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Sample records for irradiated p53-deficient tumour

  1. Endopolyploidy in irradiated p53-deficient tumour cell lines: Persistence of cell division activity in giant cells expressing Aurora B- kinase

    PubMed Central

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Ivanov, Andrei; Wheatley, Sally P; Kosmacek, Elizabeth A; Ianzini, Fiorenza; Anisimov, Alim P; Mackey, Michael; Davis, Paul J; Plakhins, Grigorijs; Illidge, Timothy M

    2008-01-01

    Recent findings including computerized live imaging suggest that polyploidy cells transiently emerging after severe genotoxic stress (and named ‘endopolyploid cells’) may have a role in tumour regrowth after anti-cancer treatment. Until now, mostly the factors enabling metaphase were studied in them. Here we investigate the mitotic activities and the role of Aurora B, in view of potential de-polyploidisation of these cells, because Aurora B- kinase is responsible for coordination and completion of mitosis. We observed that endopolyploid giant cells are formed in irradiated p53 tumours in several ways: (1) by division/fusion of daughter cells creating early multi-nucleated cells; (2) by asynchronous division/fusion of sub-nuclei of these multinucleated cells; (3) by a series of polyploidising mitoses reverting replicative interphase from aborted metaphase and forming giant cells with a single nucleus; (4) by micronucleation of arrested metaphases enclosing genome fragments; or (5) by incomplete division in the multipolar mitoses forming late multi-nucleated giant cells. We also observed that these activities are able to release para-diploid cells, although they do so infrequently. Although after a substantial delay, apoptosis typically occurs in these cells, we also found that roughly 2% of endopolyploid cells evade apoptosis and senescence arrest and continue mitotic activities. In this article we describe that catalytically active aurora B-kinase is expressed in the nuclei of many interphase endopolyploid cells, as well as being present at the centromeres, mitotic spindle and cleavage furrow during their mitotic efforts. The totally micronucleated giant cells (containing subgenomic fragments in multiple micronuclei) represented the only minor fraction, which failed to undergo mitosis and Aurora B was absent from it. These observations suggest that most endopolyploid tumour cells are not reproductively inert and that aurora B may contribute to the establishment

  2. Gamma-ray irradiation promotes premature meiosis of spontaneously differentiating testis–ova in the testis of p53-deficient medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, T; Oda, S; Li, Z; Kimori, Y; Kamei, Y; Ishikawa, T; Todo, T; Mitani, H

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the roles of p53 in impaired spermatogenic male germ cells of p53-deficient medaka were investigated by analyzing histological changes, and gene expressions of 42Sp50, Oct 4 and vitellogenin (VTG2) by RT-PCR or in situ hybridization in the testes. We found that a small number of oocyte-like cells (testis–ova) differentiated spontaneously in the cysts of type A and early type B spermatogonia in the p53-deficient testes, in contrast to the wild-type (wt) testes in which testis–ova were never found. Furthermore, ionizing radiation (IR) irradiation increased the number of testis–ova in p53-deficient testes, increased testis–ova size and proceeded up to the zygotene or pachytene stages of premature meiosis within 14 days after irradiation. However, 28 days after irradiation, almost all the testis–ova were eliminated presumably by p53-independent apoptosis, and spermatogenesis was restored completely. In the wt testis, IR never induced testis–ova differentiation. This is the first study to demonstrate the pivotal role of the p53 gene in the elimination of spontaneous testis–ova in testes, and that p53 is not indispensable for the restoration of spermatogenesis in the impaired testes in which cell cycle regulation is disturbed by IR irradiation. PMID:23034330

  3. Gamma-ray irradiation promotes premature meiosis of spontaneously differentiating testis-ova in the testis of p53-deficient medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Yasuda, T; Oda, S; Li, Z; Kimori, Y; Kamei, Y; Ishikawa, T; Todo, T; Mitani, H

    2012-10-04

    In this study, the roles of p53 in impaired spermatogenic male germ cells of p53-deficient medaka were investigated by analyzing histological changes, and gene expressions of 42Sp50, Oct 4 and vitellogenin (VTG2) by RT-PCR or in situ hybridization in the testes. We found that a small number of oocyte-like cells (testis-ova) differentiated spontaneously in the cysts of type A and early type B spermatogonia in the p53-deficient testes, in contrast to the wild-type (wt) testes in which testis-ova were never found. Furthermore, ionizing radiation (IR) irradiation increased the number of testis-ova in p53-deficient testes, increased testis-ova size and proceeded up to the zygotene or pachytene stages of premature meiosis within 14 days after irradiation. However, 28 days after irradiation, almost all the testis-ova were eliminated presumably by p53-independent apoptosis, and spermatogenesis was restored completely. In the wt testis, IR never induced testis-ova differentiation. This is the first study to demonstrate the pivotal role of the p53 gene in the elimination of spontaneous testis-ova in testes, and that p53 is not indispensable for the restoration of spermatogenesis in the impaired testes in which cell cycle regulation is disturbed by IR irradiation.

  4. Apoptosis and morphological alterations after UVA irradiation in red blood cells of p53 deficient Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Sayed, Alla El-Din Hamid; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Morphological alterations in red blood cells were described as hematological bioindicators of UVA exposure to investigate the sensitivity to UVA in wild type Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and a p53 deficient mutant. The fewer abnormal red blood cells were observed in the p53 mutant fish under the control conditions. After exposure to different doses of UVA radiation (15min, 30min and 60min/day for 3days), cellular and nuclear alterations in red blood cells were analyzed in the UVA exposed fish compared with non-exposed controls and those alterations included acanthocytes, cell membrane lysis, swollen cells, teardrop-like cell, hemolyzed cells and sickle cells. Those alterations were increased after the UVA exposure both in wild type and the p53 deficient fish. Moreover, apoptosis analyzed by acridine orange assay showed increased number of apoptosis in red blood cells at the higher UVA exposure dose. No micronuclei but nuclear abnormalities as eccentric nucleus, nuclear budding, deformed nucleus, and bilobed nucleus were observed in each group. These results suggested that UVA exposure induced both p53 dependent and independent apoptosis and morphological alterations in red blood cells but less sensitive to UVA than Wild type in medaka fish.

  5. Influences of p53 deficiency on the apoptotic response, DNA damage removal and mutagenesis in UVB-exposed mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Ikehata, Hironobu; Okuyama, Ryuhei; Ogawa, Eisaku; Nakamura, Shingo; Usami, Atsuko; Mori, Toshio; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Aiba, Setsuya; Ono, Tetsuya

    2010-07-01

    p53 suppresses the genomic instability provoked by genotoxic agents. Ultraviolet (UV) B induces skin cancers by producing DNA damage and mutations in the skin genome, whereas the skin tissue responds to the UVB insult with cell cycle arrest and apoptosis as well as damage exclusion by DNA repair. To address the p53 contribution to these skin responses in vivo, we analyzed the time course of DNA damage removal, apoptosis induction and hyperplasia in the skin after UVB irradiation in p53-knockout mice. We also examined UVB-induced mutations in the skin. We found that p53 deficiency does not abolish the UVB-induced apoptotic response in the epidermis but delays the process and the following hyperplasia 12-24 h. Regardless of the p53 genotype, 1 kJ/m(2) UVB induced a total replacement of the epidermal layer by destroying the damaged epidermis by apoptosis and rebuilding a new one through hyperplasia. We failed to detect a clear defect in removal of UVB-induced DNA photolesions from the genome of the p53-deficient skin except for a delay in the epidermis, which seemed to result from the delay in the apoptotic response. However, we found that p53 deficiency enhanced UVB-induced mutagenesis. Furthermore, in a genetic study using Xpa-knockout mice, we showed that the enhanced mutagenic response depends on the activity of nucleotide excision repair (NER), which was also supported by the mutation spectrum observed in the UVB-exposed p53-knockout mice. These results indicate that p53 protects the skin genome from the UVB genotoxicity by facilitating NER, whereas its contribution to the UVB-induced apoptosis is limited.

  6. Differential programming of p53-deficient embryonic cells during rotenone block

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in chemical toxicities. The present study used an in vitro model to investigate the differential expression of metabolic pathways during cellular stress in p53- efficient embryonic fibroblasts compared to p53-deficient cells. These c...

  7. Differential programming of p53-deficient embryonic cells during rotenone block

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in chemical toxicities. The present study used an in vitro model to investigate the differential expression of metabolic pathways during cellular stress in p53- efficient embryonic fibroblasts compared to p53-deficient cells. These c...

  8. Selective killing of p53-deficient cancer cells by SP600125

    PubMed Central

    Jemaà, Mohamed; Vitale, Ilio; Kepp, Oliver; Berardinelli, Francesco; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Senovilla, Laura; Mariño, Guillermo; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Rello-Varona, Santiago; Lissa, Delphine; Antoccia, Antonio; Tailler, Maximilien; Schlemmer, Frederic; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The genetic or functional inactivation of p53 is highly prevalent in human cancers. Using high-content videomicroscopy based on fluorescent TP53+/+ and TP53−/− human colon carcinoma cells, we discovered that SP600125, a broad-spectrum serine/threonine kinase inhibitor, kills p53-deficient cells more efficiently than their p53-proficient counterparts, in vitro. Similar observations were obtained in vivo, in mice carrying p53-deficient and -proficient human xenografts. Such a preferential cytotoxicity could be attributed to the failure of p53-deficient cells to undergo cell cycle arrest in response to SP600125. TP53−/− (but not TP53+/+) cells treated with SP600125 became polyploid upon mitotic abortion and progressively succumbed to mitochondrial apoptosis. The expression of an SP600125-resistant variant of the mitotic kinase MPS1 in TP53−/− cells reduced SP600125-induced polyploidization. Thus, by targeting MPS1, SP600125 triggers a polyploidization program that cannot be sustained by TP53−/− cells, resulting in the activation of mitotic catastrophe, an oncosuppressive mechanism for the eradication of mitosis-incompetent cells. PMID:22438244

  9. Mouse p53-Deficient Cancer Models as Platforms for Obtaining Genomic Predictors of Human Cancer Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dueñas, Marta; Santos, Mirentxu; Aranda, Juan F.; Bielza, Concha; Martínez-Cruz, Ana B.; Lorz, Corina; Taron, Miquel; Ciruelos, Eva M.; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L.; Martín, Miguel; Larrañaga, Pedro; Dahabreh, Jubrail; Stathopoulos, George P.; Rosell, Rafael; Paramio, Jesús M.; García-Escudero, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the TP53 gene are very common in human cancers, and are associated with poor clinical outcome. Transgenic mouse models lacking the Trp53 gene or that express mutant Trp53 transgenes produce tumours with malignant features in many organs. We previously showed the transcriptome of a p53-deficient mouse skin carcinoma model to be similar to those of human cancers with TP53 mutations and associated with poor clinical outcomes. This report shows that much of the 682-gene signature of this murine skin carcinoma transcriptome is also present in breast and lung cancer mouse models in which p53 is inhibited. Further, we report validated gene-expression-based tests for predicting the clinical outcome of human breast and lung adenocarcinoma. It was found that human patients with cancer could be stratified based on the similarity of their transcriptome with the mouse skin carcinoma 682-gene signature. The results also provide new targets for the treatment of p53-defective tumours. PMID:22880004

  10. Susceptibility of p53-deficient mice to induction of mesothelioma by crocidolite asbestos fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Marsella, J M; Liu, B L; Vaslet, C A; Kane, A B

    1997-01-01

    Exposure of mesothelial cells to asbestos fibers in vitro has been shown to induce DNA damage mediated by oxidants. An early cellular response to DNA damage is increased expression of the p53 protein. This protein induces transcription of genes that activate cell cycle checkpoints or induce apoptosis. A murine mesothelial cell line that spontaneously acquired a point mutation in the p53 gene shows increased sensitivity to DNA damage induced by crocidolite asbestos fibers. It is hypothesized that p53-deficient mice will show increased sensitivity to the genotoxic effects of asbestos and accelerated development of malignant mesotheliomas. PMID:9400702

  11. CHK1-targeted therapy to deplete DNA replication-stressed, p53-deficient, hyperdiploid colorectal cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Manic, Gwenola; Signore, Michele; Sistigu, Antonella; Russo, Giorgio; Corradi, Francesca; Siteni, Silvia; Musella, Martina; Vitale, Sara; De Angelis, Maria Laura; Pallocca, Matteo; Amoreo, Carla Azzurra; Sperati, Francesca; Di Franco, Simone; Barresi, Sabina; Policicchio, Eleonora; De Luca, Gabriele; De Nicola, Francesca; Mottolese, Marcella; Zeuner, Ann; Fanciulli, Maurizio; Stassi, Giorgio; Maugeri-Saccà, Marcello; Baiocchi, Marta; Tartaglia, Marco; Vitale, Ilio; De Maria, Ruggero

    2017-04-07

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for tumour formation and spreading, and their targeting is required for tumour eradication. There are limited therapeutic options for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC), particularly for tumours carrying RAS-activating mutations. The aim of this study was to identify novel CSC-targeting strategies. To discover potential therapeutics to be clinically investigated as single agent, we performed a screening with a panel of FDA-approved or investigational drugs on primary CRC cells enriched for CSCs (CRC-SCs) isolated from 27 patients. Candidate predictive biomarkers of efficacy were identified by integrating genomic, reverse-phase protein microarray (RPPA) and cytogenetic analyses, and validated by immunostainings. DNA replication stress (RS) was increased by employing DNA replication-perturbing or polyploidising agents. The drug-library screening led to the identification of LY2606368 as a potent anti-CSC agent acting in vitro and in vivo in tumour cells from a considerable number of patients (∼36%). By inhibiting checkpoint kinase (CHK)1, LY2606368 affected DNA replication in most CRC-SCs, including RAS-mutated ones, forcing them into premature, lethal mitoses. Parallel genomic, RPPA and cytogenetic analyses indicated that CRC-SCs sensitive to LY2606368 displayed signs of ongoing RS response, including the phosphorylation of RPA32 and ataxia telangiectasia mutated serine/threonine kinase (ATM). This was associated with mutation(s) in TP53 and hyperdiploidy, and made these CRC-SCs exquisitely dependent on CHK1 function. Accordingly, experimental increase of RS sensitised resistant CRC-SCs to LY2606368. LY2606368 selectively eliminates replication-stressed, p53-deficient and hyperdiploid CRC-SCs independently of RAS mutational status. These results provide a strong rationale for biomarker-driven clinical trials with LY2606368 in patients with CRC. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  12. RAG-induced DNA lesions activate proapoptotic BIM to suppress lymphomagenesis in p53-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Marco J.

    2016-01-01

    Neoplastic transformation is driven by oncogenic lesions that facilitate unrestrained cell expansion and resistance to antiproliferative signals. These oncogenic DNA lesions, acquired through errors in DNA replication, gene recombination, or extrinsically imposed damage, are thought to activate multiple tumor suppressive pathways, particularly apoptotic cell death. DNA damage induces apoptosis through well-described p53-mediated induction of PUMA and NOXA. However, loss of both these mediators (even together with defects in p53-mediated induction of cell cycle arrest and cell senescence) does not recapitulate the tumor susceptibility observed in p53−/− mice. Thus, potentially oncogenic DNA lesions are likely to also trigger apoptosis through additional, p53-independent processes. We found that loss of the BH3-only protein BIM accelerated lymphoma development in p53-deficient mice. This process was negated by concomitant loss of RAG1/2-mediated antigen receptor gene rearrangement. This demonstrates that BIM is critical for the induction of apoptosis caused by potentially oncogenic DNA lesions elicited by RAG1/2-induced gene rearrangement. Furthermore, this highlights the role of a BIM-mediated tumor suppressor pathway that acts in parallel to the p53 pathway and remains active even in the absence of wild-type p53 function, suggesting this may be exploited in the treatment of p53-deficient cancers. PMID:27621418

  13. Analysis of fused maxillary incisor dentition in p53-deficient exencephalic mice

    PubMed Central

    KAUFMAN, M. H.; KAUFMAN, D. B.; BRUNE, R. M.; STARK, M.; ARMSTRONG, J. F.; CLARKE, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    Out of a total of 21 exencephalic p53-deficient embryonic and newborn mice, 6 (28.6%) possessed fused maxillary incisor teeth. On histological analysis of the 5 examples seen on day 19.5 of gestation and newborn mice, 3 varieties were observed: an example of ‘simple’ fusion, 3 examples of simple fusion each of which contained a ‘dens in dente’ (‘tooth within a tooth’), and a single example in which the fused teeth were associated with a median supernumerary incisor tooth which, while deeply indenting the labial surface of the fused teeth, was in all locations a completely separate unit. 3-D reconstructions of the fused teeth demonstrated that they were all of the fusio subtotalis variety. No gross abnormalities were observed in the other dentition in these mice. It is noted that in mice fused maxillary incisor teeth are relatively commonly associated with both hypervitaminosis A-induced and trypan blue-induced exencephaly. It is believed that the presence of dens in dente within fused maxillary incisor teeth has only once been reported in mice, and the association between fused maxillary incisor teeth and a median supernumerary incisor tooth has not previously been reported in this species. PMID:9279659

  14. DIBENZO[A,L]PYRENE INDUCTION OF ERYTHROCYTE MICRONUCLEI IN A/J AND P53-DEFICIENT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    DIBENZO[a,l]PYRENE INDUCTION OF ERYTHROCYTE MICRONUCLEI IN AlJ AND P53-DEFICIENT MICE

    Male A/J and C57Bl/6 background p53+/+, p53+/- and p53-/- mice were treated with dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P), and micronucleus (MN) frequencies were measured in erythrocytes from bone ...

  15. DIBENZO[A,L]PYRENE INDUCTION OF ERYTHROCYTE MICRONUCLEI IN A/J AND P53-DEFICIENT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    DIBENZO[a,l]PYRENE INDUCTION OF ERYTHROCYTE MICRONUCLEI IN AlJ AND P53-DEFICIENT MICE

    Male A/J and C57Bl/6 background p53+/+, p53+/- and p53-/- mice were treated with dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P), and micronucleus (MN) frequencies were measured in erythrocytes from bone ...

  16. Enhancement of radiation response in p53-deficient cancer cells by the Aurora-B kinase inhibitor AZD1152.

    PubMed

    Tao, Y; Zhang, P; Girdler, F; Frascogna, V; Castedo, M; Bourhis, J; Kroemer, G; Deutsch, E

    2008-05-22

    Overexpression of the Aurora-B kinase correlates with oncogenic transformation and poor prognosis. We evaluated the effects of the bona fide Aurora-B kinase inhibitor AZD1152 on tumor responses to ionizing radiation (IR). When p53(wt) HCT116 and A549 cells were pretreated with AZD1152-HQPA prior to IR, additive effects were observed. Interestingly, more pronounced tumoricidal effects were observed in p53-deficient HCT116 and HT29 cells, as well as A549 cells treated with the p53 inhibitor cyclic pifithrin-alpha. In vivo studies on xenografted mice confirmed enhanced tumor growth delay after the combination of IR plus AZD1152-IR as compared to IR alone. Again, this effect was more pronounced with p53-/- HCT116 and p53-mutant xenografts. The AZD1152-mediated radiosensitization was mimicked by knockdown of Aurora-B with a short interference RNA or by inhibition of Aurora-B by transfection with an inducible kinase-dead Aurora-B. The radiosensitizing effect of AZD1152 was lost in CHK2-/- and 14-3-3-/- HCT116 cells. Altogether, these data indicate that AZD1152 can radiosensitize tumor cell lines in vitro and in vivo, the fact that these effects are exacerbated in p53-deficient cancer cells is of potential interest for further clinical development.

  17. Resistance of differentiating spermatogonia to radiation-induced apoptosis and loss in p53-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, M; Zhang, Y; Niibe, H; Terry, N H; Meistrich, M L

    1998-03-01

    The effect of the p53 gene on the survival of mouse testicular cells was evaluated by analysis of degenerating and terminal transferase-mediated end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and the subsequent production of further differentiated progeny. In p53 null mice, in contrast to wild-type mice, radiation induced negligible levels of degenerating or TUNEL-positive differentiating spermatogonia within 24 h. This was correlated with higher production of differentiated progeny of the differentiating spermatogonia in p53 null mice. Contrary to the differentiating spermatogonia, the stem spermatogonia of p53 null mice produced fewer differentiated progeny after irradiation than did the stem cells of wild-type mice. We conclude that, because the degeneration and TUNEL positivity of the differentiating spermatogonia in mice of different genotypes were correlated with each other and were dependent on p53, this process is indeed apoptosis. In the differentiating spermatogonia, p53-dependent apoptosis accounted for the bulk of the loss of their progeny after irradiation. Furthermore, whereas the differentiating spermatogonia died by apoptosis that was dependent on p53, the stem spermatogonia, which are more radioresistant, did not.

  18. Differential S-phase progression after irradiation of p53 functional versus non-functional tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Zölzer, Friedo; Mußfeldt, Tamare; Streffer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Background Many pathways seem to be involved in the regulation of the intra-S-phase checkpoint after exposure to ionizing radiation, but the role of p53 has proven to be rather elusive. Here we have a closer look at the progression of irradiated cells through S-phase in dependence of their p53 status. Materials and methods. Three pairs of tumour cell lines were used, each consisting of one p53 functional and one p53 non-functional line. Cells were labelled with bromodeoxyuridine(BrdU) immediately after irradiation, they were then incubated in label-free medium, and at different times afterwards their position within the S-phase was determined by means of flow cytometry. Results While in the p53 deficient cells progression through S-phase was slowed significantly over at least a few hours, it was halted for just about an hour in the p53 proficient cells and then proceeded without further delay or even at a slightly accelerated pace. Conclusions It is clear from the experiments presented here that p53 does play a role for the progress of cells through the S-phase after X-ray exposure, but the exact mechanisms by which replicon initiation and elongation is controlled in irradiated cells remain to be elucidated. PMID:25435848

  19. Autophagy modulates the effects of bis-anthracycline WP631 on p53-deficient prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla, Sylvia; Vizcaíno, Carolina; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Maria A; Priebe, Waldemar; Portugal, José

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of p53-deficient PC-3 human prostate carcinoma cells with nanomolar concentrations of bis-anthracycline WP631 induced changes in gene expression, which resulted in G2/M cell cycle arrest, autophagy and cell death. The presence of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), which induces metabolic stress and autophagy, enhanced the antiproliferative effects of WP631. Changes induced by WP631, 2-DG, or co-treatments with both compounds, in the expression of a variety of genes involved in autophagy and apoptosis were quantified by real-time PCR. They were consistent with a raise in autophagy followed by cell death. Some cells dying from G2/M phase showed features of necrosis like early changes in membrane permeability, while others were dying by apoptosis that occurred in presence of little caspase-3 activity. Our results indicate that WP631 is not only an antiproliferative agent acting on gene transcription, but it can also induce autophagy regardless of the presence of other pro-autophagy stimuli. The development of autophagy seemed to improve the cytotoxicity of WP631 in PC-3 cells. Our results indicate that autophagy would enhance the activity of DNA-binding drugs like WP631 that are potent inhibitors of gene transcription. PMID:25689150

  20. A Synthetic Interaction Screen Identifies Factors Selectively Required for Proliferation and TERT Transcription in p53-Deficient Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Mi; Zhu, Lihua J.; Debily, Marie-anne; Kittler, Ellen L. W.; Zapp, Maria L.; Lapointe, David; Gobeil, Stephane; Virbasius, Ching-Man; Green, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations render cancer cells selectively dependent on specific genes and regulatory pathways, and represent potential vulnerabilities that can be therapeutically exploited. Here we describe an RNA interference (RNAi)–based synthetic interaction screen to identify genes preferentially required for proliferation of p53-deficient (p53−) human cancer cells. We find that compared to p53-competent (p53+) human cancer cell lines, diverse p53− human cancer cell lines are preferentially sensitive to loss of the transcription factor ETV1 and the DNA damage kinase ATR. In p53− cells, RNAi–mediated knockdown of ETV1 or ATR results in decreased expression of the telomerase catalytic subunit TERT leading to growth arrest, which can be reversed by ectopic TERT expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis reveals that ETV1 binds to a region downstream of the TERT transcriptional start-site in p53− but not p53+ cells. We find that the role of ATR is to phosphorylate and thereby stabilize ETV1. Our collective results identify a regulatory pathway involving ETV1, ATR, and TERT that is preferentially important for proliferation of diverse p53− cancer cells. PMID:23284306

  1. Analysis of central regulatory pathways in p53-deficient primary cultures of malignant fibrous histiocytoma exposed to ifosfamide.

    PubMed

    Schlott, Thilo; Taubert, Helge; Fayyazi, Afshin; Schweyer, Stefan; Bartel, Frank; Korabiowska, Monika; Brinck, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas frequently carry p53 mutations reducing chemotherapeutical response. Especially malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) reveals a reduced ifosfamide (IF) chemosensitivity when compared to other sarcoma entities. This is the first study to analyze MFH cells for the effects of IF on the expression of the pathways P16-CDK4-Rb and P14ARF-MDM2-P73 regulating cell cycle. The aim was to identify candidate genes possibly involved in the anti-apoptotic response of p53-deficient MFH cells during chemotherapy. PCR, real-time RT-PCR and confocal laser scanning microscopy were applied on primary cultures of MFH cells containing defective p53 genes. The cultures were treated with different concentrations of IF. A non-treated MFH culture served as negative control. A threshold concentration of IF (100 microM) was determined sparing the majority of the cells (99%), whereas higher IF quantities caused complete apoptosis. Data collected over a period of 48 h showed that the MFH cells surviving 100 microM IF overexpressed the kinase gene CDK4 and oncogene MDM2 by a factor of 63. A similar strong increase was observed at the protein level for both proteins. In contrast, the other proteins analyzed were not detectable. Additionally, the MFH cells induced complex patterns of MDM2 mRNA splicing and an abnormal mRNA transcript carrying a novel MDM2 missense mutation. These effects were neither observed in the non-treated culture nor in cultures completely inducing spontaneous apoptosis. Therefore, we speculate that the induction of the gene CDK4, and especially of MDM2, is involved in anti-apoptotic mechanisms of p53-negative MFH cells tolerating IF in vitro. Further experiments are necessary to test whether the novel candidate genes favor development of chemoresistance and whether MDM2 mRNA splicing variants contribute to this process in vivo.

  2. p53 deficiency induces cancer stem cell pool expansion in a mouse model of triple-negative breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Chiche, A; Moumen, M; Romagnoli, M; Petit, V; Lasla, H; Jézéquel, P; de la Grange, P; Jonkers, J; Deugnier, M-A; Glukhova, M A; Faraldo, M M

    2016-10-24

    Triple-negative breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease characterized by the expression of basal cell markers, no estrogen or progesterone receptor expression and a lack of HER2 overexpression. Triple-negative tumors often display activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling and most have impaired p53 function. We studied the interplay between p53 loss and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in stem cell function and tumorigenesis, by deleting p53 from the mammary epithelium of K5ΔNβcat mice displaying a constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in basal cells. K5ΔNβcat transgenic mice present amplification of the basal stem cell pool and develop triple-negative mammary carcinomas. The loss of p53 in K5ΔNβcat mice led to an early expansion of mammary stem/progenitor cells and accelerated the formation of triple-negative tumors. In particular, p53-deficient tumors expressed high levels of integrins and extracellular matrix components and were enriched in cancer stem cells. They also overexpressed the tyrosine kinase receptor Met, a feature characteristic of human triple-negative breast tumors. The inhibition of Met kinase activity impaired tumorsphere formation, demonstrating the requirement of Met signaling for cancer stem cell growth in this model. Human basal-like breast cancers with predicted mutated p53 status had higher levels of MET expression than tumors with wild-type p53. These results connect p53 loss and β-catenin activation to stem cell regulation and tumorigenesis in triple-negative cancer and highlight the role of Met signaling in maintaining cancer stem cell properties, revealing new cues for targeted therapies.Oncogene advance online publication, 24 October 2016; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.396.

  3. Adenoviral Vector Driven by a Minimal Rad51 Promoter Is Selective for p53-Deficient Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Vincent; Osterbur, Marika; Capella, Cristina; Kim, Yo-El; Hine, Christopher; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Background The full length Rad51 promoter is highly active in cancer cells but not in normal cells. We therefore set out to assess whether we could confer this tumor-selectivity to an adenovirus vector. Methodology/Principal Findings Expression of an adenovirally-vectored luciferase reporter gene from the Rad51 promoter was up to 50 fold higher in cancer cells than in normal cells. Further evaluations of a panel of truncated promoter mutants identified a 447 bp minimal core promoter element that retained the full tumor selectivity and transcriptional activity of the original promoter, in the context of an adenovirus vector. This core Rad51 promoter was highly active in cancer cells that lack functional p53, but less active in normal cells and in cancer cell lines with intact p53 function. Exogenous expression of p53 in a p53 null cell line strongly suppressed activity of the Rad51 core promoter, underscoring the selectivity of this promoter for p53-deficient cells. Follow-up experiments showed that the p53-dependent suppression of the Rad51 core promoter was mediated via an indirect, p300 coactivator dependent mechanism. Finally, transduction of target cells with an adenovirus vector encoding the thymidine kinase gene under transcriptional control of the Rad51 core promoter resulted in efficient killing of p53 defective cancer cells, but not of normal cells, upon addition of ganciclovir. Conclusions/Significance Overall, these experiments demonstrated that a small core domain of the Rad51 promoter can be used to target selective transgene expression from adenoviral vectors to tumor cells lacking functional p53. PMID:22174876

  4. Adenoviral vector driven by a minimal Rad51 promoter is selective for p53-deficient tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Fong, Vincent; Osterbur, Marika; Capella, Cristina; Kim, Yo-El; Hine, Christopher; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The full length Rad51 promoter is highly active in cancer cells but not in normal cells. We therefore set out to assess whether we could confer this tumor-selectivity to an adenovirus vector. Expression of an adenovirally-vectored luciferase reporter gene from the Rad51 promoter was up to 50 fold higher in cancer cells than in normal cells. Further evaluations of a panel of truncated promoter mutants identified a 447 bp minimal core promoter element that retained the full tumor selectivity and transcriptional activity of the original promoter, in the context of an adenovirus vector. This core Rad51 promoter was highly active in cancer cells that lack functional p53, but less active in normal cells and in cancer cell lines with intact p53 function. Exogenous expression of p53 in a p53 null cell line strongly suppressed activity of the Rad51 core promoter, underscoring the selectivity of this promoter for p53-deficient cells. Follow-up experiments showed that the p53-dependent suppression of the Rad51 core promoter was mediated via an indirect, p300 coactivator dependent mechanism. Finally, transduction of target cells with an adenovirus vector encoding the thymidine kinase gene under transcriptional control of the Rad51 core promoter resulted in efficient killing of p53 defective cancer cells, but not of normal cells, upon addition of ganciclovir. Overall, these experiments demonstrated that a small core domain of the Rad51 promoter can be used to target selective transgene expression from adenoviral vectors to tumor cells lacking functional p53.

  5. Targeting p53-deficient chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo by ROS-mediated mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinyun; Chen, Gang; Pelicano, Helene; Liao, Jianwei; Huang, Jie; Feng, Li; Keating, Michael J.; Huang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common adult leukemia in Western countries. Loss of p53 function in CLL cells due to chromosome 17p deletion or p53 mutations often leads to a more malignant disease phenotype and is associated with drug resistance and poor clinical outcome. Thus, development of novel therapeutic strategies to effectively target CLL cells with p53 deficiency is clinically important. Here we showed that p53-null CLL cells were highly sensitive to ROS-mediated cell killing due to their intrinsic ROS stress. We further demonstrated that a natural compound phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) was able to effectively kill CLL cells with loss of p53, even under the protection of stromal cells. In p53-defficient CLL cells, PEITC induced a rapid depletion of glutathione and a severe accumulation of ROS, leading to massive leukemia cell death in the stromal microenvironment. The drug-induced cell death was associated with a significant decrease of in MCL-1 survival molecule. We further showed that ROS-mediated cell death was the key mechanism by which PEITC induced cytotoxicity, since such cell death could be prevented by addition of antioxidant NAC. Importantly, in vivo study showed that PEITC was able to induce substantial leukemia cell death in mice. Treatment of CLL mice harboring TCL1-Tg:p53−/− genotype with PEITC significantly prolonged the median survival time of the animals. Our study identifies a vulnerability of p53-null CLL cells with high sensitivity to ROS-generating agents, and suggests that PEITC may potentially be useful for clinical treatment of CLL with 17p deletion and p53 mutations. PMID:27655686

  6. Radiobiological hypoxia, histological parameters of tumour microenvironment and local tumour control after fractionated irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yaromina, Ala; Thames, Howard; Zhou, Xuanjing; Hering, Sandra; Eicheler, Wolfgang; Dörfler, Annegret; Leichtner, Thomas; Zips, Daniel; Baumann, Michael

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the relationships between radiobiological hypoxic fraction (rHF), pimonidazole hypoxic fraction (pHF) as well as other histological parameters of the tumour microenvironment, and local tumour control after fractionated irradiation in human squamous cell carcinomas (hSCCs). Ten different hSCC cell lines were transplanted into nude mice and rHF was calculated from local tumour control rates after single dose irradiation under normal or clamped blood flow conditions. In parallel, tumours were irradiated with 30 fractions within 6 weeks. Radiation response was quantified as dose required to cure 50% of tumours (TCD(50)). Unirradiated tumours were excised for histological evaluation including relative hypoxic area (pHF), relative vascular area (RVA), and fraction of perfused vessels (PF). A weak but significant positive correlation between rHF (R(2)=0.6, p=0.014) and TCD(50) after fractionated irradiation was found. The pHF did not correlate with rHF but was significantly associated with the TCD(50) after single dose clamp (R(2)=0.8, p=0.003) and showed a trend for an association with TCD(50) after fractionated irradiation (R(2)=0.4, p=0.067). Relative vascular area and fraction of perfused vessels did not show an association with rHF or TCD(50) after fractionated irradiation. Our data suggest that radiobiological hypoxia contributes to the response after fractionated irradiation but that also other radiobiological mechanisms are involved. In the present study, pimonidazole labelling does not reflect rHF and has a limited value to predict local tumour control after fractionated irradiation. The association between pHF and TCD(50) after single dose clamp warrants further investigation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The changing paradigm of tumour response to irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hill, Richard P

    2017-01-01

    Tumours contain multiple different cell populations, including cells derived from the bone marrow as well as cancer-associated fibroblasts and various stromal populations including the vasculature. The microenvironment of the tumour cells plays a significant role in the response of the tumour to radiation treatment. Low levels of oxygen (hypoxia) caused by the poorly organized vasculature in tumours have long been known to affect radiation response; however, other aspects of the microenvironment may also play important roles. This article reviews some of the old literature concerning tumour response to irradiation and relates this to current concepts about the role of the tumour microenvironment in tumour response to radiation treatment. Included in the discussion are the role of cancer stem cells, radiation damage to the vasculature and the potential for radiation to enhance immune activity against tumour cells. Radiation treatment can cause a significant influx of bone marrow-derived cell populations into both normal tissues and tumours. Potential roles of such cells may include enhancing vascular recovery as well as modulating immune reactivity.

  8. Silencing of RUNX2 enhances gemcitabine sensitivity of p53-deficient human pancreatic cancer AsPC-1 cells through the stimulation of TAp63-mediated cell death

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, H; Nakamura, M; Yoda, H; Hiraoka, K; Shinohara, K; Sang, M; Fujiwara, K; Shimozato, O; Nagase, H; Ozaki, T

    2015-01-01

    Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) has been considered to be one of master regulators for osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Recently, we have described that RUNX2 attenuates p53/TAp73-dependent cell death of human osteosarcoma U2OS cells bearing wild-type p53 in response to adriamycin. In this study, we have asked whether RUNX2 silencing could enhance gemcitabine (GEM) sensitivity of p53-deficient human pancreatic cancer AsPC-1 cells. Under our experimental conditions, GEM treatment increased the expression level of p53 family TAp63, whereas RUNX2 was reduced following GEM exposure, indicating that there exists an inverse relationship between the expression level of TAp63 and RUNX2 following GEM exposure. To assess whether TAp63 could be involved in the regulation of GEM sensitivity of AsPC-1 cells, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of TAp63 was performed. As expected, silencing of TAp63 significantly prohibited GEM-dependent cell death as compared with GEM-treated non-silencing cells. As TAp63 was negatively regulated by RUNX2, we sought to examine whether RUNX2 knockdown could enhance the sensitivity to GEM. Expression analysis demonstrated that depletion of RUNX2 apparently stimulates the expression of TAp63, as well as proteolytic cleavage of poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) after GEM exposure, and further augmented GEM-mediated induction of p53/TAp63-target genes, such as p21WAF1, PUMA and NOXA, relative to GEM-treated control-transfected cells, implying that RUNX2 has a critical role in the regulation of GEM resistance through the downregulation of TAp63. Notably, ablation of TAp63 gave a decrease in number of γH2AX-positive cells in response to GEM relative to control-transfected cells following GEM exposure. Consistently, GEM-dependent phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein was remarkably impaired in TAp63 knockdown cells. Collectively, our present findings strongly suggest that RUNX2-mediated repression of

  9. Methyl methanesulfonate induces apoptosis in p53-deficient H1299 and Hep3B cells through a caspase 2- and mitochondria-associated pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Yun; Sun, Li; Zhang, Guang-Lin; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope; Zhu, Xin-Qiang; Yang, Jun

    2012-11-01

    Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) has been shown to induce apoptosis in various cell types through p53-dependent pathways. Nevertheless, pharmacological and genetic blockade of p53 functions results in similar or delayed sensitivity to MMS treatment, suggesting the presence of p53-independent apoptotic mechanisms. To understand the p53-independent mechanisms that are engaged during MMS-induced apoptosis, we established MMS-induced apoptotic cell models using p53-deficient H1299 and Hep3B cells. Our results demonstrated that MMS at concentrations of 50, 100, 200, 400 and 800 μM induced the formation of gammaH2AX foci, and that at higher concentrations, 400 and 800 μM, MMS treatment led to apoptosis in the two cell lines. This apoptotic cell death was concurrent with the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, nuclear-cytosolic translocation of active caspase 2, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, and the cleavage of caspase 9, caspase 3 and PARP. However, MMS-induced DNA damage failed to stabilize the p53 family members TAp73 and DNp73. These results demonstrated a p53- and p73-independent mechanism for MMS-induced apoptosis that involves the nuclear-cytosolic translocation of active caspase 2 as well as the mitochondria-mediated pathway.

  10. Effect of an hdm-2 antagonist peptide inhibitor on cell cycle progression in p53-deficient H1299 human lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    VanderBorght, A; Valckx, A; Van Dun, J; Grand-Perret, T; De Schepper, S; Vialard, J; Janicot, M; Arts, J

    2006-10-26

    The hdm-2 oncogene is overexpressed in several types of malignancies including osteosarcomas, soft tissue sarcomas and gliomas and hdm-2 has been associated with accelerated tumor formation in both hereditary and sporadic cancers. Among the other key binding partners, hdm-2 forms a complex with the tumor suppressor p53, resulting in a rapid proteasome-mediated degradation of the p53 protein. This positions the hdm-2-p53 complex as an attractive target for the development of anticancer therapy and recently the first small molecule hdm-2 antagonist has been reported. Development of hdm-2 antagonists is currently focused on malignancies containing a wild-type p53 genotype, which is the case in approximately half of human cancer indications. However, hdm-2 has also been implicated in oncogenesis in the absence of p53. We therefore studied the effect of hdm-2 antagonists in p53-deficient human H1299 lung carcinoma cells. The hdm-2 antagonistic peptide caused G1 cell cycle arrest, inhibited colony growth and induced expression of G1 checkpoint regulatory proteins, such as p21(waf1,cip1). These data demonstrate that hdm-2 regulates the G1 cell cycle checkpoint in a p53-independent manner, suggesting that hdm-2 antagonists represent a novel class of anticancer therapeutics with broad applicability towards tumors with different p53 genetic backgrounds.

  11. p53 deficiency linked to B cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) loss enhances metastatic potential by promoting tumor growth in primary and metastatic sites in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Powell, Emily; Shao, Jiansu; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Hsiang-Chun; Cai, Shirong; Echeverria, Gloria V; Mistry, Nipun; Decker, Keith F; Schlosberg, Christopher; Do, Kim-Anh; Edwards, John R; Liang, Han; Piwnica-Worms, David; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2016-01-27

    Despite advances in early diagnosis and treatment of cancer patients, metastasis remains the major cause of mortality. TP53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer, and these alterations can occur during the early stages of oncogenesis or as later events as tumors progress to more aggressive forms. Previous studies have suggested that p53 plays a role in cellular pathways that govern metastasis. To investigate how p53 deficiency contributes to late-stage tumor growth and metastasis, we developed paired isogenic patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) differing only in p53 status for longitudinal analysis. Patient-derived isogenic human tumor lines differing only in p53 status were implanted into mouse mammary glands. Tumor growth and metastasis were monitored with bioluminescence imaging, and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were quantified by flow cytometry. RNA-Seq was performed on p53-deficient and p53 wild-type tumors, and functional validation of a lead candidate gene was performed in vivo. Isogenic p53 wild-type and p53-deficient tumors metastasized out of mammary glands and colonized distant sites with similar frequency. However, p53-deficient tumors metastasized earlier than p53 wild-type tumors and grew faster in both primary and metastatic sites as a result of increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis. In addition, greater numbers of CTCs were detected in the blood of mice engrafted with p53-deficient tumors. However, when normalized to tumor mass, the number of CTCs isolated from mice bearing parental and p53-deficient tumors was not significantly different. Gene expression profiling followed by functional validation identified B cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2), a downstream effector of p53, as a negative regulator of tumor growth both at primary and metastatic sites. BTG2 expression status correlated with survival of TNBC patients. Using paired isogenic PDX-derived metastatic TNBC cells

  12. Single-cell Raman spectroscopy of irradiated tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Quinn

    This work describes the development and application of a novel combination of single-cell Raman spectroscopy (RS), automated data processing, and principal component analysis (PCA) for investigating radiation induced biochemical responses in human tumour cells. The developed techniques are first validated for the analysis of large data sets (˜200 spectra) obtained from single cells. The effectiveness and robustness of the automated data processing methods is demonstrated, and potential pitfalls that may arise during the implementation of such methods are identified. The techniques are first applied to investigate the inherent sources of spectral variability between single cells of a human prostate tumour cell line (DU145) cultured in vitro. PCA is used to identify spectral differences that correlate with cell cycle progression and the changing confluency of a cell culture during the first 3-4 days after sub-culturing. Spectral variability arising from cell cycle progression is (i) expressed as varying intensities of protein and nucleic acid features relative to lipid features, (ii) well correlated with known biochemical changes in cells as they progress through the cell cycle, and (iii) shown to be the most significant source of inherent spectral variability between cells. This characterization provides a foundation for interpreting spectral variability in subsequent studies. The techniques are then applied to study the effects of ionizing radiation on human tumour cells. DU145 cells are cultured in vitro and irradiated to doses between 15 and 50 Gy with single fractions of 6 MV photons from a medical linear accelerator. Raman spectra are acquired from irradiated and unirradiated cells, up to 5 days post-irradiation. PCA is used to distinguish radiation induced spectral changes from inherent sources of spectral variability, such as those arising from cell cycle. Radiation induced spectral changes are found to correlate with both the irradiated dose and the

  13. Gene expression profiling analysis reveals arsenic-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in p53-proficient and p53-deficient cells through differential gene pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Xiaozhong Robinson, Joshua F.; Gribble, Elizabeth; Hong, Sung Woo; Sidhu, Jaspreet S.; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2008-12-15

    Arsenic (As) is a well-known environmental toxicant and carcinogen as well as an effective chemotherapeutic agent. The underlying mechanism of this dual capability, however, is not fully understood. Tumor suppressor gene p53, a pivotal cell cycle checkpoint signaling protein, has been hypothesized to play a possible role in mediating As-induced toxicity and therapeutic efficiency. In this study, we found that arsenite (As{sup 3+}) induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner in both p53{sup +/+} and p53{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). There was, however, a distinction between genotypes in the apoptotic response, with a more prominent induction of caspase-3 in the p53{sup -/-} cells than in the p53{sup +/+} cells. To examine this difference further, a systems-based genomic analysis was conducted comparing the critical molecular mechanisms between the p53 genotypes in response to As{sup 3+}. A significant alteration in the Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress response pathway was found in both genotypes. In p53{sup +/+} MEFs, As{sup 3+} induced p53-dependent gene expression alterations in DNA damage and cell cycle regulation genes. However, in the p53{sup -/-} MEFs, As{sup 3+} induced a significant up-regulation of pro-apoptotic genes (Noxa) and down-regulation of genes in immune modulation. Our findings demonstrate that As-induced cell death occurs through a p53-independent pathway in p53 deficient cells while apoptosis induction occurs through p53-dependent pathway in normal tissue. This difference in the mechanism of apoptotic responses between the genotypes provides important information regarding the apparent dichotomy of arsenic's dual mechanisms, and potentially leads to further advancement of its utility as a chemotherapeutic agent.

  14. MMP13, Birc2 (cIAP1) and Birc3 (cIAP2), Amplified on Chromosome 9, Collaborate with p53 Deficiency in Mouse Osteosarcoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ou; Cai, Wei-Wen; Zender, Lars; Dayaram, Tajhal; Shen, Jianhe; Herron, Alan J.; Lowe, Scott W.; Man, Tsz-Kwong; Lau, Ching C.; Donehower, Lawrence A.

    2009-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the primary malignant cancer of bone and particularly affects adolescents and young adults, causing debilitation, and sometimes death. As a model for human osteosarcoma we have been studying p53+/− mice, which develop osteosarcoma at high frequency. To discover genes that cooperate with p53 deficiency in osteosarcoma formation we have integrated array comparative genomic hybridization, microarray expression analyses in mouse and human osteosarcomas, and functional assays. In this study we found seven frequent regions of copy number gain and loss in the mouse p53+/− osteosarcomas, but have focused on a recurrent amplification event on mouse chromosome 9A1. This amplicon is syntenic with a similar chromosome 11q22 amplicon identified in a number of human tumor types. Three genes on this amplicon, the matrix metalloproteinase gene MMP13, and the anti-apoptotic genes Birc2 (cIAP1), and Birc3 (cIAP2) show elevated expression in mouse and human osteosarcomas. We developed a functional assay using clonal osteosarcoma cell lines transduced with lentiviral shRNA vectors to show that downregulation of MMP13, Birc2, or Birc3 resulted in reduced tumor growth when transplanted into immunodeficient recipient mice. These experiments revealed that high MMP13 expression enhances osteosarcoma cell survival and that Birc2 and Birc3 also enhance cell survival, but only in osteosarcoma cells with the chromosome 9A1 amplicon. We conclude that the anti-apoptotic genes Birc2 and Birc3 are potential oncogenic drivers in the chromosome 9A1 amplicon. PMID:19276372

  15. Brca1/p53 deficient mouse breast tumor hemodynamics during hyperoxic respiratory challenge monitored by a novel wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Austin; Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Eva Y. H. P.; Tromberg, Bruce; Cerussi, Albert; Choi, Bernard

    2009-02-01

    Current imaging modalities allow precise visualization of tumors but do not enable quantitative characterization of the tumor metabolic state. Such quantitative information would enhance our understanding of tumor progression and response to treatment, and to our overall understanding of tumor biology. To address this problem, we have developed a wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) instrument which combines two optical imaging modalities, spatially modulated imaging (MI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI). Our current WiFI imaging protocol consists of multispectral imaging in the near infrared (650-980 nm) spectrum, over a wide (7 cm × 5 cm) field of view. Using MI, the spatially-resolved reflectance of sinusoidal patterns projected onto the tissue is assessed, and optical properties of the tissue are estimated using a Monte Carlo model. From the spatial maps of local absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, tissue composition information is extracted in the form of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations, and percentage of lipid and water. Using LSI, the reflectance of a 785 nm laser speckle pattern on the tissue is acquired and analyzed to compute maps of blood perfusion in the tissue. Tissue metabolism state is estimated from the values of blood perfusion, volume and oxygenation state. We currently are employing the WiFI instrument to study tumor development in a BRCA1/p53 deficient mice breast tumor model. The animals are monitored with WiFI during hyperoxic respiratory challenge. At present, four tumors have been measured with WiFI, and preliminary data suggest that tumor metabolic changes during hyperoxic respiratory challenge can be determined.

  16. Development of a novel recombinant adenovirus containing gfp-zeocin fusion expression cassette for conditional replication in p53-deficient human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Baoli; Joshua, Mallam Nock; Dong, Changyuan; Qi, Yipeng

    2004-05-01

    Two obstacles limiting the efficacy of nearly all cancer gene therapy trails are low gene transduction efficiency and the lack of tumor specificity. Fortunately, a replication-competent, E1B-deficient adenovirus (dl1520) was developed that could overcome these limitations, because it was capable of efficiently and selectively destroying tumor cells lacking functional p53. In an attempt to appraise the efficiency and safety of this approach, a novel recombinant adenovirus, r3/Ad, containing a gfp-zeocin expression cassette was constructed in this work. The study in vitro demonstrated that r3/Ad has the ability to replicate in and lyse only the p53-deficient human tumor cells such as the human glioblastoma cells (U251) and human bladder cells (EJ) but not in the human fibroblast cells (MRC-5) with functional p53. Importantly, this gfp-zeocin fusion gene driven by the bipromoter (CMV and EM-7) could be used as an effective selective marker and reporter in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells; and also zeocin as a selective marker could minimize contamination of the recombinant virus by the wt-Ad5. Additionally, it was found that the r3/Ad could be useful for studying the selective replication of E1B-deficient adenovirus in vivo, it could be used as a "guide" to study the ability of the recombinant adenovirus to spread and to infect distant tumor cells in any tumor bearing animal model by GFP as a reporter. This may help determine the safety of using any E1B-deficient adenovirus in cancer gene therapy.

  17. p53 deficiency alters the yield and spectrum of radiation-induced lacZ mutants in the brain of transgenic mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Kanazawa, N.; Lutze-Mann, L.; Winegar, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particle radiation in the galacto-cosmic environment poses a significant risk in space exploration and the evaluation of radiation-induced genetic damage in tissues, especially in the central nervous system, is an important consideration in long-term manned space missions. We used a plasmid-based transgenic mouse model system, with the pUR288 lacZ transgene integrated in the genome of every cell of C57Bl/6(lacZ) mice, to evaluate the genetic damage induced by iron particle radiation. In order to examine the importance of genetic background on the radiation sensitivity of individuals, we cross-bred p53 wild-type lacZ transgenic mice with p53 nullizygous mice, producing lacZ transgenic mice that were either hemizygous or nullizygous for the p53 tumor suppressor gene. Animals were exposed to an acute dose of 1 Gy of iron particles and the lacZ mutation frequency (MF) in the brain was measured at time intervals from 1 to 16 weeks post-irradiation. Our results suggest that iron particles induced an increase in lacZ MF (2.4-fold increase in p53+/+ mice, 1.3-fold increase in p53+/- mice and 2.1-fold increase in p53-/- mice) and that this induction is both temporally regulated and p53 genotype dependent. Characterization of mutants based on their restriction patterns showed that the majority of the mutants arising spontaneously are derived from point mutations or small deletions in all three genotypes. Radiation induced alterations in the spectrum of deletion mutants and reorganization of the genome, as evidenced by the selection of mutants containing mouse genomic DNA. These observations are unique in that mutations in brain tissue after particle radiation exposure have never before been reported owing to technical limitations in most other mutation assays.

  18. p53 deficiency alters the yield and spectrum of radiation-induced lacZ mutants in the brain of transgenic mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Kanazawa, N.; Lutze-Mann, L.; Winegar, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particle radiation in the galacto-cosmic environment poses a significant risk in space exploration and the evaluation of radiation-induced genetic damage in tissues, especially in the central nervous system, is an important consideration in long-term manned space missions. We used a plasmid-based transgenic mouse model system, with the pUR288 lacZ transgene integrated in the genome of every cell of C57Bl/6(lacZ) mice, to evaluate the genetic damage induced by iron particle radiation. In order to examine the importance of genetic background on the radiation sensitivity of individuals, we cross-bred p53 wild-type lacZ transgenic mice with p53 nullizygous mice, producing lacZ transgenic mice that were either hemizygous or nullizygous for the p53 tumor suppressor gene. Animals were exposed to an acute dose of 1 Gy of iron particles and the lacZ mutation frequency (MF) in the brain was measured at time intervals from 1 to 16 weeks post-irradiation. Our results suggest that iron particles induced an increase in lacZ MF (2.4-fold increase in p53+/+ mice, 1.3-fold increase in p53+/- mice and 2.1-fold increase in p53-/- mice) and that this induction is both temporally regulated and p53 genotype dependent. Characterization of mutants based on their restriction patterns showed that the majority of the mutants arising spontaneously are derived from point mutations or small deletions in all three genotypes. Radiation induced alterations in the spectrum of deletion mutants and reorganization of the genome, as evidenced by the selection of mutants containing mouse genomic DNA. These observations are unique in that mutations in brain tissue after particle radiation exposure have never before been reported owing to technical limitations in most other mutation assays.

  19. p53 deficiency alters the yield and spectrum of radiation-induced lacZ mutants in the brain of transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, P Y; Kanazawa, N; Lutze-Mann, L; Winegar, R A

    2001-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particle radiation in the galacto-cosmic environment poses a significant risk in space exploration and the evaluation of radiation-induced genetic damage in tissues, especially in the central nervous system, is an important consideration in long-term manned space missions. We used a plasmid-based transgenic mouse model system, with the pUR288 lacZ transgene integrated in the genome of every cell of C57Bl/6(lacZ) mice, to evaluate the genetic damage induced by iron particle radiation. In order to examine the importance of genetic background on the radiation sensitivity of individuals, we cross-bred p53 wild-type lacZ transgenic mice with p53 nullizygous mice, producing lacZ transgenic mice that were either hemizygous or nullizygous for the p53 tumor suppressor gene. Animals were exposed to an acute dose of 1 Gy of iron particles and the lacZ mutation frequency (MF) in the brain was measured at time intervals from 1 to 16 weeks post-irradiation. Our results suggest that iron particles induced an increase in lacZ MF (2.4-fold increase in p53+/+ mice, 1.3-fold increase in p53+/- mice and 2.1-fold increase in p53-/- mice) and that this induction is both temporally regulated and p53 genotype dependent. Characterization of mutants based on their restriction patterns showed that the majority of the mutants arising spontaneously are derived from point mutations or small deletions in all three genotypes. Radiation induced alterations in the spectrum of deletion mutants and reorganization of the genome, as evidenced by the selection of mutants containing mouse genomic DNA. These observations are unique in that mutations in brain tissue after particle radiation exposure have never before been reported owing to technical limitations in most other mutation assays.

  20. γH2AX assay in ex vivo irradiated tumour specimens: A novel method to determine tumour radiation sensitivity in patient-derived material.

    PubMed

    Menegakis, Apostolos; von Neubeck, Cläre; Yaromina, Ala; Thames, Howard; Hering, Sandra; Hennenlotter, Joerg; Scharpf, Marcus; Noell, Susan; Krause, Mechthild; Zips, Daniel; Baumann, Michael

    2015-09-01

    To establish a clinically applicable protocol for quantification of residual γH2AX foci in ex vivo irradiated tumour samples and to apply this method in a proof-of-concept feasibility study to patient-derived tumour specimens. Evaluation of γH2AX foci formation and disappearance in excised FaDu tumour specimens after (a) different incubation times in culture medium, 4Gy irradiation and fixation after 24h (cell recovery), (b) 10h medium incubation, 4Gy irradiation and fixation after various time points (double strand break repair kinetics), and (c) 10h medium incubation, irradiation with graded single radiation doses and fixation after 24h (dose-response). The optimised protocol was applied to patient-derived samples of seminoma, prostate cancer and glioblastoma multiforme. Post excision or biopsy, tumour tissues showed stable radiation-induced γH2AX foci values in oxic cells after >6h of recovery in medium. Kinetics of foci disappearance indicated a plateau of residual foci after >12h following ex vivo irradiation. Fitting the dose-response of residual γH2AX foci yielded slopes comparable with in situ irradiation of FaDu tumours. Significant differences in the slopes of ex vivo irradiated patient-derived tumour samples were found. A novel clinically applicable method to quantify residual γH2AX foci in ex vivo irradiated tumour samples was established. The first clinical results suggest that this method allows to distinguish between radiosensitive and radioresistant tumour types. These findings support further translational evaluation of this assay to individualise radiation therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Particle therapy of moving targets-the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving targets irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    Particle therapy of moving targets is still a great challenge. The motion of organs situated in the thorax and abdomen strongly affects the precision of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy. The motion is responsible for not only the dislocation of the tumour but also the alterations in the internal density along the beam path, which influence the range of particle beams. Furthermore, in case of pencil beam scanning, there is an interference between the target movement and dynamic beam delivery. This review presents the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving target irradiation in the context of hadron therapy. Methods enabling the direct determination of tumour position (fluoroscopic imaging of implanted radio-opaque fiducial markers, electromagnetic detection of inserted transponders and ultrasonic tumour localization systems) are presented. Attention is also drawn to the techniques which use external surrogate motion for an indirect estimation of target displacement during irradiation. The role of respiratory-correlated CT [four-dimensional CT (4DCT)] in the determination of motion pattern prior to the particle treatment is also considered. An essential part of the article is the review of the main approaches to moving target irradiation in hadron therapy: gating, rescanning (repainting), gated rescanning and tumour tracking. The advantages, drawbacks and development trends of these methods are discussed. The new accelerators, called "cyclinacs", are presented, because their application to particle therapy will allow making a breakthrough in the 4D spot scanning treatment of moving organs.

  2. Particle therapy of moving targets—the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving targets irradiation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Particle therapy of moving targets is still a great challenge. The motion of organs situated in the thorax and abdomen strongly affects the precision of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy. The motion is responsible for not only the dislocation of the tumour but also the alterations in the internal density along the beam path, which influence the range of particle beams. Furthermore, in case of pencil beam scanning, there is an interference between the target movement and dynamic beam delivery. This review presents the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving target irradiation in the context of hadron therapy. Methods enabling the direct determination of tumour position (fluoroscopic imaging of implanted radio-opaque fiducial markers, electromagnetic detection of inserted transponders and ultrasonic tumour localization systems) are presented. Attention is also drawn to the techniques which use external surrogate motion for an indirect estimation of target displacement during irradiation. The role of respiratory-correlated CT [four-dimensional CT (4DCT)] in the determination of motion pattern prior to the particle treatment is also considered. An essential part of the article is the review of the main approaches to moving target irradiation in hadron therapy: gating, rescanning (repainting), gated rescanning and tumour tracking. The advantages, drawbacks and development trends of these methods are discussed. The new accelerators, called “cyclinacs”, are presented, because their application to particle therapy will allow making a breakthrough in the 4D spot scanning treatment of moving organs. PMID:27376637

  3. In vivo tumour extracellular pH monitoring using electron paramagnetic resonance: the effect of X-ray irradiation.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Jonathan; Yachi, Katsuya; Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Miyake, Yusuke; Inanami, Osamu; Bobko, Andrey A; Khramtsov, Valery V; Hirata, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    The in vivo quantification of extracellular pH (pHe ) in tumours may provide a useful biomarker for tumour cell metabolism. In this study, we assessed the viability of continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) spectroscopy with a pH-sensitive nitroxide for the measurement of extracellular tumour pH in a mouse model. CW-EPR spectroscopy (750 MHz) of C3H HeJ mice hind leg squamous cell tumour was performed after intravenous tail vein injection of pH-sensitive nitroxide (R-SG, 2-(4-((2-(4-amino-4-carboxybutanamido)-3-(carboxymethylamino)-3-oxoproylthio)methyl)phenyl)-4-pyrrolidino-2,5,5-triethyl-2,5-dihydro-1Н-imidazol-1-oxyl) during stages of normal tumour growth and in response to a single 10-Gy dose of X-ray irradiation. An inverse relationship was observed between tumour volume and pHe value, whereby, during normal tumour growth, a constant reduction in pHe was observed. This relationship was disrupted by X-ray irradiation and, from 2-3 days post-exposure, a transitory increase in pHe was observed. In this study, we demonstrated the viability of CW-EPR spectroscopy using R-SG nitroxide to obtain high-sensitivity pH measurements in a mouse tumour model with an accuracy of <0.1 pH units. In addition, the measured changes in pHe in response to X-ray irradiation suggest that this may offer a useful method for the assessment of the physiological change in response to existing and novel cancer therapies. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. In vitro response of tumour cells to non-uniform irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchowerska, N.; Ebert, M. A.; Zhang, M.; Jackson, M.

    2005-07-01

    This study examines differences in tumour cellular response using clonogenic cell survival between uniform and non-uniform irradiation. Cells were irradiated with a 6 MV x-ray intensity-modulated beam, in a single large flask (i.e. intercellular communication is possible) or in three small flasks (i.e. intercellular communication is inhibited across the dose gradient). For non-small-cell lung cancer and melanoma cell lines, the dose response over the entire cell culture was significantly different between freely communicating cell cultures and those with inhibited communication across the dose non-uniformity. Communicating cells exhibited poorer survival in the low dose region of the field but improved survival in the high dose region. In general, the response to non-uniform irradiation appeared to 'average out' over the entire cell culture. This was not seen when intercellular communication was inhibited. The results add strength to the body of evidence regarding bystander effects and the inter-dependence of cellular response.

  5. Investigation of lung tumour induction in C3H/HeH mice, with and without tumour promotion with urethane, following paternal X-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Cattanach, B M; Papworth, D; Patrick, G; Goodhead, D T; Hacker, T; Cobb, L; Whitehill, E

    1998-07-17

    In series of papers Nomura has reported that parental irradiation can lead to an enhanced incidence of lung and other tumours. However, in a recent study with BALB/cJ mice, using optimum conditions as defined by Nomura, we were unable to confirm this. We have now repeated the investigation using a different inbred strain, C3H/HeH, with and without tumour promotion in the F1 by urethane, again using protocols defined by Nomura. In a series of replicate studies spanning over 2 years, males were exposed to single, acute doses of 0, 250 and 500 cGy X-rays and thereafter placed with two females each in each of two consecutive weeks. Half the offspring from each treatment group and each week of mating were given 5 mmol/kg body weight of the urethane, while the remainder remained untreated. Most of the offspring produced were killed and scored for lung tumours at 6 months of age, while the rest were examined at 12 months of age. The proportion of fertile females and litter size provided evidence of a dose-dependent mutational response to the paternal irradiation, but no trace of a radiation-enhanced lung tumour incidence was detected among the progeny, whether in the urethane or non-urethane groups at 6 or 12 months of age, and whether assessed by numbers of mice with tumours, clusters of tumours, or cluster size. As seen in the BALB/cJ study, significant differences among different replicates were found, again suggesting a cyclical or seasonal variation in tumour incidence, but the variations seen with the two strains were not the same. The need for concurrent controls for tumour work was, nevertheless, again indicated. The overall findings do not therefore accord with those of Nomura. Furthermore, they do not support the causal association between the raised incidence of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkins lymphoma near Sellafield and the father's recorded radiation exposure during employment in the nuclear industry, as suggested by the Gardner report.

  6. Delayed radiation necrosis of the central nervous system in patients irradiated for pituitary tumours.

    PubMed

    Grattan-Smith, P J; Morris, J G; Langlands, A O

    1992-10-01

    Four cases of delayed radiation necrosis involving the CNS were found in a group of 46 patients irradiated for pituitary tumours over a six year period. This occurred in three of 11 patients with Cushing's disease representing an incidence of 27% in this group. There were no cases among 11 patients with acromegaly or among seven with prolactinomas. One case (6%) was found in the 17 patients with chromophobe adenomas. Standard doses of radiation were delivered to these patients and the findings support suggestions that the metabolic disturbances of Cushing's disease may reduce tolerance to radiation. Our results and a literature review indicate that if radiotherapy is used to treat Cushing's disease, the total dose should be less than 50 Gy at 2 Gy per day fractionation.

  7. Image-guided microbeam irradiation to brain tumour bearing mice using a carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Yuan, Hong; Burk, Laurel M.; Inscoe, Christy R.; Hadsell, Michael J.; Chtcheprov, Pavel; Lee, Yueh Z.; Lu, Jianping; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto

    2014-03-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a promising experimental and preclinical radiotherapy method for cancer treatment. Synchrotron based MRT experiments have shown that spatially fractionated microbeam radiation has the unique capability of preferentially eradicating tumour cells while sparing normal tissue in brain tumour bearing animal models. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of generating orthovoltage microbeam radiation with an adjustable microbeam width using a carbon nanotube based x-ray source array. Here we report the preliminary results from our efforts in developing an image guidance procedure for the targeted delivery of the narrow microbeams to the small tumour region in the mouse brain. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for tumour identification, and on-board x-ray radiography was used for imaging of landmarks without contrast agents. The two images were aligned using 2D rigid body image registration to determine the relative position of the tumour with respect to a landmark. The targeting accuracy and consistency were evaluated by first irradiating a group of mice inoculated with U87 human glioma brain tumours using the present protocol and then determining the locations of the microbeam radiation tracks using γ-H2AX immunofluorescence staining. The histology results showed that among 14 mice irradiated, 11 received the prescribed number of microbeams on the targeted tumour, with an average localization accuracy of 454 µm measured directly from the histology (537 µm if measured from the registered histological images). Two mice received one of the three prescribed microbeams on the tumour site. One mouse was excluded from the analysis due to tissue staining errors.

  8. Image-guided microbeam irradiation to brain tumour bearing mice using a carbon nanotube x-ray source array.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Yuan, Hong; Burk, Laurel M; Inscoe, Christy R; Hadsell, Michael J; Chtcheprov, Pavel; Lee, Yueh Z; Lu, Jianping; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto

    2014-03-07

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a promising experimental and preclinical radiotherapy method for cancer treatment. Synchrotron based MRT experiments have shown that spatially fractionated microbeam radiation has the unique capability of preferentially eradicating tumour cells while sparing normal tissue in brain tumour bearing animal models. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of generating orthovoltage microbeam radiation with an adjustable microbeam width using a carbon nanotube based x-ray source array. Here we report the preliminary results from our efforts in developing an image guidance procedure for the targeted delivery of the narrow microbeams to the small tumour region in the mouse brain. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for tumour identification, and on-board x-ray radiography was used for imaging of landmarks without contrast agents. The two images were aligned using 2D rigid body image registration to determine the relative position of the tumour with respect to a landmark. The targeting accuracy and consistency were evaluated by first irradiating a group of mice inoculated with U87 human glioma brain tumours using the present protocol and then determining the locations of the microbeam radiation tracks using γ-H2AX immunofluorescence staining. The histology results showed that among 14 mice irradiated, 11 received the prescribed number of microbeams on the targeted tumour, with an average localization accuracy of 454 µm measured directly from the histology (537 µm if measured from the registered histological images). Two mice received one of the three prescribed microbeams on the tumour site. One mouse was excluded from the analysis due to tissue staining errors.

  9. Image-guided microbeam irradiation to brain tumour bearing mice using a carbon nanotube X-ray source array

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Yuan, Hong; Burk, Laurel M; Inscoe, Christy R; Hadsell, Michael J; Chtcheprov, Pavel; Lee, Yueh Z; Lu, Jianping; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto

    2014-01-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a promising experimental and preclinical radiotherapy method for cancer treatment. Synchrotron based MRT experiments have shown that spatially fractionated microbeam radiation has the unique capability of preferentially eradicating tumour cells while sparing normal tissue in brain tumour bearing animal models. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of generating orthovoltage microbeam radiation with an adjustable microbeam width using a carbon nanotube based X-ray source array. Here we report the preliminary results from our efforts in developing an image guidance procedure for the targeted delivery of the narrow microbeams to the small tumour region in the mouse brain. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for tumour identification, and on-board X-ray radiography was used for imaging of landmarks without contrast agents. The two images were aligned using 2D rigid body image registration to determine the relative position of the tumour with respect to a landmark. The targeting accuracy and consistency were evaluated by first irradiating a group of mice inoculated with U87 human glioma brain tumours using the present protocol and then determining the locations of the microbeam radiation tracks using γ-H2AX immunofluorescence staining. The histology results showed that among 14 mice irradiated, 11 received the prescribed number of microbeams on the targeted tumour, with an average localization accuracy of 454 μm measured directly from the histology (537 μm if measured from the registered histological images). Two mice received one of the three prescribed microbeams on the tumour site. One mouse was excluded from the analysis due to tissue staining errors. PMID:24556798

  10. Survival responses of cell subpopulations isolated from a heterogeneous human colon tumour after combinations of hyperthermia and X-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Leith, J T; Heyman, P; Dewyngaert, J K; Glicksman, A S; Dexter, D L; Calabresi, P

    1983-03-01

    In summary, this research has investigated the effects of combined modality treatment (i.e., low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation and hyperthermia at 42.5 degrees C) on the survival responses of two tumour subpopulations (designated clones A and D) obtained from a heterogeneous human colon adenocarcinoma. A constant hyperthermic exposure (2 hours at 42.5 degrees C) was given either 3 min before or 3 min after graded exposure to X-rays. An isobologram analysis (Steel and Peckham 1979) of the clonogenic survival responses of the two tumour subpopulations showed that the clone A responses were within the envelope of additivity for either sequence of application. In contrast, the responses of the clone D tumour subpopulation exhibited a supra-additive response to the combined treatments with the sequence of heat followed by X-irradiation being somewhat more effective than the sequence of X-irradiation followed by heat. These data indicate that the responses of tumour subpopulations obtained from heterogeneous solid tumours to combined modality treatments may vary in an, at present, unpredictable manner.

  11. Up-regulation of the embryonic self-renewal network through reversible polyploidy in irradiated p53-mutant tumour cells

    SciTech Connect

    Salmina, Kristine; Jankevics, Eriks; Huna, Anda; Perminov, Dmitry; Radovica, Ilze; Klymenko, Tetyana; Ivanov, Andrey; Jascenko, Elina; Scherthan, Harry; Cragg, Mark; Erenpreisa, Jekaterina

    2010-08-01

    We have previously documented that transient polyploidy is a potential cell survival strategy underlying the clonogenic re-growth of tumour cells after genotoxic treatment. In an attempt to better define this mechanism, we recently documented the key role of meiotic genes in regulating the DNA repair and return of the endopolyploid tumour cells (ETC) to diploidy through reduction divisions after irradiation. Here, we studied the role of the pluripotency and self-renewal stem cell genes NANOG, OCT4 and SOX2 in this polyploidy-dependent survival mechanism. In irradiation-resistant p53-mutated lymphoma cell-lines (Namalwa and WI-L2-NS) but not sensitive p53 wild-type counterparts (TK6), low background expression of OCT4 and NANOG was up-regulated by ionising radiation with protein accumulation evident in ETC as detected by OCT4/DNA flow cytometry and immunofluorescence (IF). IF analysis also showed that the ETC generate PML bodies that appear to concentrate OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 proteins, which extend into complex nuclear networks. These polyploid tumour cells resist apoptosis, overcome cellular senescence and undergo bi- and multi-polar divisions transmitting the up-regulated OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 self-renewal cassette to their descendents. Altogether, our observations indicate that irradiation-induced ETC up-regulate key components of germ-line cells, which potentially facilitate survival and propagation of the tumour cell population.

  12. The role of meiotic cohesin REC8 in chromosome segregation in {gamma} irradiation-induced endopolyploid tumour cells

    SciTech Connect

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Cragg, Mark S.; Salmina, Kristine; Hausmann, Michael; Scherthan, Harry

    2009-09-10

    Escape from mitotic catastrophe and generation of endopolyploid tumour cells (ETCs) represents a potential survival strategy of tumour cells in response to genotoxic treatments. ETCs that resume the mitotic cell cycle have reduced ploidy and are often resistant to these treatments. In search for a mechanism for genome reduction, we previously observed that ETCs express meiotic proteins among which REC8 (a meiotic cohesin component) is of particular interest, since it favours reductional cell division in meiosis. In the present investigation, we induced endopolyploidy in p53-dysfunctional human tumour cell lines (Namalwa, WI-L2-NS, HeLa) by gamma irradiation, and analysed the sub-cellular localisation of REC8 in the resulting ETCs. We observed by RT-PCR and Western blot that REC8 is constitutively expressed in these tumour cells, along with SGOL1 and SGOL2, and that REC8 becomes modified after irradiation. REC8 localised to paired sister centromeres in ETCs, the former co-segregating to opposite poles. Furthermore, REC8 localised to the centrosome of interphase ETCs and to the astral poles in anaphase cells where it colocalised with the microtubule-associated protein NuMA. Altogether, our observations indicate that radiation-induced ETCs express features of meiotic cell divisions and that these may facilitate chromosome segregation and genome reduction.

  13. The p53-Deficient Mouse as a Breast Cancer Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-10-01

    mammary tumor progression in a relatively controlled fashion within a reasonable length of time. Elucidation of the biological processes affected by p53...role of p53 loss in the mammary tumorigenesis process . The primary goals of the remaining years will be to extend these studies by looking at other...regulation and cell proliferation; (2) angiogenesis; and (3) invasiveness and metastases. The particular genes which regulate these biological processes will

  14. Evaluation of tumour promoting potency of fish borne toxaphene residues, as compared to technical toxaphene and UV-irradiated toxaphene.

    PubMed

    Besselink, H; Nixon, E; McHugh, B; Rimkus, G; Klungsøyr, J; Leonards, P; De Boer, J; Brouwer, A

    2008-08-01

    In this study the potential impact of food chain-based biotransformation and physico-chemical weathering of toxaphene on its tumour promoting potential was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Human exposure to toxaphene is mainly through consumption of contaminated fish, therefore fish-borne residues of toxaphene (cod liver extract, CLE) were prepared by exposing cod to technical toxaphene (TT) for 63 days. UV-irradiated toxaphene (uvT) was included to represent a physico-chemical weathered toxaphene mixture. In vitro, TT, uvT and CLE all showed a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) with a relative potency of CLE>TT=uvT. Tumour promoting potency was further studied in vivo in a medium term two-stage initiation/promotion bioassay in female Sprague-Dawley rats, using an increase in altered hepatic foci positive for glutathione-S-transferase-P (AHF-GST-P) as read out. No increase in AHF-GST-P occurred following exposure to either TT, uvT, or CLE, except for the positive control group (2,3,7,8-TCDD). Based on this study the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) for tumour promoting potency is at least 12.5mg/kg/week, or higher for CLE. Considering current human exposure levels in Europe it is doubtful that consumption of fish at current levels of toxaphene contamination give rise to human health risk.

  15. Combined local hyperthermia and x-irradiation in the treatment of metastatic tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, H. J.; Yerushalmi, A.

    1976-01-01

    Six patients, all with evidence of metastatic or locally recurrent tumours, were selected for inclusion in a trial study of simultaneous hyperthermia and ionizing radiation therapy. Heat was applied by hot air, or microwaves, or a combination of both. When examined after treatment, 3 patients were found to be free of the lesions treated. One patient had a partial response, followed by regression of the tumour; one patient died with metastases in the lungs and one patient responded to the treatment but died from a massive pulmonary embolus. The simultaneous application of hyperthermia and ionizing radiation therapy was well tolerated. It induced disappearance of tumours in cases where conventional methods had failed, and with far greater efficiency than conventional therapeutic methods. PMID:1252331

  16. Dose estimation in B16 tumour bearing mice for future irradiation in the thermal column of the TRIGA reactor after B/Gd/LDL adduct infusion.

    PubMed

    Protti, N; Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Bruschi, P; Stella, S; Geninatti, S; Alberti, D; Aime, S; Altieri, S

    2011-12-01

    To test the efficacy of a new (10)B-vector compound, the B/Gd/LDL adduct synthesised at Torino University, in vivo irradiations of murine tumours are in progress at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Pavia University. A localised B16 melanoma tumour is generated in C57BL/6 mice and subsequently infused with the adduct. During the irradiation, the mouse will be put in a shield to protect the whole body except the tumour in the back-neck area. To optimise the treatment set-up, MCNP simulations were performed. A very simplified mouse model was built using MCNP geometry capabilities, as well as the geometry of the shield made of 99% (10)B enriched boric acid. A hole in the shield is foreseen in correspondence of the back-neck region. Many configurations of the shield were tested in terms of neutron flux, dose distribution and mean induced activity in the tumour region and in the radiosensitive organs of the mouse. In the final set-up, up to five mice can be treated simultaneously in the reactor thermal column and the neutron fluence in the tumour region for 10 min of irradiation is of about 5×10(12) cm(-2).

  17. Comet assay study of DNA damage and repair of tumour cells following boron neutron capture irradiation with fast d(14) + Be neutrons.

    PubMed

    Pöller, F; Bauch, T; Sauerwein, W; Böcker, W; Wittig, A; Streffer, C

    1996-11-01

    We compared the amount of radiation-induced DNA damage and the extent of DNA repair in human melanoma cells (MeWo) using the 'comet assay' after neutron, boron neutron capture and X-irradiation. Using a colony-forming assay it was shown earlier that lethal effects in tumour cells treated with fast neutrons may be increased by the neutron capture reaction 10B(n, alpha)7Li. The effectiveness of boron neutron capture in killing tumour cells depends on the number of 10B atoms delivered to the tumour, the subcellular distribution of 10B and the thermal neutron fluence at the side of the tumour. Using the 'comet assay' the DNA damage of fast neutrons (mean energy 5.8 MeV) was shown to be significantly greater than for the same absorbed dose of X-rays. The presence of 600 ppm 10B (boric acid H5 10BO3) in the cell medium during irradiation with d(14) + Be neutrons in a phantom enhances the DNA damage by 20% compared with neutron irradiation alone. After DNA damage induction by neutrons and neutron capture of boron, the DNA repair capacity of the MeWo cells is significantly reduced in comparison with X-irradiation resulting in proportionally more residual DNA damage after 180 min of repair time.

  18. Exercise training improves physical function and fitness in long-term paediatric brain tumour survivors treated with cranial irradiation.

    PubMed

    Piscione, P J; Bouffet, E; Timmons, B; Courneya, K S; Tetzlaff, D; Schneiderman, J E; de Medeiros, C B; Bartels, U; Mabbott, D J

    2017-07-01

    We examined the efficacy of exercise training for improving physical functioning and cardiopulmonary fitness in survivors of paediatric brain tumours (BTs) treated with cranial irradiation. We conducted a controlled clinical trial with crossover of exercise training versus no training in the community in either a group or combined group/home setting. A volunteer sample of 28 children treated with cranial irradiation for brain tumours completed training (mean age = 11.53 years; mean time since diagnosis = 5.25 years). end-points were physical functioning assessed by four subtests from the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of motor performance (BOT-2) and pro-rated work rate from a cycle ergometer. Linear mixed modelling was used to evaluate time, training, training setting, and carryover effects. Adherence to training was 84%. Performance on the BOT-2 was below average for all assessments. However, training resulted in improvement in bilateral coordination (F (1, 30) = 6.59, p = 0.02), irrespective of training setting and improved performance was maintained even approximately 12°weeks after training had ended (F (1, 24) = 9.60, p = 0.005). Training resulted in increased pro-rated work rate for participants in the group training setting only (F (1, 25) = 4.57, p = 0.04) and these participants maintained their improved work rate approximately 12°weeks after training had ended (F (1, 20) = 8.38, p = 0.01). Exercise training improves physical functioning and fitness in paediatric BT survivors. Exercise interventions that ameliorate adverse physical effects and promote health in long-term survivors are highly recommended in this vulnerable population. (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01944761). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cell-mediated immunity in operable bronchial carcinoma: the effect of injecting irradiated autologous tumour cells and BCG.

    PubMed

    Stack, B H; McSwan, N; Stirling, J M; Hole, D J; Parratt, D; Spilg, W G; Gillis, C R; McHattie, I; Green, A G; White, R G; Turner, M A

    1979-02-01

    In 52 patients undergoing tests of cell-mediated immunity before surgical resection of bronchial carcinoma a positive tuberculin test result was found in 71% compared with 68% of age- and sex-matched controls. Sensitisation to DNCB occurred in 52% of 37 patients but in 78% of controls. There was depression of lymphocyte transformation by PPD in 19 patients compared with controls (P=0.001), but there was no difference in lymphocyte transformation by PHA or pokeweed mitogen between 34 patients and controls. In a pilot study patients were randomly allocated to autograft (eight) or non-autograft (seven) groups. The autograft group were given an intradermal injection of a suspension of irradiated autologous tumour-cells mixed with intradermal BCG on the day of operation. Tests of cell-mediated immunity were repeated two weeks after operation. Five patients in each group received a course of radiotherapy to the mediastinum three weeks after operation. There was a rise in cutaneous tuberculin reactivity (P=0.08) and total leucocyte count (P=0.09) in the autograft group postoperatively with a fall in total lymphocyte and T lymphocyte counts in the non-autograft group (P less 0.05). These differences, however, were not followed by any difference in the frequency of tumour recurrence or the survival rate two years after operation. The results show that the immunological surveillance mechanism is impaired even in patients with early bronchial carcinoma and that it is possible to overcome postoperative immunological depression with specific immunotherapy combined with BCG. This treatment did not produce any clinical advantage in this small number of patients and the skin lesions caused the patients considerable discomfort.

  20. First spinal axis segment irradiation with spot-scanning proton beam delivered in the treatment of a lumbar primitive neuroectodermal tumour. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Weber, D C; Rutz, H P; Lomax, A J; Schneider, U; Lombriser, N; Zenhausern, R; Goitein, G

    2004-08-01

    Primary intraspinal primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) is a rare tumour entity. The optimal therapeutic management is unclear but, in general, this tumour is treated with surgery followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Proton beam radiation therapy (PT) offers superior dose distributional qualities compared with X- or gamma rays, as the dose deposition occurs in a modulated narrow zone called the Bragg peak. As a result, organs at risk are optimally speared. Here, we present a patient treated with the first spinal axis segment irradiation using spot-scanning PT with a single field, combined with conventional cranio-spinal axis radiotherapy after surgery and chemotherapy, and an extensive review of the literature outlining the clinical features and treatment modality of spinal PNET.

  1. Utility of the omentum in sacral reconstruction following total sacrectomy due to recurrent and irradiated giant cell tumour of the spine

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Cigdem; Eren, Guler Gamze; Isil, Eda; Alponat, Ahmet; Sarlak, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    Reconstruction of the lumbosacral region after surgical excision of irradiated and recurrent spinal giant cell tumours remains a challenging problem. In this case report, we describe the use of the pedicled omentum flap in reconstruction of an irradiated and infected wide sacral defect of a 19-year-old male patient. The patient had radiotherapy and subsequent wide surgical resection after recurrence of the tumour. A myocutaneous flap from the gluteal area had failed previously. Local flap options could not be used because of the recent radiotherapy to the gluteal area. Since the patient had a laparotomy for tumour resection and a colostomy, abdominal muscles were not considered reliable for reconstructive procedures. A pedicled omentum flap was chosen as a reconstructive option because of its rich blood supply, large surface area, and angiogenic capacity. This report aims to describe the use of the pedicled omentum flap for reconstruction of the lumbosacral area following surgical resection of a spinal tumour, when gluteal and abdominal flap options for reconstruction are jeopardised. PMID:22754172

  2. Senescence and tumour clearance is triggered by p53 restoration in murine liver carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wen; Zender, Lars; Miething, Cornelius; Dickins, Ross A.; Hernando, Eva; Krizhanovsky, Valery; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Lowe, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer arises from a combination of mutations in oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes, the extent to which tumour suppressor gene loss is required for maintaining established tumours is poorly understood. p53 is an important tumour suppressor that acts to restrict proliferation in response to DNA damage or deregulation of mitogenic oncogenes, by leading to the induction of various cell cycle checkpoints, apoptosis or cellular senescence1,2. Consequently, p53 mutations increase cell proliferation and survival, and in some settings promote genomic instability and resistance to certain chemotherapies3. To determine the consequences of reactivating the p53 pathway in tumours, we used RNA interference (RNAi) to conditionally regulate endogenous p53 expression in a mosaic mouse model of liver carcinoma4,5. We show that even brief reactivation of endogenous p53 in p53-deficient tumours can produce complete tumour regressions. The primary response to p53 was not apoptosis, but instead involved the induction of a cellular senescence program that was associated with differentiation and the upregulation of inflammatory cytokines. This program, although producing only cell cycle arrest in vitro, also triggered an innate immune response that targeted the tumour cells in vivo, thereby contributing to tumour clearance. Our study indicates that p53 loss can be required for the maintenance of aggressive carcinomas, and illustrates how the cellular senescence program can act together with the innate immune system to potently limit tumour growth. PMID:17251933

  3. Irradiation up-regulates CD80 expression through induction of tumour necrosis factor-α and CD40 ligand expression on B lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Fumio; Nakano, Hideki; Seo, Akira; Okada, Yayoi; Torihata, Hideko; Tanaka, Yuriko; Uchida, Tetsuya; Miyake, Hidekazu; Kakiuchi, Terutaka

    2002-01-01

    Previously, we reported that 100 Gy X-ray irradiation followed by 24 hr incubation up-regulates CD80 expression in murine B lymphoma cells, A20-2J. In the present study, we analysed the underlying mechanisms of such up-regulation using A20-HL cells derived from A20-2J cells. Irradiation of A20-HL cells with 100 Gy enhanced CD80 expression. Incubation of untreated A20-HL cells with those 100 Gy irradiated induced up-regulation of CD80 expression. Irradiation of A20-HL cells also up-regulated the expression of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and CD40 ligand (CD40L), and the amount of immunoprecipitable TNF-α and CD40L in cell lysates. The addition of anti-TNF-α or anti-CD40L monoclonal antibody (mAb) to the incubation of irradiated A20-HL cells partially inhibited up-regulation of CD80 expression, and the addition of both antibodies together almost completely inhibited the up-regulation, suggesting that irradiation up-regulated the CD80 expression through the induction of TNF-α and CD40L expression. Irradiation also increased the accumulation of CD80, TNF-α and CD40L mRNA. n-tosyl-l-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK), a nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibitor, markedly decreased irradiation-induced accumulation of CD80 mRNA and CD80 expression. FK506, a calcineurin inhibitor, and nifedipine, a calcium channel inhibitor, inhibited not only the expression of TNF-α and CD40L, but also the up-regulation of CD80 on irradiated A20-HL cells. These results strongly suggested that irradiation induced TNF-α and CD40L expression, which then up-regulated CD80 mRNA and CD80 expression through activation of NF-κB transcription factor in A20-HL cells. PMID:12100723

  4. On the surviving fraction in irradiated multicellular tumour spheroids: calculation of overall radiosensitivity parameters, influence of hypoxia and volume effects.

    PubMed

    Horas, Jorge A; Olguin, Osvaldo R; Rizzotto, Marcos G

    2005-04-21

    We model the heterogeneous response to radiation of multicellular tumour spheroids assuming position- and volume-dependent radiosensitivity. We propose a method to calculate the overall radiosensitivity parameters to obtain the surviving fraction of tumours. A mathematical model of a spherical tumour with a hypoxic core and a viable rim which is a caricature of a real tumour is constructed. The model is embedded in a two-compartment linear-quadratic (LQ) model, assuming a mixed bivariated Gaussian distribution to attain the radiosensitivity parameters. Ergodicity, i.e., the equivalence between ensemble and volumetric averages is used to obtain the overall radiosensitivities for the two compartments. We obtain expressions for the overall radiosensitivity parameters resulting from the use of both a linear and a nonlinear dependence of the local radiosensitivity with position. The model's results are compared with experimental data of surviving fraction (SF) for multicellular spheroids of different sizes. We make one fit using only the smallest spheroid data and we are able to predict the SF for the larger spheroids. These predictions are acceptable particularly using bounded sensitivities. We conclude with the importance of taking into account the contribution of clonogenic hypoxic cells to radiosensitivity and with the convenience of using bounded local sensitivities to predict overall radiosensitivity parameters.

  5. Enhanced cis-platinum ototoxicity in children with brain tumours who have received simultaneous or prior cranial irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.A.; Pillow, J.; Waters, K.D.; Keir, E.

    1989-01-01

    We report on four children who received cis-platinum simultaneously with, or in one case 10 months after, cranial irradiation and experienced exaggerated ototoxicity affecting all audible frequencies. The hearing loss was severe, affecting the critical areas for speech perception, and necessitated the provision of bilateral hearing aids. The audiograms of these patients are shown and compared to those of four children who had received cis-platinum as part of their treatment for neuroblastoma but without cranial irradiation. The precipitation of the exaggerated hearing loss with the administration of cis-platinum in one patient 10 months after finishing cranial irradiation suggests that care should be taken in the timing of cis-platinum administration in relation to concurrent or previous cranial irradiation.

  6. Induction of tumour hypoxia post-irradiation: a method for increasing the sensitizing efficiency of misonidazole and RSU 1069 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Stratford, I J; Adams, G E; Godden, J; Howells, N

    1989-03-01

    It is known that hydralazine can decrease blood flow to experimental murine tumours. A consequence of this, in the KHT sarcoma, is the induction of close to 100 per cent radiobiological hypoxia, which lasts for nearly 2 h following i.v. injection of 5 mg/kg hydralazine to the mouse. This phenomenon is exploitable in order to increase the apparent sensitizing efficiency of the nitroheterocyclic radiosensitizers, misonidazole and RSU 1069, and is demonstrated using the treatment schedule: sensitizer----60 min----X-rays----1 min----hydralazine. Such a strategy will first take advantage of the radiosensitizing properties of the nitroimidazole, then after irradiation the hydralazine should allow expression of the differential toxicity towards hypoxic cells known to occur with misonidazole and RSU 1069. Misonidazole gives an enhancement ratio (ER) of 1.3 at 100 mg/kg, rising to 2.0 at 1000 mg/kg. Where hydralazine is given after irradiation, no additional cell kill is observed with 1000 mg/kg. In contrast, at lower doses of misonidazole, hydralazine induces a substantial increase in cell killing such that the ER obtained with 100 mg/kg is the same as that achieved with 1000 mg/kg misonidazole when used alone with radiation. Similarly, 20 mg/kg RSU 1069 with radiation followed by hydralazine is equivalent to the radiosensitizing effect of 80 mg/kg RSU 1069 without hydralazine. In addition, doses of RSU 1069 that normally give no radiosensitization (5 or 10 mg/kg) produce substantial increases in cell killing when combined with hydralazine.

  7. A microRNA component of the p53 tumour suppressor network

    PubMed Central

    He, Lin; He, Xingyue; Lim, Lee P.; de Stanchina, Elisa; Xuan, Zhenyu; Liang, Yu; Xue, Wen; Zender, Lars; Magnus, Jill; Ridzon, Dana; Jackson, Aimee L.; Linsley, Peter S.; Chen, Caifu; Lowe, Scott W.; Cleary, Michele A.; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    A global decrease in microRNA (miRNA) levels is often observed in human cancers1,2, indicating that small RNAs may have an intrinsic function in tumour suppression. To identify miRNA components of tumour suppressor pathways, we compared miRNA expression profiles of wild-type and p53-deficient cells. Here we describe a family of miRNAs, miR-34a–c, whose expression reflected p53 status. Genes encoding miRNAs in the miR-34 family are direct transcriptional targets of p53, whose induction by DNA damage and oncogenic stress depends on p53 both in vitro and in vivo. Ectopic expression of miR-34 induces cell cycle arrest in both primary and tumour-derived cell lines, which is consistent with the observed ability of miR-34 to downregulate a programme of genes promoting cell cycle progression. The p53 network suppresses tumour formation through the coordinated activation of multiple transcriptional targets, and miR-34 may act in concert with other effectors to inhibit inappropriate cell proliferation. PMID:17554337

  8. Selective killing of ATM- or p53-deficient cancer cells through inhibition of ATR.

    PubMed

    Reaper, Philip M; Griffiths, Matthew R; Long, Joanna M; Charrier, Jean-Damien; Maccormick, Somhairle; Charlton, Peter A; Golec, Julian M C; Pollard, John R

    2011-04-13

    Here we report a comprehensive biological characterization of a potent and selective small-molecule inhibitor of the DNA damage response (DDR) kinase ATR. We show a profound synthetic lethal interaction between ATR and the ATM-p53 tumor suppressor pathway in cells treated with DNA-damaging agents and establish ATR inhibition as a way to transform the outcome for patients with cancer treated with ionizing radiation or genotoxic drugs.

  9. Hyperthermia induces cytoskeletal alterations and mitotic catastrophe in p53-deficient H1299 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pawlik, Andrzej; Nowak, Jakub Marcin; Grzanka, Dariusz; Gackowska, Lidia; Michalkiewicz, Jacek; Grzanka, Alina

    2013-01-01

    Hyperthermia is used in cancer therapy, however much remains to be discovered regarding its mechanisms of action at the cellular level. In this study, the effects of hyperthermia on cell death, survival, morphology and the cytoskeleton were investigated in a non-small cell lung cancer cell line, H1299. Despite the fact that this cell line is widely used in research, it has not yet been tested for heat shock sensitivity. Cells were given a 30-min heat shock at 43.5°C and 45°C and left to recover at 37°C for 24 and 48 h. 24 h after heat shock treatment, we monitored changes in the organization of the cytoskeleton using immunofluorescence microscopy. The number of actin stress fibers was significantly reduced, microtubules formed a looser meshwork, a portion of the cells possessed multipolar mitotic spindles, whereas vimentin filaments collapsed into perinuclear complexes. 48 h following heat stress, most of the cells showed recovery of the cytoskeleton, however we observed a considerable number of giant cells that were multinucleated or contained one enlarged nucleus. The data obtained by MTT assay showed a dose-dependent decrease of cell viability, while flow cytometric analysis revealed an increase in the number of cells with externalized phosphatidylserine. The results suggest that one of the modes of heat-induced cell death in H1299 cells is mitotic catastrophe, which probably ends in apoptosis.

  10. Induced p53 loss in mouse luminal cells causes clonal expansion and development of mammary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Luwei; Xiang, Dongxi; Xie, Ying; Bronson, Roderick T.; Li, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Most breast cancers may have a luminal origin. TP53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in breast cancers. However, how p53 deficiency contributes to breast tumorigenesis from luminal cells remains elusive. Here we report that induced p53 loss in Krt8+ mammary luminal cells leads to their clonal expansion without directly affecting their luminal identity. All induced mice develop mammary tumours with 9qA1 (Yap1) and/or 6qA2 (Met) amplification(s). These tumours exhibit a mammary stem cell (MaSC)-like expression signature and most closely resemble claudin-low breast cancer. Thus, although p53 does not directly control the luminal fate, its loss facilitates acquisition of MaSC-like properties by luminal cells and predisposes them to development of mammary tumours with loss of luminal identity. Our data also suggest that claudin-low breast cancer can develop from luminal cells, possibly via a basal-like intermediate state, although further study using a different luminal promoter is needed to fully support this conclusion. PMID:28194015

  11. Oral Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Lecavalier, D.R.; Main, J.H.P.

    1988-01-01

    The authors of this article review briefly the anatomy of the oral soft tissues and describe the more common benign and malignant tumours of the mouth, giving emphasis to their clinical features. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:21253197

  12. Tumour angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, F.

    1985-01-01

    Tumours induce the growth of host blood vessels to support their proliferation. This process of angiogenesis is evoked by specific chemical signals. Recognition of these angiogenic factors has led to experimental methods for cancer diagnosis and for inhibiting malignant growth by specifically blocking neovascularisation. The clinical potential of these techniques is discussed. PMID:2413796

  13. [PET scan and NMR spectroscopy for the differential diagnosis between brain radiation necrosis and tumour recurrence after stereotactic irradiation of brain metastases: Place in the decision tree].

    PubMed

    Menoux, I; Noël, G; Namer, I; Antoni, D

    2017-08-01

    After stereotactic radiation therapy for brain metastases, one of the complications is radionecrosis. Differential diagnosis with tumour recurrence can be helped by different methods of imaging, although histology remains the gold standard. According to the treatment centres, practice diverges. The objective of this single-centre retrospective study was to define the power of MRI, PET scan and NMR spectroscopy to establish a decision tree. This study included patients who underwent stereotactic radiation therapy for brain metastases, and required, during follow-up, both a PET scan and NMR spectroscopy in order to differentiate a radiation necrosis and tumour recurrence. From 2010 to 2015, 25 patients were consistent with these criteria. Conventional MRI technique, with the T1/T2 mismatch criterion, had a specificity of 75% and a sensitivity of only 44%. A lesion quotient greater than 0.3 diagnosed a recurrence with a sensitivity of 92%. PET scan combined the best sensitivity and specificity, respectively of 92% and 69%. Whatever the thresholds used in NMR spectroscopy for choline/N-acetylaspartate and choline/creatin ratios, the power of this imaging modality did not exceed that of PET scan. The criteria described in conventional MRI cannot by themselves establish the differential diagnosis. In first intention in case of doubt, PET scan should be done, combining the best sensitivity and specificity, whereas NMR spectroscopy used in combination does not improve these factors. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. 3-Bromopyruvate as inhibitor of tumour cell energy metabolism and chemopotentiator of platinum drugs.

    PubMed

    Ihrlund, Linda Strandberg; Hernlund, Emma; Khan, Omar; Shoshan, Maria C

    2008-06-01

    Tumour cells depend on aerobic glycolysis for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production, making energy metabolism an interesting therapeutic target. 3-Bromopyruvate (BP) has been shown by others to inhibit hexokinase and eradicate mouse hepatocarcinomas. We report that similar to the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (DG), BP rapidly decreased cellular ATP within hours, but unlike DG, BP concomitantly induced mitochondrial depolarization without affecting levels of reducing equivalents. Over 24h, and at equitoxic doses, DG reduced glucose consumption more than did BP. The observed BP-induced loss of ATP is therefore largely due to mitochondrial effects. Cell death induced over 24h by BP, but not DG, was blocked by N-acetylcysteine, indicating involvement of reactive oxygen species. BP-induced cytotoxicity was independent of p53. When combined with cisplatin or oxaliplatin, BP led to massive cell death. The anti-proliferative effects of low-dose platinum were strikingly potentiated also in resistant p53-deficient cells. Together with the reported lack of toxicity, this indicates the potential of BP as a clinical chemopotentiating agent.

  15. Urogenital tumours in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Swinson, S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The commonest urogenital tumours in childhood are Wilms tumour of the kidney and rhabdomyosarcoma in the pelvis. We review these tumours along with other primary renal tumours and less common ovarian and testicular tumours in childhood. Current clinical concepts, relevant staging investigations and imaging features are described. PMID:22187115

  16. A role for the p53 tumour suppressor in regulating the balance between homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining.

    PubMed

    Moureau, Sylvie; Luessing, Janna; Harte, Emma Christina; Voisin, Muriel; Lowndes, Noel Francis

    2016-09-01

    Loss of p53, a transcription factor activated by cellular stress, is a frequent event in cancer. The role of p53 in tumour suppression is largely attributed to cell fate decisions. Here, we provide evidence supporting a novel role for p53 in the regulation of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway choice. 53BP1, another tumour suppressor, was initially identified as p53 Binding Protein 1, and has been shown to inhibit DNA end resection, thereby stimulating non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Yet another tumour suppressor, BRCA1, reciprocally promotes end resection and homologous recombination (HR). Here, we show that in both human and mouse cells, the absence of p53 results in impaired 53BP1 focal recruitment to sites of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. This effect is largely independent of cell cycle phase and the extent of DNA damage. In p53-deficient cells, diminished localization of 53BP1 is accompanied by a reciprocal increase in BRCA1 recruitment to DSBs. Consistent with these findings, we demonstrate that DSB repair via NHEJ is abrogated, while repair via homology-directed repair (HDR) is stimulated. Overall, we propose that in addition to its role as an 'effector' protein in the DNA damage response, p53 plays a role in the regulation of DSB repair pathway choice. © 2016 The Authors.

  17. A role for the p53 tumour suppressor in regulating the balance between homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining

    PubMed Central

    Moureau, Sylvie; Luessing, Janna; Harte, Emma Christina; Voisin, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Loss of p53, a transcription factor activated by cellular stress, is a frequent event in cancer. The role of p53 in tumour suppression is largely attributed to cell fate decisions. Here, we provide evidence supporting a novel role for p53 in the regulation of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway choice. 53BP1, another tumour suppressor, was initially identified as p53 Binding Protein 1, and has been shown to inhibit DNA end resection, thereby stimulating non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Yet another tumour suppressor, BRCA1, reciprocally promotes end resection and homologous recombination (HR). Here, we show that in both human and mouse cells, the absence of p53 results in impaired 53BP1 focal recruitment to sites of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. This effect is largely independent of cell cycle phase and the extent of DNA damage. In p53-deficient cells, diminished localization of 53BP1 is accompanied by a reciprocal increase in BRCA1 recruitment to DSBs. Consistent with these findings, we demonstrate that DSB repair via NHEJ is abrogated, while repair via homology-directed repair (HDR) is stimulated. Overall, we propose that in addition to its role as an ‘effector’ protein in the DNA damage response, p53 plays a role in the regulation of DSB repair pathway choice. PMID:27655732

  18. "Concomitant immunity" in murine tumours of non-detectable immunogenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, R. A.; Bustuoabad, O. D.; Bonfil, R. D.; Meiss, R. P.; Pasqualini, C. D.

    1985-01-01

    Various immunization assays were used to demonstrate the lack of immunogenicity of three BALB/c tumours of spontaneous origin and of a fourth one resulting from foreign body tumorigenesis. All four tumours inhibited the growth of a second implant of the same tumour into the contralateral flank. In our tumour models "concomitant immunity" (1) was not mediated by macrophage or T-cell dependent immune reactions: both thymectomized BALB/c and nude mice (treated or untreated with silica) gave the same results as intact mice; (2) showed some degree of non-specificity, inhibiting the growth of a different tumour in 3/4 cases; though, the existence of a specific component could not be discarded; (3) was proportional to the volume of the primary tumour at the time of the second challenge; (4) was dependent on actively growing primary tumour, not being obtained with progressively increasing daily inocula of irradiated tumour cells; (5) was detectable in an actively growing secondary tumour; recurrent growth after partial surgical excision was inhibited and (6) involved cytostasis of the secondary tumour: a syngeneic graft of the overlying skin led to tumour growth while histological studies revealed the presence of viable tumour cells. It is postulated that "concomitant immunity" or resistance can be generated without the active participation of the immune system and that tumour-related factors are, in certain cases, responsible for blocking the growth of secondary tumours. Images Figure 5 PMID:2981538

  19. Irradiation characteristics of BNCT using near-threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be direct neutrons: application to intra-operative BNCT for malignant brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Tooru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Ishikawa, Masayori; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2002-08-21

    A calculation method for the dosage of neutrons by near-threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be and gamma rays by 7Li(p, p'gamma)7Li was validated through experiments with variable distance between the Li target and the phantom, focusing on large angular dependence. The production of neutrons and gamma rays in the Li target was calculated by Lee's method and their transport in the phantom was calculated using the MCNP-4B code. The dosage in intra-operative boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using near-threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be direct neutrons was evaluated using the validated calculation method. The effectiveness of the usage of the direct neutrons was confirmed from the existence of the region satisfying the requirements of the protocol utilized in intra-operative BNCT for brain tumours in Japan. The boron-dose enhancer (BDE) introduced in this paper to increase the contribution of the 10B(n, alpha)7Li dose in the living body was effective. The void utilized to increase the dose in deep regions was also effective with BDE. For the investigation of 1.900 MeV proton beams, for example, it was found that intraoperative BNCT using near-threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be direct neutrons is feasible.

  20. Vasculogenesis: a crucial player in the resistance of solid tumours to radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tumours have two main ways to develop a vasculature: by angiogenesis, the sprouting of endothelial cells from nearby blood vessels, and vasculogenesis, the formation of blood vessels from circulating cells. Because tumour irradiation abrogates local angiogenesis, the tumour must rely on the vasculogenesis pathway for regrowth after irradiation. Tumour irradiation produces a marked influx of CD11b+ myeloid cells (macrophages) into the tumours, and these are crucial to the formation of blood vessels in the tumours after irradiation and for the recurrence of the tumours. This process is driven by increased tumour hypoxia, which increases levels of HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor 1), which in turn upregulates SDF-1 (stromal cell-derived factor 1 or CXCL12), the main driver of the vasculogenesis pathway. Inhibition of HIF-1 or of its downstream target SDF-1 prevents the radiation-induced influx of the CD11b+ myeloid cells and delays or prevents the tumours from recurring following irradiation. Others and we have shown that with a variety of tumours in both mice and rats, the inhibition of the SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway delays or prevents the recurrence of implanted or autochthonous tumours following irradiation or following treatment with vascular disrupting agents or some chemotherapeutic drugs such as paclitaxel. In addition to the recruited macrophages, endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are also recruited to the irradiated tumours, a process also driven by SDF-1. Together, the recruited proangiogenic macrophages and the EPCs reform the tumour vasculature and allow the tumour to regrow following irradiation. This is a new paradigm with major implications for the treatment of solid tumours by radiotherapy. PMID:24338942

  1. Nicotinamide downregulates gene expression of interleukin-6, interleukin-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and tumour necrosis factor-α gene expression in HaCaT keratinocytes after ultraviolet B irradiation.

    PubMed

    Monfrecola, G; Gaudiello, F; Cirillo, T; Fabbrocini, G; Balato, A; Lembo, S

    2013-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation has profound effects on human skin, causing sunburn, inflammation, cellular-tissue injury, cell death, and skin cancer. Most of these effects are mediated by a number of cytokines produced by keratinocytes. In this study we investigated whether nicotinamide (NCT), the amide form of vitamin B3, might have a protective function in reducing the expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α in UV-irradiated keratinocytes. HaCaT cells were treated with UVB in the presence or absence of NCT, and cytokine mRNA levels were examined by quantitative real-time PCR. NCT significantly downregulated IL-6, IL-10, MCP-1 and TNF-α mRNA expression, whereas it did not exert any significant effect on IL-1β or IL-8 expression. Because of its ability to decrease these cytokine mediators after UV exposure, NCT is a possible therapy to improve or prevent conditions induced or aggravated by UV light.

  2. Gene expression profiling of mouse p53-deficient epidermal carcinoma defines molecular determinants of human cancer malignancy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The epidermal specific ablation of Trp53 gene leads to the spontaneous development of aggressive tumors in mice through a process that is accelerated by the simultaneous ablation of Rb gene. Since alterations of p53-dependent pathway are common hallmarks of aggressive, poor prognostic human cancers, these mouse models can recapitulate the molecular features of some of these human malignancies. Results To evaluate this possibility, gene expression microarray analysis was performed in mouse samples. The mouse tumors display increased expression of cell cycle and chromosomal instability associated genes. Remarkably, they are also enriched in human embryonic stem cell gene signatures, a characteristic feature of human aggressive tumors. Using cross-species comparison and meta-analytical approaches, we also observed that spontaneous mouse tumors display robust similarities with gene expression profiles of human tumors bearing mutated TP53, or displaying poor prognostic outcome, from multiple body tissues. We have obtained a 20-gene signature whose genes are overexpressed in mouse tumors and can identify human tumors with poor outcome from breast cancer, astrocytoma and multiple myeloma. This signature was consistently overexpressed in additional mouse tumors using microarray analysis. Two of the genes of this signature, AURKA and UBE2C, were validated in human breast and cervical cancer as potential biomarkers of malignancy. Conclusions Our analyses demonstrate that these mouse models are promising preclinical tools aimed to search for malignancy biomarkers and to test targeted therapies of prospective use in human aggressive tumors and/or with p53 mutation or inactivation. PMID:20630075

  3. Astrocytes derived from p53-deficient mice provide a multistep in vitro model for development of malignant gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Yahanda, A M; Bruner, J M; Donehower, L A; Morrison, R S

    1995-01-01

    Loss or mutation of p53 is thought to be an early event in the malignant transformation of many human astrocytic tumors. To better understand the role of p53 in their growth and transformation, we developed a model employing cultured neonatal astrocytes derived from mice deficient in one (p53 +/-) or both (p53 -/-) p53 alleles, comparing them with wild-type (p53 +/+) cells. Studies of in vitro and in vivo growth and transformation were performed, and flow cytometry and karyotyping were used to correlate changes in growth with genomic instability. Early-passage (EP) p53 -/- astrocytes achieved higher saturation densities and had more rapid growth than EP p53 +/- and +/+ cells. The EP p53 -/- cells were not transformed, as they were unable to grow in serum-free medium or in nude mice. With continued passaging, p53 -/- cells exhibited a multistep progression to a transformed phenotype. Late-passage p53 -/- cells achieved saturation densities 50 times higher than those of p53 +/+ cells and formed large, well-vascularized tumors in nude mice. p53 +/- astrocytes exhibited early loss of the remaining wild-type p53 allele and then evolved in a manner phenotypically similar to p53 -/- astrocytes. In marked contrast, astrocytes retaining both wild-type p53 alleles never exhibited a transformed phenotype and usually senesced after 7 to 10 passages. Dramatic alterations in ploidy and karyotype occurred and were restricted to cells deficient in wild-type p53 following repeated passaging. The results of these studies suggest that loss of wild-type p53 function promotes genomic instability, accelerated growth, and malignant transformation in astrocytes. PMID:7623819

  4. Aberrant V(D)J cleavages in T cell receptor beta enhancer- and p53-deficient lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yun Hee; Son, Chae-Yeon; Lee, Chul-Ho; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2010-05-01

    Previously, we generated thymic lymphoma cell lines from EbetaR/Rp53-/- (EP) double mutant mice where the T cell receptor (TCR) beta enhancer (Ebeta) was deleted, and the p53 gene was inactivated. Here, we characterized the EP cell lines to study the roles of the Ebeta and p53 on TCRbeta rearrangements during lymphomagenesis. Recombination activation genes (RAGs) were expressed, while the TCRbeta chain was not expressed in the EP cell lines. Dbeta-Jbeta rearrangements were not detected at all, and Dbeta1 and Dbeta2 cleavages were also not detected in the EP cell lines. However, Jbeta cleavages suppressed in Ebeta mutant thymocytes were readily detected in the EP cell lines. The Jbeta cleavages appeared to be uncoupled, aberrant, RAG-dependent and Ebeta-independent and were not detected in a p53 or Ebeta single mutant background, suggesting that the Jbeta cleavages are selected in the Ebeta and p53 double mutant background. Sequence analysis showed that the cleavage occurred in the cryptic recombination signal sequences (RSSs) present throughout Jbeta gene segments. The results implicate that the uncoupled and aberrant V(D)J cleavages may contribute to double-strand break-mediated genome instability during lymphomagenesis in EP mice.

  5. An optimized small animal tumour model for experimentation with low energy protons.

    PubMed

    Beyreuther, Elke; Brüchner, Kerstin; Krause, Mechthild; Schmidt, Margret; Szabo, Rita; Pawelke, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    The long-term aim of developing laser based particle acceleration towards clinical application requires not only substantial technological progress, but also the radiobiological characterization of the resulting ultra-short and ultra-intensive particle beam pulses. After comprehensive cell studies a mouse ear tumour model was established allowing for the penetration of low energy protons (~20 MeV) currently available at laser driven accelerators. The model was successfully applied for a first tumour growth delay study with laser driven electrons, whereby the need of improvements crop out. To optimise the mouse ear tumour model with respect to a stable, high take rate and a lower number of secondary tumours, Matrigel was introduced for tumour cell injection. Different concentrations of two human tumour cell lines (FaDu, LN229) and Matrigel were evaluated for stable tumour growth and fulfilling the allocation criteria for irradiation experiments. The originally applied cell injection with PBS was performed for comparison and to assess the long-term stability of the model. Finally, the optimum suspension of cells and Matrigel was applied to determine applicable dose ranges for tumour growth delay studies by 200 kV X-ray irradiation. Both human tumour models showed a high take rate and exponential tumour growth starting at a volume of ~10 mm3. As disclosed by immunofluorescence analysis these small tumours already interact with the surrounding tissue and activate endothelial cells to form vessels. The formation of delimited, solid tumours at irradiation size was shown by standard H&E staining and a realistic dose range for inducing tumour growth delay without permanent tumour control was obtained for both tumour entities. The already established mouse ear tumour model was successfully upgraded now providing stable tumour growth with high take rate for two tumour entities (HNSCC, glioblastoma) that are of interest for future irradiation experiments at experimental

  6. An optimized small animal tumour model for experimentation with low energy protons

    PubMed Central

    Brüchner, Kerstin; Krause, Mechthild; Schmidt, Margret; Szabo, Rita; Pawelke, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Background The long-term aim of developing laser based particle acceleration towards clinical application requires not only substantial technological progress, but also the radiobiological characterization of the resulting ultra-short and ultra-intensive particle beam pulses. After comprehensive cell studies a mouse ear tumour model was established allowing for the penetration of low energy protons (~20 MeV) currently available at laser driven accelerators. The model was successfully applied for a first tumour growth delay study with laser driven electrons, whereby the need of improvements crop out. Methods To optimise the mouse ear tumour model with respect to a stable, high take rate and a lower number of secondary tumours, Matrigel was introduced for tumour cell injection. Different concentrations of two human tumour cell lines (FaDu, LN229) and Matrigel were evaluated for stable tumour growth and fulfilling the allocation criteria for irradiation experiments. The originally applied cell injection with PBS was performed for comparison and to assess the long-term stability of the model. Finally, the optimum suspension of cells and Matrigel was applied to determine applicable dose ranges for tumour growth delay studies by 200 kV X-ray irradiation. Results Both human tumour models showed a high take rate and exponential tumour growth starting at a volume of ~10 mm3. As disclosed by immunofluorescence analysis these small tumours already interact with the surrounding tissue and activate endothelial cells to form vessels. The formation of delimited, solid tumours at irradiation size was shown by standard H&E staining and a realistic dose range for inducing tumour growth delay without permanent tumour control was obtained for both tumour entities. Conclusion The already established mouse ear tumour model was successfully upgraded now providing stable tumour growth with high take rate for two tumour entities (HNSCC, glioblastoma) that are of interest for future

  7. Fractionated Radiotherapy with 3 x 8 Gy Induces Systemic Anti-Tumour Responses and Abscopal Tumour Inhibition without Modulating the Humoral Anti-Tumour Response

    PubMed Central

    Habets, Thomas H. P. M.; Oth, Tammy; Houben, Ans W.; Huijskens, Mirelle J. A. J.; Senden-Gijsbers, Birgit L. M. G.; Schnijderberg, Melanie C. A.; Brans, Boudewijn; Dubois, Ludwig J.; Lambin, Philippe; De Saint-Hubert, Marijke; Germeraad, Wilfred T. V.; Tilanus, Marcel G. J.; Mottaghy, Felix M.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that fractionated radiotherapy (RT) can result in distant non-irradiated (abscopal) tumour regression. Although preclinical studies indicate the importance of T cells in this infrequent phenomenon, these studies do not preclude that other immune mechanisms exhibit an addition role in the abscopal effect. We therefore addressed the question whether in addition to T cell mediated responses also humoral anti-tumour responses are modulated after fractionated RT and whether systemic dendritic cell (DC) stimulation can enhance tumour-specific antibody production. We selected the 67NR mammary carcinoma model since this tumour showed spontaneous antibody production in all tumour-bearing mice. Fractionated RT to the primary tumour was associated with a survival benefit and a delayed growth of a non-irradiated (contralateral) secondary tumour. Notably, fractionated RT did not affect anti-tumour antibody titers and the composition of the immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes. Likewise, we demonstrated that treatment of tumour-bearing Balb/C mice with DC stimulating growth factor Flt3-L did neither modulate the magnitude nor the composition of the humoral immune response. Finally, we evaluated the immune infiltrate and Ig isotype content of the tumour tissue using flow cytometry and found no differences between treatment groups that were indicative for local antibody production. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the 67NR mammary carcinoma in Balb/C mice is associated with a pre-existing antibody response. And, we show that in tumour-bearing Balb/C mice with abscopal tumour regression such pre-existing antibody responses are not altered upon fractionated RT and/or DC stimulation with Flt3-L. Our research indicates that evaluating the humoral immune response in the setting of abscopal tumour regression is not invariably associated with therapeutic effects. PMID:27427766

  8. Treatment of spontaneous tumours by temporary local ligation

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Frederick M.; Kaplan, Martin M.; Meranze, David R.; Gradess, Morton

    1960-01-01

    Previous work in some human cases and in laboratory animals has indicated that temporary local ligation of spontaneous tumours has a selective destructive effect on these tumours, with only temporary inflammation resulting in normal tissues. In the experiments described in this paper, 49 spontaneous accessible tumours in dogs were treated by this method, with periods of ligation of from 4 to 11 hours. Success, as measured by selective necrosis of tumour tissue as compared with normal tissue, was achieved in 29 out of 41 benign tumours, including lipomas, angiomas, adenomas and mixed mammary tumours. Treatment failures were encountered in two cases each of papillomas and fibromas, six mixed mammary tumours and two testicular tumours. Total necrosis of tumour cells occurred in all eight malignant tumours encountered in this series. The outstanding feature was the specific destruction of tumour tissue by a bodily process without participation of any outside agent. Emphasis was placed on an adequate inflammatory response following temporary anoxia, although a precise definition of this inflammation could not be offered. Post-ligation bacterial multiplication, which may be expected to occur in necrotic tumour tissue, is considered to be a secondary effect rather than a possible primary cause of regression and disappearance of the tumour. If ligation treatment can be shown to be successful for a particular type of tumour, it may be possible to apply it to human patients for the treatment of areas not amenable to surgery. The results reported here warrant new experimental approaches to the study of neoplasms at the cellular level to define more precisely the anoxic and inflammatory processes involved in the selective lethal effect on tumour tissues; and the authors suggest that trials should be undertaken of combinations of chemotherapy or irradiation with ligation to reduce ligation time and extend the possible benefits. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7

  9. Extrarenal teratoid Wilms' tumour.

    PubMed

    Chowhan, A K; Reddy, M K; Javvadi, V; Kannan, T

    2011-06-01

    We report an unusual case of extrarenal teratoid Wilms' tumour in a 15-month-old male child. The tumour was retroperitoneal in location and consisted of triphasic Wilms' tumour elements, along with the presence of heterologous components. The heterologous teratoid elements were composed of predominantly glandular epithelium with the presence of focal skeletal muscle, adipose and neuroglial tissues. Although extrarenal Wilms' tumours have been documented in the literature, only a few cases have been noted to date. We present the relevant clinical, radiological, histomorphological, histochemical and immunohistochemical features of this rare tumour, and discuss the various theories of its histogenesis.

  10. Renal angiomyoadenomatous tumour.

    PubMed

    Jayalakshmy, P S; Jose, Merin; Feroze, M; Kumar, Rajesh K

    2017-09-01

    Renal angiomyoadenomatous tumour is a newly described rare neoplasm. This tumour is characterised microscopically by admixture of three components- epithelial cells arranged in tubules and nests, angiomyomatous stroma and capillary sized interconnecting vascular channels in close association with the epithelial cell clusters. Microscopically it has wide range of differential diagnoses which include mixed epithelial and stromal tumour of kidney, angiomyolipoma and clear cell renal cell carcinoma with angiomyolipomatous/angiomyoadenomatous areas. Renal angiomyoadenomatous tumour should be differentiated from these tumours. Till now, only 10 cases have been reported in English medical literature. Here, we are reporting a case of renal angiomyoadenomatous tumour in a 29 year- old female patient who presented with hematuria and low backache and describing its main features so as to differentiate this entity from other renal tumours. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case to be reported from India.

  11. Tumour progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour's survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible.

  12. Malignant tumours after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fahlenkamp, D; Reinke, P; Kirchner, S; Schnorr, D; Lindeke, A; Loening, S A

    1996-10-01

    In 1243 patients after renal transplantation, 39 malignant tumours were detected in 37 patients. The average latency period between transplantation and tumour disease was 72 months. Tumours included 8 malignant lymphomas, 7 dermatomas and 24 visceral tumours. The patients who developed a tumour had received fewer blood transfusions before transplantation than a tumour-free control group of 60 patients with renal transplants. Rejection crises occurred in a significantly smaller number of tumour patients compared with the control group.

  13. Tumours of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kircher, C H; Nielsen, S W

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of the pancreas occur most commonly in dogs and cats and only rarely in other domestic species. The incidence of neoplasms, both exocrine and endocrine, increases with age. Exocrine adenocarcinomas are the most common malignant tumours and have three fairly distinct morphological patterns: small tubular, large tubular, and acinar cell (rare). They readily metastasize, usually before clinical signs are apparent. A "starry sky" pattern with clear histiocytes scattered among tumour cells is a regular feature of poorly differentiated areas of small tubular adenocarcinomas and undifferentiated carcinomas. Islet cell tumours occur in a significant number only in dogs. Metastases are found in about half of the tumours, but malignancy cannot always be predicted by the morphological appearance. Slightly more than half of the islet cell tumours reported in the dog have been associated with clinical signs of hypoglycaemia. Nodular hyperplasia and exocrine adenomas are sometimes difficult to differentiate. Adenomas are considered rare while nodular hyperplasia is common in old animals.

  14. Endolymphatic sac tumour.

    PubMed

    Zulkarnaen, Mohammad; Tang, Ing Ping; Wong, Siong Lung

    2012-06-01

    We present a case of a papillary tumour at the cerebellopontine angle in a 41-year-old man. He presented with left-sided facial and ear pain associated with dizziness, nystagmus and hearing loss. CT scan of the temporal bone showed a destructive tumour at the left cerebellopontine angle. Surgical excision was performed and the diagnosis of the endolymphatic sac tumour was made. Endolymphatic tumour is a low grade adenocarcinoma that originates from the endolymphatic sac. The definitive diagnosis requires a combination of clinical features, radiological finding and pathological correlation.

  15. Tumour progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour’s survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  16. Parapharyngeal space primary tumours.

    PubMed

    Grilli, Gianluigi; Suarez, Vanessa; Muñoz, María Gabriela; Costales, María; Llorente, José Luis

    The aim of this study is to present our experience with the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for parapharyngeal space tumours. This study is a retrospective review of 90 patients diagnosed with tumours of the parapharyngeal space and treated surgically between 1984 and 2015. Patients whose tumours were not primary but invaded the parapharyngeal space expanding from another region, tumours originating in the deep lobe of the parotid gland and head and neck metastasis were excluded from this study. 74% percent of the parapharyngeal space neoplasms were benign and 26% were malignant. Pleomorphic adenoma was the most common neoplasm (27%), followed by paragangliomas (25%), miscellaneous malignant tumours (16%), neurogenic tumours (12%), miscellaneous benign tumours (10%), and malignant salivary gland tumours (10%). The transcervical approach was used in 56 cases, cervical-transparotid approach in 15 cases, type A infratemporal fossa approach in 13 cases, transmandibular approach in 4 cases and transoral approach in 2 cases. The most common complications were those deriving from nervous injuries. Most parapharyngeal space tumours can be removed surgically with a low rate of complications and recurrence. The transcervical approach is the most frequently used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  17. DNA replication stress in CHK1-depleted tumour cells triggers premature (S-phase) mitosis through inappropriate activation of Aurora kinase B.

    PubMed

    Zuazua-Villar, P; Rodriguez, R; Gagou, M E; Eyers, P A; Meuth, M

    2014-05-22

    The disruption of DNA replication in cells triggers checkpoint responses that slow-down S-phase progression and protect replication fork integrity. These checkpoints are also determinants of cell fate and can help maintain cell viability or trigger cell death pathways. CHK1 has a pivotal role in such S-phase responses. It helps maintain fork integrity during replication stress and protects cells from several catastrophic fates including premature mitosis, premature chromosome condensation and apoptosis. Here we investigated the role of CHK1 in protecting cancer cells from premature mitosis and apoptosis. We show that premature mitosis (characterized by the induction of histone H3 phosphorylation, aberrant chromatin condensation, and persistent RPA foci in arrested S-phase cells) is induced in p53-deficient tumour cells depleted of CHK1 when DNA synthesis is disrupted. These events are accompanied by an activation of Aurora kinase B in S-phase cells that is essential for histone H3 Ser10 phosphorylation. Histone H3 phosphorylation precedes the induction of apoptosis in p53-/- tumour cell lines but does not appear to be required for this fate as an Aurora kinase inhibitor suppresses phosphorylation of both Aurora B and histone H3 but has little effect on cell death. In contrast, only a small fraction of p53+/+ tumour cells shows this premature mitotic response, although they undergo a more rapid and robust apoptotic response. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for CHK1 in the control of Aurora B activation during DNA replication stress and support the idea that premature mitosis is a distinct cell fate triggered by the disruption of DNA replication when CHK1 function is suppressed.

  18. DNA replication stress in CHK1-depleted tumour cells triggers premature (S-phase) mitosis through inappropriate activation of Aurora kinase B

    PubMed Central

    Zuazua-Villar, P; Rodriguez, R; Gagou, M E; Eyers, P A; Meuth, M

    2014-01-01

    The disruption of DNA replication in cells triggers checkpoint responses that slow-down S-phase progression and protect replication fork integrity. These checkpoints are also determinants of cell fate and can help maintain cell viability or trigger cell death pathways. CHK1 has a pivotal role in such S-phase responses. It helps maintain fork integrity during replication stress and protects cells from several catastrophic fates including premature mitosis, premature chromosome condensation and apoptosis. Here we investigated the role of CHK1 in protecting cancer cells from premature mitosis and apoptosis. We show that premature mitosis (characterized by the induction of histone H3 phosphorylation, aberrant chromatin condensation, and persistent RPA foci in arrested S-phase cells) is induced in p53-deficient tumour cells depleted of CHK1 when DNA synthesis is disrupted. These events are accompanied by an activation of Aurora kinase B in S-phase cells that is essential for histone H3 Ser10 phosphorylation. Histone H3 phosphorylation precedes the induction of apoptosis in p53−/− tumour cell lines but does not appear to be required for this fate as an Aurora kinase inhibitor suppresses phosphorylation of both Aurora B and histone H3 but has little effect on cell death. In contrast, only a small fraction of p53+/+ tumour cells shows this premature mitotic response, although they undergo a more rapid and robust apoptotic response. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for CHK1 in the control of Aurora B activation during DNA replication stress and support the idea that premature mitosis is a distinct cell fate triggered by the disruption of DNA replication when CHK1 function is suppressed. PMID:24853431

  19. Renal Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumour: Case Report of a Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Kumarguru, B.N.; Bhat, Balachandra; Ramaswamy, A.S.; Kumar, M. Udaya

    2017-01-01

    The peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumour (PNET) is a member of the family of small round cell tumours. PNET is more aggressive in kidney when compared to the other sites. It usually presents in childhood or adolescence. It has an aggressive clinical course and may process towards metastatic disease culminating in death. A 24-year-old female presented with left sided abdominal swelling. Abdominal ultrasound confirmed a heterogeneous left renal mass. Consequently the patient underwent nephrectomy of left kidney and left oophorectomy. Grossly, the tumour involved almost entire kidney, showed multi-lobular, grey, glistening appearance with focal haemorrhagic areas. Histologically, the tumour cells were arranged in diffuse infiltrating sheets, cohesive lobules, Homer-Wright rosettes and perivascular pseudo-rosettes. Individual tumour cells were small round cells with scant cytoplasm and round nuclei having dispersed chromatin. Features were suggestive of PNET. Immunohistochemistry showed tumour cells displaying strong membrane positivity for MIC 2. Renal PNET needs to be differentiated from other primary and metastatic renal round-cell tumours. Most of the cases of renal PNET have poor response to standard treatment of combined surgical resection, post-operative irradiation, and chemotherapy. PNET is a rare primary tumour in the kidney. Histopathological diagnosis has to be confirmed by immunophenotyping of the tumour cells. PMID:28384877

  20. Renal Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumour: Case Report of a Rare Entity.

    PubMed

    Gali, Sai Chandana; Kumarguru, B N; Bhat, Balachandra; Ramaswamy, A S; Kumar, M Udaya

    2017-02-01

    The peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumour (PNET) is a member of the family of small round cell tumours. PNET is more aggressive in kidney when compared to the other sites. It usually presents in childhood or adolescence. It has an aggressive clinical course and may process towards metastatic disease culminating in death. A 24-year-old female presented with left sided abdominal swelling. Abdominal ultrasound confirmed a heterogeneous left renal mass. Consequently the patient underwent nephrectomy of left kidney and left oophorectomy. Grossly, the tumour involved almost entire kidney, showed multi-lobular, grey, glistening appearance with focal haemorrhagic areas. Histologically, the tumour cells were arranged in diffuse infiltrating sheets, cohesive lobules, Homer-Wright rosettes and perivascular pseudo-rosettes. Individual tumour cells were small round cells with scant cytoplasm and round nuclei having dispersed chromatin. Features were suggestive of PNET. Immunohistochemistry showed tumour cells displaying strong membrane positivity for MIC 2. Renal PNET needs to be differentiated from other primary and metastatic renal round-cell tumours. Most of the cases of renal PNET have poor response to standard treatment of combined surgical resection, post-operative irradiation, and chemotherapy. PNET is a rare primary tumour in the kidney. Histopathological diagnosis has to be confirmed by immunophenotyping of the tumour cells.

  1. Tumours and tumour mimics in the olecranon.

    PubMed

    Kularatne, U; James, S L J; Evans, N; Tyrrell, P N M; Singh, J

    2015-07-01

    Lesions in the olecranon are rare and may be identified during the investigation of a clinically suspected abnormality or as an incidental finding. This review describes the spectrum of tumours and tumour-like lesions that can involve the olecranon and illustrates the radiographic, CT, and MRI appearances that may facilitate diagnosis. A variety of pathological processes affecting the olecranon are presented and discussed including the epidemiology and imaging features. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Progressive dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Hamish; Tannenburg, Anthony; Walker, David G; Coyne, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour (DNET) is a benign tumour characterised by cortical location and presentation with drug resistant partial seizures in children. Recently the potential for malignant transformation has been reported, however progression without malignant transformation remains rare. We report a case of clinical and radiologic progression of a DNET in a girl 10 years after initial biopsy.

  3. The Natural History of Tumours of the Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Riches, Eric

    1966-01-01

    Experimental and epidemiological evidence has implicated environmental factors in the increasing incidence of bladder cancer. Papillary tumours are less malignant than solid. Of 36 patients with papillary growths in the renal pelvis, 20 lived five years but 11 of 15 with solid tumours died within one year. Social and geographical influences have affected the incidence of adenocarcinoma of the kidney. Experimentally it has been produced by hormones, carcinogens, viruses and irradiation. Clinically the most adverse factor was histological anaplasia; renal vein invasion was three times as common in high-grade tumours. The postoperative five-year survival was 30 out of 42 patients with low-grade lesions but 12 out of 42 with high-grade lesions. In the case of low malignancy tumours without adverse factors, 25 out of 29 patients survived for five years. This unpredictable behaviour is characteristic of urinary tract tumours. PMID:5914835

  4. Semi-automatic cone beam CT segmentation of in vivo pre-clinical subcutaneous tumours provides an efficient non-invasive alternative for tumour volume measurements.

    PubMed

    Brodin, N P; Tang, J; Skalina, K; Quinn, T J; Basu, I; Guha, C; Tomé, W A

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of using cone beam CT (CBCT) scans obtained in radiation studies using the small-animal radiation research platform to perform semi-automatic tumour segmentation of pre-clinical tumour volumes. Volume measurements were evaluated for different anatomical tumour sites, the flank, thigh and dorsum of the hind foot, for a variety of tumour cell lines. The estimated tumour volumes from CBCT and manual calliper measurements using different volume equations were compared with the "gold standard", measured by weighing the tumours following euthanasia and tumour resection. The correlation between tumour volumes estimated with the different methods, compared with the gold standard, was estimated by the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, root-mean-square deviation and the coefficient of determination. The semi-automatic CBCT volume segmentation performed favourably compared with manual calliper measures for flank tumours ≤2 cm(3) and thigh tumours ≤1 cm(3). For tumours >2 cm(3) or foot tumours, the CBCT method was not able to accurately segment the tumour volumes and manual calliper measures were superior. We demonstrated that tumour volumes of flank and thigh tumours, obtained as a part of radiation studies using image-guided small-animal irradiators, can be estimated more efficiently and accurately using semi-automatic segmentation from CBCT scans. This is the first study evaluating tumour volume assessment of pre-clinical subcutaneous tumours in different anatomical sites using on-board CBCT imaging. We also compared the accuracy of the CBCT method to manual calliper measures, using various volume calculation equations.

  5. Tumour ablation: technical aspects.

    PubMed

    Widmann, Gerlig; Bodner, Gerd; Bale, Reto

    2009-10-02

    Image-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive, relatively low-risk procedure for tumour treatment. Local recurrence and survival rates depend on the rate of complete ablation of the entire tumour including a sufficient margin of surrounding healthy tissue. Currently a variety of different RFA devices are available. The interventionalist must be able to predict the configuration and extent of the resulting ablation necrosis. Accurate planning and execution of RFA according to the size and geometry of the tumour is essential. In order to minimize complications, individualized treatment strategies may be necessary for tumours close to vital structures. This review examines the state-of-the art of different device technologies, approaches, and treatment strategies for percutaneous RFA of liver tumours.

  6. Pituitary tumours during pregnancy in mothers treated with bromocriptine.

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, R W; Turkalj, I; Braun, P

    1979-01-01

    1 Out of 805 previously infertile women in whom pregnancy was achieved on bromocriptine treatment, 137 were diagnosed as having pituitary tumours. 2 In nine of these, tumour-related complications occurred during pregnancy, chiefly visual field impairment. Surgical intervention was considered necessary in two patients. In a third patient reinstitution of bromocriptine produced remission of symptoms. 3 Although the frequency of serious complications was low, the present state of knowledge indicates that surgery or irradiation of pituitary tumours should be preferred, at least as the first line of treatment, for patients contemplating pregnancy. PMID:444358

  7. The Tumour Microenvironment after Radiotherapy: Mechanisms of Resistance and Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Holly E.; Paget, James T. E.; Khan, Aadil A.; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays a central part in curing cancer. For decades, most research on improving treatment outcomes has focussed on modulating radiation-induced biological effects on cancer cells. Recently, we have better understood that components within the tumour microenvironment have pivotal roles in determining treatment outcomes. In this Review, we describe vascular, stromal and immunological changes induced in the tumour microenvironment by irradiation and discuss how they may promote radioresistance and tumour recurrence. Subsequently, we highlight how this knowledge is guiding the development of new treatment paradigms in which biologically targeted agents will be combined with radiotherapy. PMID:26105538

  8. A chemically modified antibody mediates complete eradication of tumours by selective disruption of tumour blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, A; Hauler, F; Dziunycz, P; Schwager, K; Soltermann, A; Pretto, F; Alonso, C; Hofbauer, G F; Boyle, R W; Neri, D

    2011-03-29

    The possibility of eradicating cancer by selective destruction of tumour blood vessels may represent an attractive therapeutic avenue, but most pharmaceutical agents investigated so far did not achieve complete cures and are not completely specific. Antibody conjugates now allow us to evaluate the impact of selective vascular shutdown on tumour viability and to study mechanisms of action. We synthesised a novel porphyrin-based photosensitiser suitable for conjugation to antibodies and assessed anticancer properties of its conjugate with L19, a clinical-stage human monoclonal antibody specific to the alternatively spliced EDB domain of fibronectin, a marker of tumour angiogenesis. Here we show in two mouse model of cancer (F9 and A431) that L19 is capable of highly selective in vivo localisation around tumour blood vessels and that its conjugate with a photosensitiser allows selective disruption of tumour vasculature upon irradiation, leading to complete and long-lasting cancer eradication. Furthermore, depletion experiments revealed that natural killer cells are essential for the induction of long-lasting complete responses. These results reinforce the concept that vascular shutdown can induce a curative avalanche of tumour cell death. Immuno-photodynamic therapy may be particularly indicated for squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, which we show to be strongly positive for markers of angiogenesis.

  9. Hetergeneous tumour response to photodynamic therapy assessed by in vivo localised 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ceckler, T. L.; Gibson, S. L.; Kennedy, S. D.; Hill, R.; Bryant, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is efficacious in the treatment of small malignant lesions when all cells in the tumour receive sufficient drug, oxygen and light to induce a photodynamic effect capable of complete cytotoxicity. In large tumours, only partial effectiveness is observed presumably because of insufficient light penetration into the tissue. The heterogeneity of the metabolic response in mammary tumours following PDT has been followed in vivo using localised phosphorus NMR spectroscopy. Alterations in nucleoside triphosphates (NTP), inorganic phosphate (Pi) and pH within localised regions of the tumour were monitored over 24-48 h following PDT irradiation of the tumour. Reduction of NTP and increases in Pi were observed at 4-6 h after PDT irradiation in all regions of treated tumours. The uppermost regions of the tumours (those nearest the skin surface and exposed to the greatest light fluence) displayed the greatest and most prolonged reduction of NTP and concomitant increase in Pi resulting in necrosis. The metabolite concentrations in tumour regions located towards the base of the tumour returned a near pre-treatment levels by 24-48 h after irradiation. The ability to follow heterogeneous metabolic responses in situ provides one means to assess the degree of metabolic inhibition which subsequently leads to tumour necrosis. Images Figure 4 PMID:1829953

  10. The notochord curvature in medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos as a response to ultraviolet A irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Alaa El-Din Hamid; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, the destructive effects of ultraviolet A (UVA; 366nm) irradiation on the developmental stages of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) are revealed in terms of hatching success, mortality rate, and morphological malformations (yolk sac edema, body curvature, fin blistering, and dwarfism). Fertilized eggs in stage 4 were exposed to 15, 30, and 60min/day UVA for 3days in replicates. Fish were staged and aged following the stages established by Iwamatsu [1]. We observed and recorded the hatching time and deformed and dead embryos continuously. The hatching time was prolonged and the deformed and dead embryos numbers were increased by UVA dose increase. At stage 40, samples from each group were fixed to investigate their morphology and histopathology. Some morphological malformations were recorded after UVA exposure in both strains. Histopathological changes were represented as different shapes of curvature in notochord with collapse. The degree of collapsation was depended on the dose and time of UVA exposure. Our findings show that exposure to UVA irradiation caused less vertebral column curvature in medaka fry. Moreover, p53-deficient embryos were more tolerant than those of wild-type (Hd-rR) Japanese medaka. This study indicated the dangerous effects of the UVA on medaka. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Tumour-induced osteomalacia.

    PubMed

    Minisola, Salvatore; Peacock, Munro; Fukumoto, Seijii; Cipriani, Cristiana; Pepe, Jessica; Tella, Sri Harsha; Collins, Michael T

    2017-07-13

    Tumour-induced osteomalacia (TIO), also known as oncogenic osteomalacia, is a rare paraneoplastic disorder caused by tumours that secrete fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). Owing to the role of FGF23 in renal phosphate handling and vitamin D synthesis, TIO is characterized by decreased renal tubular reabsorption of phosphate, by hypophosphataemia and by low levels of active vitamin D. Chronic hypophosphataemia ultimately results in osteomalacia (that is, inadequate bone mineralization). The diagnosis of TIO is usually suspected when serum phosphate levels are chronically low in the setting of bone pain, fragility fractures and muscle weakness. Locating the offending tumour can be very difficult, as the tumour is often very small and can be anywhere in the body. Surgical removal of the tumour is the only definitive treatment. When the tumour cannot be located or when complete resection is not possible, medical treatment with phosphate salts or active vitamin D is necessary. One of the most promising emerging treatments for unresectable tumours that cause TIO is the anti-FGF23 monoclonal antibody KRN23. The recent identification of a fusion of fibronectin and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) as a molecular driver in some tumours not only sheds light on the pathophysiology of TIO but also opens the door to a better understanding of the transcription, translocation, post-translational modification and secretion of FGF23, as well as suggesting approaches to targeted therapy. Further study will reveal if the FGFR1 pathway is also involved in tumours that do not harbour the translocation.

  12. p53-Dependent Senescence in Mesenchymal Stem Cells under Chronic Normoxia Is Potentiated by Low-Dose γ-Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Höfig, Ines; Ingawale, Yashodhara; Atkinson, Michael J; Hertlein, Heidi; Nelson, Peter J; Rosemann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a source of adult multipotent cells important in tissue regeneration. Murine MSCs are known to proliferate poorly in vitro under normoxia. The aim of this study is to analyze the interaction of nonphysiological high oxygen and low-dose γ-irradiation onto growth, senescence, and DNA damage. Tri-potent bone marrow-derived MSCs from p53 wildtype and p53-/- mice were cultured under either 21% or 2% O2. Long-term observations revealed a decreasing ability of wildtype mMSCs to proliferate and form colonies under extended culture in normoxia. This was accompanied by increased senescence under normoxia but not associated with telomere shortening. After low-dose γ-irradiation, the normoxic wildtype cells further increased the level of senescence. The number of radiation-induced γH2AX DNA repair foci was higher in mMSCs kept under normoxia but not in p53-/- cells. P53-deficient MSCs additionally showed higher clonogeneity, lower senescence levels, and fewer γH2AX repair foci per cell as compared to their p53 wildtype counterparts irrespective of oxygen levels. These results reveal that oxygen levels together with γ-irradiation and p53 status are interconnected factors modulating growth capacity of BM MSCs in long-term culture. These efforts help to better understand and optimize handling of MSCs prior to their therapeutic use.

  13. p53-Dependent Senescence in Mesenchymal Stem Cells under Chronic Normoxia Is Potentiated by Low-Dose γ-Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Ingawale, Yashodhara; Hertlein, Heidi; Nelson, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a source of adult multipotent cells important in tissue regeneration. Murine MSCs are known to proliferate poorly in vitro under normoxia. The aim of this study is to analyze the interaction of nonphysiological high oxygen and low-dose γ-irradiation onto growth, senescence, and DNA damage. Tri-potent bone marrow-derived MSCs from p53 wildtype and p53−/− mice were cultured under either 21% or 2% O2. Long-term observations revealed a decreasing ability of wildtype mMSCs to proliferate and form colonies under extended culture in normoxia. This was accompanied by increased senescence under normoxia but not associated with telomere shortening. After low-dose γ-irradiation, the normoxic wildtype cells further increased the level of senescence. The number of radiation-induced γH2AX DNA repair foci was higher in mMSCs kept under normoxia but not in p53−/− cells. P53-deficient MSCs additionally showed higher clonogeneity, lower senescence levels, and fewer γH2AX repair foci per cell as compared to their p53 wildtype counterparts irrespective of oxygen levels. These results reveal that oxygen levels together with γ-irradiation and p53 status are interconnected factors modulating growth capacity of BM MSCs in long-term culture. These efforts help to better understand and optimize handling of MSCs prior to their therapeutic use. PMID:26788069

  14. [Gastric mesenchymal tumours (GIST)].

    PubMed

    Spivach, Arrigo; Fezzi, Margherita; Sartori, Alberto; Belgrano, Manuel; Rimondini, Alessandra; Cuttin-Zernich, Roberto; Covab, Maria Assunta; Bonifacio, Daniela; Buri, Luigi; Pagani, Carlo; Zanconati, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) has increased in recent years. A number of authors have attempted to define the actual nature of these tumours. Immunohistochemistry highlighting the positivity of tyrosine-kinase (CD117/c-Kit) has revealed the difference between gastrointestinal stromal tumours and other mesenchymal tumours and, therefore, the possibility of medical rather than surgical therapy. We retrospectively reviewed 19 patients affected by primary gastric GIST, who underwent surgery in recent years with subsequent follow-up. Gastroscopy and gastrointestinal tract radiography were used not only to obtain the diagnosis but also to establish the size, density, contours, ulceration, regional lymphadenopathy, mesenteric infiltration and the presence of metastases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of endoscopy and radiology in this pathology and the advantages and limitations of each individual technique.

  15. Delayed expression of hpS2 and prolonged expression of CIP1/WAF1/SDI1 in human tumour cells irradiated with X-rays, fission neutrons or 1 GeV/nucleon Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E. K.; Zhang, X. F.; Harrison, G. H.; Zhou, X. J.; Vigneulle, R. M.; Ove, R.; McCready, W. A.; Xu, J. F.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Differences in gene expression underlie the phenotypic differences between irradiated and unirradiated cells. The goal was to identify late-transcribed genes following irradiations differing in quality, and to determine the RBE of 1 GeV/n Fe ions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clonogenic assay was used to determine the RBE of Fe ions. Differential hybridization to cDNA target clones was used to detect differences in expression of corresponding genes in mRNA samples isolated from MCF7 cells irradiated with iso-survival doses of Fe ions (0 or 2.5 Gy) or fission neutrons (0 or 1.2 Gy) 7 days earlier. Northern analysis was used to confirm differential expression of cDNA-specific mRNA and to examine expression kinetics up to 2 weeks after irradiation. RESULTS: Fe ion RBE values were between 2.2 and 2.6 in the lines examined. Two of 17 differentially expressed cDNA clones were characterized. hpS2 mRNA was elevated from 1 to 14 days after irradiation, whereas CIP1/WAF1/SDI1 remained elevated from 3 h to 14 days after irradiation. Induction of hpS2 mRNA by irradiation was independent of p53, whereas induction of CIP1/WAF1/SDI1 was observed only in wild-type p53 lines. CONCLUSIONS: A set of coordinately regulated genes, some of which are independent of p53, is associated with change in gene expression during the first 2 weeks post-irradiation.

  16. Delayed expression of hpS2 and prolonged expression of CIP1/WAF1/SDI1 in human tumour cells irradiated with X-rays, fission neutrons or 1 GeV/nucleon Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E. K.; Zhang, X. F.; Harrison, G. H.; Zhou, X. J.; Vigneulle, R. M.; Ove, R.; McCready, W. A.; Xu, J. F.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Differences in gene expression underlie the phenotypic differences between irradiated and unirradiated cells. The goal was to identify late-transcribed genes following irradiations differing in quality, and to determine the RBE of 1 GeV/n Fe ions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clonogenic assay was used to determine the RBE of Fe ions. Differential hybridization to cDNA target clones was used to detect differences in expression of corresponding genes in mRNA samples isolated from MCF7 cells irradiated with iso-survival doses of Fe ions (0 or 2.5 Gy) or fission neutrons (0 or 1.2 Gy) 7 days earlier. Northern analysis was used to confirm differential expression of cDNA-specific mRNA and to examine expression kinetics up to 2 weeks after irradiation. RESULTS: Fe ion RBE values were between 2.2 and 2.6 in the lines examined. Two of 17 differentially expressed cDNA clones were characterized. hpS2 mRNA was elevated from 1 to 14 days after irradiation, whereas CIP1/WAF1/SDI1 remained elevated from 3 h to 14 days after irradiation. Induction of hpS2 mRNA by irradiation was independent of p53, whereas induction of CIP1/WAF1/SDI1 was observed only in wild-type p53 lines. CONCLUSIONS: A set of coordinately regulated genes, some of which are independent of p53, is associated with change in gene expression during the first 2 weeks post-irradiation.

  17. Predicting tumour response

    PubMed Central

    Law, W. Phillip; Miles, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Response prediction is an important emerging concept in oncologic imaging, with tailored, individualized treatment regimens increasingly becoming the standard of care. This review aims to define tumour response and illustrate the ways in which imaging techniques can demonstrate tumour biological characteristics that provide information on the likely benefit to be received by treatment. Two imaging approaches are described: identification of therapeutic targets and depiction of the treatment-resistant phenotype. The former approach is exemplified by the use of radionuclide imaging to confirm target expression before radionuclide therapy but with angiogenesis imaging and imaging correlates for genetic response predictors also demonstrating potential utility. Techniques to assess the treatment-resistant phenotype include demonstration of hypoperfusion with dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), depiction of necrosis with diffusion-weighted MRI, imaging of hypoxia and tumour adaption to hypoxia, and 99mTc-MIBI imaging of P-glycoprotein mediated drug resistance. To date, introduction of these techniques into clinical practice has often been constrained by inadequate cross-validation of predictive criteria and lack of verification against appropriate response end points such as survival. With further refinement, imaging predictors of response could play an important role in oncology, contributing to individualization of therapy based on the specific tumour phenotype. This ability to predict tumour response will have implications for improving efficacy of treatment, cost-effectiveness and omission of futile therapy. PMID:24061161

  18. The determinants of tumour immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Blankenstein, Thomas; Coulie, Pierre G.; Gilboa, Eli; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Many standard and targeted therapies, as well as radiotherapy, have been shown to induce an anti-tumour immune response, and immunotherapies rely on modulating the host immune system to induce an anti-tumour immune response. However, the immune response to such therapies is often reliant on the immunogenicity of a tumour. Tumour immunogenicity varies greatly between cancers of the same type in different individuals and between different types of cancer. So, what do we know about tumour immunogenicity and how might we therapeutically improve tumour immunogenicity? We asked four leading cancer immunologists around the world for their opinions on this important issue. PMID:22378190

  19. Microenvironmental autophagy promotes tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Katheder, Nadja S; Khezri, Rojyar; O'Farrell, Fergal; Schultz, Sebastian W; Jain, Ashish; Rahman, Mohammed M; Schink, Kay O; Theodossiou, Theodossis A; Johansen, Terje; Juhász, Gábor; Bilder, David; Brech, Andreas; Stenmark, Harald; Rusten, Tor Erik

    2017-01-19

    As malignant tumours develop, they interact intimately with their microenvironment and can activate autophagy, a catabolic process which provides nutrients during starvation. How tumours regulate autophagy in vivo and whether autophagy affects tumour growth is controversial. Here we demonstrate, using a well characterized Drosophila melanogaster malignant tumour model, that non-cell-autonomous autophagy is induced both in the tumour microenvironment and systemically in distant tissues. Tumour growth can be pharmacologically restrained using autophagy inhibitors, and early-stage tumour growth and invasion are genetically dependent on autophagy within the local tumour microenvironment. Induction of autophagy is mediated by Drosophila tumour necrosis factor and interleukin-6-like signalling from metabolically stressed tumour cells, whereas tumour growth depends on active amino acid transport. We show that dormant growth-impaired tumours from autophagy-deficient animals reactivate tumorous growth when transplanted into autophagy-proficient hosts. We conclude that transformed cells engage surrounding normal cells as active and essential microenvironmental contributors to early tumour growth through nutrient-generating autophagy.

  20. Percutaneous renal tumour biopsy.

    PubMed

    Delahunt, Brett; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Martignoni, Guido; Srigley, John R; Evans, Andrew J; Brunelli, Matteo

    2014-09-01

    The use of percutaneous renal tumour biopsy (RTB) as a diagnostic tool for the histological characterization of renal masses has increased dramatically within the last 30 years. This increased utilization has paralleled advances in imaging techniques and an evolving knowledge of the clinical value of nephron sparing surgery. Improved biopsy techniques using image guidance, coupled with the use of smaller gauge needles has led to a decrease in complication rates. Reports from series containing a large number of cases have shown the non-diagnostic rate of RTB to range from 4% to 21%. Re-biopsy has been shown to reduce this rate, while the use of molecular markers further improves diagnostic sensitivity. In parallel with refinements of the biopsy procedure, there has been a rapid expansion in our understanding of the complexity of renal cell neoplasia. The 2013 Vancouver Classification is the current classification for renal tumours, and contains five additional entities recognized as novel forms of renal malignancy. The diagnosis of tumour morphotype on RTB is usually achievable on routine histology; however, immunohistochemical studies may be of assistance in difficult cases. The morphology of the main tumour subtypes, based upon the Vancouver Classification, is described and differentiating features are discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Tumour Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Laura; Baker, Ann-Marie; Graham, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    The population of cells that make up a cancer are manifestly heterogeneous at the genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic levels. In this mini-review, we summarise the extent of intra-tumour heterogeneity (ITH) across human malignancies, review the mechanisms that are responsible for generating and maintaining ITH, and discuss the ramifications and opportunities that ITH presents for cancer prognostication and treatment. PMID:26973786

  2. Why measure tumours?

    PubMed

    Olsen, Øystein E

    2015-01-01

    This article questions the scientific justification of ingrained radiologic practices exemplified by size measurements of childhood solid tumours. This is approached by a critical review of staging systems from a selection of paediatric oncological treatment protocols. Local staging remains size-dependent for some tumour types. The consequent stage assignment can significantly influence treatment intensity. Still, the protocols tend not to give precise guidance on how to perform scans and standardise measurements. Also, they do not estimate or account for the inevitable variability in measurements. Counts and measurements of lung nodules are, within some tumour groups, used for diagnosis of metastatic disease. There is, however, no evidence that nodule size is a useful discriminator of benign and malignant lung nodules. The efficacy of imaging depends chiefly on observations being precise, accurate and valid for the desired diagnostic purpose. Because measurements without estimates of their errors are meaningless, studies of variability dependent on tumour shape and location, imaging device and observer need to be encouraged. Reproducible observations make good candidates for staging parameters if they have prognostic validity and at the same time show little covariation with (thereby adding new information to) the existing staging system. The lack of scientific rigour has made the validity of size measurement very difficult to assess. Action is needed, the most important being radiologists' active contribution in development of oncological staging systems, attention to standardisation, knowledge about errors in measurement and protection against undue influence of such errors in the staging of the individual child.

  3. Metastasising pilar tumour of scalp.

    PubMed Central

    Batman, P A; Evans, H J

    1986-01-01

    A case of pilar tumour of the scalp, treated by local excision and radiotherapy, later metastasised to the neck. The variable histological growth patterns of the primary tumour and its metastases are described. It is concluded that the pilar tumour is a genuine neoplasm of the hair follicle that is occasionally capable of malignant behaviour. Images PMID:3734112

  4. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour and second tumours: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Martín, Rafael; Cubedo Cervera, Ricardo; Provencio Pulla, Mariano

    2017-07-20

    There are several tumours associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST), most of them without an apparent family relationship; only 5% of them occur within the context of a family syndrome. In this article the corresponding literature about the former has been reviewed. A search in Pubmed was carried out, the methodology of which is described in detail in the body of the article. A total of 88 articles have been chosen for the review, next to the application of limits as well as a manual review. GIST patients have a twofold risk of developing a second tumour than the general population (4-33% of them develop a second neoplasm, either synchronic or metachronic). Most incident tumours associated with GIST are gastrointestinal and genitourinary tumours. In addition, patients with second tumours have a worse survival rate than those without second tumours. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiotherapy in Phyllodes Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Sasidharan, Balukrishna; Manipadam, Marie Therese; Paul, M J; Backianathan, Selvamani

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Phyllodes Tumour (PT) of the breast is a relatively rare breast neoplasm (<1%) with diverse range of pathology and biological behaviour. Aim To describe the clinical course of PT and to define the role of Radiotherapy (RT) in PT of the breast. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of hospital data of patients with PT presented from 2005 to 2014 was done. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the results. Simple description of data was done in this study. Age and duration of symptoms were expressed in median and range. Percentages, tables and general discussions were used to understand the meaning of the data analyzed. Results Out of the 98 patients, 92 were eligible for analysis. The median age of presentation was 43 years. A total of 64/92 patients were premenopausal. There was no side predilection for this tumour but 57/92 patients presented as an upper outer quadrant lump. Fifty percent of the patients presented as giant (10 cm) PT. The median duration of symptoms was 12 months (range: 1-168 months). A 60% of patients had Benign (B), 23% had Borderline (BL) and 17% had malignant (M) tumours. The surgical treatment for benign histology included Lumpectomy (L) for 15%, Wide Local Excision (WLE) for 48%, and Simple Mastectomy (SM) for 37%. All BL and M tumours were treated with WLE or SM. There was no recurrence in B and BL group when the margin was ≥1 cm. All non-metastatic M tumours received adjuvant RT irrespective of their margin status. Total 3/16 patients with M developed local recurrence. Total 6/16 M patients had distant metastases (lung or bone). Our median duration of follow up was 20 months (range: 1-120 months). Conclusion Surgical resection with adequate margins (>1 cm) gave excellent local control in B and BL tumours. For patients with BL PT, local radiotherapy is useful, if margins are close or positive even after the best surgical resection. There is a trend towards improved local control with adjuvant radiotherapy for

  6. Head and neck paragangliomas: Experience in 126 patients with 162 tumours.

    PubMed

    González-Orús Álvarez-Morujo, Ricardo José; Arístegui Ruiz, Miguel Ángel; da Costa Belisario, Julia; Martinez Guirado, Tomás; Scola Yurrita, Bartolomé

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck paragangliomas are rare tumours of a neuroendocrine nature. The aim of this study was to show our experience in the management of these kind of tumours. This was a retrospective study of head and neck paragangliomas diagnosed between 1978 and 2014. A total of 126 patients with 162 tumours were analysed. The paragangliomas included 88 jugulotympanic tumours, 53 carotid tumours and 21 vagal paragangliomas. Mean age at diagnosis was 53.1 years; 87 patients were female (69.1%) and 39, male (30.9%). Multifocality was present in 24 patients (19.1%). Germline mutations were found in 20 patients analysed; SDHD and SDHB were the most frequent. Surgery was performed on 72 isolated paragangliomas: these were 9 carotid, 21 tympanic, 37 jugular and 5 vagal paragangliomas. There were 25 isolated tumours that were observed periodically: 7 carotid, 3 tympanic, 9 jugular and 6 vagal paragangliomas; 5 jugular tumours were irradiated. Multifocal paragangliomas were individually treated, with a total of 26 surgical procedures and 36 tumours resected, 9 irradiated and 12 tumours periodically observed. Postoperative cranial nerve deficits in isolated carotid paragangliomas were lower (15%) compared with jugular tumours (45.5%, P=.04). Nerve deficit was found more frequently in tumours with intradural extension (100%) than in extradural tumours (37.5%, P=.007). Management of head and neck paragangliomas include surgery, radiotherapy and wait and scan policies. A combination of all of them is usually needed in patients with multifocal paragangliomas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  7. Therapeutic inhibition of TRF1 impairs the growth of p53-deficient K-RasG12V-induced lung cancer by induction of telomeric DNA damage.

    PubMed

    García-Beccaria, María; Martínez, Paula; Méndez-Pertuz, Marinela; Martínez, Sonia; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Cañamero, Marta; Mulero, Francisca; Ambrogio, Chiara; Flores, Juana M; Megias, Diego; Barbacid, Mariano; Pastor, Joaquín; Blasco, Maria A

    2015-07-01

    Telomeres are considered anti-cancer targets, as telomere maintenance above a minimum length is necessary for cancer growth. Telomerase abrogation in cancer-prone mouse models, however, only decreased tumor growth after several mouse generations when telomeres reach a critically short length, and this effect was lost upon p53 mutation. Here, we address whether induction of telomere uncapping by inhibition of the TRF1 shelterin protein can effectively block cancer growth independently of telomere length. We show that genetic Trf1 ablation impairs the growth of p53-null K-Ras(G12V)-induced lung carcinomas and increases mouse survival independently of telomere length. This is accompanied by induction of telomeric DNA damage, apoptosis, decreased proliferation, and G2 arrest. Long-term whole-body Trf1 deletion in adult mice did not impact on mouse survival and viability, although some mice showed a moderately decreased cellularity in bone marrow and blood. Importantly, inhibition of TRF1 binding to telomeres by small molecules blocks the growth of already established lung carcinomas without affecting mouse survival or tissue function. Thus, induction of acute telomere uncapping emerges as a potential new therapeutic target for lung cancer.

  8. Characterization of Wnt-1 Transgenic Mice (with and without p53-deficiency) as Models of Spontaneous Mammary Tumorigenesis for Chemoprevention Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-01

    mice (5 weeks of age, 20 mice/treatment) to receive: 1) control diet (AIN-76A diet); 2) fenretinide (AIN 76A diet with 0.04% w/w fenretinide ); 3...found that, relative to the control group (MTD=15.7 weeks), the fenretinide (MTD=23.1 weeks, p=O.Ol) and fluasterone (MTD=23.l weeks, p=O.006) and soy

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Cytotoxic and Apoptogenic Effects of Several Coumarins on Human Cancer Cell Lines: Osthole Induces Apoptosis in p53-Deficient H1299 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shokoohinia, Yalda; Hosseinzadeh, Leila; Alipour, Maryam; Mostafaie, Ali; Mohammadi-Motlagh, Hamid-Reza

    2014-01-01

    Natural products are excellent resources for finding lead structures for the development of chemotherapeutic agents. Coumarins are a class of natural compounds found in a variety of plants. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxic potential of coumarins isolated from Prangos ferulacea (L.) Lindl. in PC3, SKNMC, and H1299 (p53 null) human carcinoma cell lines. Osthole proved to be an outstanding potent cytotoxic agent especially against PC3 cells. Isoimperatorin exhibited moderate inhibitory effect against SKNMC and PC3 cell lines. Oxypeucedanin and braylin did not display any cytotoxic activity. In the next set of experiments, the apoptotic potentials of osthole and isoimperatorin were investigated. Induction of apoptosis by isoimperatorin was accompanied by an increase in activation of caspase-3, -8, and -9 in SKNMC cells and caspase-3 and -9 in PC3 cells. Moreover, isoimperatorin induced apoptosis by upregulating Bax and Smac/DIABLO genes in PC3 and SKNMC cells. Osthole induced apoptosis by downregulating antiapoptotic Bcl-2 in only PC3 cells and upregulating the proapoptotic genes Bax and Smac/DIABLO in PC3, SKNMC, and H1299 cells. The effects of osthole on H1299 cells are important because the loss of p53 has been associated with poor clinical prognosis in cancer treatment. PMID:25276123

  10. Anthocyanins from roselle extract arrest cell cycle G2/M phase transition via ATM/Chk pathway in p53-deficient leukemia HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsung-Chang; Huang, Hui-Pei; Chang, Kai-Ting; Wang, Chau-Jong; Chang, Yun-Ching

    2017-04-01

    Cell cycle regulation is an important issue in cancer therapy. Delphinidin and cyanidin are two major anthocyanins of the roselle plant (Hibiscus sabdariffa). In the present study, we investigated the effect of Hibiscus anthocyanins (HAs) on cell cycle arrest in human leukemia cell line HL-60 and the analyzed the underlying molecular mechanisms. HAs extracted from roselle calyces (purity 90%) markedly induced G2/M arrest evaluated with flow cytometry analysis. Western blot analyses revealed that HAs (0.1-0.7 mg mL(-1) ) induced G2/M arrest via increasing Tyr15 phosphorylation of Cdc2, and inducing Cdk inhibitors p27 and p21. HAs also induced phosphorylation of upstream signals related to G2/M arrest such as phosphorylation of Cdc25C tyrosine phosphatase at Ser216, increasing the binding of pCdc25C with 14-3-3 protein. HAs-induced phosphorylation of Cdc25C could be activated by ATM checkpoint kinases, Chk1, and Chk2. We first time confirmed that ATM-Chk1/2-Cdc25C pathway as a critical mechanism for G2/M arrest in HAs-induced leukemia cell cycle arrest, indicating that this compound could be a promising anticancer candidate or chemopreventive agents for further investigation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1290-1304, 2017.

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Cytotoxic and Apoptogenic Effects of Several Coumarins on Human Cancer Cell Lines: Osthole Induces Apoptosis in p53-Deficient H1299 Cells.

    PubMed

    Shokoohinia, Yalda; Hosseinzadeh, Leila; Alipour, Maryam; Mostafaie, Ali; Mohammadi-Motlagh, Hamid-Reza

    2014-01-01

    Natural products are excellent resources for finding lead structures for the development of chemotherapeutic agents. Coumarins are a class of natural compounds found in a variety of plants. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxic potential of coumarins isolated from Prangos ferulacea (L.) Lindl. in PC3, SKNMC, and H1299 (p53 null) human carcinoma cell lines. Osthole proved to be an outstanding potent cytotoxic agent especially against PC3 cells. Isoimperatorin exhibited moderate inhibitory effect against SKNMC and PC3 cell lines. Oxypeucedanin and braylin did not display any cytotoxic activity. In the next set of experiments, the apoptotic potentials of osthole and isoimperatorin were investigated. Induction of apoptosis by isoimperatorin was accompanied by an increase in activation of caspase-3, -8, and -9 in SKNMC cells and caspase-3 and -9 in PC3 cells. Moreover, isoimperatorin induced apoptosis by upregulating Bax and Smac/DIABLO genes in PC3 and SKNMC cells. Osthole induced apoptosis by downregulating antiapoptotic Bcl-2 in only PC3 cells and upregulating the proapoptotic genes Bax and Smac/DIABLO in PC3, SKNMC, and H1299 cells. The effects of osthole on H1299 cells are important because the loss of p53 has been associated with poor clinical prognosis in cancer treatment.

  12. Maslinic Acid, a Natural Triterpene, Induces a Death Receptor-Mediated Apoptotic Mechanism in Caco-2 p53-Deficient Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Zurita, Fernando J.; Rufino-Palomares, Eva E.; García-Salguero, Leticia; Peragón, Juan; Medina, Pedro P.; Parra, Andrés; Cascante, Marta; Lupiáñez, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Maslinic acid (MA) is a natural triterpene present in high concentrations in the waxy skin of olives. We have previously reported that MA induces apoptotic cell death via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in HT29 colon cancer cells. Here, we show that MA induces apoptosis in Caco-2 colon cancer cells via the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in a dose-dependent manner. MA triggered a series of effects associated with apoptosis, including the cleavage of caspases -8 and -3, and increased the levels of t-Bid within a few hours of its addition to the culture medium. MA had no effect on the expression of the Bax protein, release of cytochrome-c or on the mitochondrial membrane potential. This suggests that MA triggered the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in this cell type, as opposed to the intrinsic pathway found in the HT29 colon-cancer cell line. Our results suggest that the apoptotic mechanism induced in Caco-2 may be different from that found in HT29 colon-cancer cells, and that in Caco-2 cells MA seems to work independently of p53. Natural antitumoral agents capable of activating both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways could be of great use in treating colon-cancer of whatever origin. PMID:26751572

  13. Early immunisation with dendritic cells after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation elicits graft vs tumour reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Gigi, V; Stein, J; Askenasy, N; Yaniv, I; Ash, S

    2013-01-01

    Background: Perspectives of immunotherapy to cancer mediated by bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in conjunction with dendritic cell (DC)-mediated immune sensitisation have yielded modest success so far. In this study, we assessed the impact of DC on graft vs tumour (GvT) reactions triggered by allogeneic BMT. Methods: H2Ka mice implanted with congenic subcutaneous Neuro-2a neuroblastoma (NB, H2Ka) tumours were irradiated and grafted with allogeneic H2Kb bone marrow cells (BMC) followed by immunisation with tumour-inexperienced or tumour-pulsed DC. Results: Immunisation with tumour-pulsed donor DC after allogeneic BMT suppressed tumour growth through induction of T cell-mediated NB cell lysis. Early post-transplant administration of DC was more effective than delayed immunisation, with similar efficacy of DC inoculated into the tumour and intravenously. In addition, tumour inexperienced DC were equally effective as tumour-pulsed DC in suppression of tumour growth. Immunisation of DC did not impact quantitative immune reconstitution, however, it enhanced T-cell maturation as evident from interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion, proliferation in response to mitogenic stimulation and tumour cell lysis in vitro. Dendritic cells potentiate GvT reactivity both through activation of T cells and specific sensitisation against tumour antigens. We found that during pulsing with tumour lysate DC also elaborate a factor that selectively inhibits lymphocyte proliferation, which is however abolished by humoral and DC-mediated lymphocyte activation. Conclusion: These data reveal complex involvement of antigen-presenting cells in GvT reactions, suggesting that the limited success in clinical application is not a result of limited efficacy but suboptimal implementation. Although DC can amplify soluble signals from NB lysates that inhibit lymphocyte proliferation, early administration of DC is a dominant factor in suppression of tumour growth. PMID:23511628

  14. Diagnosing Musculoskeletal Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Simon R.; Spooner, David; Sneath, Rodney S.

    2001-01-01

    In 1993 we became aware of a worrying increase in apparent errors in the histopathological diagnosis of musculoskeletal tumours in our Unit. As a result all cases seen over the past 8 years were reviewed by an independent panel. Of the 1996 cases reviewed there was an error in 87. In 54 cases (2.7%) this had led to some significant change in the active management of the patient. The main areas where errors arose were in those very cases where clinical and radiological features were not helpful in confirming or refuting the diagnosis. The incidence of errors rose with the passage of time, possibly related to a deterioration in the pathologist’s health. The error rate in diagnosing bone tumours in previously published series ranges from 9 to 40%. To ensure as accurate a rate of diagnosis as possible multidisciplinary working and regular audit are essential. PMID:18521309

  15. Cranial irradiation in childhood decreases likelihood of marriage.

    PubMed

    2009-11-18

    Adults who have survived childhood cancer are less likely to get married than their peers. Those who had central nervous system tumours, cranial irradiation, impaired processing efficiency and short stature were least likely to marry.

  16. Tumours of the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Svend W.; Mackey, L. J.; Misdorp, W.

    1976-01-01

    The most frequent renal tumours of animals are renal cell carcinoma and nephroblastoma. Renal cell carcinomas are seen mainly in dogs and cattle and nephroblastoma is encountered in pigs, puppies, and calves. Renal cell carcinomas are usually papillary in the dog. They show a marked propensity for vascular invasion, penetration of the posterior vena cava, and subsequent pulmonary metastasis. Nephroblastoma, which is morphologically identical to Wilms' tumour of children, is almost always a benign tumour in animals. It is one of the most frequent neoplasms of pigs, possibly owing to the fact that most pigs are slaughtered (and examined) when a few months old. Lymphosarcoma involving the kidney is particularly frequent in the cat, but is also seen in other species as part of a generalized disease. ImagesFig. 5,6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 1,2Fig. 3,4Fig. 16,17,18,19Fig. 9,10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14,15 PMID:1086154

  17. [Adrenal tumours in childhood].

    PubMed

    Martos-Moreno, G A; Pozo-Román, J; Argente, J

    2013-09-01

    This special article aims to summarise the current knowledge regarding the two groups of tumours with their origin in the adrenal gland: 1) adrenocortical tumours, derived from the cortex of the adrenal gland and 2) phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas, neuroendocrine tumours derived from nodes of neural crest derived cells symmetrically distributed at both sides of the entire spine (paragangliomas [PG]). These PGs can be functioning tumors that secrete catecholamines, which confers their typical dark colour after staining with chromium salts (chromaffin tumors). Among these, the term phaeochromocytoma (PC) is restricted to those PGs derived from the chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla (intra-adrenal PGs), whereas the term PG is used for those sympathetic or parasympathetic ones in an extra-adrenal location. We analyse the state of the art of their pathogenic and genetic bases, as well as their clinical signs and symptoms, the tests currently available for performing their diagnosis (biochemical, hormonal, imaging and molecular studies) and management (surgery, pre- and post-surgical medical treatment), considering the current and developing strategies in chemo- and radiotherapy.

  18. [Malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumours: Two case reports and complete review of the literature cases].

    PubMed

    Le Fèvre, C; Castelli, J; Perrin, C; Hénaux, P L; Noël, G

    2016-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours are extremely rare and can be associated with neurofibramatosis type 1. Their prognosis is poor and surgery remains the mainstay of therapy and should be the first line of treatment. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are second line treatment and their effectiveness remains to demonstrate. The diagnosis is clinical, radiological, histological and immunohistochemical. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours have a potential of local tumour recurrence very high and can metastasize. They often occur in extremity of the members but also rarely into brain. We report two cases of intracerebral nerve sheath tumour. The first was a 68-year-old woman who was admitted with progressive symptoms of headache and diplopia. A left frontotemporal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours was diagnosed and was treated by surgery and irradiation. Ten months later, she presented a local recurrence and spine bone's metastases were treated by vertebroplasty and irradiation. The patient died 15 months after the diagnosis. The second case was a 47-year-old woman who was referred because headache and vomiting symptoms. A right frontal malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours was diagnosed and treated by surgery and irradiation. After that, the patient had three local recurrence operated and pulmonary and cranial bone's metastases. She was still alive after 20 months. We propose a literature review with 25 cases of intracerebral nerve sheath tumour identified, including the two current cases.

  19. [Phyllodes tumour: a rare, rapidly growing breast tumour].

    PubMed

    den Exter, Paul L; Hornstra, Bonne J; Vree, Robbert

    2009-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman presented at the breast outpatient clinic with a giant tumour of her left breast. The size, rapid growth and radiological characteristics of the lesion led us to suspect a phyllodes tumour. A histological examination of a needle biopsy confirmed this diagnosis. An additional CT scan revealed no signs of metastases. We performed a mastectomy during which a tumour measuring 48 x 33 x 25 cm was resected. Histological examination revealed a borderline phyllodes tumour. Phyllodes tumours are rare fibroepithelial neoplasms of the breast and pre-operatively these are often difficult to differentiate from fibroadenomas. Phyllodes tumours have a variable clinical course with the ability to metastasize and a propensity to recur locally. Complete excision with wide margins is essential to prevent local recurrence. In our case, the surgical margins were limited and our patient was therefore treated with postoperative radiation therapy.

  20. Clinical features of gastroenteropancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) endocrine tumours (carcinoids and pancreatic islet cell tumours) are composed of multipotent neuroendocrine cells that exhibit a unique ability to produce, store, and secrete biologically active substances and cause distinct clinical syndromes. The classification of GEP tumours as functioning or non-functioning is based on the presence of symptoms that accompany these syndromes secondary to the secretion of hormones, neuropeptides and/or neurotransmitters (functioning tumours). Non-functioning tumours are considered to be neoplasms of neuroendocrine differentiation that are not associated with obvious symptoms attributed to the hypersecretion of metabolically active substances. However, a number of these tumours are either capable of producing low levels of such substances, which can be detected by immunohistochemistry but are insufficient to cause symptoms related to a clinical syndrome, or alternatively, they may secrete substances that are either metabolically inactive or inappropriately processed. In some cases, GEP tumours are not associated with the production of any hormone or neurotransmitter. Both functioning and non-functioning tumours can also produce symptoms due to mass effects compressing vital surrounding structures. Gastroenteropancreatic tumours are usually classified further according to the anatomic site of origin: foregut (including respiratory tract, thymus, stomach, duodenum, and pancreas), midgut (including small intestine, appendix, and right colon), and hindgut (including transverse colon, sigmoid, and rectum). Within these subgroups the biological and clinical characteristics of the tumours vary considerably, but this classification is still in use because a significant number of previous studies, mainly observational, have used it extensively. PMID:26516377

  1. Immunology of naturally transmissible tumours.

    PubMed

    Siddle, Hannah V; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Naturally transmissible tumours can emerge when a tumour cell gains the ability to pass as an infectious allograft between individuals. The ability of these tumours to colonize a new host and to cross histocompatibility barriers contradicts our understanding of the vertebrate immune response to allografts. Two naturally occurring contagious cancers are currently active in the animal kingdom, canine transmissible venereal tumour (CTVT), which spreads among dogs, and devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), among Tasmanian devils. CTVT are generally not fatal as a tumour-specific host immune response controls or clears the tumours after transmission and a period of growth. In contrast, the growth of DFTD tumours is not controlled by the Tasmanian devil's immune system and the disease causes close to 100% mortality, severely impacting the devil population. To avoid the immune response of the host both DFTD and CTVT use a variety of immune escape strategies that have similarities to many single organism tumours, including MHC loss and the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines. However, both tumours appear to have a complex interaction with the immune system of their respective host, which has evolved over the relatively long life of these tumours. The Tasmanian devil is struggling to survive with the burden of this disease and it is only with an understanding of how DFTD passes between individuals that a vaccine might be developed. Further, an understanding of how these tumours achieve natural transmissibility should provide insights into general mechanisms of immune escape that emerge during tumour evolution. © 2014 The Authors. Immunology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Investigation on nanoparticle distribution for thermal ablation of a tumour subjected to nanoparticle assisted thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Soni, Sanjeev; Tyagi, Himanshu; Taylor, Robert A; Kumar, Amod

    2014-07-01

    This study investigates the effect of the distribution of nanoparticles delivered to a skin tumour for the thermal ablation conditions attained during thermal therapy. Ultimate aim is to define a distribution of nanoparticles as well as a combination of other therapeutic parameters to attain thermal ablation temperatures (50-60 °C) within whole of the tumour region. Three different cases of nanoparticle distributions are analysed under controlled conditions for all other parameters viz. irradiation intensity and duration, and volume fraction of nanoparticles. Results show that distribution of nanoparticles into only the periphery of tumour resulted in desired thermal ablation temperature in whole of tumour. For the tumour size considered in this study, an irradiation intensity of 1.25 W/cm(2) for duration of 300 s and a nanoparticle volume fraction of 0.001% was optimal to attain a temperature of ≥53 °C within the whole tumour region. It is concluded that distribution of nanoparticles in peripheral region of tumour, along with a controlled combination of other parameters, seems favourable and provides a promising pathway for thermal ablation of a tumour subjected to nanoparticle assisted thermal therapy.

  3. Metabolic scaling in solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Milotti, E.; Vyshemirsky, V.; Sega, M.; Stella, S.; Chignola, R.

    2013-01-01

    Tumour metabolism is an outstanding topic of cancer research, as it determines the growth rate and the global activity of tumours. Recently, by combining the diffusion of oxygen, nutrients, and metabolites in the extracellular environment, and the internal motions that mix live and dead cells, we derived a growth law of solid tumours which is linked to parameters at the cellular level1. Here we use this growth law to obtain a metabolic scaling law for solid tumours, which is obeyed by tumours of different histotypes both in vitro and in vivo, and we display its relation with the fractal dimension of the distribution of live cells in the tumour mass. The scaling behaviour is related to measurable parameters, with potential applications in the clinical practice. PMID:23727729

  4. Metabolic scaling in solid tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milotti, E.; Vyshemirsky, V.; Sega, M.; Stella, S.; Chignola, R.

    2013-06-01

    Tumour metabolism is an outstanding topic of cancer research, as it determines the growth rate and the global activity of tumours. Recently, by combining the diffusion of oxygen, nutrients, and metabolites in the extracellular environment, and the internal motions that mix live and dead cells, we derived a growth law of solid tumours which is linked to parameters at the cellular level. Here we use this growth law to obtain a metabolic scaling law for solid tumours, which is obeyed by tumours of different histotypes both in vitro and in vivo, and we display its relation with the fractal dimension of the distribution of live cells in the tumour mass. The scaling behaviour is related to measurable parameters, with potential applications in the clinical practice.

  5. VEGF targets the tumour cell

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Hira Lal; Mercurio, Arthur M.

    2014-01-01

    The function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cancer is not limited to angiogenesis and vascular permeability. VEGF-mediated signalling occurs in tumour cells, and this signalling contributes to key aspects of tumorigenesis, including the function of cancer stem cells and tumour initiation. In addition to VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases, the neuropilins are crucial for mediating the effects of VEGF on tumour cells, primarily because of their ability to regulate the function and the trafficking of growth factor receptors and integrins. This has important implications for our understanding of tumour biology and for the development of more effective therapeutic approaches. PMID:24263190

  6. VEGF targets the tumour cell.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2013-12-01

    The function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cancer is not limited to angiogenesis and vascular permeability. VEGF-mediated signalling occurs in tumour cells, and this signalling contributes to key aspects of tumorigenesis, including the function of cancer stem cells and tumour initiation. In addition to VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases, the neuropilins are crucial for mediating the effects of VEGF on tumour cells, primarily because of their ability to regulate the function and the trafficking of growth factor receptors and integrins. This has important implications for our understanding of tumour biology and for the development of more effective therapeutic approaches.

  7. Imaging biomarkers of brain tumour margin and tumour invasion.

    PubMed

    Price, S J; Gillard, J H

    2011-12-01

    Invasion of tumour cells into the normal brain is one of the major reasons of treatment failure for gliomas. Although there is a good understanding of the molecular and cellular processes that occur during this invasion, it is not possible to detect the extent of the tumour with conventional imaging. However, there is an understanding that the degree of invasion differs with individual tumours, and yet they are all treated the same. Newer imaging techniques that probe the pathological changes within tumours may be suitable biomarkers for invasion. Imaging methods are now available that can detect subtle changes in white matter organisation (diffusion tensor imaging), tumour metabolism and cellular proliferation (using MR spectroscopy and positron emission tomography) occurring in regions of tumour that cannot be detected by conventional imaging. The role of such biomarkers of invasion should allow better delineation of tumour margins, which should improve treatment planning (especially surgery and radiotherapy) and provide information on the invasiveness of an individual tumour to help select the most appropriate therapy and help stratify patients for clinical trials.

  8. Uterine Tumour Resembling Ovarian Sex Cord Tumour- A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Ilhan, Tolgay Tuyan; Gül, Ayhan; Ugurluoglu, Ceyhan; Çelik, Çetin

    2016-01-01

    Uterine Tumour Resembling Ovarian Sex-Cord Tumours (UTROSCTs) are an extremely rare type of uterine body tumours arising from the endometrial stroma. Epidemiology, aetiology, pathogenesis, management and natural history of UTROSCTs are still a question of debate, as there is little available data in the literature. Although rare, the possibility of UTROSCTs should be kept in mind, when a patient presents with abnormal bleeding and an enlarged uterus. UTROSCTs appear dirty white/cream-coloured, gelatinous, well-circumscribed mass with smooth surface on macroscopic examination. We present a rare case of endometrial stromal tumour with sex-cord-like differentiation which was successfully treated by hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. The clinical manifestations, pathologic characteristics, diagnosis and management of these tumours are reviewed here. PMID:28208949

  9. [Pelvic irradiation in prostate cancer: what place for what volumes?].

    PubMed

    Chapet, O; Enachescu, C; Lorchel, F

    2013-10-01

    External beam radiotherapy alone is a standard treatment for prostate cancer. According to clinical, histological and biological characteristics of the tumour, lymph node irradiation can be done in combination with irradiation of the prostate. The completion of pelvic irradiation remains controversial and may cause complications by increasing volumes of irradiated healthy tissues. The accuracy of the delineation of lymph node becomes an important issue. This article proposes to take on the characteristics of the pelvic lymph node drainage of the prostate, to review the literature on pelvic irradiation and the definition of volumes to be irradiated.

  10. Giant cell tumour of the mandibular condyle.

    PubMed

    Della Sala, S W; Recla, M; Campolongo, F; Bortot, G; Bauer, M; Peterlongo, P

    1996-01-01

    The authors report a case of giant cell tumour of the mandibular condyle, which is a rare finding. This tumour, studied using the main three radiological modalities (plain radiography, CT and MRI) showed characteristic radiological features of "giant cell tumour".

  11. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  12. Intraspinal tumours in the Kenya African.

    PubMed

    Ruberti, R F; Carmagnani, A L

    1976-06-01

    Thirty-one cases of intraspinal tumours in the African have been described, with age, sex incidence, frequency, site and histopathology shown. Intraspinal tumours in this series are compared with the larger series. Extradural and intramedullary tumours together with cervical spine tumours appear to be more frequent in this series. There is a high incidence of dumbell tumours in the neurinomas. Sarcomas are the most common type of tumours and mainly affect the thoracic spine.

  13. Sclerostin expression in bone tumours and tumour-like lesions.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Yusuke; Hookway, Edward S; Kashima, Takeshi G; Munemoto, Mitsuru; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Hassan, Andrew Bassim; Oppermann, Udo; Athanasou, Nick A

    2016-09-01

    To assess the immunophenotypic and mRNA expression of sclerostin in human skeletal tissues and in a wide range of benign and malignant bone tumours and tumour-like lesions. Sclerostin expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In lamellar and woven bone, there was strong sclerostin expression by osteocytes. Osteoblasts and other cell types in bone were negative. Hypertrophic chondrocytes in the growth plate and mineralized cartilage cells in zone 4 of hyaline articular cartilage strongly expressed sclerostin, but most chondrocytes in hyaline cartilage were negative. In primary bone-forming tumours, including osteosarcomas, there was patchy expression of sclerostin in mineralized osteoid and bone. Sclerostin staining was seen in woven bone in fibrous dysplasia, in osteofibrous dysplasia, and in reactive bone formed in fracture callus, in myositis ossificans, and in the wall of solitary bone cysts and aneurysmal bone cysts. Sclerostin was expressed by hypertrophic chondrocytes in osteochondroma and chondroblasts in chondroblastoma, but not by tumour cells in other bone tumours, including myeloma and metastatic carcinoma. mRNA expression of sclerostin was identified by quantitative PCR in osteosarcoma specimens and cell lines. Sclerostin is an osteocyte marker that is strongly expressed in human woven and lamellar bone and mineralizing chondrocytes. This makes it a useful marker with which to identify benign and malignant osteogenic tumours and mineralizing cartilage tumours, such as chondroblastomas and other lesions in which there is bone formation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Benign hepatic tumours and tumour like conditions in men.

    PubMed Central

    Karhunen, P J

    1986-01-01

    In a consecutive medicolegal necropsy series benign hepatic tumours and tumour like conditions occurred in 52% of the 95 men aged 35-69 years. The incidence increased with age, mainly due to small bile duct tumours (n = 26; mean age 56.7 years; p less than 0.01; mean size 1.3 mm). The next most common tumours were cavernous hemangiomas (n = 19; mean age 53.9 years; mean size 5.2 mm) that were not related to age. Focal nodular hyperplasia (n = 3; mean size 8.0 mm) tended to occur in a younger age group (mean age 40.3 years; p less than 0.001). Multiple bile duct tumours were present in 46% and hemangiomas in 50% of the men studied. Liver cell adenoma, nodular regenerative hyperplasia, and peliosis hepatis were incidental findings (one case of each). Nodular regenerative hyperplasia was associated with the consumption of alcohol and a total dose of 21.5 g of testosterone. These results indicate that benign hepatic tumours and tumour like conditions are not rare in men but may remain undetected because of their small size. Images PMID:3950039

  15. Metabolic reprogramming of the tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yazhi; Zhao, Shimin; Zhou, Binhua P; Mi, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Tumour cells, stromal cells and the stroma comprise the tumour microenvironment. The metabolism of both tumour cells and several types of tumour stromal cells, such as cancer-associated fibroblasts and tumour-associated macrophages, is reprogrammed. Current studies have found that stromal cells promote tumour progression and metastasis, through not only the paracrine secretion of cytokines or chemokines, but also intermediate metabolites. Here, we summarize the latest insights into the mechanism of metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts and tumour-associated macrophages, and their potential roles in tumour progression and metastasis. © 2015 FEBS.

  16. Recurrent hyperphosphatemic tumoural calcinosis

    PubMed Central

    Amit, Sonal; Agarwal, Asha; Nigam, Anand; Rao, Yashwant Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Tumoural calcinosis (TC) is a benign gradually developing disorder that can occur in a variety of clinical settings, characterised by subcutaneous deposition of calcium phosphate with or without giant cell reaction. We describe a case of 11-year-old girl presenting with recurrent hard swellings in the vicinity of shoulder and hip joints associated with elevated serum phosphate and normal serum calcium levels. TC has been mainly reported from Africa, with very few cases reported from India. After the diagnosis of hyperphosphatemic TC was established, the patient was treated with oral sevelamer and is under constant follow-up to detect recurrence, if any. The present case highlights the fact that although an uncommon lesion, TC must be considered in the differential diagnosis of subcutaneous hard lump in the vicinity of a joint. PMID:23010461

  17. Diagnostics of neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Hodolic, M; Fettich, J; Banti, E; Chondrogiannis, S; Al-Nahhas, A; Rubello, D

    2010-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are rare pathologies which origin from neuroectodermic and endodermic cells and that can produce peptides and amino acids. About 70% of NETs derive from gastroenterohepatic (GEP) system and the other 30% from the different sites through the body. They are distinguished into single and multiple localizations and also into sporadic, familial multiple endocrine-related forms and recurrent forms. Moreover, when they produce hormones they usually are symptomatic; yet, they are characterized by the synthesis and secretion in the blood stream of several tumor-specific markers or can express somatostatin receptors in their cellular surface. The diagnosis and follow-up of NETs rely on laboratory studies, histopathology and the combination of anatomical and functional imaging, with the latter being the main method for monitoring response to therapy. In recent years, nuclear medicine has contributed to the impressive development of the knowledge of NETs in terms of biology (receptor scintigraphy), pharmacology (development of new tracers) and therapy (radiometabolic therapy). Nuclear medicine procedures for diagnosis and treatment of NETs are based on the biological properties of these tumours: the expression of somatostatin receptors. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy not only has a crucial role in diagnosis and staging of NETs, but also in assessing suitability for treatment with cold and radiolabelled somatostatin analogues, as well as in monitoring response to treatment and detecting recurrent disease. In conventional nuclear medicine, the two most important functional imaging modalities are ¹¹¹In-octrescan and ¹²³I-MIBG. Over the last 5 years, due to the development of new tracers, such as ⁶⁸Ga labelled-DOTA-peptides PET and ¹⁸F-DOPA, PET has also been employed with significant benefits in the diagnosis and management of NETs.

  18. Manipulation of oxygenation in a human tumour xenograft with BW12C or hydralazine: effects on responses to radiation and to the bioreductive cytotoxicity of misonidazole or RSU-1069.

    PubMed

    Cole, S; Robbins, L

    1989-11-01

    The influence of altered tumour oxygenation on the responses to radiation and/or bioreductive 2-nitroimidazole compounds was studied in a well differentiated, human, colon adenocarcinoma (MAWI), grown as a subcutaneous xenograft in nude mice. Tumour growth delays were measured after local, single 5-18 Gy doses of X-rays. BW12C, which inhibits dissociation of oxyhaemoglobin, produced radioprotection similar to that resulting from clamping off the tumour blood supply during irradiation. Hydralazine, a vasoactive agent, also appeared to give radioprotection. BW12C or misonidazole (MISO) alone had no measurable inhibitory effect on xenograft growth. Hydralazine or RSU-1069 slightly increased the time for tumours to reach 6 times their original volumes. When hydralazine was given 40 min after a dose of 800 mg/kg of MISO, without X-rays, growth delays in excess of 5 tumour volume doubling times resulted and fewer tumour cells were present in histological sections. Lower doses of MISO combined with hydralazine were ineffective. Other combinations of bioreductive cytotoxic agents and methods of manipulation of tumour blood flow/oxygenation induced slight and inconsistent growth delays. Hydralazine was injected after irradiation of tumours in mice previously treated with various doses of MISO in an attempt to exploit the bioreductive cytotoxic potential of MISO in conjunction with its radiosensitizing properties; however, tumour growth delays were similar with or without hydralazine after irradiation. Thus, post-irradiation restriction of tumour blood flow appears to be an ineffective therapeutic strategy in this human xenograft tumour model.

  19. Tumours of bones and joints

    PubMed Central

    Misdorp, W.; Van Der Heul, R. O.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of bones and joints are not infrequent in dogs but are rare in other domestic animals. In the dog, most bone tumours are malignant; osteosarcomas are by far the most frequently encountered tumours, especially in giant breeds and boxers. The following main categories of bone tumour are described: bone-forming, cartilage-forming, giant cell, marrow, vascular, miscellaneous, metastatic, unclassified, and tumour-like lesions. The tumours of joints and related structures are classified as synovial sarcomas, fibroxanthomas, and malignant giant cell tumour of soft tissues. ImagesFig. 21Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 17Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 29Fig. 30Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 33Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 28Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 37Fig. 38Fig. 39Fig. 40Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12 PMID:1086157

  20. Murine Bioluminescent Hepatic Tumour Model

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Simon; Salwa, Slawomir; Gao, Xuefeng; Tabirca, Sabin; O'Hanlon, Deirdre; O'Sullivan, Gerald C.; Tangney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This video describes the establishment of liver metastases in a mouse model that can be subsequently analysed by bioluminescent imaging. Tumour cells are administered specifically to the liver to induce a localised liver tumour, via mobilisation of the spleen and splitting into two, leaving intact the vascular pedicle for each half of the spleen. Lewis lung carcinoma cells that constitutively express the firefly luciferase gene (luc1) are inoculated into one hemi-spleen which is then resected 10 minutes later. The other hemi-spleen is left intact and returned to the abdomen. Liver tumour growth can be monitored by bioluminescence imaging using the IVIS whole body imaging system. Quantitative imaging of tumour growth using IVIS provides precise quantitation of viable tumour cells. Tumour cell death and necrosis due to drug treatment is indicated early by a reduction in the bioluminescent signal. This mouse model allows for investigating the mechanisms underlying metastatic tumour-cell survival and growth and can be used for the evaluation of therapeutics of liver metastasis. PMID:20689502

  1. [SDHB expression in Warthin's tumour].

    PubMed

    Vera-Sirera, Beatriz; Pérez-Rojas, Judith; López-Valdivia, Cecilia; Jiménez, Enrique; Collado-Martín, Diego; Vera-Sempere, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Succinic dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) is an enzyme belonging to the mitochondrial complex II. The aim of this study is to analyse SDHB expression in a series of Warthin's tumours, studying its relationship with oncocytic changes, constantly present in this form of tumour. In resection tumour specimens from a series of ten Warthin's tumours (all from the parotid gland), immunohistochemical expression of SDHB was analysed using a commercially-available monoclonal antibody. The Warthin's tumours studied affected 10 men (mean age: 64.2 yrs, range 40-80), all with smoking habits, and 2 with metachronous bilateral involvement. Two patients presented associated urothelial carcinoma. Our SDHB study showed marked reactivity (++/+++) in all cases in the oncocytic epithelial component and also in striated duct cytoplasm (+) from non-tumorous parotid tissue. Expression was not influenced by age, smoking intensity or bilateral character. One of the tumours showed squamous metaplasia foci with SDHB-negativity at this level. Due to the constant and intense SDHB reactivity in oncocytic cells in our observations, oncocytic changes are not considered to be associated with defective enzyme activity in the mitochondrial complex II. Strong SDHB reactivity is an additional marker of oncocytic changes in Warthin's tumour. Neither of these facts has been described previously. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Imaging characteristics of pleural tumours.

    PubMed

    De Paoli, Luca; Quaia, Emilio; Poillucci, Gabriele; Gennari, Antonio; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2015-12-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is doubtless the more known pleural tumour. However, according to the morphology code of the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O), there are several histological types of pleural neoplasms, divided into mesothelial, mesenchymal and lymphoproliferative tumours, that may be misdiagnosed. In this paper we summarise and illustrate the incidence aspects and the clinical, pathological and radiological features of these neoplasms. • According to the ICD-O, there are 11 different histological types of pleural neoplasm. • Imaging, clinical and histopathological aspects of these neoplasms may be overlapping. • Knowledge of different pleural tumours plays an important role for diagnosis orientation.

  3. Tumours of the nasal cavity*

    PubMed Central

    Stünzi, H.; Hauser, B.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of the nasal cavity are rare in domestic animals, most cases occurring in the dog. Epithelial tumours are the most common type in carnivores (dogs and cats). In general, the same types of tumour occur in domestic animals as occur in man. There was no significant predisposition for breed in dogs, but in both dogs and cats far more males than females were affected. Metastases occurred only rarely. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:1086156

  4. Microenvironmental regulation of tumour angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Michele; Biziato, Daniela; Petrova, Tatiana V

    2017-08-01

    Tumours display considerable variation in the patterning and properties of angiogenic blood vessels, as well as in their responses to anti-angiogenic therapy. Angiogenic programming of neoplastic tissue is a multidimensional process regulated by cancer cells in concert with a variety of tumour-associated stromal cells and their bioactive products, which encompass cytokines and growth factors, the extracellular matrix and secreted microvesicles. In this Review, we discuss the extrinsic regulation of angiogenesis by the tumour microenvironment, highlighting potential vulnerabilities that could be targeted to improve the applicability and reach of anti-angiogenic cancer therapies.

  5. Malignant phyllodes tumour with intraductal and invasive carcinoma and lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Korula, A; Varghese, J; Thomas, M; Vyas, F; Korula, A

    2008-11-01

    Phyllodes tumours constitute 2-3 percent of fibroepithelial breast tumours, with a 1-2 percent rate of malignancy. Metastasis is usually haematogeneous, and axillary lymph node dissection is not routinely performed. Carcinoma in a phyllodes tumour is distinctly uncommon, but has been known to occur in benign phyllodes tumours. We describe a 51-year-old woman with a malignant phyllodes tumour with foci of intraductal carcinoma within the tumour and adjacent breast tissue. Though the carcinoma was found to be invasive based on the presence of carcinomatous lymph node metastasis, extensive sampling did not yield an invasive component within the breast, probably because of the marked stromal overgrowth of the phyllodes. A malignant phyllodes tumour with foci of intraductal carcinoma and axillary lymph node metastases was diagnosed rather than carcinosarcoma. Chemotherapy and irradiation were included in the postoperative management. Coexistence of phyllodes tumour and carcinoma is rare, and extensive sampling may be necessary to find the foci of carcinoma within an extensive and obviously malignant stromal overgrowth. There is little consensus on the treatment and prognosis in these cases, and it is recommended that treatment be tailored to individual patients, based on the presence of invasion, lymph node metastasis and/or distant metastasis.

  6. Multicellular Streaming in Solid Tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kas, Josef

    As early as 400 BCE, the Roman medical encyclopaedist Celsus recognized that solid tumours are stiffer than surrounding tissue. However, cancer cell lines are softer, and softer cells facilitate invasion. This paradox raises several questions: Does softness emerge from adaptation to mechanical and chemical cues in the external microenvironment, or are soft cells already present inside a primary solid tumour? If the latter, how can a more rigid tissue contain more soft cells? Here we show that in primary tumour samples from patients with mammary and cervix carcinomas, cells do exhibit a broad distribution of rigidities, with a higher fraction of softer and more contractile cells compared to normal tissue. Mechanical modelling based on patient data reveals that, surprisingly, tumours with a significant fraction of very soft cells can still remain rigid. Moreover, in tissues with the observed distributions of cell stiffnesses, softer cells spontaneously self-organize into lines or streams, possibly facilitating cancer metastasis.

  7. Quantifying tumour heterogeneity with CT

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Heterogeneity is a key feature of malignancy associated with adverse tumour biology. Quantifying heterogeneity could provide a useful non-invasive imaging biomarker. Heterogeneity on computed tomography (CT) can be quantified using texture analysis which extracts spatial information from CT images (unenhanced, contrast-enhanced and derived images such as CT perfusion) that may not be perceptible to the naked eye. The main components of texture analysis can be categorized into image transformation and quantification. Image transformation filters the conventional image into its basic components (spatial, frequency, etc.) to produce derived subimages. Texture quantification techniques include structural-, model- (fractal dimensions), statistical- and frequency-based methods. The underlying tumour biology that CT texture analysis may reflect includes (but is not limited to) tumour hypoxia and angiogenesis. Emerging studies show that CT texture analysis has the potential to be a useful adjunct in clinical oncologic imaging, providing important information about tumour characterization, prognosis and treatment prediction and response. PMID:23545171

  8. Is sensitization with nicotinamide and carbogen dependent on nicotinamide concentration at the time of irradiation?

    PubMed

    Rojas, A; Stratford, M R L; Bentzen, S M; Denekamp, J

    2004-07-01

    To determine whether tumour radiosensitization and the therapeutic benefit of administering carbogen with nicotinamide depend upon irradiating at the time of peak drug concentration. Local tumour control of CaNT tumours in CBA mice and acute skin reactions in albino WHT mice were assessed after treatment with 10 X-ray fractions in air, carbogen alone or combined with 0.1, 0.2 or 0.5 mg g(-1) nicotinamide, injected 15, 30 or 60 min before irradiation. Plasma and tumour drug pharmacokinetics were performed. Nicotinamide was rapidly taken up into tumours; a six- and threefold higher concentration was obtained with 0.5 mg g(-1) compared with 0.1 and 0.2 mg g(-1), respectively. Tumour, but not skin, radiosensitization increased as the dose of nicotinamide increased (p = 0.03), but at each dose level there was no significant difference in radiosensitivity when irradiations were done at or after the time of peak concentration. An almost eightfold increase in plasma levels increased tumour enhancement ratios from 1.74 to 1.92 (p < 0.0001). In tumours all schedules gave significant enhancement relative to carbogen alone (p < or = 0.04). Tumour and skin radiosensitivity was independent of time of nicotinamide administration. Higher drug concentrations were not mirrored by proportionally higher enhancement ratios. Lower plasma levels than previously suggested significantly enhanced tumour radiosensitivity relative to carbogen alone. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  9. Primitive neuroectodermal adrenal gland tumour.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Y P; Lang, Brian H H; Tam, S C; Wong, K P

    2014-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma, also called primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the adrenal gland, is extremely rare. Only a few cases have been reported in the literature. We report on a woman with adult-onset primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the adrenal gland presenting with progressive flank pain. Computed tomography confirmed an adrenal tumour with invasion of the left diaphragm and kidney. Radical surgery was performed and the pain completely resolved; histology confirmed the presence of primitive neuroectodermal tumour, for which she was given chemotherapy. The clinical presentation of this condition is non-specific, and a definitive diagnosis is based on a combination of histology, as well as immunohistochemical and cytogenic analysis. According to the literature, these tumours demonstrate rapid growth and aggressive behaviour but there are no well-established guidelines or treatment strategies. Nevertheless, surgery remains the mainstay of local disease control; curative surgery can be performed in most patients. Adjuvant chemoirradiation has been advocated yet no consensus is available. The prognosis of patients with primitive neuroectodermal tumours remains poor.

  10. Mitomycin C in combination with radiotherapy as a potent inhibitor of tumour cell repopulation in a human squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Budach, W; Paulsen, F; Welz, S; Classen, J; Scheithauer, H; Marini, P; Belka, C; Bamberg, M

    2002-01-01

    The potential of Mitomycin C in combination with fractionated irradiation to inhibit tumour cell repopulation of a fast growing squamous cell carcinoma after fractionated radiotherapy was investigated in vivo. A rapidly growing human squamous cell carcinoma (FaDudd) was used for the study. For experiments, NMRI (nu/nu) mice with subcutaneously growing tumours were randomly allocated to no treatment, Mitomycin C, fractionated irradiation (ambient: 11x4.5 Gy in 15 days), or fractionated irradiation combined with Mitomycin C. Graded top up doses (clamped blood flow: 0–57 Gy) were given at day 16, 23, 30 or 37. End point of the study was the time to local tumour progression. Data were examined by multiple regression analysis (Cox). Mitomycin C alone resulted in a median time to local tumour progression of 23 (95% confidence limits: 17–43) days, fractionated irradiation in 31 (25–35) days and combined Mitomycin C plus fractionated irradiation in 65 (58–73) days (P=0.02). Mitomycin C decreased the relative risk of local recurrence by 94% (P<<0.001) equivalent to 31.7 Gy top up dose. Repopulation accounted for 1.33 (0.95–1.72) Gy per day top up dose after fractionated irradiation alone and for 0.68 (0.13–1.22) Gy per day after fractionated irradiation+Mitomycin C (P=0.018). Mitomycin C significantly reduces the risk of local recurrence and inhibits tumour cell repopulation in combination with fractionated irradiation in vivo in the tested tumour model. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 470–476. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600081 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 The Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11875717

  11. A critique of the evidence for active host defence against cancer, based on personal studies of 27 murine tumours of spontaneous origin.

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, H. B.; Blake, E. R.; Walder, A. S.

    1976-01-01

    Extensive experience with isotransplants of 27 different tumours (leukaemias, sarcomata, carcinomata), all of strictly spontaneous origin in laboratory bred mice of low cancer strains CBA/Ht and WHT/Ht, has revealed no evidence of tumour immunogenicity. Of approximately 20,000 maintenance transplants, none failed and none regressed; of almost 10,000 carefully observed tumours arising from small or minimal inocula of tumour cells, none spontaneously regressed. The number of injected viable tumour cells required to give a 50% probability of successful transplantation (the TD50) ranged from approximately 1 cell to greater than 10,000 cells among the 27 tumours; high TD50 values, which were dramatically reduced by various procedures having no immunological significance, did not signify active "resistance" of the hosts. In the case of all of 7 randomly selected tumours, prior "immunization" of recipients with homologous lethally irradiated cells increased their tumour receptivity. Several experiments using various tumours failed to give evidence that immunity could be non-specifically induced or that a massive preponderance of lymphocytes from specifically sensitized mice could inhibit tumour transplantation or growth in vivo; no trace of "resistance" to tumour was adopted by isogeneic recipients of lymphocytes from regional nodes of tumour bearers. A limited review of the recent literature on tumour immunity shows that practically all the animal data presented in support of a general theory of tumour immunogenicity or to provide a basis for active clinical immunotherapy have been obtained from transplanted tumour systems which entail artefactual immunity associated with viral or chemical induction of the tumours or their allogeneic transplantation. It is suggested that isotransplants of spontaneously arising tumours are the only appropriate models of human cancer and that any genuine rapport between the animal laboratory and the clinic requires their exclusive use

  12. Microsatellite instability in thyroid tumours and tumour-like lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lazzereschi, D; Palmirotta, R; Ranieri, A; Ottini, L; Verì, M C; Cama, A; Cetta, F; Nardi, F; Colletta, G; Mariani-Costantini, R

    1999-01-01

    Fifty-one thyroid tumours and tumour-like lesions were analysed for instability at ten dinucleotide microsatellite loci and at two coding mononucleotide repeats within the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) type II receptor (TβRII) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) receptor (IGFIIR) genes respectively. Microsatellite instability (MI) was detected in 11 out of 51 cases (21.5%), including six (11.7%) with MI at one or two loci and five (9.8%) with Ml at three or more loci (RER+ phenotype). No mutations in the TβRII and IGFIIR repeats were observed. The overall frequency of MI did not significantly vary in relation to age, gender, benign versus malignant status and tumour size. However, widespread MI was significantly more frequent in follicular adenomas and carcinomas than in papillary and Hürthle cell tumours: three out of nine tumours of follicular type (33.3%) resulted in replication error positive (RER+), versus 1 out of 29 papillary carcinomas (3.4%, P = 0.01), and zero out of eight Hürthle cell neoplasms. Regional lymph node metastases were present in five MI-negative primary cancers and resulted in MI-positive in two cases. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:9888478

  13. Therapy-induced tumour secretomes promote resistance and tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Obenauf, Anna C.; Zou, Yilong; Ji, Andrew L.; Vanharanta, Sakari; Shu, Weiping; Shi, Hubing; Kong, Xiangju; Bosenberg, Marcus C.; Wiesner, Thomas; Rosen, Neal; Lo, Roger S.; Massagué, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance invariably limits the clinical efficacy of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors against cancer1,2. Here we show that targeted therapy with BRAF, ALK, or EGFR kinase inhibitors induces a complex network of secreted signals in drug-stressed melanoma and lung adenocarcinoma cells. This therapy-induced secretome (TIS) stimulates the outgrowth, dissemination, and metastasis of drug-resistant cancer cell clones and supports the survival of drug-sensitive cancer cells, contributing to incomplete tumour regression. The vemurafenib reactive secretome in melanoma is driven by down-regulation of the transcription factor FRA1. In situ transcriptome analysis of drug-resistant melanoma cells responding to the regressing tumour microenvironment revealed hyperactivation of multiple signalling pathways, most prominently the AKT pathway. Dual inhibition of RAF and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways blunted the outgrowth of the drug-resistant cell population in BRAF mutant melanoma tumours, suggesting this combination therapy as a strategy against tumour relapse. Thus, therapeutic inhibition of oncogenic drivers induces vast secretome changes in drug-sensitive cancer cells, paradoxically establishing a tumour microenvironment that supports the expansion of drug-resistant clones, but is susceptible to combination therapy. PMID:25807485

  14. Vasoproliferative tumours of the retina

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, H.; Bornfeld, N.; Vij, O.; Coupland, S.; Bechrakis, N.; Kellner, U.; Foerster, M.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Vasoproliferative tumours of the retina (VPTR) are benign tumours of unknown origin, occurring mostly in otherwise healthy patients. VPTR may be associated with other chorioretinal diseases, such as uveitis. The tumours, which histologically represent reactive gliovascular proliferations, are characterised by a pink to yellow appearance on funduscopy and are accompanied by exudative and haemorrhagic changes of the retina.
METHODS—22 cases of VPTR in 21 patients were examined with a follow up period between 1 month and 6 years. Ophthalmological changes associated with VPTR were intraretinal and subretinal exudations (n=18), exudative detachments of the surrounding sensory retina (n=13), intraretinal and subretinal haemorrhages (n=10), exudative changes within the macula (n=10), hyperpigmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium at the border of the exudative retinal changes (n=9), and vitreous haemorrhages (n=4). Tumour biopsy was performed in two cases. Treatment consisted of plaque radiotherapy (n=14), plaque radiotherapy and cryotherapy (two), cryotherapy only (two), observation (three), and enucleation in one case of a blind and painful eye.
RESULTS—Regression of the tumour and the associated exudative changes could be observed in all treated cases. Visual acuity at last follow up improved two lines or more in two cases, remained within two lines of the initial visual acuity in 15 cases, and worsened in the remaining five. Histopathological examination of the biopsy specimens and the tumour of the enucleated eye showed massive capillary proliferation with perivascular spindle-shaped glial cells of retinal origin.
CONCLUSION—The correct diagnosis of VPTR is of importance as these lesions may lead to visual loss. Further, VPTR must be differentiated from angiomas associated with von Hippel-Lindau disease as well as from ocular and systemic malignancies. Regression of tumour thickness and associated retinal changes can be achieved with

  15. Multiple tumours in survival estimates.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Stefano; De Angelis, Roberta; Ciccolallo, Laura; Carrani, Eugenio; Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Grande, Enrico; Zigon, Giulia; Brenner, Hermann

    2009-04-01

    In international comparisons of cancer registry based survival it is common practice to restrict the analysis to first primary tumours and exclude multiple cancers. The probability of correctly detecting subsequent cancers depends on the registry's running time, which results in different proportions of excluded patients and may lead to biased comparisons. We evaluated the impact on the age-standardised relative survival estimates of also including multiple primary tumours. Data from 2,919,023 malignant cancers from 69 European cancer registries participating in the EUROCARE-4 collaborative study were used. A total of 183,683 multiple primary tumours were found, with an overall proportion of 6.3% over all the considered cancers, ranging from 0.4% (Naples, Italy) to 12.9% (Iceland). The proportion of multiple tumours varied greatly by type of tumour, being higher for those with high incidence and long survival (breast, prostate and colon-rectum). Five-year relative survival was lower when including patients with multiple cancers. For all cancers combined the average difference was -0.4 percentage points in women and -0.7 percentage points in men, and was greater for older registries. Inclusion of multiple tumours led to lower survival in 44 out of 45 cancer sites analysed, with the greatest differences found for larynx (-1.9%), oropharynx (-1.5%), and penis (-1.3%). Including multiple primary tumours in survival estimates for international comparison is advisable because it reduces the bias due to different observation periods, age, registration quality and completeness of registration. The general effect of inclusion is to reduce survival estimates by a variable amount depending on the proportion of multiple primaries and cancer site.

  16. The radiation response of cells from 9L gliosarcoma tumours is correlated with [F18]-EF5 uptake

    PubMed Central

    KOCH, CAMERON J.; SHUMAN, ANNE L.; JENKINS, WALTER T.; KACHUR, ALEXANDER V.; KARP, JOEL S.; FREIFELDER, RICHARD; DOLBIER, WILLIAM R.; EVANS, SYDNEY M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tumour hypoxia affects cancer biology and therapy-resistance in both animals and humans. The purpose of this study was to determine whether EF5 ([2-(2-nitro-1-H-imidazol-1-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl)-acetamide]) binding and/or radioactive drug uptake correlated with single-dose radiation response in 9L gliosarcoma tumours. Materials and methods Twenty-two 9L tumours were grown in male Fischer rats. Rats were administered low specific activity 18F-EF5 and their tumours irradiated and assessed for cell survival and hypoxia. Hypoxia assays included EF5 binding measured by antibodies against bound-drug adducts and gamma counts of 18F-EF5 tumour uptake compared with uptake by normal muscle and blood. These assays were compared with cellular radiation response (in vivo to in vitro assay). In six cases, uptake of tumour versus muscle was also assayed using images from a PET (positron emission tomography) camera (PENN G-PET). Results The intertumoural variation in radiation response of 9L tumour-cells was significantly correlated with uptake of 18F-labelled EF5 (i.e., including both bound and non-bound drug) using either tumour to muscle or tumour to blood gamma count ratios. In the tumours where imaging was performed, there was a significant correlation between the image analysis and gamma count analysis. Intertumoural variation in cellular radiation response of the same 22 tumours was also correlated with mean flow cytometry signal due to EF5 binding. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first animal model/drug combination demonstrating a correlation of radioresponse for tumour-cells from individual tumours with drug metabolism using either immunohistochemical or non-invasive techniques. PMID:19995239

  17. Tumour banking: the Spanish design.

    PubMed

    Morente, M M; de Alava, E; Fernandez, P L

    2007-01-01

    In the last decade the technical advances in high throughput techniques to analyze DNA, RNA and proteins have had a potential major impact on prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of many human diseases. Key pieces in this process, mainly thinking about the future, are tumour banks and tumour bank networks. To face these challenges, diverse suitable models and designs can be developed. The current article presents the development of a nationwide design of tumour banks in Spain based on a network of networks, specially focusing on its harmonization efforts mainly regarding technical procedures, ethical requirements, unified quality control policy and unique sample identification. We also describe our most important goals for the next years. This model does not correspond to a central tumour bank, but to a cooperative and coordinated network of national and regional networks. Independently from the network in which it is included, sample collections reside in their original institution, where it can be used for further clinical diagnosis, teaching and research activities of each independent hospital. The herein described 'network of networks' functional model could be useful for other countries and/or international tumour bank activities.

  18. A photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome for tumour control and simultaneous inhibition of treatment escape pathways

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Sears, R. Bryan; Zheng, Lei Zak; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles can facilitate multimodal therapies of cancer by promoting tumour-selective drug release. However, few are effective because cancer cells develop ways to resist and evade treatment. Here, we introduce a photoactivatable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome (PMIL) that imparts light-induced cytotoxicity in synchrony with photo-initiated and sustained release of inhibitors that suppress tumour regrowth and treatment escape signalling pathways. The PMIL consists of a nanoliposome doped with a photoactivatable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD) in the lipid bilayer, and a nanoparticle containing cabozantinib (XL184)—a multikinase inhibitor—encapsulated inside. Near infrared tumour irradiation, following intravenous PMIL administration, triggers photodynamic damage of tumour cells and microvessels, and simultaneously initiates release of XL184 inside the tumour. A single PMIL treatment achieves prolonged tumour reduction in two mouse models and suppresses metastatic escape in an orthotopic pancreatic tumour model. The PMIL offers new prospects for cancer therapy by enabling spatiotemporal control of drug release whilst reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities. PMID:26780659

  19. A photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome for tumour control and simultaneous inhibition of treatment escape pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Bryan Sears, R.; Zheng, Lei Zak; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles can facilitate multimodal therapies of cancer by promoting tumour-selective drug release. However, few are effective because cancer cells develop ways to resist and evade treatment. Here, we introduce a photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome (PMIL) that imparts light-induced cytotoxicity in synchrony with a photoinitiated and sustained release of inhibitors that suppress tumour regrowth and treatment escape signalling pathways. The PMIL consists of a nanoliposome doped with a photoactivable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD) in the lipid bilayer, and a nanoparticle containing cabozantinib (XL184)—a multikinase inhibitor—encapsulated inside. Near-infrared tumour irradiation, following intravenous PMIL administration, triggers photodynamic damage of tumour cells and microvessels, and simultaneously initiates release of XL184 inside the tumour. A single PMIL treatment achieves prolonged tumour reduction in two mouse models and suppresses metastatic escape in an orthotopic pancreatic tumour model. The PMIL offers new prospects for cancer therapy by enabling spatiotemporal control of drug release while reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities.

  20. A photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome for tumour control and simultaneous inhibition of treatment escape pathways.

    PubMed

    Spring, Bryan Q; Bryan Sears, R; Zheng, Lei Zak; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E; Schoenfeld, David A; Pogue, Brian W; Pereira, Stephen P; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles can facilitate multimodal therapies of cancer by promoting tumour-selective drug release. However, few are effective because cancer cells develop ways to resist and evade treatment. Here, we introduce a photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome (PMIL) that imparts light-induced cytotoxicity in synchrony with a photoinitiated and sustained release of inhibitors that suppress tumour regrowth and treatment escape signalling pathways. The PMIL consists of a nanoliposome doped with a photoactivable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD) in the lipid bilayer, and a nanoparticle containing cabozantinib (XL184)--a multikinase inhibitor--encapsulated inside. Near-infrared tumour irradiation, following intravenous PMIL administration, triggers photodynamic damage of tumour cells and microvessels, and simultaneously initiates release of XL184 inside the tumour. A single PMIL treatment achieves prolonged tumour reduction in two mouse models and suppresses metastatic escape in an orthotopic pancreatic tumour model. The PMIL offers new prospects for cancer therapy by enabling spatiotemporal control of drug release while reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities.

  1. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-01-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown. PMID:23238442

  2. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    PubMed

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  3. Multifocal multi-site Warthin tumour.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Jennifer M; Phillips, John S; Hellquist, Henrik B; Premachandra, Don J

    2008-12-01

    The unique case of a 55-year-old man with multifocal adenolymphoma (Warthin's tumour) of both parotid glands, the neck and post-nasal space is presented. Warthin tumour is almost exclusively a parotid tumour but is known to be bilateral in 7-10% of cases and multifocal in 2% of cases. Most extraglandular Warthin tumours have been located in neck lymph nodes and only a few cases have been reported from other sites. The presented case is unique in having synchronous and metachronous Warthin tumours, as well as one of the tumours being neither truly parotid, nor within a lymph node.

  4. Tumour-associated eosinophilia in the bladder.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, D; Fletcher, C D; Gower, R L

    1984-01-01

    Tumour eosinophilia is an uncommon but striking phenomenon which has been found in many tumours, mostly of large cell type or squamous differentiation. The incidence, appearance and importance of tumour eosinophilia in the bladder are described. Eosinophilia is commoner in deeply invasive tumours and in tumours showing squamous metaplasia. Transitional cell carcinomas with eosinophilia have a better prognosis than those without, but this improvement is not seen in squamous cell carcinomas of the bladder. When eosinophilia is found on superficial biopsies of a bladder tumour, the possibility of muscle invasion should be considered. PMID:6725595

  5. PHD2 in tumour angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, D A; Giaccia, A J

    2010-01-01

    Originally identified as the enzymes responsible for catalysing the oxidation of specific, conserved proline residues within hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), the additional roles for the prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD) proteins have remained elusive. Of the four identified PHD enzymes, PHD2 is considered to be the key oxygen sensor, as knockdown of PHD2 results in elevated HIF protein. Several recent studies have highlighted the importance of PHD2 in tumourigenesis. However, there is conflicting evidence as to the exact role of PHD2 in tumour angiogenesis. The divergence seems to be because of the contribution of stromal-derived PHD2, and in particular the involvement of endothelial cells, vs tumour-derived PHD2. This review summarises our current understanding of PHD2 and tumour angiogenesis, focusing on the influences of PHD2 on vascular normalisation and neovascularisation. PMID:20461086

  6. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, T H; Amin, M R; Bashar, M A; Ahmed, Z; Matin, A; Hasan, G Z; Islam, M D; Hossain, M Z

    2011-04-01

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour in infancy is rare, mainly benign with little tendency to recur after excision or effective curettage. This pigmented neoplasm of neural crest origin occurring in infants before 1 year of age. The most common site of occurrence is the anterior maxillary alveolar ridge (70%), following by the skull, brain and mandible. The genital organ is the most frequent extra cranial site. We report a 6 months old male baby with a similar tumour arising from right half of cheek involving the maxilla. We diagnosed the case after histological report. We remove the tumour through a sub-labial incision. The mass was blackish in colour, and was mobilized from all side including from the maxillary sinuses. The author thought that this should be reported for improving the clinical awareness and treatment of pigmented soft tissue mass in children. Almost one year follow up of the patients showed no recurrence.

  7. Tumour markers in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cove, D. H.; Woods, K. L.; Smith, S. C.; Burnett, D.; Leonard, J.; Grieve, R. J.; Howell, A.

    1979-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of 8 potential tumour markers has been evaluated in 69 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer and 57 patients with Stage III and IV. Serum CEA concentrations were raised in 13% of patients with local and 65% of those with advanced breast cancer. In patients with clinical evidence of progression or regression of tumour, serum CEA levels changed appropriately in 83% of cases. Taking 4 of the markers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), lactalbumin, alpha subunit and haptoglobin) serum concentrations of one or more were raised in 33% of patients with local disease and 81% of those with advanced breast cancer. However, marker concentrations were often only marginally raised, and are unlikely to provide sensitive guide to tumour burden. CEA, lactalbumin and alpha subunit were detectable in 68%, 43% and 40% respectively of extracts of primary breast cancers. PMID:92331

  8. Glioblastoma brain tumours: estimating the time from brain tumour initiation and resolution of a patient survival anomaly after similar treatment protocols.

    PubMed

    Murray, J D

    2012-01-01

    A practical mathematical model for glioblastomas (brain tumours), which incorporates the two key parameters of tumour growth, namely the cancer cell diffusion and the cell proliferation rate, has been shown to be clinically useful and predictive. Previous studies explain why multifocal recurrence is inevitable and show how various treatment scenarios have been incorporated in the model. In most tumours, it is not known when the cancer started. Based on patient in vivo parameters, obtained from two brain scans, it is shown how to estimate the time, after initial detection, when the tumour started. This is an input of potential importance in any future controlled clinical study of any connection between cell phone radiation and brain tumour incidence. It is also used to estimate more accurately survival times from detection. Finally, based on patient parameters, the solution of the model equation of the tumour growth helps to explain why certain patients live longer than others after similar treatment protocols specifically surgical resection (removal) and irradiation.

  9. Tumour endothelial cells in high metastatic tumours promote metastasis via epigenetic dysregulation of biglycan

    PubMed Central

    Maishi, Nako; Ohba, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Alam, Mohammad Towfik; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Inoue, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels are gateways for distant metastasis. Recent studies have revealed that tumour endothelial cells (TECs) demonstrate distinct phenotypes from their normal counterparts. We have demonstrated that features of TECs are different depending on tumour malignancy, suggesting that TECs communicate with surrounding tumour cells. However, the contribution of TECs to metastasis has not been elucidated. Here, we show that TECs actively promote tumour metastasis through a bidirectional interaction between tumour cells and TECs. Co-implantation of TECs isolated from highly metastatic tumours accelerated lung metastases of low metastatic tumours. Biglycan, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan secreted from TECs, activated tumour cell migration via nuclear factor-κB and extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2. Biglycan expression was upregulated by DNA demethylation in TECs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that TECs are altered in their microenvironment and, in turn, instigate tumour cells to metastasize, which is a novel mechanism for tumour metastasis. PMID:27295191

  10. Molecular radiotheranostics for neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Navalkissoor, Shaunak; Flux, Glenn; Bomanji, Jamshed

    2017-10-01

    This article discusses the important role of nuclear medicine imaging and therapy in the management of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy has a high impact on patient management versus conventional imaging. Molecular radiotherapy is an important part of the management of patients with NETs. Selection of patients for molecular radiotherapy in NETs is based on uptake on their radionuclide imaging study. The imaging agent has the same mechanism of uptake as the therapeutic agent. Thus, the imaging study preselects patients that are likely to concentrate radiation within their tumours. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  11. [Radionuclide therapy for neuroendocrine tumours].

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Jann; Oturai, Peter; Højgaard, Liselotte; Knigge, Ulrich; Hansen, Carsten Palnaes; Martiný, Lars; Rasmussen, Palle; Kjaer, Andreas

    2010-10-25

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy using somatostatin analogues labelled with beta-emitting isotopes can be given to patients with metastasized or inoperable neuroendocrine tumours provided these have increased uptake on octreotide scintigraphy. This is a brief review of the treatment principle, indications and contraindications and practices with (177)Lu-DOTATATE treatment used at Rigshospitalet. Side effects are generally mild and reversible. Severe long-term side effects are rare. The majority of patients will experience increased quality of life and partial tumour reduction or stabilization for a period of time. However, up to 20% will experience no treatment effect.

  12. Establishment of a small animal tumour model for in vivo studies with low energy laser accelerated particles.

    PubMed

    Brüchner, Kerstin; Beyreuther, Elke; Baumann, Michael; Krause, Mechthild; Oppelt, Melanie; Pawelke, Jörg

    2014-02-18

    The long-term aim of developing a laser based acceleration of protons and ions towards clinical application requires not only substantial technological progress, but also the radiobiological characterization of the resulting ultra-short pulsed particle beams. Recent in vitro data showed similar effects of laser-accelerated versus "conventional" protons on clonogenic cell survival. As the proton energies currently achieved by laser driven acceleration are too low to penetrate standard tumour models on mouse legs, the aim of the present work was to establish a tumour model allowing for the penetration of low energy protons (~ 20 MeV) to further verify their effects in vivo. KHT mouse sarcoma cells were injected subcutaneously in the right ear of NMRI (nu/nu) mice and the growing tumours were characterized with respect to growth parameters, histology and radiation response. In parallel, the laser system JETI was prepared for animal experimentation, i.e. a new irradiation setup was implemented and the laser parameters were carefully adjusted. Finally, a proof-of-principle experiment with laser accelerated electrons was performed to validate the tumour model under realistic conditions, i.e. altered environment and horizontal beam delivery. KHT sarcoma on mice ears showed a high take rate and continuous tumour growth after reaching a volume of ~ 5 mm(3). The first irradiation experiment using laser accelerated electrons versus 200 kV X-rays was successfully performed and tumour growth delay was evaluated. Comparable tumour growth delay was found between X-ray and laser accelerated electron irradiation. Moreover, experimental influences, like anaesthesia and positioning at JETI, were found to be negligible. A small animal tumour model suitable for the irradiation with low energy particles was established and validated at a laser based particle accelerator. Thus, the translation from in vitro to in vivo experimentation was for the first time realized allowing a broader

  13. Identification of human brain tumour initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sheila K; Hawkins, Cynthia; Clarke, Ian D; Squire, Jeremy A; Bayani, Jane; Hide, Takuichiro; Henkelman, R Mark; Cusimano, Michael D; Dirks, Peter B

    2004-11-18

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis suggests that neoplastic clones are maintained exclusively by a rare fraction of cells with stem cell properties. Although the existence of CSCs in human leukaemia is established, little evidence exists for CSCs in solid tumours, except for breast cancer. Recently, we prospectively isolated a CD133+ cell subpopulation from human brain tumours that exhibited stem cell properties in vitro. However, the true measures of CSCs are their capacity for self renewal and exact recapitulation of the original tumour. Here we report the development of a xenograft assay that identified human brain tumour initiating cells that initiate tumours in vivo. Only the CD133+ brain tumour fraction contains cells that are capable of tumour initiation in NOD-SCID (non-obese diabetic, severe combined immunodeficient) mouse brains. Injection of as few as 100 CD133+ cells produced a tumour that could be serially transplanted and was a phenocopy of the patient's original tumour, whereas injection of 10(5) CD133- cells engrafted but did not cause a tumour. Thus, the identification of brain tumour initiating cells provides insights into human brain tumour pathogenesis, giving strong support for the CSC hypothesis as the basis for many solid tumours, and establishes a previously unidentified cellular target for more effective cancer therapies.

  14. Effect of VEGF receptor inhibitor PTK787/ZK222548 combined with ionizing radiation on endothelial cells and tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Hess, C; Vuong, V; Hegyi, I; Riesterer, O; Wood, J; Fabbro, D; Glanzmann, C; Bodis, S; Pruschy, M

    2001-01-01

    The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor is a major target for anti-angiogenesis-based cancer treatment. Here we report the treatment effect of ionizing radiation in combination with the novel orally bioavailable VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 on endothelial cell proliferation in vitro and with tumour xenografts in vivo. Combined treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with increasing doses of PTK787/ZK222584 and ionizing radiation abrogated VEGF-dependent proliferation in a dose-dependent way, but inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation was not due to apoptosis induction. In vivo, a combined treatment regimen of PTK787/ZK222584 (4 × 100 mg/kg) during 4 consecutive days in combination with ionizing radiation (4 × 3 Gy) exerted a substantial tumour growth delay for radiation-resistant p53-disfunctional tumour xenografts derived from SW480 colon adenocarcinoma cells while each treatment modality alone had only a minimal effect on tumour size and neovascularization. SW480 tumours from animals that received a combined treatment regimen, displayed not only an extended tumour growth delay but also a significant decrease in the number of microvessels in the tumour xenograft. These results support the model of a cooperative antitumoural effect of angiogenesis inhibitor and irradiation and show that the orally bioavailable VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 is suitable for combination therapy with irradiation. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11747347

  15. [Intestinal carcinoid tumour: Case report].

    PubMed

    Mussan-Chelminsky, Gil; Vidal-González, Pablo; Núñez-García, Edgar; Valencia-García, Luis César; Márquez-Ugalde, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Carcinoid of the small intestine, is a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor that rarely presents with clinical signs. This tumour can be associated with other conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, presenting a wide range of symptoms. In some cases they have an aggressive and highly symptomatic behaviour; thus, clinical suspicion must be high to make an early diagnosis. A 60 year-old male patient with Crohn's disease and gastrointestinal symptoms attributed to this disease within the last year. He presented with intestinal obstruction initially treated with conservative management with no improvement. Exploratory laparotomy was performed finding a mesenteric tumour that caused the bowel obstruction. Bowel resection with primary anastomosis was performed. The pathology report showed an intestinal carcinoid tumour with lymph node metastases. The patient recovered well, and was discharged without complications to continue medical treatment and follow-up by the Oncology department. In almost 42% of the cases, the most common site of carcinoid tumours is the small intestine, and of these, 41% are presented as locoregional disease. Patients with Crohn's disease present a higher incidence. In these cases, the most common presentation is an acute intestinal obstruction (90%). Surgery is usually curative, and follow up is important as the symptoms of Crohn's disease can hide any recurrence. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. PET imaging in endocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Khan, S; Lloyd, C; Szyszko, T; Win, Z; Rubello, D; Al-Nahhas, A

    2008-06-01

    The role of PET in the assessment of endocrine tumours has been, until recently, restricted to the use of (18)F-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG). Being a marker of metabolically active lesions that show high grading and low differentiation, FDG is not ideal for this purpose since the majority of endocrine tumours are slow growing and highly differentiated. It is however useful when dedifferentiation takes place and provides excellent prognostic information. A number of hormone precursors and amino acids are labelled with (11)C and used successfully in the management of parathyroid, adrenal and pituitary tumours. However, the short half-life of (11)C radiopharmaceuticals restricts their use to centres with access to an on-site cyclotron, while the high cost of production may limit their use to research purposes. A promising new positron-emission tomography (PET) tracer is Gallium-68 obtained by elution from a long shelf-life generator that makes it economic and cyclotron-independent. Its short half-life and flexible labelling ability to a wide range of peptides and antibodies makes it ideal for PET imaging. In addition to imaging GEP-NETs and phaeochromocytoma, it has the potential to be used in a wider range of endocrine tumours.

  17. Primary brain tumours in adults.

    PubMed

    Ricard, Damien; Idbaih, Ahmed; Ducray, François; Lahutte, Marion; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Delattre, Jean-Yves

    2012-05-26

    Important advances have been made in the understanding and management of adult gliomas and primary CNS lymphomas--the two most common primary brain tumours. Progress in imaging has led to a better analysis of the nature and grade of these tumours. Findings from large phase 3 studies have yielded some standard treatments for gliomas, and have confirmed the prognostic value of specific molecular alterations. High-throughput methods that enable genome-wide analysis of tumours have improved the knowledge of tumour biology, which should lead to a better classification of gliomas and pave the way for so-called targeted therapy trials. Primary CNS lymphomas are a group of rare non-Hodgkin lymphomas. High-dose methotrexate-based regimens increase survival, but the standards of care and the place of whole-brain radiotherapy remain unclear, and are likely to depend on the age of the patient. The focus now is on the development of new polychemotherapy regimens to reduce or defer whole-brain radiotherapy and its delayed complications.

  18. The kallikrein-kinin-system in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and its role in tumour survival, invasion, migration and response to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Beck, Carolin; Piontek, Guido; Haug, Anna; Bas, Murat; Knopf, Andreas; Stark, Thomas; Mißlbeck, Martin; Rudelius, Martina; Reiter, Rudolf; Brandstetter, Markus; Pickhard, Anja

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the kallikrein-kinin-system in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and its implication on tumour survival, invasion, migration and response to radiotherapy. The expression of BKB2R was studied in a series of 180 tumour samples to determine the functional significance of BKB2R in HNSCC. Additionally, four different HNSCC cell lines were treated with an irradiation dose of 8Gy following bradykinin receptor stimulation or blockage. Tumour cell survival was tested using a colony formation assay. The invasive potential of tumour cells was assessed using Matrigel invasion chambers, the cells' ability to migrate was determined with a wound-healing assay. To examine the biochemical activation of BKB2R, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its downstream pathways, western blot analyses were conducted. Immunohistochemistry revealed an over-expression of BKB2R in HNSCC tumour cells in comparison to normal peritumoural tissue. Blocking the BKB2R at irradiated tumour cells led to a reduced response to radiotherapy of tumour cells and led to an activation of the EGFR and its downstream pathways, known mediators of tumour cell survival, migration and invasion. Bradykinin stimulation also resulted in a better tumour cell survival, but these effects were achieved via an EGFR-independent signalling. Our results demonstrate that the kallikrein-kinin-system is involved in survival, invasion and migration of HNSCC cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An Improved Tumour Temperature Measurement and Control Method for Superficial Tumour Ultrasound Hyperthermia Therapeutic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen1, G. F.; Chen, Y. Z.; Ren, G. X.

    2006-10-01

    In tumour hyperthermia therapy, the research on measurement and control of tumour temperature is very important. Based on the hardware platform of superficial tumour ultrasound hyperthermia therapeutic system, an improved tumour temperature measurement and control method is presented in this paper. The experiment process, data and results are discussed in detail. The improved method will greatly reduce the pain and dread of the patients during the therapy period on the tumour temperature measurement and control by using the pinhead sensor.

  20. 'Primary extrarenal Wilms' tumour': rare presentation of a common paediatric tumour.

    PubMed

    Goel, Vandana; Verma, Amit Kumar; Batra, Vineeta; Puri, Sunil Kumar

    2014-06-06

    Wilms' tumour (nephroblastoma), the most common abdominal malignancy of childhood, occurs primarily as a malignant renal tumour. Extrarenal Wilms' tumour is rare with occasional reports from the Indian subcontinent. The various locations of extrarenal Wilms' tumour include retroperitoneum, uterus, skin and thorax. In this report we will discuss the imaging features highlighting the imaging differential diagnosis in a case of retroperitoneal (extrarenal) primary Wilms' tumour.

  1. Effects of photodynamic therapy on leucocyte-endothelium interaction: differences between normal and tumour tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Dellian, M.; Abels, C.; Kuhnle, G. E.; Goetz, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    An inflammatory reaction is regularly noticed in irradiated tissues following photodynamic therapy (PDT). This observation is potentially associated with leucocyte-mediated tissue damage, which might further contribute to the tumoricidal effect of this therapy. The objective of our study was to investigate the effects of PDT on leucocyte-endothelium interaction in the microvasculature of tumours and normal tissue. Experiments were performed in the dorsal skinfold chamber preparation of Syrian golden hamsters bearing amelanotic melanoma A-Mel-3. The photosensitiser. Photofrin (5 mg kg-1 i.v.) was injected 24 h before laser irradiation (630 nm, 100 mW cm-2, 10 J cm-2 or 100 J cm-2). Post-capillary confluent venules (diameter 15-40 microns) of subcutaneous (s.c.) tissue or the amelanotic melanoma A-Mel-3 were observed by intravital microscopy before, 5, 30, 60 and 180 min after laser irradiation and recorded for off-line analysis. Before treatment, the number of adherent leucocytes in tumour vessels was only 22% of the number observed in vessels of s.c. tissue (P < 0.01). The maximum increase in adhering leucocytes was observed in post-capillary venules of s.c. tissue 1 h after PDT (P < 0.01). In contrast, enhanced leucocyte-endothelium interaction was missing in tumour vessels and in control groups. These results indicate that the tumour destruction observed after PDT is not mediated by leucocyte-endothelium interaction in the tumour. Induction of leucocyte adhesion in the PDT-treated normal tissue suggests a contribution to the peritumoral inflammatory response. Different maturational status or biochemical properties of tumour microvascular endothelium may explain the lack of leucocyte adherence upon PDT. Images Figure 1 PMID:7577457

  2. Isolation of inflammatory cells from human tumours.

    PubMed

    Polak, Marta E

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory cells are present in many tumours, and understanding their function is of increasing importance, particularly to studies of tumour immunology. The tumour-infiltrating leukocytes encompass a variety of cell types, e.g. T lymphocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells, and mast cells. Choice of the isolation method greatly depends on the tumour type and the leukocyte subset of interest, but the protocol usually includes tissue disaggregation and cell enrichment. We recommend density centrifugation for initial enrichment, followed by specific magnetic bead negative or positive panning with leukocyte and tumour cell selective antibodies.

  3. Malignant tumours of childhood in Zaria.

    PubMed

    Samaila, Modupeola Omotara

    2009-01-01

    The increased prevalence of hitherto uncommon tumours in children in our geographic setting formed the basis for this study. This study aimed to determine the current histopathologic distribution pattern of paediatric malignancies in Zaria. An eight year (2000-2007) consecutive analysis of malignant tumours in children ages 0 to 15 years in a referral University laboratory. All tissue biopsies were fixed in 10% formalin and processed in wax. Tumours were characterised histologically into tissues of origin and categorised into three age groups; <1 year, 1-5 years and 6-15 years. 189 children with malignant tumours were analysed. They showed a male preponderance (M: F; 1.2: 1.0) and their ages ranged from 5 days to 15 years. Tumours of mesenchymal origin were the commonest (115: 60.8%) while epithelial tumours including germ cell tumours accounted for 74 (39.2%) cases. The age group 1-5 years had the highest epithelial tumours while age group 6-15 years had the most tumours with 102 (54%) cases overall. The five commonest tumours over-all were rhabdomyosarcoma, Burkitt lymphoma, retinoblastoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and nephroblastoma. Germ cell tumours affected the ovary predominantly and two of the endodermal sinus tumour cases were seen in the testis of an eighteen month child and sacrococcygeum of a 5 year old girl, respectively. Of the six immature teratoma cases, four were cutaneous in distribution. The vascular tumours included epithelioid haemangioendothelioma, haemangioblastoma and Dabska tumour and they accounted for (5.8%) of all tumours seen. The commonest sites of occurrence of these tumours were the oculo-orbital, jaw, head and neck regions with 82 cases (43.4%) while lymph nodes were involved in 31 (16.4%) cases. The distribution and occurrence of malignant tumours in children is age related. Lymphomas were the commonest tumours overall while retinoblastoma and Burkitt lymphoma were the commonest tumours affecting children below 5 years and 6-10 years

  4. Kill-painting of hypoxic tumours in charged particle therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tinganelli, Walter; Durante, Marco; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Krämer, Michael; Maier, Andreas; Kraft-Weyrather, Wilma; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Friedrich, Thomas; Scifoni, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    Solid tumours often present regions with severe oxygen deprivation (hypoxia), which are resistant to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Increased radiosensitivity as a function of the oxygen concentration is well described for X-rays. It has also been demonstrated that radioresistance in anoxia is reduced using high-LET radiation rather than conventional X-rays. However, the dependence of the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) on radiation quality in the regions of intermediate oxygen concentrations, those normally found in tumours, had never been measured and biophysical models were based on extrapolations. Here we present a complete survival dataset of mammalian cells exposed to different ions in oxygen concentration ranging from normoxia (21%) to anoxia (0%). The data were used to generate a model of the dependence of the OER on oxygen concentration and particle energy. The model was implemented in the ion beam treatment planning system to prescribe uniform cell killing across volumes with heterogeneous radiosensitivity. The adaptive treatment plans have been validated in two different accelerator facilities, using a biological phantom where cells can be irradiated simultaneously at three different oxygen concentrations. We thus realized a hypoxia-adapted treatment plan, which will be used for painting by voxel of hypoxic tumours visualized by functional imaging. PMID:26596243

  5. Abdominal tumours in children: 3-D visualisation and surgical planning.

    PubMed

    Günther, P; Schenk, J P; Wunsch, R; Tröger, J; Waag, K L

    2004-10-01

    Solid abdominal tumours are of special importance in the field of paediatric surgery. Because of the dangers of cumulative irradiation and improved delineation of soft parts MRI is usually employed in children for diagnostic assessment. Compiling the radiologic information for surgical planning is often difficult by conventional methods. Newly improved and efficient 3-D volume rendering software is now available for visual reconstruction of tumour anatomy utilising segmentation and other special techniques. Because the intraoperative complication rate is close to 20 % as described in the literature, optimal preoperative visualisation and planning would seem imperative. All children with solid abdominal tumours at Heidelberg University in the year 2002 were included in this study. MR examinations were performed with a 0.5 Tesla magnet using a standard protocol. All MR data were processed with VG Studio Max 1.1, converting the two-dimensional data into three-dimensional data. This report presents 15 cases using this special technique: 7 with abdominal neuroblastoma, 6 with nephroblastoma, 1 ganglioneuroma, and 1 ovarian teratoma. Our experience shows that a better understanding of the surgical anatomy, particularly regarding the surrounding organs and vasculature, can be helpful in decreasing the incidence of inadvertent intraoperative injuries to these structures.

  6. Radiotherapy alone for local tumour control in esthesioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Benfari, G; Fusconi, M; Ciofalo, A; Gallo, A; Altissimi, G; Celani, T; De Vincentiis, M

    2008-12-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is an uncommon tumour. Due to its low incidence, this neoplasm is difficult to evaluate and its treatment remains a matter of debate. Although the role of post-operative radiation is relatively well-defined, little is reported regarding the role of radiotherapy as the only treatment modality. A retrospective analysis of the literature has been conducted. With reference to the treatment of esthesioneuroblastoma, 55 patients submitted only to radiotherapy have been selected from publications of internationally indexed literature between 1979 and 2006. According to the Kadish classification, 6 patients were in stage A, 12 in stage B, and 37 in stage C. Response to therapy for each stage was assessed. There was no evidence of disease in: 6/6 stage A patients with a median follow-up period of 103.6 months, 7/12 stage B patients with a median followup period of 120 months, and 7/37 stage C patients with a median follow-up period of 77.3 months. A total of 27 patients died due to tumour-related causes and 5 due to intercurrent disease, while 3 patients were alive with disease (local recurrence and cervical lymph node metastasis). In conclusion, esthesioneuroblastoma is a malignant tumour which grows both locoregionally and distantly. For this reason, despite the satisfying results regarding response to radiotherapy alone in stage A patients, irradiation should be used only in early lesions arising below the cribriform plate, whereas all other cases require aggressive and multimodal therapy.

  7. Histochemical Phosphatases and Metachromasia in Murine Tumours Induced by Bone Seeking Radionuclides

    PubMed Central

    Bland, M. R.; Loutit, J. F.; Sansom, Janet M.

    1974-01-01

    Tumours induced in mice, either CBA normal and chimaerical, or C3H, by 90Sr or 226Ra or plutonium have been examined histochemically with (1) diazotate fast red violet LB salt in naphthol AS-MX phosphate buffer at pH 8·6 and 5·2, (2) 1: 9 dimethyl methylene blue (Taylor). It is concluded: (a) The diagnosis of osteosarcoma is facilitated with Taylor's Blue which stains osteoid metachromatically. Cells of osteosarcoma, like normal osteoblasts, contain alkaline phosphatase but this may be lost by mutation either in the original tumour or subsequently on passage of the tumour serially to compatible hosts. (b) Osteosarcomata may contain giant-cells of two forms, bizarre tumour cells and osteoclasts; the latter contain acid phosphatase. Osteosarcomata which retain their osteoid on serial passage have few cells containing acid phosphatases. (c) Primitive mesenchymal cell tumours of angiomatous form may occur, if the bone marrow is irradiated, e.g. by 90Sr-90Y and Pu. These tumours lack osteoid and cells interpretable as osteoblasts or osteoclasts (though they destroy bone). (d) Tumours classifiable as fibrosarcomata occur rarely, and may be truly of fibroblastic origin or be mutated osteosarcomata. (e) Lymphomata also occur when the marrow is irradiated (90Sr-90Y and Pu). They may be generalized, when their cells may contain alkaline phosphatase or lack it. They may be localized to abdominal viscera, the reticulo-sarcomatous form, in which case the cells lack alkaline phosphatase. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 5Fig. 8Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 2Fig. 4Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 9Fig. 12 PMID:4133784

  8. [Mobile phones and head tumours: it is time to read and highlight data in a proper way].

    PubMed

    Levis, Angelo G; Minicucci, Nadia; Ricci, Paolo; Gennaro, Valerio; Garbisa, Spiridione

    2011-01-01

    The uncertainty about the relationship between the use of mobile phones (MPs: analogue and digital cellulars, and cordless) and the increase of head tumour risk can be solved by a critical analysis of the methodological elements of both the positive and the negative studies. Results by Hardell indicate a cause/effect relationship: exposures for or latencies from ≥ 10 years to MPs increase by up to 100% the risk of tumour on the same side of the head preferred for phone use (ipsilateral tumours) - which is the only one significantly irradiated - with statistical significance for brain gliomas, meningiomas and acoustic neuromas. On the contrary, studies published under the Interphone project and others produced negative results and are characterised by the substantial underestimation of the risk of tumour. However, also in the Interphone studies a clear and statistically significant increase of ipsilateral head tumours (gliomas, neuromas and parotid gland tumours) is quite common in people having used MPs since or for ≥ 10 years. And also the metaanalyses by Hardell and other Authors, including only the literature data on ipsilateral tumours in people having used MPs since or for ≥ 10 years - and so also part of the Interphone data - still show statistically significant increases of head tumours.

  9. Tissue irradiator

    DOEpatents

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-12-16

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in- vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood- carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170.

  10. [Food irradiation].

    PubMed

    Migdał, W

    1995-01-01

    A worldwide standard on food irradiation was adopted in 1983 by Codex Alimentarius Commission of the Joint Food Standard Programme of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and the World Health Organization (WHO). As a result, 41 countries have approved the use of irradiation for treating one or more food items and the number is increasing. Generally, irradiation is used to: food loses, food spoilage, disinfestation, safety and hygiene. The number of countries which use irradiation for processing food for commercial purposes has been increasing steadily from 19 in 1987 to 33 today. In the frames of the national programme on the application of irradiation for food preservation and hygienization an experimental plant for electron beam processing has been established in Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. The plant is equipped with a small research accelerator Pilot (19MeV, 1 kW) and an industrial unit Elektronika (10MeV, 10 kW). On the basis of the research there were performed at different scientific institutions in Poland, health authorities have issued permission for irradiation for: spices, garlic, onions, mushrooms, potatoes, dry mushrooms and vegetables.

  11. Tumour cell-derived exosomes endow mesenchymal stromal cells with tumour-promotion capabilities.

    PubMed

    Lin, L Y; Du, L M; Cao, K; Huang, Y; Yu, P F; Zhang, L Y; Li, F Y; Wang, Y; Shi, Y F

    2016-11-17

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a major component of the tumour microenvironment. A plethora of elegant studies focusing on tumour-derived MSCs have shown that they, unlike normal MSCs in other tissue, exhibit a strong ability to promote tumour progression. However, the mechanisms underlying the conversion of normal MSCs into tumour-associated MSCs are unknown. We report here a critical role of tumour cell-derived exosomes in endowing bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) with a tumour-favourable phenotype. Tumour cell-derived exosomes affected neither the growth factor production nor the immunosuppressive property of MSCs; rather, they endowed MSCs with a strong ability to promote macrophage infiltration into B16-F0 melanoma or EL-4 lymphoma. Ablation of macrophages by clodronate liposome administration reversed the tumour-promoting effect of MSCs educated by tumour cell-derived exosomes (TE-MSCs) on the tumour growth. By comparing the chemokine profile of BM-MSCs with that of TE-MSCs, we found that TE-MSCs produced a large amount of CCR2 ligands, CCL2 and CCL7, which are responsible for macrophage recruitment. CCR2-specific inhibitor was found to block the tumour-promoting effect of TE-MSCs. Thus, our investigations demonstrated that tumour cell-derived exosomes confer BM-MSCs the ability to enhance tumour growth. Therefore, we uncovered a novel mechanism underlying the conversion of normal MSCs to tumour-associated MSCs.

  12. Notch as a tumour suppressor.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Craig S; Radtke, Freddy

    2017-03-01

    The Notch signalling cascade is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that has a crucial role in regulating development and homeostasis in various tissues. The cellular processes and events that it controls are diverse, and continued investigation over recent decades has revealed how the role of Notch signalling is multifaceted and highly context dependent. Consistent with the far-reaching impact that Notch has on development and homeostasis, aberrant activity of the pathway is also linked to the initiation and progression of several malignancies, and Notch can in fact be either oncogenic or tumour suppressive depending on the tissue and cellular context. The Notch pathway therefore represents an important target for therapeutic agents designed to treat many types of cancer. In this Review, we focus on the latest developments relating specifically to the tumour-suppressor activity of Notch signalling and discuss the potential mechanisms by which Notch can inhibit carcinogenesis in various tissues. Potential therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring or augmenting Notch-mediated tumour suppression will also be highlighted.

  13. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak Mohanty, Sweta; Ray, Jay Gopal; Richa; Mukherjee, Sanjit; Mandal, Chitra; Chaudhuri, Keya

    2010-11-23

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy (MNTI) is a rare benign tumour of neural crest origin that was first described by Krompecher in 1918.1 It is predominantly found in infancy, with about 92% of cases below the age of 12 months and 82% below the age of 6 months. The predominant site of origin is in the premaxilla though it is reported at other sites also including the skull, the mandible, the epididymis and the brain.2 The lesions often have areas of bluish discolouration on the surface and are characterised by displacement of the involved tooth bud and local aggressiveness. The present report deals with two cases of MNTI, a 5-month-old baby girl and a 6-month-old baby boy who reported to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Dr R Ahmed Dental College and Hospital, Kolkata, India. The clinical, radiological, histological and immunohistochemical findings, confirmed the diagnosis of MNTI. Flow cytometry was performed to analyse aneuploidy. The tumours were treated surgically with no history of recurrence to date.

  14. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy

    PubMed Central

    Pattanayak, Sweta; Ray, Jay Gopal; Richa; Mukherjee, Sanjit; Mandal, Chitra; Chaudhuri, Keya

    2010-01-01

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy (MNTI) is a rare benign tumour of neural crest origin that was first described by Krompecher in 1918.1 It is predominantly found in infancy, with about 92% of cases below the age of 12 months and 82% below the age of 6 months. The predominant site of origin is in the premaxilla though it is reported at other sites also including the skull, the mandible, the epididymis and the brain.2 The lesions often have areas of bluish discolouration on the surface and are characterised by displacement of the involved tooth bud and local aggressiveness. The present report deals with two cases of MNTI, a 5-month-old baby girl and a 6-month-old baby boy who reported to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Dr R Ahmed Dental College and Hospital, Kolkata, India. The clinical, radiological, histological and immunohistochemical findings, confirmed the diagnosis of MNTI. Flow cytometry was performed to analyse aneuploidy. The tumours were treated surgically with no history of recurrence to date. PMID:22797196

  15. Latest advances in pancreatic tumours.

    PubMed

    Lariño Noia, José

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer continues to have a bleak prognosis. Hardly any therapeutic advances have been made in the last few years and consequently most efforts have focused on preventing its development and on diagnosing precursor lesions. In this regard, the use of statins as a preventive factor and the implementation of screening programmes in high-risk patients are gaining ground. In the field of treatment, there is greater focus on the role of neoadjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer and on a multimodal approach to the disease, with few advances in effective novel therapies. Most studies concerned cystic tumours of the pancreas, especially intraductal mucinous papillary tumour, with its known potential for malignant transformation. Multiple studies were devoted to validation of the 2012 Fukuoka international guidelines and the highly controversial 2015 AGA guidelines. Notable among these studies were those demonstrating the suboptimal positive predictive value and questioning important aspects of the guidelines, such as discontinuation of follow-up or the criteria for surgical referral. Notable among diagnostic procedures were cystoscopy and endoscopic ultrasound-guided needle-based confocal laser endomicroscopy as the most promising techniques due to their high efficacy and negative predictive value in detecting mucinous cystic lesions. There were also a large number of studies on the natural history of intraductal papillary mucinous tumours, which help deepen knowledge of these entities and the search for predictive factors of cancer development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. New frontiers for astrocytic tumours.

    PubMed

    Nano, Rosanna; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Corti, Maurizio; Paolini, Alessandro; Pasi, Francesca; Corbella, Franco; DI Liberto, Riccardo

    2012-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme, the most common type of primary brain tumour, remains an unsolved clinical problem. A great deal of work has been done in an effort to understand the biology and genetics of glioblastoma multiforme, but clinically effective treatments remain elusive. It is well known that malignant gliomas develop resistance to chemo- and radiotherapy. In this review we evaluated the literature data regarding therapeutic progress for the treatment of astrocytic tumours, focusing our attention on new frontiers for glioblastoma. The research studies performed in in vitro and in vivo models show that the application of hyperthermia using magnetic nanoparticles is safe and could be a promising tool in the treatment of glioblastoma patients. Our efforts are focused towards new fields of research, for example nanomedicine and the study of the uptake and cytotoxic effects of magnetic nanoparticles. The improvement of the quality of life of patients, by increasing their survival rate is the best result to be pursued, since these tumours are considered as ineradicable.

  17. Mathematical models of tumour angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Akisato; Suzuki, Takashi

    2007-07-01

    We first study a parabolic-ODE system modelling tumour growth proposed by Othmer and Stevens [Aggregation, blowup, and collapse: the ABC's of taxis in reinforced random walks, SIAM J. Appl. Math. 57 (4) (1997) 1044-1081]. According to Levine and Sleeman [A system of reaction and diffusion equations arising in the theory of reinforced random walks, SIAM J. Appl. Math. 57 (3) (1997) 683-730], we reduced it to a hyperbolic equation and showed the existence of collapse in [A. Kubo, T. Suzuki, Asymptotic behavior of the solution to a parabolic ODE system modeling tumour growth, Differential Integral Equations 17 (2004) 721-736]. We also deal with the system in case the reduced equation is elliptic and show the existence of collapse analogously. Next we apply the above result to another model proposed by Anderson and Chaplain arising from tumour angiogenesis and show the existence of collapse. Further we investigate a contact point between these two models and a common property to them.

  18. Caffeine ameliorates radiation-induced skin reactions in mice but does not influence tumour radiation response.

    PubMed

    Hebbar, S A; Mitra, A K; George, K C; Verma, N C

    2002-03-01

    Intramuscular administration of caffeine at a dose of 80 mg kg(-1) body weight to the gastrocnemius muscles of Swiss mice 5 min prior to local irradiation (35 Gy) of the leg delayed the progression of radiation-induced skin reactions in such animals. While 90% epilation with reddening of the skin was noted in animals treated with radiation alone, animals pretreated with caffeine suffered only partial hair loss with slight reddening of the skin on the 16th and 20th days post-irradiation. Beyond the 28th day, damage scores in irradiated feet for both the groups were similar (score 3) and remained unchanged until the 32nd day and then decreased and disappeared completely in both treatment groups by the 40th day after irradiation. In addition, the effect of caffeine on the radiation response of a mouse fibrosarcoma was investigated. Results showed that intratumoral administration of caffeine at a dose of 80 mg kg(-1) body weight 5 min prior to local exposure of tumours to 10 Gy of 60Co gamma-rays did not influence the response of tumours to radiation. The present study thus showed that although caffeine ameliorated radiation-induced skin reactions in the mouse leg, it did not affect the tumour radiation response, indicating its potential application in cancer radiotherapy.

  19. Resistance to tumour challenge after tumour laser thermotherapy is associated with a cellular immune response

    PubMed Central

    Ivarsson, K; Myllymäki, L; Jansner, K; Stenram, U; Tranberg, K-G

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that interstitial laser thermotherapy (ILT) of an experimental liver tumour is superior to surgical excision, at least partly due to a laser-induced immunological effect. The aim of the present study was to investigate the time–response relationship of the ILT-induced immunisation and the cellular response of macrophages and lymphocytes. A dimethylhydrazine-induced adenocarcinoma was transplanted into the liver of syngeneic rats. Rats with tumour were treated 6–8 days later (tumour size 0.25–0.40 cm3) with ILT of tumour or resection of the tumour-bearing lobe. Two groups of rats without tumour were treated with resection of a normal liver lobe or ILT of normal liver. A challenging tumour was implanted into the liver of each rat 2, 5 or 10 weeks after primary treatment. Rats were killed 6, 12 and 48 days (or earlier due to their condition) after challenge (n=8 in all groups). Immunohistochemical techniques were used to determine lymphocytes (CD8, CD4) and macrophages (ED1, ED2) in rats having had treatment of a primary tumour. Interstitial laser thermotherapy of the first tumour was followed by eradication of challenging tumour and absence of tumour spread. This contrasted with rapid growth and spread of challenging tumour in the other groups. In the challenging vital tumour tissue and in the interface between the tumour and surroundings, the number of ED1 macrophages and CD8 lymphocytes was higher in rats having been treated with the ILT of tumour than in those having undergone resection of the tumour-bearing lobe. The number of ED2 macrophages and CD4 lymphocytes was low and did not vary between these two groups. Interstitial laser thermotherapy elicited an immune response that eradicated a challenging tumour and was associated with increased numbers of tumour-infiltrating macrophages and CD8 lymphocytes. PMID:16091763

  20. PET imaging of primary mediastinal tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, K.; Yamada, S.; Kondo, T.; Yamada, K.; Fukuda, H.; Fujiwara, T.; Ito, M.; Ido, T.

    1996-01-01

    Mediastinal masses include a wide variety of tumours and remain an interesting diagnostic challenge for radiologist. We performed positron emission tomography (PET) studies of primary mediastinal tumours in order to predict the malignancy of these tumours preoperatively. Twenty-two patients with primary mediastinal tumours were studied with PET using 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG). The histological findings of surgical pathology or biopsy, or mediastinoscopy were compared with those of computerised tomography (CT) and PET. PET images were evaluated semiquantitatively using the differential uptake ratio (DUR). Increased FDG uptake was observed in nine of ten patients with malignant tumours, including thymic carcinomas, lymphomas, invasive thymomas and a case of sarcoidosis. A moderate level of FDG uptake was found in a myeloma, non-invasive thymomas, and a schwannoma, whereas a low uptake was observed in a teratoma and various benign cysts. The mean FDG uptake of malignant tumours was significantly higher than that of benign tumours. Both thymic cancer and invasive thymoma showed a high FDG uptake. CT examination resulted in three false-negative and two false-positive cases when used in predicting tumour invasion, while PET was associated with a false-positive and a false-negative case. In conclusion, the use of FDG with PET is clinically helpful in evaluating the malignant nature of primary mediastinal tumours. Our results also suggest that a high FDG uptake reflects the invasiveness of malignant nature of thymic tumours. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8611400

  1. DNA methyltransferase immunohistochemical expression in odontogenic tumours.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Douglas Magno; Antunes, Daniella Moraes; Duarte, Carina Magalhães Esteves; Ferro, Leonardo Borges; Nunes, Fabio Daumas

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic tumours are a heterogeneous group of lesions formed from tissues that give rise to the tooth. DNA methylation, a covalent addition of a methyl group to the 5-carbon position of a cytosine nucleotide, is considered an important regulator of gene expression. The addition of the methyl radical is catalysed by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). Although some epigenetic studies have been conducted in odontogenic tumours, a study with the three types of DNMTs in several different members of this group is missing. This study analyses the expression of DNMTs in odontogenic tumours. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue samples of 20 ameloblastomas, 10 calcifying cystic odontogenic tumours, 10 calcifying epithelial tumours, 10 adenomatoid odontogenic tumours, 10 keratocystic odontogenic tumours, five ameloblastic fibromas, two ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, four central odontogenic fibromas, seven peripheral odontogenic fibromas and 10 odontogenic myxomas were included. Immunohistochemical expression of DNMT1, 3A and 3B was assessed using a semi-quantitative analysis, and also a correlation with p21, p27 and E-cadherin immunoexpression was made. DNMT1, 3A and 3B were expressed in the nucleus and/or cytoplasm of all odontogenic tumours. DNMT1 expression was directly correlated with p27 expression in ameloblastomas. The high expression of DNMTs in odontogenic tumour cells suggests methylation as an important mechanism for this group of tumours. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Gene expression profiling of human ovarian tumours

    PubMed Central

    Biade, S; Marinucci, M; Schick, J; Roberts, D; Workman, G; Sage, E H; O'Dwyer, P J; LiVolsi, V A; Johnson, S W

    2006-01-01

    There is currently a lack of reliable diagnostic and prognostic markers for ovarian cancer. We established gene expression profiles for 120 human ovarian tumours to identify determinants of histologic subtype, grade and degree of malignancy. Unsupervised cluster analysis of the most variable set of expression data resulted in three major tumour groups. One consisted predominantly of benign tumours, one contained mostly malignant tumours, and one was comprised of a mixture of borderline and malignant tumours. Using two supervised approaches, we identified a set of genes that distinguished the benign, borderline and malignant phenotypes. These algorithms were unable to establish profiles for histologic subtype or grade. To validate these findings, the expression of 21 candidate genes selected from these analyses was measured by quantitative RT–PCR using an independent set of tumour samples. Hierarchical clustering of these data resulted in two major groups, one benign and one malignant, with the borderline tumours interspersed between the two groups. These results indicate that borderline ovarian tumours may be classified as either benign or malignant, and that this classifier could be useful for predicting the clinical course of borderline tumours. Immunohistochemical analysis also demonstrated increased expression of CD24 antigen in malignant versus benign tumour tissue. The data that we have generated will contribute to a growing body of expression data that more accurately define the biologic and clinical characteristics of ovarian cancers. PMID:16969345

  3. Gene expression profiling of human ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Biade, S; Marinucci, M; Schick, J; Roberts, D; Workman, G; Sage, E H; O'Dwyer, P J; Livolsi, V A; Johnson, S W

    2006-10-23

    There is currently a lack of reliable diagnostic and prognostic markers for ovarian cancer. We established gene expression profiles for 120 human ovarian tumours to identify determinants of histologic subtype, grade and degree of malignancy. Unsupervised cluster analysis of the most variable set of expression data resulted in three major tumour groups. One consisted predominantly of benign tumours, one contained mostly malignant tumours, and one was comprised of a mixture of borderline and malignant tumours. Using two supervised approaches, we identified a set of genes that distinguished the benign, borderline and malignant phenotypes. These algorithms were unable to establish profiles for histologic subtype or grade. To validate these findings, the expression of 21 candidate genes selected from these analyses was measured by quantitative RT-PCR using an independent set of tumour samples. Hierarchical clustering of these data resulted in two major groups, one benign and one malignant, with the borderline tumours interspersed between the two groups. These results indicate that borderline ovarian tumours may be classified as either benign or malignant, and that this classifier could be useful for predicting the clinical course of borderline tumours. Immunohistochemical analysis also demonstrated increased expression of CD24 antigen in malignant versus benign tumour tissue. The data that we have generated will contribute to a growing body of expression data that more accurately define the biologic and clinical characteristics of ovarian cancers.

  4. Tumour thickness predicts cervical nodal metastases and survival in early oral tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    O-charoenrat, P; Pillai, G; Patel, S; Fisher, C; Archer, D; Eccles, S; Rhys-Evans, P

    2003-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral tongue is characterized by a high propensity for cervical nodal metastasis, which affects the probability of regional control and survival. Until now, elective treatment of the clinically negative neck in early lesions (T(1-2)) of the oral tongue cancer remains controversial. This study attempted to identify predictive factor(s) for cervical nodal metastasis and treatment outcomes in patients with early stage SCC of the oral tongue treated primarily by surgery. Fifty patients with previously untreated Stage I/II primary tongue carcinomas with available archival specimens treated at the Royal Marsden Hospital between 1981 and 1998 were reviewed. Clinico-pathological features including age, gender, alcohol and tobacco consumption, tumour location, histological grade, tumour-stromal border, growth pattern, tumour thickness, and clinical stage were evaluated and the correlations with cervical metastases and outcome analysis were determined. The overall occult nodal metastatic rate was 40% (20/50). Tumour thickness exceeding 5 mm was statistically significantly correlated with cervical metastases (P = 0.003; relative risk = 2.429). No statistical correlation was observed between other clinico-pathological parameters and nodal metastasis. With a median follow-up of 98 months, 5-year actuarial overall, disease-specific (DSS), and relapse-free survival were 65.71, 67.77, and 68.18%, respectively. Univariate analysis for DSS showed poorer outcomes for patients with age > 60 years (P = 0.0423) and tumour thickness > 5 mm (P = 0.0067). The effect of tumour thickness was maintained (P = 0.005) on multivariate analysis. The present study indicates that the thickness of primary tumour has a strong predictive value for occult cervical metastasis and poor outcomes in patients with Stage I/II oral tongue SCC. Thus, elective neck treatment (surgery or irradiation) is indicated for tumours exceeding 5 mm thickness. Copyright 2003 Elsevier

  5. Depression of Alloantigens in Malignancy. Evidence for Tumour Susceptibility Alloantigens and for Possible Self-Reactivity of Lymphoid Cells Active in the Microcytotoxicity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Martin, W. John; Esber, Elaine; Cotton, W. Graeme; Rice, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Inbred strains of mice were found to differ markedly in both susceptibility to the spontaneous development of malignant alveologenic lung tumours and the ease with which these tumours could be induced with chemical carcinogens administered to adult animals. Malignant lung tumours occurred in normal strain A mice but were very rare in normal C3Hf, DBA/2 and C57BL/6 mice or in these mice treated as adults with the carcinogen 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea (ENU). Malignant tumours could, however, be induced in C3Hf mice exposed prenatally to ENU. Two transplacentally induced malignant lung tumours of C3Hf mice failed to grow when transplanted to normal C3Hf recipients but did grow progressively when transplanted into either (C3Hf × A) F1 hybrid or C3H recipients. The tumours grew progressively in sublethally x-irradiated but otherwise untreated C3Hf mice. Immunization of C3Hf mice with either of the lung tumours, or with normal lung tissue of either A or C3H mice, induced a degree of radioresistant immunity such that tumour cells inoculated into immunized, sublethally x-irradiated mice, failed to grow progressively. Radioresistant immunity was not induced when C3Hf mice were immunized with lung tissue of DBA/2 or C57BL/6 mice. Lymphoid cells of (C3Hf × A) F1 and C3H mice bearing transplanted C3Hf lung tumour reacted against cultured lung tumour cells in the microcytotoxicity assay. Reactivity was also observed against cells cultured from normal lungs of C3H and (C3Hf × A) F1 mice but not against cells cultured from normal lungs of C3Hf or C57BL/6 mice. These results were interpreted to indicate that transplacentally induced malignant lung tumours of C3Hf mice express an antigenic component which exists as a normal tissue alloantigen, present in A and C3H but not in C3Hf, DBA/2 or C57BL/6 mice. It was suggested that the normal expression of the alloantigen in A mice may contribute to the susceptibility of these mice to the spontaneous development of lung tumours. The

  6. In vivo Assay of the Radiation Sensitivity of Hypoxic Tumour Cells; Influence of γ-rays, Cyclotron Neutrons, Misonidazole, Hyperthermia and Mixed Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Porschen, W.; Gartzen, J.; Gewehr, K.; Mühlensiepen, H.; Weber, H.-J.; Feinendegen, L. E.

    1978-01-01

    Tumour cell death can be evaluated in the living mouse by externally measuring the rate of loss of tumour-bound DNA tracer. By sequentially labelling the tumour-bearing animals with 125IUdR and 131IUdR 50 h apart, the average tumour cells at the time of the second injection are labelled by 125IUdR and the euoxic tumour cells are specifically labelled with 131IUdR. Tumour treatment at this stage of labelling permits the observation of the reaction of euoxic cells and average tumour cells and finally yields data on hypoxic cells and thus on the oxygen enhancement ratio. This information adds to results from tumour control and growth delay. With this technique effects were analysed of 60-Co γ-rays, cyclotron neutrons (E = 6 MeV), misonidazole (500 mg/kg body wt) and hyperthermia (42°C water-bath), or combinations of these. Misonidazole (15 min before irradiation) altered the oxygen enhancement ratio by a factor of 1·5 for γ-rays and of 1·1 for neutrons; when evaluated from tumour-growth delay and TCD-50 misonidazole gave a dose modifying factor of 1·47 for γ-rays and of 1·2-1·3 for neutrons. Based on percentage tumour regression 100 days after treatment, the enhancement ratio from hyperthermia (after irradiation) was 2·75 for γ-rays (at 10 Gray) and 2·2 for neutrons (at 3·2 Gray). For neutrons combined with misonidazole and hyperthermia the ratio was 2·4. These results demonstrate that effects of neutron irradiation may be modified by electron-affinic substances and/or hyperthermia. PMID:277225

  7. Interventions for the treatment of borderline ovarian tumours

    PubMed Central

    Faluyi, Olusola; Mackean, Melanie; Gourley, Charlie; Bryant, Andrew; Dickinson, Heather O

    2014-01-01

    Background The safety of conservative surgery and the benefit of additional interventions after surgery for borderline ovarian tumours are unknown. Objectives To evaluate the benefits and harm of different treatment modalities offered for borderline ovarian tumours. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register to 2009, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2008, Issue 4), MEDLINE and EMBASE to 2009. We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared different interventions in adult women diagnosed with borderline ovarian tumours of any histological variant. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Main results We identified seven RCTs that enrolled 372 women. We could not pool results of trials as the treatment comparisons differed. Six RCTs (n = 340) conducted over 15 years ago, evaluated adjuvant therapy (chemotherapy, pelvic external irradiation or intraperitoneal radioactive isotope therapy) after radical surgery; over 87% of participants had Stage I tumours. Most participants were followed up for over 10 years. Overall and recurrence-free survival were similar between both arms of these trials, except that one trial (n = 66) showed a significantly lower survival (P = 0.03) in women who received chemotherapy (thio-TEPA). Adverse effects of treatment were incompletely reported and all six trials were at high risk of bias. One further trial (n = 32) that recruited participants with bilateral serous tumours who were wishing fertility preservation, revealed a significantly increased chance of pregnancy (hazard ratio (HR) = 3.3, 95% CI 1.4 to 8.0) but non-significantly earlier disease recurrence (HR = 1.5, 95% CI 0.6 to 3.8) in the women who had ultra-conservative surgery (bilateral

  8. An analysis of T lymphocyte subsets in tumour-transplanted mice on the basis of Lyt antigenic markers and functions

    PubMed Central

    Lala, P. K.; McKenzie, I. F. C.

    1982-01-01

    Small lymphocyte subsets were characterized radioautographically on the basis of several surface markers, viz. surface Ig (S-Ig), Thy-1 and Lyt (Ly-1, Ly-2 and 3) antigens in host lymphoid organs (thymus, spleen and blood) as well as at the tumour site at various stages of subcutaneous growth of two different syngeneic tumours—MPC-11 plasmacytoma and WEHI-164 fibrosarcoma in BALB/c mice. In both tumour-host combinations there was a rise in the levels of null (S-Ig-, Thy-1-) small lymphocytes as well as the Ly-23+ subset of T small lymphocytes at all the sites examined. The absolute number of these two subsets also increased excepting the case of null cell rise in the thymus which was relative. The functional potentials of Lyt subsets were explored by employing in vitro and in vivo assays. While no appreciable levels of anti-tumour cytotoxic T cells (Tc) were detectable by a 51Cr release assay in the host spleen or the tumour-draining lymph nodes at any stage of growth of MPC-11 tumour, such Tc was generated in vitro by a co-cultivation of unprimed spleen cells with irradiated MPC-11 cells. These Tc were Thy-1+ and Ly-12+, as noted from antibody+C′ mediated abrogation of cytotoxicity. These results suggested that the generation of anti-tumour Tc in vivo was suppressed in tumour-bearing hosts. The possibility of a cell-mediated suppression was tested by an adoptive transfer of thymocytes or splenocytes from tumour-bearing mice into naive or pre-immunized recipients which then received fresh tumour transplants. This procedure caused a specific enhancement of tumour growth in three tumour-host combinations: MPC-11 or WEHI-164 tumour in BALB/c mice and W-1 fibrosarcoma in CBA mice. The suppressor lineage lymphocytes appearing in vivo were found to be Thy-1+ and Ly-1-, 2+, as noted from antibody +C′ mediated abrogation of their tumour-growth promoting ability. They appeared earlier (7 days) in the thymus and later (>2 weeks) in the spleen and then persisted during

  9. Tumour location within the breast: Does tumour site have prognostic ability?

    PubMed

    Rummel, Seth; Hueman, Matthew T; Costantino, Nick; Shriver, Craig D; Ellsworth, Rachel E

    2015-01-01

    Tumour location within the breast varies with the highest frequency in the upper outer quadrant (UOQ) and lowest frequency in the lower inner quadrant (LIQ). Whether tumour location is prognostic is unclear. To determine whether tumour location is prognostic, associations between tumour site and clinicopathological characteristics were evaluated. All patients enrolled in the Clinical Breast Care Project whose tumour site-UOQ, upper inner quadrant (UIQ), central, LIQ, lower outer quadrant (LOQ)-was determined by a single, dedicated breast pathologist were included in this study. Patients with multicentric disease (n = 122) or tumours spanning multiple quadrants (n = 381) were excluded from further analysis. Clinicopathological characteristics were analysed using chi-square tests for univariate analysis with multivariate analysis performed using principal components analysis (PCA) and multiple logistic regression. Significance was defined as P < 0.05. Of the 980 patients with defined tumour location, 30 had bilateral disease. Tumour location in the UOQ (51.5%) was significantly higher than in the UIQ (15.6%), LOQ (14.2%), central (10.6%), or LIQ (8.1%). Tumours in the central quadrant were significantly more likely to have higher tumour stage (P = 0.003) and size (P < 0.001), metastatic lymph nodes (P < 0.001), and mortality (P = 0.011). After multivariate analysis, only tumour size and lymph node status remained significantly associated with survival. Evaluation of tumour location as a prognostic factor revealed that although tumours in the central region are associated with less favourable outcome, these associations are not independent of location but rather driven by larger tumour size. Tumours in the central region are more difficult to detect mammographically, resulting in larger tumour size at diagnosis and thus less favourable prognosis. Together, these data demonstrate that tumour location is not an independent prognostic factor.

  10. Role of Delta-like 4 in Jagged1-induced tumour angiogenesis and tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Oon, Chern Ein; Bridges, Esther; Sheldon, Helen; Sainson, Richard C.A.; Jubb, Adrian; Turley, Helen; Leek, Russell; Buffa, Francesca; Harris, Adrian L.; Li, Ji-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Delta-like 4 (DLL4) and Jagged1 (JAG1) are two key Notch ligands implicated in tumour angiogenesis. They were shown to have opposite effects on mouse retinal and adult regenerative angiogenesis. In tumours, both ligands are upregulated but their relative effects and interactions in tumour biology, particularly in tumour response to therapeutic intervention are unclear. Here we demonstrate that DLL4 and JAG1 displayed equal potency in stimulating Notch target genes in HMEC-1 endothelial cells but had opposing effects on sprouting angiogenesis in vitro. Mouse DLL4 or JAG1 expressed in glioblastoma cells decreased tumour cell proliferation in vitro but promoted tumour growth in vivo. mDLL4-expressing tumours showed fewer but larger vessels whereas mJAG1-tumours produced more vessels. In both tumour types pericyte coverage was decreased but the vessels were more perfused. Both ligands increased tumour resistance towards anti-VEGF therapy but the resistance was higher in mDLL4-tumours versus mJAG1-tumours. However, their sensitivity to the therapy was restored by blocking Notch signalling with dibenzazepine. Importantly, anti-DLL4 antibody blocked the effect of JAG1 on tumour growth and increased vessel branching in vivo. The mechanism behind the differential responsiveness was due to a positive feedback loop for DLL4-Notch signalling, rendering DLL4 more dominant in activating Notch signalling in the tumour microenvironment. We concluded that DLL4 and JAG1 promote tumour growth by modulating tumour angiogenesis via different mechanisms. JAG1 is not antagonistic but utilises DLL4 in tumour angiogenesis. The results suggest that anti-JAG1 therapy should be explored in conjunction with anti-DLL4 treatment in developing anti-Notch therapies in clinics. PMID:28445154

  11. Irradiation subassembly

    DOEpatents

    Seim, O.S.; Filewicz, E.C.; Hutter, E.

    1973-10-23

    An irradiation subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which includes a bundle of slender elongated irradiation -capsules or fuel elements enclosed by a coolant tube and having yieldable retaining liner between the irradiation capsules and the coolant tube. For a hexagonal bundle surrounded by a hexagonal tube the yieldable retaining liner may consist either of six segments corresponding to the six sides of the tube or three angular segments each corresponding in two adjacent sides of the tube. The sides of adjacent segments abut and are so cut that metal-tometal contact is retained when the volume enclosed by the retaining liner is varied and Springs are provided for urging the segments toward the center of the tube to hold the capsules in a closely packed configuration. (Official Gazette)

  12. Fertility sparing treatment in borderline ovarian tumours

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Rosa Maria; Vazquez-Vicente, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Borderline ovarian tumours are low malignant potential tumours. They represent 10–15% of all epithelial ovarian malignancies. Patients with this type of tumour are younger at the time of diagnosis than patients with invasive ovarian cancer. Most of them are diagnosed in the early stages and have an excellent prognosis. It has been quite clearly established that the majority of borderline ovarian tumours should be managed with surgery alone. Because a high proportion of women with this malignancy are young and the prognosis is excellent, the preservation of fertility is an important issue in the management of these tumours. In this systemic review of the literature, we have evaluated in-depth oncological safety and reproductive outcomes in women with borderline ovarian tumours treated with fertility-sparing surgery, reviewing the indications, benefits, and disadvantages of each type of conservative surgery, as well as new alternative options to surgery to preserve fertility. PMID:25729420

  13. [Solitary fibrous tumours of the kidney].

    PubMed

    Gres, Pascal; Avances, Christophe; Ben Naoum, Kamel; Chapuis, Héliette; Costa, Pierre

    2004-02-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFT) are mesenchymal tumours that usually arise from the pleura. Renal SFT are exceptional (9 cases reported in the literature). The authors report a new case discovered during assessment of HT and treated by radical right nephrectomy. The histological appearance is characteristic: a tumour with a fibrous centre, composed of a monomorphic proliferation of spindle cells, with positive CD 34, CD 99, and bcl 2 labelling. The prognosis after complete resection is generally favourable.

  14. Surgical treatment of benign endobronchial tumours

    PubMed Central

    Halttunen, P; Meurala, H; Standertskjöld-Nordenstam, C-G

    1982-01-01

    Four cases of benign endobronchial tumour are reported which were successfully treated by bronchial resection. In two cases (of fibroma and leiomyoma respectively) a cylinder of bronchus alone was resected; in one case (lipoma) a healthy right upper lobe was preserved by a bronchoplastic procedure and in the other (chondroma) the tumour was removed with the right lower lobe, which was irreversibly damaged. It is important to recognise that such tumours are unsuitable for treatment by endoscopic means alone. Images PMID:7157223

  15. Tumour promotion versus tumour suppression in chronic hepatic iron overload.

    PubMed

    Bloomer, Steven A; Brown, Kyle E

    2015-06-01

    Although iron-catalysed oxidative damage is presumed to be a major mechanism of injury leading to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in hemochromatosis, these events have been difficult to recapitulate in an animal model. In this study, we evaluated regulators of hepatocarcinogenesis in a rodent model of chronic iron overload. Sprague-Dawley rats were iron loaded with iron dextran over 6 months. Livers were harvested and analysed for markers of oxidative stress, as well as the following proteins: p53, murine double minute 2, the Shc proteins p66, p52, p46; β-catenin, CHOP, C/EBPα and Yes-associated protein. In this model, iron loading is associated with hepatocyte proliferation, and indices of oxidative damage are mildly increased in tandem with augmented antioxidant defenses. Alterations potentially favouring carcinogenesis included a modest but significant decrease in p53 levels and increases in p52, p46 and β-catenin levels compared with control livers. Countering these factors, the iron-loaded livers demonstrated a significant decrease in CHOP, which has recently been implicated in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as a reciprocal increase in C/EBPα and decrease in Yes-associated protein. Our results suggest that chronic iron overload elicits both tumour suppressive as well as tumour-promoting mechanisms in rodent liver.

  16. Galectin-1-based tumour-targeting for gold nanostructure-mediated photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Samir V; Nedosekin, Dmitry A; Miller, Emily K; Zharov, Vladimir P; Dings, Ruud P M; Chen, Jingyi; Griffin, Robert J

    2017-05-09

    To demonstrate delivery of Au nanocages to cells using the galectin-1 binding peptide anginex (Ax) and to demonstrate the value of this targeting for selective in vitro photothermal cell killing. Au nanocages were synthesised, coated with polydopamine (PDA), and conjugated with Ax. Tumour and endothelial cell viability was measured with and without laser irradiation. Photoacoustic (PA) mapping and PA flow cytometry were used to confirm cell targeting in vitro and in tissue slices ex vivo. Cell viability was maintained at ≥50% at 100 pM suggesting low toxicity of the nanocage alone. Combining the targeted construct (25 pM) with low power 808 nm laser irradiation for 10-20 min (a duration previously shown to induce rapid and sustained heating of Au nanocages [AuNC] in solution), resulted in over 50% killing of endothelial and tumour cells. In contrast, the untargeted construct combined with laser irradiation resulted in negligible cell killing. We estimate approximately 6 × 10(4) peptides were conjugated to each nanocage, which also resulted in inhibition of cell migration. Binding of the targeted nanocage reached a plateau after three hours, and cell association was 20-fold higher than non-targeted nanocages both in vitro and ex vivo on tumour tissue slices. A threefold increase in tumour accumulation was observed in preliminary in vivo studies. These studies demonstrate Ax's potential as an effective targeting agent for Au-based theranostics to tumour and endothelial cells, enabling photothermal killing. This platform further suggests potential for multimodal in vivo therapy via next-generation drug-loaded nanocages.

  17. Histogenesis of ovarian malignant mixed mesodermal tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, T J

    1990-01-01

    The histogenesis of ovarian malignant mixed mesodermal tumours, which includes the concept of metaplastic carcinoma, is controversial. Four such tumours were examined for evidence of metaplastic transition from carcinoma to sarcoma using morphology and reticulin stains. Consecutive sections were stained immunohistochemically using cytokeratin and vimentin to determine whether cells at the interface between carcinoma and sarcoma expressed both cytokeratin and vimentin. There was no evidence of morphological, architectural, or immunohistochemical transitions from carcinoma to sarcoma in the four tumours studied. This suggests that ovarian malignant mixed mesodermal tumours are not metaplastic carcinomas but are composed of histogenetically different elements. Images PMID:2160478

  18. Endovascular treatment of primary hepatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Popiel, M; Gulie, L; Turculeţ, C; Beuran, M

    2008-01-01

    First transcatheter embolization of hepatic artery has been materializing in 1974, in France, for unresectable hepatic tumours. Then, this treatment has become use enough in many countries, especially in Japan, where primary hepatic tumours are very frequent. In this article, we present procedures of interventional endovascular treatment for primary hepatic tumours: chemoembolization, intra–arterial chemotherapy. The study comprises patients with primary hepatic tumours investigated by hepatic–ultrasound and contrast–enhanced CT or MRI. DSA–hepatic angiography is very important to verify the accessory hepatic supply. It has been performed selective catheterization of right/left hepatic branches followed by cytostatics injection. Most of the patients have benefit by hepatic chemoembolization (cytostatics, Lipiodol and embolic materials). The selective intra–arterial chemotherapy (cytostatics without Lipiodol) was performing in cases with contraindications for Lipiodol or embolic materials injection (cirrhosis–Child C, thrombosis of portal vein, hepatic insufficiency). For treatment of primary hepatic tumours we use 5–F–Uracil, Farmarubicin and Mytomicin C. Less numbers of the reservoirs were placed because financial causes. Chemoembolization was better than procedures without Lipiodol or embolic materials. Lipiodol reached in tumoural tissue and the distribution of Lipiodol harmonises with degree of vascularisation. After the chemoembolization procedure, the diameter of tumours decreased gradually depending on the size of tumour. Effective alternative for unresectable primary hepatic tumours (big size, hepatic dysfunction, and other surgical risk factors) is endovascular interventional treatment. PMID:20108517

  19. Tumours of the upper alimentary tract

    PubMed Central

    Head, K. W.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of the oropharynx of domestic animals are common in most parts of the world, but squamous cell carcinoma of the upper alimentary tract shows differences in prevalence in different geographical areas and occurs at different sites in the various species. Oral tumours of the melanogenic system are more common in dogs than in man. The following main histological categories, which broadly correspond to those used in the classification of tumours of man, are described: papilloma; squamous cell carcinoma; salivary gland tumours; malignant melanoma; tumours of soft (mesenchymal) tissues; tumours of the facial bones; tumours of haematopoietic and related tissues; and odontogenic tumours and jaw cysts. Papilloma, squamous cell carcinoma, malignant melanoma, fibroma, and fibrosarcoma account for about 80% of the tumours that occur in the upper alimentary tract of domestic animals. ImagesFig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 34Fig. 35Fig. 36Fig. 37Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 22Fig. 23Fig. 24Fig. 25Fig. 26Fig. 27Fig. 28Fig. 29Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 17Fig. 30Fig. 31Fig. 32Fig. 33Fig. 18Fig. 19Fig. 20Fig. 21Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 1 PMID:1086147

  20. Diagnostic utility of Wilms’ tumour-1 protein (WT-1) immunostaining in paediatric renal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Surbhi; Mishra, Kiran; Sarkar, Urvee; Sharma, Satendra; Kumari, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Renal tumours constitute about 7 per cent of all neoplasms in children. It is important to differentiate Wilms’ tumour (commonest tumour) from non-Wilms’ tumours. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunoexpression and diagnostic role of Wilms’ tumour-1 protein (WT1) in paediatric renal tumours. Methods: A total of 53 cases of renal tumours in children (below 18 yr) who underwent total nephrectomy were included in this retrospective study. WT1 immunostaining was done using mouse monoclonal WT1 antibody (clone: 6F-H2). Results: Of the 53 cases, 38 (72%) were of Wilms’ tumour. Non-Wilms’ group (15) included six cases of mesoblastic nephroma (MN), two each of clear cell sarcoma (CCSK), renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and peripheral neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) and one each of angiomyolipoma (AML), rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) and malignant rhabdoid tumour (MRT). Proportion of WT1 positivity in Wilms’ tumour was 100 per cent in contrast to 26.7 per cent in non-Wilms’ tumours (P<0.001). Epithelial and blastemal components of Wilms’ tumour showed moderate (2+) nuclear and cytoplasmic staining in 80 (24/30) and 75 per cent (24/32) cases, respectively. MN, PNET, CCSK and AML were negative for WT1. RMS, RCC and MRT showed cytoplasmic staining, strongest in RMS. No significant association was seen between WT1 expression and NWTSG (National Wilms’ Tumor Study Group) stage. Interpretation & conclusions: WT1 helps to differentiate Wilms’ tumour from other paediatric renal tumours. It may help in differentiating the two subgroups of Wilms’ tumour which have distinct molecular pathogenesis and biological behaviour, however, further prospective studies are required for validation of this hypothesis. PMID:27748279

  1. Prognostic impact of tumour size in completely resected thymic epithelial tumours.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Takayuki; Fukumoto, Koichi; Okasaka, Toshiki; Kawaguchi, Koji; Nakamura, Shota; Hakiri, Shuhei; Ozeki, Naoki; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Tateyama, Hisashi; Yokoi, Kohei

    2016-12-01

    The T descriptor of thymic epithelial tumours proposed by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer and the International Thymic Malignancy Interest Group as well as the Masaoka-Koga system is defined by the anatomical extent of primary tumours, regardless of their size. However, the prognostic significance of tumour size in thymic epithelial tumours has not been fully elucidated. We evaluated the prognostic significance of tumour size in 154 consecutive patients with thymic epithelial tumours including 124 thymomas, 21 thymic carcinomas and 9 neuroendocrine tumours, who underwent complete resection between 2001 and 2014. Among all tumours, the median tumour size was 4.9 cm. The median thymoma, thymic carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumour sizes were 4.8, 5.7 and 5.8, respectively, although the differences were not significant. In survival analysis, the 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates for all patients were 91 and 81%, and 80 and 69%, respectively. Under the stratification of tumour size, no trend was observed for OS, whereas RFS showed stepwise deterioration as tumour size increased. For 119 patients with Stage I disease, RFS showed deterioration as tumour size increased. Multivariate analysis revealed that tumour size >4.0 cm was an independent prognostic factor for worsening RFS (P = 0.03). Patients with tumours >4.0 cm showed significantly worse outcomes in RFS compared with those with smaller tumours. This relationship was also noted in patients with Stage I disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnostic utility of Wilms' tumour-1 protein (WT-1) immunostaining in paediatric renal tumours.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Surbhi; Mishra, Kiran; Sarkar, Urvee; Sharma, Satendra; Kumari, Anita

    2016-05-01

    Renal tumours constitute about 7 per cent of all neoplasms in children. It is important to differentiate Wilms' tumour (commonest tumour) from non-Wilms' tumours. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunoexpression and diagnostic role of Wilms' tumour-1 protein (WT1) in paediatric renal tumours. A total of 53 cases of renal tumours in children (below 18 yr) who underwent total nephrectomy were included in this retrospective study. WT1 immunostaining was done using mouse monoclonal WT1 antibody (clone: 6F-H2). Of the 53 cases, 38 (72%) were of Wilms' tumour. Non-Wilms' group (15) included six cases of mesoblastic nephroma (MN), two each of clear cell sarcoma (CCSK), renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and peripheral neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) and one each of angiomyolipoma (AML), rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) and malignant rhabdoid tumour (MRT). Proportion of WT1 positivity in Wilms' tumour was 100 per cent in contrast to 26.7 per cent in non-Wilms' tumours ( P<0.001). Epithelial and blastemal components of Wilms' tumour showed moderate (2+) nuclear and cytoplasmic staining in 80 (24/30) and 75 per cent (24/32) cases, respectively. MN, PNET, CCSK and AML were negative for WT1. RMS, RCC and MRT showed cytoplasmic staining, strongest in RMS. No significant association was seen between WT1 expression and NWTSG (National Wilms' Tumor Study Group) stage. WT1 helps to differentiate Wilms' tumour from other paediatric renal tumours. It may help in differentiating the two subgroups of Wilms' tumour which have distinct molecular pathogenesis and biological behaviour, however, further prospective studies are required for validation of this hypothesis.

  3. Irradiated foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... it reduces the risk for food poisoning . Food irradiation is used in many countries. It was first approved in the U.S. to prevent sprouts on white potatoes, and to control insects on wheat and in certain spices and seasonings.

  4. Tumour and normal tissue radiobiology in mouse models: how close are mice to mini-humans?

    PubMed

    Koontz, Bridget F; Verhaegen, Frank; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    Animal modelling is essential to the study of radiobiology and the advancement of clinical radiation oncology by providing preclinical data. Mouse models in particular have been highly utilized in the study of both tumour and normal tissue radiobiology because of their cost effectiveness and versatility. Technology has significantly advanced in preclinical radiation techniques to allow highly conformal image-guided irradiation of small animals in an effort to mimic human treatment capabilities. However, the biological and physical limitations of animal modelling should be recognized and considered when interpreting preclinical radiotherapy (RT) studies. Murine tumour and normal tissue radioresponse has been shown to vary from human cellular and molecular pathways. Small animal irradiation techniques utilize different anatomical boundaries and may have different physical properties than human RT. This review addresses the difference between the human condition and mouse models and discusses possible strategies for future refinement of murine models of cancer and radiation for the benefit of both basic radiobiology and clinical translation.

  5. Tumour-to-tumour metastases: prostate carcinoma metastasising to a renal oncocytoma.

    PubMed

    Petts, Gemma; Rashid, Tina; Hrouda, David; Ngo, Nye-Thane

    2013-01-09

    This is a case report of prostate carcinoma metastasising to a renal oncocytoma. The report demonstrates the unusual presentation of metastases from a common cancer to a common benign tumour, and reviews the rare phenomenon of tumour-to-tumour metastases.

  6. Oxidative photodamage induced by photodynamic therapy with methoxyphenyl porphyrin derivatives in tumour-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Daicoviciu, D; Filip, A; Ion, R M; Clichici, S; Decea, N; Muresan, A

    2011-01-01

    The oxidative effects of photodynamic therapy with 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-methoxyphenyl) porphyrin (TMP) and Zn-5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-methoxyphenyl) porphyrin (ZnTMP) were evaluated in Wistar rats subcutaneously inoculated with Walker 256 carcinoma. The animals were irradiated with red light (λ = 685 nm; D = 50 J/cm2; 15 min) 3 h after intra-peritoneal administration of 10 mg/kg body weight of porphyrins. The presence of free radicals in tumours after photodynamic therapy with TMP and ZnTMP revealed by chemiluminescence of luminol attained the highest level at 18 h after irradiation. Lipid peroxides measured as thiobarbituric-reactive substances and protein carbonyls, which are indices of oxidative effects produced on susceptible biomolecules, were significantly increased in tumour tissues of animals 24 h after photodynamic therapy. The levels of thiol groups and total antioxidant capacity in the tumours were decreased. The activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were also increased in tumour tissues after photodynamic therapy. Increased levels of plasma lipid peroxides as well as changes in the levels of erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activities suggest possible systemic effects of photodynamic therapy with TMP and ZnTMP.

  7. In vivo covalent cross-linking of photon-converted rare-earth nanostructures for tumour localization and theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Xiangzhao; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Aw, Junxin; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Mu, Jing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaogang; Chen, Huabing; Gao, Mingyuan; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Yeow, Edwin K.L.; Liu, Gang; Olivo, Malini; Xing, Bengang

    2016-01-01

    The development of precision nanomedicines to direct nanostructure-based reagents into tumour-targeted areas remains a critical challenge in clinics. Chemical reaction-mediated localization in response to tumour environmental perturbations offers promising opportunities for rational design of effective nano-theranostics. Here, we present a unique microenvironment-sensitive strategy for localization of peptide-premodified upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) within tumour areas. Upon tumour-specific cathepsin protease reactions, the cleavage of peptides induces covalent cross-linking between the exposed cysteine and 2-cyanobenzothiazole on neighbouring particles, thus triggering the accumulation of UCNs into tumour site. Such enzyme-triggered cross-linking of UCNs leads to enhanced upconversion emission upon 808 nm laser irradiation, and in turn amplifies the singlet oxygen generation from the photosensitizers attached on UCNs. Importantly, this design enables remarkable tumour inhibition through either intratumoral UCNs injection or intravenous injection of nanoparticles modified with the targeting ligand. Our strategy may provide a multimodality solution for effective molecular sensing and site-specific tumour treatment. PMID:26786559

  8. In vivo covalent cross-linking of photon-converted rare-earth nanostructures for tumour localization and theranostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Xiangzhao; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Aw, Junxin; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Mu, Jing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaogang; Chen, Huabing; Gao, Mingyuan; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Yeow, Edwin K. L.; Liu, Gang; Olivo, Malini; Xing, Bengang

    2016-01-01

    The development of precision nanomedicines to direct nanostructure-based reagents into tumour-targeted areas remains a critical challenge in clinics. Chemical reaction-mediated localization in response to tumour environmental perturbations offers promising opportunities for rational design of effective nano-theranostics. Here, we present a unique microenvironment-sensitive strategy for localization of peptide-premodified upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) within tumour areas. Upon tumour-specific cathepsin protease reactions, the cleavage of peptides induces covalent cross-linking between the exposed cysteine and 2-cyanobenzothiazole on neighbouring particles, thus triggering the accumulation of UCNs into tumour site. Such enzyme-triggered cross-linking of UCNs leads to enhanced upconversion emission upon 808 nm laser irradiation, and in turn amplifies the singlet oxygen generation from the photosensitizers attached on UCNs. Importantly, this design enables remarkable tumour inhibition through either intratumoral UCNs injection or intravenous injection of nanoparticles modified with the targeting ligand. Our strategy may provide a multimodality solution for effective molecular sensing and site-specific tumour treatment.

  9. Radiobiological and Magnetic Resonance Studies of Combined Radiation and Cisplatin Therapy in the 9l Rat Brain Tumour Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, David E.

    1993-01-01

    tissue was evaluated in the rat, and MRI changes were found to occur on average 130 days following partial brain irradiation. Combined radiation and cisplatin treatments of intracranial 9L tumours did not result in tumour regression observable by MRI, despite histopathological evidence of increased tumour necrosis compared with radiation or cisplatin treatments alone.

  10. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Somerhausen, Nicolas De Saint Aubain

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To study the evolution of concepts concerning gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) over 30 years. Discussion. GISTs have been, for more than 30 years, the subject of considerable controversy regarding their line of differentiation as well as the prediction of their behaviour. Furthermore, once they spread within the peritoneal cavity, they are extremely hard to control. The recent findings of c-Kit mutations and the immunohistochemical detection of the product of this gene, KIT or CD117, in the mainly non-myogenic subset of this family of tumours, has led to a reappraisal of this group of lesions, which, with some exceptions, is now thought to be derived from the interstitial cells of Cajal, and this has facilitated a clearer definition of their pathological spectrum. In this article, we review chronologically the evolution of the concept of GIST with the gradual application of electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, DNA ploidy analysis. We discuss the impact of these techniques on the pathological assessment and clinical management of GISTs. PMID:18521245

  11. Transillumination imaging of intraocular tumours.

    PubMed

    Kjersem, Bård; Krohn, Jørgen

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss a recently described modification of a standard photo slit lamp system for ocular transillumination, with special emphasis on the light transmission through the eye wall and the photographic technique. Transillumination photography was carried out with the Haag-Streit Photo-Slit Lamp BX 900 (Haag-Streit AG, Koeniz, Switzerland). After having released the background lighting optic fibre cable from its holder, the patient was positioned at the slit lamp, and the fibre tip was gently pressed against the sclera or the cornea of the patient's eye. During about 1/1000 of a second, the eye was illuminated by the flash and the scleral shadow of the tumour was exposed to the camera sensor. The images were of good diagnostic quality, making it easy to outline the tumours and to evaluate the involvement of intraocular structures. None of the examined patients experienced discomfort or negative side effects. The method is recommended in cases where photographic transillumination documentation of intraocular pathologies is considered important.

  12. Intra-tumour heterogeneity - going beyond genetics.

    PubMed

    Caiado, Francisco; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Norell, Håkan

    2016-06-01

    Cancer patients die primarily due to disease recurrence after transient treatment responses. The emergence of therapy-resistant escape variants is fuelled by intra-tumour heterogeneity, underpinned by interference and Darwinian evolution among continuously developing sub-clones in the mutating tumour. Novel cancer cell variants build upon the pre-existing genetic landscape and tumour heterogeneity is often ascribed largely to genetic variability. While mutations are required for cancer development and studies of genetic evolution of tumours have improved our understanding of cancer biology, genetics only represents one dimension of the fitness of each cancer cell. Beyond the mutations, several non-genetic factors also add significant variability, resulting in a complex and highly dynamic tumour cell population that can drive disease under almost any condition. This viewpoint article summarizes the genetic basis of intra-tumour heterogeneity, before dissecting four major interdependent non-genetic factors we think critically contribute to the overall variability of tumour cells in all types of cancer: epigenetic regulation, cellular differentiation hierarchies, gene expression stochasticity and tumour microenvironment. We finally present the relevant technological approaches to address the combined contribution of both genetic and non-genetic factors to intra-tumour heterogeneity, focusing on genomic profiling, cellular lineage tracing and single-cell RNA sequencing technologies. This strategy will ultimately allow dissection of the full range and depth of intra-tumour heterogeneity. We thus believe that understanding how cancer genetics synergize with the emerging non-genetic factors will be key for development of therapies able to tackle tumour escape and thereby improve cancer patient survival. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. Photodynamic therapy with recombinant adenovirus AdmIL-12 enhances anti-tumour therapy efficacy in human papillomavirus 16 (E6/E7) infected tumour model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun Kyung; Bae, Su-Mi; Kwak, Sun-Young; Lee, Sung Jong; Kim, Yong-Wook; Han, Chan-Hee; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Kyung Tae; Kim, Young-Jae; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Ahn, Woong Shick

    2008-01-01

    Immunotherapy with photodynamic therapy (PDT) offers great promise as a new alternative for cancer treatment; however, its use remains experimental. Here we investigated the utility of adenoviral delivery of interleukin-12 (AdmIL-12) as an adjuvant for PDT in mouse tumour challenge model. PDT was performed by irradiating Radachlorin in C57BL/6 mice transplanted with TC-1 cells. PDT plus AdmIL-12 treatment for tumour suppression as well as specific immune responses were evaluated with the following tests: in vitro and in vivo tumour growth inhibition, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) assay, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) assay. Direct intratumoral injection of AdmIL-12 resulted in a significant suppression of tumour growth compared to the control group. Treatment of PDT along with AdmIL-12 further enhanced antitumour effects significantly higher than either AdmIL-12 or PDT alone. This combined treatment resulted in complete regression of 9-mm sized tumour in every animal. We also evaluated immune responses induced by these treatments. Combined treatment significantly increased the production level of IFN-γ and TNF-α compared with that by AdmIL-12 or PDT alone. PDT plus AdmIL-12 enhanced antitumour immunity through increased expansion of the CTL subset mediated by CD8+ T cells. Taken together, these results indicate that the high anti-cancer activity of PDT with AdmIL-12 is a powerful tool against cancer therapy and is a promising subject for further investigation. PMID:18397271

  14. Clinical course and outcome of pregnancies in amenorrhoeic women with hyperprolactinaemia and pituitary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Bergh, Torbjörn; Nillius, Sven Johan; Wide, Leif

    1978-01-01

    Seventeen term pregnancies occurred in 14 amenorrhoeic women with hyperprolactinaemia and radiological evidence of pituitary tumour. The abortion rate was high (32%). All but one of the term pregnancies occurred after ovulation-inducing treatment with human gonadotrophins and bromocriptine (four and 12 pregnancies respectively). Two of the 14 women had visual complications during pregnancy, but neither had serious residual visual impairment. Two patients had possible pituitary enlargement during pregnancy. Bromocriptine may be the most suitable primary treatment for many infertile women with prolactin-secreting tumours. Tumour complications during pregnancy are a definite risk, but most pregnancies went uneventfully to term. Patients with pituitary tumour should be carefully evaluated before starting ovulation-inducing treatment with bromocriptine alone, and they should be told of the possible risks and of the advantages and disadvantages of pretreatment with irradiation or surgery. Patients should be carefully monitored during pregnancy and have their visual fields checked frequently. If visual complications due to tumour enlargement occur during a pregnancy, reinstituting bromocriptine may be the treatment of choice. If this fails, other forms of treatment such as induction of labour, high-dose corticosteroid treatment, pituitary implantation of yttrium-90, or surgery may be effective. ImagesFIG 1FIG 2 PMID:638504

  15. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy: a rare brain tumour of childhood.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Babar; Soares, Delvene; Tahir, Muhammad Zubair; Kumar, Rajesh; Minhas, Khurram; Bari, Muhammad Ehsan

    2013-05-01

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy is a rare, mostly benign but locally aggressive tumour of neural crest cell origin occurring in infants. The most commonly affected anatomic site is the maxilla. Such tumours of the brain and skull are very rare. We present the case of an 8 months old baby girl whose presenting complaint was a swelling in the scalp for 6 months. She was otherwise asymptomatic. CT imaging confirmed the presence of an osteolytic tumour in the anterior parasagittal skull with dural involvement. The tumour was surgically excised enbloc. The patient has been well at 2 years follow-up without any evidence of recurrence.

  16. Effects of employing a 10B-carrier and manipulating intratumour hypoxia on local tumour response and lung metastatic potential in boron neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Masunaga, S; Sakurai, Y; Tanaka, H; Suzuki, M; Liu, Y; Kondo, N; Maruhashi, A; Kinashi, Y; Ono, K

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effects of employing a 10B-carrier and manipulating intratumour hypoxia on local tumour response and lung metastatic potential in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) by measuring the response of intratumour quiescent (Q) cells. Methods B16-BL6 melanoma tumour-bearing C57BL/6 mice were continuously given 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all proliferating (P) cells. The tumours received reactor thermal neutron beam irradiation following the administration of a 10B-carrier [L-para-boronophenylalanine-10B (BPA) or sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate-10B (BSH)] in combination with an acute hypoxia-releasing agent (nicotinamide) or mild temperature hyperthermia (MTH). Immediately after the irradiation, cells from some tumours were isolated and incubated with a cytokinesis blocker. The responses of the Q and total (P+Q) cell populations were assessed based on the frequency of micronuclei using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. In other tumour-bearing mice, macroscopic lung metastases were enumerated 17 days after irradiation. Results BPA-BNCT increased the sensitivity of the total tumour cell population more than BSH-BNCT. However, the sensitivity of Q cells treated with BPA was lower than that of BSH-treated Q cells. With or without a 10B–carrier, MTH enhanced the sensitivity of the Q cell population. Without irradiation, nicotinamide treatment decreased the number of lung metastases. With irradiation, BPA-BNCT, especially in combination with nicotinamide treatment, showed the potential to reduce the number of metastases more than BSH-BNCT. Conclusion BSH-BNCT in combination with MTH improves local tumour control, while BPA-BNCT in combination with nicotinamide may reduce the number of lung metastases. PMID:22391496

  17. Classification of odontogenic tumours. A historical review.

    PubMed

    Philipsen, Hans Peter; Reichart, Peter A

    2006-10-01

    Using the term odontome for any tumour arising from the dental formative tissues, Broca suggested a classification of odontogenic tumours (OTs) in 1869. From 1888 to 1914, Bland-Sutton and Gabell, James and Payne modified tumour terminology, while maintaining Broca's odontome concept. Thoma and Goldman's classification (1946) divided the OTs into tumours of ectodermal, mesodermal and mixed origin and abolished the general term odontome. The Pindborg and Clausen classification (1958) based on the idea that the reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal tissue interactions were also operating in the pathogenesis of OTs. In 1966, WHO established a Collaborating Centre for the Histological Classification of Odontogenic Tumours and Allied Lesions (including jaw cysts) headed by Dr Jens Pindborg. In 1971, the first authoritative WHO guide to the classification of OTs and cysts appeared followed in 1992 by a second edition. In 2002, Philipsen and Reichart produced a revision of the 1992-edition and in 2003, the editors of the WHO Blue Book series: 'WHO Classification of Tumours' decided to produce a volume on the Head and Neck Tumours including a chapter on Odontogenic Tumours and Bone Related Lesions. In July of 2005 this volume was published by IARC, Lyon.

  18. FDG uptake, a surrogate of tumour hypoxia?

    PubMed Central

    Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tumour hyperglycolysis is driven by activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) through tumour hypoxia. Accordingly, the degree of 2-fluro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) uptake by tumours might indirectly reflect the level of hypoxia, obviating the need for more specific radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. Discussion In this paper, available data on the relationship between hypoxia and FDG uptake by tumour tissue in vitro and in vivo are reviewed. In pre-clinical in vitro studies, acute hypoxia was consistently shown to increase FDG uptake by normal and tumour cells within a couple of hours after onset with mobilisation or modification of glucose transporters optimising glucose uptake, followed by a delayed response with increased rates of transcription of GLUT mRNA. In pre-clinical imaging studies on chronic hypoxia that compared FDG uptake by tumours grown in rat or mice to uptake by FMISO, the pattern of normoxic and hypoxic regions within the human tumour xenografts, as imaged by FMISO, largely correlated with glucose metabolism although minor locoregional differences could not be excluded. In the clinical setting, data are limited and discordant. Conclusion Further evaluation of FDG uptake by various tumour types in relation to intrinsic and bioreductive markers of hypoxia and response to radiotherapy or hypoxia-dependent drugs is needed to fully assess its application as a marker of hypoxia in the clinical setting. PMID:18509637

  19. Skull metastasis from rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Gil-Arnaiz, Irene; Martínez-Trufero, Javier; Pazo-Cid, Roberto Antonio; Felipo, Francesc; Lecumberri, María José; Calderero, Verónica

    2009-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Rectum localisation is infrequent for these neoplasms, accounting for about 5% of all cases. Distant metastases of GIST are also rare. We present a patient with special features: the tumour is localised in rectum and it has an uncommon metastatic site, the skull, implying a complex differential diagnosis approach.

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea in pituitary tumours1

    PubMed Central

    Cole, I E; Keene, Malcolm

    1980-01-01

    Three cases of CSF rhinorrhoea due to pituitary tumours are reported and the literature reviewed. The treatment of choice appears to be trans-sphenoidal exploration of the pituitary fossa with insertion of a free muscle graft followed by radiotherapy. The probability of the tumour being a prolactin-secreting adenoma is discussed. PMID:7017123

  1. Peculiarities of hyperlipidaemia in tumour patients.

    PubMed Central

    Dilman, V. M.; Berstein, L. M.; Ostroumova, M. N.; Tsyrlina, Y. V.; Golubev, A. G.

    1981-01-01

    The study group included 684 cases: 258 patients with breast carcinoma, 113 males with lung cancer, 42 patients with rectal tumours, 42 patients with stomach tumours, 59 patients with fibroadenomatosis, and 170 healthy subjects of varying age (male and female). A relatively high blood triglyceride level was found in patients with breast, lung, rectal (females), and stomach (female) tumours. The blood concentration of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in patients with breast, lung, and stomach (female) tumours was relatively low. The elimination of tumour (breast carcinoma) did not lead to significant changes in lipid metabolism. There was no correlation between degree of lipidaemia and stage of tumour progression except in the cases of rectal cancer. Preliminary results are presented on the tentative classification of hyperlipoproteinaemia in tumour patients, using the lipid concentration threshold values advocated by Carlson et al. (1977); an increased frequency of Type IV hyperlipoproteinaemia proved to be the most characteristic feature of tumour patients. The results are discussed in terms of the concept of the importance of lipid metabolic disturbances, primarily those due to ageing, in the genesis of the syndrome of "cancerophilia" (predisposition to cancer). PMID:7248149

  2. [Single-cell sequencing and tumour heterogeneity].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2014-12-01

    The heterogeneity of tumours is now beginning to be documented precisely by single-cell new-generation sequencing. Recently published results on breast tumours show that each of the cells analysed displays a unique pattern of point mutations. This extensive genetic diversity is present before any treatment, and is likely to cause resistance to initially successful targeted therapies.

  3. Irradiation with UV-C inhibits TNF-α-dependent activation of the NF-κB pathway in a mechanism potentially mediated by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Szoltysek, Katarzyna; Walaszczyk, Anna; Janus, Patryk; Kimmel, Marek; Widlak, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Pathways depending on the NF-κB transcription factor are essential components of cellular response to stress. Plethora of stimuli modulating NF-κB includes inflammatory signals, ultraviolet radiation (UV) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), yet interference between different factors affecting NF-κB remains relatively understudied. Here, we aim to characterize the influence of UV radiation on TNF-α-induced activity of the NF-κB pathway. We document inhibition of TNF-α-induced activation of NF-κB and subsequent suppression of NF-κB-regulated genes in cells exposed to UV-C several hours before TNF-α stimulation. Accumulation of ROS and subsequent activation of NRF2, p53, AP-1 and NF-κB-dependent pathways, with downstream activation of antioxidant mechanisms (e.g., SOD2 and HMOX1 expression), is observed in the UV-treated cells. Moreover, NF-κB inhibition is not observed if generation of UV-induced ROS is suppressed by chemical antioxidants. It is noteworthy that stimulation with TNF-α also generates a wave of ROS, which is suppressed in cells pre-treated by UV. We postulate that irradiation with UV-C activates antioxidant mechanisms, which in turn affect ROS-mediated activation of NF-κB by TNF-α. Considering a potential cross talk between p53 and NF-κB, we additionally compare observed effects in p53-proficient and p53-deficient cells and find the UV-mediated suppression of TNF-α-activated NF-κB in both types of cells.

  4. Class IIa HDAC inhibition reduces breast tumours and metastases through anti-tumour macrophages.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Jennifer L; Sotayo, Alaba; Ponichtera, Holly E; Castrillon, Jessica A; Pourzia, Alexandra L; Schad, Sara; Johnson, Shawn F; Carrasco, Ruben D; Lazo, Suzan; Bronson, Roderick T; Davis, Scott P; Lobera, Mercedes; Nolan, Michael A; Letai, Anthony

    2017-03-16

    Although the main focus of immuno-oncology has been manipulating the adaptive immune system, harnessing both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system might produce superior tumour reduction and elimination. Tumour-associated macrophages often have net pro-tumour effects, but their embedded location and their untapped potential provide impetus to discover strategies to turn them against tumours. Strategies that deplete (anti-CSF-1 antibodies and CSF-1R inhibition) or stimulate (agonistic anti-CD40 or inhibitory anti-CD47 antibodies) tumour-associated macrophages have had some success. We hypothesized that pharmacologic modulation of macrophage phenotype could produce an anti-tumour effect. We previously reported that a first-in-class selective class IIa histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, TMP195, influenced human monocyte responses to the colony-stimulating factors CSF-1 and CSF-2 in vitro. Here, we utilize a macrophage-dependent autochthonous mouse model of breast cancer to demonstrate that in vivo TMP195 treatment alters the tumour microenvironment and reduces tumour burden and pulmonary metastases by modulating macrophage phenotypes. TMP195 induces the recruitment and differentiation of highly phagocytic and stimulatory macrophages within tumours. Furthermore, combining TMP195 with chemotherapy regimens or T-cell checkpoint blockade in this model significantly enhances the durability of tumour reduction. These data introduce class IIa HDAC inhibition as a means to harness the anti-tumour potential of macrophages to enhance cancer therapy.

  5. p53 tumour suppressor gene expression in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, C; Ziske, C; Wiedenmann, B; Moelling, K

    1996-01-01

    Neuroendocrine pancreatic tumours grow slower and metastasise later than ductal and acinar carcinomas. The expression of the p53 tumour suppressor gene in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells is unknown. Pancreatic neuroendocrine cell lines (n = 5) and human tumour tissues (n = 19) were studied for changed p53 coding sequence, transcription, and translation. Proliferative activity of tumour cells was determined analysing Ki-67 expression. No mutation in the p53 nucleotide sequence of neuroendocrine tumour cell was found. However, an overexpression of p53 could be detected in neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines at a protein level. As no p53 mutations were seen, it is suggested that post-translational events can also lead to an overexpression of p53. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8675094

  6. Cooperative tumour cell membrane targeted phototherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Heegon; Lee, Junsung; Oh, Chanhee; Park, Ji-Ho

    2017-06-01

    The targeted delivery of therapeutics using antibodies or nanomaterials has improved the precision and safety of cancer therapy. However, the paucity and heterogeneity of identified molecular targets within tumours have resulted in poor and uneven distribution of targeted agents, thus compromising treatment outcomes. Here, we construct a cooperative targeting system in which synthetic and biological nanocomponents participate together in the tumour cell membrane-selective localization of synthetic receptor-lipid conjugates (SR-lipids) to amplify the subsequent targeting of therapeutics. The SR-lipids are first delivered selectively to tumour cell membranes in the perivascular region using fusogenic liposomes. By hitchhiking with extracellular vesicles secreted by the cells, the SR-lipids are transferred to neighbouring cells and further spread throughout the tumour tissues where the molecular targets are limited. We show that this tumour cell membrane-targeted delivery of SR-lipids leads to uniform distribution and enhanced phototherapeutic efficacy of the targeted photosensitizer.

  7. Large benign retroperitoneal tumour in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Berczi, Csaba; Osvath, Peter; Flasko, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    A 31-year-old female was in the 13th week of pregnancy when an abdominal ultrasound examination revealed a large retroperitoneal tumour. Magnetic resonance imaging was carried out and the imaging described a 10-cm mass in diameter extending from the right kidney. Given that the patient was in her first trimester and that there was a suspicion of malignancy, further surgical exploration of the tumour was warranted. During the operation, the tumour was removed, but nephrectomy was not necessary. Histologic analysis of the resected tumour showed a mucinous cystic adenoma, and no signs of malignancy were present. Following the surgery, the pregnancy was otherwise uneventful and further complications did not occur. This case illustrates that surgery is recommended in patients with a retroperitoneal tumour early during a pregnancy, when a malignancy cannot be excluded.

  8. Large benign retroperitoneal tumour in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Berczi, Csaba; Osvath, Peter; Flasko, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    A 31-year-old female was in the 13th week of pregnancy when an abdominal ultrasound examination revealed a large retroperitoneal tumour. Magnetic resonance imaging was carried out and the imaging described a 10-cm mass in diameter extending from the right kidney. Given that the patient was in her first trimester and that there was a suspicion of malignancy, further surgical exploration of the tumour was warranted. During the operation, the tumour was removed, but nephrectomy was not necessary. Histologic analysis of the resected tumour showed a mucinous cystic adenoma, and no signs of malignancy were present. Following the surgery, the pregnancy was otherwise uneventful and further complications did not occur. This case illustrates that surgery is recommended in patients with a retroperitoneal tumour early during a pregnancy, when a malignancy cannot be excluded. PMID:26609332

  9. Canine mammary tumour cell lines established in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hellmén, E

    1993-01-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common tumours in the female dog. The tumours have a complex histology and exist in epithelial, mixed and mesenchymal forms. To study the biology of canine mammary tumours, five cell lines have been established and characterized. The results indicate that canine mammary tumours might be derived from mammary stem cells and that the tumour growth is independent of oestrogens. The established canine mammary tumour cell lines will be valuable tools in further studies of the histogenesis and pathogenesis of these tumours.

  10. Adult Wilms' Tumour: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Modi, Sunny; Tiang, Kor Woi; Inglis, Po; Collins, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Wilms' tumour (nephroblastoma) is the most common renal tumour in children. Wilms' tumour in adults is extremely rare and has a poorer prognosis than paediatric Wilms' tumour. It is difficult to differentiate adult Wilms' tumour from renal cell carcinoma based on radiological findings alone. The diagnosis in adults is often serendipitous following nephrectomy for presumed renal cell carcinoma. Because of the paucity of literature, there are no standard protocols for the management of adult Wilms' tumour, and therefore, it is managed as per paediatric Wilms' tumour. Herein, we report the case of adult Wilms' tumour in a 43-year-old man, which was diagnosed unexpectedly following nephrectomy for presumed renal cell carcinoma.

  11. Adamantinoma: an unusual bone tumour.

    PubMed

    Roque, Pedro; Mankin, Henry J; Rosenberg, Andrew

    2008-12-01

    Adamantinoma is a rare tumour, which most often affects the tibia and produces lytic and sometimes destructive lesions, which can cause fractures. The lesions occur principally in adults and are more common in males. A small percentage of the patients develop metastases, sometimes quite late in the course. Our institution has treated 42 patients with adamantinomas since 1972 and has evaluated them by imaging studies and histology. The majority of the patients were treated by resection of the lesion and insertion of an intercalary allograft. Only three of the patients died of disease with the time until death ranging from 10 to 17 years. Recurrence occurred in only three patients and the allograft success rate in terms of function was 71% at a mean time of 10 years.

  12. Transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Massoud, A; Powell, M; Williams, R; Hindmarsh, P; Brook, C

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 29 January 1997
 OBJECTIVES—Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is the preferred method for the excision of pituitary microadenomas in adults. This study was carried out to establish the long term efficacy and safety of TSS in children.
STUDY DESIGN—A 14 year retrospective analysis was carried out on 23 children (16 boys and seven girls), all less than 18 years of age, who had undergone TSS at our centre.
RESULTS—Twenty nine transsphenoidal surgical procedures were carried out. The most common diagnosis was an adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) secreting adenoma (14 (61%) patients). The median length of follow up was 8.0 years (range 0.3-14.0 years). Eighteen (78%) patients were cured after the first procedure. No death was related to the operation. The most common postoperative complication was diabetes insipidus, which was transient in most patients. Other complications were headaches in two patients and cerebrospinal fluid leaks in two patients. De novo endocrine deficiencies after TSS in children were as follows: three (14%) patients developed panhypopituitarism, eight (73%) developed growth hormone insufficiency, three (14%) developed secondary hypothyroidism, and four (21%) developed gonadotrophin deficiency. Permanent ACTH deficiency occurred in five (24%) patients, though all patients received postoperative glucocorticoid treatment until dynamic pituitary tests were performed three months after TSS.
CONCLUSIONS—TSS in children is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary tumours, provided it is performed by surgeons with considerable experience and expertise. Surgical complications are minimal. Postoperative endocrine deficit is considerable, but is only permanent in a small proportion of patients.

 • Transsphenoidal surgery is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary tumours in children • Transsphenoidal surgery should be performed by surgeons with considerable experience and expertise • Surgical complications of

  13. Modified midfacial translocation for access to ventral skull base tumours.

    PubMed

    Hussain, A; Shakeel, M; Vallamkondu, V; Kamel, M

    2014-09-01

    To describe our technical modifications of midfacial translocation for access to the nasopharynx, and anterior, central and lateral skull base. Retrospective chart review of a prospective case series. Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Scotland, UK. Along with demographics, other parameters studied were adequacy of exposure, completeness of resection, aesthetic outcome and complications. Our main outcome measures included adequacy of exposure, partial or total resection of tumour, aesthetic outcome, and complications related to surgical technique. A total of 48 patients underwent modified midfacial translocation at our institution for nasopharyngeal, parapharyngeal, and anterior, central and lateral skull base tumours. In all cases, the exposure was deemed to be adequate. Two patients developed wound dehiscence in previously irradiated fields. Other incisions healed very well and the aesthetic outcome was regarded as satisfactory. Modified midfacial translocation is based on the principle of temporary craniofacial disassembly for access to the skull base. Our modifications offer adequate access and a better aesthetic outcome. All incisions are placed through the aesthetic sub units of the nose with preservation of the lip. Preservation of the bony piriform aperture prevents airway compromise.

  14. Combined effect of clinically relevant doses of emitefur, a new 5-fluorouracil derivative, and radiation in murine tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Shibamoto, Y.; Murata, R.; Miyauchi, S.; Hirohashi, M.; Takagi, T.; Sasai, K.; Shibata, T.; Oya, N.; Takahashi, M.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the combined effect of radiation and clinically relevant doses of emitefur (BOF-A2), a newly developed anti-cancer agent consisting of a masked form of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and a potent inhibitor of 5-FU degradation, in two types of murine tumours. In preliminary pharmacokinetic studies, the area under the curve for 5-FU in plasma, after administration of 12.5 mg kg-1 and 25 mg kg-1 emitefur in mice, appeared to be similar to that obtained on the first day and that on the seventh day, respectively, after starting administration of 400-600 mg day-1 in humans. These doses (12.5 and 25 mg kg-1) of emitefur were evaluated either alone or in combination with single (15 Gy), five-fraction (4 Gy each) or ten-fraction (2.8 Gy each) irradiation using a tumour growth delay assay for SCCVII tumours and in combination with four-fraction (5 Gy each) irradiation using an in vivo-in vitro assay for EMT6 tumours. The anti-tumour and radiation-enhancing effects of 12.5 mg kg-1 emitefur were not significant in any except the ten-fraction experiment. On the other hand, multiple doses of 25 mg kg-1 emitefur given either alone or in combination with radiation produced marked effects. The mean tumour growth delay time (the time to double in volume for treated tumours minus that for untreated tumours) was 8.1 days for five administrations of 25 mg kg-1 emitefur. 10.4 days for five fractions of 4 Gy and 22.1 days for five treatments with the combination of the two. Thus, the increase in growth delay afforded by this combination was at least additive. The effect of four fractions of 5 Gy with 25 mg kg-1 emitefur in EMT6 tumours was lower than that of four fractions of 7.5 Gy, but the effect of five fractions of 4 Gy with this dose of emitefur in SCCVII tumours was similar to the effect of five fractions of 6 Gy, and the effect of ten fractions of 2.8 Gy with 25 mg kg-1 emitefur was much higher than that of ten fractions of 4.2 Gy. In conclusion, emitefur given either alone

  15. Functional polarization of tumour-associated macrophages by tumour-derived lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Colegio, Oscar R; Chu, Ngoc-Quynh; Szabo, Alison L; Chu, Thach; Rhebergen, Anne Marie; Jairam, Vikram; Cyrus, Nika; Brokowski, Carolyn E; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C; Phillips, Gillian M; Cline, Gary W; Phillips, Andrew J; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-09-25

    Macrophages have an important role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. To perform this function, macrophages must have the capacity to monitor the functional states of their 'client cells': namely, the parenchymal cells in the various tissues in which macrophages reside. Tumours exhibit many features of abnormally developed organs, including tissue architecture and cellular composition. Similarly to macrophages in normal tissues and organs, macrophages in tumours (tumour-associated macrophages) perform some key homeostatic functions that allow tumour maintenance and growth. However, the signals involved in communication between tumours and macrophages are poorly defined. Here we show that lactic acid produced by tumour cells, as a by-product of aerobic or anaerobic glycolysis, has a critical function in signalling, through inducing the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and the M2-like polarization of tumour-associated macrophages. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this effect of lactic acid is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α). Finally, we show that the lactate-induced expression of arginase 1 by macrophages has an important role in tumour growth. Collectively, these findings identify a mechanism of communication between macrophages and their client cells, including tumour cells. This communication most probably evolved to promote homeostasis in normal tissues but can also be engaged in tumours to promote their growth.

  16. Untangling the model muddle: Empirical tumour growth in Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease.

    PubMed

    Hamede, Rodrigo K; Beeton, Nicholas J; Carver, Scott; Jones, Menna E

    2017-07-24

    A pressing and unresolved topic in cancer research is how tumours grow in the absence of treatment. Despite advances in cancer biology, therapeutic and diagnostic technologies, there is limited knowledge regarding the fundamental growth and developmental patterns in solid tumours. In this ten year study, we estimated growth curves in Tasmanian devil facial tumours, a clonal transmissible cancer, in males and females with two different karyotypes (diploid, tetraploid) and facial locations (mucosal, dermal), using established differential equation models and model selection. Logistic growth was the most parsimonious model for diploid, tetraploid and mucosal tumours, with less model certainty for dermal tumours. Estimates of daily proportional tumour growth rate per day (95% Bayesian CIs) varied with ploidy and location [diploid 0.016 (0.014-0.020), tetraploid 0.026 (0.020-0.033), mucosal 0.013 (0.011-0.015), dermal 0.020 (0.016-0.024)]. Final tumour size (cm(3)) also varied, particularly the upper credible interval owing to host mortality as tumours approached maximum volume [diploid 364 (136-2,475), tetraploid 172 (100-305), dermal 226 (134-471)]. To our knowledge, these are the first empirical estimates of tumour growth in the absence of treatment in a wild population. Through this animal-cancer system our findings may enhance understanding of how tumour properties interact with growth dynamics in other types of cancer.

  17. Rare benign tumours of the nipple.

    PubMed

    Spyropoulou, G A; Pavlidis, L; Trakatelli, M; Athanasiou, E; Pazarli, E; Sotiriadis, D; Demiri, E

    2015-01-01

    Benign lesions of the breast in total are much more frequent than malignant ones. However, there are no epidemiologic data on the prevalence of benign or malignant tumours of the nipple, and the bibliography on benign nipple tumours in general is limited. To present some rare cases of benign nipple tumours and review the literature. Four cases of rare benign nipple tumours: neurofibromas, wart, leiomyoma and milium are presented. The literature search on benign nipple tumours was performed using MEDLINE, Pubmed, and Cochrane databases with limits: English language, human species and available abstract. The keyword used was 'benign nipple tumours'. The initial search retrieved 337 articles. The papers were reviewed and the articles that referred to benign lesions that appeared at the nipple specifically were identified. Different entities that were described included: neurofibroma, leiomyoma, milium, florid papillomatosis, syringomatous adenoma, nevoid hyperkeratosis, fibroma, pseudolymphoma and haemangioma. Differential diagnosis of benign tumours of the nipple can be demanding for the physicians. Many of the symptoms and signs like pruritus, serosanguinous discharge, lichenification, erosion and nodular enlargement are produced by either malignant or benign nipple lesions. Radiology can be unclear in the diagnosis of nipple abnormalities. Histological examination of the lesion can be the only definite answer in these cases. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  18. Imaging of retinal and choroidal vascular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, H; Jmor, F; Damato, B

    2013-01-01

    The most common intraocular vascular tumours are choroidal haemangiomas, vasoproliferative tumours, and retinal haemangioblastomas. Rarer conditions include cavernous retinal angioma and arteriovenous malformations. Options for ablating the tumour include photodynamic therapy, argon laser photocoagulation, trans-scleral diathermy, cryotherapy, anti-angiogenic agents, plaque radiotherapy, and proton beam radiotherapy. Secondary effects are common and include retinal exudates, macular oedema, epiretinal membranes, retinal fibrosis, as well as serous and tractional retinal detachment, which are treated using standard methods (ie, intravitreal anti-angiogenic agents or steroids as well as vitreoretinal procedures, such as epiretinal membrane peeling and release of retinal traction). The detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of vascular tumours and their complications have improved considerably thanks to advances in imaging. These include spectral domain and enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT and EDI-OCT, respectively), wide-angle photography and angiography as well as wide-angle fundus autofluorescence. Such novel imaging has provided new diagnostic clues and has profoundly influenced therapeutic strategies so that vascular tumours and secondary effects are now treated concurrently instead of sequentially, enhancing any opportunities for conserving vision and the eye. In this review, we describe how SD-OCT, EDI-OCT, autofluorescence, wide-angle photography and wide-angle angiography have facilitated the evaluation of eyes with the more common vascular tumours, that is, choroidal haemangioma, retinal vasoproliferative tumours, and retinal haemangioblastoma. PMID:23196648

  19. Phase congruency map driven brain tumour segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilágyi, Tünde; Brady, Michael; Berényi, Ervin

    2015-03-01

    Computer Aided Diagnostic (CAD) systems are already of proven value in healthcare, especially for surgical planning, nevertheless much remains to be done. Gliomas are the most common brain tumours (70%) in adults, with a survival time of just 2-3 months if detected at WHO grades III or higher. Such tumours are extremely variable, necessitating multi-modal Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI). The use of Gadolinium-based contrast agents is only relevant at later stages of the disease where it highlights the enhancing rim of the tumour. Currently, there is no single accepted method that can be used as a reference. There are three main challenges with such images: to decide whether there is tumour present and is so localize it; to construct a mask that separates healthy and diseased tissue; and to differentiate between the tumour core and the surrounding oedema. This paper presents two contributions. First, we develop tumour seed selection based on multiscale multi-modal texture feature vectors. Second, we develop a method based on a local phase congruency based feature map to drive level-set segmentation. The segmentations achieved with our method are more accurate than previously presented methods, particularly for challenging low grade tumours.

  20. Paediatric extracranial germ-cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Furqan; Murray, Matthew J; Amatruda, James F; Coleman, Nicholas; Nicholson, James C; Hale, Juliet P; Pashankar, Farzana; Stoneham, Sara J; Poynter, Jenny N; Olson, Thomas A; Billmire, Deborah F; Stark, Daniel; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Frazier, A Lindsay

    2016-04-01

    Management of paediatric extracranial germ-cell tumours carries a unique set of challenges. Germ-cell tumours are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that present across a wide age range and vary in site, histology, and clinical behaviour. Patients with germ-cell tumours are managed by a diverse array of specialists. Thus, staging, risk stratification, and treatment approaches for germ-cell tumours have evolved disparately along several trajectories. Paediatric germ-cell tumours differ from the adolescent and adult disease in many ways, leading to complexities in applying age-appropriate, evidence-based care. Suboptimal outcomes remain for several groups of patients, including adolescents, and patients with extragonadal tumours, high tumour markers at diagnosis, or platinum-resistant disease. Survivors have significant long-term toxicities. The challenge moving forward will be to translate new insights from molecular studies and collaborative clinical data into improved patient outcomes. Future trials will be characterised by improved risk-stratification systems, biomarkers for response and toxic effects, rational reduction of therapy for low-risk patients and novel approaches for poor-risk patients, and improved international collaboration across paediatric and adult cooperative research groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Malignant sweat gland tumours: an update.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, José C; Calonje, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous adnexal tumours can be a diagnostic challenge for the pathologist. This is particularly true in the case of tumours with sweat gland differentiation, due to a large number of rare entities, a multiplicity of names to designate the same neoplasms and consequent lack of consensus regarding their classification and nomenclature. In the traditional view, sweat gland tumours were divided into eccrine and apocrine. However, this has been challenged in recent years, and in fact many of these tumours may have both eccrine and apocrine variants. Some display more complex features and defy classification, due to the presence of other lines of differentiation, namely follicular and/or sebaceous (in the case of apocrine tumours, due to the close embryological relationship between apocrine glands, hair follicles and sebaceous glands). The present paper reviews and updates the basic concepts regarding the following malignant sweat gland tumours: apocrine carcinoma, porocarcinoma, hidradenocarcinoma, spiradenocarcinoma, cylindrocarcinoma, microcystic adnexal carcinoma and related entities, squamoid eccrine ductal carcinoma, digital papillary adenocarcinoma, primary cutaneous mucinous carcinoma, endocrine mucin-producing sweat gland carcinoma and primary cutaneous signet ring cell carcinoma. Particular emphasis is put in recent findings that may have implications in the diagnosis and management of these tumours.

  2. A model of vascular tumour growth in mice combining longitudinal tumour size data with histological biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ribba, Benjamin; Watkin, Emmanuel; Tod, Michel; Girard, Pascal; Grenier, Emmanuel; You, Benoît; Giraudo, Enrico; Freyer, Gilles

    2011-02-01

    Optimising the delivery of antiangiogenic drugs requires the development of drug-disease models of vascular tumour growth that incorporate histological data indicative of cytostatic action. In this study, we formulated a model to analyse the dynamics of tumour progression in nude mice xenografted with HT29 or HCT116 colorectal cancer cells. In 30 mice, tumour size was periodically measured, and percentages of hypoxic and necrotic tissue were assessed using immunohistochemistry techniques on tumour samples after euthanasia. The simultaneous analysis of histological data together with longitudinal tumour size data prompted the development of a semi-mechanistic model integrating random effects of parameters. In this model, the peripheral non-hypoxic tissue proliferates according to a generalised-logistic equation where the maximal tumour size is represented by a variable called 'carrying capacity'. The ratio of the whole tumour size to the carrying capacity was used to define the hypoxic stress. As this stress increases, non-hypoxic tissue turns hypoxic. Hypoxic tissue does not stop proliferating, but hypoxia constitutes a transient stage before the tissue becomes necrotic. As the tumour grows, the carrying capacity increases owing to the process of angiogenesis. The model is shown to correctly predict tumour growth dynamics as well as percentages of necrotic and hypoxic tissues within the tumour. We show how the model can be used as a theoretical tool to investigate the effects of antiangiogenic treatments on tumour growth. This model provides a tool to analyse tumour size data in combination with histological biomarkers such as the percentages of hypoxic and necrotic tissue and is shown to be useful for gaining insight into the effects of antiangiogenic drugs on tumour growth and composition.

  3. Gestational trophoblastic tumours: an update for 2014.

    PubMed

    Froeling, Fieke E M; Seckl, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    Gestational trophoblastic disease describes a variety of pregnancy-related diseases including the premalignant conditions of a partial and complete hydatidiform mole and the malignant disorders of invasive mole, choriocarcinoma and the rare placental-site trophoblastic tumour and epithelioid trophoblastic tumour. The availability of a highly sensitive tumour marker in the form of human chorionic gonadotrophin, the chemosensitive character of the disease with effective treatment strategies and centralization of care of a rare group of diseases has resulted in excellent survival rates, which can exceed 98 %. This review gives a general overview of gestational trophoblastic disease, the most recent insights in aetiology and pathology and a summary of the different management strategies.

  4. Photodynamic therapy and anti-tumour immunity

    PubMed Central

    Castano, Ana P.; Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses non-toxic photosensitizers and harmless visible light in combination with oxygen to produce cytotoxic reactive oxygen species that kill malignant cells by apoptosis and/or necrosis, shut down the tumour microvasculature and stimulate the host immune system. In contrast to surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy that are mostly immunosuppressive, PDT causes acute inflammation, expression of heat-shock proteins, invasion and infiltration of the tumour by leukocytes, and might increase the presentation of tumour-derived antigens to T cells. PMID:16794636

  5. Transoral robotic surgery for retromolar trigone tumours.

    PubMed

    Durmus, K; Apuhan, T; Ozer, E

    2013-12-01

    The retromolar trigone is a challenging transoral surgical site due to the difficulty of visualization. Our aim is to report a new technique of transoral robotic resection of retromolar trigone tumours. We present three patients with retromolar trigone tumours with pathological diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma who underwent successful transoral robotic resection. Robotic retromolar trigone resection and concurrent supraomohyoid neck dissections were performed in all patients without any complication. In conclusion, transoral robotic surgery is a safe and feasible technique for resection of malignant retromolar trigone tumours with minimal complications and favourable outcomes.

  6. Contrast‐enhanced ultrasound of pancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    D'Onofrio, Mirko; Crosara, Stefano; Dal Corso, Flavia; Barbi, Emilio; Canestrini, Stefano; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Indication/purpose: To review contrast‐enhanced ultrasound features of the most common pancreatic tumours. Methods: Contrast‐enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can provide distinctive features of pancreatic tumours that are reported in the present paper, providing radiologic‐pathological correlations and clarifying the main differential diagnosis. Conclusion: Contrast‐enhanced ultrasound plays a well‐established role in the evaluation of pancreatic tumours. When possible, CEUS should be always performed after the initial US diagnosis, in order to improve the accuracy of the first line examination. PMID:28191218

  7. Pulmonary tumour microembolism clinically mimicking alveolitis

    PubMed Central

    Lo, A W I; Tse, G M K; Chu, W C W; Chan, A B W

    2003-01-01

    A 56 year old man with previously unsuspected recurrence of squamous cell carcinoma of the oesophagus presented with dyspnoea. Bronchoscopy and computed tomography suggested bronchopneumonic changes with an infectious cause. He suffered a rapidly deteriorating course and died despite active treatment, including antibiotics and mechanical ventilation. Necropsy revealed a florid pulmonary tumour microembolism mimicking alveolitis. No bronchopneumonia was seen. The emboli arose from loosely attached tumour vegetations in the tricuspid valve. In a patient with known malignancy, tumour microembolism should be considered as an uncommon cause of rapid respiratory failure, refractory to antibiotic treatment. PMID:14600135

  8. Modes of invasion during tumour dissemination.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Pahini; Orgaz, Jose L; Sanz-Moreno, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cell migration and invasion underlie metastatic dissemination, one of the major problems in cancer. Tumour cells exhibit a striking variety of invasion strategies. Importantly, cancer cells can switch between invasion modes in order to cope with challenging environments. This ability to switch migratory modes or plasticity highlights the challenges behind antimetastasis therapy design. In this Review, we present current knowledge on different tumour invasion strategies, the determinants controlling plasticity and arising therapeutic opportunities. We propose that targeting master regulators controlling plasticity is needed to hinder tumour dissemination and metastasis. © 2016 The Authors. Published by FEBS Press and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Tumour size, tumour complexity, and surgical approach are associated with nephrectomy type in small renal cortical tumours treated electively.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Gregory J; Clark, Peter E; Barocas, Daniel A; Cookson, Michael S; Smith, Joseph A; Herrell, S Duke; Chang, Sam S

    2012-06-01

    Study Type - Therapy (case series) Level of Evidence 4 What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Although the benefits of nephron-sparing renal cortical tumour treatments are now widely accepted and have robust data supporting their oncological efficacy, safety, and positive effect on medium- and long-term renal function, the decision to perform partial nephrectomy (PN) remains a complex interaction between several competing factors. Various patient factors, e.g. comorbid conditions, age, body habitus, patient preference, etc. may effect this decision. Then there are the preferences of the surgeon him- or herself, including faculty with different operative techniques and surgical approaches, which may lead to one treatment decision over another. Finally, the anatomy of the tumour itself, i.e. the complexity of the tumour within the kidney and anatomical relationships within the organ, is intuitively critical to a surgeon's assessment of resectability. There is very little published data indicating which of the multitude of clinical variables have the greatest impact on the decision to perform PN. Most previous investigations into the subject have focused on either imperative or relative indications for PN (i.e. solitary kidney, bilateral renal masses, and multifocal tumours) or have used maximal tumour diameter (i.e. tumour size) alone in their assessment of the clinical variables associated with PN use. To identify preoperative variables associated with choice of partial nephrectomy (PN) vs radical nephrectomy (RN). Between January 2004 and June 2008, 203 patients were treated for clinical T1a renal cortical tumours. Of these, 154 (75.8%) had all data available and form the analytic cohort. Patients were categorized into two groups, PN and RN, based on preoperative treatment plan. Patient-, procedure-, and tumour-related variables, together with tumour complexity (based on the R.E.N.A.L Nephrometry Score [RENAL-NS]) were evaluated for their

  10. Establishment of a small animal tumour model for in vivo studies with low energy laser accelerated particles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The long-term aim of developing a laser based acceleration of protons and ions towards clinical application requires not only substantial technological progress, but also the radiobiological characterization of the resulting ultra-short pulsed particle beams. Recent in vitro data showed similar effects of laser-accelerated versus "conventional" protons on clonogenic cell survival. As the proton energies currently achieved by laser driven acceleration are too low to penetrate standard tumour models on mouse legs, the aim of the present work was to establish a tumour model allowing for the penetration of low energy protons (~ 20 MeV) to further verify their effects in vivo. Methods KHT mouse sarcoma cells were injected subcutaneously in the right ear of NMRI (nu/nu) mice and the growing tumours were characterized with respect to growth parameters, histology and radiation response. In parallel, the laser system JETI was prepared for animal experimentation, i.e. a new irradiation setup was implemented and the laser parameters were carefully adjusted. Finally, a proof-of-principle experiment with laser accelerated electrons was performed to validate the tumour model under realistic conditions, i.e. altered environment and horizontal beam delivery. Results KHT sarcoma on mice ears showed a high take rate and continuous tumour growth after reaching a volume of ~ 5 mm3. The first irradiation experiment using laser accelerated electrons versus 200 kV X-rays was successfully performed and tumour growth delay was evaluated. Comparable tumour growth delay was found between X-ray and laser accelerated electron irradiation. Moreover, experimental influences, like anaesthesia and positioning at JETI, were found to be negligible. Conclusion A small animal tumour model suitable for the irradiation with low energy particles was established and validated at a laser based particle accelerator. Thus, the translation from in vitro to in vivo experimentation was for the

  11. Odontogenic ghost cell tumour with clear cell components: clear cell odontogenic ghost cell tumour?

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung Hoon; Ahn, Sang Gun; Kim, Su Gwan; Kim, Jin

    2004-07-01

    A case of odontogenic ghost cell tumour (OGCT) with clear cell components was encountered in the mandible of a 63-year-old man. The tumour revealed ameloblastomatous-type epithelial components accompanied by clusters of ghost cells and dentinoid juxtaposed to the odontogenic epithelium. In addition, some areas of the tumour tissue showed sheets and islands of clear, glycogen containing epithelial cells, which were separated by a thin fibrous connective tissue stroma. Both ameloblastic and clear cells exhibited positive immunoreactivities for cytokeratin 19 and AE1/3. It is not known whether this tumour represents a clear cell change of a pre-existing OGCT or a separate and distinct neoplasm derived de novo from the odontogenic epithelium. This tumour was given the term 'clear cell OGCT' because it captures the clear cell components, which is one of the most prominent distinguishing features of the tumour.

  12. The validity of surgical clips as radiographic markers for the tumour resection cavity in head and neck cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Bittermann, Gido; Voss, Pit; Duttenhoefer, Fabian; Zimmerer, Ruediger; Vach, Kirstin; Metzger, Marc C

    2015-07-01

    A prerequisite of irradiation after advanced head and neck tumour resection is the accurate localization of the tumour resection margin. The purpose of the following study is to evaluate the use of surgical clips placed in the tumour resection margins for use as radiographic markers to facilitate focussed adjuvant radiation therapy. To evaluate whether the clips remain predictive for the resection margin, we analysed the deviation of each clip in two postoperative CT scans on different days. Bone registration points were used to fuse the two CT scans in the region of the primary tumour and the distances between corresponding clips were measured. The tumour resection margins were labelled with an average of 18 titanium clips. In total 282 clips were evaluated. Metric analysis of clip deviation between the two postoperative CT scans found a mean distance of 4.5 mm ± 2.5 mm with a range of 0.5-11.8 mm. No significant statistical relationship of the clip differences as a function of time, the method of reconstruction or administered radiotherapy could be demonstrated. Placement of surgical clips in the cavity walls after complete tumour resection provides an easy and inexpensive approach for defining resection margins and allows for increased accuracy of adjuvant treatment. Clinical trial number DRKS00007534. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Endobronchial brachytherapy in the treatment of malignant lung tumours.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Sacristán, J A; Granda-Orive, J I; Gutiérrez Jiménez, T; Delgado, J M; Rodero Baños, A; Saez Valls, R

    2004-09-01

    A prospective study was made to assess the short-term clinical and endoscopic response to high-dose-rate endobronchial brachytherapy (HDREB) in patients with malignant endobronchial tumours. From July 1995 to May 2000, 288 HDREB sessions were carried out on 81 patients. The mean patient age was 61.57 yrs (range 34-82); males were predominant (87.65%). Tumours were primary in 76 patients (93.82%) and metastatic in five patients (6.18%). The inclusion criteria were malignant endobronchial tumour and either palliative treatment for incurable disease or intent-to-cure treatment for residual malignancy on the bronchial resection surface after surgery or an inoperable tumour. The exclusion criteria were as follows: impediments to catheter placement, expected survival <2 months, Karnofsky index <60, or absence of informed consent. The clinical response of a symptom was categorised as complete (disappearance of the symptom), partial (less than complete) or absent. The endoscopic response was considered to be complete if lesions disappeared and biopsy findings remained negative 1 month after the last radiation session; partial if lesions improved to some extent, but the biopsy findings were positive; and absent if there was no change in relation to baseline. The technique consisted of delivering high-dose irradiation from an Ir192 source to a target volume using one or two endobronchial catheters inserted under optical or video bronchoscopic guidance. Four sessions were scheduled at weekly intervals and 500 cGy was applied per session over a length of 1-9 cm, measured 0.5-1 cm from the centre of the source. In total, 85% of the symptoms analysed (haemoptysis, cough, dyspnoea, expectoration, and stridor) disappeared with HDREB, which was categorised as a complete response. The endoscopic response was complete in 56.79% of patients, partial or less than complete in 40.74% and absent in 2.46%. One major complication occurred (bronchial fistula 1.2%), but no lethal haemoptysis

  14. Neutron medical treatment of tumours — a survey of facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, F. M.; Loeper-Kabasakal, B.; Breitkreutz, H.

    2012-03-01

    Neutron therapy has two branches: Fast Neutron Therapy (FNT) and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The mean neutron energies used for FNT range from 2 MeV to 25 MeV whereas the maximum energy for BNCT is about 10 keV. Neutron generators for FNT have been cyclotrons, accelerators and reactors, whereas BNCT is so far bound to reactors. Both therapies use the effects of high-LET radiation (secondary recoil protons and alpha particles, respectively) and can attack otherwise radioresistant tumours, however, with the hazard of adverse effects for irradiated healthy tissue. FNT has been administered to about 30,000 patients world-wide. From formerly 40 facilities, only eight are operational or stand-by today. The reasons for this development have been, on the one hand, related to technical and economical conditions; on the other hand, strong side effects and insufficient proof of clinical results in the early years as well as increasing competition with new clinical methods have reduced patient numbers. In fact, strict observations of indications, appropriate therapy-planning including low-LET radiation, and consequent treatment of side effects have lead to remarkable results in the meantime. BNCT initially was developed for the treatment of extremely aggressive forms of brain tumour, taking advantage of the action of the blood-brain-barrier which allows for a boronated compound to be selectively enriched in tumour cells. Meanwhile, also malignant melanoma (MM) and Head-and-Neck (H&T) tumours are treated because of their relative radioresistance. At present, epithermal beams with sufficient flux are available only at two facilities. Existing research reactors were indispensable in the development of BNCT, but are to be replaced by hospital-based epithermal neutron sources. Clinical results indicate significantly increased survival times, but the number of patients ever treated is still below 1,000. 3D-dose calculation systems have been developed at several facilities

  15. Therapeutic effect of interleukin 12 on mouse haemangiosarcomas is not associated with an increased anti-tumour cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity.

    PubMed Central

    Vizler, C.; Rosato, A.; Calderazzo, F.; Quintieri, L.; Fruscella, P.; Wainstok de Calmanovici, R.; Mantovani, A.; Vecchi, A.; Zanovello, P.; Collavo, D.

    1998-01-01

    In syngeneic mice, the H5V polyoma middle-T oncogene-transformed endothelioma cell line induces Kaposi's sarcoma-like cavernous haemangiomas that regress transiently, probably because of an anti-tumour immune response, but eventually grow progressively and kill the host. To evaluate the generation of tumour-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), spleen cells of tumour-bearing mice were restimulated with irradiated H5V cells in mixed leucocyte-tumour cell cultures. Tumour-specific CTLs were demonstrable only when low numbers of H5V stimulator cells were used (<1 H5V cell per 50 splenocytes). We found that H5V cells secrete immunosuppressive mediators because CTL generation was blocked when H5V cells culture supernatants were added to allogeneic mixed leucocyte cultures. As numerous tumour-derived immunosuppressive mediators may interfere with interleukin 12 (IL-12) production, we tested whether IL-12 treatment of the tumour-bearing mice would augment their immune response and thus suppress tumour growth. Indeed, IL-12 inhibited tumour growth and prevented mortality, but did not increase anti-H5V CTL generation either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, the anti-tumour activity in IL-12-treated mice was abrogated by anti-interferon (IFN)-gamma monoclonal antibody (MAb) co-administration. These results strongly suggest that the anti-tumour effect of IL-12 is principally mediated by IFN-gamma release that in turn blocks H5V cell proliferation and induces the release of factors that suppress angiogenesis. PMID:9484826

  16. Tumour necrosis factor alpha increases melphalan concentration in tumour tissue after isolated limb perfusion

    PubMed Central

    de Wilt, J H W; ten Hagen, T L M; de Boeck, G; van Tiel, S T; de Bruijn, E A; Eggermont, A M M

    2000-01-01

    Several possible mechanisms for the synergistic anti-tumour effects between tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and melphalan after isolated limb perfusion (ILP) have been presented. We found a significant sixfold increase in melphalan tumour tissue concentration after ILP when TNF-α was added to the perfusate, which provides a straightforward explanation for the observed synergism between melphalan and TNF-α in ILP. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10737379

  17. Tumour angiogenic activity and vascular survival ability in bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, I; Giatromanolaki, A; Koukourakis, M I; Sivridis, E

    2004-03-01

    Tumour angiogenic activity (TAA) is an important prognostic factor in many human tumours, including transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder. The new tumour vessels are formed in the invading tumour front. This peripheral tumour area is internalised as soon as the growing tumour forms a new front. To investigate and compare TAA with the ability of the tumour vasculature to survive (VSA) in inner tumour areas. Fifty one cystectomy specimens with transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder were studied. Sections were stained immunohistochemically for endothelial cells and proliferation activity, using the monoclonal antibodies CD31 and MIB-1, respectively. TAA was studied at the invading tumour edge-designated as the mean number of blood vessels in three "hot spots" at this site. VSA was assessed by comparing the vascular density in peripheral and inner tumour areas. High TAA at the invading tumour edge significantly correlated with lymph node involvement, but not with patient survival. Extensive lymphocytic infiltration was more frequent in tumours with high TAA. VSA was significantly higher in tumours of high proliferation index, high histological grade, advanced T stage, and poor prognosis. However, there was no association with metastasis to regional lymph nodes. VSA and TAA provide a more complete profile of the tumour vasculature and are associated with aggressive tumour behaviour in transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder. The qualitative information provided by VSA may be important for the identification of angiogenic tumours with differential responses to various antiangiogenic treatments.

  18. Ovarian yolk sac tumour in a girl - case report.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Charu; Shah, Hemanshi; Sisodiya Shenoy, Neha; Makhija, Deepa; Waghmare, Mukta

    2017-01-01

    Yolk sac tumours are rare ovarian malignancies accounting for less than 1% of malignant ovarian germ cell tumours. They are mostly seen in adolescents and young women and are usually unilateral making fertility preservation imperative. Raised alpha-feto protein level is the hallmark of this tumour. We describe stage III yolk sac tumour in a girl child.

  19. [Application of tumour markers in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Keuren, Jeffrey F W; Thomas, Chris M G; Bonfrèr, J M G Hans; Sweep, C G J Fred; Boonstra, Joke G

    2009-01-01

    Usefully requesting and applying serum tumour markers in diagnosis and treatment can be difficult. It should be noted that tumour markers are used for varying purposes: screening, diagnosis, staging and prognostic evaluation, detection of recurrence and treatment monitoring. Due to the poor sensitivity and specificity of current tumour markers, most are not suitable for screening an asymptomatic population. Further, the benefits of an improved prognosis by early detection should be weighed against a poorer quality of life and the cost of substantial over-diagnosis and over-treatment. Serum tumour markers are particularly applicable in treatment monitoring and detection of recurrence. Sometimes they can be used to support the diagnostic process and give useful prognostic information.

  20. Imaging tumour hypoxia with positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, I N; Manavaki, R; Blower, P J; West, C; Williams, K J; Harris, A L; Domarkas, J; Lord, S; Baldry, C; Gilbert, F J

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia, a hallmark of most solid tumours, is a negative prognostic factor due to its association with an aggressive tumour phenotype and therapeutic resistance. Given its prominent role in oncology, accurate detection of hypoxia is important, as it impacts on prognosis and could influence treatment planning. A variety of approaches have been explored over the years for detecting and monitoring changes in hypoxia in tumours, including biological markers and noninvasive imaging techniques. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the preferred method for imaging tumour hypoxia due to its high specificity and sensitivity to probe physiological processes in vivo, as well as the ability to provide information about intracellular oxygenation levels. This review provides an overview of imaging hypoxia with PET, with an emphasis on the advantages and limitations of the currently available hypoxia radiotracers. PMID:25514380

  1. [Malignant phyllodes tumour : a case report].

    PubMed

    Radermacher, J; Burlet, O; Sylvestre, R M; Wetz, P; Delvenne, Ph

    2016-11-01

    A 28 year old woman has suffered over the previous month from a post-traumatic swelling sensation of the left breast. Ultrasonography demonstrates a 9 cm, sharply-cut, rounded, hypo-echogenic lesion. Surgery is performed, with the hypothesis of an haematoma. The pathological analysis of the lesion shows a malignant phyllodes tumour with heterologous rhabdomyosarcomatous features. No metastasis is found. A radical mastectomy is performed and the patient benefits from an adjuvant radio-chemotherapy. Phyllodes tumours represent up to 1 % of all mammary cancers, with 10-20 % of malignant lesions. These tumours behave differently from usual breast cancers. This atypical case, arising in a traumatic context, provides the opportunity to discuss the treatment and classification of phyllodes tumours of the breast.

  2. Peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumour in a dog.

    PubMed

    Junginger, J; Röthlisberger, A; Lehmbecker, A; Stein, V M; Ludwig, D C; Baumgärtner, W; Seehusen, F

    2013-11-01

    A 1-year-old German shepherd dog was presented with paraparesis quickly progressing to paraplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large mass beneath the thoracolumbar vertebral column infiltrating the spinal canal and resulting in severe extradural compression of the spinal cord. Microscopically, this comprised a cell-rich unencapsulated tumour supported by fine bands of a fibrovascular stroma and occasionally forming primitive rosettes. Immunohistochemistry showed the tumour cells to express synaptophysin and neuron-specific enolase. Ultrastructurally, the neoplastic cells had low to moderate numbers of intracytoplasmic neurosecretory granules. A peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumour was diagnosed. This is a rare embryonal tumour of neural origin that may have arisen from adrenal medulla, autonomic ganglia or peripheral nerves.

  3. Growth hormone receptor antagonism suppresses tumour regrowth after radiotherapy in an endometrial cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Evans, Angharad; Jamieson, Stephen M F; Liu, Dong-Xu; Wilson, William R; Perry, Jo K

    2016-08-28

    Human GH expression is associated with poor survival outcomes for endometrial cancer patients, enhanced oncogenicity of endometrial cancer cells and reduced sensitivity to ionising radiation in vitro, suggesting that GH is a potential target for anticancer therapy. However, whether GH receptor inhibition sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo has not been tested. In the current study, we evaluated whether the GH receptor antagonist, pegvisomant (Pfizer), sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo in an endometrial tumour xenograft model. Subcutaneous administration of pegvisomant (20 or 100 mg/kg/day, s.c.) reduced serum IGF1 levels by 23% and 68%, respectively, compared to vehicle treated controls. RL95-2 xenografts grown in immunodeficient NIH-III mice were treated with vehicle or pegvisomant (100 mg/kg/day), with or without fractionated gamma radiation (10 × 2.5 Gy over 5 days). When combined with radiation, pegvisomant significantly increased the median time tumours took to reach 3× the pre-radiation treatment volume (49 days versus 72 days; p = 0.001). Immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated that 100 mg/kg pegvisomant every second day was sufficient to abrogate MAP Kinase signalling throughout the tumour. In addition, treatment with pegvisomant increased hypoxic regions in irradiated tumours, as determined by immunohistochemical detection of pimonidazole adducts, and decreased the area of CD31 labelling in unirradiated tumours, suggesting an anti-vascular effect. Pegvisomant did not affect intratumoral staining for HIF1α, VEGF-A, CD11b, or phospho-EGFR. Our results suggest that blockade of the human GH receptor may improve the response of GH and/or IGF1-responsive endometrial tumours to radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of proton beam irradiation on uveal melanomas: a comparative study of Ki-67 expression in irradiated versus non-irradiated melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Chiquet, C.; Grange, J.; Ayzac, L.; Chauvel, P.; Patricot, L.; Devouassoux-Shish..., M.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To assess the cellular proliferation using the monoclonal antibody Ki-67, in paraffin embedded uveal melanomas irradiated by proton beam, as well as in non-irradiated uveal melanomas.
METHODS—30 enucleated eyes were included for histopathological study and Ki-67 immunostaining. Patients were enucleated between 1991 and 1996 for uveal melanoma, 14 after proton beam irradiation and 16 without treatment (control group). The mean follow up period was 2.5 years after diagnosis and 1 year after enucleation.
RESULTS—A significant relation was found between Ki-67 score and mitotic index (r = 0.56, p = 0.001), histological largest tumour diameter (r = 0.38, p = 0.03), fibrosis (r = −0.35, p = 0.05), absence of tumoral pigmentation (p = 0.05), and presence of vascular thrombosis (p = 0.03). The Ki-67 score was significantly higher in the non-irradiated group (p = 0.01) and in the group of patients whose cause of enucleation was tumoral evolution (p = 0.005) compared with the group of patients enucleated after neovascular glaucoma. The Ki-67 score was very high in a case of orbital recurrence of uveal melanoma and metastatic death. 70% of metastasised tumours showed a Ki-67 score higher than the median value.
CONCLUSION—Ki-67 labelling is a reliable method of estimating the proliferative activity in uveal melanomas after proton beam irradiation. The Ki-67 score is significantly correlated with prognostic variables (mitotic index and histological largest tumour diameter), and with radiation effects after proton beam irradiation.

 PMID:10611107

  5. Simulating tumour removal in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Radetzky, A; Rudolph, M

    2001-12-01

    In this article the software system ROBO-SIM is described. ROBO-SIM is a planning and simulation tool for minimally invasive neurosurgery. Different to the most other simulation tools, ROBO-SIM is able to use actual patient's datasets for simulation. Same as in real neurosurgery a planning step, which provides more functionality as up-to-date planning systems on the market, is performed before undergoing the simulated operation. The planning steps include the definition of the trepanation point for entry into the skull and the target point within the depth of the brain, checking the surgical track and doing virtual trepanations (virtual craniotomy). For use with an intra-operative active manipulator, which is guided by the surgeon during real surgery (robotic surgery), go- and non-go-areas can be defined. During operation, the robot restricts the surgeon from leaving these go-areas. After planning, an additional simulation system, which is understood as an extension to the planning step, is used to simulate whole surgical interventions directly on the patient's anatomy basing on the planning data and by using the same instruments as for the real intervention. First tests with ROBO-SIM are performed on a phantom developed for this purpose and on actual patient's datasets with ventricular tumours.

  6. Keratocystic odontogenic tumour: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald-Jankowski, D S

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this review is to evaluate the principal clinical and conventional radiographic features of non-syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumour (KCOT) by systematic review (SR), and to compare the frequencies between four global groups. Methods The databases searched were the PubMed interface of Medline and LILACS. Only those reports of KCOTs that occurred in a series of consecutive cases, in the reporting authors' caseload, were considered. Results 51 reports, of 49 series of cases, were included in the SR. 11 SR-included series were in languages other than English. KCOTs affected males more frequently and were three times more prevalent in the mandible. Although the mean age at first presentation was 37 years, the largest proportion of cases first presented in the third decade. The main symptom was swelling. Over a third were found incidentally. Nearly two-thirds displayed buccolingual expansion. Over a quarter of cases recurred. Only a quarter of all SR-included reported series of cases included details of at least one radiological feature. The East Asian global group presented significantly as well-defined, even corticated, multilocular radiolucencies with buccolingual expansion. The KCOTs affecting the Western global group significantly displayed an association with unerupted teeth. Conclusions Long-term follow-up of large series that would have revealed detailed radiographic description and long-term outcomes of non-syndromic KCOT was lacking. PMID:21159911

  7. Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumour of the Mandible: An Unusually Aggressive Presentation of an Indolent Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Dev, DP Arul; Michael, Manoj Joseph; Akhilesh, AV; Das, Bindu

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumour (CEOT) or Pindborg tumour is a rare odontogenic tumour of epithelial origin. They constitute less than 1% of odontogenic tumours. Intra-ossseous variant of CEOT are more common compared to extra-osseous variant. Although benign, these can exhibit deceptively aggressive presentation. Here we report a rare case of CEOT in a 36-year-old female patient who presented with aggressive intra-osseous lesion with cortical breach and exuberant soft tissue proliferation. The lesion was treated with resection and reconstructed with titanium reconstruction plate. PMID:27790590

  8. Stromal Claudin14-Heterozygosity, but Not Deletion, Increases Tumour Blood Leakage without Affecting Tumour Growth

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Marianne; Reynolds, Louise E.; Robinson, Stephen D.; Lees, Delphine M.; Parsons, Maddy; Elia, George; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan

    2013-01-01

    The maintenance of endothelial cell-cell junctions is vital for the control of blood vessel leakage and is known to be important in the growth and maturation of new blood vessels during angiogenesis. Here we have investigated the role of a tight junction molecule, Claudin14, in tumour blood vessel leakage, angiogenesis and tumour growth. Using syngeneic tumour models our results showed that genetic ablation of Claudin14 was not sufficient to affect tumour blood vessel morphology or function. However, and surprisingly, Claudin14-heterozygous mice displayed several blood vessel-related phenotypes including: disruption of ZO-1-positive cell-cell junctions in tumour blood vessels; abnormal distribution of basement membrane laminin around tumour blood vessels; increased intratumoural leakage and decreased intratumoural hypoxia. Additionally, although total numbers of tumour blood vessels were increased in Claudin14-heterozygous mice, and in VEGF-stimulated angiogenesis ex vivo, the number of lumenated vessels was not changed between genotypes and this correlated with no difference in syngeneic tumour growth between wild-type, Claudin14-heterozygous and Claudin14-null mice. Lastly, Claudin14-heterozygosity, but not complete deficiency, also enhanced endothelial cell proliferation significantly. These data establish a new role for Claudin14 in the regulation of tumour blood vessel integrity and angiogenesis that is evident only after the partial loss of this molecule in Claudin14-heterozyous mice but not in Claudin14-null mice. PMID:23675413

  9. Primary primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the kidney in adults.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ritu; Singhal, Mitali; Pandey, Rakesh

    2013-03-04

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) is a neural crest tumour derived from neuroectoderm. Renal PNET is a very rare tumour occurring during childhood or adolescence. We report two cases of PNET involving kidney in adults. Presenting signs and symptoms include abdominal/flank pain and/or haematuria. Microscopy reveals the tumour consisted of small round cells with round nuclei and scant cytoplasm. Diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry with diffuse membranous positivity of tumour cells with CD99. As these tumours have an aggressive clinical course with rapid death in many reported cases, it is important to differentiate them from other small round-cell tumours.

  10. Tumour-targeted nanomedicines: principles and practice

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, T; Hennink, W E; Storm, G

    2008-01-01

    Drug targeting systems are nanometre-sized carrier materials designed for improving the biodistribution of systemically applied (chemo)therapeutics. Various different tumour-targeted nanomedicines have been evaluated over the years, and clear evidence is currently available for substantial improvement of the therapeutic index of anticancer agents. Here, we briefly summarise the most important targeting systems and strategies, and discuss recent advances and future directions in the development of tumour-targeted nanomedicines. PMID:18648371

  11. Watery diarrhoea and an islet cell tumour

    PubMed Central

    Hindle, W.; McBrien, D. J.; Creamer, B.

    1964-01-01

    It is suggested that there are two hormonal syndromes associated with noninsulin-secreting islet cell tumours and this case is an example of the non-gastrin-secreting type with watery diarrhoea and hypokalaemia. The patient had histamine-fast achlorhydria and a normal gastric biopsy and no gastrin was recovered from the tumour tissue. The watery diarrhoea was isosmotic with plasma and was increased by an intravenous saline load. There was a dramatic response to steroids. PMID:14209921

  12. Phytosanitary Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Hallman, Guy J.; Blackburn, Carl M.

    2016-01-01

    Phytosanitary treatments disinfest traded commodities of potential quarantine pests. Phytosanitary irradiation (PI) treatments use ionizing radiation to accomplish this, and, since their international commercial debut in 2004, the use of this technology has increased by ~10% annually. Generic PI treatments (one dose is used for a group of pests and/or commodities, although not all have been tested for efficacy) are used in virtually all commercial PI treatments, and new generic PI doses are proposed, such as 300 Gy, for all insects except pupae and adult Lepidoptera (moths). Fresh fruits and vegetables tolerate PI better than any other broadly used treatment. Advances that would help facilitate the use of PI include streamlining the approval process, making the technology more accessible to potential users, lowering doses and broadening their coverage, and solving potential issues related to factors that might affect efficacy. PMID:28231103

  13. Clinicopathological study of canine transmissible venereal tumour in leishmaniotic dogs.

    PubMed

    Marino, G; Gaglio, G; Zanghì, A

    2012-06-01

    Canine transmissible venereal tumour is occasionally observed in leishmaniotic dogs, and Leishmania amastigotes can be harboured in canine transmissible venereal tumour cells. The aim of this paper was to investigate the clinicopathological significance of the association of both diseases. Nineteen dogs affected by canine transmissible venereal tumour and canine leishmaniasis were studied retrospectively. In these dogs, the tumour manifested a large size and often aggressive behaviour (42%) and no predictive sign of spontaneous regression was observed. Sporadic Leishmania amastigotes were found within the canine transmissible venereal tumour in three cases, probably transported by infected macrophages often infiltrating the tumour. A high Leishmania parasitisation of canine transmissible venereal tumour was observed in two other cases and verified by immunohistochemistry. Canine transmissible venereal tumour is a tumour of the dog able to harbour a large number of Leishmania parasites. Alternatively, the systemic disease (canine leishmaniasis) may lower the immune defence against malignancy (canine transmissible venereal tumour). © 2012 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  14. Multiscale modelling and nonlinear simulation of vascular tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Macklin, Paul; Anderson, Alexander R. A.; Chaplain, Mark A. J.; Cristini, Vittorio

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we present a new multiscale mathematical model for solid tumour growth which couples an improved model of tumour invasion with a model of tumour-induced angiogenesis. We perform nonlinear simulations of the multi-scale model that demonstrate the importance of the coupling between the development and remodeling of the vascular network, the blood flow through the network and the tumour progression. Consistent with clinical observations, the hydrostatic stress generated by tumour cell proliferation shuts down large portions of the vascular network dramatically affecting the flow, the subsequent network remodeling, the delivery of nutrients to the tumour and the subsequent tumour progression. In addition, extracellular matrix degradation by tumour cells is seen to have a dramatic affect on both the development of the vascular network and the growth response of the tumour. In particular, the newly developing vessels tend to encapsulate, rather than penetrate, the tumour and are thus less effective in delivering nutrients. PMID:18781303

  15. A dynamical model of tumour immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Frascoli, Federico; Kim, Peter S; Hughes, Barry D; Landman, Kerry A

    2014-07-01

    A coupled ordinary differential equation model of tumour-immune dynamics is presented and analysed. The model accounts for biological and clinical factors which regulate the interaction rates of cytotoxic T lymphocytes on the surface of the tumour mass. A phase plane analysis demonstrates that competition between tumour cells and lymphocytes can result in tumour eradication, perpetual oscillations, or unbounded solutions. To investigate the dependence of the dynamic behaviour on model parameters, the equations are solved analytically and conditions for unbounded versus bounded solutions are discussed. An analytic characterisation of the basin of attraction for oscillatory orbits is given. It is also shown that the tumour shape, characterised by a surface area to volume scaling factor, influences the size of the basin, with significant consequences for therapy design. The findings reveal that the tumour volume must surpass a threshold size that depends on lymphocyte parameters for the cancer to be completely eliminated. A semi-analytic procedure to calculate oscillation periods and determine their sensitivity to model parameters is also presented. Numerical results show that the period of oscillations exhibits notable nonlinear dependence on biologically relevant conditions.

  16. Smooth muscle tumours of the alimentary tract.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, T.; Danton, M. H.; Parks, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    Neoplasms arising from smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are uncommon, comprising only 1% of gastrointestinal tumours. A total of 51 cases of smooth muscle tumour of the GI tract were analysed; 44 leiomyomas and 7 leiomyosarcomas. Lesions occurred in all areas from the oesophagus to the rectum, the stomach being the commonest site. Thirty-six patients had clinical features referable to the tumour. The tumour was detected during investigation or management of an unrelated disease process in 15 patients. The clinical presentation varied depending on tumour location, but abdominal pain and GI bleeding were the commonest presenting symptoms. The lesion was demonstrated preoperatively, mainly by endoscopy and barium studies, in 27 patients. Surgical excision was the treatment of choice, where possible. There was no recurrence in the leiomyoma group but four patients died in the leiomyosarcoma group. Although rare, smooth muscle tumours should be considered in situations where clinical presentation and investigations are not suggestive of any common GI disorder. The preoperative assessment and diagnosis is difficult because of the variability in clinical features and their inaccessibility to routine GI investigation. It is recommended that, where possible, the lesion, whether symptomatic or discovered incidentally, should be excised completely to achieve a cure and prevent future complications. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2221768

  17. [An immobilising malignant phyllodes tumour of the breast].

    PubMed

    Fritsche, E; Hug, U; Winterholer, D

    2015-04-01

    Phyllodes tumours of the breast are rare occurrences, but they can reach huge dimensions. Descriptions of tumours whereby the women are immobilised as a consequence of the size of the tumour, are hard to find in the literature. In this presentation we show a case of a woman in otherwise healthy condition with a giant phyllodes tumour of her left breast. Because of the weight of the tumour, the patient could not leave her bed for more than 6 months.

  18. Volume increase and spatial shifts of chromosome territories in nuclei of radiation-induced polyploidizing tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Schwarz-Finsterle, Jutta; Scherthan, Harry; Huna, Anda; González, Paula; Mueller, Patrick; Schmitt, Eberhard; Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Hausmann, Michael

    2013-08-30

    The exposure of tumour cells to high doses of ionizing radiation can induce endopolyploidization as an escape route from cell death. This strategy generally results in mitotic catastrophe during the first few days after irradiation. However, some cells escape mitotic catastrophe, polyploidize and attempt to undergo genome reduction and de-polyploidization in order to create new, viable para-diploid tumour cell sub-clones. In search for the consequences of ionizing radiation induced endopolyploidization, genome and chromosome architecture in nuclei of polyploid tumour cells, and sub-nuclei after division of bi- or multi-nucleated cells were investigated during 7 days following irradiation. Polyploidization was induced in p53-function deficient HeLa cells by exposure to 10Gy of X-irradiation. Chromosome territories #1, #4, #12 and centromeres of chromosomes #6, #10, #X were labelled by FISH and analysed for chromosome numbers, volumes and spatial distribution during 7 days post irradiation. The numbers of interphase chromosome territories or centromeres, respectively, the positions of the most peripherally and centrally located chromosome territories, and the territory volumes were compared to non-irradiated controls over this time course. Nuclei with three copies of several chromosomes (#1, #6, #10, #12, #X) were found in the irradiated as well as non-irradiated specimens. From day 2 to day 5 post irradiation, chromosome territories (#1, #4, #12) shifted towards the nuclear periphery and their volumes increased 16- to 25-fold. Consequently, chromosome territories returned towards the nuclear centre during day 6 and 7 post irradiation. In comparison to non-irradiated cells (∼500μm(3)), the nuclear volume of irradiated cells was increased 8-fold (to ∼4000μm(3)) at day 7 post irradiation. Additionally, smaller cell nuclei with an average volume of about ∼255μm(3) were detected on day 7. The data suggest a radiation-induced generation of large intra

  19. Modelling radiation-induced cell death and tumour re-oxygenation: local versus global and instant versus delayed cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Aguiar, Pablo; Espinoza, Ignacio; Sánchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-02-01

    The resistance of hypoxic cells to radiation, due to the oxygen dependence of radiosensitivity, is well known and must be taken into account to accurately calculate the radiation induced cell death. A proper modelling of the response of tumours to radiation requires deriving the distribution of oxygen at a microscopic scale. This usually involves solving the reaction-diffusion equation in tumour voxels using a vascularization distribution model. Moreover, re-oxygenation arises during the course of radiotherapy, one reason being the increase of available oxygen caused by cell killing, which can turn hypoxic tumours into oxic. In this work we study the effect of cell death kinetics in tumour oxygenation modelling, analysing how it affects the timing of re-oxygenation, surviving fraction and tumour control. Two models of cell death are compared, an instantaneous cell killing, mimicking early apoptosis, and a delayed cell death scenario in which cells can die shortly after being damaged, as well as long after irradiation. For each of these scenarios, the decrease in oxygen consumption due to cell death can be computed globally (macroscopic voxel average) or locally (microscopic). A re-oxygenation model already used in the literature, the so called full re-oxygenation, is also considered. The impact of cell death kinetics and re-oxygenation on tumour responses is illustrated for two radiotherapy fractionation schemes: a conventional schedule, and a hypofractionated treatment. The results show large differences in the doses needed to achieve 50% tumour control for the investigated cell death models. Moreover, the models affect the tumour responses differently depending on the treatment schedule. This corroborates the complex nature of re-oxygenation, showing the need to take into account the kinetics of cell death in radiation response models.

  20. Modelling radiation-induced cell death and tumour re-oxygenation: local versus global and instant versus delayed cell death.

    PubMed

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Aguiar, Pablo; Espinoza, Ignacio; Sánchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-02-07

    The resistance of hypoxic cells to radiation, due to the oxygen dependence of radiosensitivity, is well known and must be taken into account to accurately calculate the radiation induced cell death. A proper modelling of the response of tumours to radiation requires deriving the distribution of oxygen at a microscopic scale. This usually involves solving the reaction-diffusion equation in tumour voxels using a vascularization distribution model. Moreover, re-oxygenation arises during the course of radiotherapy, one reason being the increase of available oxygen caused by cell killing, which can turn hypoxic tumours into oxic. In this work we study the effect of cell death kinetics in tumour oxygenation modelling, analysing how it affects the timing of re-oxygenation, surviving fraction and tumour control. Two models of cell death are compared, an instantaneous cell killing, mimicking early apoptosis, and a delayed cell death scenario in which cells can die shortly after being damaged, as well as long after irradiation. For each of these scenarios, the decrease in oxygen consumption due to cell death can be computed globally (macroscopic voxel average) or locally (microscopic). A re-oxygenation model already used in the literature, the so called full re-oxygenation, is also considered. The impact of cell death kinetics and re-oxygenation on tumour responses is illustrated for two radiotherapy fractionation schemes: a conventional schedule, and a hypofractionated treatment. The results show large differences in the doses needed to achieve 50% tumour control for the investigated cell death models. Moreover, the models affect the tumour responses differently depending on the treatment schedule. This corroborates the complex nature of re-oxygenation, showing the need to take into account the kinetics of cell death in radiation response models.

  1. Influence of femtosecond laser radiation on cells of the transplantable tumour Krebs-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshalkin, Yu P.; Popova, N. A.; Nikolin, V. P.; Kaledin, V. I.; Kirpichnikov, A. V.; Pestryakov, Efim V.

    2012-06-01

    The influence of femtosecond radiation of a titaniumsapphire laser on cells of the transplantable ascitic tumour Krebs-2 was studied. After in vitro irradiation by the pulsed fundamentalharmonic radiation with the wavelength 800 nm, pulse duration 30 fs, repetition rate 1 kHz, mean power 100 and 300 mW and exposure time 3 min, as well as by the second-harmonic radiation (40 nm, 50 fs, 120 mW), all cells were diffusely stained by the vital stain trypan blue, which may be an evidence of their death or abnormalities of membrane permeability. However, implantation of such cells to experimental animals led to formation of tumours at the transplantation site with the kinetics slightly different from the control one. In the group of mice to which the cells were inoculated after irradiation with second harmonic pulses of titanium-sapphire laser the inhibition of tumour growth was observed due to partial death of cells under the action of UV spectral components. To explain the mechanism of the observed phenomenon the possibility of pore formation (photoporation) in the cell membrane, described earlier in the papers on foreign DNA transfection into cells, is considered.

  2. Influence of femtosecond laser radiation on cells of the transplantable tumour Krebs-2

    SciTech Connect

    Meshalkin, Yu P; Popova, N A; Nikolin, V P; Kaledin, V I; Kirpichnikov, A V; Pestryakov, Efim V

    2012-06-30

    The influence of femtosecond radiation of a titaniumsapphire laser on cells of the transplantable ascitic tumour Krebs-2 was studied. After in vitro irradiation by the pulsed fundamentalharmonic radiation with the wavelength 800 nm, pulse duration 30 fs, repetition rate 1 kHz, mean power 100 and 300 mW and exposure time 3 min, as well as by the second-harmonic radiation (40 nm, 50 fs, 120 mW), all cells were diffusely stained by the vital stain trypan blue, which may be an evidence of their death or abnormalities of membrane permeability. However, implantation of such cells to experimental animals led to formation of tumours at the transplantation site with the kinetics slightly different from the control one. In the group of mice to which the cells were inoculated after irradiation with second harmonic pulses of titanium-sapphire laser the inhibition of tumour growth was observed due to partial death of cells under the action of UV spectral components. To explain the mechanism of the observed phenomenon the possibility of pore formation (photoporation) in the cell membrane, described earlier in the papers on foreign DNA transfection into cells, is considered.

  3. Thyroid exposure to scattered radiation and associated second cancer risk from paediatric radiotherapy for extracranial tumours.

    PubMed

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Kourinou, Kalliopi; Lyraraki, Efrossini; Varveris, Haralambos; Damilakis, John

    2012-12-01

    This study was conducted to estimate the scattered thyroid dose and relevant second cancer risk from radiotherapy for extracranial tumours during childhood.  Anteroposeterior and posteronaterior field irradiations employed during the treatment of Hodgkin's disease, neuroblastoma and Wilms' tumour were simulated on two humanoid phantoms representing 5- and 10-y-old patients. Measurements were performed using thermoluminescent dosemeters. Practical thyroid lead shields with thicknesses of 2-10 mm were placed in the phantoms' neck region. The lifetime risk for cancer induction was assessed using sex- and age-specific risk factors. Thyroid dose per monitor unit varied from 28.1 to 492.4 μGy by the primary irradiation site and patient's age. The 10-mm-thick lead shield led to a dose reduction up to 28.9 %. For typical prescribed tumour doses, the total risks for thyroid cancer development after radiotherapy of 5- and 10-y-old male patients were 0.05-0.99  and 0.03-0.48 %, respectively. The corresponding risks for females increased to 0.29-5.51 and 0.17-2.94 %.

  4. Tumour nuclear oestrogen receptor beta 1 correlates inversely with parathyroid tumour weight.

    PubMed

    Haglund, Felix; Rosin, Gustaf; Nilsson, Inga-Lena; Juhlin, C Christofer; Pernow, Ylva; Norenstedt, Sophie; Dinets, Andrii; Larsson, Catharina; Hartman, Johan; Höög, Anders

    2015-03-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common endocrinopathy, frequently caused by a parathyroid adenoma, rarely by a parathyroid carcinoma that lacks effective oncological treatment. As the majority of cases are present in postmenopausal women, oestrogen signalling has been implicated in the tumourigenesis. Oestrogen receptor beta 1 (ERB1) and ERB2 have been recently identified in parathyroid adenomas, the former inducing genes coupled to tumour apoptosis. We applied immunohistochemistry and slide digitalisation to quantify nuclear ERB1 and ERB2 in 172 parathyroid adenomas, atypical adenomas and carcinomas, and ten normal parathyroid glands. All the normal parathyroid glands expressed ERB1 and ERB2. The majority of tumours expressed ERB1 (70.6%) at varying intensities, and ERB2 (96.5%) at strong intensities. Parathyroid carcinomas expressed ERB1 in three out of six cases and ERB2 in five out of six cases. The intensity of tumour nuclear ERB1 staining significantly correlated inversely with tumour weight (P=0.011), and patients whose tumours were classified as ERB1-negative had significantly greater tumour weight as well as higher serum calcium (P=0.002) and parathyroid hormone levels (P=0.003). Additionally, tumour nuclear ERB1 was not expressed differentially with respect to sex or age of the patient. Levels of tumour nuclear ERB2 did not correlate with clinical characteristics. In conclusion, decreased ERB1 immunoreactivity is associated with increased tumour weight in parathyroid adenomas. Given the previously reported correlation with tumour-suppressive signalling, selective oestrogen receptor modulation (SERMs) may play a role in the treatment of parathyroid carcinomas. Future studies of SERMs and oestrogen treatment in PHPT should consider tumour weight as a potential factor in pharmacological responsiveness. © 2015 The authors.

  5. Tumour nuclear oestrogen receptor beta 1 correlates inversely with parathyroid tumour weight

    PubMed Central

    Haglund, Felix; Rosin, Gustaf; Nilsson, Inga-Lena; Juhlin, C Christofer; Pernow, Ylva; Norenstedt, Sophie; Dinets, Andrii; Larsson, Catharina; Hartman, Johan; Höög, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common endocrinopathy, frequently caused by a parathyroid adenoma, rarely by a parathyroid carcinoma that lacks effective oncological treatment. As the majority of cases are present in postmenopausal women, oestrogen signalling has been implicated in the tumourigenesis. Oestrogen receptor beta 1 (ERB1) and ERB2 have been recently identified in parathyroid adenomas, the former inducing genes coupled to tumour apoptosis. We applied immunohistochemistry and slide digitalisation to quantify nuclear ERB1 and ERB2 in 172 parathyroid adenomas, atypical adenomas and carcinomas, and ten normal parathyroid glands. All the normal parathyroid glands expressed ERB1 and ERB2. The majority of tumours expressed ERB1 (70.6%) at varying intensities, and ERB2 (96.5%) at strong intensities. Parathyroid carcinomas expressed ERB1 in three out of six cases and ERB2 in five out of six cases. The intensity of tumour nuclear ERB1 staining significantly correlated inversely with tumour weight (P=0.011), and patients whose tumours were classified as ERB1-negative had significantly greater tumour weight as well as higher serum calcium (P=0.002) and parathyroid hormone levels (P=0.003). Additionally, tumour nuclear ERB1 was not expressed differentially with respect to sex or age of the patient. Levels of tumour nuclear ERB2 did not correlate with clinical characteristics. In conclusion, decreased ERB1 immunoreactivity is associated with increased tumour weight in parathyroid adenomas. Given the previously reported correlation with tumour-suppressive signalling, selective oestrogen receptor modulation (SERMs) may play a role in the treatment of parathyroid carcinomas. Future studies of SERMs and oestrogen treatment in PHPT should consider tumour weight as a potential factor in pharmacological responsiveness. PMID:25648860

  6. Accuracy of Various MRI Sequences in Determining the Tumour Margin in Musculoskeletal Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Putta, Tharani; Gibikote, Sridhar; Madhuri, Vrisha; Walter, Noel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background It is imperative that bone tumour margin and extent of tumour involvement are accurately assessed pre-operatively in order for the surgeon to attain a safe surgical margin. In this study, we comprehensively assessed each of the findings that influence surgical planning, on various MRI sequences and compared them with the gold standard – pathology. Material/Methods In this prospective study including 21 patients with extremity bone tumours, margins as seen on various MRI sequences (T1, T2, STIR, DWI, post-gadolinium T1 FS) were measured and biopsies were obtained from each of these sites during the surgical resection. The resected tumour specimen and individual biopsy samples were studied to assess the true tumour margin. Margins on each of the MRI sequences were then compared with the gold standard – pathology. In addition to the intramedullary tumour margin, we also assessed the extent of soft tissue component, neurovascular bundle involvement, epiphyseal and joint involvement, and the presence or absence of skip lesions. Results T1-weighted imaging was the best sequence to measure tumour margin without resulting in clinically significant underestimation or overestimation of the tumour extent (mean difference of 0.8 mm; 95% confidence interval between −0.9 mm to 2.5 mm; inter-class correlation coefficient of 0.998). STIR and T1 FS post-gadolinium imaging grossly overestimated tumour extent by an average of 16.7 mm and 16.8 mm, respectively (P values <0.05). Post-gadolinium imaging was better to assess joint involvement while T1 and STIR were the best to assess epiphyseal involvement. Conclusions T1-weighted imaging was the best sequence to assess longitudinal intramedullary tumour extent. We suggest that osteotomy plane 1.5 cm beyond the T1 tumour margin is safe and also limits unwarranted surgical bone loss. However, this needs to be prospectively proven with a larger sample size. PMID:28058070

  7. Accuracy of Various MRI Sequences in Determining the Tumour Margin in Musculoskeletal Tumours.

    PubMed

    Putta, Tharani; Gibikote, Sridhar; Madhuri, Vrisha; Walter, Noel

    2016-01-01

    It is imperative that bone tumour margin and extent of tumour involvement are accurately assessed pre-operatively in order for the surgeon to attain a safe surgical margin. In this study, we comprehensively assessed each of the findings that influence surgical planning, on various MRI sequences and compared them with the gold standard - pathology. In this prospective study including 21 patients with extremity bone tumours, margins as seen on various MRI sequences (T1, T2, STIR, DWI, post-gadolinium T1 FS) were measured and biopsies were obtained from each of these sites during the surgical resection. The resected tumour specimen and individual biopsy samples were studied to assess the true tumour margin. Margins on each of the MRI sequences were then compared with the gold standard - pathology. In addition to the intramedullary tumour margin, we also assessed the extent of soft tissue component, neurovascular bundle involvement, epiphyseal and joint involvement, and the presence or absence of skip lesions. T1-weighted imaging was the best sequence to measure tumour margin without resulting in clinically significant underestimation or overestimation of the tumour extent (mean difference of 0.8 mm; 95% confidence interval between -0.9 mm to 2.5 mm; inter-class correlation coefficient of 0.998). STIR and T1 FS post-gadolinium imaging grossly overestimated tumour extent by an average of 16.7 mm and 16.8 mm, respectively (P values <0.05). Post-gadolinium imaging was better to assess joint involvement while T1 and STIR were the best to assess epiphyseal involvement. T1-weighted imaging was the best sequence to assess longitudinal intramedullary tumour extent. We suggest that osteotomy plane 1.5 cm beyond the T1 tumour margin is safe and also limits unwarranted surgical bone loss. However, this needs to be prospectively proven with a larger sample size.

  8. [Reoxygenation of tumors of the uterine cervix during combined radiotherapy using low dose gamma-neutron irradiation with californium-252].

    PubMed

    Tacev, T; Rasovská, O; Strnad, V; Krystof, V; Prokes, B; Vacek, A

    1989-03-01

    A polarographic method was used to follow the changes in oxygenation of a tumour of uterus cervix after intracavital irradiation by 252Cf by a physical dose of 2 Gy, applied at the beginning of a therapeutic cycle of combined radiotherapy. The results reached are compared with the results of tumour oxygenation in the course of a conventional therapeutic procedure. It has become apparent that even after the irradiation of a tumour of uterus cervix by a small dose of gamma-neutron radiation with 252Cf there is, beginning with 2nd week of therapy, a significant reoxygenation of the tumour population. The changes of oxygenation after a conventional irradiation have been less marked and reached, in the 4th week of therapy, only marginally significant increase. Differences in reoxygenation of tumours of uterus cervix were confirmed by analysis of the oxygen test. The importance of tumour reoxygenation after the application of 252Cf source of radiation for facilitation of its regression in a combined treatment with Californium-252 and gamma irradiation is discussed.

  9. Tumour macrophages as potential targets of bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Tumour cells communicate with the cells of their microenvironment via a series of molecular and cellular interactions to aid their progression to a malignant state and ultimately their metastatic spread. Of the cells in the microenvironment with a key role in cancer development, tumour associated macrophages (TAMs) are among the most notable. Tumour cells release a range of chemokines, cytokines and growth factors to attract macrophages, and these in turn release numerous factors (e.g. VEGF, MMP-9 and EGF) that are implicated in invasion-promoting processes such as tumour cell growth, flicking of the angiogenic switch and immunosuppression. TAM density has been shown to correlate with poor prognosis in breast cancer, suggesting that these cells may represent a potential therapeutic target. However, there are currently no agents that specifically target TAM's available for clinical use. Bisphosphonates (BPs), such as zoledronic acid, are anti-resorptive agents approved for treatment of skeletal complication associated with metastatic breast cancer and prostate cancer. These agents act on osteoclasts, key cells in the bone microenvironment, to inhibit bone resorption. Over the past 30 years this has led to a great reduction in skeletal-related events (SRE's) in patients with advanced cancer and improved the morbidity associated with cancer-induced bone disease. However, there is now a growing body of evidence, both from in vitro and in vivo models, showing that zoledronic acid can also target tumour cells to increase apoptotic cell death and decrease proliferation, migration and invasion, and that this effect is significantly enhanced in combination with chemotherapy agents. Whether macrophages in the peripheral tumour microenvironment are exposed to sufficient levels of bisphosphonate to be affected is currently unknown. Macrophages belong to the same cell lineage as osteoclasts, the major target of BPs, and are highly phagocytic cells shown to be sensitive to

  10. [Partial breast irradiation (PBI): the therapy of the future?].

    PubMed

    Koning, Caro C E; Bijker, Nina; van Tienhoven, Geertjan

    2010-01-01

    Breast-conserving therapy with radiation therapy of 50 Gy over 5 weeks to the entire breast plus a tumour bed boost is the standard treatment for patients with early stage breast cancer. Several attempts have been made to lower the treatment burden, such as omitting either all radiotherapy or the tumour bed boost, without success. Phase III trials are now being carried out to evaluate the treatment of the primary tumour area only (PBI). Various methods for selection of patient groups and of delivering the radiation dose have been employed. Vaidya et al. report the same favourable local recurrence rates following PBI with single dose intraoperative radiotherapy as with whole-breast irradiation. As the follow-up period so far has been short, long-time results should be awaited.

  11. Tumour-induced neoneurogenesis and perineural tumour growth: a mathematical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolas, Georgios; Bianchi, Arianna; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.

    2016-02-01

    It is well-known that tumours induce the formation of a lymphatic and a blood vasculature around themselves. A similar but far less studied process occurs in relation to the nervous system and is referred to as neoneurogenesis. The relationship between tumour progression and the nervous system is still poorly understood and is likely to involve a multitude of factors. It is therefore relevant to study tumour-nerve interactions through mathematical modelling: this may reveal the most significant factors of the plethora of interacting elements regulating neoneurogenesis. The present work is a first attempt to model the neurobiological aspect of cancer development through a system of differential equations. The model confirms the experimental observations that a tumour is able to promote nerve formation/elongation around itself, and that high levels of nerve growth factor and axon guidance molecules are recorded in the presence of a tumour. Our results also reflect the observation that high stress levels (represented by higher norepinephrine release by sympathetic nerves) contribute to tumour development and spread, indicating a mutually beneficial relationship between tumour cells and neurons. The model predictions suggest novel therapeutic strategies, aimed at blocking the stress effects on tumour growth and dissemination.

  12. Clinical management of tumours in geriatric dogs and cats: systemic effects of tumours and paraneoplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Gorman, N T

    1990-04-21

    There are many clinical presentations of neoplastic disease in the dog and cat. Some relate to the presence of a solid mass but many relate to the systemic effect that the tumour has on the animal. This paper covers the broad categories of the systemic metabolic and haematological effects that are associated with tumours in the dog and cat.

  13. Augmented reality in bone tumour resection

    PubMed Central

    Park, Y. K.; Gupta, S.; Yoon, C.; Han, I.; Kim, H-S.; Choi, H.; Hong, J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We evaluated the accuracy of augmented reality (AR)-based navigation assistance through simulation of bone tumours in a pig femur model. Methods We developed an AR-based navigation system for bone tumour resection, which could be used on a tablet PC. To simulate a bone tumour in the pig femur, a cortical window was made in the diaphysis and bone cement was inserted. A total of 133 pig femurs were used and tumour resection was simulated with AR-assisted resection (164 resection in 82 femurs, half by an orthropaedic oncology expert and half by an orthopaedic resident) and resection with the conventional method (82 resection in 41 femurs). In the conventional group, resection was performed after measuring the distance from the edge of the condyle to the expected resection margin with a ruler as per routine clinical practice. Results The mean error of 164 resections in 82 femurs in the AR group was 1.71 mm (0 to 6). The mean error of 82 resections in 41 femurs in the conventional resection group was 2.64 mm (0 to 11) (p < 0.05, one-way analysis of variance). The probabilities of a surgeon obtaining a 10 mm surgical margin with a 3 mm tolerance were 90.2% in AR-assisted resections, and 70.7% in conventional resections. Conclusion We demonstrated that the accuracy of tumour resection was satisfactory with the help of the AR navigation system, with the tumour shown as a virtual template. In addition, this concept made the navigation system simple and available without additional cost or time. Cite this article: H. S. Cho, Y. K. Park, S. Gupta, C. Yoon, I. Han, H-S. Kim, H. Choi, J. Hong. Augmented reality in bone tumour resection: An experimental study. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:137–143. PMID:28258117

  14. Sublethal irradiation promotes invasiveness of neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schweigerer, Lothar; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Schmidberger, Heinz; Hecht, Monica . E-mail: monica.hecht@med.uni-goettingen.de

    2005-05-13

    Neuroblastoma is the most frequent extracranial solid tumour of childhood. Despite multiple clinical efforts, clinical outcome has remained poor. Neuroblastoma is considered to be radiosensitive, but some clinical studies including the German trial NB90 failed to show a clinical benefit of radiation therapy. The mechanisms underlying this apparent discrepancy are still unclear. We have therefore investigated the effects of radiation on neuroblastoma cell behaviour in vitro. We show that sublethal doses of irradiation up-regulated the expression of the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor c-Met in some neuroblastoma cell lines. The increase in HGF/c-Met expression was correlated with enhanced invasiveness and activation of proteases degrading the extracellular matrix. Thus, irradiation at sublethal doses may promote the metastatic dissemination of neuroblastoma cells through activating the HGF/c-Met pathway and triggering matrix degradation.

  15. Desmoplastic nested spindle cell tumours and nested stromal epithelial tumours of the liver.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sunayana; Bihari, Chhagan

    2016-04-01

    Desmoplastic nested spindle cell tumour of liver (DNSTL), nested stromal-epithelial tumour (NSET) and calcifying nested stromal-epithelial tumour (CNSET) are recently described entities with similar morphology, immunohistochemistry and molecular genetics. These are rare entities with only three large case series described till date. These tumours commonly present in the paediatric age group. NSETs, in addition have been described to be associated with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) production and Cushingoid features. It is important to discuss this rare group of tumours with a low malignant potential as the most common radiological differential diagnosis is hepatoblastoma, which has a relatively poorer prognosis. Thus, a pathologist needs to keep this entity in mind, so as to offer a correct histological diagnosis.

  16. Occurrence of tumours metastatic to bones and multicentric tumours with skeletal involvement in dogs.

    PubMed

    Trost, M E; Inkelmann, M A; Galiza, G J N; Silva, T M; Kommers, G D

    2014-01-01

    The skeletons of 110 dogs with malignant tumours of different origins were examined by necropsy examination over a 3-year period to identify bone metastases. Twenty-one cases of metastatic or multicentric tumours with bone involvement were recorded. In general, more female dogs presented with bony metastases; however, when the dogs with mammary tumours were omitted, the gender distribution of the cases was approximately equivalent. The mammary gland was the primary site of most of the metastatic bone lesions, followed by the musculoskeletal system and the respiratory system. The majority (77%) of metastases were grossly visible and present in multiple bones. However, in 23% of the cases, the metastases could be diagnosed only at the microscopical level. The vertebrae and the humerus were the most frequently affected bones regardless of the primary site and the histogenesis of the tumours. The results of this study revealed a high prevalence of bone metastases and/or bone involvement in dogs with multicentric tumours.

  17. CD34 + tumours of the orbit including solitary fibrous tumours: a six-case series.

    PubMed

    Jung, Su Kyung; Paik, Ji Sun; Park, Gyeong Sin; Yang, Suk-Woo

    2017-04-27

    To report six cases of CD34+ fibroblastic mesenchymal tumours, which are uncommon neoplasms in the orbit. Six patients presenting with proptosis and palpable mass who were later diagnosed with fibrous solitary tumours, fibrous histocytoma or haemangiopericytoma in the orbit were included. All patients received radiologic examinations and surgical excision for histopathology and immunohistochemistry examinations. Five patients had no recurrence after a minimum follow-up of 12 months. One patient (case 6) experienced recurrence twice, and had debulking surgeries each time. At present, the patient still has remnant tumour in the orbit, but no growth has been detected during the past two years. The tumour size will be closely monitored. Even though fibroblastic tumours are rarely found in the orbit, they can present as a palpable mass with proptosis. Complete surgical excision is important for long-term prognosis, and immunohistochemical study is helpful for confirming pathologic diagnosis.

  18. Loss of the tumour suppressor gene AIP mediates the browning of human brown fat tumours.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Linda; Hansen, Nils; Saba, Karim H; Nilsson, Jenny; Fioretos, Thoas; Rissler, Pehr; Nord, Karolin H

    2017-10-01

    Human brown fat tumours (hibernomas) show concomitant loss of the tumour suppressor genes MEN1 and AIP. We hypothesized that the brown fat phenotype is attributable to these mutations. Accordingly, in this study, we demonstrate that silencing of AIP in human brown preadipocytic and white fat cell lines results in the induction of the brown fat marker UCP1. In human adipocytic tumours, loss of MEN1 was found both in white (one of 51 lipomas) and in brown fat tumours. In contrast, concurrent loss of AIP was always accompanied by a brown fat morphology. We conclude that this white-to-brown phenotype switch in brown fat tumours is mediated by the loss of AIP. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Clinical relevance associated to the analysis of circulating tumour cells in patients with solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Serrano Fernádez, María José; Alvarez Merino, Juan Carlos; Martínez Zubiaurre, Iñigo; Fernández García, Ana; Sánchez Rovira, Pedro; Lorente Acosta, José Antonio

    2009-10-01

    The distant growth of tumour cells escaping from primary tumours, a process termed metastasis, represents the leading cause of death among patients affected by malignant neoplasias from breast and colon. During the metastasis process, cancer cells liberated from primary tumour tissue, also termed circulating tumour cells (CTCs), travel through the circulatory and/or lymphatic systems to reach distant organs. The early detection and the genotypic and phenotypic characterisation of such CTCs could represent a powerful diagnostic tool of the disease, and could also be considered an important predictive and prognostic marker of disease progression and treatment response. In this article we discuss the potential relevance in the clinic of monitoring CTCs from patients suffering from solid epithelial tumours, with emphasis on the impact of such analyses as a predictive marker for treatment response.

  20. Vascular tumours in infants. Part I: benign vascular tumours other than infantile haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Hoeger, P H; Colmenero, I

    2014-09-01

    Vascular anomalies can be subdivided into vascular tumours and vascular malformations (VMs). While most VMs are present at birth and do not exhibit significant postnatal growth, vascular tumours are characterized by their dynamics of growth and (sometimes) spontaneous regression. This review focuses on benign vascular tumours other than infantile haemangiomas (IHs), namely pyogenic granuloma, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, glomangioma, rapidly involuting and noninvoluting congenital haemangioma, verrucous haemangioma and spindle cell haemangioma. While some of them bear clinical resemblance to IH, they can be separated by age of appearance, growth characteristics and/or negative staining for glucose transporter 1. Separation of these tumours from IH is necessary because their outcome and therapeutic options are different. Semimalignant and malignant vascular tumours will be addressed in a separate review.

  1. Increased survival of children with solid tumours: how did we get there and how to keep the success going?

    PubMed

    Rechnitzer, Catherine

    2011-10-03

    . Following evaluation of tumour response, additional investigations may be needed to define the resectability of the tumour, combining different imaging techniques, e.g. CT scanning and/or MRI angiographies, ultrasound with Doppler. After tumour resection and particularly in the case of non-radical resection, imaging of the tumour residue is required as baseline for further surveillance and eventually planning of irradiation fields. How do we secure further improvement in treatment results for childhood cancer? Multidisciplinary teams, optimal logistics and continuous education are the best tools with focus on reduction in delay to diagnosis and improvement in the multidisciplinary forum allowing optimal therapeutic decisions.

  2. Possible Role of Hormones in Treatment of Metastatic Testicular Teratomas: Tumour Regression with Medroxyprogesterone Acetate

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, H. J. G.; Hendry, W. F.

    1973-01-01

    Three patients in a consecutive series of 16 cases of metastatic mallgnant teratoma testis have shown well-marked tumour regression during hormone treatment. In two cases multiple lung metastases had previously failed to respond to actinomycin D therapy, and following treatment with medroxyprogesterone acetate one patient had well-marked selective tumour regression for nine months while the other is alive, well, and free from disease at seven years. The third case was treated with a combination of actinomycin D and medroxyprogesterone acetate and is alive and disease-free at two years. Attention is drawn to this preliminary study in the hope of stimulating interest in the possible value of hormones, either alone or combined with chemotherapy and irradiation, in the treatment of metastatic testicular teratoma. Multicentre prospective clinical trials are now needed if knowledge is to be advanced in this field. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8 PMID:4726928

  3. Naturally occurring tumours in the basal metazoan Hydra.

    PubMed

    Domazet-Lošo, Tomislav; Klimovich, Alexander; Anokhin, Boris; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Hamm, Mailin J; Lange, Christina; Bosch, Thomas C G

    2014-06-24

    The molecular nature of tumours is well studied in vertebrates, although their evolutionary origin remains unknown. In particular, there is no evidence for naturally occurring tumours in pre-bilaterian animals, such as sponges and cnidarians. This is somewhat surprising given that recent computational studies have predicted that most metazoans might be prone to develop tumours. Here we provide first evidence for naturally occurring tumours in two species of Hydra. Histological, cellular and molecular data reveal that these tumours are transplantable and might originate by differentiation arrest of female gametes. Growth of tumour cells is independent from the cellular environment. Tumour-bearing polyps have significantly reduced fitness. In addition, Hydra tumours show a greatly altered transcriptome that mimics expression shifts in vertebrate cancers. Therefore, this study shows that spontaneous tumours have deep evolutionary roots and that early branching animals may be informative in revealing the fundamental mechanisms of tumorigenesis.

  4. Expression and significance of PTEN in canine mammary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Changwei; Lin, Degui; Wang, Jinqiu; Wang, Lei

    2008-10-01

    To explore the expression and clinical importance of the anti-oncogene phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) in canine mammary gland tumours, PTEN expression was compared in 50 cases of canine mammary tumour and four examples of normal mammary tissue using real-time quantitative PCR. PTEN expression was similar in benign mammary tumours and normal mammary tissues (P>0.05), but was lower in malignant tumours than in normal mammary tissues or benign mammary tumours (P<0.001). PTEN expression was also low in the lymph node metastases of malignant mammary tumours. The expression profile of PTEN in malignant mammary tumours compared to those without lymph node metastasis varied significantly. Low-level PETN expression might play an important role in carcinogenesis and the progression of canine mammary tumours, and PTEN protein detection might be useful in evaluating tumour development and prognosis.

  5. Biofilm formation by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium colonizing solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Crull, Katja; Rohde, Manfred; Westphal, Kathrin; Loessner, Holger; Wolf, Kathrin; Felipe-López, Alfonso; Hensel, Michael; Weiss, Siegfried

    2011-08-01

    Systemic administration of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to tumour bearing mice results in preferential colonization of the tumours and retardation of tumour growth. Although the bacteria are able to invade the tumour cells in vitro, in tumours they were never detected intracellularly. Ultrastructural analysis of Salmonella-colonized tumours revealed that the bacteria had formed biofilms. Interestingly, depletion of neutrophilic granulocytes drastically reduced biofilm formation. Obviously, bacteria form biofilms in response to the immune reactions of the host. Importantly, we tested Salmonella mutants that were no longer able to form biofilms by deleting central regulators of biofilm formation. Such bacteria could be observed intracellularly in immune cells of the host or in tumour cells. Thus, tumour colonizing S. typhimurium might form biofilms as protection against phagocytosis. Since other bacteria are behaving similarly, solid murine tumours might represent a unique model to study biofilm formation in vivo. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. SIRT2: tumour suppressor or tumour promoter in operable breast cancer?

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Liane M; Zino, Samer; MacDonald, Alasdair I; Curle, Jennifer; Reilly, Justice E; Mohammed, Zahra M A; McMillan, Donald C; Mallon, Elizabeth; Payne, Anthony P; Edwards, Joanne; Shiels, Paul G

    2014-01-01

    Sirtuins comprise a family of genes involved in cellular stress, survival and damage responses. They have been implicated in a range of diseases including cancer, with most information pertaining to their function in tumourigenesis being derived from in vitro studies, or model organisms. Their putative roles as tumour suppressors or tumour promoters remain to be validated in vivo. Little is known about their role in breast tumourigenesis. We sought to evaluate the seven sirtuin family members (SIRT1-7) in a human breast cancer cohort, in relation to clinico-pathological features and outcome of the disease. Immunohistochemical analysis of SIRT1-7 protein levels was undertaken in 392 oestrogen receptor (ER+ve) and 153 ER-ve breast tumour samples. SIRT1-7 transcriptional levels were assessed in normal (n=25), non-malignant (n=73) and malignant (n=70) breast tissue using Relative Quantitative Real Time PCR. Statistical analyses determined if SIRT1-7 transcription or protein expression was associated with clinical parameters or outcome. In ER-ve tumours, high protein levels of nuclear SIRT2 were associated with reduced time to recurrence and disease-specific death. This association was only observed in Grade 3 tumours. In the ER+ve cohort, high SIRT2 nuclear levels were associated with shorter disease-free survival and time to recurrence whilst on Tamoxifen, in patients with Grade 3 tumours. Conversely, in Grade 2 tumours, high SIRT2 levels were associated with increased time to recurrence. Our data suggest that SIRT2 is the sirtuin predominantly involved in breast tumourigenesis and prognosis. It indicates that SIRT2 acts as a tumour suppressor or tumour promoter dependent upon breast tumour grade. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A spatio-temporal simulation model of the response of solid tumours to radiotherapy in vivo: parametric validation concerning oxygen enhancement ratio and cell cycle duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipas, Vassilis P.; Stamatakos, Georgios S.; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos K.; Dionysiou, Dimitra D.; Dale, Roger G.

    2004-04-01

    Advanced bio-simulation methods are expected to substantially improve radiotherapy treatment planning. To this end a novel spatio-temporal patient-specific simulation model of the in vivo response of malignant tumours to radiotherapy schemes has been recently developed by our group. This paper discusses recent improvements to the model: an optimized algorithm leading to conformal shrinkage of the tumour as a response to radiotherapy, the introduction of the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), a realistic initial cell phase distribution and finally an advanced imaging-based algorithm simulating the neovascularization field. A parametric study of the influence of the cell cycle duration Tc, OER, OERbgr for the beta LQ parameter on tumour growth, shrinkage and response to irradiation under two different fractionation schemes has been made. The model has been applied to two glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cases, one with wild type (wt) and another one with mutated (mt) p53 gene. Furthermore, the model has been applied to a hypothetical GBM tumour with agr and bgr values corresponding to those of generic radiosensitive tumours. According to the model predictions, a whole tumour with shorter Tc tends to repopulate faster, as is to be expected. Furthermore, a higher OER value for the dormant cells leads to a more radioresistant whole tumour. A small variation of the OERbgr value does not seem to play a major role in the tumour response. Accelerated fractionation proved to be superior to the standard scheme for the whole range of the OER values considered. Finally, the tumour with mt p53 was shown to be more radioresistant compared to the tumour with wt p53. Although all simulation predictions agree at least qualitatively with the clinical experience and literature, a long-term clinical adaptation and quantitative validation procedure is in progress.

  8. Phylogenetic Quantification of Intra-tumour Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Roland F.; Trinh, Anne; Sipos, Botond; Brenton, James D.; Goldman, Nick; Markowetz, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Intra-tumour genetic heterogeneity is the result of ongoing evolutionary change within each cancer. The expansion of genetically distinct sub-clonal populations may explain the emergence of drug resistance, and if so, would have prognostic and predictive utility. However, methods for objectively quantifying tumour heterogeneity have been missing and are particularly difficult to establish in cancers where predominant copy number variation prevents accurate phylogenetic reconstruction owing to horizontal dependencies caused by long and cascading genomic rearrangements. To address these challenges, we present MEDICC, a method for phylogenetic reconstruction and heterogeneity quantification based on a Minimum Event Distance for Intra-tumour Copy-number Comparisons. Using a transducer-based pairwise comparison function, we determine optimal phasing of major and minor alleles, as well as evolutionary distances between samples, and are able to reconstruct ancestral genomes. Rigorous simulations and an extensive clinical study show the power of our method, which outperforms state-of-the-art competitors in reconstruction accuracy, and additionally allows unbiased numerical quantification of tumour heterogeneity. Accurate quantification and evolutionary inference are essential to understand the functional consequences of tumour heterogeneity. The MEDICC algorithms are independent of the experimental techniques used and are applicable to both next-generation sequencing and array CGH data. PMID:24743184

  9. Targeting the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jean M; Coleman, Robert L; Sood, Anil K

    2016-03-01

    The study of cancer initiation, growth, and metastasis has traditionally been focused on cancer cells, and the view that they proliferate due to uncontrolled growth signalling owing to genetic derangements. However, uncontrolled growth in tumours cannot be explained solely by aberrations in cancer cells themselves. To fully understand the biological behaviour of tumours, it is essential to understand the microenvironment in which cancer cells exist, and how they manipulate the surrounding stroma to promote the malignant phenotype. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecologic cancer worldwide. The majority of patients will have objective responses to standard tumour debulking surgery and platinum-taxane doublet chemotherapy, but most will experience disease recurrence and chemotherapy resistance. As such, a great deal of effort has been put forth to develop therapies that target the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer. Herein, we review the key components of the tumour microenvironment as they pertain to this disease, outline targeting opportunities and supporting evidence thus far, and discuss resistance to therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Neuroendocrine tumours: cracking the epigenetic code.

    PubMed

    Karpathakis, A; Dibra, H; Thirlwell, C

    2013-06-01

    The field of epigenetics has evolved rapidly over recent years providing insight into the tumorigenesis of many solid and haematological malignancies. Determination of epigenetic modifications in neuroendocrine tumour (NET) development is imperative if we are to improve our understanding of the biology of this heterogenous group of tumours. Epigenetic marks such as DNA methylation at RASSF1A are frequent findings in NETs of all origins and may be associated with worse prognosis. MicroRNA signatures and histone modifications have been identified which can differentiate subtypes of NET and distinguish NET from adenocarcinoma in cases of diagnostic uncertainty. Historically, candidate gene-driven approaches have yielded limited insight into the epigenetics of NET. Recent progress has been facilitated by development of high-throughput tools including second-generation sequencing and arrays for analysis of the 'epigenome' of tumour and normal tissue, permitting unbiased approaches such as exome sequencing that identified mutations of chromatin-remodelling genes ATRX/DAXX in 44% of pancreatic NETs. Epigenetic changes are reversible and therefore represent an attractive therapeutic target; to date, clinical outcomes of epigenetic therapies in solid tumours have been disappointing; however, in vitro studies on NETs are promising and further clinical trials are required to determine utility of this class of novel agents. In this review, we perform a comprehensive evaluation of epigenetic changes found in NETs to date, including rare NETs such as phaeochromocytoma and adrenocortical tumours. We suggest priorities for future research and discuss potential clinical applications and novel therapies.

  11. Imaging tumours of the ampulla of Vater.

    PubMed

    Zbar, Andrew P; Maor, Yaakov; Czerniak, Abraham

    2012-12-01

    Although comparatively rare, ampullary tumours tend to be more readily curable than periampullary lesions and pancreatic carcinomas, consequent upon an earlier presentation, a lower likelihood of involved lymph nodes or vascular infiltration and a less aggressive histology. Recently, selected early cases have been able to resected endoscopically making accurate preoperative tumour (T) staging critical in such decision making. The most commonly available imaging methods are endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and CT scanning where in the former case there is variable accuracy for larger (T2/T3) ampullary tumours particularly where the patient has undergone preoperative common bile duct stenting. CT scanning has consistent shown inferior T staging of ampullary tumours when compared with EUS, although it provides information concerning visceral and nodal metastatic disease. Transpapillary intraductal ultrasound (where available) has shown high accuracy for early T1 tumours potentially suitable for endoscopic or local ampullary excision with the added advantage that it may be conducted without preliminary sphincterotomy. Recently, our group has been using intraoperative transduodenal ultrasound which assists surgical decision making concerning local excision or radical pancreaticoduodenal resection. Very recent images using 3-dimensional endoduodenal ultrasound has provided exquisite images of the ampulla and remain to be validated in ampullary neoplasms.

  12. The diagnosis of soft tissue tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Serpell, J. W.; Fish, S. H.; Fisher, C.; Thomas, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    We prospectively analysed methods of diagnosis in 118 patients referred for definitive treatment with documented or presumed soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Of 65 patients with primary STS, 54 were biopsied before referral. Of these, 5 (9%) were biopsied by Tru-cut biopsy, 17 (32%) by incisional biopsy and 32 (59%) by excisional biopsy. The remaining 11 patients with primary STS, referred without biopsy, were all diagnosed by Tru-cut biopsy. An additional eight patients suspected of having STS were referred without biopsy and were found to have malignant tumours other than STS involving soft tissue by Tru-cut biopsy. Nineteen patients were proved to have benign soft tissue tumours; in 13 presumed to have STS, the diagnosis was unknown at referral. In four of these, biopsy was inappropriate. Of nine submitted to Tru-cut biopsy, an unequivocal diagnosis was made in 5 (56%) and incisional biopsy was required in the other four. Therefore, paradoxically, benign soft tissue tumours may be more difficult to diagnose with Tru-cut biopsy than malignant tumours. This study confirms the high degree of accuracy of Tru-cut biopsy in diagnosing malignant soft tissue tumours and highlights the disadvantages of open biopsy techniques. PMID:1416683

  13. [Tumours of the upper cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Hernández García, Borja Jesús; Isla Guerrero, Alberto; Castaño, Ana; Alvarez Ruiz, Fernando; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Vertebral tumours arising in the upper cervical spine are rare. We present our experience in managing these neoplasms. We retrospectively reviewed the case histories of patients treated at our institution between January 2000 and June 2011. There were 9 patients with tumours in C1-C2-C3: 2metastases, 3chordomas, 2plasmocytomas, 1chondrosarcoma and 1osteochondroma. All patients complained of neck pain at the time of diagnosis. Three patients underwent an anterior and posterior approach, 3 an exclusively posterior approach and 3 an exclusively anterior surgical approach. Tumour resection was intralesional in 7 cases. Chemo-radiotherapy was used as adjuvant therapy in patients with malignant tumours. Vertebral tumours in the upper cervical spine are usually malignant. Achieving en bloc resection is particularly challenging and is technically unfeasible in many cases. This worsens the prognosis and makes adjuvant treatment very important. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. [New TNM classification of malignant lung tumours].

    PubMed

    Wohlschläger, J; Wittekind, C; Theegarten, D

    2010-09-01

    The staging system for lung tumours is now recommended for the classification of both non-small-cell and small-cell lung cancer as well as for carcinoid tumours of the lung. The T classifications have been redefined: T1 has been subclassified as T1a (≤ 2 cm in size) and T1b (> 2-3 cm in size). T2 has been subclassified as T2a (> 3-5 cm in size) and T2b (> 5-7 cm in size). T2 (> 7 cm in size) has been reclassified as T3. Multiple tumour nodules in the same lobe have been reclassified from T4 to T3. Multiple tumour nodules in the same lung but a different lobe have been reclassified from M1 to T4. No changes have been made in the N classification. The M classification has been redefined: M1 has been subdivided into M1a and M1b. Malignant pleural and pericardial effusions have been reclassified from T4 to M1a. Separate tumour nodules in the contralateral lung have been reclassified from T4 to M1a. M1b designates distant metastasis.

  15. Constitutional ring chromosomes and tumour suppressor genes.

    PubMed Central

    Tommerup, N; Lothe, R

    1992-01-01

    The types of malignancy reported in carriers of constitutional ring chromosomes r(11), r(13), and r(22) are concordant with the chromosomal assignment of tumour suppressor loci associated with Wilms' tumour, retinoblastoma, and meningioma. It is suggested that the somatic instability of ring chromosomes may play a role in this association and that constitutional ring chromosomes may be a source for mapping of tumour suppressor loci with the potential for covering most or all of the human genome. The hypothesis predicts the presence of a locus on chromosome 10 associated with follicular carcinoma of the thyroid, in line with previous cytogenetic findings of rearrangements involving chromosome 10 in thyroid tumours, and a locus on chromosome 22 associated with testicular cancer. Development of neurofibromatoses (NF) that do not fulfil the clinical criteria of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) in carriers with r(22) suggests either the presence of an additional NF locus on chromosome 22 or that ring chromosome mediated predisposition to somatic mutation of a specific tumour suppressor may be associated with atypical development of features usually associated with germline mutations. PMID:1336057

  16. Objective tumour heterogeneity determination in gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Dirk; Klein, Jan; Rexilius, Jan; Stieltjes, Bram

    2009-02-01

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) derived apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values are known to correlate inversely to tumour cellularity in brain tumours. The average ADC value increases after successful chemotherapy, radiotherapy or a combination of both and can be therewith used as a surrogate marker for treatment response. Moreover, high and low malignant areas can be distinguished. The main purpose of our project was to develop a software platform that enables the automated delineation and ADC quantification of different tumour sections in a fast, objective, user independent manner. Moreover, the software platform allows for an analysis of the probability density of the ADC in high and low malignant areas in ROIs drawn on conventional imaging to create a ground truth. We tested an Expectation Maximization algorithm with a Gaussian mixture model to objectively determine tumour heterogeneity in gliomas because of yielding Gaussian distributions in the different areas. Furthermore, the algorithm was initialized by seed points in the areas of the gross tumour volume and the data indicated that an automatic initialization should be possible. Thus automated clustering of high and low malignant areas and subsequent ADC determination within these areas is possible yielding reproducible ADC measurements within heterogeneous gliomas.

  17. Mast cells, angiogenesis, and tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of mast cells (MCs) in tumours was described by Ehrlich in his doctoral thesis. Since this early account, ample evidence has been provided highlighting participation of MCs to the inflammatory reaction that occurs in many clinical and experimental tumour settings. MCs are bone marrow-derived tissue-homing leukocytes that are endowed with a panoply of releasable mediators and surface receptors. These cells actively take part to innate and acquired immune reactions as well as to a series of fundamental functions such as angiogenesis, tissue repair, and tissue remodelling. The involvement of MCs in tumour development is debated. Although some evidence suggests that MCs can promote tumourigenesis and tumour progression, there are some clinical sets as well as experimental tumour models in which MCs seem to have functions that favour the host. One of the major issues linking MCs to cancer is the ability of these cells to release potent pro-angiogenic factors. This review will focus on the most recent acquisitions about this intriguing field of research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mast cells in inflammation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Approaches to paraspinal tumours - a technical note.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Arjun; Pawar, Sumeet; Prasad, Apurva; Ramani, P S

    2017-03-23

    Neurogenic tumours of the paraspinal space can occur in all age groups. It is common in adult population and relatively rare in elderly group. Usually they are benign, but in children, arising from the autonomic system, tends to be malignant in nature. Usually in adults, they arise from peripheral nerve sheath and are labelled as schwannomas. For a given tumour, determination of a correct surgical approach is mandatory to achieve a successful surgical outcome. Several factors like tumour size, histology, involvement of the bony spinal canal, etc. are some of the deciding factors for a correct surgical approach. Since many such tumours are benign, total excision is possible with a correct surgical approach. If the tumour involves the integrity of the spine then additionally a stabilization procedure may have to be carried out. Unfortunately, there are still no guidelines regarding the choice of surgical approach for the excision of such tumors. Presented here is a series of five patients managed by us over a period of 10 years. Four patients were adults and one female child was three years old. Four patients were operated upon successfully and the fifth one is waiting for surgery.

  19. Giant malignant phyllodes tumour of breast.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Ramakrishnan; Savasere, Thejas; Prabhuswamy, Vinod Kumar; Babu, Rajashekhara; Shivaswamy, Sadashivaiah

    2014-01-01

    The term phyllodes tumour includes lesions ranging from completely benign tumours to malignant sarcomas. Clinically phyllodes tumours are smooth, rounded, and usually painless multinodular lesions indistinguishable from fibroadenomas. Percentage of phyllodes tumour classified as malignant ranges from 23% to 50%. We report a case of second largest phyllodes tumour in a 35-year-old lady who presented with swelling of right breast since 6 months, initially small in size, that progressed gradually to present size. Examination revealed mass in the right breast measuring 36×32 cms with lobulated firm surface and weighing 10 kgs. Fine needle aspiration cytology was reported as borderline phyllodes; however core biopsy examination showed biphasic neoplasm with malignant stromal component. Simple mastectomy was done and specimen was sent for histopathological examination which confirmed the core biopsy report. Postoperatively the patient received chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The patient is on follow-up for a year and has not shown any evidence of metastasis or recurrence.

  20. [Pax-2 antigen expression in kidney tumours].

    PubMed

    Vjestica, Jelena M; Marković-Lipkovski, Jasmina; Tulić, Cane D; Djokić, Milan R; Segar, Bojan S; Cirović, Sanja L; Stojanović, Martina M; Vuksanović, Aleksandar M

    2011-01-01

    Pax-2 transcriptional factor is expressed during kidney development and could re-express in renal tumors. The aim of this study was to examine Pax-2 expression in different types of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in order to see whether it is good immunohistochemical marker. We analyzed 48 different renal tumours stained with Pax-2 antibody. Pax-2 positive reaction was noticed in nucleus or cytoplasm. Expression of this antigen in tumours tissue was correlated with tumour stage and nuc-lear grade. Pax-2 expression between different histological RCC types was analyzed by chi2 test and Fishers test for two in-depended samples. Pax-2 is expressed by a high percentage of re-nal tumors regardless of histologic type. Significant diffe-rence of Pax-2 expression between oncocytomas and chromofobe RCC was found. Nuclear expression of Pax-2 is useful diagnostic kidney tumour marker. Pax-2 showed stronger expression in lower malignancy kidney tumours and in oncocytomas, than in high grade RCC like in those with sarcomatoid differentiation

  1. Use of Irradiated Foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brynjolfsson, A.

    1985-01-01

    The safety of irradiated foods is reviewed. Guidelines and regulations for processing irradiated foods are considered. The radiolytic products formed in food when it is irradiated and its wholesomeness is discussed. It is concluded that food irradiation processing is not a panacea for all problems in food processing but when properly used will serve the space station well.

  2. Use of Irradiated Foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brynjolfsson, A.

    1985-01-01

    The safety of irradiated foods is reviewed. Guidelines and regulations for processing irradiated foods are considered. The radiolytic products formed in food when it is irradiated and its wholesomeness is discussed. It is concluded that food irradiation processing is not a panacea for all problems in food processing but when properly used will serve the space station well.

  3. Thalidomide increases both intra-tumoural tumour necrosis factor-α production and anti-tumour activity in response to 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Z; Joseph, W R; Browne, W L; Mountjoy, K G; Palmer, B D; Baguley, B C; Ching, L-M

    1999-01-01

    5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA), synthesized in this laboratory and currently in phase I clinical trial, is a low molecular weight inducer of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Administration of DMXAA to mice with established transplantable tumours elicits rapid vascular collapse selectively in the tumour, followed by extensive haemorrhagic necrosis mediated primarily through the production of TNF-α. In this report we have investigated the synthesis of TNF-α mRNA in hepatic, splenic and tumour tissue. Co-administration of thalidomide with DMXAA increased anti-tumour activity and increased intra-tumoural TNF-α production approximately tenfold over that obtained with DMXAA alone. Thalidomide increased splenic TNF-α production slightly but significantly decreased serum and hepatic levels of TNF-α induced with DMXAA. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced 300-fold higher serum TNF-α than did DMXAA at the maximum tolerated dose, but induced similar amounts of TNF-α in spleen, liver and tumour. Splenic TNF-α activity induced with LPS was slightly increased with thalidomide, but serum and liver TNF-α levels were suppressed. Thalidomide did not increase intra-tumoural TNF-α production induced with LPS, in sharp contrast to that obtained with DMXAA. While thalidomide improved the anti-tumour response to DMXAA, it had no effect on the anti-tumour action of LPS that did not induce a significant growth delay or cures against the Colon 38 tumour. The increase in the anti-tumour action by thalidomide in combination with DMXAA corresponded to an increase in intra-tumoural TNF-α production. Co-administration of thalidomide may represent a novel approach to improving selective intra-tumoural TNF-α production and anti-tumour efficacy of DMXAA. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10360649

  4. Evaluation of dual-wavelength excitation autofluorescence imaging of colorectal tumours with a high-sensitivity CMOS imager: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kominami, Yoko; Yoshida, Shigeto; Tanaka, Shinji; Miyaki, Rie; Sanomura, Yoji; Seo, Min-Woong; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Kawahito, Shoji; Arimoto, Hidenobu; Yamada, Kenji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2015-09-02

    It is important to devise efficient and easy methods of detecting colorectal tumours to reduce mortality from colorectal cancer. Dual-wavelength excitation autofluorescence intensity can be used to visualize colorectal tumours. Therefore, we evaluated dual-wavelength excitation autofluorescence images of colorectal tumours obtained with a newly developed, high-sensitivity complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) imager. A total 107 colorectal tumours (44 adenomas, 43 adenocarcinomas with intramucosal invasion, and 20 sessile serrated adenoma/polyps [SSA/Ps]) in 98 patients who underwent endoscopic tumour resection were included. The specimens were irradiated with excitation light at 365 nm and 405 nm, and autofluorescence images measured with a 475 ± 25-nm band pass filter were obtained using a new, high-sensitivity CMOS imager. Ratio images (F365ex/F405ex) were created to evaluate the lesion brightness compared with that of normal mucosa, and specimens were categorized into a no signal or high signal group. Adenomas and adenocarcinomas were depicted in 87 ratio images, with 86.2% (n = 75) in the High signal group. SSA/P was depicted in 20 ratio images, with 70.0% (n = 14) in the High signal group. Dual-wavelength excitation autofluorescence images of colorectal tumours can be acquired using our high-sensitivity CMOS imager, and are useful in detecting colorectal tumours.

  5. Detection of irradiated liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shengchu, Qi; Jilan, Wu; Rongyao, Yuan

    D-2,3-butanediol is formed by irradiation processes in irradiated liquors. This radiolytic product is not formed in unirradiated liquors and its presence can therefore be used to identify whether a liquor has been irradiated or not. The relation meso/dl≈1 for 2,3-butanediol and the amount present in irradiated liquors may therefore be used as an indication of the dose used in the irradiation.

  6. [Human tumour banks: imperative in medicine].

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Lina; Bernardo, M Teresa; Tavares, Mariana; Cotovio, Patrícia; Mação, Patrícia; Oliveira, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    A tumour bank is a consequence of the modern medicine to follow the knowledge of bio-pathology of pre-neoplastic and neoplastic diseases in order to define diagnostic criteria and accurate therapy. It can be an independent unit but it should depend on a real or virtual net in the country or in connection between different states. The informed agreement of the patient and law are integrally followed according with each country legislation and medical ethics is never overtaken for the accomplishment of diagnosis in the departments of pathology. A tumour bank works in the department of pathology, depends on trained technicians and pathologists and requires specific equipment for the different types of re-collecting, after dealing with confidentiality and law determinations. There are already some tumour bank nets in Europe (Spain, Croatia, Holland, UK, Germany) and Portugal is starting now its way.

  7. Laparoscopic resection of duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Zioni, Tammy; Dizengof, Vitaliy; Kirshtein, Boris

    2017-01-01

    Only a few studies have revealed using laparoscopic technique with limited resection of gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) of the duodenum. A 68-year-old man was admitted to the hospital due to upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Evaluation revealed an ulcerated, bleeding GI tumour in the second part of the duodenum. After control of bleeding during gastroduodenoscopy, he underwent a laparoscopic wedge resection of the area. During 1.5 years of follow-up, the patient is disease free, eats drinks well, and has regained weight. Surgical resection of duodenal GIST with free margins is the main treatment of this tumour. Various surgical treatment options have been reported. Laparoscopic resection of duodenal GIST is an advanced and challenging procedure requiring experience and good surgical technique. The laparoscopic limited resection of duodenal GIST is feasible and safe, reducing postoperative morbidity without compromising oncologic results. PMID:28281485

  8. The use of biomarkers in neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohid Shakil; Caplin, Martyn E

    2013-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) arising from the gastrointestinal tract are increasing. At the time of diagnosis, histological grade, based on Ki-67 proliferation index on a tumour biopsy or specimen, offers prognostication but with often lengthy survival, this may not reflect current tumour biology later in the disease course. Biomarkers, including plasma chromogranin A, urinary 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid and pancreatic specific hormones (insulin, gastrin, vasoactive intestinal peptide), have a role in diagnosis but despite being incorporated into routine clinical practice, there is a lack of robust prospectively collected data investigating their prognostic and predictive value. Given the increasing number of treatment options available for NETs and prolonged survival, there is no agreement on the order of treatment for individual NET patients but the emergence of novel biomarkers and validation of existing ones, in addition to better understanding of the molecular biology, may help solve this clinical problem. PMID:28839724

  9. [Pigmented ciliary body tumours: benign or malignant?].

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Vicente, E; Saornil-Álvarez, M A; López-Lara, F; García-Álvarez, C; de Frutos-Baraja, J M; Díez-Andino, P

    2013-12-01

    We report the cases of 2 women with a pigmented tumour in the ciliary body, one a melanocytoma and the other a melanoma, with different clinical manifestations. The first one presented with decreased visual acuity associated with recent growth of the tumour, as well as sectorial opacities of the lens and subluxation. The second one is asymptomatic and has been kept under observation for more than 30 years. Although the definitive diagnosis of a pigmented tumour of the ciliary body is only achieved by the histopathology study, the group of clinical features is a determining factor when a conservative treatment is indicated. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Are natural antibodies involved in tumour defence?

    PubMed

    Bohn, J

    1999-09-01

    Natural antibodies (NAb) are found in the serum of healthy individuals. These antibodies are produced without any apparent specific antigenic stimulation. They are one part of the circulating immunoglobulins and are found in virtually all vertebrate species. NAb react to various self- and non-self antigens. A protective function in different infection models could be demonstrated. Several groups have reported the ability of NAb to bind to tumour cells. Their possible role in tumour defence is documented in mice. The present status of attempts to characterise the role of NAb in tumour defence is discussed, particularly as regards the human immune system. This paper focuses on antibody cell interactions and discusses the genetic background of the Nab-producing B-cells.

  11. Autoimmune pancreatitis mimicking Klatskin tumour on radiology.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Yousaf Bashir; Sohail, Abdul Malik Amir Humza; Haider, Zishan

    2015-04-09

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is categorised into two distinct types, AIP type 1 and 2. Although there can be multisystem involvement, rarely, the cholangitis associated with AIP can present radiologically in a manner similar to that of Klatskin tumour. We present the case of a 65-year-old man who was almost misdiagnosed with a Klatskin tumour because of the similarity in radiological features of the two aforementioned clinical entities. The patient presented with a history of jaundice, pruritus and abdominal pain, and work up showed deranged liver function tests, elevated cancer antigen 19-9 levels and positive antinuclear antibodies. CT scan of the abdomen showed findings suggestive of Klatskin tumour but due to diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and surrounding low-attenuation halo found on a closer review, a diagnosis of AIP was performed. The patient was started on standard corticosteroid therapy and responded well, with complete resolution of the radiological findings.

  12. Tumours of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zeeshan; Hussain, Shakir; Carter, Simon R

    2015-09-01

    Sarcomas are rare tumours and particularly rarer in the foot and ankle region. The complex anatomy of the foot and ankle makes it unique and hence poses a challenge to the surgeon for limb salvage surgery. Other lesions found in the foot and ankle region are benign bone and soft tissue tumours, metastasis and infection. The purpose of this article is to discuss the relevance of the complex anatomy of the foot and ankle in relation to tumours, clinical features, their general management principles and further discussion about some of the more common bone and soft tissue lesions. Discussion of every single bone and soft tissue lesion in the foot and ankle region is beyond the scope of this article.

  13. Brain tumour-associated status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Goonawardena, Janindu; Marshman, Laurence A G; Drummond, Katharine J

    2015-01-01

    We have reviewed the scant literature on status epilepticus in patients with brain tumours. Patients with brain tumour-associated epilepsy (TAE) appear less likely to develop status epilepticus (TASE) than patients with epilepsy in the general population (EGP) are to develop status epilepticus (SEGP). TASE is associated with lesions in similar locations as TAE; in particular, the frontal lobes. However, in contrast to TAE, where seizures commence early in the course of the disease or at presentation, TASE is more likely to occur later in the disease course and herald tumour progression. In marked contrast to TAE, where epilepsy risk is inversely proportional to Word Health Organization tumour grade, TASE risk appears to be directly proportional to tumour grade (high grade gliomas appear singularly predisposed). Whilst anti-epileptic drug (AED) resistance is more common in TAE than EGP (with resistance directly proportional to tumour grade and frontal location), TASE appears paradoxically more responsive to simple AED regimes than either TAE or SEGP. Although some results suggest that mortality may be higher with TASE than with SEGP, it is likely that (as with SEGP) the major determinant of mortality is the underlying disease process. Because all such data have been derived from retrospective studies, because TASE and SEGP are less common than TAE and EGP, and because TASE and SEGP classification has often been inconsistent, findings can only be considered preliminary: multi-centre, prospective studies are required. Whilst preliminary, our review suggests that TASE has a distinct clinical profile compared to TAE and SEGP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical application of tumour markers: a review.

    PubMed

    Amayo, A A; Kuria, J G

    2009-12-01

    Tumour markers have made a difference to oncology practice. They can be used in screening, diagnosis, prognostication and assessment of treatment efficacy. Reports on tumour marker usage suggest that many clinicians assume that a biomarker for a particular cancer can be effectively used for all these indications. This assumption is incorrect. Several guidelines have been published to inform clinicians on effective utilisation of these tests. To outline the recommended uses of the most commonly requested tumours markers in clinical practice. A hand search of literature on the recommended use of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), alphafetoprotein (AFP), prostate specific antigen (PSA), CA-125 and CA-19.9. Systematic reviews and prospective randomised clinical trials of tumour marker applications were also looked at. Five key journals and reference lists of relevant studies were considered. Two authors abstracted relevant data independently. Emphasis was given to guidelines from expert panels. The quality of the guidelines was assessed by availability of level of evidence supporting the recommendations. Several national and international expert groups have developed guidelines for use of markers for most cancers. CEA, AFP, PSA, CA-125 and CA-19.9 are validated for use in treatment monitoring of colorectal, hepatocellular, prostatic, ovarian and pancreatic carcinomas respectively. AFP and PSA are also useful for cancer screening in high risk groups. CA-125 has limited role in screening while CEA and CA 19.9 are not recommended for cancer screening. Not all currently available tumour markers can be used for screening and diagnosis of malignancies. Adherence to recommendations on tumour marker utilisation will improve the cost-effectiveness of these tests.

  15. Cytomorphology of neuroendocrine tumours of the gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Yadav, R; Jain, D; Mathur, S R; Iyer, V K

    2016-04-01

    Gallbladder neuroendocrine tumours (GB-NETs) are rare and account for 0.5% of all NETs. GB-NETs have an aggressive behaviour, which depends on the tumour grade. The cytomorphological spectrum of these tumours has never been described in detail. The present study evaluates the cytological features of GB-NETs and grades them according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. Furthermore, the expression of thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) has not been investigated previously in GB-NETs, although found in a subset of extrapulmonary NETs. Twenty cases of GB-NET among 875 gallbladder carcinomas diagnosed by ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) over a period of nearly 4 years were studied. The following parameters were evaluated: architectural pattern, nuclear chromatin, nucleoli, mitoses, necrosis, moulding, apoptosis and smudge cells. Cases were categorized into well-differentiated (grades 1 and 2), small cell carcinoma (SCC) (grade 3) and mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma. Nuclear positivity for TTF-1 was considered as positive. Morphologically, tumour cells were mainly arranged in rosettes in the well-differentiated category; sudden anisonucleosis and rare nuclear moulding with or without mitotic figures were other features. Eleven cases of SCC showed prominent nuclear moulding with frequent smudge cells, mitoses, apoptosis and necrosis. Three mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas showed papillary fragments and an acinar arrangement of tumour cells. Four of the nine SCCs in which TTF-1 was evaluated on de-stained smears showed nuclear positivity. Histopathology was available in two SCCs and showed morphology similar to FNAC. Cytology plays an important role in the diagnosis of GB-NETs for appropriate subtype characterization, which is necessary for the prognostication of these tumours. TTF-1 may not be used for the differentiation of gallbladder SCCs from pulmonary SCCs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Investigating citrullinated proteins in tumour cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The conversion of arginine into citrulline, termed citrullination, has important consequences for the structure and function of proteins. Studies have found PADI4, an enzyme performing citrullination, to be highly expressed in a variety of malignant tumours and have shown that PADI4 participates in the process of tumorigenesis. However, as citrullinated proteins have not been systematically investigated in tumours, the present study aimed to identify novel citrullinated proteins in tumours by 2-D western blotting (2-D WB). Methods Two identical two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) gels were prepared using extracts from ECA, H292, HeLa, HEPG2, Lovo, MCF-7, PANC-1, SGC, and SKOV3 tumour cell lines. The expression profiles on a 2-DE gel were trans-blotted to PVDF membranes, and the blots were then probed with an anti-citrulline antibody. By comparing the 2-DE profile with the parallel 2-D WB profile at a global level, protein spots with immuno-signals were collected from the second 2-DE gel and identified using mass spectrometry. Immunoprecipitation was used to verify the expression and citrullination of the targeted proteins in tumour cell lines. Results 2-D WB and mass spectrometry identified citrullinated α-enolase (ENO1), heat shock protein 60 (HSP60), keratin 8 (KRT8), tubulin beta (TUBB), T cell receptor chain and vimentin in these cell lines. Immunoprecipitation analyses verified the expression and citrullination of ENO1, HSP60, KRT8, and TUBB in the total protein lysates of the tumour cell lines. Conclusions The citrullination of these proteins suggests a new mechanism in the tumorigenic process. PMID:24099319

  17. Is visual radiological evaluation of liver tumour burden in patients with neuroendocrine tumours reproducible?

    PubMed Central

    Hentic, Olivia; Vullierme, Marie-Pierre; Lagadec, Matthieu; Ronot, Maxime; Ruszniewski, Philippe; Vilgrain, Valérie

    2017-01-01

    Background Visual semi-quantitative assessment of liver tumour burden for neuroendocrine tumour liver metastases is often used in patient management and outcome. However, published data on the reproducibility of these evaluations are lacking. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the interobserver and intraobserver agreement of a visual semi-quantitative assessment of liver tumour burden using CT scan. Methods Fifty consecutive patients (24 men and 26 women, mean aged 54 years) were retrospectively reviewed by four readers (two senior radiologists, one junior radiologist and one gastroenterologist) who assessed the liver tumour burden based on a visual semi-quantitative method with four classes (0–10, 11–25, 26–50 and ≥50%). Interobserver and intraobserver agreement were assessed by weighted kappa coefficient and percentage of agreement. The intraclass correlation was calculated. Results Agreement among the four observers for the evaluation of liver tumour burden was substantial, ranging from 0.62 to 0.73 (P < 0.0001). The intraclass coefficient was 0.977 (P < 0.0001). Intraobserver agreement was 0.78 and ICC was 0.97. Conclusion Reproducibility of the visual semi-quantitative evaluation of liver tumour burden is good and is independent of the level of experience of the readers. We therefore suggest that clinical studies in patients with neuroendocrine liver metastases use this method to categorise liver tumour burden. PMID:28069898

  18. The tumour microenvironment harbours ontogenically distinct dendritic cell populations with opposing effects on tumour immunity

    PubMed Central

    Laoui, Damya; Keirsse, Jiri; Morias, Yannick; Van Overmeire, Eva; Geeraerts, Xenia; Elkrim, Yvon; Kiss, Mate; Bolli, Evangelia; Lahmar, Qods; Sichien, Dorine; Serneels, Jens; Scott, Charlotte L.; Boon, Louis; De Baetselier, Patrick; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Guilliams, Martin; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.

    2016-01-01

    Various steady state and inflamed tissues have been shown to contain a heterogeneous DC population consisting of developmentally distinct subsets, including cDC1s, cDC2s and monocyte-derived DCs, displaying differential functional specializations. The identification of functionally distinct tumour-associated DC (TADC) subpopulations could prove essential for the understanding of basic TADC biology and for envisaging targeted immunotherapies. We demonstrate that multiple mouse tumours as well as human tumours harbour ontogenically discrete TADC subsets. Monocyte-derived TADCs are prominent in tumour antigen uptake, but lack strong T-cell stimulatory capacity due to NO-mediated immunosuppression. Pre-cDC-derived TADCs have lymph node migratory potential, whereby cDC1s efficiently activate CD8+ T cells and cDC2s induce Th17 cells. Mice vaccinated with cDC2s displayed a reduced tumour growth accompanied by a reprogramming of pro-tumoural TAMs and a reduction of MDSCs, while cDC1 vaccination strongly induces anti-tumour CTLs. Our data might prove important for therapeutic interventions targeted at specific TADC subsets or their precursors. PMID:28008905

  19. The tumour suppressor C/EBPδ inhibits FBXW7 expression and promotes mammary tumour metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Balamurugan, Kuppusamy; Wang, Ju-Ming; Tsai, Hsin-Hwa; Sharan, Shikha; Anver, Miriam; Leighty, Robert; Sterneck, Esta

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation and hypoxia are known to promote the metastatic progression of tumours. The CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-δ (C/EBPδ, CEBPD) is an inflammatory response gene and candidate tumour suppressor, but its physiological role in tumourigenesis in vivo is unknown. Here, we demonstrate a tumour suppressor function of C/EBPδ using transgenic mice overexpressing the Neu/Her2/ERBB2 proto-oncogene in the mammary gland. Unexpectedly, this study also revealed that C/EBPδ is necessary for efficient tumour metastasis. We show that C/EBPδ is induced by hypoxia in tumours in vivo and in breast tumour cells in vitro, and that C/EBPδ-deficient cells exhibit reduced glycolytic metabolism and cell viability under hypoxia. C/EBPδ supports CXCR4 expression. On the other hand, C/EBPδ directly inhibits expression of the tumour suppressor F-box and WD repeat-domain containing 7 gene (FBXW7, FBW7, AGO, Cdc4), encoding an F-box protein that promotes degradation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Consequently, C/EBPδ enhances mTOR/AKT/S6K1 signalling and augments translation and activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), which is necessary for hypoxia adaptation. This work provides new insight into the mechanisms by which metastasis-promoting signals are induced specifically under hypoxia. PMID:21076392

  20. Human Papillomavirus-related tumours of the oropharynx display a lower tumour hypoxia signature.

    PubMed

    Hanns, Elodie; Job, Sylvie; Coliat, Pierre; Wasylyk, Christine; Ramolu, Ludivine; Pencreach, Erwan; Suarez-Carmona, Meggy; Herfs, Michael; Ledrappier, Sonia; Macabre, Christine; Abecassis, Joseph; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Jung, Alain C

    2015-09-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients have improved prognosis compared to other head and neck (HNSCC) cancers. Since poor prognosis is associated with tumour hypoxia, we studied whether the hypoxic response is different in HPV-related cells and tumours. HPV-positive and -negative cells were incubated in hypoxia and analyzed by qRTPCR, western blotting and cell proliferation assays. Tumours formed by xenografting these cells in nude mice were studied by IHC. HNSCC patient samples were analyzed by unsupervised clustering of hypoxia-related gene expression, quantitative real-time PCR (qRTPCR) and immunohistochemical (IHC) detection of neo-blood vessels. HPV-positive and -negative cells responded differently to hypoxia, in terms of gene expression (HIF-1α, PHD-3, GLUT-1 and VEGF-A) and cell survival. Tumour xenografts formed by HPV-positive cells had fewer hypoxic areas than those formed by HPV-negative cells. HPV related tumours were less hypoxic, expressed lower levels of hypoxia-responsive genes, and had a higher density of neo-blood vessels. HPV-related OSCC display lower tumour hypoxia, which could be linked to the distinct intrinsic abilities of HPV-positive tumour cells to adapt to hypoxia and to their better prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Tumour-on-a-chip: microfluidic models of tumour morphology, growth and microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Trubelja, Alen

    2017-01-01

    Cancer remains one of the leading causes of death, albeit enormous efforts to cure the disease. To overcome the major challenges in cancer therapy, we need to have a better understanding of the tumour microenvironment (TME), as well as a more effective means to screen anti-cancer drug leads; both can be achieved using advanced technologies, including the emerging tumour-on-a-chip technology. Here, we review the recent development of the tumour-on-a-chip technology, which integrates microfluidics, microfabrication, tissue engineering and biomaterials research, and offers new opportunities for building and applying functional three-dimensional in vitro human tumour models for oncology research, immunotherapy studies and drug screening. In particular, tumour-on-a-chip microdevices allow well-controlled microscopic studies of the interaction among tumour cells, immune cells and cells in the TME, of which simple tissue cultures and animal models are not amenable to do. The challenges in developing the next-generation tumour-on-a-chip technology are also discussed. PMID:28637915

  2. Anti-tumour strategies aiming to target tumour-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoqiang; Mo, Chunfen; Wang, Yongsheng; Wei, Dandan; Xiao, Hengyi

    2013-01-01

    Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) represent a predominant population of inflammatory cells that present in solid tumours. TAMs are mostly characterized as alternatively activated M2-like macrophages and are known to orchestrate nearly all stages of tumour progression. Experimental investigations indicate that TAMs contribute to drug-resistance and radio-protective effects, and clinical evidence shows that an elevated number of TAMs and their M2 profile are correlated with therapy failure and poor prognosis in cancer patients. Recently, many studies on TAM-targeted strategies have made significant progress and some pilot works have achieved encouraging results. Among these, connections between some anti-tumour drugs and their influence on TAMs have been suggested. In this review, we will summarize recent advances in TAM-targeted strategies for tumour therapy. Based on the proposed mechanisms, those strategies are grouped into four categories: (i) inhibiting macrophage recruitment; (ii) suppressing TAM survival; (iii) enhancing M1-like tumoricidal activity of TAMs; (iv) blocking M2-like tumour-promoting activity of TAMs. It is desired that further attention be drawn to this research field and more effort be made to promote TAM-targeted tumour therapy. PMID:23113570

  3. Optimization of tumour control probability for heterogeneous tumours in fractionated radiotherapy treatment protocols.

    PubMed

    Levin-Plotnik, D; Hamilton, R J

    2004-02-07

    We find the dose distribution that maximizes the tumour control probability (TCP) for a fixed mean tumour dose per fraction. We consider a heterogeneous tumour volume having a radiation response characterized by the linear quadratic model with heterogeneous radiosensitivity and repopulation rate that may vary in time. Using variational calculus methods a general solution is obtained. We demonstrate the spatial dependence of the optimal dose distribution by explicitly evaluating the solution for different functional forms of the tumour properties. For homogeneous radiosensitivity and growth rate, we find that the dose distribution that maximizes TCP is homogeneous when the clonogen cell density is homogeneous, while for a heterogeneous initial tumour density we find that the first dose fraction is inhomogeneous, which homogenizes the clonogen cell density, and subsequent dose fractions are homogeneous. When the tumour properties have explicit spatial dependence, we show that the spatial variation of the optimized dose distribution is insensitive to the functional form. However, the dose distribution and tumour clonogen density are sensitive to the value of the repopulation rate. The optimized dose distribution yields a higher TCP than a typical clinical dose distribution or a homogeneous dose distribution.

  4. Strategy for stochastic dose-rate induced enhanced elimination of malignant tumour without dose escalation.

    PubMed

    Paul, Subhadip; Roy, Prasun Kumar

    2016-09-01

    The efficacy of radiation therapy, a primary modality of cancer treatment, depends in general upon the total radiation dose administered to the tumour during the course of therapy. Nevertheless, the delivered radiation also irradiates normal tissues and dose escalation procedure often increases the elimination of normal tissue as well. In this article, we have developed theoretical frameworks under the premise of linear-quadratic-linear (LQL) model using stochastic differential equation and Jensen's inequality for exploring the possibility of attending to the two therapeutic performance objectives in contraposition-increasing the elimination of prostate tumour cells and enhancing the relative sparing of normal tissue in fractionated radiation therapy, within a prescribed limit of total radiation dose. Our study predicts that stochastic temporal modulation in radiation dose-rate appreciably enhances prostate tumour cell elimination, without needing dose escalation in radiation therapy. However, constant higher dose-rate can also enhance the elimination of tumour cells. In this context, we have shown that the sparing of normal tissue with stochastic dose-rate is considerably more than the sparing of normal tissue with the equivalent constant higher dose-rate. Further, by contrasting the stochastic dose-rate effects under LQL and linear-quadratic (LQ) models, we have also shown that the LQ model over-estimates stochastic dose-rate effect in tumour and under-estimates the stochastic dose-rate effect in normal tissue. Our study indicates the possibility of utilizing stochastic modulation of radiation dose-rate for designing enhanced radiation therapy protocol for cancer.

  5. Coordinated regulation of myeloid cells by tumours.

    PubMed

    Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2012-03-22

    Myeloid cells are the most abundant nucleated haematopoietic cells in the human body and are a collection of distinct cell populations with many diverse functions. The three groups of terminally differentiated myeloid cells - macrophages, dendritic cells and granulocytes - are essential for the normal function of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Mounting evidence indicates that the tumour microenvironment alters myeloid cells and can convert them into potent immunosuppressive cells. Here, we consider myeloid cells as an intricately connected, complex, single system and we focus on how tumours manipulate the myeloid system to evade the host immune response.

  6. Malignant tumours in patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Tirelli, U.; Franceschi, S.; Carbone, A.

    1994-01-01

    One of the most important though somewhat neglected aspects of research in HIV infection concerns the development, clinicopathological characteristics, and treatment of malignant tumours in infected patients. With the improved survival of patients with AIDS owing to the better prevention and treatment of infectious complications there may well be an increase in AIDS related malignancies. This paper reviews the epidemiology, pathology, and treatment of malignant tumours in patients with HIV. Images p1149-a p1149-b p1149-c FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 p1151-a p1151-b p1151-c PMID:8173459

  7. Stochastic Gompertz model of tumour cell growth.

    PubMed

    Lo, C F

    2007-09-21

    In this communication, based upon the deterministic Gompertz law of cell growth, a stochastic model in tumour growth is proposed. This model takes account of both cell fission and mortality too. The corresponding density function of the size of the tumour cells obeys a functional Fokker--Planck equation which can be solved analytically. It is found that the density function exhibits an interesting "multi-peak" structure generated by cell fission as time evolves. Within this framework the action of therapy is also examined by simply incorporating a therapy term into the deterministic cell growth term.

  8. Coordinated regulation of myeloid cells by tumours

    PubMed Central

    Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid cells are the most abundant nucleated hematopoietic cells in the human body and are a collection of distinct cell populations with many diverse functions. The three groups of terminally differentiated myeloid cells — macrophages, dendritic cells and granulocytes — are essential for the normal function of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Mounting evidence indicates that the tumour microenvironment alters myeloid cells and can convert them into potent immune suppressive cells. Here, we consider myeloid cells as an intricately connected, complex, single system and we focus on how tumours manipulate the myeloid system to evade the host immune response. PMID:22437938

  9. Nine cases of Merkel cell tumour.

    PubMed Central

    Bose, A

    1997-01-01

    Merkel cell tumour is an aggressive neuroendocrine neoplasm arising in the dermis. Although only a few hundred cases have been reported worldwide, nine were seen in Nottingham between 1985 and early 1994. The patients were five women and four men age 63-88. One was the first Afro-Caribbean reported to have such a tumour. In no case was the diagnosis made clinically; histological and histochemical examination was necessary. Three of the patients died quickly with metastatic disease. The primary treatment is surgical excision. For advanced disease, radiotherapy is commonly beneficial. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9306997

  10. A Large Extragnathic Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika M.; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Narasimhamurthy, Srinath

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are developmental cysts which occur typically in the jawbones. They present more commonly in the posterior mandible of young adults than the maxilla. OKCs have been reclassified under odontogenic tumours in 2005 by the WHO and have since been termed as keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOTs). Here we report a case of a recurrent buccal lesion in a 62-year-old man which was provisionally diagnosed as a space infection (buccal abscess) but surprisingly turned out to be a soft tissue KCOT in an unusual location on histopathologic examination. PMID:26770859

  11. Parotid gland metastases of distant primary tumours: A diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Achim M; Günzel, Thomas; Lieder, Anja

    2016-04-01

    Metastatic disease is common among parotid malignancies. The majority of primary tumours are located in the head and neck, but primary tumours below the clavicle must also be considered, especially in histological types not usually found in primary parotid or skin tumours. We performed 644 consecutive parotidectomies between 1980 and 2012. Benign tumours were found in 555 patients (86%) and malignant tumours in 89 patients (14%). Of 89 malignant tumours, 39 were metastases (44%). In 5 cases, the primary tumour was located below the clavicle (6% of malignant tumours). A carcinoma of the bronchus was subsequently diagnosed in three patients: one patient had breast carcinoma and one renal cell carcinoma. The majority of metastases in the parotid gland arise from primary tumours of the head and neck. In 10-20% of metastases, the primary tumour arises below the clavicle. Parotid metastases can be the first clinical manifestation of a malignant tumour, and can also occur years after curative intent treatment. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry will offer clues to a possible metastatic process and to primary tumour location. Parotidectomy with complete excision of the tumour can be a curative measure or form an essential part of symptom control and should be considered in all but the most moribund patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The management of soft tissue tumours of the abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Smith, H G; Tzanis, D; Messiou, C; Benson, C; van der Hage, J A; Fiore, M; Bonvalot, S; Hayes, A J

    2017-09-01

    Soft tissue tumours of the abdominal wall account for approximately 10% of all soft tissue tumours. Tumours at this site comprise a heterogeneous group of pathologies with distinct clinical behaviours and responses to treatment. The management of these tumours has largely been extrapolated from studies of soft tissue tumours at other sites. This review aims to summarise the existing data relating to abdominal wall tumours and suggest principles for managing soft tissue tumours at this site. Relevant articles were retrieved from a comprehensive literature search using the PubMed database. Key words included abdominal wall, soft tissue tumours, surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. No restrictions on publication date were used. The most common pathologies presenting in the abdominal wall are desmoid tumours, soft-tissue sarcoma and dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP). Desmoid tumours should be managed with an initial period of observation, with surgery reserved for progressive lesions. Surgery should be the primary treatment for soft-tissue sarcomas and DFSP, with radiotherapy reserved for large-high grade tumours and preferentially given pre-operatively. Abdominal wall tumours are rare and should be managed in centres with experience in the management of soft tissue tumours. Management should be tailored to the biological behaviour of specific pathologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  13. Photothermal effects induced by laser heating of gold nanorods in suspensions and inoculated tumours during in vivo experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Terentyuk, G S; Ivanov, A V; Polyanskaya, N I; Maksimova, I L; Skaptsov, A A; Chumakov, D S; Khlebtsov, B N; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G

    2012-05-31

    Photothermal effects are studied under laser irradiation of aqueous suspensions of gold nanorods (in vitro experiments) and mice-inoculated Erlich carcinoma after intravenous injection of gold nanorods with the size 40 Multiplication-Sign 10 nm and plasmon resonance at the wavelength 810 nm (in vivo experiment). In 24 hours after the injection the polyethylene-glycol-coated nanoparticles accumulated in the tumour with the concentration three - four times greater than in healthy muscle tissue. At concentrations, attained as a result of passive accumulation of nanoparticles in the tumour (4 {mu}g per 1 g of tumour), the efficiency of the tumour heating was higher than that in aqueous solutions having the same concentration of nanoparticles. Various mechanisms of this effect are discussed including the difference in thermal physical parameters of water and biotissue, the aggregation of nanoparticles in tissues, the influence of multiple scattering in biotissue, and the nonuniform accumulation of particles in the tumour. Using the Monte Carlo method for simulating multiple scattering of light, it is shown that there are such proportions between the biotissue scattering coefficient and the absorption coefficient of nanoparticles, at which the fraction of absorbed photons in the tissue is higher than that in a transparent medium containing the same nanoparticles. The conclusion is made that the regime of hyperthermia is less efficient for antineoplastic therapy than the thermal damage due to fast short-time heating of the tissues up to the destruction temperature.

  14. Photothermal effects induced by laser heating of gold nanorods in suspensions and inoculated tumours during in vivo experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentyuk, G. S.; Ivanov, A. V.; Polyanskaya, N. I.; Maksimova, I. L.; Skaptsov, A. A.; Chumakov, D. S.; Khlebtsov, B. N.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.

    2012-05-01

    Photothermal effects are studied under laser irradiation of aqueous suspensions of gold nanorods (in vitro experiments) and mice-inoculated Erlich carcinoma after intravenous injection of gold nanorods with the size 40 × 10 nm and plasmon resonance at the wavelength 810 nm (in vivo experiment). In 24 hours after the injection the polyethylene-glycol-coated nanoparticles accumulated in the tumour with the concentration three — four times greater than in healthy muscle tissue. At concentrations, attained as a result of passive accumulation of nanoparticles in the tumour (4 μg per 1 g of tumour), the efficiency of the tumour heating was higher than that in aqueous solutions having the same concentration of nanoparticles. Various mechanisms of this effect are discussed including the difference in thermal physical parameters of water and biotissue, the aggregation of nanoparticles in tissues, the influence of multiple scattering in biotissue, and the nonuniform accumulation of particles in the tumour. Using the Monte Carlo method for simulating multiple scattering of light, it is shown that there are such proportions between the biotissue scattering coefficient and the absorption coefficient of nanoparticles, at which the fraction of absorbed photons in the tissue is higher than that in a transparent medium containing the same nanoparticles. The conclusion is made that the regime of hyperthermia is less efficient for antineoplastic therapy than the thermal damage due to fast short-time heating of the tissues up to the destruction temperature.

  15. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha) in leishmaniasis. I. TNF alpha mediates host protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Liew, F Y; Parkinson, C; Millott, S; Severn, A; Carrier, M

    1990-01-01

    Genetically resistant CBA mice developed significantly larger lesions to Leishmania major infection when they were injected with rabbit anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-specific antibodies compared to control mice injected with normal rabbit immunoglobulin. BALB/c mice recovered from a previous infection following prophylactic sublethal irradiation also developed exacerbated lesions when treated with the anti-TNF antibody. Injection of TNF into the lesion of infected CBA mice significantly reduced the lesion development. Furthermore, TNF activates macrophages to kill Leishmania in vitro. These data demonstrate that TNF plays an important role in mediating host-protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:2335376

  16. Adult Wilms’ Tumour: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Tiang, Kor Woi; Inglis, Po; Collins, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Wilms’ tumour (nephroblastoma) is the most common renal tumour in children. Wilms’ tumour in adults is extremely rare and has a poorer prognosis than paediatric Wilms’ tumour. It is difficult to differentiate adult Wilms’ tumour from renal cell carcinoma based on radiological findings alone. The diagnosis in adults is often serendipitous following nephrectomy for presumed renal cell carcinoma. Because of the paucity of literature, there are no standard protocols for the management of adult Wilms’ tumour, and therefore, it is managed as per paediatric Wilms’ tumour. Herein, we report the case of adult Wilms’ tumour in a 43-year-old man, which was diagnosed unexpectedly following nephrectomy for presumed renal cell carcinoma. PMID:28326278

  17. Systematic pan-cancer analysis of tumour purity.

    PubMed

    Aran, Dvir; Sirota, Marina; Butte, Atul J

    2015-12-04

    The tumour microenvironment is the non-cancerous cells present in and around a tumour, including mainly immune cells, but also fibroblasts and cells that comprise supporting blood vessels. These non-cancerous components of the tumour may play an important role in cancer biology. They also have a strong influence on the genomic analysis of tumour samples, and may alter the biological interpretation of results. Here we present a systematic analysis using different measurement modalities of tumour purity in >10,000 samples across 21 cancer types from the Cancer Genome Atlas. Patients are stratified according to clinical features in an attempt to detect clinical differences driven by purity levels. We demonstrate the confounding effect of tumour purity on correlating and clustering tumours with transcriptomics data. Finally, using a differential expression method that accounts for tumour purity, we find an immunotherapy gene signature in several cancer types that is not detected by traditional differential expression analyses.

  18. Cutaneous location of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour.

    PubMed

    Bellon, Nathalia; Fraitag, Sylvie; Miquel, Catherine; Salomon, Laurent J; Bourdeaut, Franck; Bodemer, Christine; Roujeau, Thomas; Zerah, Michel; Hadj-Rabia, Smail

    2014-07-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour is a rare and highly malignant tumour of the posterior fossae nervous system that occurs in children especially in the first few years of life. Cutaneous location is not previously reported. A newborn boy was referred for both aqueductal stenosis detected antenatally and skin tags mimicking hamartoma. The cerebral tumour increased in size during a few months leading to both skin and cerebral biopsies. Integrase Interactor-1 (INI-1) immunostaining and tumoural and leukocytes INI-1 gene sequencing confirmed the atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour nature of the cerebral tumour. INI-1 immunostaining in skin biopsy confirmed the dermal location of rhabdoid tumour. Thus, unusual cutaneous lesions may be part of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour. The loss of Integrase INI-1 on immunohistochemical staining is characteristic.

  19. Ileocaecal intussusception secondary to metastatic phyllodes tumour of the breast.

    PubMed

    Morcos, Basem B; Baker, Bilal; Hashem, Sameh A

    2010-09-01

    A patient with phyllodes tumour of the breast is discussed. During follow-up, she presented with intestinal obstruction caused by ileocaecal intussusception. The cause of the intussusception was metastatic phyllodes tumour, which is a unique presentation.

  20. Towards the Design of a Patient-Specific Virtual Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Caraguel, Flavien; Lesart, Anne-Cécile; Estève, François; van der Sanden, Boudewijn

    2016-01-01

    The design of a patient-specific virtual tumour is an important step towards Personalized Medicine. However this requires to capture the description of many key events of tumour development, including angiogenesis, matrix remodelling, hypoxia, and cell state heterogeneity that will all influence the tumour growth kinetics and degree of tumour invasiveness. To that end, an integrated hybrid and multiscale approach has been developed based on data acquired on a preclinical mouse model as a proof of concept. Fluorescence imaging is exploited to build case-specific virtual tumours. Numerical simulations show that the virtual tumour matches the characteristics and spatiotemporal evolution of its real counterpart. We achieved this by combining image analysis and physiological modelling to accurately described the evolution of different tumour cases over a month. The development of such models is essential since a dedicated virtual tumour would be the perfect tool to identify the optimum therapeutic strategies that would make Personalized Medicine truly reachable and achievable. PMID:28096895

  1. Intraoperative intravital microscopy permits the study of human tumour vessels

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Daniel T.; Muhitch, Jason B.; Kim, Minhyung; Doyen, Kurt C.; Bogner, Paul N.; Evans, Sharon S.; Skitzki, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour vessels have been studied extensively as they are critical sites for drug delivery, anti-angiogenic therapies and immunotherapy. As a preclinical tool, intravital microscopy (IVM) allows for in vivo real-time direct observation of vessels at the cellular level. However, to date there are no reports of intravital high-resolution imaging of human tumours in the clinical setting. Here we report the feasibility of IVM examinations of human malignant disease with an emphasis on tumour vasculature as the major site of tumour-host interactions. Consistent with preclinical observations, we show that patient tumour vessels are disorganized, tortuous and ∼50% do not support blood flow. Human tumour vessel diameters are larger than predicted from immunohistochemistry or preclinical IVM, and thereby have lower wall shear stress, which influences delivery of drugs and cellular immunotherapies. Thus, real-time clinical imaging of living human tumours is feasible and allows for detection of characteristics within the tumour microenvironment. PMID:26883450

  2. Anticancer activity of cationic porphyrins in melanoma tumour-bearing mice and mechanistic in vitro studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Porphyrin TMPyP4 (P4) and its C14H28-alkyl derivative (C14) are G-quadruplex binders and singlet oxygen (1O2) generators. In contrast, TMPyP2 (P2) produces 1O2 but it is not a G-quadruplex binder. As their photosensitizing activity is currently undefined, we report in this study their efficacy against a melanoma skin tumour and describe an in vitro mechanistic study which gives insights into their anticancer activity. Methods Uptake and antiproliferative activity of photoactivated P2, P4 and C14 have been investigated in murine melanoma B78-H1 cells by FACS, clonogenic and migration assays. Apoptosis was investigated by PARP-1 cleavage and annexin-propidium iodide assays. Biodistribution and in vivo anticancer activity were tested in melanoma tumour-bearing mice. Porphyrin binding and photocleavage of G-rich mRNA regions were investigated by electrophoresis and RT-PCR. Porphyrin effect on ERK pathway was explored by Western blots. Results Thanks to its higher lipophylicity C14 was taken up by murine melanoma B78-H1 cells up to 30-fold more efficiently than P4. When photoactivated (7.2 J/cm2) in B78-H1 melanoma cells, P4 and C14, but not control P2, caused a strong inhibition of metabolic activity, clonogenic growth and cell migration. Biodistribution studies on melanoma tumour-bearing mice showed that P4 and C14 localize in the tumour. Upon irradiation (660 nm, 193 J/cm2), P4 and C14 retarded tumour growth and increased the median survival time of the treated mice by ~50% (P <0.01 by ANOVA), whereas porphyrin P2 did not. The light-dependent mechanism mediated by P4 and C14 is likely due to the binding to and photocleavage of G-rich quadruplex-forming sequences within the 5′-untranslated regions of the mitogenic ras genes. This causes a decrease of RAS protein and inhibition of downstream ERK pathway, which stimulates proliferation. Annexin V/propidium iodide and PARP-1 cleavage assays showed that the porphyrins arrested tumour growth by apoptosis

  3. pH distributions in spontaneous and isotransplanted rat tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Kallinowski, F.; Vaupel, P.

    1988-01-01

    Spontaneous mammary tumours of the rat with various degrees of malignancy exhibit similar tissue pH distributions. The mean pH (+/- s.d.) of dysplasia is 7.05 +/- 0.20. In benign tumours the mean pH is 6.95 +/- 0.19 and in malignant tumours it is 6.94 +/- 0.19. In contrast, tumours with the same degree of malignancy but different histologies show different pH distributions. Benign tumours with a higher percentage of fibrous tissue exhibit less acidic pH values than those with larger portions of epithelial cells (delta pH = 0.38 pH units). The pH distribution in the benign tumours is independent of the tumour wet weight up to stages of very advanced growth. In the malignant tumours, a trend towards more acidic pH values is observed as the tumour mass enlarges. However, in tissue areas within a malignant tumour with gross, long-established necrosis the pH distribution is shifted towards more alkaline pH values. The pH distributions in spontaneous rat tumours are not significantly different from those obtained in isotransplanted Yoshida sarcomas (6.87 +/- 0.21). In the Yoshida sarcomas, mean pH values do not correlate with tumour size. However, a pH gradient from the rim to the centre of the tumours is found which coincides with the development of small, disseminated necroses in the tumour centre. It is concluded that pathology-related variations of tumour pH may be more important than the mode of tumour origin or the degree of malignancy. PMID:3179183

  4. Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tam, Jessica; Cheung, Wa Sham; Senger, Christof; Reichman, Mark; Campbell, Karen M

    2015-01-01

    Melanotic neuroectodermal tumour of infancy is a rare benign pigmented tumour that typically appears in the first year of life. We report an atypical presentation of this tumour, associated with an erupted primary tooth in a 7-month-old boy. We discuss the clinical, radiographic and histologic features of this rare tumour, as well as its surgical management and the follow-up treatment plan.

  5. [Modalities of breast cancer irradiation in 2016: Aims and indications of intensity modulated radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Bourgier, C; Fenoglietto, P; Lemanski, C; Ducteil, A; Charissoux, M; Draghici, R; Azria, D

    2016-10-01

    Irradiation techniques for breast cancer (arctherapy, tomotherapy) are evolving and intensity-modulated radiation therapy is being increasingly considered for the management of these tumours. Here, we propose a review of intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning issues, clinical toxicities and indications for breast cancer.

  6. Malignant gonadal tumour formation in intersexual states

    PubMed Central

    Pigott, H. W. S.

    1975-01-01

    Two cases of malignant tumour are reported in phenotypically male hermaphrodites. The importance of establishing the presence of persistent Müllerian duct structures in pseudo-hermaphrodites is discussed in relation to prophylactic castration in anticipation of malignant change. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:1197157

  7. Analysis of nanoparticle delivery to tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Stefan; Tavares, Anthony J.; Dai, Qin; Ohta, Seiichi; Audet, Julie; Dvorak, Harold F.; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-05-01

    Targeting nanoparticles to malignant tissues for improved diagnosis and therapy is a popular concept. However, after surveying the literature from the past 10 years, only 0.7% (median) of the administered nanoparticle dose is found to be delivered to a solid tumour. This has negative consequences on the translation of nanotechnology for human use with respect to manufacturing, cost, toxicity, and imaging and therapeutic efficacy. In this article, we conduct a multivariate analysis on the compiled data to reveal the contributions of nanoparticle physicochemical parameters, tumour models and cancer types on the low delivery efficiency. We explore the potential causes of the poor delivery efficiency from the perspectives of tumour biology (intercellular versus transcellular transport, enhanced permeability and retention effect, and physicochemical-dependent nanoparticle transport through the tumour stroma) as well as competing organs (mononuclear phagocytic and renal systems) and present a 30-year research strategy to overcome this fundamental limitation. Solving the nanoparticle delivery problem will accelerate the clinical translation of nanomedicine.

  8. Solitary fibrous tumour of the vagus nerve.

    PubMed

    Scholsem, Martin; Scholtes, Felix

    2012-04-01

    We describe the complete removal of a foramen magnum solitary fibrous tumour in a 36-year-old woman. It originated on a caudal vagus nerve rootlet, classically described as the 'cranial' accessory nerve root. This ninth case of immunohistologically confirmed cranial or spinal nerve SFT is the first of the vagus nerve.

  9. Vagal Schwannoma: A Rare Parapharyngeal Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Panduranga M; Sreedharan, Suja S; Majeed, Nazeem A; Shenoy, Vijendra S

    2016-01-01

    Among the parapharyngeal tumours, salivary gland tumours are the commonest, followed by schwannomas, which are slow growing benign tumours. Half of the parapharyngeal schwannomas originate from the vagus. Complete surgical excision is the treatment of choice. We hereby present two cases of parapharyngeal schwannomas, one which had presented as an intraoral mass and the other as a swelling in the neck. The first case, a 57-year-old female patient complained of a slowly increasing swelling in the left side of the throat since 3 months, associated with pain and dysphagia. In the Contrast Enhanced CT scan of the neck, a well-defined cystic lesion with central enhancing solid components (4cm X 4.5cm X 3cm) was seen in the left parapharyngeal region. The second case, a 39-year-old male patient complained of a painless, gradually increasing swelling below the lobule of the right ear since one month. Examination revealed a solitary, nontender, firm and mobile swelling of 2cm X 2cm below the lobule of the right ear. In Contrast Enhanced CT scan of the neck, an enhancing lesion was seen involving the right parapharyngeal space, post-styloid compartment. Both the patients underwent trans-cervical surgical excision. Vagal nerve schwannoma is rare. The majority of the cases present with a slow growing neck swelling without neurological deficit. Complete surgical excision of the tumour is important to prevent recurrence. PMID:27190844

  10. Pineal parenchymal tumours and pineal cysts.

    PubMed

    Jouvet, A; Vasiljevic, A; Champier, J; Fèvre Montange, M

    2015-01-01

    Pineal parenchymal tumours (PPTs) and pineal cysts represent one third of the pineal region lesions. PPTs are subdivided into pineocytoma (PC), pineoblastoma (PB) and PPT with intermediate differentiation (PPTID). We report morphological and immunochemical features which permit to grade these tumours. The description of histopathological features and grading is based on a large cooperative series and on the WHO 2007 classification. PCs occur in adults between the third and the sixth decade of life. PBs typically occur in children. PPTIDs have a peak incidence in young adults between 20 and 40 years of age. There is no sex preference. PC is characterized by a uniform cell proliferation with large fibrillary pineocytomatous rosettes. PB is a high-density tumour composed of small blue cells with hyper-chromatic, round or carrot shaped nuclei. PPTIDs have lobulated or diffuse patterns. Grading is based on morphological features, count of mitoses and neurofilament protein (NFP) expression. PCs (grade I) have no mitosis and NFP is highly expressed in pineocytomatous rosettes. PBs (grade IV) are high mitotic tumours and present low or no expression of NFPs. PPTIDs are grade II when mitoses are fewer than 6 for 10 high-power fields and NFPs are expressed, and are grade III when mitoses are greater or equal to 6 or are fewer than 6 with NFPs lowly expressed. Pineal cysts may be differentiated from PPTs by the high expression of NFPs and no expression of Ki-67. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Tetraploidy in BRCA2 breast tumours.

    PubMed

    Jonsdottir, Asta Bjork; Stefansson, Olafur Andri; Bjornsson, Johannes; Jonasson, Jon G; Ogmundsdottir, Helga M; Eyfjord, Jorunn E

    2012-02-01

    Tetraploidy and aneuploidy can be caused by cell division errors and are frequently observed in many human carcinomas. We have recently reported delayed cytokinesis in primary human fibroblasts from BRCA2 mutation carriers, implying a function for the BRCA2 tumour suppressor in completion of cell division. Here, we address ploidy aberrations in breast tumours derived from BRCA2 germline mutation carriers. Ploidy aberrations were evaluated from flow cytometry histograms on selected breast tumour samples (n=236), previously screened for local BRCA mutations. The ploidy between BRCA2-mutated (n=71) and matched sporadic (n=165) cancers was compared. Differences in ploidy distribution were examined with respect to molecular tumour subtypes, previously defined by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarray sections. Tetraploidy was significantly 3 times more common in BRCA2 breast cancers than sporadic. However, no differences were found in the overall ploidy distribution between BRCA2-mutation carriers and non-carriers. In BRCA2 cancers, tetraploidy was associated with luminal characteristics. The increased frequency of tetraploidy in BRCA2 associated cancers may be linked to cell division errors, particularly cytokinesis. Additionally, tetraploidy emerges predominantly in BRCA2 breast cancers displaying luminal rather than triple-negative phenotypes.

  12. Congenital epulis: A rare benign tumour.

    PubMed

    Wong, D K C; Ramli, R; Muhaizan, W M; Primuharsa Putra, S H A

    2016-10-01

    Congenital epulis is a rare benign pedunculated tumour of the oral cavity arising from the alveolar ridges. It is usually detected in newborns and can be successfully resected surgically. We report a case of a newborn baby who had a 5x3x3cm pedunculated lobar mass arising from the upper alveolar ridge.

  13. Circulating tumour markers in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Seregni, Ettore; Coli, Antonio; Mazzucca, Nicola

    2004-06-01

    A large number of markers have been proposed for breast cancer, but among them only CA 15.3, CEA and cytokeratins (i.e. TPA, TPS and Cyfra 21.1) are currently used in clinical practice. Serum marker levels reflect tumour burden and for this reason they are not sensitive enough to be used for screening and early diagnosis of primary breast cancer. By contrast, the role of tumour markers is established in the diagnosis of recurrent disease and in the evaluation of response to treatment. In the former case, however, prospective randomised studies are required to demonstrate any survival benefit when earlier therapeutic interventions are instituted upon elevation of serum markers. In the second case, tumour marker evaluation represents a simple, objective method for monitoring of therapeutic response that seems to offer significant advantages over conventional imaging methods (e.g. objectivity, modifications in tumour biology). Furthermore, research studies are ongoing to identify and validate new biochemical parameters which can be of use not only in advanced disease but also in other stages of the diagnostic work-up of breast cancer.

  14. Peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the orbit.

    PubMed

    Romero, Ricardo; Castano, Ananda; Abelairas, Jose; Peralta, Jesus; Garcia-Cabezas, Miguel A; Sanchez-Orgaz, Margarita; Arbizu, Alvaro; Vallejo-Garcia, Jose

    2011-07-01

    Peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumours (pPNETs) are a group of soft-tissue tumours of neuroepithelial origin that arise outside the central and sympathetic nervous system. Orbital location is infrequent, and to the best of the authors' knowledge only 16 cases have been reported in the literature. With this article, the authors report the demographics and clinical characteristics, diagnostic features, differential diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic options of primary orbital peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumour, based on their patients and on the cases reported in the literature to date. A differential diagnosis should be made with other small round cell tumours; immunohistochemical and ultrastructural techniques are essential for this purpose. Although bone invasion and extraorbital extension are possible, systemic metastases are uncommon in the cases of orbital pPNETs. Surgery has been the initial treatment in most cases; chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy is considered the best additional treatment. The orbital pPNET could be less aggressive than other forms of pPNETs, since most of the patients reported were alive after the follow-up period (at least 6 months).

  15. Tumour immunomodulation: mucins in resistance to initiation and maturation of immune response against tumours.

    PubMed

    Anandkumar, A; Devaraj, H

    2013-07-01

    Mucins are high molecular weight glycoproteins designed for cellular protection and sensing the external environment. Aberrant glycosylation and altered mucin expression seen in cancers are implicated in mucin-dependent refraction to immunosurveilance and immunosuppressive induction around the tumour. Although mucins provide molecular targets for immune system's tumour recognition, their characteristics dictate that the nature of immune response required for recognition and lyses of mucin-expressing tumours needs to follow predominantly a MHC-unrestricted αβ TCR-mediated effector cell response. Frequent loss of dendritic cells maturation and elimination of reactive lymphocytes altered adhesive and anti-adhesive properties of the mucins, promote tumour survival and escape from the immune response. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Neuropsychological Differences between Survivors of Supratentorial and Infratentorial Brain Tumours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, S. K.; Mullins, W. A.; O'Neil, S. H.; Wilson, K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between brain tumour location and core areas of cognitive and behavioural functioning for paediatric brain tumour survivors. The extant literature both supports and refutes an association between paediatric brain tumour location and neurocognitive outcomes. We examined…

  17. Neuropsychological Differences between Survivors of Supratentorial and Infratentorial Brain Tumours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, S. K.; Mullins, W. A.; O'Neil, S. H.; Wilson, K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between brain tumour location and core areas of cognitive and behavioural functioning for paediatric brain tumour survivors. The extant literature both supports and refutes an association between paediatric brain tumour location and neurocognitive outcomes. We examined…

  18. Frequent MED12 mutations in phyllodes tumours of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, M; Sekine, S; Ogawa, R; Yoshida, H; Maeshima, A; Kanai, Y; Kinoshita, T; Ochiai, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Phyllodes tumours are rare fibroepithelial tumours of the breast, that include benign, borderline, and malignant lesions. Although the molecular basis of phyllodes tumours largely remains unknown, a recent exome study identified MED12 mutations as a sole recurrent genetic alteration in fibroadenoma, a common benign fibroepithelial tumour that shares some histological features with the phyllodes tumour. Methods: Forty-six phyllodes tumours and 58 fibroadenomas of the breast were analysed for MED12 mutations by using Sanger sequencing. Results: MED12 mutations were identified in 37 out of the 46 phyllodes tumours (80%). The prevalence of MED12 mutations was similar among benign (15/18, 83%), borderline (12/15, 80%), and malignant tumours (10/13, 77%). MED12 mutations were also identified in 36 of the 58 fibroadenomas (62%). The mutations were frequent among intracanalicular-type (24/32, 75%) and complex-type lesions (4/6, 67%), but were significantly less common among the pericanalicular-type lesions (8/20, 40%). A microdissection-based analysis showed that MED12 mutations were confined to the stromal components in both phyllodes tumours and fibroadenomas. Conclusions: MED12 mutations were frequent among the phyllodes tumours of the breast, regardless of the tumour grade. Phyllodes tumours and fibroadenomas share, at least in part, a common genetic background. PMID:25839987

  19. Frequent MED12 mutations in phyllodes tumours of the breast.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, M; Sekine, S; Ogawa, R; Yoshida, H; Maeshima, A; Kanai, Y; Kinoshita, T; Ochiai, A

    2015-05-12

    Phyllodes tumours are rare fibroepithelial tumours of the breast, that include benign, borderline, and malignant lesions. Although the molecular basis of phyllodes tumours largely remains unknown, a recent exome study identified MED12 mutations as a sole recurrent genetic alteration in fibroadenoma, a common benign fibroepithelial tumour that shares some histological features with the phyllodes tumour. Forty-six phyllodes tumours and 58 fibroadenomas of the breast were analysed for MED12 mutations by using Sanger sequencing. MED12 mutations were identified in 37 out of the 46 phyllodes tumours (80%). The prevalence of MED12 mutations was similar among benign (15/18, 83%), borderline (12/15, 80%), and malignant tumours (10/13, 77%). MED12 mutations were also identified in 36 of the 58 fibroadenomas (62%). The mutations were frequent among intracanalicular-type (24/32, 75%) and complex-type lesions (4/6, 67%), but were significantly less common among the pericanalicular-type lesions (8/20, 40%). A microdissection-based analysis showed that MED12 mutations were confined to the stromal components in both phyllodes tumours and fibroadenomas. MED12 mutations were frequent among the phyllodes tumours of the breast, regardless of the tumour grade. Phyllodes tumours and fibroadenomas share, at least in part, a common genetic background.

  20. [Malignant germinal tumours of the mediastinum: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Lemarié, E

    2004-11-01

    Mediastinal germinal tumours are composed of tissues resembling those that follow one another during embryo development, by differentiation of the primordial and extraembryonic layers. Such practice separates the mature teratomas (benign), seminomas and non-seminomatous germinal tumours (NSGT). Platin-based chemotherapy has shattered the prognosis of such tumours.

  1. Probing Tumour Proteostasis and the UPR with Serum Markers.

    PubMed

    Galmiche, Antoine; Sauzay, Chloé; Houessinon, Aline; Chauffert, Bruno; Pluquet, Olivier

    2016-05-01

    Tumour proteostasis and the unfolded protein response (UPR) are emerging drivers of tumour progression and important determinants of clinical efficacy of cancer therapy. Recent findings indicate that they also regulate the production of protein tumour markers. Here, we discuss how this new knowledge opens up new perspectives for cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Slow growth of an untreated Wilms's tumour in the adolescent.

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, P C; Wood, B J; Smith, D F; Teasdale, J M

    1978-01-01

    Retrospective radiological documentation of a growing Wilms's tumour in rare. Considered to be a relatively rapidly growing tumour, we present a case where there was adequate radiological evidence of a Wilms's tumour 4 years before the clinical metastatic presentation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:215089

  3. The mechanical microenvironment in cancer: How physics affects tumours.

    PubMed

    Nagelkerke, Anika; Bussink, Johan; Rowan, Alan E; Span, Paul N

    2015-12-01

    The tumour microenvironment contributes greatly to the response of tumour cells. It consists of chemical gradients, for example of oxygen and nutrients. However, a physical environment is also present. Apart from chemical input, cells also receive physical signals. Tumours display unique mechanical properties: they are a lot stiffer than normal tissue. This may be either a cause or a consequence of cancer, but literature suggests it has a major impact on tumour cells as will be described in this review. The mechanical microenvironment may cause malignant transformation, possibly through activation of oncogenic pathways and inhibition of tumour suppressor genes. In addition, the mechanical microenvironment may promote tumour progression by influencing processes such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, enhancing cell survival through autophagy, but also affects sensitivity of tumour cells to therapeutics. Furthermore, multiple intracellular signalling pathways prove sensitive to the mechanical properties of the microenvironment. It appears the increased stiffness is unlikely to be caused by increased stiffness of the tumour cells themselves. However, there are indications that tumours display a higher cell density, making them more rigid. In addition, increased matrix deposition in the tumour, as well as increased interstitial fluid pressure may account for the increased stiffness of tumours. Overall, tumour mechanics are significantly different from normal tissue. Therefore, this feature should be further explored for use in cancer prevention, detection and treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. TU-F-CAMPUS-J-01: A Formulation of 4D Treatment Planning for Tumour Tracking Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Michael L M; Chan, Anthony T C; Lee, Louis K Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a formulation for 4D treatment planning for a tumour tracking volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment (VMAT) plan for lung cancer. Methods: A VMAT plan was optimized based on a reference phase of the 4DCT of a lung cancer patient. The PTV was generated from the GTV of the reference phase. The collimator angle was set to 90 degrees such that the MLC travels along superior-inferior direction which is the main component of movement of a lung tumour. Then, each control point of the VMAT plan was assigned to a particular phase of the 4DCT in chronological order. The MLC positions of each control point were shifted according to the position of the tumour centroid of its assigned phase to form a tumour tracking VMAT plan. The control points of the same phase were grouped to form a pseudo VMAT plan for that particular phase. Dose calculation was performed for each pseudo VMAT plan on the corresponding phase of the 4DCT. The CTs of all phases were registered to the reference phase CT according to the displacement of the tumour centroid. The individual dose distributions of the pseudo VMAT plans were summed up and displayed on the reference phase of the 4DCT. A control VMAT plan was optimized based on a PTV generated from the ITV of all phases and compared with the tumour tracking VMAT plan. Results: Both plans achieved >95% volume coverage at the prescription dose level (96% for the tumour tracking plan and 97% for the control plan). But the normal lung volume irradiated at the prescription dose level was 39% less for the tumour tracking plan than the control plan. Conclusion: A formulation of 4D treatment planning for tumour tracking VMAT plans for lung cancer was developed.

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid-derived circulating tumour DNA better represents the genomic alterations of brain tumours than plasma.

    PubMed

    De Mattos-Arruda, Leticia; Mayor, Regina; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Weigelt, Britta; Martínez-Ricarte, Francisco; Torrejon, Davis; Oliveira, Mafalda; Arias, Alexandra; Raventos, Carolina; Tang, Jiabin; Guerini-Rocco, Elena; Martínez-Sáez, Elena; Lois, Sergio; Marín, Oscar; de la Cruz, Xavier; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Towers, Russel; Vivancos, Ana; Peg, Vicente; Ramon y Cajal, Santiago; Carles, Joan; Rodon, Jordi; González-Cao, María; Tabernero, Josep; Felip, Enriqueta; Sahuquillo, Joan; Berger, Michael F; Cortes, Javier; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Seoane, Joan

    2015-11-10

    Cell-free circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) in plasma has been shown to be informative of the genomic alterations present in tumours and has been used to monitor tumour progression and response to treatments. However, patients with brain tumours do not present with or present with low amounts of ctDNA in plasma precluding the genomic characterization of brain cancer through plasma ctDNA. Here we show that ctDNA derived from central nervous system tumours is more abundantly present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) than in plasma. Massively parallel sequencing of CSF ctDNA more comprehensively characterizes the genomic alterations of brain tumours than plasma, allowing the identification of actionable brain tumour somatic mutations. We show that CSF ctDNA levels longitudinally fluctuate in time and follow the changes in brain tumour burden providing biomarkers to monitor brain malignancies. Moreover, CSF ctDNA is shown to facilitate and complement the diagnosis of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis.

  6. Orbital tumours and tumour-like lesions: exploring the armamentarium of multiparametric imaging.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Bela S; Vargas, Maria Isabel; Ailianou, Angeliki; Merlini, Laura; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra; Delattre, Bénédicte M; Rager, Olivier; Burkhardt, Karim; Becker, Minerva

    2016-02-01

    Although the orbit is a small anatomical space, the wide range of structures present within it are often the site of origin of various tumours and tumour-like conditions, both in adults and children. Cross-sectional imaging is mandatory for the detection, characterization, and mapping of these lesions. This review focuses on multiparametric imaging of orbital tumours. Each tumour is reviewed in relation to its clinical presentation, compartmental location, imaging characteristics, and its histological features. We herein describe orbital tumours as lesions of the globe (retinoblastoma, uveal melanoma), optic nerve sheath complex (meningioma, optic nerve glioma), conal-intraconal compartment (hemangioma), extraconal compartment (dermoid/epidermoid, lacrimal gland tumours, lymphoma, rhabdomysarcoma), and bone and sinus compartment (fibrous dysplasia). Lesions without any typical compartmental localization and those with multi-compartment involvement (veno-lymphatic malformation, plexiform neurofibroma, idiopathic orbital pseudotumour, IgG4 related disease, metastases) are also reviewed. We discuss the role of advanced imaging techniques, such as MR diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography CT (FDG-PET CT), and positron emission tomography MRI (MRI PET) as problem-solving tools in the evaluation of those orbital masses that present with non-specific morphologic imaging findings. Main messages/Teaching points • A compartment-based approach is essential for the diagnosis of orbital tumours. • CT and MRI play a key role in the work-up of orbital tumours. • DWI, PET CT, and MRI PET are complementary tools to solve diagnostic dilemmas. • Awareness of salient imaging pearls and diagnostic pitfalls avoids interpretation errors.

  7. Better outcomes by monitoring tumour dynamics using sensitive tumour markers in patients with recurrent gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Shuhei; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Nishimura, Yukihisa; Kubota, Takeshi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Konishi, Hirotaka; Murayama, Yasutoshi; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Ikoma, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Otsuji, Eigo

    2013-04-01

    Little is known about the prognostic value and clinical significance of monitoring tumour status using tumour markers in patients with recurrent gastric cancer. Between 2002 and 2009, 91 consecutive patients exhibited recurrence after curative gastrectomy for gastric cancer. They were followed intensively using tumour markers such as CA19-9 and CEA and their records were retrospectively analyzed. At the time of recurrence, patients were divided into three groups. Each tumour marker was re-elevated in 45 patients (51%) (re-elevation group: REG), was continuously-elevated since initial surgery in 23 patients (25%) (continuous elevation group: CEG) and was not elevated in 22 patients (24%) (non-elevation group: NEG). Survival after recurrence in REG was significantly better than in the other groups. In particular, those in REG had significantly better outcomes than those in NEG, in both survival after recurrence (p=0.0109) and total postoperative survival (p=0.0197), although there were no significant differences in recurrence-free survival between the two groups (p=0.8818). REG patients were able to receive more chemotherapy regimens than NEG patients (p=0.0730, REG vs. NEG, first-line 43% vs. 68%, second-line 33% vs. 32%, third-line or more 24% vs. 0%). Multivariate analysis revealed that re-elevations in tumour markers were found to be an independent prognostic factor for survival after recurrence [p=0.0014, hazard ratio=0.39 (95% CI: 0.21-0.69)]. [corrected]. Particularly for peritoneal recurrence, those in REG had significantly better outcomes than those in NEG (p<0.0005). Monitoring tumour dynamics using tumour markers may facilitate clinical decision-making, according to changes in tumour markers and contribute to survival prolongation in patients with recurrent gastric cancer.

  8. RNF43 is a tumour suppressor gene mutated in mucinous tumours of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Ryland, Georgina L; Hunter, Sally M; Doyle, Maria A; Rowley, Simone M; Christie, Michael; Allan, Prue E; Bowtell, David D L; Gorringe, Kylie L; Campbell, Ian G

    2013-02-01

    Mucinous carcinomas represent a distinct morphological subtype which can arise from several organ sites, including the ovary, and their genetic characteristics are largely under-described. Exome sequencing of 12 primary mucinous ovarian tumours identified RNF43 as the most frequently somatically mutated novel gene, secondary to KRAS and mutated at a frequency equal to that of TP53 and BRAF. Further screening of RNF43 in a larger cohort of ovarian tumours identified additional mutations, with a total frequency of 2/22 (9%) in mucinous ovarian borderline tumours and 6/29 (21%) in mucinous ovarian carcinomas. Seven mutations were predicted to truncate the protein and one missense mutation was predicted to be deleterious by in silico analysis. Six tumours had allelic imbalance at the RNF43 locus, with loss of the wild-type allele. The mutation spectrum strongly suggests that RNF43 is an important tumour suppressor gene in mucinous ovarian tumours, similar to its reported role in mucinous pancreatic precancerous cysts.

  9. Soft Tissue Giant Cell Tumour of Low Malignant Potential: A Rare Tumour at a Rare Site

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Amoolya; V., Geethamani; C., Vijaya

    2013-01-01

    “Soft tissue giant cell tumour of low malignant potential” is considered as the soft tissue counterpart of osteoclastoma of the bone. It is a primary soft tissue tumour which is classified under the category of fibrohistiocytic tumours of intermediate malignancy.Seventy percent of the tumours involve the extremities and only about seven percent of them arise in head and neck region. They are composed of nodules of histiocytes in a vascular stroma, with multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells positive for vimentin, smooth muscle actin (SMA), CD68 and Tarterate Resistant Acid Phosphatase (TRAP). We are presenting a case of a 75-year-old man who had a nodule on the ala of the nose. Histopathology showed a histiocytic lesion. Benign fibrous histiocytoma, plexiform fibrohistiocytic tumour, solitary reticulohistiocytoma and histioid leprosy were ruled out by using special stains and immunostains. Expression of smooth muscle actin and CD68 confirmed the diagnosis of a soft tissue giant cell tumour with a low malignant potential. PMID:24551690

  10. Identification of novel tumour-associated antigens in canine mammary gland tumour.

    PubMed

    Furuya, M; Funasaki, M; Tani, H; Sasai, K

    2015-09-01

    Canine mammary gland tumour (MGT) is the most common neoplasm in female dogs and has similar biological characteristics to human MGT. Spontaneous canine MGT is a more attractive clinical model in oncological research than that of the murine experimental model. Tumour-associated antigens (TAAs), which are produced in tumour cells, are applied as tumour markers, tumour vaccine antigens and molecular targets of therapeutic drugs. In this study, we have primarily identified 13 different TAAs of canine MGT by serological immunoscreening of cDNA expression library. The results of serological mini-arrays of identified antigens showed that CCDC41 antigen specially reacted with 35% of sera from MGT-dogs and did not react with control sera. We also found that HSPH1 mRNA expression levels increased significantly in MGT tissues. These findings will contribute to the development of diagnostic technologies and translational target therapies for dogs. HSPH1, which is strongly expressed in the tumour tissue, will be a possible vaccine antigen of canine MGT. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. [Phyllodes tumour of the seminal vesicle - case report of a rare tumour entity].

    PubMed

    Rau, D; Alt, W; Kälble, T

    2010-11-01

    Neoplasms of the seminal vesicles are rare. Here we report on a patient with a low-grade phyllodes tumour of the seminal vesicle. The patient was admitted to our hospital with a tumour in the excavatio rectovesicalis diagnosed by CT scan. He had no symptoms. For further diagnosis we took transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies, the histopathological examination showed no malignant features. One month later a follow-up CT scan demonstrated a significant enlargement of the tumour. Therefore we decided to perform a surgical exploration. During surgery we found a partially necrotic mass involving the prostate, the urinary bladder and the rectum. Both radical cystoprostatectomy with ileal conduit and anterior resection of the rectum with colostomy were necessary. Histologically the specimen showed a low-grade phyllodes tumour of the left seminal vesicle. One year after surgery the follow-up was completely normal without any residual or recurrent tumour. Frequency, histology, diagnostic investigations, therapy and prognosis of this rare tumour entity are discussed with respect to the actual literature.

  12. Stimulation of local solid tumour development of the nonproducer Marek's disease tumour transplant JMV by virus-induced immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Bulow, V V; Weiland, F

    1980-01-01

    Chickens could be protected against lethal lymphoblastic leukaemia due to the nonproducer JMV Marek's disease (MD) tumour transplant by infection with the herpesvirus of turkeys (HVT) or various strains of MD virus. However, solid JMV tumours developed in MD virus-infected birds at the site of intramuscular or subcutaneous transplantation, but tumours never developed at the site of MD virus inoculation. The incidence and extent of local tumour growth, the development of metastases and the inhibition of tumour regression were related to the pathogenicity of the MD virus strains used for pre-treatment of the chickens. Infection of chickens with reticulo-endotheliosis virus (REV-C) or with chick syncytial virus (CSV), which are nonprotective against MD virus or JMV transplants, stimulated local tumour development of the attenuated JMV-A variant of the JMV transplant. Chickens which did not reject local tumours died of visceral JMV tumour metastases. A direct helper mechanism of viral infection on the oncogenicity of transplants was excluded. The results suggested that virus-induced immunosuppression stimulated the development of local JMV tumours which never occurred in normal chickens. Immunity to the JMV transplant, including resistance to lethal leukaemia and successful regression of local tumours, did not coincide with immunity to MD virus-induced visceral lymphomas or nerve lesions. Vaccinal induced tumour immunity evidently was defective. The significance of these results is discussed with reference to immunological functions of MD tumour-specific antigens.

  13. Commercial food irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Black, E.F.; Libby, L.M.

    1983-06-01

    Food irradiation is discussed. Irradiation exposes food to gamma rays from a cobalt-60 or a cesium-137 source, or to high-energy electrons emitted by an electron accelerator. A major advantage is that food can be packaged either before or after treatment. FDA regulations with regard to irradiation are discussed. Comments on an 'Advance Notice' on irradiation, published by the FDA in 1981 are summarized.

  14. Carotid body tumours. A 20-year single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Dalainas, Ilias; Nano, Giovanni; Casana, Renato; Bianchi, Paolo; Stegher, Silvia; Malacrida, Giovanni; Tealdi, Domenico Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this single-institution retrospective study was to review the surgical outcomes of resection of carotid body tumours over the last 20 years in our hospital. From January 1985 to December 2004, 17 patients were admitted to our institution with carotid body tumours. All patients were treated by surgical resection of the tumour. No perioperative deaths occurred. Perioperative comorbidities were more frequent in patients with large carotid body tumours intimately associated with the carotid vessels. Surgical excision of carotid body tumours is safe and effective even in the long term.

  15. Unravelling mechanisms of p53-mediated tumour suppression

    PubMed Central

    Bieging, Kathryn T.; Mello, Stephano Spano; Attardi, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    p53 is a crucial tumour suppressor that responds to diverse stress signals by orchestrating specific cellular responses, including transient cell cycle arrest, cellular senescence and apoptosis, which are all processes associated with tumour suppression. However, recent studies have challenged the relative importance of these canonical cellular responses for p53-mediated tumour suppression and have highlighted roles for p53 in modulating other cellular processes, including metabolism, stem cell maintenance, invasion and metastasis, as well as communication within the tumour microenvironment. In this Opinion article, we discuss the roles of classical p53 functions, as well as emerging p53-regulated processes, in tumour suppression. PMID:24739573

  16. Custom mega-prosthetic replacement for proximal humeral tumours

    PubMed Central

    Paraskumar, M.; Sivaseelam, A.; Natarajan, S.

    2006-01-01

    We used custom mega-prostheses in 57 patients with aggressive benign and malignant tumours of the proximal humerus. The most common tumour was osteosarcoma, followed by giant cell tumour and chondrosarcoma. We achieved extra-articular and wide resection margins in all primary malignant tumours and narrow margins in benign and metastatic tumours. Six patients died of disease, 4 patients developed local recurrences and 43 were continuously disease free at an average follow-up of 5.5 years (range 2–14.5 years). Five patients required revision replacements. The most common complications were proximal subluxation and aseptic loosening. Functional outcome was satisfactory in 78% of cases. PMID:16565840

  17. Skull base tumours Part II. Central skull base tumours and intrinsic tumours of the bony skull base.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alexandra

    2008-06-01

    With the advances of cross-sectional imaging radiologists gained an increasing responsibility in the management of patients with skull base pathology. As this anatomic area is hidden to clinical exam, surgeons and radiation oncologists have to rely on imaging studies to plan the most adequate treatment. To fulfil these endeavour radiologists need to be knowledgeable about skull base anatomy, about the main treatment options available, their indications and contra-indications and needs to be aware of the wide gamut of pathologies seen in this anatomic region. This article will provide a radiologists' friendly approach to the central skull base and will review the most common central skull base tumours and tumours intrinsic to the bony skull base.

  18. The role of macrophages in the cytotoxic killing of tumour cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zembala, M.; Ptak, W.; Hanczakowska, Maria

    1973-01-01

    Lymph node and spleen cells from normal mice were cultured for 3 days with polyoma virus-induced tumour, Ehrlich's ascites tumour or leukaemia L 1210 cells. This resulted in in vitro immunization of the lymphocytes, which were then transferred to irradiated target cells labelled with 51Cr. Normal, i.e. non-immune thioglycollate-stimulated peritoneal macrophages were also added to some tubes. Non-immune macrophages mixed with immunized lymphocytes showed a significantly increased ability to destroy tumour cells as compared with macrophages in the absence of immunized lymphocytes. The immunized lymphocytes were almost entirely inactive alone. When the number of macrophages was kept constant the cytotoxicity was dependent on the number of viable immunized lymphocytes placed on the target cells. Immunized lymphocytes, in the presence of macrophages, only exhibited strong killing of the target cells against which they had been immunized; some lysis of `bystander' cells was, however, seen provided specific target cells were present. Macrophage monolayers exposed to immunized lymphocytes upon contact with specific antigen became `armed' and showed a significant cytotoxicity for specific target cells. When immunized lymphocytes and normal macrophages were treated with actinomycin D and puromycin, cytotoxicity was inhibited in the immunized lymphocytes but not in the macrophages. The possible mechanism of normal macrophage cooperation with immunized lymphocytes in the cytotoxic killing reaction is discussed. Results presented in this paper favour the view that immunologically specific cytophilic factor (presumptive cytophilic antibody) is involved in the macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity in the system studied. PMID:4356674

  19. Tumour markers in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Warnes, T W; Smith, A

    1987-01-01

    The 20-year period since the discovery of AFP by Abelev has seen the introduction of a wide range of new tumour markers and it is now clear that PLC is biologically heterogeneous. Hepatoblastomas, fibrolamellar carcinomas, hepatocellular carcinomas and cholangiocarcinomas may secrete a variety of distinctive markers which are predominantly glycoproteins, and may resemble those found in placenta or fetal liver. Diagnostically, AFP remains the best marker for HCC, both in sensitivity and specificity; it is known to consist of isoforms. In patients with elevated serum AFP and filling defects on liver scan, Con A reactive AFP may differentiate PLC from hepatic metastases, whilst fucosylated AFP may distinguish PLC from benign disorders when AFP is non-diagnostically elevated. With this recognition of tumour heterogeneity the value of a multiple-marker approach has become apparent. The measurement of vitamin B12 binding protein and neurotensin should lead to the detection of most patients with the fibrolamellar variant of HCC and many of these should be resectable. In patients with normal serum AFP levels, HCC-associated GGTP is of major value whilst in low-incidence areas for HCC, patients should also be screened for H-ALP; using a multiple marker approach in high-risk groups, 90% of clinically diagnosed hepatocellular carcinomas are serologically positive. The Chinese and Alaskan studies, in which small, potentially resectable tumours were detected, suggest that it is now possible to achieve 5-year survival figures of up to 60% in HCC patients detected by screening. The value of such a strategy in low-incidence countries is currently under study. In patient monitoring, as in diagnosis, AFP remains the outstanding marker. In AFP-negative patients, other markers including vitamin B12-binding protein, neurotensin, HCC-specific isoenzymes, des-gamma-carboxy-prothrombin and alpha-fucosidase, are of undoubted diagnostic value, but their value as indicants of disease

  20. Incidence and prevalence of salivary gland tumours in Valparaiso, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Juan; Martinez, René; Niklander, Sven; Marshall, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Background To determine the incidence and prevalence of salivary gland tumours in the province of Valparaíso, Chile. Material and Methods Retrospective review of salivary gland tumours diagnosed between the years 2000 and 2011 from four local pathology services. Information on demographics and histopathology were retrieved from the medical records. Results The study sample consisted of 279 salivary gland tumours. Prevalence and incidence rates per 100.000 persons were 15.4 and 2.51, respectively. Most of the neoplasms corresponded to benign tumours (70.3%). The most affected gland was the parotid gland. Pleomorphic adenoma was the most common benign tumour (53.8%) and mucoepidermoid carcinoma was the most common malignant tumour (7.2%). Conclusions Salivary gland tumours are uncommon neoplasms that usually arise in the parotid gland. Pleomorphic adenoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma were the most common benign and malignant tumours reported in this series. Key words:Salivary gland tumours, benign tumours, malignant tumours, salivary glands neoplasms, cancer, neoplasia. PMID:26034925

  1. Disparate responses of tumour vessels to angiotensin II: tumour volume-dependent effects on perfusion and oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Thews, O; Kelleher, D K; Vaupel, P

    2000-01-01

    Perfusion and oxygenation of experimental tumours were studied during angiotensin II (AT II) administration whereby the rate of the continuous AT II infusion was chosen to increase the mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) by 50–70 mmHg. In subcutaneous DS- sarcomas the red blood cell (RBC) flux was assessed using the laser Doppler technique and the mean tumour oxygen partial pressure (p O 2) was measured polarographically using O 2-sensitive catheter and needle electrodes. Changes in RBC flux with increasing MABP depended mainly on tumour size. In small tumours, RBC flux decreased with rising MABP whereas in larger tumours RBC flux increased parallel to the MABP. As a result of these volume-dependent effects on tumour blood flow, the impact of AT II on tumour p O 2 was also mainly tumour volume-related. In small tumours oxygenation decreased with increasing MABP during AT II infusion, whereas in large tumours a positive relationship between blood pressure and O 2 status was found. This disparate behaviour might be the result of the co-existence of two functionally distinct populations of tumour vessels. In small tumours, perfusion decreases presumably due to vasoconstriction of pre-existing host vessels feeding the tumour. In larger malignancies, newly formed tumour vessels predominate and seem not to have this vasoresponsive capability (lack of smooth muscle cells and/or AT receptors), resulting in an improvement of perfusion which is not tumour-related per se, but is due to the increased perfusion pressure. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10901375

  2. The relationship between tumour budding, the tumour microenvironment and survival in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gujam, F J A; McMillan, D C; Mohammed, Z M A; Edwards, J; Going, J J

    2015-09-29

    Tumour budding has previously been reported to predict survival in several solid organ tumours, including breast; however, whether this is independent of other aspects of the tumour microenvironment is unknown. In the present study, the relationship between tumour budding, the tumour microenvironment and survival was examined in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. Patients presenting between 1995 and 1998 were studied (n=474). Using routine pathological sections, tumour budding was measured at the invasive margin and its association with clinicopathological characteristics and cancer-specific survival (CSS) was examined. Tumour budding was associated with several adverse pathological characteristics, including lymph node involvement, lymph vessel invasion (LVI), increased tumour stroma percentage (TSP) and weaker local inflammatory infiltrative. Tumour budding was associated with reduced CSS (hazard ratio (HR) 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14-3.09, P=0.004), independent of nodal status, molecular subtypes, tumour necrosis, CD8+, CD138+, LVI, blood vessel invasion and TSP. Further, tumour budding was independently associated with reduced CSS in node-negative patients (HR 2.63, 95% CI 1.16-5.92, P=0.020) and those who have low TSP (HR 1.98, 95% CI 1.09-3.57, P=0.024) and high-grade local inflammatory infiltrative (HR 2.27, 95% CI 1.35-5.36, P=0.014). Tumour budding was a significant predictor of survival in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer, independent of adverse pathological characteristics and components of tumour microenvironment. The present study further confirms the clinical utility of both tumour and host-based factors of tumour microenvironment.

  3. The relationship between tumour budding, the tumour microenvironment and survival in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gujam, F J A; McMillan, D C; Mohammed, Z M A; Edwards, J; Going, J J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tumour budding has previously been reported to predict survival in several solid organ tumours, including breast; however, whether this is independent of other aspects of the tumour microenvironment is unknown. In the present study, the relationship between tumour budding, the tumour microenvironment and survival was examined in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. Methods: Patients presenting between 1995 and 1998 were studied (n=474). Using routine pathological sections, tumour budding was measured at the invasive margin and its association with clinicopathological characteristics and cancer-specific survival (CSS) was examined. Results: Tumour budding was associated with several adverse pathological characteristics, including lymph node involvement, lymph vessel invasion (LVI), increased tumour stroma percentage (TSP) and weaker local inflammatory infiltrative. Tumour budding was associated with reduced CSS (hazard ratio (HR) 2.08, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14–3.09, P=0.004), independent of nodal status, molecular subtypes, tumour necrosis, CD8+, CD138+, LVI, blood vessel invasion and TSP. Further, tumour budding was independently associated with reduced CSS in node-negative patients (HR 2.63, 95% CI 1.16–5.92, P=0.020) and those who have low TSP (HR 1.98, 95% CI 1.09–3.57, P=0.024) and high-grade local inflammatory infiltrative (HR 2.27, 95% CI 1.35–5.36, P=0.014). Conclusions: Tumour budding was a significant predictor of survival in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer, independent of adverse pathological characteristics and components of tumour microenvironment. The present study further confirms the clinical utility of both tumour and host-based factors of tumour microenvironment. PMID:26263482

  4. Tumour microvesicles contain retrotransposon elements and amplified oncogene sequences

    PubMed Central

    Balaj, Leonora; Lessard, Ryan; Dai, Lixin; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Pomeroy, Scott L.; Breakefield, Xandra O.; Skog, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Tumour cells release an abundance of microvesicles containing a selected set of proteins and RNAs. Here, we show that tumour microvesicles also carry DNA, which reflects the genetic status of the tumour, including amplification of the oncogene c-Myc. We also find amplified c-Myc in serum microvesicles from tumour-bearing mice. Further, we find remarkably high levels of retrotransposon RNA transcripts, especially for some human endogenous retroviruses, such as LINE-1 and Alu retrotransposon elements, in tumour microvesicles and these transposable elements could be transferred to normal cells. These findings expand the nucleic acid content of tumour microvesicles to include: elevated levels of specific coding and non-coding RNA and DNA, mutated and amplified oncogene sequences and transposable elements. Thus, tumour microvesicles contain a repertoire of genetic information available for horizontal gene transfer and potential use as blood biomarkers for cancer. PMID:21285958

  5. Microenvironment–A Role in Tumour Progression and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Muppalla, Jaya Nagendra Krishna; Muddana, Keerthi; Dorankula, Shyam Prasad Reddy; Thokala, Madhusudan Rao; Pasupula, Ajay Prakash

    2013-01-01

    In addition to malignant cells, solid tumours comprise supporting stromal tissue that consists of Extra Cellular Matrix (ECM), connective tissue cells, inflammatory cells and blood vessels. The stromal compartment and the malignant cells together shape the tumour microenvironment that in turn determines tumour progression and efficacy of anti-tumour treatments. It is now recognized that the host microenvironment undergoes extensive change during the evolution and progression of cancer. This involves the generation of Tumour-Associated Fibroblasts (TAFs), which, through release of growth factors and cytokines, lead to enhanced angiogenesis, increased tumour growth and invasion. It has also been demonstrated that TAFs may modulate the Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) phenotype, which has therapeutic implications. Understanding the various components in the tumour microenvironment may afford us the opportunity to develop new drugs that target these reversible nonmutational events in the prevention and treatment of cancer. PMID:24179956

  6. Pathology of Neuroendocrine Tumours of the Female Genital Tract.

    PubMed

    Howitt, Brooke E; Kelly, Paul; McCluggage, W Glenn

    2017-09-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours are uncommon or rare at all sites in the female genital tract. The 2014 World Health Organisation (WHO) Classification of neuroendocrine tumours of the endometrium, cervix, vagina and vulva has been updated with adoption of the terms low-grade neuroendocrine tumour and high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma. In the endometrium and cervix, high-grade neoplasms are much more prevalent than low-grade and are more common in the cervix than the corpus. In the ovary, low-grade tumours are more common than high-grade carcinomas and the term carcinoid tumour is still used in WHO 2014. The term ovarian small-cell carcinoma of pulmonary type is included in WHO 2014 for a tumour which in other organs is termed high small-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Neuroendocrine tumours at various sites within the female genital tract often occur in association with other neoplasms and more uncommonly in pure form.

  7. Giant Mediastinal Germ Cell Tumour: An Enigma of Surgical Consideration

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Nurayub Mohd; Azizan, Nornazirah; Zakaria, Andee Dzulkarnaen; Rahman, Mohd Ramzisham Abdul

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of 16-year-old male, who was referred from private centre for dyspnoea, fatigue, and orthopnea. The chest radiograph revealed complete opacification of left chest which was confirmed by computed tomography as a large left mediastinal mass measuring 14 × 15 × 18 cm. The diagnostic needle core biopsy revealed mixed germ cell tumour with possible combination of embryonal carcinoma, yolk sac, and teratoma. After 4 cycles of neoadjuvant BEP regime, there was initial response of tumour markers but not tumour bulk. Instead of classic median sternotomy or clamshell incision, posterolateral approach with piecemeal manner was chosen. Histology confirmed mixed germ cell tumour with residual teratomatous component without yolk sac or embryonal carcinoma component. Weighing 3.5 kg, it is one of the largest mediastinal germ cell tumours ever reported. We describe this rare and gigantic intrathoracic tumour and discuss the spectrum of surgical approach and treatment of this exceptional tumour. PMID:27807495

  8. Welding irradiated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Chandler, G.T.; Nelson, D.Z.; Franco-Ferreira, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    Conventional welding processes produced severe underbead cracking in irradiated stainless steel containing 1 to 33 appm helium from n,a reactions. A shallow penetration overlay technique was successfully demonstrated for welding irradiated stainless steel. The technique was applied to irradiated 304 stainless steel that contained 10 appm helium. Surface cracking, present in conventional welds made on the same steel at the same and lower helium concentrations, was eliminated. Underbead cracking was minimal compared to conventional welding methods. However, cracking in the irradiated material was greater than in tritium charged and aged material at the same helium concentrations. The overlay technique provides a potential method for repair or modification of irradiated reactor materials.

  9. Long-term thermal sensitivity of previously irradiated skin.

    PubMed

    Law, M P; Ahier, R G

    1982-12-01

    The response of the mouse ear to hyperthermia was investigated at 7-64 weeks after irradiation with X rays. Thermal sensitivity was increased by 12 weeks after single doses of 18 to 20 Gy but showed no further changes up to 64 weeks after exposure. It is suggested that the increase in sensitivity to retreatment by hyperthermia several months after the initial course of radiation may be related to the turnover time of the tissue. Although there are reports which suggest that prior irradiation, given more than two months earlier, does not affect the response of human skin or superficial tumours to the mild hyperthermic treatment in current clinical use, more aggressive heat therapy may produce unexpectedly severe responses in previously irradiated sites.

  10. Effects of nandrolone decanoate on the toxicity and anti-tumour action of CCNU and FU in murine tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Bibby, M. C.; Double, J. A.; Mughal, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    Pre-treatment with the anabolic steroid nandrolone decanoate (ND) increases the LD50 of 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU) and 5-Fluorouracil (FU) in NMRI mice. Administration of ND did not affect the anti-tumour action of CCNU against a transplantable mouse adenocarcinoma of the colon (MAC 13) or the anti-tumour action of FU against MAC 26. In both tumour lines ND had no significant effect on tumour growth. These data suggest that an increase in the anti-tumour selectivity of these agents may be produced by pre-treatment with ND. PMID:7295514

  11. Selective internal radiation therapy for liver tumours.

    PubMed

    Sundram, Francis X; Buscombe, John R

    2017-10-01

    Primary and secondary liver malignancies are common and associated with a poor prognosis. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice; however, many patients have unresectable disease. In these cases, several liver directed therapies are available, including selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT). SIRT is a multidisciplinary treatment involving nuclear medicine, interventional radiology and oncology. High doses of localised internal radiation are selectively delivered to liver tumour tissues, with relative sparing of adjacent normal liver parenchyma. Side effects are minimal and radiation protection measures following treatment are straightforward. In patients who have progressed following chemotherapy, clinical trials demonstrate prolonged liver progression-free survival. SIRT is offered at 10 centres in England via the NHS England Commissioning through Evaluation programme and is approved by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence for certain liver malignancies. SIRT holds unique promise for personalised treatment of liver tumours. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  12. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma presented as cavernous sinus tumour.

    PubMed

    Moona, Mohammad Shafi; Mehdi, Itrat

    2011-12-01

    A 32 year Libyan male presented with the complaints of headache and diplopia. He was diagnosed with a cavernous sinus meningioma on the basis of MRI findings but no initial biopsy was taken. Depending on the radiologic diagnosis the patient was treated with gamma knife surgery twice, abroad. During follow up he developed left ear deafness and left cervical lymph adenopathy. An ENT evaluation with biopsy from the nasopharynx and cervical lymph node was taken. The histopathologic diagnosis of the resected tumour showed a nasopharyngeal carcinoma with cervical lymph node metastasis (poorly differentiated lympho-epithelial carcinoma). The cavernous sinus tumour which was initially treated as a meningioma was in fact metastasis from the nasopharyngeal carcinoma, making this an interesting and rare occurrence.

  13. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour of penis.

    PubMed

    Kaur, J; Madan, R; Singh, L; Sharma, D N; Julka, P K; Rath, G K; Roy, S

    2015-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) is a rare variety of soft tissue sarcoma that originates from Schwann cells or pluripotent cells of neural crest origin. They have historically been difficult tumours to diagnose and treat. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment with a goal to achieve negative margins. Despite aggressive surgery and adjuvant therapy, the prognosis of patients with MPNST remains poor. MPNST arising from penis is a very rare entity; thus, it presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. We present a case of penile MPNST in a 38-year-old man in the absence of neurofibromatosis treated with surgery followed by post-operative radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gray in 30 fractions and adjuvant chemotherapy with ifosfamide and adriamycin.

  14. Coexistent dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour and pilocytic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Nasit, Jitendra G.; Shah, Payal; Zalawadia, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour (DNET) is an uncommon mixed glioneuronal tumour. DNET is classified as Grade I neoplasm in revised World Health Organization classification of tumors of the nervous system. DNET is commonly seen in the temporal lobe of children and young adults with features of pharmacoresistant complex partial seizures. Tumors arising in association with DNETs are rare. Only two cases of pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) arising in DNETs are reported. Surgical excision is the only successful management with favourable prognosis. The development of recurrence and malignancy after subtotal or even after complete excision challenges the premise of stability and highlights the importance of close clinical follow up. Here, a case of DNET with area of PA is described which helps in understanding the pathogenesis and biological behavior of DNET. PMID:27695565

  15. Metastatic carcinoid tumour with spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Scott, Si; Antwi-Yeboah, Y; Bucur, Sd

    2012-07-01

    Carcinoid tumours are rare with an incidence of 5.25/100,000. They predominantly originate in the gastrointestinal tract (50-60%) or bronchopulmonary system (25-30%). Common sites of metastasis are lymph nodes, liver, lungs and bone. Spinal metastasis are rare, but has been reported in patients with symptoms of spinal cord compression including neurological deficits. We report a rare case of carcinoid metastasis with spinal cord compression, in a 63-year-old man, presenting with a one-year history of back pain without any neurological symptoms. The patient underwent a two-level decompressive laminectomy of T10 and T11 as well as piecemeal tumour resection. Post-operatively the patient made a good recovery without complications.

  16. Metastatic carcinoid tumour with spinal cord compression

    PubMed Central

    Scott, SI; Antwi-Yeboah, Y; Bucur, SD

    2012-01-01

    Carcinoid tumours are rare with an incidence of 5.25/100,000. They predominantly originate in the gastrointestinal tract (50-60%) or bronchopulmonary system (25-30%). Common sites of metastasis are lymph nodes, liver, lungs and bone. Spinal metastasis are rare, but has been reported in patients with symptoms of spinal cord compression including neurological deficits. We report a rare case of carcinoid metastasis with spinal cord compression, in a 63-year-old man, presenting with a one-year history of back pain without any neurological symptoms. The patient underwent a two-level decompressive laminectomy of T10 and T11 as well as piecemeal tumour resection. Post-operatively the patient made a good recovery without complications. PMID:24960730

  17. Insulinoma--a deceptive endocrine tumour.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Abdul

    2011-09-01

    Insulinoma is a deceptive endocrine tumour that can easily mislead even an astute clinician because of its bizarre and nonspecific symptom complex. A 45 year old woman presented with altered behaviour, seizures and spells of coma and was being treated as a case of hysterical neurosis. Biochemical and radiological investigations revealed fasting hypoglycaemia, endogenous hyperinsulinism, and a pancreatic parenchymal lesion. Removal of the pancreatic lesion resulted in abrupt restoration of euglycaemia and complete disappearance of patients' symptoms.

  18. [De novo tumours of renal transplants].

    PubMed

    Hétet, J F; Rigaud, J; Dorel-Le Théo, M; Láuté, F; Karam, G; Blanchet, P

    2007-12-01

    Kidney cancer occurs rarely and late in renal transplants. The lack of grafts and the increasing age of the cadaver donors are likely to result in an increasing number of such cancers. To date, the treatment of choice is the transplant removal. Nevertheless partial nephrectomy may be discussed in selected cases. Ultrasonographic screening should allow detection of low volume tumours suitable for partial nephrectomy. Alternative techniques (radiofrequency, cryoablation) are to be assessed in such patients.

  19. Malignant testicular tumour incidence and mortality trends

    PubMed Central

    Wojtyła-Buciora, Paulina; Więckowska, Barbara; Krzywinska-Wiewiorowska, Małgorzata; Gromadecka-Sutkiewicz, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study In Poland testicular tumours are the most frequent cancer among men aged 20–44 years. Testicular tumour incidence since the 1980s and 1990s has been diversified geographically, with an increased risk of mortality in Wielkopolska Province, which was highlighted at the turn of the 1980s and 1990s. The aim of the study was the comparative analysis of the tendencies in incidence and death rates due to malignant testicular tumours observed among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province. Material and methods Data from the National Cancer Registry were used for calculations. The incidence/mortality rates among men due to malignant testicular cancer as well as the tendencies in incidence/death ratio observed in Poland and Wielkopolska were established based on regression equation. The analysis was deepened by adopting the multiple linear regression model. A p-value < 0.05 was arbitrarily adopted as the criterion of statistical significance, and for multiple comparisons it was modified according to the Bonferroni adjustment to a value of p < 0.0028. Calculations were performed with the use of PQStat v1.4.8 package. Results The incidence of malignant testicular neoplasms observed among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province indicated a significant rising tendency. The multiple linear regression model confirmed that the year variable is a strong incidence forecast factor only within the territory of Poland. A corresponding analysis of mortality rates among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province did not show any statistically significant correlations. Conclusions Late diagnosis of Polish patients calls for undertaking appropriate educational activities that would facilitate earlier reporting of the patients, thus increasing their chances for recovery. Introducing preventive examinations in the regions of increased risk of testicular tumour may allow earlier diagnosis. PMID:27095941

  20. Symptomatic Control of Neuroendocrine Tumours with Everolimus.

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, Hannah E; Larbi, Emmanuel; Middleton, Gary

    2015-12-01

    Everolimus, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, increases progression-free survival in patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumours. Patients with neuroendocrine tumours and symptomatic carcinoid have inferior health-related quality of life than those without symptoms. We aimed to evaluate the effect of everolimus on symptomatic control of neuroendocrine tumours. Fifteen patients with metastatic neuroendocrine disease pre-treated with depot octreotide received combination everolimus and octreotide (midgut = 8, pancreatic = 3, other = 4). Reasons for initiation of everolimus were progressive disease (PD) by response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (n = 5), worsening syndromic symptomology (n = 5), or both (n = 5). Symptomatic and objective response and toxicity were evaluated using standard criteria. 7/10 patients who were syndromic had improvements in symptomology, with a mean duration of symptom control 13.9 months (range 1-39). All 10 symptomatic patients had non pancreatic neuroendocrine (pNET) primaries, and with everolimus, 6/10 had reduced stool frequency, 3/7 had a reduction of asthenia, and 5/7 had reduced frequency and severity of flushing. Sixty percent of patients experienced any grade toxicities, including the following: 40% grade 1/2 stomatitis, 7% grade 3/4 stomatitis, 20% grade 1/2 rash, 13% diarrhoea, and one case of pneumonitis. In this cohort of 15 patients, we demonstrated that 70% of non pNET individuals with common carcinoid syndrome symptoms resistant to depot octreotide had improvement in these symptoms on institution of everolimus, with meaningful durations of symptom control. Although this data is observational, to our knowledge, this represents the largest analysis of carcinoid syndrome control with combined everolimus and octreotide.

  1. Antibody transport and internalization into tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Matzku, S.; Moldenhauer, G.; Kalthoff, H.; Canevari, S.; Colnaghi, M.; Schuhmacher, J.; Bihl, H.

    1990-01-01

    Internalization of monoclonal antibody (MAb) conjugates is an important feature of tumour targeting, both with respect to the therapeutic action of substances coupled to the antibody and to retention of radionuclides. Problems of analysing internalization in vitro and in vivo, of manipulating internalization, and of evaluating the involvement of normal tissues are illustrated by recent experimental data and are discussed in the light of published evidence. Images Figure 4 PMID:2383472

  2. The impact of cancer therapy on the endocrine system in survivors of childhood brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, H K; Shalet, S M

    2004-12-01

    Survival rates are improving following cancer therapy for childhood brain tumours. There is therefore a growing cohort of survivors at risk of late effects of cancer therapy. Endocrine problems are very common in these patients. The recognition and prompt management of these are essential to prevent further morbidity and impairment of quality of life. Cranial radiation can damage hypothalamic-pituitary function, most frequently affecting GH status; however, higher radiation doses may cause more widespread hypothalamic-pituitary damage. Early puberty secondary to cranial irradiation is now being managed with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogues to improve final height. Prompt diagnosis and management of GH deficiency may improve final height outcome; continued GH therapy beyond final height aids the achievement of adult body composition (lean body mass and bone mass) and GH therapy in adulthood improves quality of life. Both cranial irradiation alone and with spinal irradiation can result in radiation damage to the thyroid resulting in hypothyroidism and thyroid nodules, a high proportion of which are malignant. Gonadal damage secondary to spinal irradiation and adjuvant chemotherapy may have long-term consequences including infertility.

  3. Papillary renal cell carcinoma within a renal oncocytoma: case report of an incidental finding of a tumour within a tumour

    PubMed Central

    Rowsell, Corwyn; Fleshner, Neil; Marrano, Paula; Squire, Jeremy; Evans, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The most common renal tumours are clear cell, papillary, chromophobe and collecting duct renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), and benign oncocytomas and angiomyolipomas. Tumours with hybrid features between some of these entities have been recognised; in particular, tumours with features of both chromophobe RCC and oncocytoma. Case reports describing one distinct type of primary renal tumour actually within another are very rare. The incidental finding of a papillary RCC located in an oncocytoma in a nephrectomy specimen from a 75‐year‐old man is described. Morphological criteria for each tumour type were completely satisfied and fluorescence in situ hybridisation detected the expected number of copies of chromosome 7 in the cells of each tumour type. The cells in the papillary tumour contained three copies, whereas the oncocytoma cells contained only two per nucleus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a papillary RCC being identified within an oncocytoma. PMID:17405978

  4. Heat shock protein derived from a non-autologous tumour can be used as an anti-tumour vaccine.

    PubMed

    Casey, David G; Lysaght, Joanne; James, Tharappel; Bateman, Andrew; Melcher, Alan A; Todryk, Stephen M

    2003-09-01

    Antigenic cross-reactivity between certain tumours has allowed the development of more widely applicable, major histocompatibility complex-disparate (allogeneic) whole-cell vaccines. This principle should also allow heat shock proteins (hsp) derived from certain tumours (and carrying cross-reactive antigens) to be used as vaccines to generate anti-tumour immunity in a range of cancer patients. Here, hsp70 derived from gp70-antigen+ B16 melanoma generated cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-mediated immune protection in BALB/c mice against challenge with gp70-antigen+ CT26 colorectal tumour cells. Using ovalbumin as a model tumour antigen, it is shown that hsp70 enhances peptide re-presentation by dendritic cells via class I over equimolar whole ovalbumin antigen. However, while transfection of tumour cells with inducible hsp70 increases hsp yield from tumours, it does not enhance antigen recognition via purified hsp70 nor via whole cells or their lysate.

  5. Heat shock protein derived from a non-autologous tumour can be used as an anti-tumour vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Casey, David G; Lysaght, Joanne; James, Tharappel; Bateman, Andrew; Melcher, Alan A; Todryk, Stephen M

    2003-01-01

    Antigenic cross-reactivity between certain tumours has allowed the development of more widely applicable, major histocompatibility complex-disparate (allogeneic) whole-cell vaccines. This principle should also allow heat shock proteins (hsp) derived from certain tumours (and carrying cross-reactive antigens) to be used as vaccines to generate anti-tumour immunity in a range of cancer patients. Here, hsp70 derived from gp70-antigen+ B16 melanoma generated cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-mediated immune protection in BALB/c mice against challenge with gp70-antigen+ CT26 colorectal tumour cells. Using ovalbumin as a model tumour antigen, it is shown that hsp70 enhances peptide re-presentation by dendritic cells via class I over equimolar whole ovalbumin antigen. However, while transfection of tumour cells with inducible hsp70 increases hsp yield from tumours, it does not enhance antigen recognition via purified hsp70 nor via whole cells or their lysate. PMID:12941147

  6. Candidate tumour suppressor Fau regulates apoptosis in human cells: an essential role for Bcl-G.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Mark R; Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Williams, Gwyn T

    2011-09-01

    FAU, which encodes a ubiquitin-like protein (termed FUBI) with ribosomal protein S30 as a carboxy-terminal extension, has recently been identified as a pro-apoptotic regulatory gene. This activity may be mediated by Bcl-G (a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family) which can be covalently modified by FUBI. FAU gene expression has been shown to be down-regulated in human breast, prostate and ovarian tumours, and this down-regulation is strongly associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. We demonstrate here that ectopic FAU expression increases basal apoptosis in human T-cell lines and 293T/17 cells, whereas it has only a transient stimulatory effect on ultraviolet-C (UVC)-induced apoptosis. Conversely, siRNA-mediated silencing of FAU gene expression has no effect on basal apoptosis, but attenuates UV-induced apoptosis. Importantly, prior knockdown of Bcl-G expression ablates the stimulation of basal apoptosis by FAU, consistent with an essential downstream role for Bcl-G, itself a candidate tumour suppressor, in mediating the apoptosis regulatory role of FAU. In 293T/17 cells, Bcl-G knockdown also attenuates UV-induced apoptosis, so that Bcl-G may constitute a common factor in the pathways by which both FAU and UV-irradiation induce apoptosis. UV irradiation increases Bcl-G mRNA levels, providing an explanation for the transient nature of the effect of ectopic FAU expression on UV-induced apoptosis. Since failure of apoptosis is fundamental to the development of many cancers, the pro-apoptotic activity of the Fau/Bcl-G pathway offers an attractive explanation for the putative tumour suppressor role of FAU. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of residual abdominal tumour motion in carbon ion gated treatments through respiratory motion modelling.

    PubMed

    Meschini, Giorgia; Seregni, Matteo; Pella, Andrea; Ciocca, Mario; Fossati, Piero; Valvo, Francesca; Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido

    2017-02-01

    At the Italian National Centre for Oncologic Hadrontherapy (CNAO) patients with upper-abdominal tumours are being treated with carbon ion therapy, adopting the respiratory gating technique in combination with layered rescanning and abdominal compression to mitigate organ motion. Since online imaging of the irradiated volume is not feasible, this study proposes a modelling approach for the estimation of residual motion of the target within the gating window. The model extracts a priori respiratory motion information from the planning 4DCT using deformable image registration (DIR), then combines such information with the external surrogate signal recorded during dose delivery. This provides estimation of a CT volume corresponding to any given respiratory phase measured during treatment. The method was applied for the retrospective estimation of tumour residual motion during irradiation, considering 16 patients treated at CNAO with the respiratory gating protocol. The estimated tumour displacement, calculated with respect to the reference end-exhale position, was always limited (average displacement is 0.32±0.65mm over all patients) and below the maximum motion defined in the treatment plan. This supports the hypothesis of target position reproducibility, which is the crucial assumption in the gating approach. We also demonstrated the use of the model as a simulation tool to establish a patient-specific relationship between residual motion and the width of the gating window. In conclusion, the implemented method yields an estimation of the repeatability of the internal anatomy configuration during gated treatments, which can be used for further studies concerning the dosimetric impact of the estimated residual organ motion.

  8. Tumour exosome integrins determine organotropic metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Ayuko; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Shen, Tang-Long; Rodrigues, Goncalo; Hashimoto, Ayako; Mark, Milica Tesic; Molina, Henrik; Kohsaka, Shinji; Di Giannatale, Angela; Ceder, Sophia; Singh, Swarnima; Williams, Caitlin; Soplop, Nadine; Uryu, Kunihiro; Pharmer, Lindsay; King, Tari; Bojmar, Linda; Davies, Alexander E.; Ararso, Yonathan; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Haiying; Hernandez, Jonathan; Weiss, Joshua M.; Dumont-Cole, Vanessa D.; Kramer, Kimberly; Wexler, Leonard H.; Narendran, Aru; Schwartz, Gary K.; Healey, John H.; Sandstrom, Per; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Kure, Elin H.; Grandgenett, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; de Sousa, Maria; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Mallya, Kavita; Batra, Surinder K.; Jarnagin, William R.; Brady, Mary S.; Fodstad, Oystein; Muller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Minn, Andy J.; Bissell, Mina J.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Kang, Yibin; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Matei, Irina; Peinado, Hector; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2015-01-01

    Ever since Stephen Paget’s 1889 hypothesis, metastatic organotropism has remained one of cancer’s greatest mysteries. Here we demonstrate that exosomes from mouse and human lung-, liver- and brain-tropic tumour cells fuse preferentially with resident cells at their predicted destination, namely lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells, liver Kupffer cells and brain endothelial cells. We show that tumour-derived exosomes uptaken by organ-specific cells prepare the pre-metastatic niche. Treatment with exosomes from lung-tropic models redirected the metastasis of bone-tropic tumour cells. Exosome proteomics revealed distinct integrin expression patterns, in which the exosomal integrins α6β4 and α6β1 were associated with lung metastasis, while exosomal integrin αvβ5 was linked to liver metastasis. Targeting the integrins α6β4 and αvβ5 decreased exosome uptake, as well as lung and liver metastasis, respectively. We demonstrate that exosome integrin uptake by resident cells activates Src phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory S100 gene expression. Finally, our clinical data indicate that exosomal integrins could be used to predict organ-specific metastasis. PMID:26524530

  9. Tumour exosome integrins determine organotropic metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshino, Ayuko; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Shen, Tang-Long; Rodrigues, Goncalo; Hashimoto, Ayako; Tesic Mark, Milica; Molina, Henrik; Kohsaka, Shinji; Di Giannatale, Angela; Ceder, Sophia; Singh, Swarnima; Williams, Caitlin; Soplop, Nadine; Uryu, Kunihiro; Pharmer, Lindsay; King, Tari; Bojmar, Linda; Davies, Alexander E.; Ararso, Yonathan; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Haiying; Hernandez, Jonathan; Weiss, Joshua M.; Dumont-Cole, Vanessa D.; Kramer, Kimberly; Wexler, Leonard H.; Narendran, Aru; Schwartz, Gary K.; Sandstrom, Per; Jørgen Labori, Knut; Kure, Elin H.; Grandgenett, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; de Sousa, Maria; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Mallya, Kavita; Batra, Surinder K.; Jarnagin, William R.; Brady, Mary S.; Fodstad, Oystein; Muller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Minn, Andy J.; Bissell, Mina J.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Kang, Yibin; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Matei, Irina; Peinado, Hector; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2015-10-28

    Ever since Stephen Paget’s 1889 hypothesis, metastatic organotropism has remained one of cancer’s greatest mysteries. In this paper, we demonstrate that exosomes from mouse and human lung-, liver- and brain-tropic tumour cells fuse preferentially with resident cells at their predicted destination, namely lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells, liver Kupffer cells and brain endothelial cells. We show that tumour-derived exosomes uptaken by organ-specific cells prepare the pre-metastatic niche. Treatment with exosomes from lung-tropic models redirected the metastasis of bone-tropic tumour cells. Exosome proteomics revealed distinct integrin expression patterns, in which the exosomal integrins α6β4 and α6β1 were associated with lung metastasis, while exosomal integrin αvβ5 was linked to liver metastasis. Targeting the integrins α6β4 and αvβ5 decreased exosome uptake, as well as lung and liver metastasis, respectively. We demonstrate that exosome integrin uptake by resident cells activates Src phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory S100 gene expression. In conclusion, our clinical data indicate that exosomal integrins could be used to predict organ-specific metastasis.

  10. Tumour exosome integrins determine organotropic metastasis

    DOE PAGES

    Hoshino, Ayuko; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Shen, Tang-Long; ...

    2015-10-28

    Ever since Stephen Paget’s 1889 hypothesis, metastatic organotropism has remained one of cancer’s greatest mysteries. In this paper, we demonstrate that exosomes from mouse and human lung-, liver- and brain-tropic tumour cells fuse preferentially with resident cells at their predicted destination, namely lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells, liver Kupffer cells and brain endothelial cells. We show that tumour-derived exosomes uptaken by organ-specific cells prepare the pre-metastatic niche. Treatment with exosomes from lung-tropic models redirected the metastasis of bone-tropic tumour cells. Exosome proteomics revealed distinct integrin expression patterns, in which the exosomal integrins α6β4 and α6β1 were associated with lung metastasis,more » while exosomal integrin αvβ5 was linked to liver metastasis. Targeting the integrins α6β4 and αvβ5 decreased exosome uptake, as well as lung and liver metastasis, respectively. We demonstrate that exosome integrin uptake by resident cells activates Src phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory S100 gene expression. In conclusion, our clinical data indicate that exosomal integrins could be used to predict organ-specific metastasis.« less

  11. [Ovarian yolk sac tumour: general review].

    PubMed

    Even, Caroline; Lhommé, Catherine; Duvillard, Pierre; Morice, Philippe; Balleyguier, Corinne; Pautier, Patricia; Troalen, Frédéric; de La Motte Rouge, Thibault

    2011-08-01

    Ovarian yolk sac tumour (OYST) is a very rare malignancy arising most often in young women. Preoperative clinical, biological (alpha-foetoprotein) and radiological findings should help to establish the diagnosis of OYST, in order to propose adequate surgical treatment. The aim of surgery is to remove the primary tumour, to obtain an accurate histological diagnosis and to assess the disease extent. In young women, fertility-sparing surgery should be performed, in order to preserve the possibility of pregnancy later on. Chemotherapy has substantially modified the prognosis of these tumours, and practically all patients will be cured. The overall 5-year survival rate is 94% when patients are treated with BEP chemotherapy. Depending on the clinical situation, two to four cycles of the BEP regimen should be administered after surgery. Identification of prognostic factors may help to propose risk-adapted treatment in order to increase the cure rate in patients with a poor prognosis and to decrease toxicity in patients with a low risk of relapse. Fertility preservation represents a major objective in women treated for OYSTs.

  12. Cell metabolism, tumour diagnosis and multispectral FLIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rück, A.; Hauser, C.; Lorenz, S.; Mosch, S.; Rotte, S.; Kessler, M.; Kalinina, S.

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescence guided diagnosis of tumour tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results are interfering with the outcome. Discrimination between tumour and inflammation could be therefore difficult. Improvement of fluorescence diagnosis through observation of cell metabolism could be the solution, which needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. However, a complex combination of fluorophores give rise to the emission signal. Also in PDD (photodynamic diagnosis) different photosensitizer metabolites contribute to the fluorescence signal. Therefore, the fluorescence decay in many cases does not show a simple monoexponential profile. In those cases a considerable improvement could be achieved when time-resolved and spectral-resolved techniques are simultaneously incorporated. The discussion will focus on the detection of NADH, FAD and 5-ALA induced porphyrins. With respect to NADH and FAD the discrimination between protein bound and free coenzyme was investigated with multispectral FLIM in normal oral keratinocytes and squamous carcinoma cells from different origin. The redox ratio, which can be correlated with the fluorescence lifetimes of NADH and FAD changed depending on the state of the cells. Most of the investigations were done in monolayer cell cultures. However, in order to get information from a more realistic in vivo situation additionally the chorioallantoismembrane (CAM) of fertilized eggs was used where tumour cells or biopsies were allowed to grow. The results of theses measurements will be discussed as well.

  13. Multicentre tumour marker reference range study.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A P; Van Dalen, A; Sibley, P E; Kasper, L A; Durham, A P; el Shami, A S

    1999-01-01

    The array of antibodies and assay formats utilised by kit manufacturers contribute to different values being quoted as clinically "normal". Kit-specific reference range limits will maximise the clinical utility of tumour marker assays. Serum samples (approximately 800) were obtained from volunteers, age 20-70 years, in France, Germany, The Netherlands and Portugal. Each sample was assayed with a number of DPC tumour markers kits. IMMULITE assays were carried out in The Netherlands; Coat-A-Count IRMA, IRMA-Count, Double Antibody and Milenia assays at EURO/DPC Ltd. Analytes included, BR-MA, OM-MA, GI-MA (for the determination of CA 15-3, CA 125 and CA 19-9, respectively), CEA, PSA, PAP and HCG. The median and 95th percentiles for each analyte in each assay format were estimated; where appropriate, data subsets were considered. Kit-specific reference range data generated for important tumour marker analytes will help clinicians interprete their assay results.

  14. Tumour exosome integrins determine organotropic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Ayuko; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Shen, Tang-Long; Rodrigues, Goncalo; Hashimoto, Ayako; Tesic Mark, Milica; Molina, Henrik; Kohsaka, Shinji; Di Giannatale, Angela; Ceder, Sophia; Singh, Swarnima; Williams, Caitlin; Soplop, Nadine; Uryu, Kunihiro; Pharmer, Lindsay; King, Tari; Bojmar, Linda; Davies, Alexander E; Ararso, Yonathan; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Haiying; Hernandez, Jonathan; Weiss, Joshua M; Dumont-Cole, Vanessa D; Kramer, Kimberly; Wexler, Leonard H; Narendran, Aru; Schwartz, Gary K; Healey, John H; Sandstrom, Per; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Kure, Elin H; Grandgenett, Paul M; Hollingsworth, Michael A; de Sousa, Maria; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Mallya, Kavita; Batra, Surinder K; Jarnagin, William R; Brady, Mary S; Fodstad, Oystein; Muller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Minn, Andy J; Bissell, Mina J; Garcia, Benjamin A; Kang, Yibin; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K; Ghajar, Cyrus M; Matei, Irina; Peinado, Hector; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2015-11-19

    Ever since Stephen Paget's 1889 hypothesis, metastatic organotropism has remained one of cancer's greatest mysteries. Here we demonstrate that exosomes from mouse and human lung-, liver- and brain-tropic tumour cells fuse preferentially with resident cells at their predicted destination, namely lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells, liver Kupffer cells and brain endothelial cells. We show that tumour-derived exosomes uptaken by organ-specific cells prepare the pre-metastatic niche. Treatment with exosomes from lung-tropic models redirected the metastasis of bone-tropic tumour cells. Exosome proteomics revealed distinct integrin expression patterns, in which the exosomal integrins α6β4 and α6β1 were associated with lung metastasis, while exosomal integrin αvβ5 was linked to liver metastasis. Targeting the integrins α6β4 and αvβ5 decreased exosome uptake, as well as lung and liver metastasis, respectively. We demonstrate that exosome integrin uptake by resident cells activates Src phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory S100 gene expression. Finally, our clinical data indicate that exosomal integrins could be used to predict organ-specific metastasis.

  15. Imatinib treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs are believed to originate from intersticial cells of Cajal (the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract) or related stem cells, and are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. The use of imatinib has revolutionized the management of GIST and altered its natural history, substantially improving survival time and delaying disease progression in many patients. The success of imatinib in controlling advanced GIST led to interest in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant use of the drug. The neoadjuvant (preoperative) use of imatinib is recommended to facilitate resection and avoid mutilating surgery by decreasing tumour size, and adjuvant therapy is indicated for patients at high risk of recurrence. The molecular characterization (genotyping) of GISTs has become an essential part of the routine management of the disease as KIT and PDGFRA mutation status predicts the likelihood of achieving response to imatinib. However, the vast majority of patients who initially responded to imatinib will develop tumour progression (secondary resistance). Secondary resistance is often related to secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations that interfere with drug binding. Multiple novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be potentially useful for the treatment of imatinib-resistant GISTs as they interfere with KIT and PDGFRA receptors or with the downstream-signalling proteins. PMID:19968734

  16. Imatinib treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs are believed to originate from intersticial cells of Cajal (the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract) or related stem cells, and are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. The use of imatinib has revolutionized the management of GIST and altered its natural history, substantially improving survival time and delaying disease progression in many patients. The success of imatinib in controlling advanced GIST led to interest in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant use of the drug. The neoadjuvant (preoperative) use of imatinib is recommended to facilitate resection and avoid mutilating surgery by decreasing tumour size, and adjuvant therapy is indicated for patients at high risk of recurrence. The molecular characterization (genotyping) of GISTs has become an essential part of the routine management of the disease as KIT and PDGFRA mutation status predicts the likelihood of achieving response to imatinib. However, the vast majority of patients who initially responded to imatinib will develop tumour progression (secondary resistance). Secondary resistance is often related to secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations that interfere with drug binding. Multiple novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be potentially useful for the treatment of imatinib-resistant GISTs as they interfere with KIT and PDGFRA receptors or with the downstream-signalling proteins.

  17. Genomic landscape of paediatric adrenocortical tumours.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Emilia M; Chen, Xiang; Easton, John; Finkelstein, David; Liu, Zhifa; Pounds, Stanley; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Lund, Troy C; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Boggs, Kristy; Yergeau, Donald; Cheng, Jinjun; Mulder, Heather L; Manne, Jayanthi; Jenkins, Jesse; Mastellaro, Maria J; Figueiredo, Bonald C; Dyer, Michael A; Pappo, Alberto; Zhang, Jinghui; Downing, James R; Ribeiro, Raul C; Zambetti, Gerard P

    2015-03-06

    Paediatric adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare malignancy with poor prognosis. Here we analyse 37 adrenocortical tumours (ACTs) by whole-genome, whole-exome and/or transcriptome sequencing. Most cases (91%) show loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosome 11p, with uniform selection against the maternal chromosome. IGF2 on chromosome 11p is overexpressed in 100% of the tumours. TP53 mutations and chromosome 17 LOH with selection against wild-type TP53 are observed in 28 ACTs (76%). Chromosomes 11p and 17 undergo copy-neutral LOH early during tumorigenesis, suggesting tumour-driver events. Additional genetic alterations include recurrent somatic mutations in ATRX and CTNNB1 and integration of human herpesvirus-6 in chromosome 11p. A dismal outcome is predicted by concomitant TP53 and ATRX mutations and associated genomic abnormalities, including massive structural variations and frequent background mutations. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the nature, timing and potential prognostic significance of key genetic alterations in paediatric ACT and outline a hypothetical model of paediatric adrenocortical tumorigenesis.

  18. Stereotactic Irradiation of GH-Secreting Pituitary Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Minniti, G.; Scaringi, C.; Amelio, D.; Maurizi Enrici, R.

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is often employed in patients with acromegaly refractory to medical and/or surgical interventions in order to prevent tumour regrowth and normalize elevated GH and IGF-I levels. It achieves tumour control and hormone normalization up to 90% and 70% of patients at 10–15 years. Despite the excellent tumour control, conventional RT is associated with a potential risk of developing late toxicity, especially hypopituitarism, and its role in the management of patients with GH-secreting pituitary adenomas remains a matter of debate. Stereotactic techniques have been developed with the aim to deliver more localized irradiation and minimize the long-term consequences of treatment, while improving its efficacy. Stereotactic irradiation can be given in a single dose as stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or in multiple doses as fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT). We have reviewed the recent published literature on stereotactic techniques for GH-secreting pituitary tumors with the aim to define the efficacy and potential adverse effects of each of these techniques. PMID:22518123

  19. Brain tumour segmentation and tumour tissue classification based on multiple MR protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Astrid; Remmele, Stefanie; Keupp, Jochen

    2011-03-01

    Segmentation of brain tumours in Magnetic Resonance (MR) images and classification of the tumour tissue into vital, necrotic, and perifocal edematous areas is required in a variety of clinical applications. Manual delineation of the tumour tissue boundaries is a tedious and error-prone task, and the results are not reproducible. Furthermore, tissue classification mostly requires information of several MR protocols and contrasts. Here we present a nearly automatic segmentation and classification algorithm for brain tumour tissue working on a combination of T1 weighted contrast enhanced (T1CE) images and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Both image types are included in MR brain tumour protocols that are used in clinical routine. The algorithm is based on a region growing technique, hence it is fast (ten seconds on a standard personal computer). The only required user interaction is a mouse click for providing the starting point. The region growing parameters are automatically adapted in the course of growing, and if a new maximum image intensity is found, the region growing is restarted. This makes the algorithm robust, i.e. independent of the given starting point in a certain capture range. Furthermore, we use a lossless coarse-to-fine approach, which, together with the automatic adaptation of the parameters, can avoid leakage of the region growing procedure. We tested our algorithm on 20 cases of human glioblastoma and meningioma. In the majority of the test cases we got satisfactory results.

  20. Heated tumour cells of autologous and allogeneic origin elicit anti-tumour immunity.

    PubMed

    Todryk, Stephen M; Eaton, Jonathan; Birchall, Lindsay; Greenhalgh, Rebecca; Soars, Diane; Dalgleish, Angus G; Melcher, Alan A; Pandha, Hardev S

    2004-04-01

    Vaccination with established tumour cell lines may circumvent the problem of obtaining autologous tumour cells from patients, but may also need immunological adjuvants. Up-regulation of heat shock proteins within tumour cell vaccines has resulted in increased immunogenicity in some models, but this has yet to be demonstrated for allogeneic (MHC-disparate) cell vaccines. This was investigated here using a rat model for prostate tumour cell vaccination. Heating of tumour cells (42 degrees C, 1 h) elicited significant increases in HSP70 expression. Vaccination with heated autologous PAIII cells elicited protection against PAIII challenge in 60% of rats >50 days compared to 0% with unheated vaccine and was associated with an increased Th1 (IFNgamma) immune response. Heated allogeneic MLL cells elicited significant protection against PAIII challenge, in contrast to unheated cells. The principle was confirmed in two mouse models, although the allogeneic melanoma vaccine K1735 elicited the best protection when heated and administered mixed with autologous dendritic cells. Thus, while heating of vaccine cells in some models is highly beneficial, and is a means of enhancing immunogenicity without genetic modification or inclusion of potentially toxic adjuvants, additional immune enhancement may be required.

  1. Tumour-derived microvesicles (TMV) mimic the effect of tumour cells on monocyte subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Baran, Jaroslaw; Weglarczyk, Kazimierz; Szatanek, Rafal; Szaflarska, Anna; Siedlar, Maciej; Zembala, Marek

    2010-09-01

    Monocytes/macrophages may be affected by tumour cells via cell-to-cell contact, soluble factors and by tumour-derived microvesicles (TMV). Previous observations indicate that TMV interact with monocytes and alter their immunophenotype and activity. This study was designed to determine interactions of TMV with subpopulations (CD14(++)CD16(-) and CD14(+)CD16(++)) of human monocytes. Engulfment of TMV by subsets of monocytes was analysed by flow cytometry. Moreover cytokine release and production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) and reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) by CD14(++)CD16(-) and CD14(+)CD16(++) cells after TMV stimulation was determined. It was found that TMV are engulfed more efficiently by CD14(++)CD16(-) than CD14(+)CD16(++) cells. TMV-activated CD14(++)CD16(-) cells produce more ROI and interleukin -10 (IL-10) than CD14(++)CD16(+). CD14(+)CD16(++) cells following TMV stimulation showed an increased release of tumour necrosis factor alpha, IL-12p40 and RNI. TMV significantly modulate biological activity of monocyte subsets with a pattern similar to tumour cells. Therefore, TMV mimic the activating effect of tumour cells on monocytes as assessed by release of cytokines, ROI and RNI.

  2. Induction of IL-25 secretion from tumour-associated fibroblasts suppresses mammary tumour metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shu-Yi; Jian, Feng-Yin; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Shih-Chang; Hsieh, Mao-Chih; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Lee, Wen-Hwa; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Tumour-associated fibroblasts (TAFs), as a functionally supportive microenvironment, play an essential role in tumour progression. Here we investigate the role of IL-25, an endogenous anticancer factor secreted from TAFs, in suppression of mouse 4T1 mammary tumour metastasis. We show that a synthetic dihydrobenzofuran lignan (Q2-3), the dimerization product of plant caffeic acid methyl ester, suppresses 4T1 metastasis by increasing fibroblastic IL-25 activity. The secretion of IL-25 from treated human or mouse fibroblasts is enhanced in vitro, and this activity confers a strong suppressive effect on growth activity of test carcinoma cells. Subsequent in vivo experiments showed that the anti-metastatic effects of Q2-3 on 4T1 and human MDA-MD-231 tumour cells are additive when employed in combination with the clinically used drug, docetaxel. Altogether, our findings reveal that the release of IL-25 from TAFs may serve as a check point for control of mammary tumour metastasis and that phytochemical Q2-3 can efficiently promote such anticancer activities. PMID:27089063

  3. Antiangiogenic and tumour inhibitory effects of downregulating tumour endothelial FABP4

    PubMed Central

    Harjes, U; Bridges, E; Gharpure, K M; Roxanis, I; Sheldon, H; Miranda, F; Mangala, L S; Pradeep, S; Lopez-Berestein, G; Ahmed, A; Fielding, B; Sood, A K; Harris, A L

    2017-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) is a fatty acid chaperone, which is induced during adipocyte differentiation. Previously we have shown that FABP4 in endothelial cells is induced by the NOTCH1 signalling pathway, the latter of which is involved in mechanisms of resistance to antiangioge