high density of ticks by soldiers operating in a military shooting range, and the signaling by owners and local veterinary authorities of several cases of babesiosis among cattle. A total of 422 ticks were collected from 35 heads, whereas 96 ticks were collected by dragging. Ticks were identified as Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus Say (n = 373), Rhipicephalus bursa Canestrini & Fanzago (n = 63), Rhipicephalus sanguineus/turanicus (n = 32), Hyalomma marginatum Koch (n = 49) and Dermacentor marginatus Sulzer, 1776 (n = 1). A randomly selected sample of ticks (235 from animals and 36 by dragging) was analyzed using molecular methods to detect species of Babesia and Theileria. In total, 11 ticks collected from animals (4.7%) and two ticks (5.5%) collected by dragging were positive. Sequencing of PCR products of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene revealed Babesia caballi (n = 2), Babesia bigemina (n = 3), Theileria sergenti/buffeli/orientalis (n = 7) and Theileria equi (n = 1). None of the detected species has been associated with human infection.

  11. High-Quality Draft Genome Sequence of Babesia divergens, the Etiological Agent of Cattle and Human Babesiosis

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta, Isabel; González, Luis M.; Estrada, Karel; Grande, Ricardo; Zaballos, Ángel; Lobo, Cheryl A.; Barrera, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Babesia divergens causes significant morbidity and mortality in cattle and splenectomized or immunocompromised individuals. Here, we present a 10.7-Mb high-quality draft genome of this parasite close to chromosome resolution that will enable comparative genome analyses and synteny studies among related parasites. PMID:25395649

  12. Detection and molecular characterization of canine babesiosis causative agent Babesia canis in the naturally infected dog in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Paulauskas, Algimantas; Radzijevskaja, Jana; Karvelienė, Birutė; Grigonis, Aidas; Aleksandravičienė, Asta; Zamokas, Gintaras; Babickaitė, Lina; Sabūnas, Vytautas; Petkevičius, Saulius

    2014-10-15

    Canine babesiosis caused by Babesia canis is an emerging infectious disease in Europe. Although previously uncommon, canine babesiosis has become quite frequent in Lithuania during the past decade. In the last few years an increasing number of cases with a wide variety of clinical signs have been recorded throughout the country. In Lithuania the identification of the disease agent in veterinarian clinics is based on a microscopic analysis of size and morphology. To date, no data on the genetic characterization of Babesia species in dogs have been documented for Lithuania. A total of 123 blood samples from dogs showing clinical signs of babesiosis on the basis of veterinary examination were tested for the presence of babesial parasites. Babesia isolated from dogs were detected and characterized by nested-PCR and sequence analysis of a fragment of the 18S rRNA gene. Babesia parasites were detected in blood smears of 94 dogs (76.4%). The molecular analysis revealed the presence of B. canis in 108 dogs (87.8%). Two genotypes of B. canis were distinguished on the basis on two nucleotide (GA → AG) substitutions observed in 18S rRNA gene sequences. The results of the present study provide knowledge of the distribution of B. canis genotypes in dogs in Lithuania, and show the necessity to use a molecular analysis for an accurate diagnosis of canine babesiosis.

  13. Assessment of theileria equi and babesia caballi infections in equine populations in Egypt by molecular, serological and hematological approaches

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Equine piroplasmosis caused by Theileria equi, Babesia caballi, or both, cause significant economic losses in the equine industry and remains uncontrolled in Egypt. Methods: T. equi and B. caballi infections were assessed in blood from 88 horses and 51 donkeys from different localities ...

  14. Divergent macrophage responses to Mycobacterium bovis among naturally exposed uninfected and infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz-López, Omar A; García-Gil, Cindy; Morales-Martínez, Claudia; López-Rincón, Gonzalo; Estrada-Chávez, Ciro; Gutiérrez-Pabello, José A; Esquivel-Solís, Hugo

    2017-05-01

    Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis (TB), is a successful pathogen that remains an important global threat to livestock. Cattle naturally exposed to M. bovis normally become reactive to the M. bovis-purified protein derivative (tuberculin) skin test; however, some individuals remain negative, suggesting that they may be resistant to infection. To better understand host innate resistance to infection, 26 cattle from herds with a long history of high TB prevalence were included in this study. We investigated the bactericidal activity, the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and the TB-related gene expression profile after in vitro M. bovis challenge of monocyte-derived macrophages from cattle with TB (n=17) and from non-infected, exposed cattle (in-contacts, n=9). The disease status was established based on the tuberculin skin test and blood interferon-gamma test responses, the presence of visible lesions at inspection on abattoirs and the histopathology and culture of M. bovis. Although macrophages from TB-infected cattle enabled M. bovis replication, macrophages from healthy, exposed cattle had twofold lower bacterial loads, overproduced nitric oxide and had lower interleukin (IL)-10 gene expression (P⩽0.05). Higher mRNA expression levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase, C-C motif chemokine ligand 2 and IL-12 were observed in macrophages from all in-contact cattle than in macrophages from their TB-infected counterparts, which expressed more tumour necrosis factor-α; however, the differences were not statistically significant owing to individual variation. These results confirm that macrophage bactericidal responses have a crucial role in innate resistance to M. bovis infection in cattle.

  15. Susceptibilities of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum strains to antimicrobial agents in vitro.

    PubMed

    ter Laak, E A; Noordergraaf, J H; Verschure, M H

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the susceptibility of various strains of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum, which are prevalent causes of pneumonia in calves, to 16 antimicrobial agents in vitro. The MICs of the antimicrobial agents were determined by a serial broth dilution method for 16 field strains and the type strain of M. bovis, for 19 field strains and the type strain of M. dispar, and for 17 field strains of U. diversum. Final MICs for M. bovis and M. dispar were read after 7 days and final MICs for U. diversum after 1 to 2 days. All strains tested were susceptible to tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin but were resistant to nifuroquine and streptomycin. Most strains of U. diversum were intermediately susceptible to oxytetracycline but fully susceptible to chlortetracycline; most strains of M. bovis and M. dispar, however, were resistant to both agents. Strains of M. dispar and U. diversum were susceptible to doxycycline and minocycline, but strains of M. bovis were only intermediately susceptible. Susceptibility or resistance to chloramphenicol, spiramycin, spectinomycin, lincomycin, or enrofloxacin depended on the species but was not equal for the three species. The type strains of M. bovis and M. dispar were more susceptible to various antimicrobial agents, including tetracyclines, than the field strains. This finding might indicate that M. bovis and M. dispar strains are becoming resistant to these agents. Antimicrobial agents that are effective in vitro against all three mycoplasma species can be considered for treating mycoplasma infections in pneumonic calves. Therefore, tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin may be preferred over oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline.

  16. Susceptibilities of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum strains to antimicrobial agents in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    ter Laak, E A; Noordergraaf, J H; Verschure, M H

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the susceptibility of various strains of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum, which are prevalent causes of pneumonia in calves, to 16 antimicrobial agents in vitro. The MICs of the antimicrobial agents were determined by a serial broth dilution method for 16 field strains and the type strain of M. bovis, for 19 field strains and the type strain of M. dispar, and for 17 field strains of U. diversum. Final MICs for M. bovis and M. dispar were read after 7 days and final MICs for U. diversum after 1 to 2 days. All strains tested were susceptible to tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin but were resistant to nifuroquine and streptomycin. Most strains of U. diversum were intermediately susceptible to oxytetracycline but fully susceptible to chlortetracycline; most strains of M. bovis and M. dispar, however, were resistant to both agents. Strains of M. dispar and U. diversum were susceptible to doxycycline and minocycline, but strains of M. bovis were only intermediately susceptible. Susceptibility or resistance to chloramphenicol, spiramycin, spectinomycin, lincomycin, or enrofloxacin depended on the species but was not equal for the three species. The type strains of M. bovis and M. dispar were more susceptible to various antimicrobial agents, including tetracyclines, than the field strains. This finding might indicate that M. bovis and M. dispar strains are becoming resistant to these agents. Antimicrobial agents that are effective in vitro against all three mycoplasma species can be considered for treating mycoplasma infections in pneumonic calves. Therefore, tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin may be preferred over oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline. PMID:8452363

  17. The immune response of bovine mammary epithelial cells to live or heat-inactivated Mycoplasma bovis.

    PubMed

    Zbinden, Christina; Pilo, Paola; Frey, Joachim; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Wellnitz, Olga

    2015-09-30

    Mycoplasma bovis is an emerging bacterial agent causing bovine mastitis. Although these cell wall-free bacteria lack classical virulence factors, they are able to activate the immune system of the host. However, effects on the bovine mammary immune system are not yet well characterized and detailed knowledge would improve the prevention and therapy of mycoplasmal mastitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunogenic effects of M. bovis on the mammary gland in an established primary bovine mammary epithelial cell (bMEC) culture system. Primary bMEC of four different cows were challenged with live and heat-inactivated M. bovis strain JF4278 isolated from acute bovine mastitis, as well as with the type strain PG45. The immune response was evaluated 6 and 24h after mycoplasmal challenge by measuring the relative mRNA expression of selected immune factors by quantitative PCR. M. bovis triggered an immune response in bMEC, reflected by the upregulation of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin(IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, lactoferrin, Toll-like receptor-2, RANTES, and serum amyloid A mRNA. Interestingly, this cellular reaction was only observed in response to live, but not to heat-inactivated M. bovis, in contrast to other bacterial pathogens of mastitis such as Staphylococcus aureus. This study provides evidence that bMEC exhibit a strong inflammatory reaction in response to live M. bovis. The lack of a cellular response to heat-inactivated M. bovis supports the current hypothesis that mycoplasmas activate the immune system through secreted secondary metabolites.

  18. Isolation and molecular characterization of Mycobacterium bovis from Kafue lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis) from Zambia.

    PubMed

    Malama, Sydney; Johansen, Tone Bjordal; Muma, John Bwalya; Mwanza, Sydney; Djønne, Berit; Godfroid, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is a chronic bacterial disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis. Infections due to M. bovis, which serves as a stable reservoir, can pose serious challenge to control and eradicate in both wildlife and livestock at the interface. This study aimed at isolating and characterizing M. bovis from Kafue lechwe (Kobus leche kafuensis) and black lechwe (Kobus leche smithemani) at the animal/human interface in Zambia. The samples with lesions compatible with BTB collected during the hunting seasons of 2009 and 2010 were cultured for isolation of mycobacteria using Stonebrink with pyruvate (BD Diagnostics, MD, USA) and Middlebrook 7H10 (BD Diagnostics) slants. Isolated mycobacteria were identified using IS6110 polymerase chain reaction and deletion analysis. Molecular characterization of the isolates was performed using spoligotyping and mycobacteria interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR) with nine loci. Data was analyzed using BioNumerics software 6.1. Out of the 39 samples, acid fast bacilli were detected in 27 (69.2 %) based on smear microscopy. Seven isolates were found to belong to Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex, and all were identified as M. bovis based on deletion analysis. All seven isolates were identical on spoligotyping as belonging to the SB0120 (SIT 482). MIRU-VNTR differentiated the isolates into five different patterns. This study has confirmed that M. bovis circulates in the Kafue lechwe, and non-tuberculous mycobacteria were detected in the black lechwe in Zambia which represents a wildlife reservoir, with a potential to spillover to cattle and humans. Isolates of M. bovis from lechwe antelopes are much conserved as only one spoligotype was detected. The study has shown that three loci differentiated fairly well. This option is cheap and less laborious, and hence a better option in resource-strained country like Zambia. The study further showed that some of the loci recommended by the European

  19. Comparative Proteomics Analysis of Human Macrophages Infected with Virulent Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei; Wang, Rui; Dong, Wenqi; Hu, Linlin; Zong, Bingbing; Zhang, Yanyan; Wang, Xiangru; Guo, Aizhen; Zhang, Anding; Xiang, Yaozu; Chen, Huanchun; Tan, Chen

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), the most common pathogens of tuberculosis (TB), is virulent to human and cattle, and transmission between cattle and humans warrants reconsideration concerning food safety and public health. Recently, efforts have begun to analyze cellular proteomic responses induced by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). However, the underlying mechanisms by which virulent M. bovis affects human hosts are not fully understood. For the present study, we utilized a global and comparative labeling strategy of isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) to assess proteomic changes in the human monocyte cell line (THP-1) using a vaccine strain and two virulent strains H37Rv and M. bovis. We measured 2,032 proteins, of which 61 were significantly differentially regulated. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis was employed to investigate the canonical pathways and functional networks involved in the infection. Several pathways, most notably the phagosome maturation pathway and TNF signaling pathway, were differentially affected by virulent strain treatment, including the key proteins CCL20 and ICAM1. Our qRT-PCR results were in accordance with those obtained from iTRAQ. The key enzyme MTHFD2, which is mainly involved in metabolism pathways, as well as LAMTOR2 might be effective upon M. bovis infection. String analysis also suggested that the vacuolar protein VPS26A interacted with TBC1D9B uniquely induced by M. bovis. In this study, we have first demonstrated the application of iTRAQ to compare human protein alterations induced by virulent M. bovis infections, thus providing a conceptual understanding of mycobacteria pathogenesis within the host as well as insight into preventing and controlling TB in human and animal hosts' transmission. PMID:28337427

  20. Mycobacterium bovis DNA detection in colostrum as a potential indicator of vaccination effectiveness against bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Rodríguez, Sara E; Gordiano-Hidalgo, María Alejandra; López-Rincón, Gonzálo; Bojorquez-Narváez, Luis; Padilla-Ramírez, Francisco Javier; Pereira-Suárez, Ana Laura; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto; Estrada-Chávez, Ciro

    2013-04-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) remains a problem on many dairy farms in Mexico, as well as a public health risk. We previously found a high frequency of Mycobacterium bovis DNA in colostrum from dairy cows using a nested PCR to detect mpb70. Since there are no reliable in vivo tests to determine the effectiveness of booster Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination against bTB, in this work we monitored M. bovis DNA in colostrum by using this nested PCR. In order to decrease the risk of adverse reactions in animals likely containing viable M. bovis, a single application of BCG and a subunit vaccine (EEP-1) formulated with M. bovis culture filtrate proteins (CFP) and a copolymer as the adjuvant was performed in tuberculin skin test-negative cattle (TST(-)), while TST reactor animals (TST(+)) received EEP-1 only. Booster immunization using EEP-1 was applied to both groups, 2 months after primary vaccination to whole herds and 12 months later to lactating cows. Colostrum samples were collected from 6 farms where the cows were vaccinated over a 12-month period postvaccination and, for comparison, from one control farm where the cows were not vaccinated with comparable bTB prevalence. We observed an inverse relationship between the frequency of M. bovis DNA detection and time postvaccination at the first (P < 0.001) and second (P < 0.0001) 6-month periods. Additionally, the concentration of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was higher in mpb70 PCR-positive colostrum samples (P = 0.0003). These results suggest that M. bovis DNA frequency in colostrum could be a potentially useful biomarker for bTB vaccine efficacy on commercial dairy farms.

  1. Mycobacterium bovis DNA Detection in Colostrum as a Potential Indicator of Vaccination Effectiveness against Bovine Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Rodríguez, Sara E.; Gordiano-Hidalgo, María Alejandra; López-Rincón, Gonzálo; Bojorquez-Narváez, Luis; Padilla-Ramírez, Francisco Javier; Pereira-Suárez, Ana Laura; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) remains a problem on many dairy farms in Mexico, as well as a public health risk. We previously found a high frequency of Mycobacterium bovis DNA in colostrum from dairy cows using a nested PCR to detect mpb70. Since there are no reliable in vivo tests to determine the effectiveness of booster Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination against bTB, in this work we monitored M. bovis DNA in colostrum by using this nested PCR. In order to decrease the risk of adverse reactions in animals likely containing viable M. bovis, a single application of BCG and a subunit vaccine (EEP-1) formulated with M. bovis culture filtrate proteins (CFP) and a copolymer as the adjuvant was performed in tuberculin skin test-negative cattle (TST−), while TST reactor animals (TST+) received EEP-1 only. Booster immunization using EEP-1 was applied to both groups, 2 months after primary vaccination to whole herds and 12 months later to lactating cows. Colostrum samples were collected from 6 farms where the cows were vaccinated over a 12-month period postvaccination and, for comparison, from one control farm where the cows were not vaccinated with comparable bTB prevalence. We observed an inverse relationship between the frequency of M. bovis DNA detection and time postvaccination at the first (P < 0.001) and second (P < 0.0001) 6-month periods. Additionally, the concentration of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) was higher in mpb70 PCR-positive colostrum samples (P = 0.0003). These results suggest that M. bovis DNA frequency in colostrum could be a potentially useful biomarker for bTB vaccine efficacy on commercial dairy farms. PMID:23425597

  2. New Insights into Mycobacterium bovis Prevalence in Wild Mammals in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Matos, A C; Figueira, L; Martins, M H; Pinto, M L; Matos, M; Coelho, A C

    2016-10-01

    A survey to determine the prevalence of Mycobacterium bovis in wild mammals in Portugal was conducted by testing samples from hunted animals and those found dead between 2009 and 2013. In this study, we investigated 2116 wild mammals. Post-mortem examinations were performed, and tissues were collected from wild mammals representing 8 families and 11 different species, with a total of 393 animals analysed. Cultures were performed, and acid-fast isolates were identified by PCR. Tissues were also screened for Mycobacterium bovis by directly extracting DNA and testing for the Mycobacterium bovis-specific sequences. Mycobacterium bovis prevalence was 26.9% (95% CI: 22.8-31.5%). Mycobacterium bovis was recorded in 106 of the 393 studied species: prevalence by species were 26.9% (95% CI: 16.8-40.2%) in red foxes, 20.0% (95% CI: 7.0-45.2%) in Egyptian mongooses, 21.4% (95% CI: 16.2-27.7%) in wild boar and 38.3% (95% CI: 29.9-47.4%) in red deer. Mycobacterium bovis infection was detected in six of eight taxonomic families. For some species, the small sample sizes obtained were a reflection of their restricted range and low abundance, making estimates of infection prevalence very difficult (1 beech marten of 4; 1 Eurasian otter of 3; 2 common genet of 3). Infection was not detected in European badgers, hedgehog, wild rabbits and hare. The results of this study confirm the presence of Mycobacterium bovis infection in wild carnivores in Portugal. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. PCR detection of Bartonella bovis and Bartonella henselae in the blood of beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Cherry, Natalie A; Maggi, Ricardo G; Cannedy, Allen L; Breitschwerdt, Edward B

    2009-03-30

    Although an organism primarily associated with non-clinical bacteremia in domestic cattle and wild ruminants, Bartonella bovis was recently defined as a cause of bovine endocarditis. The purpose of this study was to develop a B. bovis species-specific PCR assay that could be used to confirm the molecular prevalence of Bartonella spp. infection. Blood samples from 142 cattle were tested by conventional PCR targeting the Bartonella 16S-23S intergenic spacer (ITS) region. Overall, Bartonella DNA was detected in 82.4% (117/142) of the cattle using either Bartonella genus primers or B. bovis species-specific primers. Based upon size, 115 of the 117 Bartonella genus ITS PCR amplicons were consistent with B. bovis infection, which was confirmed by PCR using B. bovis species-specific primers and by sequencing three randomly selected, appropriately sized Bartonella genus PCR amplicons. By DNA sequencing, Bartonella henselae was confirmed as the two remaining amplicons, showing sequence similarity to B. henselae URBHLIE 9 (AF312496) and B. henselae Houston 1 (NC_005956), respectively. Following pre-enrichment blood culture of 12 samples in Bartonella alpha Proteobacteria growth medium (BAPGM) B. henselae infection was found in another three cows. Four of the five cows infected with B. henselae were co-infected with B. bovis. To our knowledge this study describes the first detection of B. henselae in any large ruminant species in the world and supports the need for further investigation of prevalence and pathogenic potential of B. henselae and B. bovis in cattle.

  4. Molecular detection and genetic diversity of Babesia gibsoni in dogs in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Terao, Masashi; Akter, Shirin; Yasin, Md Golam; Nakao, Ryo; Kato, Hirotomo; Alam, Mohammad Zahangir; Katakura, Ken

    2015-04-01

    Babesia gibsoni is a tick-borne hemoprotozoan parasite of dogs that often causes fever and hemolytic illness. Detection of B. gibsoni has been predominantly reported in Asian countries, including Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Malaysia, Bangladesh and India. The present study shows the first molecular characterization of B. gibsoni detected from dogs in Bangladesh. Blood samples were collected on FTA® Elute cards from 50 stray dogs in Mymensingh District in Bangladesh. DNA eluted from the cards was subjected to nested PCR for the 18S rRNA gene of Babesia species. Approximately 800bp PCR products were detected in 15 of 50 dogs (30%). Based on restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and direct sequencing of the PCR products, all parasite isolates were identified as B. gibsoni. Furthermore, the BgTRAP (B. gibsoni thrombospondin-related adhesive protein) gene fragments were detected in 13 of 15 18S rRNA gene PCR positive blood samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the BgTRAP gene revealed that B. gibsoni parasites in Bangladesh formed a cluster, which was genetically different from other Asian B. gibsoni isolates. In addition, tandem repeat analysis of the BgTRAP gene clearly showed considerable genetic variation among Bangladeshi isolates. These results suggested that B. gibsoni parasites in a different genetic clade are endemic in dogs in Bangladesh. Further studies are required to elucidate the origin, distribution, vector and pathogenesis of B. gibsoni parasites circulating in dogs in Bangladesh.

  5. Coinfection of sheep with Anaplasma, Theileria and Babesia species in the Kurdistan Region, Iraq.

    PubMed

    Renneker, S; Abdo, J; Bakheit, M A; Kullmann, B; Beyer, D; Ahmed, J; Seitzer, U

    2013-11-01

    Infections of small ruminants with Anaplasma, Theileria and Babesia species are widely distributed in the old world and are of great economic impact. In Iraq, data on disease occurrence in sheep caused by above-mentioned infectious agents are scarce. This study provides information on various haemoparasitic agents infecting sheep in the Kurdistan Region, Iraq, using molecular diagnostic tools. Altogether, 195 samples originating from three governorates in the Kurdistan Region, namely Duhok, Erbil and Sulaimaniya, were analysed. The following pathogens were identified: Anaplasma ovis (62.6%), Theileria ovis (14.35%), T. lestoquardi (7.7%), T. uilenbergi (5.6%) and Babesia ovis (1.5%). T. uilenbergi is detected for the first time in Iraq. Coinfection of sheep with different pathogens could be observed in this study, and it was found that 45 of 195 (23%) of the samples contained more than one pathogen. Even triple-positive samples were identified in 3% of the investigated animals. In conclusion, we confirm the coinfection of sheep with various haemoparasitic pathogen species in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. Further investigations are needed to reveal the epidemiology of the diseases, the respective tick vectors, and, in the case of coinfection, pathogens' interaction and possible cross-protection.

  6. First Molecular Detection of Babesia gibsoni in Dogs from Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    He, Lan; Miao, Xiaoyan; Hu, Jinfang; Huang, Yuan; He, Pei; He, Junwei; Yu, Long; Malobi, Ngabu; Shi, Ligang; Zhao, Junlong

    2017-01-01

    Canine piroplasmosis is a significant disease in dogs caused by Babesia and Theileria parasites. The clinical manifestations range from mild illness to serious disease depending on the parasite species and the physical condition of the infected dog. Canine piroplasmosis has been reported to be prevalent in China. However, no molecular evidence of the disease has been reported in pet dogs from Wuhan. In this study, 118 blood samples were randomly collected from pet dogs in veterinary clinics. The blood samples were subjected to both microscopic examination and reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assays to detect piroplasm infection. Parasites were observed in 10 blood samples via microscopic examination, whereas there were 14 Babesia gibsoni-positive RLB tests. Phylogenetic analysis was performed after the 18S rRNA and ITS gene sequences from the 14 positive samples were cloned and sequenced. The results confirmed the existence of B. gibsoni in this area. This is the first molecular report of canine babesiosis in pet dogs from Wuhan, China. Pet dogs are companion animals, and the prevalence of babesiosis will be of concern in daily life. This study will help veterinarians better understand the prevalence of canine babesiosis and provide a guide for disease control in pet dogs.

  7. Detection of Leishmania infantum, Babesia canis, and rickettsiae in ticks removed from dogs living in Italy.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Michele; Nicetto, Martina; Fogliazza, Alessandro; Montarsi, Fabrizio; Caldin, Marco; Furlanello, Tommaso; Solano-Gallego, Laia

    2012-12-01

    The aims of this study were to determine natural infections by Anaplasma phagocytophilum/Anaplasma platys, Bartonella henselae, Ehrlichia canis, Leishmania infantum, Rickettsia spp., Babesia spp., and Hepatozoon spp. by molecular methods in ticks (n=91) removed from dogs with clinical signs and laboratory abnormalities compatible with tick-borne diseases (n=22) living in Italy and to assess the distribution and species of ticks encountered. Ticks from dogs living in southern Italy were all identified as Rhipicephalus sanguineus (n=25), ticks from central Italy included Rh. sanguineus (n=8) and Ixodes ricinus (n=9), ticks from northern Italy included Rh. sanguineus (n=45), Dermacentor marginatus (n=3), and one I. ricinus. Leishmania infantum, Rickettsia spp., and Babesia canis were the only pathogens detected in 7 (8%), 4 (4%), and 2 (2%) out of 91 ticks, respectively. L. infantum was detected in I. ricinus from central Italy and in Rh. sanguineus from northern and central Italy. Rickettsia conorii and Ri. massiliae were detected in Rh. sanguineus ticks from central and southern Italy (Sicily), respectively. Bab. canis was detected in D. marginatus ticks from northern Italy.

  8. Babesia divergens apical membrane antigen 1 and its interaction with the human red blood cell.

    PubMed

    Montero, Estrella; Rodriguez, Marilis; Oksov, Yelena; Lobo, Cheryl A

    2009-11-01

    Multiple parasite ligand-erythrocyte receptor interactions must occur for successful Babesia and Plasmodium invasion of the human red cell. One such parasite ligand is the apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) which is a conserved apicomplexan protein present in the micronemes and then secreted onto the surface of the merozoite. Much evidence exists for a vital role for AMA1 in host cell invasion; however, its interaction with the host erythrocyte has remained controversial. In this paper, we present a detailed characterization of a Babesia divergens homolog of AMA1 (BdAMA1), and taking advantage of the relatively high amounts of native BdAMA1 available from the parasite culture system, show that proteolytic products of native BdAMA1 bind to a trypsin- and chymotrypsin-sensitive receptor on the red blood cell. Moreover, immuno-electron microscopic images of the B. divergens merozoite captured during invasion offer additional evidence of the presence of BdAMA1 on the red cell membrane. Given the importance of AMA1 in invasion and the central role invasion plays in pathogenesis, these studies have implications both for novel drug design and for the development of new vaccine approaches aimed at interfering with AMA1 function.

  9. PCR-Based Detection of Babesia ovis in Rhipicephalus bursa and Small Ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilnejad, Bijan; Tavassoli, Mousa; Asri-Rezaei, Siamak; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Mardani, Karim; Jalilzadeh-Amin, Ghader; Golabi, Mostafa; Arjmand, Jafar

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the prevalence of Babesia ovis infection in adult Rhipicephalus bursa and small ruminants in West Azerbaijan province, Iran. Blood samples were collected from 280 sheep and 122 goats of forty randomly selected flocks. Specific B. ovis fragment was detected in 67 animals (16.7%), of which 52 animals (18.6%) were sheep and 15 animals (12.2%) goats (P < 0.05). Of the 848 R. bursa collected from naturally infested small ruminants and farm dogs, Babesia ovis was detected by PCR in salivary glands of 94 adult ticks. The frequency of B. ovis infection was higher in flocks with tick in comparison with animals without tick (P < 0.05). Positive amplification from blood of ruminants, ticks, oviposition ticks, eggs, and larvae was subjected to restriction digestion with HphI. One RFLP profile was produced. The PCR-RFLP results indicated that one strain of B. ovis exists in this area. The results showed that the PCR was useful method to investigate the epidemiology of small ruminants' babesiosis. Furthermore, R. Bursa, which can transovarially transmit B. ovis and as well as being widely distributed in West Azerbaijan province, Iran, might play an important role in the field as a natural vector of B. ovis. PMID:24876944

  10. Survey of babesiosis in symptomatic dogs from Romania: occurrence of Babesia gibsoni associated with breed.

    PubMed

    Imre, Mirela; Farkas, Róbert; Ilie, Marius Stelian; Imre, Kálmán; Dărăbuş, Gheorghe

    2013-12-01

    Blood samples from 49 symptomatic dogs from 5 western and north-western counties of Romania were screened using microscopic examination, polymerase-chain-reaction-restriction-fragment-length-polymorphism procedure (PCR-RFLP), and sequence analysis. Results of the microscopic evaluation of stained blood smears revealed 45 positive samples with the presence of large and small intraerythrocytic piroplasms in 35 and 10 samples, respectively. Babesia canis (35/49, 71.4%) and Babesia gibsoni (14/49, 28.6%) were identified and differentiated by PCR-RFLP targeting the 18S rRNA gene. Results of the sequence analysis of all B. gibsoni and 17 randomly selected B. canis PCR products confirmed the PCR-RFLP-diagnosed species. The distribution of B. gibsoni infection was positively associated (p<0.001) with fighting dog breeds including infection in 12 American Pit Bull Terriers and one American Staffordshire Terrier. This report is the first to present molecular evidence of the occurrence of B. gibsoni in Romania confirmed by sequencing.

  11. Detection of Babesia bigemina in cattle of different genetic groups and in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus tick.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M C S; Oliveira-Sequeira, T C G; Regitano, L C A; Alencar, M M; Néo, T A; Silva, A M; Oliveira, H N

    2008-08-17

    Babesia bigemina infections were investigated in four genetic groups of beef cattle and in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus engorged female ticks. Blood samples and engorged female ticks were collected from 15 cows and 15 calves from each of the following genetic groups: Nelore, Angus x Nelore, Canchim x Nelore, and Simmental x Nelore. Microscopic examination of blood smears and tick hemolymph revealed that merozoites of B. bigemina (6/60) as well as kinetes of Babesia spp. (9/549) were only detected in samples (blood and ticks, respectively) originated from calves. PCR-based methods using primers for specific detection of B. bigemina revealed 100% infection in both calves and cows, regardless the genetic group. Tick infection was detected by nested-PCR amplifications showing that the frequency of B. bigemina was higher (P<0.01) in female ticks collected from calves (134/549) than in those collected from cows (52/553). The frequency of B. bigemina was similar in ticks collected from animals, either cows or calves, of the four genetic groups (P>0.05).

  12. Microscopic and Molecular Detection of Theileria (Babesia) Equi Infection in Equids of Kurdistan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    HABIBI, Gholamreza; ESMAEILNIA, Kasra; HABLOLVARID, Mohammad Hasan; AFSHARI, Asghar; ZAMEN, Mohsen; BOZORGI, Soghra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Equine piroplasmosis (EP) is the cause of persistent tick-borne infection with no symptoms, but the most important problem of EP is due to the persistent carrier state. Carrier animals to Babesia (Theileria) equi (Laveran 1901) and B. caballi (Nuttall, 1910) infestation could be identified by extremely sensitive PCR-based method. The purpose of this study was to identify the causative agents of equine piroplasmosis based on molecular and microscopic assays in equids from Kurdistan Province, Iran. Methods: Thirty one horse and mule blood samples were used with history of living in Kurdistan Province of Iran. The blood specimens were utilized for T. equi and B. caballi DNA identification by PCR and Giemsa stained smears for microscopic observation. Results: The results clearly showed the presence of B. (Theileria) equi DNA in 30 of 31 blood samples (96.77%), but the microscopic examination revealed the 3 of 31 positive Babesia like organisms in the red blood cells (9.67%). Conclusion: The obtained results demonstrated the presence of hidden B. (Theileria) equi infection in horses with previous habitance in Kurdistan Province of Iran. The carrier animals became a main source of infection and can transmit the disease. Therefore, hidden infection might be considered as a health threatening and limiting factor in animals used in therapeutic antisera research and production centers. PMID:27095973

  13. Fatal acute babesiosis in captive grey wolves (Canis lupus) due to Babesia canis.

    PubMed

    Erdélyi, Károly; Mezősi, László; Vladov, Sztojkov; Földvári, Gábor

    2014-04-01

    Two adult male Eurasian grey wolves belonging to a group of 12 animals, kept in an open air 15,000-m(2) enclosure at the Bear Farm facility near Veresegyháza, Hungary, were found dead in September 2002. Another 2 wolves died during the same period, but laboratory examination of their carcasses was not possible. During necropsy both animals were found to be in a good body condition. Oral mucosa, conjunctiva, sclera, and subcutaneous tissues revealed severe jaundice. The liver, gall bladder, and spleen were enlarged. The kidneys were paler than normal, and petechial haemorrhages were also seen under their fascia. Small, round Babesia-like organisms, 1.5-2 μm in diameter, were demonstrated in large numbers in stained impression smears made from the spleens of both animals. PCR amplification and sequencing identified Babesia canis. There are very few reports on babesiosis in the grey wolf, and our findings draw attention to the potential threat posed by B. canis that will probably have to be taken into account in future ex situ and in situ wolf conservation efforts.

  14. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Babesia orientalis Rhoptry Neck 2 BoRON2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Long; He, Pei; He, Junwei; Sun, Yali; Huang, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Babesiosis caused by Babesia orientalis is one of the most prevalent infections of water buffalo transmitted by Rhipicephalus haemaphysaloides causing a parasitic and hemolytic disease. The organelles proteins localized in apical membrane especially rhoptries neck and microneme protein form a complex called moving junction important during invasion process of parasites belonging to apicomplexan group, including Babesia species. A truncated fragment coding a 936 bps fragment was cloned in pMD-19T and subcloned into pET32 (a)+ expression vector, expressed in E. coli BL21. Purified recombinant BoRON2 was used to produce polyclonal antibody against BoRON2. Here, we identified the full sequence of gene encoding the rhoptry neck 2 protein that we named BoRON2 which is 4035 bp in full-length open reading frame without introns, encoding a polypeptide of 1345 amino acids. Western blot of rBoRON2 probed with buffalo positive serum analysis revealed a band of around 150 kDa in parasite lysates, suggesting an active involvement during invasion process. These findings most likely are constructive in perspective of ongoing research focused particularly on water buffalo babesiosis prevention and therapeutics and globally provide new information for genes comparative analysis. PMID:28775897

  15. Humoral Immune Responses of White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) to Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination and Experimental Challenge with M. bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Monitoring serum antibody production kinetics to multiple mycobacterial antigens can be useful as a diagnostic tool for the detection of Mycobacterium bovis infection as well as for the characterization of disease progression and efficacy of intervention strategies in several species. In the presen...

  16. Humoral Immune Responses of White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) to Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination and Experimental Challenge with M. bovis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Monitoring serum antibody production kinetics to multiple mycobacterial antigens can be useful as a diagnostic tool for the detection of Mycobacterium bovis infection as well as for the characterization of disease progression and efficacy of intervention strategies in several species. Humoral immun...

  17. T-cell mRNA Expression in Response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination and Mycobacterium bovis Infection of White-tailed deer

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding immune responses of white-tailed deer (WTD) to infection with Mycobacterium bovis provides insight into mechanisms of pathogen control and may provide clues to development of effective vaccine strategies. WTD were vaccinated with either BCG strain Pasteur or BCG Danish. Both vaccinates...

  18. Toxicogenomic response of Mycobacterium bovis BCG to peracetic acid and a comparative analysis of the M. bovis BCG response to three oxidative disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Nde, Chantal W; Toghrol, Freshteh; Jang, Hyeung-Jin; Bentley, William E

    2011-04-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of death worldwide and infects thousands of Americans annually. Mycobacterium bovis causes tuberculosis in humans and several animal species. Peracetic acid is an approved tuberculocide in hospital and domestic environments. This study presents for the first time the transcriptomic changes in M. bovis BCG after treatment with 0.1 mM peracetic acid for 10 and 20 min. This study also presents for the first time a comparison among the transcriptomic responses of M. bovis BCG to three oxidative disinfectants: peracetic acid, sodium hypochlorite, and hydrogen peroxide after 10 min of treatment. Results indicate that arginine biosynthesis, virulence, and oxidative stress response genes were upregulated after both peracetic acid treatment times. Three DNA repair genes were downregulated after 10 and 20 min and cell wall component genes were upregulated after 20 min. The devR-devS signal transduction system was upregulated after 10 min, suggesting a role in the protection against peracetic acid treatment. Results also suggest that peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite both induce the expression of the ctpF gene which is upregulated in hypoxic environments. Further, this study reveals that in M. bovis BCG, hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid both induce the expression of katG involved in oxidative stress response and the mbtD and mbtI genes involved in iron regulation/virulence.

  19. Hemoparasites in a wild primate: Infection patterns suggest interaction of Plasmodium and Babesia in a lemur species☆

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Andrea; Fichtel, Claudia; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Kappeler, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Hemoparasites can cause serious morbidity in humans and animals and often involve wildlife reservoirs. Understanding patterns of hemoparasite infections in natural populations can therefore inform about emerging disease risks, especially in the light of climate change and human disruption of natural ecosystems. We investigated the effects of host age, sex, host group size and season on infection patterns of Plasmodium sp., Babesia sp. and filarial nematodes in a population of wild Malagasy primates, Verreaux's sifakas (Propithecus verreauxi), as well as the effects of these infections on hematological variables. We tested 45 blood samples from 36 individuals and identified two species of Plasmodium, one species of Babesia and two species of filarial nematodes. Plasmodium spp. and Babesia sp. infections showed opposite patterns of age-dependency, with babesiosis being prevalent among young animals, while older animals were infected with Plasmodium sp. In addition, Babesia sp. infection was a statistically significant negative predictor of Plasmodium sp. infection. These results suggest that Plasmodium and Babesia parasites may interact within the host, either through cross-immunity or via resource competition, so that Plasmodium infections can only establish after babesiosis has resolved. We found no effects of host sex, host group size and season on hemoparasite infections. Infections showed high prevalences and did not influence hematological variables. This preliminary evidence supports the impression that the hosts and parasites considered in this study appear to be well-adapted to each other, resulting in persistent infections with low pathogenic and probably low zoonotic potential. Our results illustrate the crucial role of biodiversity in host-parasite relationships, specifically how within-host pathogen diversity may regulate the abundance of parasites. PMID:26767166

  20. Structural and functional characterization of Bc28.1, major erythrocyte-binding protein from Babesia canis merozoite surface.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yin-Shan; Murciano, Brice; Moubri, Karina; Cibrelus, Prisca; Schetters, Theo; Gorenflot, André; Delbecq, Stéphane; Roumestand, Christian

    2012-03-16

    Babesiosis (formerly known as piroplasmosis) is a tick-borne disease caused by the intraerythrocytic development of protozoa parasites from the genus Babesia. Like Plasmodium falciparum, the agent of malaria, or Toxoplasma gondii, responsible for human toxoplasmosis, Babesia belongs to the Apicomplexa family. Babesia canis is the agent of the canine babesiosis in Europe. Clinical manifestations of this disease range from mild to severe and possibly lead to death by multiple organ failure. The identification and characterization of parasite surface proteins represent major goals, both for the understanding of the Apicomplexa invasion process and for the vaccine potential of such antigens. Indeed, we have already shown that Bd37, the major antigenic adhesion protein from Babesia divergens, the agent of bovine babesiosis, was able to induce complete protection against various parasite strains. The major merozoite surface antigens of Babesia canis have been described as a 28-kDa membrane protein family, anchored at the surface of the merozoite. Here, we demonstrate that Bc28.1, a major member of this multigenic family, is expressed at high levels at the surface of the merozoite. This protein is also found in the parasite in vitro culture supernatants, which are the basis of effective vaccines against canine babesiosis. We defined the erythrocyte binding function of Bc28.1 and determined its high resolution solution structure using NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, although these proteins are thought to play a similar role in the adhesion process, the structure of Bc28.1 from B. canis appears unrelated to the previously published structure of Bd37 from B. divergens. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments also suggest that the mechanism of the interaction with the erythrocyte membrane could be different for the two proteins. The resolution of the structure of Bc28 represents a milestone for the characterization of the parasite erythrocyte binding and its interaction with

  1. Molecular identification of Theileria and Babesia in sheep and goats in the Black Sea Region in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Mehmet Fatih; Aktas, Munir; Dumanli, Nazir

    2013-08-01

    This study was carried out to investigate presence and distribution of Theileria and Babesia species via microscopic examination and reverse line blotting (RLB) techniques in sheep and goats in the Black Sea region of Turkey. For this purpose, 1,128 blood samples (869 sheep and 259 goats) were collected by active surveillance from sheep and goats in different provinces of various cities in the region in the years 2010 and 2011. Smears were prepared from the blood samples, stained with Giemsa, and examined under the light microscope for Theileria and Babesia piroplasms. The genomic DNAs were extracted from blood samples. The length of 360-430-bp fragment in the variable V4 region of 18S SSU rRNA gene of Theileria and Babesia species was amplified using the gDNAs. The polymerase chain reaction products were hybridized to the membrane-connected species-specific probes. A total of 38 animals (3.37%) including 34 sheep (3.91%) and 4 goats (1.54%) were found to be positive for Theileria spp. piroplasms in microscopic examination of smears while Babesia spp. piroplasm could not detected. Infection rates were 34.64% in sheep, 10.04% in goats, and totally 28.99% for Theileria ovis while 0.58% in sheep and totally 0.44% for Babesia ovis. However, Theileria sp. OT3 was detected in 2.65% of sheep and 2.04% of all animals; besides Theileria sp., MK had 0.58% prevalence in sheep and 0.77% in goats, with a total 0.62% with RLB. Although T. ovis and Theileria sp. MK were determined in both sheep and goats, B. ovis and Theileria sp. OT3 were observed only in the sheep. These results provide the first detailed molecular data for sheep and goat theileriosis and babesiosis in the region.

  2. Detection of Enzootic Babesiosis in Baboons (Papio cynocephalus) and Phylogenetic Evidence Supporting Synonymy of the Genera Entopolypoides and Babesia

    PubMed Central

    Bronsdon, Melinda A.; Homer, Mary J.; Magera, Jennifer M. H.; Harrison, Carol; Andrews, Robert G.; Bielitzki, Joseph T.; Emerson, Carol L.; Persing, David H.; Fritsche, Thomas R.

    1999-01-01

    Blood smear evaluation of two baboons (Papio cynocephalus) experiencing acute hemolytic crises following experimental stem cell transplantation revealed numerous intraerythrocytic organisms typical of the genus Babesia. Both animals had received whole-blood transfusions from two baboon donors, one of which was subsequently found to display rare trophozoites of Entopolypoides macaci. An investigation was then undertaken to determine the prevalence of hematozoa in baboons held in our primate colony and to determine the relationship, if any, between the involved species. Analysis of thick and thin blood films from 65 healthy baboons (23 originating from our breeding facility, 26 originating from an out-of-state breeding facility, and 16 imported from Africa) for hematozoa revealed rare E. macaci parasites in 31%, with respective prevalences of 39, 35, and 12%. Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear small-subunit rRNA gene sequences amplified from peripheral blood of a baboon chronically infected with E. macaci demonstrated this parasite to be most closely related to Babesia microti (97.9% sequence similarity); sera from infected animals did not react in indirect fluorescent-antibody tests with Babesia microti antigen, however, suggesting that they represent different species. These results support an emerging view that the genus Entopolypoides Mayer 1933 is synonymous with that of the genus Babesia Starcovici 1893 and that the morphological variation noted among intracellular forms is a function of alteration in host immune status. The presence of an underrecognized, but highly enzootic, Babesia sp. in baboons may result in substantial, unanticipated impact on research programs. The similarity of this parasite to the known human pathogen B. microti may also pose risks to humans undergoing xenotransplantation, mandating effective screening of donor animals. PMID:10203519

  3. Structural and Functional Characterization of Bc28.1, Major Erythrocyte-binding Protein from Babesia canis Merozoite Surface*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yin-Shan; Murciano, Brice; Moubri, Karina; Cibrelus, Prisca; Schetters, Theo; Gorenflot, André; Delbecq, Stéphane; Roumestand, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Babesiosis (formerly known as piroplasmosis) is a tick-borne disease caused by the intraerythrocytic development of protozoa parasites from the genus Babesia. Like Plasmodium falciparum, the agent of malaria, or Toxoplasma gondii, responsible for human toxoplasmosis, Babesia belongs to the Apicomplexa family. Babesia canis is the agent of the canine babesiosis in Europe. Clinical manifestations of this disease range from mild to severe and possibly lead to death by multiple organ failure. The identification and characterization of parasite surface proteins represent major goals, both for the understanding of the Apicomplexa invasion process and for the vaccine potential of such antigens. Indeed, we have already shown that Bd37, the major antigenic adhesion protein from Babesia divergens, the agent of bovine babesiosis, was able to induce complete protection against various parasite strains. The major merozoite surface antigens of Babesia canis have been described as a 28-kDa membrane protein family, anchored at the surface of the merozoite. Here, we demonstrate that Bc28.1, a major member of this multigenic family, is expressed at high levels at the surface of the merozoite. This protein is also found in the parasite in vitro culture supernatants, which are the basis of effective vaccines against canine babesiosis. We defined the erythrocyte binding function of Bc28.1 and determined its high resolution solution structure using NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, although these proteins are thought to play a similar role in the adhesion process, the structure of Bc28.1 from B. canis appears unrelated to the previously published structure of Bd37 from B. divergens. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments also suggest that the mechanism of the interaction with the erythrocyte membrane could be different for the two proteins. The resolution of the structure of Bc28 represents a milestone for the characterization of the parasite erythrocyte binding and its interaction with

  4. Allele-Specific PCR Method Based on pncA and oxyR Sequences for Distinguishing Mycobacterium bovis from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Intraspecific M. bovis pncA Sequence Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    de los Monteros, Luz Elena Espinosa; Galán, Juan Carlos; Gutiérrez, Montserrat; Samper, Sofía; García Marín, Juan F.; Martín, Carlos; Domínguez, Lucas; de Rafael, Luis; Baquero, Fernando; Gómez-Mampaso, Enrique; Blázquez, Jesús

    1998-01-01

    An allele-specific amplification method based on two genetic polymorphisms to differentiate Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Mycobacterium bovis was tested. Based on the differences found at position 169 in the pncA genes from M. tuberculosis and M. bovis, a PCR system which was able to differentiate most of the 237 M. tuberculosis complex isolates tested in one of the two species was developed. All 121 M. tuberculosis strains showed the expected base (cytosine) at position 169. Most of the M. bovis isolates had a guanine at the cited position. Nevertheless, 18 of the 116 M. bovis isolates, all of them goat isolates, showed the pncA polymorphism specific to M. tuberculosis. These results suggest that goat M. bovis may be the nicotinamidase-missing link at the origin of the M. tuberculosis species. Based on the polymorphism found at position 285 in the oxyR gene, the same system was used to differentiate M. tuberculosis from M. bovis. In this case, DNAs from all 121 M. tuberculosis isolates had the expected base (guanine) at this position. In addition, all 116 M. bovis isolates, including those from goats, showed the identical polymorphism (adenine). The oxyR allele-specific amplification method can differentiate M. bovis from M. tuberculosis, is rapid (results can be obtained in less than 3 h), and is easy to perform. PMID:9431955

  5. Comparison of Sputum-Culture Conversion for Mycobacterium bovis and M. tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, Joseph S.; Silk, Benjamin J.; Ershova, Julia; Mazurek, Gerald H.; LoBue, Philip A.; Moonan, Patrick K.

    2017-01-01

    Current US guidelines recommend longer treatment for tuberculosis (TB) caused by pyrazinamide-resistant organisms (e.g., Mycobacterium bovis) than for M. tuberculosis TB. We compared treatment response times for patients with M. bovis TB and M. tuberculosis TB reported in the United States during 2006–2013. We included culture-positive, pulmonary TB patients with genotyping results who received standard 4-drug treatment at the time of diagnosis. Time to sputum-culture conversion was defined as time between treatment start date and date of first consistently culture-negative sputum. We analyzed 297 case-patients with M. bovis TB and 30,848 case-patients with M. tuberculosis TB. After 2 months of treatment, 71% of M. bovis and 65% of M. tuberculosis TB patients showed conversion of sputum cultures to negative. Likelihood of culture conversion was higher for M. bovis than for M. tuberculosis, even after controlling for treatment administration type, sex, and a composite indicator of bacillary burden. PMID:28221125

  6. Mycobacterium bovis infection at the interface between domestic and wild animals in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Hang'ombe, Mudenda B; Munyeme, Musso; Nakajima, Chie; Fukushima, Yukari; Suzuki, Haruka; Matandiko, Wigganson; Ishii, Akihiro; Mweene, Aaron S; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2012-11-14

    In Zambia, the presence of bovine tuberculosis in both wild and domestic animals has long been acknowledged and mutual transmission between them has been predicted without any direct evidence. Elucidation of the circulating Mycobacterium bovis strains at wild and domestic animals interphase area in Zambia, where bovine tuberculosis was diagnosed in wildlife seemed to be important. A PCR identified 15 and 37 M. bovis isolates from lechwe and cattle, respectively. Spoligotype analysis revealed that M. bovis strains from lechwe and cattle in Kafue basin clustered into a major node SB0120, where isolates outside the Kafue basin clustered into different nodes of SB0131 and SB0948. The comparatively higher variety of strains in cattle compared to lechwe elucidated by Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units-Variable Number Tandem Repeats analyses are consistent with cattle being the probable source of M. bovis in wild and domestic animals interphase area in Zambia. These results provide strong evidence of M. bovis strains transfer between cattle and lechwe, with the latter having developed into a sylvatic reservoir host.

  7. Evaluation of Cocktails with Recombinant Proteins of Mycobacterium bovis for a Specific Diagnosis of Bovine Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mon, María Laura; Moyano, Roberto Damián; Viale, Mariana Noelia; Colombatti Olivieri, María Alejandra; Gamietea, Ignacio José; Montenegro, Valeria Noely; Alonso, Bernardo; Santangelo, María de la Paz; Singh, Mahavir; Duran, Rosario; Romano, María Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The Delayed type hypersensitivity skin test (DTH) and interferon-gamma assay are used for the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis (TBB). The specificity of these diagnoses, however, is compromised because both are based on the response against purified protein derivative of Mycobacterium bovis (PPD-B). In this study, we assessed the potential of two cocktails containing M. bovis recombinant proteins: cocktail 1 (C1): ESAT-6, CFP-10 and MPB83 and cocktail 2 (C2): ESAT-6, CFP-10, MPB83, HspX, TB10.3, and MPB70. C1, C2, and PPD-B showed similar response by DTH in M. bovis-sensitized guinea pigs. Importantly, C1 induced a lower response than PPD-B in M. avium-sensitized guinea pigs. In cattle, C1 displayed better performance than PPD-B and C2; indeed, C1 showed the least detection of animals either vaccinated or Map-infected. To optimize the composition of the cocktails, we obtained protein fractions from PPD-B and tested their immunogenicity in experimentally M. bovis-infected cattle. In one highly reactive fraction, seven proteins were identified. The inclusion of FixB in C1 enhanced the recognition of M. bovis-infected cattle without compromising specificity. Our data provide a promising basis for the future development of a cocktail for TBB detection without interference by the presence of sensitized or infected animals with other mycobacteria. PMID:25110654

  8. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis isolates from free-ranging wildlife in South African game reserves.

    PubMed

    Michel, A L; Coetzee, M L; Keet, D F; Maré, L; Warren, R; Cooper, D; Bengis, R G; Kremer, K; van Helden, P

    2009-02-02

    Bovine tuberculosis is endemic in African buffalo and a number of other wildlife species in the Kruger National Park (KNP) and Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park (HiP) in South Africa. It was thought that the infection had been introduced into the KNP ecosystem through direct contact between cattle and buffalo, a hypothesis which was confirmed in this study by IS6110 and PGRS restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) typing. The molecular characterisation of 189 Mycobacterium bovis isolates from nine wildlife species in the HiP, including three smaller associated parks, and the Kruger National Park with adjacent areas showed that the respective epidemics were each caused by an infiltration of a single M. bovis genotype. The two M. bovis strains had different genetic profiles, as demonstrated by hybridisation with the IS6110 and PGRS RFLP probes, as well as with regard to evidence of evolutionary changes to the IS profile. While the M. bovis type in HiP was transmitted between buffaloes and to at least baboon, bushpig and lion without obvious genetic changes in the RFLP patterns, in the KNP a dominant strain was represented in 73% of the M. bovis isolates, whilst the remaining 27% were variants of this strain. No species-specific variants were observed, except for one IS6110 type which was found only in a group of five epidemiologically related greater kudu. This finding was attributed to species-specific behaviour patterns rather than an advanced host-pathogen interaction.

  9. Investigation of a Mycobacterium bovis outbreak in cattle at a Colorado dairy in 2010.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Tolani I; Orloski, Kathleen A; Roberts, Nancy J

    2014-04-01

    To describe an epidemiological investigation of a bovine tuberculosis outbreak on a Colorado dairy operation. A cull dairy cow infected with Mycobacterium bovis (index cow) was detected at a Texas abattoir during routine slaughter surveillance and subsequent diagnostic testing. This initiated an epidemiological investigation that was performed in accordance with USDA regulations. The index cow was traced back to a Colorado dairy (index herd). Of the 908 cattle in the index herd, 101 (11.1%; 86 adult cattle > 2 years old and 15 immature cattle ≤ 2 years old) were infected with M bovis. Fourteen M bovis-infected cattle ≤ 2 years old were identified on 5 additional premises that had purchased cattle from the index herd directly or indirectly. All 115 affected cattle were infected with the same genetic type (spoligotype) of M bovis. A substantial proportion of cattle that left the index herd during the 5 years previous to the identification of the index cow were untraceable because of a lack of unique animal identification and inadequate records. Results indicated that neonatal calves can have an important role in the transmission of M bovis. Also, this report highlights the exigent need for unique individual identification of livestock, including neonatal animals, so that thorough epidemiological investigations of reportable (zoonotic or foreign animal) diseases can be conducted when necessary.

  10. Comparison of Sputum-Culture Conversion for Mycobacterium bovis and M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Scott, Colleen; Cavanaugh, Joseph S; Silk, Benjamin J; Ershova, Julia; Mazurek, Gerald H; LoBue, Philip A; Moonan, Patrick K

    2017-03-01

    Current US guidelines recommend longer treatment for tuberculosis (TB) caused by pyrazinamide-resistant organisms (e.g., Mycobacterium bovis) than for M. tuberculosis TB. We compared treatment response times for patients with M. bovis TB and M. tuberculosis TB reported in the United States during 2006-2013. We included culture-positive, pulmonary TB patients with genotyping results who received standard 4-drug treatment at the time of diagnosis. Time to sputum-culture conversion was defined as time between treatment start date and date of first consistently culture-negative sputum. We analyzed 297 case-patients with M. bovis TB and 30,848 case-patients with M. tuberculosis TB. After 2 months of treatment, 71% of M. bovis and 65% of M. tuberculosis TB patients showed conversion of sputum cultures to negative. Likelihood of culture conversion was higher for M. bovis than for M. tuberculosis, even after controlling for treatment administration type, sex, and a composite indicator of bacillary burden.

  11. [Mycobacterium bovis in wildlife of the dairy regions of Santa Fe (Argentina)].

    PubMed

    Abdala, Alejandro A; Garbaccio, Sergio; Zumárraga, Martín; Tarabla, Héctor D

    2015-01-01

    Control eradication campaigns of bovine tuberculosis based on the «test and slaughter» approach were successful in many countries and regions; however, in some areas the infection persists and one of the main reasons is Mycobacterium bovis infection in wild life species. Argentina has applied the same approach since 1999, achieving progress in dairy cattle herds. Nonetheless, the wildlife role has never been investigated. The objective of this study was to determine if wildlife from the Santa Fe dairy area is infected with M. bovis. Wildlife species having a positive tuberculin skin test were captured in five dairy farms. Ninety five wildlife mammals were captured; M. bovis was recovered from 7 possums (Didelphys albiventris), from one fox (Lycolapex gimnocercus) and from one rat (Rattus norvegicus). None of the animals exhibited macroscopic lesions. The most frequently isolated M. bovis spoligotypes were types 34 (4 isolates) and 12 (3 isolates). Spoligotype 34 is the most frequently isolated type in Argentine cattle. The role of D. albiventris as spillover host of M. bovis is discussed in this study. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolation of Mycobacterium bovis from Free-Ranging Wildlife in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yunho; Ryoo, Soyoon; Lee, Hyunkyoung; Kim, Narae; Lee, Hang; Park, So-Young; Song, Woong-Seog; Kim, Jong-Taek; Lee, Hee Soo; Myung Kim, Jae

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate Mycobacterium bovis infection in wild boar ( Sus scrofa ) in South Korea. During 2012-15, we attempted to isolate M. bovis from 847 wild animals, mainly Korean water deer ( Hydropotes inermis argyropus), raccoon dogs ( Nyctereutes procyonoides ), and wild boar, from 11 regions in South Korea. We isolated M. bovis from three of 118 wild boar (2.5%) captured in Gyeonggi Province, where bovine tuberculosis (bTB) outbreaks have also occurred in livestock. Spoligotypes and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number tandem repeats types of these M. bovis isolates (SB0140 and SB1040, 4-2-3-3-7-5-5-4-4-3-4-3 and 5-2-3-3-7-5-5-4-3-10-5-2; MIRU4, MIRU16, MIRU27, MIRU31, ETR-A, ETR-B, ETR-C, QUB11b, QUB26, QUB3336, VNTR2401, and VNTR3171) have also been identified from farmed livestock such as cattle ( Bos taurus coreanae), Formosan sika deer ( Cervus nippon taiouanus), and American elk ( Cervus canadensis ) in the country. In South Korea, bTB appears to be endemic in livestock, and there are numerous opportunities for contact between wild boar and livestock due to high population densities and broad activity ranges. Our results support the hypothesis that M. bovis is transmitted between domestic and wild animals.

  13. Mycobacterium bovis infection at the interface between domestic and wild animals in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Zambia, the presence of bovine tuberculosis in both wild and domestic animals has long been acknowledged and mutual transmission between them has been predicted without any direct evidence. Elucidation of the circulating Mycobacterium bovis strains at wild and domestic animals interphase area in Zambia, where bovine tuberculosis was diagnosed in wildlife seemed to be important. Results A PCR identified 15 and 37 M. bovis isolates from lechwe and cattle, respectively. Spoligotype analysis revealed that M. bovis strains from lechwe and cattle in Kafue basin clustered into a major node SB0120, where isolates outside the Kafue basin clustered into different nodes of SB0131 and SB0948. The comparatively higher variety of strains in cattle compared to lechwe elucidated by Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units–Variable Number Tandem Repeats analyses are consistent with cattle being the probable source of M. bovis in wild and domestic animals interphase area in Zambia. Conclusions These results provide strong evidence of M. bovis strains transfer between cattle and lechwe, with the latter having developed into a sylvatic reservoir host. PMID:23151267

  14. AIM2 inhibits autophagy and IFN-β production during M. bovis infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunfa; Yue, Ruichao; Yang, Yang; Cui, Yongyong; Yang, Lifeng; Zhao, Deming; Zhou, Xiangmei

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria can trigger the AIM2 inflammasome, autophagy activation and type-I interferon release, which are both activated by cytosolic DNA. We have recently demonstrated that activation of the AIM2 inflammasome during M. bovis infection is the result of mycobacterial translocation into the cytosol. To elucidate the effects of inflammasome activation on autophagy, we investigated the role of the AIM2 inflammasome from macrophages infected with a virulent strain of M. bovis. The results showed that the M. bovis-induced AIM2 inflammasome activation decreases autophagy in immortalized and primary murine macrophages. This relied on the inflammasome sensor AIM2 which conjugates with cytosolic DNA to inhibit the STING-dependent pathway involved in selective autophagy and interferon-β release in Mycobacterium-infected macrophages. These results suggest that the AIM2 cytosolic DNA sensor may conjugate competitively with cytosolic M. bovis DNA to restrict M. bovis induced STING-TBK1-dependent autophagy activation and IFN-β secretion. PMID:27409673

  15. Mycobacteriosis in ostriches (Struthio camelus) due to infection with Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Pamela; Jahns, Hanne; Power, Eugene; Bainbridge, John; Kenny, Kevin; Corpa, Juan M; Cassidy, Joseph P; Callanan, John J

    2013-12-01

    Avian tuberculosis rarely affects ratites compared to other bird species and is typically caused by Mycobacterium avium species. This study describes the pathological and microbiological findings in three adult ostriches with mycobacteriosis, in one of which Mycobacterium bovis was isolated from the lesions. Post mortem examinations on ostriches from two different zoological collections in Ireland revealed multifocal caseous granulomas affecting the spleen and liver in all cases, with additional involvement of intestines in two cases. In one case, granulomas were present within the pharynx, at the thoracic inlet and multifocally on the pleural surface. Acid-fast bacilli were observed in all lesions. Mycobacterium sp. of the M. avium complex was isolated from the intestinal lesions in the two cases with intestinal involvement, and M. bovis sp. oligotype SB0140 was cultured from the liver of the third ostrich. This represents the first reported case of M. bovis infection in an ostrich. Avian tuberculosis due to M. bovis is rare and to date has been reported in only parrots and experimentally inoculated birds. Mycobacterium bovis needs to be considered as a possible cause of tuberculosis in ostriches because the lesions are similar to those observed with M. avium complex infection.

  16. An experimental vaccine composed of two adjuvants gives protection against Mycoplasma bovis in calves.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Katarzyna; Bednarek, Dariusz; Ayling, Roger D; Kycko, Anna; Szacawa, Ewelina; Karpińska, Teresa A

    2016-06-08

    Mycoplasma bovis is a major pathogen affecting cattle causing bronchopneumonia, mastitis, and other disorders. Only autogenous vaccines made specifically for individual farms are available in parts of Europe and the United States. A novel experimental vaccine composed of a field M. bovis isolate combined with saponin and Emulsigen(®) adjuvants was evaluated. Eighteen 3-4 week old calves were placed in three equal groups: vaccinated (Vac), positive control (PC) and negative control (NC). The Vac calves were subcutaneously injected with 8ml of the vaccine; the PC and NC calves received phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Three weeks later the Vac and PC calves were challenged with a virulent M. bovis strain, the NC group received PBS. Throughout the study clinical observations, microbiology and immunological tests were carried out. Three weeks post challenge two calves from each group were euthanased for necropsy and histopathological examination. The vaccine effectively stimulated the humoral immune response, with high titres of anti-M. bovis specific antibodies and total Ig concentration. This vaccine also intensified the IgA response. A clinically protective effect of the vaccine was demonstrated as it also reduced the gross pathological lung lesions and nasal shedding of M. bovis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neutrophil extracellular trap formation as innate immune reactions against the apicomplexan parasite Eimeria bovis.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Jan Hillern; Ruiz, Antonio; Zahner, Horst; Taubert, Anja; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2010-01-15

    Eimeria bovis infections are under immunological control and recent studies have emphasized the role of early PMN-mediated innate immune responses in infected calves. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have recently been demonstrated to act as a killing mechanism of PMN against several pathogens. In the present study, the interactions of bovine PMN with sporozoites of E. bovis were investigated in this respect in vitro. For demonstration and quantification of NET formation, extracellular DNA was stained by Sytox Orange. Fluorescence images after Sytox Orange staining as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed NET formation to occur upon contact with E. bovis sporozoites. Exposure of PMN to viable sporozoites induced stronger NET formation than to dead or homogenized parasites. NET formation was abolished by treatment with DNase and could be reduced by diphenylene iodonium, which is described as a potent inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. After sporozoite and PMN co-culture, extracellular fibres were found attached to sporozoites and seemed to trap them, strongly suggesting that NETs immobilize E. bovis sporozoites and thereby prevent them from infecting host cells. Thus, transfer of sporozoites, previously being confronted with PMN, to adequate host cells resulted in clearly reduced infection rates when compared to PMN-free controls. NET formation by PMN may therefore represent an effector mechanism in early innate immune reactions against E. bovis. This is the first report indicating Eimeria-induced NET formation.

  18. Prevalence of Eimeria bovis and Eimeria zuernii in German cattle herds and factors influencing oocyst excretion.

    PubMed

    Bangoura, Berit; Mundt, Hans-Christian; Schmäschke, Ronald; Westphal, Bernhard; Daugschies, Arwid

    2012-02-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the prevalence of the pathogenic coccidia species Eimeria bovis and Eimeria zuernii in shed-reared animals in German dairy and fattening facilities. Samples were obtained from 65 cattle farms distributed randomly across all the regions of Germany regardless of the occurrence of clinical problems. The samples were obtained rectally. Faecal consistency and the total number of oocysts per gram of faeces (OPG) were determined, along with the OPG values for E. bovis and E. zuernii. A questionnaire was completed for each farm to record information about herd size and management, along with individual animal data. Eimeria oocysts were detected in 62 of these farms, which give a prevalence of 95.4%. The farm prevalence of the pathogenic species was 76.9% for E. bovis and 83.1% for E. zuernii. The number of oocysts excreted could not be correlated significantly with farm type or farm management but depended on the floor type, the age of the calves and the time after rehousing. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between OPG and the observation of diarrhoea. E. zuernii had a greater influence on the occurrence of diarrhoea than E. bovis. This study confirms that herd management frequently does not meet the requirements of effective coccidia control despite the fact that the pathogenic coccidia E. bovis and E. zuernii are ubiquitous in German cattle populations.

  19. Health-Care Associated Mycobacterium bovis-BCG Infection in Cancer Patients without prior BCG Instillation.

    PubMed

    Meije, Y; Martínez-Montauti, J; Caylà, J A; Loureiro, J; Ortega, L; Clemente, M; Sanz, X; Ricart, M; Santomà, M J; Coll, P; Sierra, M; Calsina, M; Vaqué, M; Ruiz-Camps, I; López-Sánchez, C; Montes, M; Ayestarán, A; Carratalà, J; Orcau, A

    2017-05-29

    Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), an attenuated strain of Mycobacterium bovis, is widely used as adjunctive therapy for superficial bladder cancer. Intravesical administration of BCG has been associated with systemic infection. Disseminated infection due to M. bovis is otherwise uncommon. After identification of three patients with health-care associated BCG infection (HCBCGI) who had never received intravesical BCG administration, an epidemiologic study was performed. All patients with HCBCGI in the Barcelona tuberculosis (TB) program were reviewed from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2015 searching for infections caused by M. bovis-BCG. Patients with HCBCGI who had not received intravesical BCG instillation were selected and the source of infection was investigated. Nine oncology patients with infection caused by M. bovis-BCG were studied. All had permanent central venous catheters. Catheter maintenance was performed at four different outpatient clinics in the same room in which other patients underwent BCG instillations for bladder cancer without required biological precautions. All patients developed pulmonary TB, either alone or with extrapulmonary disease. Catheter-related infection was considered the mechanism of acquisition based on the epidemiologic association and positive catheter cultures for BCG in patients in whom mycobacterial cultures were performed. Physicians should be alerted to the possibility of TB due to nosocomially acquired, catheter-related infections with M. bovis-BCG in patients with indwelling catheters. This problem may be more common than expected in centers providing BCG therapy for bladder cancer without adequate precautions.

  20. Genetic resistance to experimental infection with Mycobacterium bovis in red deer (Cervus elaphus).

    PubMed

    Mackintosh, C G; Qureshi, T; Waldrup, K; Labes, R E; Dodds, K G; Griffin, J F

    2000-03-01

    Tuberculosis (Tb) caused by Mycobacterium bovis is a worldwide threat to livestock and humans. One control strategy is to breed livestock that are more resistant to Mycobacterium bovis. In a 3-year heritability study 6 farmed red deer stags were selected from 39 on the basis of their differing responses to experimental challenge via the tonsillar sac with approximately 500 CFU of M. bovis. Two stags remained uninfected, two were moderately affected, and two developed serious spreading Tb. Seventy offspring, bred from these six stags by artificial insemination using stored semen, were similarly challenged with M. bovis. The offspring showed patterns of response to M. bovis challenge similar to those of their sires, providing evidence for a strong genetic basis to resistance to Tb, with an estimated heritability of 0.48 (standard error, 0.096; P < 0. 01). This is the first time the heritability of Tb resistance in domestic livestock has been measured. The breeding of selection lines of resistant and susceptible deer will provide an ideal model to study the mechanisms of Tb resistance in a ruminant and could provide an additional strategy for reducing the number and severity of outbreaks of Tb in farmed deer herds. Laboratory studies to identify genetic and immunological markers for resistance to Tb are under way. Preliminary studies showed no associations between NRAMP or DRB genes and resistance to Tb in deer. Patterns of immune responses seen in resistant animals suggest that both innate and acquired pathways of immunity are necessary to produce the resistant phenotype.

  1. Epidemiology of Human Mycobacterium bovis Disease, California, USA, 2003–2011

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neha; Flood, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective review of California tuberculosis (TB) registry and genotyping data to evaluate trends, analyze epidemiologic differences between adult and child case-patients with Mycobacterium bovis disease, and identify risk factors for M. bovis disease. The percentage of TB cases attributable to M. bovis increased from 3.4% (80/2,384) in 2003 to 5.4% (98/1,808) in 2011 (p = 0.002). All (6/6) child case-patients with M. bovis disease during 2010–2011 had >1 parent/guardian who was born in Mexico, compared with 38% (22/58) of child case-patients with M. tuberculosis disease (p = 0.005). Multivariate analysis of TB case-patients showed Hispanic ethnicity, extrapulmonary disease, diabetes, and immunosuppressive conditions, excluding HIV co-infection, were independently associated with M. bovis disease. Prevention efforts should focus on Hispanic binational families and adults with immunosuppressive conditions. Collection of additional risk factors in the national TB surveillance system and expansion of whole-genome sequencing should be considered. PMID:25693687

  2. Cloning and expression of Mycobacterium bovis BCG DNA in "Streptomyces lividans".

    PubMed

    Kieser, T; Moss, M T; Dale, J W; Hopwood, D A

    1986-10-01

    The ability of "Streptomyces lividans" to use the expression signals of genes from Mycobacterium bovis BCG was tested in vivo by using gene fusions. Random DNA fragments from M. bovis BCG were inserted into promoter-probe plasmids in Escherichia coli and in "S. lividans." Comparison with promoter activity detected with random DNA fragments from the respective hosts suggested that "S. lividans" efficiently utilizes a high proportion of mycobacterial promoters, whereas a smaller fraction are expressed, and expressed more weakly, in E. coli. M. bovis BCG DNA fragments were also inserted into the specially constructed translational fusion vector (pIJ688) in "S. lividans." pIJ688 contains the kanamycin phosphotransferase gene (neo) from transposon Tn5, truncated at its amino terminus, as the indicator. The results suggested that "S. lividans" uses M. bovis BCG translational signals almost as efficiently as its own signals. Moreover, several hybrid proteins with an M. bovis BCG-derived amino terminus seemed to be reasonably stable in "S. lividans." These experiments indicate that "S. lividans" may be a suitable host for the expression of Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes from their own signals. This is a precondition for the expression of entire biosynthetic pathways, which could be valuable in the production of diagnostic and therapeutic agents. The vectors may also have wider applications for the analysis of gene expression in Streptomyces.

  3. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma bovis clinical isolates recovered from bison (Bison bison).

    PubMed

    Suleman, Muhammad; Prysliak, Tracy; Windeyer, Claire; Perez-Casal, Jose

    2016-03-01

    Mycoplasma bovis is a pathogen globally affecting cattle and bison herds, causing pneumonia, arthritis, mastitis, abortions, and other symptoms, leading to huge economic losses. Many studies have been done regarding the antimicrobial susceptibility of M. bovis isolated from cattle, but no such study is available for isolates recovered from bison. For the first time, in vitro susceptibilities of 40 M. bovis clinical isolates collected from bison herds in Canada are reported here. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined using Sensititre® plates. The most effective MIC50 and MIC90 were for spectinomycin (1 and >64 μg/mL), tiamulin (1 and >32 μg/mL), and tulathromycin (16 and 64 μg/mL), whereas tetracyclines, fluoroquinolones, and florfenicol failed to inhibit growth of M. bovis bison isolates. Isolates were nonsusceptible to tetracyclines (100%), fluoroquinolones (97.5%), and tilmicosin (100%), whereas the highest susceptibility of bison clinical isolates was seen with spectinomycin (95%) and tulathromycin (67.5%). Two lung isolates (Mb283 and 348) were found resistant to both spectinomycin and tulathromycin. These results show a marked difference in antimicrobial susceptibility of bison isolates as compared with previously reported and laboratory reference cattle isolates, emphasizing the necessity of testing antimicrobial susceptibility of M. bovis bison isolates and to generate better therapeutic regime for improved recovery chances for infected bison herds across North America.

  4. Multilocus sequence typing of Mycoplasma bovis reveals host-specific genotypes in cattle versus bison.

    PubMed

    Register, Karen B; Thole, Luke; Rosenbush, Ricardo F; Minion, F Chris

    2015-01-30

    Mycoplasma bovis is a primary agent of mastitis, pneumonia and arthritis in cattle and the bacterium most frequently isolated from the polymicrobial syndrome known as bovine respiratory disease complex. Recently, M. bovis has emerged as a significant health problem in bison, causing necrotic pharyngitis, pneumonia, dystocia and abortion. Whether isolates from cattle and bison comprise genetically distinct populations is unknown. This study describes the development of a highly discriminatory multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) method for M. bovis and its use to investigate the population structure of the bacterium. Genome sequences from six M. bovis isolates were used for selection of gene targets. Seven of 44 housekeeping genes initially evaluated were selected as targets on the basis of sequence variability and distribution within the genome. For each gene target sequence, four to seven alleles could be distinguished that collectively define 32 sequence types (STs) from a collection of 94 cattle isolates and 42 bison isolates. A phylogeny based on concatenated target gene sequences of each isolate revealed that bison isolates are genetically distinct from strains that infect cattle, suggesting recent disease outbreaks in bison may be due to the emergence of unique genetic variants. No correlation was found between ST and disease presentation or geographic origin. MLST data reported here were used to populate a newly created and publicly available, curated database to which researchers can contribute. The MLST scheme and database provide novel tools for exploring the population structure of M. bovis and tracking the evolution and spread of strains.

  5. Necrotic pharyngitis associated with Mycoplasma bovis infections in American bison (Bison bison).

    PubMed

    Dyer, Neil; Register, Karen B; Miskimins, Dale; Newell, Teresa

    2013-03-01

    Mycoplasma bovis has emerged as a significant and costly infectious disease problem in bison, generally presenting as severe, caseonecrotic pneumonia. Three diagnostic cases in which M. bovis is associated with necrotic pharyngitis in bison are described in the current study. The bacterium was isolated from lesions of the pharynx or lung of 3 American bison (Bison bison), at 2 different locations in the upper Midwestern United States, with severe, necrotic pharyngeal abscesses. Chronic caseonecrotic inflammation typical of M. bovis infection in bovines was observed microscopically in the pharynxes of affected bison. A mixed population of bacteria was recovered from the pharyngeal lesions, and Trueperella pyogenes, a frequent secondary pathogen in ruminant respiratory disease, was consistently isolated from the affected animals. Distinctive histopathological features of the pharyngeal lesions favor causation by M. bovis, although a role for T. pyogenes in the clinical presentation cannot be excluded. Veterinarians and producers working with bison should be aware that M. bovis may be associated with pharyngitis in bison.

  6. Characterization of Mycobacterium bovis from Humans and Cattle in Namwala District, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Malama, Sydney; Johansen, Tone Bjordal; Muma, John Bwalya; Munyeme, Musso; Mbulo, Grace; Muwonge, Adrian; Djønne, Berit; Godfroid, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem in Zambia. While human to human transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is of major importance in driving the tuberculosis epidemic, the impact of Mycobacterium bovis transmission from infected cattle is largely unknown. This cross-sectional study aimed at molecular characterization of M. bovis in humans and cattle. A total of 100 human sputum samples and 67 bovine tissues were collected and analyzed for the presence of mycobacteria. Of 65 human samples that harbored acid fast bacteria (AFB), 55 isolates were obtained of which 34 were identified as M. tuberculosis and 2 as M. bovis. AFB-positive bovine samples (n = 67) yielded 47 mycobacterial isolates among which 25 were identified as M. bovis and no M. tuberculosis was found. Among the M. bovis isolates, spoligotyping revealed a high homogeneity in genotypes circulating in Namwala district. Human and cattle isolates shared identical MIRU-VNTR genotypes, suggesting that transmission between the two hosts may occur. Therefore, this study has documented zoonotic TB in human patients in Namwala district of Zambia. However, further molecular epidemiological studies in the study area are recommended.

  7. Black-backed jackals (Canis mesomelas) are natural hosts of Babesia rossi, the virulent causative agent of canine babesiosis in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Penzhorn, Barend L; Vorster, Ilse; Harrison-White, Robert F; Oosthuizen, Marinda C

    2017-03-13

    Babesia rossi, which is transmitted by Haemaphysalis spp. and is highly virulent to domestic dogs, occurs only in sub-Saharan Africa. Since dogs are not native to the region, it has been postulated that the natural host of B. rossi is an indigenous African canid. Although various attempts at artificial infection indicated that black-backed jackals (Canis mesomelas) could become subclinically infected with B. rossi, data on occurrence of B. rossi in free-ranging jackals was lacking. A long-term behaviour study in which free-ranging black-backed jackals were radio-collared offered the opportunity of collecting blood specimens from a large number of free-ranging jackals. Genomic DNA was extracted from the EDTA blood samples (n = 107). PCR products were subjected to Reverse Line Blot hybridization using Theileria and Babesia genera-specific as well as 28 species-specific oligonucleotide probes, including Babesia canis, Babesia rossi, Babesia vogeli and Babesia gibsoni. The near full-length parasite 18S rRNA gene was amplified from two selected samples (free-ranging jackals), cloned and a total of six recombinants were sequenced. Of 91 free-ranging jackals, 77 (84.6%) reacted with the Babesia genus-specific probe; 27 (29.7%) also reacted with the B. rossi probe. Of 16 captive jackals, 6 (37.5%) reacted with the B. rossi probe, while one further sample reacted with the Babesia genus-specific probe only. After cloning, 6 recombinants yielded identical sequences identical to that of B. rossi (L19079) and differing by 2 base pairs from B. rossi (DQ111760) in GenBank. The observed sequence similarities were confirmed by phylogenetic analyses using neighbour joining and maximum parsimony. Black-backed jackals are natural hosts of B. rossi.

  8. Detection of Babesia infection among human, goats and sheep using microscopic and molecular methods in the city of Kuhdasht in Lorestan Province, West of Iran.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Arash; Nayebzadeh, Hassan; Gholami, Shirzad

    2017-09-01

    Babesiosis is a lethal protozoan disease, responsible for the loss of livestock in Iran and in the world. The purpose of the current study was to detect and identify Babesia spp. infection using microscopic and molecular methods in human, sheep and goats in Kuhdasht region, in the Lorestan Province, west of Iran. During 2013, a total of 384 blood smear samples were collected from 51 goats, 306 sheep suspected of Babesiosis infection and 27 humans from Kuhdasht region. The blood samples were fixed, stained and under light microscopic examined. DNA samples were extracted and amplified by polymerase chain reaction of 18S-rRNA gene. PCR and the semi-nested PCR were performed to identify to Babesi spp. and to differentiate genus of Theileria and Babesia spp. The results of microscopic examination indicated that a total of 47 (12.2%) samples were positive for Babesia spp. infection: 38 (9.9%) belonging to sheep and 9 to goats (2.3%). No Babesia was observed in human samples. The PCR showed a band size of 389 bp, of Babesia spp. and the semi-nested PCR detected B. ovis with a band size of 186 bp. By molecular method, 16 (4.2%) sheep and 2 (0.5%) goat blood samples were infected by Babesia. Totally, 18 samples (4.7%) were observed to have Babesia, while no infection was found in human. Thus, the results of our study have shown sheep and goats could be vulnerable to Babesia spp., especially B. ovis in Lorestan Province, Iran. Therefore, studies on the status of the animal Piroplasmosis especially Theileriosis are recommended.

  9. Bovine mastitis in Ontario due to Mycoplasma agalactiae subsp. bovis.

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnke, H L; Thawley, D; Nelson, F C

    1976-01-01

    Bovine mastitis caused by Mycoplasma agalactiae subsp. bovis was first diagnosed in 16 of 55 cows in an Ontario herd in Feburary 1972. A total of 182 of 598 (30.4%) cows from 33 of 64 (51.5%) farms in widely separated areas of the province were culturally positive. Herd incidence varied from 15 to 40% with one closed herd having an incidence of 61%. Four herds were investigated culturally and serologically by the growth inhibition test for 15 months. In the acute phase the organism was present in the milk in extremely high numbers and could still be isolated from a few cows after eight to 12 months. The sera from 89.5% of the animals with clinical mycoplasma mastitis produced a zone of surface "film" and/or colony inhibition and some cows remained positive for six to 12 months. The disease was experimentally reproduced with a pure culture of the organism isolated from the milk of a cow from one of the herds. PMID:1000385

  10. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis in Texas and Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Perumaalla, V S; Adams, L G; Payeur, J B; Jarnagin, J L; Baca, D R; Suárez Güemes, F; Ficht, T A

    1996-01-01

    Seventy-nine Mycobacterium bovis isolates recovered from Mexican and Texas cattle were categorized into 16 and 25 distinct types on the basis of IS6110 and direct-repeat fingerprint patterns, respectively. By using a combination of both fingerprint patterns, 30 distinct restriction fragment length polymorphism types were defined. Fifty-eight of 79 isolates (73%) were distributed among nine clusters. Clustered isolates were identified within herds, as well as in geographically disperse herds in Texas and Mexico. This observation is consistent with active transmission within herds and among herds, presumably as a result of active or historical cattle movements. The majority of bovine isolates (64 of 79) exhibited a single copy of IS6110. Interestingly, in contrast to previous studies, a high percentage of bovine isolates (15 of 79) exhibited multiple IS6110 copies (two to five) distributed among 11 different restriction fragment length polymorphism types. It is speculated that transmission from noncattle sources may be responsible. Continued fingerprinting of isolates originating from nonbovine sources and herd surveys is expected to provide useful information regarding the epidemiology of tuberculosis in this region. PMID:8862559

  11. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis: usefulness in international trade.

    PubMed

    Milian-Suazo, Feliciano; Harris, Beth; Arriaga Díaz, Camila; Romero Torres, Cecilia; Stuber, Tod; Alvarez Ojeda, Genoveva; Morales Loredo, Alberto; Perez Soria, Martina; Payeur, Janet B

    2008-11-17

    Tuberculosis (TB) represents a barrier for free trade of livestock between Mexico and the United States of America (US). In spite of efforts from Mexico to export TB-free animals, some of those found with TB lesions in slaughterhouses in the US are traced back to that country. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine, through molecular epidemiology, the most probable source of infection for cattle found with TB lesions in the US. Ninety M. bovis isolates, 50 from Mexico obtained from cattle in 8 different states, and 40 from the US from cattle, deer, elk and feral pigs from 7 different states were included in the study. All samples were analyzed in both laboratories, Mexico and the US, following the same protocol for molecular analysis by spoligotyping. Twenty-seven clusters, ranging from 1 to 18 genetically similar strains were found. Some clustering by country was observed, strains from cattle and deer in Michigan in the US fell into the same cluster, suggesting transmission between species. These results, combined with epidemiological information suggest that despite of the possibility that some animals with lesions in the US come from Mexico as false negatives, the US has its own source of infection, must probably in dairy cattle and wildlife. Genetic diversity of isolates from Mexico was larger than that in the US, which could be a consequence of the endemic status of the disease and the indiscriminate movement of animals between regions.

  12. Evaluation of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for detection of Mycoplasma bovis-Specific antibody in bison sera

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycoplasma bovis has recently emerged as a significant and costly infectious disease problem in bison. This report demonstrates that ELISAs for detection of M. bovis-specific antibody in cattle are not optimal for identification of seropositive bison. An ELISA optimized for use with bison sera is ...

  13. Oral vaccination of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) with Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wildlife reservoirs of Mycobacterium bovis represent serious obstacles to the eradication of tuberculosis from livestock, particularly cattle. In Michigan, USA tuberculous white-tailed deer transmit M. bovis to other deer and cattle. One approach in dealing with this wildlife reservoir is to vaccina...

  14. Animal-side Serologic Assay for Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium bovis Infection in Multiple Species of Free-ranging Wildlife

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Numerous species of wild mammals are susceptible to Mycobacterium bovis, a cause of bovine tuberculosis (TB). Eurasian badgers, white-tailed deer, brushtail possums, and wild boar are implicated in the maintenance of wildlife reservoirs of M. bovis infection in different countries, fueling bovine TB...

  15. A serological investigation of the thirty-year history of exposure to Mycoplasma bovis in healthy North American bison

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mycoplasma bovis causes mastitis, pneumonia and arthritis in cattle and is a major contributor to bovine respiratory disease complex. Recently, it has emerged as a significant respiratory and reproductive health problem in bison. Understanding why M. bovis, known to cause disease in cattle for ove...

  16. Tracing the origins of Mycobacterium bovis tuberculosis in humans in the USA to cattle in Mexico using spoligotyping☆

    PubMed Central

    Rodwell, Timothy C.; Kapasi, Anokhi J.; Moore, Marisa; Milian-Suazo, Feliciano; Harris, Beth; Guerrero, L.P.; Moser, Kathleen; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Garfein, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To compare genotypes of Mycobacterium bovis strains from humans in Southern California with genotypes of M. bovis strains in cattle in Mexico and the USA to explore the possible origins of human infections. Methods We conducted a descriptive analysis of M. bovis genotypes from a binational population of humans and cattle using spacer oligonucleotide typing (spoligotyping). Results One hundred six human M. bovis spoligotypes were compared to spoligotypes from 496 Mexican cattle and 219 US cattle. Twelve spoligotype patterns were identified among human cases and 126 spoligotype patterns were detected in cattle. Over 91% (97/106) of the human M. bovis isolates had spoligotypes that were identical to those found in Mexican cattle. Four human cases had spoligotypes that matched both cattle born in Mexico and in the USA. Nine human cases had spoligotypes that did not match cattle born in Mexico or the USA. Conclusions Our data indicate that the population of M. bovis strains causing human TB disease in Southern California is closely related to the M. bovis strain population found in Mexican cattle and supports existing epidemiological evidence that human M. bovis disease in San Diego likely originated from Mexican cattle. PMID:20399697

  17. Bovicin HC5, a lantibiotic produced by Streptococcus bovis HC5, catalyzed the efflux of intracellular potassium but not ATP

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovicin HC5, a broad spectrum lantibiotic produced by Streptococcus bovis HC5, catalyzed the efflux of intracellular potassium from Streptococcus bovis JB1, a sensitive strain. ATP also decreased, but this decline appeared to be caused by the activity of the F1FO ATPase rather than efflux per se....

  18. A Study of Naturally Acquired Canine Babesiosis Caused by Single and Mixed Babesia Species in Zambia: Clinicopathological Findings and Case Management

    PubMed Central

    Nalubamba, King Shimumbo; Mudenda, Ntombi Basimbi; Namwila, Mwaka Mwangala; Mulenga, Chilufya Susan; Bwalya, Eugene Chisela; M'kandawire, Ethel; Saasa, Ngonda; Hankanga, Careen; Oparaocha, Elizabeth; Simuunza, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective and prospective analysis of clinical records of dogs diagnosed with Babesia infections was carried out for the years 2000 to 2013 from practices in Lusaka, Zambia. Records of 363 dogs with confirmed Babesia infections were analysed using demographic factors including sex, breed, age, and clinical signs in relation to haematological findings and Babesia species. The clinical and laboratory findings observed are described as well as Babesia species identification. The study included 18 breeds and the highest proportion were mongrels (32.2%), males representing 64.5% of the population. The most common presenting problems were anorexia (65.3%) and lethargy/weakness (65.3%). The most common clinical signs were fever (87.3%), pallor (52.3%), lymphadenopathy (47.4%), and presence of ticks (44.9%). Anaemia (96.4%) and nucleated erythrocytes (42.2%) were the most common laboratory findings. A mixed infection of Babesia rossi and Babesia gibsoni was present in 59.7% of dogs, whilst 8% and 32.2% had B. rossi and B. gibsoni as a single infection, respectively. Case management mainly involved therapy with tetracyclines and imidocarb and was usually accompanied by clinical improvement. This study highlights, for the first time, the presence of B. gibsoni in natural dog populations in Zambia, where previously only B. rossi was reported. PMID:26682062

  19. The susceptibility of bovine udder quarters colonized with Corynebacterium bovis to experimental infection with Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, B W; Barnum, D A

    1984-01-01

    Twenty bovine udder quarters colonized with Corynebacterium bovis SR6 and 20 uncolonized quarters were challenged by inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus Newbould 305 (ATCC 29740) into the teat cistern. The percentage of infection in quarters colonized with C. bovis (50%) was significantly lower than that in controls (100%). By similar challenge no significant difference was observed between the percentage of infection with Streptococcus agalactiae ATCC 27956 in 33 quarters colonized with C. bovis (70%) compared to 33 controls (87.9%). A total of 37 quarters colonized with C. bovis and 37 control quarters were challenged with Staph. aureus Newbould 305 (ATCC 29740) and Maxi (ATCC 27543) and Strep. agalactiae (ATCC 27956) by exposure of the teat orifice. The percentage of teat ducts colonized with C. bovis which became infected with either pathogen was not different from that for controls. PMID:6372969

  20. Coenzyme Q1-catalyzed luminol chemiluminescent assay for rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Yamashoji, Shiro

    2003-01-01

    Coenzyme Q1 is herein proposed as the best catalyst among coenzymes Q and vitamins K for quinone-catalyzed luminol chemiluminescent assays applied to rapid determination of viability or rapid antimicrobial susceptibility tests of Mycobacterium bovis. Luminol chemiluminescence intensity (LCI) was determined 10 min after the incubation of M. bovis with coenzyme Q1, and was proportional to CFU (colony-forming unit)/ml in the range of 9,000 to 2,250,000. LCI depended on the the production of the superoxide anion (O2-) rather than H2O2 during a 10-min incubation of M. bovis with coenzyme Q1, as superoxide dismutase reduced LCI more effectively than catalase. The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 10 kinds of antituberculous agents estimated on the basis of decrease in LCI after one or two days' cultivation were in good agreement with MICs determined by turbidity analysis, which requires upwards of 1 week to complete.

  1. Menadione-catalyzed luminol chemiluminescent assay for viability of Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Yamashoji, Shiro

    2002-01-01

    Stable luminol chemiluminescence was observed 10 min after the addition of menadione to a suspension of Mycobacterium bovis homogenized in Middlebrook 7H9 broth base including OADC enrichment. The chemiluminescence intensity was proportional to the absorbance of the bacterial suspension at 600 nm in a range of 0.005 to 0.15. Luminol chemiluminescence disappeared after 10 min incubation of M. bovis at over 60% of ethanol or 4 days of cultivation of M. bovis in the presence of 40 microg/ml of streptomycin. The bacterium showing the disappearance of chemiluminescence could not grow after being washed, suggesting that the inhibition concentration of the antimicrobials can be estimated on the basis of the disappearance of chemiluminescence. Menadione-catalyzed luminol chemiluminescent assay was rapid and sensitive in comparison to turbidimetry, tetrazolium (WST-8) reduction assay, and the assay using the Mycobacteria growth indicator tube (MGIT).

  2. Filamentous-haemagglutinin-like protein genes encoded on a plasmid of Moraxella bovis.

    PubMed

    Kakuda, Tsutomu; Sarataphan, Nopporn; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Takai, Shinji

    2006-11-26

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a plasmid, pMBO-1, from Moraxella bovis strain Epp63 was determined. We identified 30 open reading frames (ORFs) encoded by the 44,215bp molecule. Two large ORFs, flpA and flpB, encoding proteins with similarity to Bordetella pertussis filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA), were identified on the same plasmid. The gene for a specific accessory protein (Fap), which may play a role in the secretion of Flp protein, was also identified. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of total RNA isolated from M. bovis Epp63 indicated that the flpA, flpB, and fap genes are all transcribed. Southern blot analysis indicated that the flp and fap genes are present in other clinical isolates of geographically diverse M. bovis.

  3. Infection of Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) with Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium complex in Spain.

    PubMed

    Balseiro, Ana; Rodríguez, Oscar; González-Quirós, Pablo; Merediz, Isabel; Sevilla, Iker A; Davé, Dipesh; Dalley, Deanna J; Lesellier, Sandrine; Chambers, Mark A; Bezos, Javier; Muñoz, Marta; Delahay, Richard J; Gortázar, Christian; Prieto, José M

    2011-11-01

    The prevalence, distribution and pathology related to infection with Mycobacterium bovis and other mycobacteria were determined in trapped (n=36) and road-killed (n=121) badgers in Spain from 2006 to 2010. The prevalence of M. bovis based on bacteriological culture from road-killed badgers was 8/121 (6.6%) and from trapped badgers was 0/36 (0%). Tuberculosis/M. bovis infection was evident in 15/121 (12.4%) road-killed badgers when bacteriology and histopathology were combined. Mycobacterium avium complex was isolated by culture from the tracheal aspirate of 1/36 (2.8%) trapped badgers and from tissue pools from 8/121 (6.6%) road-killed badgers.

  4. Expression of Ruminococcus albus xylanase gene ( xynA) in Streptococcus bovis 12-U-1.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mutsumi; Nagamine, Takafumi; Harada, Chisato; Tajima, Kiyoshi; Matsui, Hiroki; Benno, Yoshimi

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this study was to ligate the xylanase gene A ( xynA) isolated from Ruminococcus albus 7 into the promoter and signal-peptide region of the lichenase [beta-(1,3-1,4)-glucanase] gene of Streptococcus bovis JB1. This fusion gene was inserted into the pSBE11 vector, and the resulting recombinant, plasmid pXA, was used to transform S. bovis 12-U-1 cells. The transformant, S. bovis 12UXA, secreted the xylanase, which was stable against freeze-thaw treatment and long-time incubation at 37 degrees C. The introduction of pXA and production of xylanase did not affect cell growth, and the xylanase produced degraded xylan from oat-spelt and birchwood.

  5. Mycobacterium bovis BCG Causing Vertebral Osteomyelitis (Pott’s Disease) Following Intravesical BCG Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Aljada, Ibrahim S.; Crane, John K.; Corriere, Nancy; Wagle, Datta G.; Amsterdam, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    We report a case of Mycobacterium bovis BCG vertebral osteomyelitis in a 79-year-old man 2.5 years after intravesical BCG therapy for bladder cancer. The recovered isolate resembled M. tuberculosis biochemically, but resistance to pyrazinamide (PZA) rendered that diagnosis suspect. High-pressure liquid chromatographic studies confirmed the diagnosis of M. bovis BCG infection. The patient was originally started on a four-drug antituberculous regimen of isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, and PZA. When susceptibility studies were reported, the regimen was changed to isoniazid and rifampin for 12 months. Subsequently, the patient was transferred to a skilled nursing facility for 3 months, where he underwent intensive physical therapy. Although extravesical adverse reactions are rare, clinicians and clinical microbiologists need to be aware of the possibility of disseminated infection by M. bovis BCG in the appropriate setting of clinical history, physical examination, and laboratory investigation. PMID:10325395

  6. An epidemiological evaluation of Mycobacterium bovis infections in wild game animals of the Spanish Mediterranean ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Parra, A; García, A; Inglis, N F; Tato, A; Alonso, J M; Hermoso de Mendoza, M; Hermoso de Mendoza, J; Larrasa, J

    2006-04-01

    Recreational hunting of indigenous wild artiodactyls has been one of the most lucrative and rapidly growing industries in Western Spain over the last five years. In the absence of careful ecological management, one consequence of the commercial exploitation of this natural resource has been the appearance of outbreaks of infectious disease; most notably bovine tuberculosis. From the outset of the study in 1997, we have observed a steady increase in prevalence of Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) in both species reaching 1.74 (+/-0.17) in deer in 2002 and 2.32 (+/-0.24) in wild boar. The latter species seems to be most severely affected with pulmonary lesions appearing more chronic than those observed in deer. In this study, we describe the epidemiology of M. bovis in European wild boar (Sus scrofa) and Iberian red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) in Extremadura (W. Spain); a region where there are large areas of natural habitat for these species.

  7. Cytoskeletal changes in Eimeria bovis-infected host endothelial cells during first merogony.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Carlos; Schröpfer, Elmar; Stowasser, Michael; Eckstein-Ludwig, Ursula; Behrendt, Jan Hillern; Zahner, Horst

    2008-10-01

    The first merogony of Eimeria bovis takes place in lymphatic endothelial cells of the ileum, resulting in the formation of macromeronts up to 250 microm. In this study, we investigated the host cell cytoskeleton (actin filaments, microtubules, spectrin, vimentin intermediate filaments) associated with parasitic development in vitro by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) using primary bovine umbilical vein endothelial cells (BUVEC) and bovine spleen lymphatic endothelial cells (BSLEC) as host cells. No prominent changes in the host cell cytoskeleton were detected 1-3 days after E. bovis sporozoite invasion. With ongoing meront maturation a significant increase in microtubules and actin filaments close to the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) was found. Mature macromeronts within the PV were completely enclosed by these cytoskeletal elements. Our findings suggest, that in order to guarantee the survival of the host cell on the enlargement of macromeronts, E. bovis needs not only to augment but also to rearrange its cytoskeletal system.

  8. Alternative mechanism of Eimeria bovis sporozoites to invade cells in vitro by breaching the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, J H; Clauss, W; Zahner, H; Hermosilla, C

    2004-10-01

    In vitro Eimeria bovis sporozoites invade a wide range of cell types, and in the case of bovine cells, they may develop to first-generation schizonts. Often, however, they subsequently leave their host cell to invade a new one, which seems contrary to the classical way of infecting a cell by forming a parasitophorous vacuole. Using a standard, "cell wound assay," we show that E. bovis can invade bovine endothelial cells by breaching the plasma membrane and may again leave the surviving cell. Eimeria bovis sporozoites also infected VERO and HT29 cells but obviously without damaging the plasma membrane. The same held true when bovine endothelial cells were exposed to tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. According to a literature report dealing with Plasmodium yoelii sporozoites, breaching the membrane of certain host cells may be a common phenomenon for coccidian sporozoites but may not be for merozoites.

  9. Genomic fingerprinting of Mycobacterium bovis from cattle by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Skuce, R A; Brittain, D; Hughes, M S; Beck, L A; Neill, S D

    1994-01-01

    Two insertion sequences, IS6110 and IS1081, specific to the tuberculosis complex mycobacteria and a highly reiterated DNA element (pTBN12) cloned from Mycobacterium tuberculosis were systematically used to identify restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) types among bovine isolates of Mycobacterium bovis in Northern Ireland. In a sample of 109 isolates, probes IS6110, IS1081, and pTBN12 identified 10, 2, and 12 distinct patterns, respectively. By combining the patterns generated by the three probes it was possible to identify 28 distinct RFLP types. The standard protocol advocated for RFLP analysis of M. tuberculosis was used and would facilitate computer-based gel documentation and image analysis to establish a database of M. bovis types for large-scale epidemiological studies. These procedures will facilitate interlaboratory comparisons of M. bovis isolates and will help to elucidate the precise epidemiology of bovine tuberculosis in different countries. Images PMID:7814471

  10. Radiometric selective inhibition tests for differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis, and other mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, W M; Hawkins, J E

    1985-01-01

    In the context of a busy reference laboratory, radiometric selective inhibition tests were evaluated for rapid differentiation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis and of the M. tuberculosis complex from other mycobacteria. p-Nitro-alpha-acetylamino-beta-hydroxypropiophenone at 5 micrograms and hydroxylamine hydrochloride at 62.5 and 125 micrograms per ml of 7H12 medium were used to separate the M. tuberculosis complex from other mycobacteria (MOTT bacilli). Since it is important epidemiologically to distinguish M. tuberculosis from M. bovis, susceptibility to 1 microgram of thiophene-2-carboxylic acid per ml was also determined radiometrically. By using these three agents as selective inhibitors, M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, and MOTT bacilli were differentiated with a high degree of specificity by a BACTEC radiometric procedure. Results of tests performed on clinical isolates submitted on solid medium to our reference laboratory were available within 5 days. PMID:3921561

  11. [Presence of Streptococcus bovis in urine samples from patients experiencing symptoms of urinary tract].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Camarasa, Cristina; Gutiérrez Soto, Blanca; Jiménez-Guerra, Gemma; Sorlózano Puerto, Antonio; Navarro-Marí, José María; Gutiérrez-Fernández, José

    Given the relevance of proper clinical validation of Streptococcus bovis, we here consider revising its presence in urine samples in order to determine its relative frequency and the pattern of antibiotic susceptibility. The susceptibility to antibiotics of 91 isolates of S. bovis from urine samples was retrospectively reviewed over a period of 4 years (2012-2015). The mean age of patients was 55 years, 81% of whom were women and 37.4% were hospitalized patients suffering from urological diseases (61%). Susceptibility to penicillin, vancomycin and teicoplanin was 97.8%. Due to the fact that S. bovis can be infrequent in urine isolates and given its presence in patients suffering from urological diseases, further pathogenic studies, showing the true ability of this group of bacteria to produce disease, are required. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Characteristics of Streptococcus bovis endocarditis and its differences with Streptococcus viridans endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Corredoira, J; Alonso, M P; Coira, A; Casariego, E; Arias, C; Alonso, D; Pita, J; Rodriguez, A; López, M J; Varela, J

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of infective endocarditis (IE) caused by S. bovis and compare them to those caused by streptococci of the viridans group (SVG). A prospective study was undertaken considering 55 consecutive cases of IE due to S. bovis and 41 to SVG over 18 years. The study was divided into two periods (1988-1996 and 1997-2005). S. bovis caused 24% of the IE in our centre and constituted the main aetiology for this disease, showing an increase of 358% during the second period studied. Biotype I was responsible for 94.5% of cases and there was a high degree of association with colon tumours (53%). Over the period of the study, 107 patients admitted to our hospital had bacteraemia caused by S. bovis and 310 patients had bacteraemia caused by SVG. In the first group, 55 (51%) were endocarditis cases, but only 41 (13%) of the patients with SVG bacteraemia had endocarditis (p < 0.0001). The distinguishing features of endocarditis caused by S. bovis in comparison with those caused by SGV were: a greater increase in cases during the 2nd period studied (from 12 to 43 vs. from 19 to 22, p < 0.01), a higher percentage of males (93% vs. 71%, p < 0.004), patients significantly older (median age 66 vs. 58.5, p < 0.004), less predisposing cardiopathy (42% vs. 76%, p < 0.0009), more bivalvular involvement (42% vs. 22%, p < 0.04), more spondylitis (9% vs. 0%, p < 0.04), a higher association with colonic tumours (53% vs. 5%, p < 0.0001), and a higher percentage of antibiotic resistance: erythromycin 66% vs. 19%, p < 0.0001; clindamycin 67% vs. 11%, p < 0.0001; cotrimoxazole 77% vs. 30.5%, p < 0.0001, respectively. IE due to S. bovis is an emergent disease in our environment, presenting different characteristics to those produced by SVG.

  13. Nitric Oxide Not Apoptosis Mediates Differential Killing of Mycobacterium bovis in Bovine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel-Solís, Hugo; Vallecillo, Antonio J.; Benítez-Guzmán, Alejandro; Adams, L. Garry; López-Vidal, Yolanda; Gutiérrez-Pabello, José A.

    2013-01-01

    To identify the resistance phenotype against Mycobacterium bovis in cattle, we used a bactericidal assay that has been considered a marker of this trait. Three of 24 cows (12.5%) were phenotyped as resistant and 21 as susceptible. Resistance of bovine macrophages (MΦ) to BCG challenge was evaluated for its association with SLC11A1 GT microsatellite polymorphisms within 3′UTR region. Twenty-three cows (95.8%) had a GT13 genotype, reported as resistant, consequently the SLC11A1polymorphism was not in agreement with our bactericidal assay results. MΦ of cows with resistant or susceptible phenotype were challenged in vitro with virulent M. bovis field strain or BCG, and nitric oxide production, bacterial killing and apoptosis induction were measured in resting and LPS-primed states. M. bovis field strain induced more apoptosis than BCG, although the difference was not significant. Resistant MΦ controlled better the replication of M. bovis (P<0.01), produced more nitric oxide (P<0.05) and were slightly more prone to undergo apoptosis than susceptible cells. LPS pretreatment of MΦ enhanced all the functional parameters analyzed. Inhibition of nitric oxide production with nG-monomethyl-L-arginine monoacetate enhanced replication of M. bovis but did not modify apoptosis rates in both resistant and susceptible MΦ. We conclude that nitric oxide production not apoptosis is a major determinant of macrophage resistance to M. bovis infection in cattle and that the influence of SLC11A1 gene 3′UTR polymorphism is not associated with this event. PMID:23691050

  14. High Prevalence of Inducible Erythromycin Resistance among Streptococcus bovis Isolates in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Lee-Jene; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Ho, Shen-Wu; Luh, Kwen-Tay

    2001-01-01

    Susceptibilities to 13 antimicrobial agents were determined by measurement of MICs for 60 isolates of Streptococcus bovis from blood cultures. Thirty-eight isolates (63.3%) had high-level resistance to erythromycin (MICs, ≥128 μg/ml). Among the 38 erythromycin-resistant strains, 21 isolates (55%) had inducible resistance to macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B (iMLS isolates) and 17 (45%) had constitutive resistance to macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B (cMLS isolates). Tetracycline resistance was also found among all of the erythromycin-resistant strains. None of the strains displayed resistance to penicillin, chloramphenicol, or vancomycin. Detection of erythromycin resistance genes by PCR and sequencing indicated that all 17 cMLS isolates were positive for the ermB gene and that 7 of 21 iMLS isolates carried the ermB gene and the remaining 14 iMLS isolates carried the ermT gene. Sequence analysis of amplified partial ermB fragments (594 bp) from S. bovis isolates revealed a 99.8% nucleotide identity and a 100% amino acid homology compared with the sequences from gene banks. The sequences of amplified fragments with primers targeted for ermC were shown to be very similar to that of ermGT (ermT) from Lactobacillus reuteri (98.5% nucleotide identity). This is the first report to describe the detection of the ermT class of erythromycin resistance determinants in S. bovis. The high rate of inducible erythromycin resistance among S. bovis isolates in Taiwan was not reported before. The iMLS S. bovis isolates were shown to be heterogeneous by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis. These results indicate that the prevalence of inducible erythromycin resistance in S. bovis in Taiwan is very high and that most of the resistant strains carry the ermT or the ermB gene. PMID:11709309

  15. Eimeria bovis infection modulates endothelial host cell cholesterol metabolism for successful replication.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Penny H; Hirzmann, Joerg; Kerner, Katharina; Gimpl, Gerald; Lochnit, Guenter; Hermosilla, Carlos R; Taubert, Anja

    2015-09-23

    During first merogony Eimeria bovis forms large macromeronts in endothelial host cells containing >120 000 merozoites I. During multiplication, large amounts of cholesterol are indispensable for the enormous offspring membrane production. Cholesterol auxotrophy was proven for other apicomplexan parasites. Consequently they scavenge cholesterol from their host cell apparently in a parasite-specific manner. We here analyzed the influence of E. bovis infection on endothelial host cell cholesterol metabolism and found considerable differences to other coccidian parasites. Overall, free cholesterol significantly accumulated in E. bovis infected host cells. Furthermore, a striking increase of lipid droplet formation was observed within immature macromeronts. Artificial host cell lipid droplet enrichment significantly improved E. bovis merozoite I production confirming the key role of lipid droplet contents for optimal parasite proliferation. The transcription of several genes being involved in both, cholesterol de novo biosynthesis and low density lipoprotein-(LDL) mediated uptake, was significantly up-regulated at a time in infected cells suggesting a simultaneous exploitation of these two cholesterol acquisition pathways. E. bovis scavenges LDL-derived cholesterol apparently through significantly increased levels of surface LDL receptor abundance and LDL binding to infected cells. Consequently, LDL supplementation significantly improved parasite replication. The up-regulation of the oxidized LDL receptor 1 furthermore identified this scavenger receptor as a key molecule in parasite-triggered LDL uptake. Moreover, cellular cholesterol processing was altered in infected cells as indicated by up-regulation of cholesterol-25-hydroxylase and sterol O-acyltransferase. Overall, these results show that E. bovis considerably exploits the host cell cholesterol metabolism to guarantee its massive intracellular growth and replication.

  16. Nitric oxide not apoptosis mediates differential killing of Mycobacterium bovis in bovine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Esquivel-Solís, Hugo; Vallecillo, Antonio J; Benítez-Guzmán, Alejandro; Adams, L Garry; López-Vidal, Yolanda; Gutiérrez-Pabello, José A

    2013-01-01

    To identify the resistance phenotype against Mycobacterium bovis in cattle, we used a bactericidal assay that has been considered a marker of this trait. Three of 24 cows (12.5%) were phenotyped as resistant and 21 as susceptible. Resistance of bovine macrophages (MΦ) to BCG challenge was evaluated for its association with SLC11A1 GT microsatellite polymorphisms within 3'UTR region. Twenty-three cows (95.8%) had a GT13 genotype, reported as resistant, consequently the SLC11A1 polymorphism was not in agreement with our bactericidal assay results. MΦ of cows with resistant or susceptible phenotype were challenged in vitro with virulent M. bovis field strain or BCG, and nitric oxide production, bacterial killing and apoptosis induction were measured in resting and LPS-primed states. M. bovis field strain induced more apoptosis than BCG, although the difference was not significant. Resistant MΦ controlled better the replication of M. bovis (P<0.01), produced more nitric oxide (P<0.05) and were slightly more prone to undergo apoptosis than susceptible cells. LPS pretreatment of MΦ enhanced all the functional parameters analyzed. Inhibition of nitric oxide production with n (G)-monomethyl-L-arginine monoacetate enhanced replication of M. bovis but did not modify apoptosis rates in both resistant and susceptible MΦ. We conclude that nitric oxide production not apoptosis is a major determinant of macrophage resistance to M. bovis infection in cattle and that the influence of SLC11A1 gene 3'UTR polymorphism is not associated with this event.

  17. Usefulness of Spoligotyping in Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis-Related Infections in South America

    PubMed Central

    Zumárraga, Martín J.; Martin, Carlos; Samper, Sofia; Alito, Alicia; Latini, Omar; Bigi, Fabiana; Roxo, Eliana; Cicuta, María Elena; Errico, Francisco; Ramos, Miguel Castro; Cataldi, Angel; van Soolingen, Dick; Romano, María Isabel

    1999-01-01

    Two hundred twenty-four Mycobacterium bovis isolates, mainly from South American countries, were typed by spoligotyping, and 41 different spoligotypes were identified. A total of 202 M. bovis isolates (90%) were grouped into 19 different clusters. The largest cluster contained 96 isolates (42.8%) on the basis of the most frequently observed spoligotype, spoligotype 34. Nineteen M. bovis isolates from humans in Argentina had spoligotypes and polymorphic GC-rich repetitive sequence (PGRS) types that represented the most common types found among isolates from cattle. All five isolates from Uruguay and three of the six isolates from Paraguay had spoligotypes that were also detected for isolates from Argentina. The spoligotypes of isolates from Brazil, Costa Rica, and Mexico and of some of the isolates from Paraguay could not be found in Argentina. A total of 154 M. bovis isolates were selected in order to compare the discriminative power of spoligotyping and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis with direct repeat (DR) and PGRS probes. By spoligotyping, 31 different types were found, while AluI-digested DR probe-associated RFLP analysis identified 42 types, and RFLP analysis with the PGRS probe also detected 42 types; these were partly independent of the DR types. By combining the results obtained by spoligotyping and by RFLP analysis with the DR and PGRS probes, 88 different types were obtained. Although the differentiation of M. bovis by spoligotyping was less discriminatory than differentiation by RFLP analysis with the DR and PGRS probes, spoligotyping is easier to perform and its results are easier to interpret. Therefore, for the purpose of typing of M. bovis isolates, spoligotyping could be performed first and the isolates could be grouped into clusters and then analyzed by RFLP analysis with the DR and PGRS probes. PMID:9889207

  18. Upregulation of Thymosin β-10 by Mycobacterium bovis Infection of Bovine Macrophages Is Associated with Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Pabello, José A.; McMurray, David N.; Adams, L. Garry

    2002-01-01

    Bovine macrophages underwent apoptosis as a result of infection with a Mycobacterium bovis field strain. Macrophages infected with a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 25:1 developed chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation at 4 h and 8 h, respectively, whereas changes in chromatin condensation induced by MOIs of 10:1 and 1:1 required more time and had a reduced number of apoptotic cells. Not only infected macrophages underwent apoptosis, but also uninfected bystander macrophages became apoptotic. Increased differential expression of thymosin β-10 was identified in M. bovis-infected bovine macrophages by differential display reverse transcriptase PCR. Phagocytosis of latex beads had no effect on the expression of thymosin β-10, whereas bacterial suspensions upregulated thymosin β-10 expression, suggesting that M. bovis or mycobacterial products are essential in the process. Heat-inactivated M. bovis induced a slight increase in thymosin β-10 mRNA, whereas live virulent and attenuated M. bovis organisms increased the gene expression almost twofold. A mouse macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) overexpressing the bovine thymosin β-10 transgene had spontaneous apoptosis at a higher rate (66.5%) than parental cells (4.7%) or RAW cells harboring the empty vector (22.8%). The apoptotic rates of the overexpressing cells were significantly higher when compared with both the empty vector transfected (P < 0.01) and parental cells (P < 0.001). Our evidence suggests that upregulation of thymosin β-10 in M. bovis-infected macrophages is linked with increased cell death due to apoptosis. PMID:11895978

  19. Fine-mapping host genetic variation underlying outcomes to Mycobacterium bovis infection in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, S; Bishop, S C; Allen, A R; McBride, S H; Skuce, R A; Bermingham, M; Woolliams, J A; Glass, E J

    2017-06-24

    Susceptibility to Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle is governed in part by host genetics. However, cattle diagnosed as infected with M. bovis display varying signs of pathology. The variation in host response to infection could represent a continuum since time of exposure or distinct outcomes due to differing pathogen handling. The relationships between host genetics and variation in host response and pathological sequelae following M. bovis infection were explored by genotyping 1966 Holstein-Friesian dairy cows at 538,231 SNPs with three distinct phenotypes. These were: single intradermal cervical comparative tuberculin (SICCT) test positives with visible lesions (VLs), SICCT-positives with undetected visible lesions (NVLs) and matched controls SICCT-negative on multiple occasions. Regional heritability mapping identified three loci associated with the NVL phenotype on chromosomes 17, 22 and 23, distinct to the region on chromosome 13 associated with the VL phenotype. The region on chromosome 23 was at genome-wide significance and candidate genes overlapping the mapped window included members of the bovine leukocyte antigen class IIb region, a complex known for its role in immunity and disease resistance. Chromosome heritability analysis attributed variance to six and thirteen chromosomes for the VL and NVL phenotypes, respectively, and four of these chromosomes were found to explain a proportion of the phenotypic variation for both the VL and NVL phenotype. By grouping the M. bovis outcomes (VLs and NVLs) variance was attributed to nine chromosomes. When contrasting the two M. bovis infection outcomes (VLs vs NVLs) nine chromosomes were found to harbour heritable variation. Regardless of the case phenotype under investigation, chromosome heritability did not exceed 8% indicating that the genetic control of bTB resistance consists of variants of small to moderate effect situated across many chromosomes of the bovine genome. These findings suggest the host

  20. In vivo intravascular biotinylation of Schistosoma bovis adult worms and proteomic analysis of tegumental surface proteins.

    PubMed

    de la Torre-Escudero, Eduardo; Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo; Manzano-Román, Raúl; Oleaga, Ana

    2013-12-06

    Schistosoma bovis is a blood-dwelling fluke of ruminants that lives for years inside the vasculature of their hosts. The parasite tegument covers the surface of the worms and plays a key role in the host-parasite relationship. The parasite molecules expressed at the tegument surface are potential targets for immune or drug intervention. The purpose of this work was the identification of the proteins expressed in vivo on the surface of the tegument of S. bovis adult worms. To accomplish this we used a method based on in vivo vascular perfusion of mice infected with S. bovis which allowed the labelling of the surface of the worms inside the blood vasculature. The biotinylation of parasite inside blood vessels prevents the handling of worms in vitro and hence possible damage to the tegument that could produce results that would be difficult to interpret. Trypsin digestion of biotinylated proteins and subsequent liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-MS/MS) resulted in the identification on the S. bovis tegument of 80 parasite proteins and 28 host proteins. The proteins identified were compared with the findings from other proteomic studies of the schistosome surface. The experimental approach used in this work is a reliable method for selective investigation of the surface of the worms and provides valuable information about the exposed protein repertoire of the tegument of S. bovis in the environmental conditions that the parasite faces inside the blood vessels. To identify the proteins expressed on the surface of the tegument of S. bovis adult worms we used a method based on in vivo vascular perfusion, with biotin, of mice infected with S. bovis which allowed the labelling of the surface of the worms inside the blood vasculature. This methodology prevents the handling of worms in vitro and hence possible damage to the tegument that could produce results that would be difficult to interpret. This work is the first in which vascular perfusion