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Sample records for irradiated p53-deficient tumour

  1. Stochastic modelling of tumorigenesis in p53 deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Mao, J. H.; Lindsay, K. A.; Balmain, A.; Wheldon, T. E.

    1998-01-01

    Stochastic models of tumorigenesis have been developed to investigate the implications of experimental data on tumour induction in wild-type and p53-deficient mice for tumorigenesis mechanisms. Conventional multistage models in which inactivation of each p53 allele represents a distinct stage predict excessively large numbers of tumours in p53-deficient genotypes, allowing this category of model to be rejected. Multistage multipath models, in which a p53-mediated pathway co-exists with one or more p53-independent pathways, are consistent with the data, although these models require unknown pathways and do not enable age-specific curves of tumour appearance to be computed. An alternative model that fits the data is the 'multigate' model in which tumorigenesis results from a small number of gate-pass (enabling) events independently of p53 status. The role of p53 inactivation is as a rate modifier that accelerates the gate-pass events. This model implies that wild-type p53 acts as a 'caretaker' to maintain genetic uniformity in cell populations, and that p53 inactivation increases the probability of occurrence of a viable cellular mutant by a factor of about ten. The multigate model predicts a relationship between the time pattern of tumour occurrence and tumour genotype that should be experimentally testable. Stochastic modelling may help to distinguish 'gatekeeper' and 'caretaker' genes in other tumorigenic pathays. PMID:9460995

  2. Differential programming of p53-deficient embryonic cells during rotenone block

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in chemical toxicities. The present study used an in vitro model to investigate the differential expression of metabolic pathways during cellular stress in p53- efficient embryonic fibroblasts compared to p53-deficient cells. These c...

  3. Mouse p53-Deficient Cancer Models as Platforms for Obtaining Genomic Predictors of Human Cancer Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Dueñas, Marta; Santos, Mirentxu; Aranda, Juan F.; Bielza, Concha; Martínez-Cruz, Ana B.; Lorz, Corina; Taron, Miquel; Ciruelos, Eva M.; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L.; Martín, Miguel; Larrañaga, Pedro; Dahabreh, Jubrail; Stathopoulos, George P.; Rosell, Rafael; Paramio, Jesús M.; García-Escudero, Ramón

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the TP53 gene are very common in human cancers, and are associated with poor clinical outcome. Transgenic mouse models lacking the Trp53 gene or that express mutant Trp53 transgenes produce tumours with malignant features in many organs. We previously showed the transcriptome of a p53-deficient mouse skin carcinoma model to be similar to those of human cancers with TP53 mutations and associated with poor clinical outcomes. This report shows that much of the 682-gene signature of this murine skin carcinoma transcriptome is also present in breast and lung cancer mouse models in which p53 is inhibited. Further, we report validated gene-expression-based tests for predicting the clinical outcome of human breast and lung adenocarcinoma. It was found that human patients with cancer could be stratified based on the similarity of their transcriptome with the mouse skin carcinoma 682-gene signature. The results also provide new targets for the treatment of p53-defective tumours. PMID:22880004

  4. RAG-induced DNA lesions activate proapoptotic BIM to suppress lymphomagenesis in p53-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Delbridge, Alex R D; Pang, Swee Heng Milon; Vandenberg, Cassandra J; Grabow, Stephanie; Aubrey, Brandon J; Tai, Lin; Herold, Marco J; Strasser, Andreas

    2016-09-19

    Neoplastic transformation is driven by oncogenic lesions that facilitate unrestrained cell expansion and resistance to antiproliferative signals. These oncogenic DNA lesions, acquired through errors in DNA replication, gene recombination, or extrinsically imposed damage, are thought to activate multiple tumor suppressive pathways, particularly apoptotic cell death. DNA damage induces apoptosis through well-described p53-mediated induction of PUMA and NOXA. However, loss of both these mediators (even together with defects in p53-mediated induction of cell cycle arrest and cell senescence) does not recapitulate the tumor susceptibility observed in p53(-/-) mice. Thus, potentially oncogenic DNA lesions are likely to also trigger apoptosis through additional, p53-independent processes. We found that loss of the BH3-only protein BIM accelerated lymphoma development in p53-deficient mice. This process was negated by concomitant loss of RAG1/2-mediated antigen receptor gene rearrangement. This demonstrates that BIM is critical for the induction of apoptosis caused by potentially oncogenic DNA lesions elicited by RAG1/2-induced gene rearrangement. Furthermore, this highlights the role of a BIM-mediated tumor suppressor pathway that acts in parallel to the p53 pathway and remains active even in the absence of wild-type p53 function, suggesting this may be exploited in the treatment of p53-deficient cancers. PMID:27621418

  5. Analysis of fused maxillary incisor dentition in p53-deficient exencephalic mice

    PubMed Central

    KAUFMAN, M. H.; KAUFMAN, D. B.; BRUNE, R. M.; STARK, M.; ARMSTRONG, J. F.; CLARKE, A. R.

    1997-01-01

    Out of a total of 21 exencephalic p53-deficient embryonic and newborn mice, 6 (28.6%) possessed fused maxillary incisor teeth. On histological analysis of the 5 examples seen on day 19.5 of gestation and newborn mice, 3 varieties were observed: an example of ‘simple’ fusion, 3 examples of simple fusion each of which contained a ‘dens in dente’ (‘tooth within a tooth’), and a single example in which the fused teeth were associated with a median supernumerary incisor tooth which, while deeply indenting the labial surface of the fused teeth, was in all locations a completely separate unit. 3-D reconstructions of the fused teeth demonstrated that they were all of the fusio subtotalis variety. No gross abnormalities were observed in the other dentition in these mice. It is noted that in mice fused maxillary incisor teeth are relatively commonly associated with both hypervitaminosis A-induced and trypan blue-induced exencephaly. It is believed that the presence of dens in dente within fused maxillary incisor teeth has only once been reported in mice, and the association between fused maxillary incisor teeth and a median supernumerary incisor tooth has not previously been reported in this species. PMID:9279659

  6. DIBENZO[A,L]PYRENE INDUCTION OF ERYTHROCYTE MICRONUCLEI IN A/J AND P53-DEFICIENT MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    DIBENZO[a,l]PYRENE INDUCTION OF ERYTHROCYTE MICRONUCLEI IN AlJ AND P53-DEFICIENT MICE

    Male A/J and C57Bl/6 background p53+/+, p53+/- and p53-/- mice were treated with dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P), and micronucleus (MN) frequencies were measured in erythrocytes from bone ...

  7. Effects of p53 knockout on ochratoxin A-induced genotoxicity in p53-deficient gpt delta mice.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Daisuke; Kijima, Aki; Suzuki, Yuta; Ishii, Yuji; Jin, Meilan; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Yanai, Tokuma; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Umemura, Takashi

    2013-02-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin produced by fungal species and is carcinogenic targeting the S3 segment of the renal proximal tubules in rodents. We previously reported that exposure of gpt delta rats to OTA induced both mutations in the red/gam gene (Spi(-)), suggesting large deletion mutations, and fluctuations in genes transcribed by p53 in the kidneys, which were associated with DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, particularly homologous recombination (HR) repair. In the present study, to investigate the effects of p53 knockout on OTA-induced mutagenicity, apoptosis, and karyomegaly in renal tubular cells, p53-proficient and p53-deficient gpt delta mice were given 1 and 5mg/kg of OTA for 4 weeks. Significant increases in Spi(-) mutant frequencies (MFs) were observed in the kidneys of p53-deficient gpt delta mice given 5 mg/kg of OTA, but not in the kidneys of p53-proficient gpt delta mice given the same dose. There were no changes in gpt MFs in both genotypes of mice treated with OTA. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that p53 protein levels in the kidneys of p53-proficient mice given OTA were significantly increased compared with the control. Incidences of apoptosis and karyomegaly in not only the outer stripe of outer medulla but also the cortex were significantly higher in p53-deficient at 5mg/kg than in p53-proficient gpt delta mice at same dose, which had no change in the cortex, the inner stripe of outer stripe, and the inner medulla. Given that p53 regulates HR repair in DSBs, these results suggest that OTA may promote large deletion mutations in the process of HR repair for DSBs. Additionally, the lower incidence of karyomegaly and apoptosis found in the p53-proficient gpt delta mice suggests that these phenomena may arise from OTA-induced DNA damage.

  8. Retention of the In Vitro Radiosensitizing Potential of Gemcitabine Under Anoxic Conditions, in p53 Wild-Type and p53-Deficient Non-Small-Cell Lung Carcinoma Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, An; Pauwels, Bea; Lambrechts, Hilde A.J.; Pattyn, Greet G.O.; Ides, Johan; Baay, Marc; Meijnders, Paul; Peeters, Marc; Vermorken, Jan B.; Lardon, Filip

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Whereas radiosensitization by gemcitabine is well studied under normal oxygen conditions, little is known about its radiosensitizing potential under reduced oxygen conditions. Therefore, the present study evaluated the impact of anoxia on gemcitabine-mediated radiosensitization. Methods and Materials: The clonogenic assay was performed in three isogenic A549 cell lines differing in p53 status (24 h, 0-15 nM gemcitabine, 0-8 Gy irradiation, normoxia vs. anoxia). Using radiosensitizing conditions, cells were collected for cell cycle analysis and apoptosis detection. Results: Whereas wild-type p53 A549-LXSN cells were more sensitive to radiation than p53-deficient A549-E6 cells, both cell lines showed similar radiosensitization by gemcitabine under normoxia and anoxia. Independent of p53 functionality, gemcitabine was able to overcome anoxia-induced G{sub 0/1} arrest and established an (early) S phase block in normoxic and anoxic cells. The percentage early and late apoptotic/necrotic cells increased with the gemcitabine/radiation combination, with a significant difference between A549-LXSN and A549-E6. Conclusions: This study is the first to show that gemcitabine retains its radiosensitizing potential under low oxygen conditions. Although radiosensitization was observed in both p53 wild-type and p53-deficient cells, p53 status might influence induction of apoptosis after gemcitabine/radiation treatment, whereas no effect on cell cycle progression was noticed.

  9. Kras activation in p53-deficient myoblasts results in high-grade sarcoma formation with impaired myogenic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    McKinnon, Timothy; Venier, Rosemarie; Dickson, Brendan C.; Kabaroff, Leah; Alkema, Manon; Chen, Li; Shern, Jack F.; Yohe, Marielle E.; Khan, Javed; Gladdy, Rebecca A.

    2015-01-01

    While genomic studies have improved our ability to classify sarcomas, the molecular mechanisms involved in the formation and progression of many sarcoma subtypes are unknown. To better understand developmental origins and genetic drivers involved in rhabdomyosarcomagenesis, we describe a novel sarcoma model system employing primary murine p53-deficient myoblasts that were isolated and lentivirally transduced with KrasG12D. Myoblast cell lines were characterized and subjected to proliferation, anchorage-independent growth and differentiation assays to assess the effects of transgenic KrasG12D expression. KrasG12D overexpression transformed p53−/− myoblasts as demonstrated by an increased anchorage-independent growth. Induction of differentiation in parental myoblasts resulted in activation of key myogenic regulators. In contrast, Kras-transduced myoblasts had impaired terminal differentiation. p53−/− myoblasts transformed by KrasG12D overexpression resulted in rapid, reproducible tumor formation following orthotopic injection into syngeneic host hindlimbs. Pathological analysis revealed high-grade sarcomas with myogenic differentiation based on the expression of muscle-specific markers, such as Myod1 and Myog. Gene expression patterns of murine sarcomas shared biological pathways with RMS gene sets as determined by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and were 61% similar to human RMS as determined by metagene analysis. Thus, our novel model system is an effective means to model high-grade sarcomas along the RMS spectrum. PMID:25992772

  10. Autophagy modulates the effects of bis-anthracycline WP631 on p53-deficient prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla, Sylvia; Vizcaíno, Carolina; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Maria A; Priebe, Waldemar; Portugal, José

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of p53-deficient PC-3 human prostate carcinoma cells with nanomolar concentrations of bis-anthracycline WP631 induced changes in gene expression, which resulted in G2/M cell cycle arrest, autophagy and cell death. The presence of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), which induces metabolic stress and autophagy, enhanced the antiproliferative effects of WP631. Changes induced by WP631, 2-DG, or co-treatments with both compounds, in the expression of a variety of genes involved in autophagy and apoptosis were quantified by real-time PCR. They were consistent with a raise in autophagy followed by cell death. Some cells dying from G2/M phase showed features of necrosis like early changes in membrane permeability, while others were dying by apoptosis that occurred in presence of little caspase-3 activity. Our results indicate that WP631 is not only an antiproliferative agent acting on gene transcription, but it can also induce autophagy regardless of the presence of other pro-autophagy stimuli. The development of autophagy seemed to improve the cytotoxicity of WP631 in PC-3 cells. Our results indicate that autophagy would enhance the activity of DNA-binding drugs like WP631 that are potent inhibitors of gene transcription. PMID:25689150

  11. Nuclear factor-kappaB sensitizes to benzyl isothiocyanate-induced antiproliferation in p53-deficient colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Abe, N; Hou, D-X; Munemasa, S; Murata, Y; Nakamura, Y

    2014-01-01

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), a dietary isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, inhibits the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells, most of which overexpress β-catenin as a result of mutations in the genes for adenomatous polyposis coli or mutations in β-catenin itself. Because nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a plausible target of BITC signaling in inflammatory cell models, we hypothesized that it is also involved in BITC-inhibited proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of the NF-κB p65 subunit significantly decreased the BITC sensitivity of human colorectal cancer HT-29 cells with mutated p53 tumor suppressor protein. Treating HT-29 cells with BITC induced the phosphorylation of IκB kinase, IκB-α and p65, the degradation of IκB-α, the translocation of p65 to the nucleus and the upregulation of NF-κB transcriptional activity. BITC also decreased β-catenin binding to a positive cis element of the cyclin D1 promoter and thus inhibited β-catenin-dependent cyclin D1 transcription, possibly through a direct interaction between p65 and β-catenin. siRNA-mediated knockdown of p65 confirmed that p65 negatively affects cyclin D1 expression. On the other hand, when human colorectal cancer HCT-116 cells with wild-type p53 were treated with BITC, translocation of p65 to the nucleus was inhibited rather than enhanced. p53 knockout increased the BITC sensitivity of HCT-116 cells in a p65-dependent manner, suggesting that p53 negatively regulates p65-dependent effects. Together, these results identify BITC as a novel type of antiproliferative agent that regulates the NF-κB pathway in p53-deficient colorectal cancer cells. PMID:25412312

  12. Nuclear factor-kappaB sensitizes to benzyl isothiocyanate-induced antiproliferation in p53-deficient colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abe, N; Hou, D-X; Munemasa, S; Murata, Y; Nakamura, Y

    2014-01-01

    Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), a dietary isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, inhibits the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells, most of which overexpress β-catenin as a result of mutations in the genes for adenomatous polyposis coli or mutations in β-catenin itself. Because nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a plausible target of BITC signaling in inflammatory cell models, we hypothesized that it is also involved in BITC-inhibited proliferation of colorectal cancer cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of the NF-κB p65 subunit significantly decreased the BITC sensitivity of human colorectal cancer HT-29 cells with mutated p53 tumor suppressor protein. Treating HT-29 cells with BITC induced the phosphorylation of IκB kinase, IκB-α and p65, the degradation of IκB-α, the translocation of p65 to the nucleus and the upregulation of NF-κB transcriptional activity. BITC also decreased β-catenin binding to a positive cis element of the cyclin D1 promoter and thus inhibited β-catenin-dependent cyclin D1 transcription, possibly through a direct interaction between p65 and β-catenin. siRNA-mediated knockdown of p65 confirmed that p65 negatively affects cyclin D1 expression. On the other hand, when human colorectal cancer HCT-116 cells with wild-type p53 were treated with BITC, translocation of p65 to the nucleus was inhibited rather than enhanced. p53 knockout increased the BITC sensitivity of HCT-116 cells in a p65-dependent manner, suggesting that p53 negatively regulates p65-dependent effects. Together, these results identify BITC as a novel type of antiproliferative agent that regulates the NF-κB pathway in p53-deficient colorectal cancer cells. PMID:25412312

  13. A delay prior to mitotic entry triggers caspase 8-dependent cell death in p53-deficient Hela and HCT-116 cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Victoria C; Plooster, Melissa; Leung, Jessica C; Cassimeris, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Stathmin/Oncoprotein 18, a microtubule destabilizing protein, is required for survival of p53-deficient cells. Stathmin-depleted cells are slower to enter mitosis, but whether delayed mitotic entry triggers cell death or whether stathmin has a separate pro-survival function was unknown. To test these possibilities, we abrogated the cell cycle delay by inhibiting Wee1 in synchronized, stathmin-depleted cells and found that apoptosis was reduced to control levels. Synchronized cells treated with a 4 hour pulse of inhibitors to CDK1 or both Aurora A and PLK1 delayed mitotic entry and apoptosis was triggered only in p53-deficient cells. We did not detect mitotic defects downstream of the delayed mitotic entry, indicating that cell death is activated by a mechanism distinct from those activated by prolonged mitotic arrest. Cell death is triggered by initiator caspase 8, based on its cleavage to the active form and by rescue of viability after caspase 8 depletion or treatment with a caspase 8 inhibitor. In contrast, initiator caspase 9, activated by prolonged mitotic arrest, is not activated and is not required for apoptosis under our experimental conditions. P53 upregulates expression of cFLIPL, a protein that blocks caspase 8 activation. cFLIPL levels are lower in cells lacking p53 and these levels are reduced to a greater extent after stathmin depletion. Expression of FLAG-tagged cFLIPL in p53-deficient cells rescues them from apoptosis triggered by stathmin depletion or CDK1 inhibition during G2. These data indicate that a cell cycle delay in G2 activates caspase 8 to initiate apoptosis specifically in p53-deficient cells.

  14. CHK1 regulates NF-κB signaling upon DNA damage in p53- deficient cells and associated tumor-derived microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Brittany L.; Pulkoski-Gross, Michael J.; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Obeid, Lina M.

    2016-01-01

    The recently discovered CHK1-Suppressed (CS) pathway is activated by inhibition or loss of the checkpoint kinase CHK1, promoting an apoptotic response to DNA damage mediated by caspase-2 in p53-deficient cells. Although functions of the CS-pathway have been investigated biochemically, it remains unclear whether and how CHK1 inhibition can be regulated endogenously and whether this constitutes a key component of the DNA damage response (DDR). Here, we present data that define the first endogenous activation of the CS-pathway whereby, upon DNA damage, wild type p53 acts as an endogenous regulator of CHK1 levels that modulates caspase-2 activation. Moreover, we demonstrate that persistence of CHK1 levels in response to DNA damage in p53-deficient cancer cells, leads to CHK1-mediated activation of NF-κB and induction of NF-κB-regulated genes in cells and in associated tumor-derived microvesicles (TMVs), both of which are abrogated by loss or inhibition of CHK1. These data define a novel role for CHK1 in the DDR pathway as a regulator NF-κB activity. Our data provide evidence that targeting CHK1 in p53-deficient cancers may abrogate NF-κB signaling that is associated with increased cellular survival and chemoresistance. PMID:26921248

  15. Identification of ATR-Chk1 pathway inhibitors that selectively target p53-deficient cells without directly suppressing ATR catalytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Kawasumi, Masaoki; Bradner, James E.; Tolliday, Nicola; Thibodeau, Renee; Sloan, Heather; Brummond, Kay M.; Nghiem, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to DNA-damaging chemotherapy is a barrier to effective treatment that appears to be augmented by p53 functional deficiency in many cancers. In p53-deficient cells where the G1/S checkpoint is compromised, cell viability after DNA damage relies upon intact intra-S and G2/M checkpoints mediated by the ATR and Chk1 kinases. Thus, a logical rationale to sensitize p53-deficient cancers to DNA-damaging chemotherapy is through the use of ATP-competitive inhibitors of ATR or Chk1. To discover small molecules that may act on uncharacterized components of the ATR pathway, we performed a phenotype-based screen of 9,195 compounds for their ability to inhibit hydroxyurea-induced phosphorylation of Ser345 on Chk1, known to be a critical ATR substrate. This effort led to the identification of four small-molecule compounds, three of which were derived from known bioactive library (anthothecol, dihydrocelastryl, and erysolin) and one of which was a novel synthetic compound termed MARPIN. These compounds all inhibited ATR-selective phosphorylation and sensitized p53-deficient cancer cells to DNA-damaging agents in vitro and in vivo. Notably, these compounds did not inhibit ATR catalytic activity in vitro, unlike typical ATP-competitive inhibitors, but acted in a mechanistically distinct manner to disable ATR-Chk1 function. Our results highlight a set of novel molecular probes to further elucidate druggable mechanisms to improve cancer therapeutic responses produced by DNA-damaging drugs. PMID:25336189

  16. Spatio-temporal cell dynamics in tumour spheroid irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, H.; Bleicher, M.; Meyer-Hermann, M.

    2010-10-01

    Multicellular tumour spheroids are realistic in vitro systems in radiation research that integrate cell-cell interaction and cell cycle control by factors in the medium. The dynamic reaction inside a tumour spheroid triggered by radiation is not well understood. Of special interest is the amount of cell cycle synchronisation which could be triggered by irradiation, since this would allow follow-up irradiations to exploit the increased sensitivity of certain cell cycle phases. In order to investigate these questions we need to support irradiation experiments with mathematical models. In this article a new model is introduced combining the dynamics of tumour growth and irradiation treatments. The tumour spheroid growth is modelled using an agent-based Delaunay/Voronoi hybrid model in which the cells are represented by weighted dynamic vertices. Cell properties like full cell cycle dynamics are included. In order to be able to distinguish between different cell reactions in response to irradiation quality we introduce a probabilistic model for damage dynamics. The overall cell survival from this model is in agreement with predictions from the linear-quadratic model. Our model can describe the growth of avascular tumour spheroids in agreement to experimental results. Using the probabilistic model for irradiation damage dynamics the classic ‘four Rs’ of radiotherapy can be studied in silico. We found a pronounced reactivation of the tumour spheroid in response to irradiation. A majority of the surviving cells is synchronized in their cell cycle progression after irradiation. The cell synchronisation could be actively triggered and should be exploited in an advanced fractionation scheme. Thus it has been demonstrated that our model could be used to understand the dynamics of tumour growth after irradiation and to propose optimized fractionation schemes in cooperation with experimental investigations.

  17. The combination of 5-fluorouracil plus p53 pathway restoration is associated with depletion of p53-deficient or mutant p53-expressing putative colon cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Catherine; Zhang, Xiang M; Tavaluc, Raluca T; Hart, Lori S; Dicker, David T; Wang, Wenge; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2009-11-01

    The cancer stem cell hypothesis suggests that rare populations of tumor-initiating cells may be resistant to therapy, lead to tumor relapse and contribute to poor prognosis for cancer patients. We previously demonstrated the feasibility of p53 pathway restoration in p53-deficient tumor cell populations using small molecules including ellipticine or its derivatives. We now establish a single cell p53-regulated green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-reporter system in human DLD1 colon tumor cells expressing mutant p53 protein. We use these p53-EGFP reporter DLD1 cells to investigate the status of p53 transcriptional activity in putative colon cancer stem cell populations following exposure to p53 pathway-restoring drugs and/or classical chemotherapy. We demonstrate induction of p53-specific EGFP reporter fluorescence following overexpression of p53 family member p73 by an Adenovirus vector. We further show that p53-reporter activity is induced in DLD1 putative cancer stem cell side-populations analyzed by their Hoechst dye efflux properties following treatment with the p53 pathway restoring drug ellipticine. Combination of ellipticine with the cytotoxic agent 5-fluorouracil resulted in increased cytotoxicity as compared to either agent alone and this was associated with depletion of putative cancer stem cell populations as compared with 5-FU alone treatment. Our results support the feasibility of therapeutic targeting of mutant p53 in putative cancer stem cells as well as the potential to enhance cytotoxic chemotherapy. PMID:19923910

  18. Gene expression profiling analysis reveals arsenic-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in p53-proficient and p53-deficient cells through differential gene pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Xiaozhong Robinson, Joshua F.; Gribble, Elizabeth; Hong, Sung Woo; Sidhu, Jaspreet S.; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2008-12-15

    Arsenic (As) is a well-known environmental toxicant and carcinogen as well as an effective chemotherapeutic agent. The underlying mechanism of this dual capability, however, is not fully understood. Tumor suppressor gene p53, a pivotal cell cycle checkpoint signaling protein, has been hypothesized to play a possible role in mediating As-induced toxicity and therapeutic efficiency. In this study, we found that arsenite (As{sup 3+}) induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner in both p53{sup +/+} and p53{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). There was, however, a distinction between genotypes in the apoptotic response, with a more prominent induction of caspase-3 in the p53{sup -/-} cells than in the p53{sup +/+} cells. To examine this difference further, a systems-based genomic analysis was conducted comparing the critical molecular mechanisms between the p53 genotypes in response to As{sup 3+}. A significant alteration in the Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress response pathway was found in both genotypes. In p53{sup +/+} MEFs, As{sup 3+} induced p53-dependent gene expression alterations in DNA damage and cell cycle regulation genes. However, in the p53{sup -/-} MEFs, As{sup 3+} induced a significant up-regulation of pro-apoptotic genes (Noxa) and down-regulation of genes in immune modulation. Our findings demonstrate that As-induced cell death occurs through a p53-independent pathway in p53 deficient cells while apoptosis induction occurs through p53-dependent pathway in normal tissue. This difference in the mechanism of apoptotic responses between the genotypes provides important information regarding the apparent dichotomy of arsenic's dual mechanisms, and potentially leads to further advancement of its utility as a chemotherapeutic agent.

  19. Brca1/p53 deficient mouse breast tumor hemodynamics during hyperoxic respiratory challenge monitored by a novel wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Austin; Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Eva Y. H. P.; Tromberg, Bruce; Cerussi, Albert; Choi, Bernard

    2009-02-01

    Current imaging modalities allow precise visualization of tumors but do not enable quantitative characterization of the tumor metabolic state. Such quantitative information would enhance our understanding of tumor progression and response to treatment, and to our overall understanding of tumor biology. To address this problem, we have developed a wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) instrument which combines two optical imaging modalities, spatially modulated imaging (MI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI). Our current WiFI imaging protocol consists of multispectral imaging in the near infrared (650-980 nm) spectrum, over a wide (7 cm × 5 cm) field of view. Using MI, the spatially-resolved reflectance of sinusoidal patterns projected onto the tissue is assessed, and optical properties of the tissue are estimated using a Monte Carlo model. From the spatial maps of local absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, tissue composition information is extracted in the form of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations, and percentage of lipid and water. Using LSI, the reflectance of a 785 nm laser speckle pattern on the tissue is acquired and analyzed to compute maps of blood perfusion in the tissue. Tissue metabolism state is estimated from the values of blood perfusion, volume and oxygenation state. We currently are employing the WiFI instrument to study tumor development in a BRCA1/p53 deficient mice breast tumor model. The animals are monitored with WiFI during hyperoxic respiratory challenge. At present, four tumors have been measured with WiFI, and preliminary data suggest that tumor metabolic changes during hyperoxic respiratory challenge can be determined.

  20. MMP13, Birc2 (cIAP1) and Birc3 (cIAP2), Amplified on Chromosome 9, Collaborate with p53 Deficiency in Mouse Osteosarcoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ou; Cai, Wei-Wen; Zender, Lars; Dayaram, Tajhal; Shen, Jianhe; Herron, Alan J.; Lowe, Scott W.; Man, Tsz-Kwong; Lau, Ching C.; Donehower, Lawrence A.

    2009-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the primary malignant cancer of bone and particularly affects adolescents and young adults, causing debilitation, and sometimes death. As a model for human osteosarcoma we have been studying p53+/− mice, which develop osteosarcoma at high frequency. To discover genes that cooperate with p53 deficiency in osteosarcoma formation we have integrated array comparative genomic hybridization, microarray expression analyses in mouse and human osteosarcomas, and functional assays. In this study we found seven frequent regions of copy number gain and loss in the mouse p53+/− osteosarcomas, but have focused on a recurrent amplification event on mouse chromosome 9A1. This amplicon is syntenic with a similar chromosome 11q22 amplicon identified in a number of human tumor types. Three genes on this amplicon, the matrix metalloproteinase gene MMP13, and the anti-apoptotic genes Birc2 (cIAP1), and Birc3 (cIAP2) show elevated expression in mouse and human osteosarcomas. We developed a functional assay using clonal osteosarcoma cell lines transduced with lentiviral shRNA vectors to show that downregulation of MMP13, Birc2, or Birc3 resulted in reduced tumor growth when transplanted into immunodeficient recipient mice. These experiments revealed that high MMP13 expression enhances osteosarcoma cell survival and that Birc2 and Birc3 also enhance cell survival, but only in osteosarcoma cells with the chromosome 9A1 amplicon. We conclude that the anti-apoptotic genes Birc2 and Birc3 are potential oncogenic drivers in the chromosome 9A1 amplicon. PMID:19276372

  1. Single-cell Raman spectroscopy of irradiated tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Quinn

    This work describes the development and application of a novel combination of single-cell Raman spectroscopy (RS), automated data processing, and principal component analysis (PCA) for investigating radiation induced biochemical responses in human tumour cells. The developed techniques are first validated for the analysis of large data sets (˜200 spectra) obtained from single cells. The effectiveness and robustness of the automated data processing methods is demonstrated, and potential pitfalls that may arise during the implementation of such methods are identified. The techniques are first applied to investigate the inherent sources of spectral variability between single cells of a human prostate tumour cell line (DU145) cultured in vitro. PCA is used to identify spectral differences that correlate with cell cycle progression and the changing confluency of a cell culture during the first 3-4 days after sub-culturing. Spectral variability arising from cell cycle progression is (i) expressed as varying intensities of protein and nucleic acid features relative to lipid features, (ii) well correlated with known biochemical changes in cells as they progress through the cell cycle, and (iii) shown to be the most significant source of inherent spectral variability between cells. This characterization provides a foundation for interpreting spectral variability in subsequent studies. The techniques are then applied to study the effects of ionizing radiation on human tumour cells. DU145 cells are cultured in vitro and irradiated to doses between 15 and 50 Gy with single fractions of 6 MV photons from a medical linear accelerator. Raman spectra are acquired from irradiated and unirradiated cells, up to 5 days post-irradiation. PCA is used to distinguish radiation induced spectral changes from inherent sources of spectral variability, such as those arising from cell cycle. Radiation induced spectral changes are found to correlate with both the irradiated dose and the

  2. p53 deficiency alters the yield and spectrum of radiation-induced lacZ mutants in the brain of transgenic mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Kanazawa, N.; Lutze-Mann, L.; Winegar, R. A.

    2001-01-01

    Exposure to heavy particle radiation in the galacto-cosmic environment poses a significant risk in space exploration and the evaluation of radiation-induced genetic damage in tissues, especially in the central nervous system, is an important consideration in long-term manned space missions. We used a plasmid-based transgenic mouse model system, with the pUR288 lacZ transgene integrated in the genome of every cell of C57Bl/6(lacZ) mice, to evaluate the genetic damage induced by iron particle radiation. In order to examine the importance of genetic background on the radiation sensitivity of individuals, we cross-bred p53 wild-type lacZ transgenic mice with p53 nullizygous mice, producing lacZ transgenic mice that were either hemizygous or nullizygous for the p53 tumor suppressor gene. Animals were exposed to an acute dose of 1 Gy of iron particles and the lacZ mutation frequency (MF) in the brain was measured at time intervals from 1 to 16 weeks post-irradiation. Our results suggest that iron particles induced an increase in lacZ MF (2.4-fold increase in p53+/+ mice, 1.3-fold increase in p53+/- mice and 2.1-fold increase in p53-/- mice) and that this induction is both temporally regulated and p53 genotype dependent. Characterization of mutants based on their restriction patterns showed that the majority of the mutants arising spontaneously are derived from point mutations or small deletions in all three genotypes. Radiation induced alterations in the spectrum of deletion mutants and reorganization of the genome, as evidenced by the selection of mutants containing mouse genomic DNA. These observations are unique in that mutations in brain tissue after particle radiation exposure have never before been reported owing to technical limitations in most other mutation assays.

  3. Local hyperthermic treatment does not enhance mitoxantrone effectiveness for responses of a rat solid tumour regrowing after irradiation.

    PubMed

    van Bree, C; Schopman, E M; Bakker, P J; Kipp, J B; Barendsen, G W

    1996-01-01

    Tumours regrowing after irradiation may respond differently to chemo-hyperthermia as compared to non- irradiated tumours. In this study, the efficacy of combined treatment of previously irradiated tumors with mitoxantrone and local hyperthermia (HT) was investigated. Rat R-1 tumours were irradiated with dose fractions of 5Gy X-rays applied on 4 consecutive days. Animals were retreated with mitoxantrone (5mg/kg i.p.), HT (1 h at 43 degrees C) or mitoxantrone + HT (3-h interval) on day 9 after the start of irradiation when tumour volumes were decreasing, or on day 16 when tumour volumes were increasing again. Pharmacokinetics were studied in relation to tumor cell survival and tumour growth delay. No Ht=induced changes in the pharmacokinetics of mitoxantrone were observed. The data on clonogenic survival correlated well with these findings and combined treatment were not more effective than mitoxantrone alone. In the treatment schedule applied, HT did not induce pharmacokinetic changes in irradiated tumours leading to an enhanced cytotoxicity of mitoxantrone. The HT- enhanced effectiveness of the drug observed in non- irradiated tumours is much less in pre-irradiated tumours. Responses of regrowing tumours to combined chemo- hyperthermia depend in a complex way on the stage of regrowth and on the treatment schedule. PMID:8601562

  4. Irradiation as an etiologic factor in tumours of the thyroid, parathyroid and salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Palmer, J A; Mustard, R A; Simpson, W J

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation to the head and neck region, usually of low dosage, results in an increased frequency of thyroid, parathyroid and salivary gland tumours. The authors have reviewed their experience with these tumours. Fifty of 475 patients with carcinoma of the thyroid had received previous irradiation. Papillary or mixed papillar-follicular carcinoma occurred most commonly. Eleven of 100 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism had been irradiated and had a parathyroid adenoma. Twenty of 662 patients with salivary gland tumours had previously been irradiated. Mucoepidermoid carcinoma was the most common tumour. Patients who have been irradiated and have a palpable abnormality of the thyroid or the salivary glands should be treated surgically. The various noninvasive tests are of little value in distinguishing between a benign and a malignant tumour. Those with hypercalcemia, considered to be due to primary hyperparathyroidism, should be treated by exploration of the neck, identification of the four parathyroid glands and excision of an adenoma with biopsy of the three remaining glands. If more than one gland is abnormal, a subtotal parathyroidectomy is recommended.

  5. Particle therapy of moving targets-the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving targets irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    Particle therapy of moving targets is still a great challenge. The motion of organs situated in the thorax and abdomen strongly affects the precision of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy. The motion is responsible for not only the dislocation of the tumour but also the alterations in the internal density along the beam path, which influence the range of particle beams. Furthermore, in case of pencil beam scanning, there is an interference between the target movement and dynamic beam delivery. This review presents the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving target irradiation in the context of hadron therapy. Methods enabling the direct determination of tumour position (fluoroscopic imaging of implanted radio-opaque fiducial markers, electromagnetic detection of inserted transponders and ultrasonic tumour localization systems) are presented. Attention is also drawn to the techniques which use external surrogate motion for an indirect estimation of target displacement during irradiation. The role of respiratory-correlated CT [four-dimensional CT (4DCT)] in the determination of motion pattern prior to the particle treatment is also considered. An essential part of the article is the review of the main approaches to moving target irradiation in hadron therapy: gating, rescanning (repainting), gated rescanning and tumour tracking. The advantages, drawbacks and development trends of these methods are discussed. The new accelerators, called "cyclinacs", are presented, because their application to particle therapy will allow making a breakthrough in the 4D spot scanning treatment of moving organs.

  6. Particle therapy of moving targets-the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving targets irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Tomasz

    2016-10-01

    Particle therapy of moving targets is still a great challenge. The motion of organs situated in the thorax and abdomen strongly affects the precision of proton and carbon ion radiotherapy. The motion is responsible for not only the dislocation of the tumour but also the alterations in the internal density along the beam path, which influence the range of particle beams. Furthermore, in case of pencil beam scanning, there is an interference between the target movement and dynamic beam delivery. This review presents the strategies for tumour motion monitoring and moving target irradiation in the context of hadron therapy. Methods enabling the direct determination of tumour position (fluoroscopic imaging of implanted radio-opaque fiducial markers, electromagnetic detection of inserted transponders and ultrasonic tumour localization systems) are presented. Attention is also drawn to the techniques which use external surrogate motion for an indirect estimation of target displacement during irradiation. The role of respiratory-correlated CT [four-dimensional CT (4DCT)] in the determination of motion pattern prior to the particle treatment is also considered. An essential part of the article is the review of the main approaches to moving target irradiation in hadron therapy: gating, rescanning (repainting), gated rescanning and tumour tracking. The advantages, drawbacks and development trends of these methods are discussed. The new accelerators, called "cyclinacs", are presented, because their application to particle therapy will allow making a breakthrough in the 4D spot scanning treatment of moving organs. PMID:27376637

  7. [Dose of tissue tolerance, dose of tumour sterilisation in continuous and discontinuous irradiation (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Swyngedauw, J

    1975-05-01

    In the radiotherapy of cancer, two conditions are necessary:-- 1 degree sterilisation of the tumor; 2 degrees safeguard of surrounding tissues. In discontinuous irradiation, sterilisation depends on the administration of a certain tumour-dose within a suitable period or number of sessions. At the rate of 5 sessions weekly, the following dose-number law may be formulated (ELLIS): DT = 2,500.N0,22. Perfect tolerance of the connective tissue is in fact obtained if the total dose is equal or less than: N.S.D..N0,24.T0,11. The nominal standard dose of ELLIS, is a limiting dose of about 1,800 rads. ORTON and ELLIS have published tables which permit one to obtain, without an index of saturation of the supporting tissue by means of a series of double entry tables corresponding each to a frequency of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 sessions per week. Each table provides the T.D.F. factor in relation to the number of sessions and the elementary dose. The T.D.F. factor is about 100 whatever the periodicity, and whatever the subdivisions of the dose when ELLIS' equation is satisfied, i.e. when one is at the limit of tolerance. Furthermore, the T.D.F. factor of two parts, of treatment under various regimens may be added together. It is sufficient for the sum to be equal to 100 to ensure full tolerance, which eliminates all difficulty of manipulation of a fractionated formula. The conditions of obtention of continuous irradiation do not permit one to separate the doses of sterilisation and tolerance, as was the case with discontinuous irradiation but, generally speaking, both in continuous and discontinuous administration the shorter the period of treatment the more the sterilising dose exceeds the tolerance dose, whereas with very small tumours, one may obtain tumour sterilisation within the limits of tolerance of the supporting tissues. For very large or radio-resistant tumours, one may have to, in order to obtain sterilisation, exceed more or less the perfect tolerance defined by T.D.F. 100 or

  8. [Dose of tissue tolerance, dose of tumour sterilisation in continuous and discontinuous irradiation (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Swyngedauw, J

    1975-05-01

    In the radiotherapy of cancer, two conditions are necessary:-- 1 degree sterilisation of the tumor; 2 degrees safeguard of surrounding tissues. In discontinuous irradiation, sterilisation depends on the administration of a certain tumour-dose within a suitable period or number of sessions. At the rate of 5 sessions weekly, the following dose-number law may be formulated (ELLIS): DT = 2,500.N0,22. Perfect tolerance of the connective tissue is in fact obtained if the total dose is equal or less than: N.S.D..N0,24.T0,11. The nominal standard dose of ELLIS, is a limiting dose of about 1,800 rads. ORTON and ELLIS have published tables which permit one to obtain, without an index of saturation of the supporting tissue by means of a series of double entry tables corresponding each to a frequency of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 sessions per week. Each table provides the T.D.F. factor in relation to the number of sessions and the elementary dose. The T.D.F. factor is about 100 whatever the periodicity, and whatever the subdivisions of the dose when ELLIS' equation is satisfied, i.e. when one is at the limit of tolerance. Furthermore, the T.D.F. factor of two parts, of treatment under various regimens may be added together. It is sufficient for the sum to be equal to 100 to ensure full tolerance, which eliminates all difficulty of manipulation of a fractionated formula. The conditions of obtention of continuous irradiation do not permit one to separate the doses of sterilisation and tolerance, as was the case with discontinuous irradiation but, generally speaking, both in continuous and discontinuous administration the shorter the period of treatment the more the sterilising dose exceeds the tolerance dose, whereas with very small tumours, one may obtain tumour sterilisation within the limits of tolerance of the supporting tissues. For very large or radio-resistant tumours, one may have to, in order to obtain sterilisation, exceed more or less the perfect tolerance defined by T.D.F. 100 or

  9. In vitro response of tumour cells to non-uniform irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchowerska, N.; Ebert, M. A.; Zhang, M.; Jackson, M.

    2005-07-01

    This study examines differences in tumour cellular response using clonogenic cell survival between uniform and non-uniform irradiation. Cells were irradiated with a 6 MV x-ray intensity-modulated beam, in a single large flask (i.e. intercellular communication is possible) or in three small flasks (i.e. intercellular communication is inhibited across the dose gradient). For non-small-cell lung cancer and melanoma cell lines, the dose response over the entire cell culture was significantly different between freely communicating cell cultures and those with inhibited communication across the dose non-uniformity. Communicating cells exhibited poorer survival in the low dose region of the field but improved survival in the high dose region. In general, the response to non-uniform irradiation appeared to 'average out' over the entire cell culture. This was not seen when intercellular communication was inhibited. The results add strength to the body of evidence regarding bystander effects and the inter-dependence of cellular response.

  10. Image-guided microbeam irradiation to brain tumour bearing mice using a carbon nanotube x-ray source array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Yuan, Hong; Burk, Laurel M.; Inscoe, Christy R.; Hadsell, Michael J.; Chtcheprov, Pavel; Lee, Yueh Z.; Lu, Jianping; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto

    2014-03-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a promising experimental and preclinical radiotherapy method for cancer treatment. Synchrotron based MRT experiments have shown that spatially fractionated microbeam radiation has the unique capability of preferentially eradicating tumour cells while sparing normal tissue in brain tumour bearing animal models. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of generating orthovoltage microbeam radiation with an adjustable microbeam width using a carbon nanotube based x-ray source array. Here we report the preliminary results from our efforts in developing an image guidance procedure for the targeted delivery of the narrow microbeams to the small tumour region in the mouse brain. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for tumour identification, and on-board x-ray radiography was used for imaging of landmarks without contrast agents. The two images were aligned using 2D rigid body image registration to determine the relative position of the tumour with respect to a landmark. The targeting accuracy and consistency were evaluated by first irradiating a group of mice inoculated with U87 human glioma brain tumours using the present protocol and then determining the locations of the microbeam radiation tracks using γ-H2AX immunofluorescence staining. The histology results showed that among 14 mice irradiated, 11 received the prescribed number of microbeams on the targeted tumour, with an average localization accuracy of 454 µm measured directly from the histology (537 µm if measured from the registered histological images). Two mice received one of the three prescribed microbeams on the tumour site. One mouse was excluded from the analysis due to tissue staining errors.

  11. Image-guided microbeam irradiation to brain tumour bearing mice using a carbon nanotube x-ray source array.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Yuan, Hong; Burk, Laurel M; Inscoe, Christy R; Hadsell, Michael J; Chtcheprov, Pavel; Lee, Yueh Z; Lu, Jianping; Chang, Sha; Zhou, Otto

    2014-03-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a promising experimental and preclinical radiotherapy method for cancer treatment. Synchrotron based MRT experiments have shown that spatially fractionated microbeam radiation has the unique capability of preferentially eradicating tumour cells while sparing normal tissue in brain tumour bearing animal models. We recently demonstrated the feasibility of generating orthovoltage microbeam radiation with an adjustable microbeam width using a carbon nanotube based x-ray source array. Here we report the preliminary results from our efforts in developing an image guidance procedure for the targeted delivery of the narrow microbeams to the small tumour region in the mouse brain. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for tumour identification, and on-board x-ray radiography was used for imaging of landmarks without contrast agents. The two images were aligned using 2D rigid body image registration to determine the relative position of the tumour with respect to a landmark. The targeting accuracy and consistency were evaluated by first irradiating a group of mice inoculated with U87 human glioma brain tumours using the present protocol and then determining the locations of the microbeam radiation tracks using γ-H2AX immunofluorescence staining. The histology results showed that among 14 mice irradiated, 11 received the prescribed number of microbeams on the targeted tumour, with an average localization accuracy of 454 µm measured directly from the histology (537 µm if measured from the registered histological images). Two mice received one of the three prescribed microbeams on the tumour site. One mouse was excluded from the analysis due to tissue staining errors.

  12. Up-regulation of the embryonic self-renewal network through reversible polyploidy in irradiated p53-mutant tumour cells

    SciTech Connect

    Salmina, Kristine; Jankevics, Eriks; Huna, Anda; Perminov, Dmitry; Radovica, Ilze; Klymenko, Tetyana; Ivanov, Andrey; Jascenko, Elina; Scherthan, Harry; Cragg, Mark; Erenpreisa, Jekaterina

    2010-08-01

    We have previously documented that transient polyploidy is a potential cell survival strategy underlying the clonogenic re-growth of tumour cells after genotoxic treatment. In an attempt to better define this mechanism, we recently documented the key role of meiotic genes in regulating the DNA repair and return of the endopolyploid tumour cells (ETC) to diploidy through reduction divisions after irradiation. Here, we studied the role of the pluripotency and self-renewal stem cell genes NANOG, OCT4 and SOX2 in this polyploidy-dependent survival mechanism. In irradiation-resistant p53-mutated lymphoma cell-lines (Namalwa and WI-L2-NS) but not sensitive p53 wild-type counterparts (TK6), low background expression of OCT4 and NANOG was up-regulated by ionising radiation with protein accumulation evident in ETC as detected by OCT4/DNA flow cytometry and immunofluorescence (IF). IF analysis also showed that the ETC generate PML bodies that appear to concentrate OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 proteins, which extend into complex nuclear networks. These polyploid tumour cells resist apoptosis, overcome cellular senescence and undergo bi- and multi-polar divisions transmitting the up-regulated OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 self-renewal cassette to their descendents. Altogether, our observations indicate that irradiation-induced ETC up-regulate key components of germ-line cells, which potentially facilitate survival and propagation of the tumour cell population.

  13. The role of meiotic cohesin REC8 in chromosome segregation in {gamma} irradiation-induced endopolyploid tumour cells

    SciTech Connect

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Cragg, Mark S.; Salmina, Kristine; Hausmann, Michael; Scherthan, Harry

    2009-09-10

    Escape from mitotic catastrophe and generation of endopolyploid tumour cells (ETCs) represents a potential survival strategy of tumour cells in response to genotoxic treatments. ETCs that resume the mitotic cell cycle have reduced ploidy and are often resistant to these treatments. In search for a mechanism for genome reduction, we previously observed that ETCs express meiotic proteins among which REC8 (a meiotic cohesin component) is of particular interest, since it favours reductional cell division in meiosis. In the present investigation, we induced endopolyploidy in p53-dysfunctional human tumour cell lines (Namalwa, WI-L2-NS, HeLa) by gamma irradiation, and analysed the sub-cellular localisation of REC8 in the resulting ETCs. We observed by RT-PCR and Western blot that REC8 is constitutively expressed in these tumour cells, along with SGOL1 and SGOL2, and that REC8 becomes modified after irradiation. REC8 localised to paired sister centromeres in ETCs, the former co-segregating to opposite poles. Furthermore, REC8 localised to the centrosome of interphase ETCs and to the astral poles in anaphase cells where it colocalised with the microtubule-associated protein NuMA. Altogether, our observations indicate that radiation-induced ETCs express features of meiotic cell divisions and that these may facilitate chromosome segregation and genome reduction.

  14. Single-cell-based computer simulation of the oxygen-dependent tumour response to irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harting, Christine; Peschke, Peter; Borkenstein, Klaus; Karger, Christian P.

    2007-08-01

    Optimization of treatment plans in radiotherapy requires the knowledge of tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Mathematical models may help to obtain quantitative estimates of TCP and NTCP. A single-cell-based computer simulation model is presented, which simulates tumour growth and radiation response on the basis of the response of the constituting cells. The model contains oxic, hypoxic and necrotic tumour cells as well as capillary cells which are considered as sources of a radial oxygen profile. Survival of tumour cells is calculated by the linear quadratic model including the modified response due to the local oxygen concentration. The model additionally includes cell proliferation, hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, apoptosis and resorption of inactivated tumour cells. By selecting different degrees of angiogenesis, the model allows the simulation of oxic as well as hypoxic tumours having distinctly different oxygen distributions. The simulation model showed that poorly oxygenated tumours exhibit an increased radiation tolerance. Inter-tumoural variation of radiosensitivity flattens the dose response curve. This effect is enhanced by proliferation between fractions. Intra-tumoural radiosensitivity variation does not play a significant role. The model may contribute to the mechanistic understanding of the influence of biological tumour parameters on TCP. It can in principle be validated in radiation experiments with experimental tumours.

  15. Evaluation of tumour promoting potency of fish borne toxaphene residues, as compared to technical toxaphene and UV-irradiated toxaphene.

    PubMed

    Besselink, H; Nixon, E; McHugh, B; Rimkus, G; Klungsøyr, J; Leonards, P; De Boer, J; Brouwer, A

    2008-08-01

    In this study the potential impact of food chain-based biotransformation and physico-chemical weathering of toxaphene on its tumour promoting potential was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Human exposure to toxaphene is mainly through consumption of contaminated fish, therefore fish-borne residues of toxaphene (cod liver extract, CLE) were prepared by exposing cod to technical toxaphene (TT) for 63 days. UV-irradiated toxaphene (uvT) was included to represent a physico-chemical weathered toxaphene mixture. In vitro, TT, uvT and CLE all showed a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) with a relative potency of CLE>TT=uvT. Tumour promoting potency was further studied in vivo in a medium term two-stage initiation/promotion bioassay in female Sprague-Dawley rats, using an increase in altered hepatic foci positive for glutathione-S-transferase-P (AHF-GST-P) as read out. No increase in AHF-GST-P occurred following exposure to either TT, uvT, or CLE, except for the positive control group (2,3,7,8-TCDD). Based on this study the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) for tumour promoting potency is at least 12.5mg/kg/week, or higher for CLE. Considering current human exposure levels in Europe it is doubtful that consumption of fish at current levels of toxaphene contamination give rise to human health risk. PMID:18558458

  16. Dose estimation in B16 tumour bearing mice for future irradiation in the thermal column of the TRIGA reactor after B/Gd/LDL adduct infusion.

    PubMed

    Protti, N; Ballarini, F; Bortolussi, S; Bruschi, P; Stella, S; Geninatti, S; Alberti, D; Aime, S; Altieri, S

    2011-12-01

    To test the efficacy of a new (10)B-vector compound, the B/Gd/LDL adduct synthesised at Torino University, in vivo irradiations of murine tumours are in progress at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of the Pavia University. A localised B16 melanoma tumour is generated in C57BL/6 mice and subsequently infused with the adduct. During the irradiation, the mouse will be put in a shield to protect the whole body except the tumour in the back-neck area. To optimise the treatment set-up, MCNP simulations were performed. A very simplified mouse model was built using MCNP geometry capabilities, as well as the geometry of the shield made of 99% (10)B enriched boric acid. A hole in the shield is foreseen in correspondence of the back-neck region. Many configurations of the shield were tested in terms of neutron flux, dose distribution and mean induced activity in the tumour region and in the radiosensitive organs of the mouse. In the final set-up, up to five mice can be treated simultaneously in the reactor thermal column and the neutron fluence in the tumour region for 10 min of irradiation is of about 5×10(12) cm(-2). PMID:21459587

  17. Senescence and tumour clearance is triggered by p53 restoration in murine liver carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wen; Zender, Lars; Miething, Cornelius; Dickins, Ross A.; Hernando, Eva; Krizhanovsky, Valery; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Lowe, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer arises from a combination of mutations in oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes, the extent to which tumour suppressor gene loss is required for maintaining established tumours is poorly understood. p53 is an important tumour suppressor that acts to restrict proliferation in response to DNA damage or deregulation of mitogenic oncogenes, by leading to the induction of various cell cycle checkpoints, apoptosis or cellular senescence1,2. Consequently, p53 mutations increase cell proliferation and survival, and in some settings promote genomic instability and resistance to certain chemotherapies3. To determine the consequences of reactivating the p53 pathway in tumours, we used RNA interference (RNAi) to conditionally regulate endogenous p53 expression in a mosaic mouse model of liver carcinoma4,5. We show that even brief reactivation of endogenous p53 in p53-deficient tumours can produce complete tumour regressions. The primary response to p53 was not apoptosis, but instead involved the induction of a cellular senescence program that was associated with differentiation and the upregulation of inflammatory cytokines. This program, although producing only cell cycle arrest in vitro, also triggered an innate immune response that targeted the tumour cells in vivo, thereby contributing to tumour clearance. Our study indicates that p53 loss can be required for the maintenance of aggressive carcinomas, and illustrates how the cellular senescence program can act together with the innate immune system to potently limit tumour growth. PMID:17251933

  18. Utility of the omentum in sacral reconstruction following total sacrectomy due to recurrent and irradiated giant cell tumour of the spine.

    PubMed

    Unal, Cigdem; Eren, Guler Gamze; Isil, Eda; Alponat, Ahmet; Sarlak, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    Reconstruction of the lumbosacral region after surgical excision of irradiated and recurrent spinal giant cell tumours remains a challenging problem. In this case report, we describe the use of the pedicled omentum flap in reconstruction of an irradiated and infected wide sacral defect of a 19-year-old male patient. The patient had radiotherapy and subsequent wide surgical resection after recurrence of the tumour. A myocutaneous flap from the gluteal area had failed previously. Local flap options could not be used because of the recent radiotherapy to the gluteal area. Since the patient had a laparotomy for tumour resection and a colostomy, abdominal muscles were not considered reliable for reconstructive procedures. A pedicled omentum flap was chosen as a reconstructive option because of its rich blood supply, large surface area, and angiogenic capacity. This report aims to describe the use of the pedicled omentum flap for reconstruction of the lumbosacral area following surgical resection of a spinal tumour, when gluteal and abdominal flap options for reconstruction are jeopardised.

  19. A dosimetric phantom study of dose accuracy and build-up effects using IMRT and RapidArc in stereotactic irradiation of lung tumours

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Stereotactic lung radiotherapy (SLRT) has emerged as a curative treatment for medically inoperable patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc treatments (VMAT) have been proposed as the best practical approaches for the delivery of SLRT. However, a large number of narrow field shapes are needed in the dose delivery of intensity-modulated techniques and the probability of underdosing the tumour periphery increases as the effective field size is decreased. The purpose of this study was to evaluate small lung tumour doses irradiated by intensity-modulated techniques to understand the risk for dose calculation errors in precision radiotherapy such as SLRT. Materials and methods The study was executed with two heterogeneous phantoms with targets of Ø1.5 and Ø4.0 cm. Dose distributions in the simulated tumours delivered by small sliding window apertures (SWAs), IMRT and RapidArc treatment plans were measured with radiochromic film. Calculation algorithms of pencil beam convolution (PBC) and anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA) were used to calculate the corresponding dose distributions. Results Peripheral doses of the tumours were decreased as SWA decreased, which was not modelled by the calculation algorithms. The smallest SWA studied was 2 mm, which reduced the 90% isodose line width by 4.2 mm with the Ø4.0 cm tumour as compared to open field irradiation. PBC was not able to predict the dose accurately as the gamma evaluation failed to meet the criteria of ±3%/±1 mm on average in 61% of the defined volume with the smaller tumour. With AAA the corresponding value was 16%. The dosimetric inaccuracy of AAA was within ±3% with the optimized treatment plans of IMRT and RapidArc. The exception was the clinical RapidArc plan with dose overestimation of 4%. Conclusions Overall, the peripheral doses of the simulated lung tumours were

  20. Enhanced cis-platinum ototoxicity in children with brain tumours who have received simultaneous or prior cranial irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.A.; Pillow, J.; Waters, K.D.; Keir, E.

    1989-01-01

    We report on four children who received cis-platinum simultaneously with, or in one case 10 months after, cranial irradiation and experienced exaggerated ototoxicity affecting all audible frequencies. The hearing loss was severe, affecting the critical areas for speech perception, and necessitated the provision of bilateral hearing aids. The audiograms of these patients are shown and compared to those of four children who had received cis-platinum as part of their treatment for neuroblastoma but without cranial irradiation. The precipitation of the exaggerated hearing loss with the administration of cis-platinum in one patient 10 months after finishing cranial irradiation suggests that care should be taken in the timing of cis-platinum administration in relation to concurrent or previous cranial irradiation.

  1. p53 deficiency enhances mitotic arrest and slippage induced by pharmacological inhibition of Aurora kinases.

    PubMed

    Marxer, M; Ma, H T; Man, W Y; Poon, R Y C

    2014-07-01

    A number of small-molecule inhibitors of Aurora kinases have been developed and are undergoing clinical trials for anti-cancer therapies. Different Aurora kinases, however, behave as very different targets: while inhibition of Aurora A (AURKA) induces a delay in mitotic exit, inhibition of Aurora B (AURKB) triggers mitotic slippage. Furthermore, while it is evident that p53 is regulated by Aurora kinase-dependent phosphorylation, how p53 may in turn regulate Aurora kinases remains mysterious. To address these issues, isogenic p53-containing and -negative cells were exposed to classic inhibitors that target both AURKA and AURKB (Alisertib and ZM447439), as well as to new generation of inhibitors that target AURKA (MK-5108), AURKB (Barasertib) individually. The fate of individual cells was then tracked with time-lapse microscopy. Remarkably, loss of p53, either by gene disruption or small interfering RNA-mediated depletion, sensitized cells to inhibition of both AURKA and AURKB, promoting mitotic arrest and slippage respectively. As the p53-dependent post-mitotic checkpoint is also important for preventing genome reduplication after mitotic slippage, these studies indicate that the loss of p53 in cancer cells represents a major opportunity for anti-cancer drugs targeting the Aurora kinases.

  2. Malignant testicular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, Pierre Del; Tawil, Elie; Béland, Gilles

    1974-01-01

    A series of 71 patients with malignant testicular tumours treated primarily by orchiectomy and irradiation is reviewed with respect to pathological and clinical features and modes of treatment. The three-year crude survival rate in 36 patients with seminoma was 86% and in 24 patients with carcinoma it was 41.7%. There were no survivors among patients with choriocarcinoma. Our results are comparable with those of other series. A prospective study is proposed of the value of irradiation and subsequent limited lymph node dissection following orchiectomy in cases of carcinoma of the testis. PMID:4855670

  3. Neonatal tumours.

    PubMed

    Moore, S W

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal or perinatal tumours frequently relate to prenatal or developmental events and have a short exposure window which provides an opportunity to study tumours in a selective sensitive period of development. As a result, they display a number of host-specific features which include occasional spontaneous maturational changes with cells still responding to developmental influences. Neonatal tumours (NNT) are studied for a number of important reasons. Firstly, many of the benign tumours arising from soft tissue appear to result from disturbances in growth and development and some are associated with other congenital anomalies. Study of these aspects may open the door for investigation of genetic and epigenetic changes in genes controlling foetal development as well as environmental and drug effects during pregnancy. Secondly, the clinical behaviour of NNT differs from that of similar tumours occurring later in childhood. In addition, certain apparently malignant NNT can 'change course' in infancy leading to the maturation of apparently highly malignant tumours. Thirdly, NNT underline the genetic associations of most tumours but appear to differ in the effects of proto-oncogenes and other oncogenic factors. In this context, there are also connections between the foetal and neonatal period and some "adult" cancers. Fourthly, they appear to arise in a period in which minimal environmental interference has occurred, thus providing a unique potential window of opportunity to study the pathogenesis of tumour behaviour. This study will seek to review what is currently known in each of these areas of study as they apply to NNT. Further study of the provocative differences in tumour behaviour in neonates provides insights into the natural history of cancer in humans and promotes novel cancer therapies.

  4. A role for the p53 tumour suppressor in regulating the balance between homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining

    PubMed Central

    Moureau, Sylvie; Luessing, Janna; Harte, Emma Christina; Voisin, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Loss of p53, a transcription factor activated by cellular stress, is a frequent event in cancer. The role of p53 in tumour suppression is largely attributed to cell fate decisions. Here, we provide evidence supporting a novel role for p53 in the regulation of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway choice. 53BP1, another tumour suppressor, was initially identified as p53 Binding Protein 1, and has been shown to inhibit DNA end resection, thereby stimulating non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Yet another tumour suppressor, BRCA1, reciprocally promotes end resection and homologous recombination (HR). Here, we show that in both human and mouse cells, the absence of p53 results in impaired 53BP1 focal recruitment to sites of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. This effect is largely independent of cell cycle phase and the extent of DNA damage. In p53-deficient cells, diminished localization of 53BP1 is accompanied by a reciprocal increase in BRCA1 recruitment to DSBs. Consistent with these findings, we demonstrate that DSB repair via NHEJ is abrogated, while repair via homology-directed repair (HDR) is stimulated. Overall, we propose that in addition to its role as an ‘effector’ protein in the DNA damage response, p53 plays a role in the regulation of DSB repair pathway choice. PMID:27655732

  5. Gastric calcifying fibrous tumour

    PubMed Central

    Attila, Tan; Chen, Dean; Gardiner, Geoffrey W; Ptak, Theadore W; Marcon, Norman E

    2006-01-01

    Intramucosal gastric tumours are most commonly found to be gastrointestinal stromal tumours or leiomyomas (smooth muscle tumours); however, a variety of other uncommon mesenchymal tumours can occur in the stomach wall. A rare benign calcifying fibrous tumour is reported and the endoscopic appearance, ultrasound findings and morphology are documented. A review of the literature found only two similar cases. PMID:16858502

  6. Imaging of testicular tumours.

    PubMed

    Owens, E J; Kabala, J; Goddard, P

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the diagnosis, pathology and imaging of testicular tumours, predominantly germ cell tumours. It will discuss the imaging techniques used in their diagnosis, staging and surveillance.

  7. Tumour-specific CD4 T cells eradicate melanoma via indirect recognition of tumour-derived antigen.

    PubMed

    Shklovskaya, Elena; Terry, Alexandra M; Guy, Thomas V; Buckley, Adrian; Bolton, Holly A; Zhu, Erhua; Holst, Jeff; Fazekas de St. Groth, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    The importance of CD4 T cells in tumour immunity has been increasingly recognised, with recent reports describing robust CD4 T cell-dependent tumour control in mice whose immune-regulatory mechanisms have been disturbed by irradiation, chemotherapy, immunomodulatory therapy and/or constitutive immunodeficiency. Tumour control in such models has been attributed in large part to direct Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II-dependent CD4 T cell killing of tumour cells. To test whether CD4 T cells can eradicate tumours without directly killing tumour cells, we developed an animal model in which tumour-derived antigen could be presented to T-cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic CD4 T cells by host but not tumour MHC class II molecules. In I-E(+) mice bearing I-E(null) tumours, naive I-E-restricted CD4 T cells proliferated locally in tumour-draining lymph nodes after recognising tumour-derived antigen on migratory dendritic cells. In lymphopaenic but not immunosufficient hosts, CD4 T cells differentiated into polarised T helper type 1 (Th1) cells expressing interferon gamma (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin (IL)-2 but little IL-17, and cleared established tumours. Tumour clearance was enhanced by higher TCR affinity for tumour antigen-MHC class II and was critically dependent on IFNγ, as demonstrated by early tumour escape in animals treated with an IFNγ blocking antibody. Thus, CD4 T cells and IFNγ can control tumour growth without direct T-cell killing of tumour cells, and without requiring additional adaptive immune cells such as CD8 T cells and B cells. Our results support a role for effective CD4 T cell-dependent tumour immunity against MHC class II-negative tumours. PMID:26837456

  8. Genomic profiling of murine mammary tumors identifies potential personalized drug targets for p53-deficient mammary cancers

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Yash N.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Kanchi, Krishna L.; Herschkowitz, Jason I.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Rosen, Jeffrey M.; Perou, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Targeted therapies against basal-like breast tumors, which are typically ‘triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs)’, remain an important unmet clinical need. Somatic TP53 mutations are the most common genetic event in basal-like breast tumors and TNBC. To identify additional drivers and possible drug targets of this subtype, a comparative study between human and murine tumors was performed by utilizing a murine Trp53-null mammary transplant tumor model. We show that two subsets of murine Trp53-null mammary transplant tumors resemble aspects of the human basal-like subtype. DNA-microarray, whole-genome and exome-based sequencing approaches were used to interrogate the secondary genetic aberrations of these tumors, which were then compared to human basal-like tumors to identify conserved somatic genetic features. DNA copy-number variation produced the largest number of conserved candidate personalized drug targets. These candidates were filtered using a DNA-RNA Pearson correlation cut-off and a requirement that the gene was deemed essential in at least 5% of human breast cancer cell lines from an RNA-mediated interference screen database. Five potential personalized drug target genes, which were spontaneously amplified loci in both murine and human basal-like tumors, were identified: Cul4a, Lamp1, Met, Pnpla6 and Tubgcp3. As a proof of concept, inhibition of Met using crizotinib caused Met-amplified murine tumors to initially undergo complete regression. This study identifies Met as a promising drug target in a subset of murine Trp53-null tumors, thus identifying a potential shared driver with a subset of human basal-like breast cancers. Our results also highlight the importance of comparative genomic studies for discovering personalized drug targets and for providing a preclinical model for further investigations of key tumor signaling pathways. PMID:27149990

  9. Tumour biology: Senescence in premalignant tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, Manuel; Gil, Jesús; Efeyan, Alejo; Guerra, Carmen; Schuhmacher, Alberto J.; Barradas, Marta; Benguría, Alberto; Zaballos, Angel; Flores, Juana M.; Barbacid, Mariano; Beach, David; Serrano, Manuel

    2005-08-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence is a cellular response that may be crucial for protection against cancer development, but its investigation has so far been restricted to cultured cells that have been manipulated to overexpress an oncogene. Here we analyse tumours initiated by an endogenous oncogene, ras, and show that senescent cells exist in premalignant tumours but not in malignant ones. Senescence is therefore a defining feature of premalignant tumours that could prove valuable in the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer.

  10. Irradiation characteristics of BNCT using near-threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be direct neutrons: application to intra-operative BNCT for malignant brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Tooru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Ishikawa, Masayori; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2002-08-21

    A calculation method for the dosage of neutrons by near-threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be and gamma rays by 7Li(p, p'gamma)7Li was validated through experiments with variable distance between the Li target and the phantom, focusing on large angular dependence. The production of neutrons and gamma rays in the Li target was calculated by Lee's method and their transport in the phantom was calculated using the MCNP-4B code. The dosage in intra-operative boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using near-threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be direct neutrons was evaluated using the validated calculation method. The effectiveness of the usage of the direct neutrons was confirmed from the existence of the region satisfying the requirements of the protocol utilized in intra-operative BNCT for brain tumours in Japan. The boron-dose enhancer (BDE) introduced in this paper to increase the contribution of the 10B(n, alpha)7Li dose in the living body was effective. The void utilized to increase the dose in deep regions was also effective with BDE. For the investigation of 1.900 MeV proton beams, for example, it was found that intraoperative BNCT using near-threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be direct neutrons is feasible.

  11. Malignant mixed tumour. A salivary gland tumour showing both carcinomatous and sarcomatous features.

    PubMed

    Hellquist, H; Michaels, L

    1986-01-01

    Two malignant mixed tumours, in which both carcinomatous and sarcomatous features were present, are described. They arose in the palate in patients who had undergone surgery and irradiation for a pleomorphic adenoma at the same site 30 and 36 years previously. The histological differential diagnoses of recurrent benign pleomorphic adenoma, pleomorphic adenoma resembling mesenchymal tumour, and carcinoma in (ex) pleomorphic adenoma are discussed. On the basis of their positive reaction for keratin with specific monoclonal antibodies it is suggested that the myoepithelial cells are of epithelial origin. Immunohistochemical studies together with the histological appearance of the neoplasms indicate that the carcinomatous as well as the sarcomatous elements were derived from modified myoepithelial tumour cells. Irradiation may have been responsible for inducing a true malignant mixed tumour as distinct from the more common malignancy which may arise in pleomorphic adenoma, this being a simple carcinoma.

  12. Fractionated Radiotherapy with 3 x 8 Gy Induces Systemic Anti-Tumour Responses and Abscopal Tumour Inhibition without Modulating the Humoral Anti-Tumour Response

    PubMed Central

    Habets, Thomas H. P. M.; Oth, Tammy; Houben, Ans W.; Huijskens, Mirelle J. A. J.; Senden-Gijsbers, Birgit L. M. G.; Schnijderberg, Melanie C. A.; Brans, Boudewijn; Dubois, Ludwig J.; Lambin, Philippe; De Saint-Hubert, Marijke; Germeraad, Wilfred T. V.; Tilanus, Marcel G. J.; Mottaghy, Felix M.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that fractionated radiotherapy (RT) can result in distant non-irradiated (abscopal) tumour regression. Although preclinical studies indicate the importance of T cells in this infrequent phenomenon, these studies do not preclude that other immune mechanisms exhibit an addition role in the abscopal effect. We therefore addressed the question whether in addition to T cell mediated responses also humoral anti-tumour responses are modulated after fractionated RT and whether systemic dendritic cell (DC) stimulation can enhance tumour-specific antibody production. We selected the 67NR mammary carcinoma model since this tumour showed spontaneous antibody production in all tumour-bearing mice. Fractionated RT to the primary tumour was associated with a survival benefit and a delayed growth of a non-irradiated (contralateral) secondary tumour. Notably, fractionated RT did not affect anti-tumour antibody titers and the composition of the immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes. Likewise, we demonstrated that treatment of tumour-bearing Balb/C mice with DC stimulating growth factor Flt3-L did neither modulate the magnitude nor the composition of the humoral immune response. Finally, we evaluated the immune infiltrate and Ig isotype content of the tumour tissue using flow cytometry and found no differences between treatment groups that were indicative for local antibody production. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the 67NR mammary carcinoma in Balb/C mice is associated with a pre-existing antibody response. And, we show that in tumour-bearing Balb/C mice with abscopal tumour regression such pre-existing antibody responses are not altered upon fractionated RT and/or DC stimulation with Flt3-L. Our research indicates that evaluating the humoral immune response in the setting of abscopal tumour regression is not invariably associated with therapeutic effects. PMID:27427766

  13. Nicotinamide downregulates gene expression of interleukin-6, interleukin-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and tumour necrosis factor-α gene expression in HaCaT keratinocytes after ultraviolet B irradiation.

    PubMed

    Monfrecola, G; Gaudiello, F; Cirillo, T; Fabbrocini, G; Balato, A; Lembo, S

    2013-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation has profound effects on human skin, causing sunburn, inflammation, cellular-tissue injury, cell death, and skin cancer. Most of these effects are mediated by a number of cytokines produced by keratinocytes. In this study we investigated whether nicotinamide (NCT), the amide form of vitamin B3, might have a protective function in reducing the expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α in UV-irradiated keratinocytes. HaCaT cells were treated with UVB in the presence or absence of NCT, and cytokine mRNA levels were examined by quantitative real-time PCR. NCT significantly downregulated IL-6, IL-10, MCP-1 and TNF-α mRNA expression, whereas it did not exert any significant effect on IL-1β or IL-8 expression. Because of its ability to decrease these cytokine mediators after UV exposure, NCT is a possible therapy to improve or prevent conditions induced or aggravated by UV light.

  14. Bronchial mucous gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Spencer, H

    1979-07-27

    Tumours arising in the bronchial mucous glands closely resemble tumours arising in the mixed salivary glands. Bronchial mucous gland tumours account for less than 0.5 per cent of all lung tumours. Twenty six tumours are reviewed and they have been divided into five types, (a) adenoidcystic carcinomas, (b) muco-epidermoid tumors, (c) mixed (pleomorphic) tumors, (d) cystadenomas and (f) oxyphilic adenoma. The clinical features, and postoperative course of the patients are reviewed. Adenocystic carcinomas, arising in the bronchus frequently involve the neighbouring trachea and spread mainly by direct infiltration. Most muco-epidermoid bronchial tumours were confined to young persons, and the only malignant muco-epidermoid tumour occurred in an elderly person. The prognosis in young persons is good provided the tumours are completely excised. The two mixed bronchial tumours resembled their salivary counterparts and one subsequently behaved as a carcinoma and metastasised. Bronchial cystadenomas all proved to be benign tumours but in two cases were associated with surface papillary proliferation. The only example of an oxyphil cell adenoma was discovered at post mortem examination. The histogenesis of the tumours is considered.

  15. Circulating tumour cells: insights into tumour heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hayes, D F; Paoletti, C

    2013-08-01

    Tumour heterogeneity is a major barrier to cure breast cancer. It can exist between patients with different intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer or within an individual patient with breast cancer. In the latter case, heterogeneity has been observed between different metastatic sites, between metastatic sites and the original primary tumour, and even within a single tumour at either a metastatic or a primary site. Tumour heterogeneity is a function of two separate, although linked, processes. First, genetic instability is a hallmark of malignancy, and results in 'fixed' genetic changes that are almost certainly carried forward through progression of the cancer over time, with increasingly complex additional genetic changes in new metastases as they arise. The second type of heterogeneity is due to differential but 'plastic' expression of various genes important in the biology and response to various therapies. Together, these processes result in highly variable cancers with differential response, and resistance, to both targeted (e.g. endocrine or anti-human epithelial growth receptor type 2 (HER2) agents) and nontargeted therapies (e.g. chemotherapy). Ideally, tumour heterogeneity would be monitored over time, especially in relation to therapeutic strategies. However, biopsies of metastases require invasive and costly procedures, and biopsies of multiple metastases, or serially over time, are impractical. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) represent a potential surrogate for tissue-based cancer and therefore might provide the opportunity to monitor serial changes in tumour biology. Recent advances have enabled accurate and reliable quantification and molecular characterization of CTCs with regard to a number of important biomarkers including oestrogen receptor alpha and HER2. Preliminary data have demonstrated that expression of these markers between CTCs in individual patients with metastatic breast cancer reflects the heterogeneity of the underlying tumours. Future

  16. Tumour progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour's survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible.

  17. Tumour progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour’s survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  18. The Tumour Microenvironment after Radiotherapy: Mechanisms of Resistance and Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Holly E.; Paget, James T. E.; Khan, Aadil A.; Harrington, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays a central part in curing cancer. For decades, most research on improving treatment outcomes has focussed on modulating radiation-induced biological effects on cancer cells. Recently, we have better understood that components within the tumour microenvironment have pivotal roles in determining treatment outcomes. In this Review, we describe vascular, stromal and immunological changes induced in the tumour microenvironment by irradiation and discuss how they may promote radioresistance and tumour recurrence. Subsequently, we highlight how this knowledge is guiding the development of new treatment paradigms in which biologically targeted agents will be combined with radiotherapy. PMID:26105538

  19. Uveal tumour resection

    PubMed Central

    Char, D.; Miller, T.; Crawford, J

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To review the ocular retention rates, visual results, and metastases in uveal tumours managed with eye wall resection techniques.
METHODS—This was a retrospective analysis of consecutive local uveal tumour resections performed by a single surgeon. All enucleation specimens were reviewed by one author. Both parametric and non-parametric analysis of data were performed.
RESULTS—138 eyes were scheduled for eye wall resection surgery. The mean age was 52 years (range 11-86 years). Tumours involved predominantly the iris in 14 cases, iris-ciliary body in 57, ciliary body alone in 18 patients, and in 49 cases the choroid was involved (ciliochoroidal, iris-ciliary body-choroid, or choroid). 125 eyes harboured melanomas; posterior tumours were more likely to have epithelioid cells (p<0.05). The mean follow up was 6 years. The mean clock hours in iris and iris-ciliary body tumours was 3.5. In tumours that involved the choroid the mean largest diameter was 12.9 mm and the mean thickness 8.5 mm. 105 of 138 (76%) eyes were retained. Histological assessment of surgical margins did not correlate evidence of tumour in enucleated eyes or metastatic disease. Surgical margins of more anterior tumours were more likely to be clear on histological evaluation (p<0.05). Approximately 53% of retained eyes had a final visual acuity of ⩾20/40; visual results were significantly better in more anteriorly located tumours (p<0.05). All retained iris tumour cases had ⩾20/40 final visual acuity. In tumours that involved the choroid nine of 31 retained eyes kept that level of visual acuity. Eight patients developed metastases; all metastatic events developed in patients with tumours that involved the choroid, and seven of eight were mixed cell melanomas.
CONCLUSIONS—76% of eyes were retained and 53% of these had a final visual acuity of ⩾20/40. Only 7% of uveal melanoma patients developed metastatic disease with a mean follow up of 6 years. Survival did not

  20. Hetergeneous tumour response to photodynamic therapy assessed by in vivo localised 31P NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ceckler, T. L.; Gibson, S. L.; Kennedy, S. D.; Hill, R.; Bryant, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is efficacious in the treatment of small malignant lesions when all cells in the tumour receive sufficient drug, oxygen and light to induce a photodynamic effect capable of complete cytotoxicity. In large tumours, only partial effectiveness is observed presumably because of insufficient light penetration into the tissue. The heterogeneity of the metabolic response in mammary tumours following PDT has been followed in vivo using localised phosphorus NMR spectroscopy. Alterations in nucleoside triphosphates (NTP), inorganic phosphate (Pi) and pH within localised regions of the tumour were monitored over 24-48 h following PDT irradiation of the tumour. Reduction of NTP and increases in Pi were observed at 4-6 h after PDT irradiation in all regions of treated tumours. The uppermost regions of the tumours (those nearest the skin surface and exposed to the greatest light fluence) displayed the greatest and most prolonged reduction of NTP and concomitant increase in Pi resulting in necrosis. The metabolite concentrations in tumour regions located towards the base of the tumour returned a near pre-treatment levels by 24-48 h after irradiation. The ability to follow heterogeneous metabolic responses in situ provides one means to assess the degree of metabolic inhibition which subsequently leads to tumour necrosis. Images Figure 4 PMID:1829953

  1. Tumours of the thymus

    PubMed Central

    Sellors, T. Holmes; Thackray, A. C.; Thomson, A. D.

    1967-01-01

    Eighty-eight cases of thymoma are discussed with the object of trying to co-ordinate the histological and clinical features. The pathological specimens were in all cases obtained at operation. The pathology classification introduced by Thomson and Thackray in 1957 has been found to correspond adequately with the clinical pattern. The most common groups of tumours are basically epithelial and can be separated into five or six subdivisions, each of which has a separate pattern of behaviour. Lymphoid and teratomatous tumours also occur, but there were only two examples in this series. Clinically, separation of patients who suffered from myasthenia (38) and those who did not (50) affords the first main grouping. The majority of patients who had myasthenia gravis had tumours classified as epidermoid (19) and lymphoepithelial (14), the former with a more malignant appearance and behaviour than the latter. Removal of the tumour with or without radiation gave considerable and sometimes complete relief from myasthenic symptoms. Non-myasthenic thymoma (50) was usually discovered as a result of pressure signs or in the course of routine radiography. Spindle or oval celled tumours followed a benign pattern whereas undifferentiated thymoma was in every sense malignant, as also were teratomatous growths. Granulomatous or Hodgkin-like thymomas were of special interest and had an unpredictable course, some patients surviving many years after what was regarded as inadequate treatment. The place of radiotherapy as a pre- or post-operative agent complementary to surgery is discussed. Images PMID:6033387

  2. Salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Speight, P M; Barrett, A W

    2002-09-01

    Salivary gland tumours are a relatively rare and morphologically diverse group of lesions. Although most clinicians and pathologists will have encountered the more common benign neoplasms, few have experience of the full range of salivary cancers, which are best managed in specialist centres. This review considers some current areas of difficulty and controversy in the diagnosis and management of these neoplasms. The classification of these lesions is complex, encompassing nearly 40 different entities, but precise classification and terminology is essential for an accurate diagnosis and for the allocation of tumours to prognostic groups. For many salivary tumours diagnosis is straightforward but the wide range of morphological diversity between and within tumour types means that a diagnosis may not be possible on small incisional biopsies and careful consideration of the clinical and pathological features together is essential. Although tumour grading is important and helpful, it is not an independent prognostic indicator and must be considered in the context of stage. Large malignancies tend to have a poor prognosis regardless of grade and even high-grade neoplasms may do well when they are small. A helpful guide to management of salivary cancers is the '4 cm rule'.

  3. Immunology of naturally transmissible tumours

    PubMed Central

    Siddle, Hannah V; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Naturally transmissible tumours can emerge when a tumour cell gains the ability to pass as an infectious allograft between individuals. The ability of these tumours to colonize a new host and to cross histocompatibility barriers contradicts our understanding of the vertebrate immune response to allografts. Two naturally occurring contagious cancers are currently active in the animal kingdom, canine transmissible venereal tumour (CTVT), which spreads among dogs, and devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), among Tasmanian devils. CTVT are generally not fatal as a tumour-specific host immune response controls or clears the tumours after transmission and a period of growth. In contrast, the growth of DFTD tumours is not controlled by the Tasmanian devil's immune system and the disease causes close to 100% mortality, severely impacting the devil population. To avoid the immune response of the host both DFTD and CTVT use a variety of immune escape strategies that have similarities to many single organism tumours, including MHC loss and the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines. However, both tumours appear to have a complex interaction with the immune system of their respective host, which has evolved over the relatively long life of these tumours. The Tasmanian devil is struggling to survive with the burden of this disease and it is only with an understanding of how DFTD passes between individuals that a vaccine might be developed. Further, an understanding of how these tumours achieve natural transmissibility should provide insights into general mechanisms of immune escape that emerge during tumour evolution. PMID:25187312

  4. Parallel evolution of tumour subclones mimics diversity between tumours.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A; Rowan, Andrew J; Joshi, Tejal; Fisher, Rosalie; Larkin, James; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2013-08-01

    Intratumour heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumour adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicine approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumour (intratumour heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumours (intertumour heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, we obtained 48 biopsies from eight stage III and IV clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and used DNA copy-number analyses to compare biopsies from the same tumour with 440 single tumour biopsies from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of TCGA and multi-region ccRCC samples revealed segregation of samples from the same tumour into unrelated clusters; 25% of multi-region samples appeared more similar to unrelated samples than to any other sample originating from the same tumour. We found that the majority of recurrent DNA copy number driver aberrations in single biopsies were not present ubiquitously in late-stage ccRCCs and were likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumour progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumours may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumours reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumour sampling bias and impact upon tumour progression and clinical outcome.

  5. Parallel evolution of tumour subclones mimics diversity between tumours.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A; Rowan, Andrew J; Joshi, Tejal; Fisher, Rosalie; Larkin, James; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2013-08-01

    Intratumour heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumour adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicine approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumour (intratumour heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumours (intertumour heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, we obtained 48 biopsies from eight stage III and IV clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and used DNA copy-number analyses to compare biopsies from the same tumour with 440 single tumour biopsies from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of TCGA and multi-region ccRCC samples revealed segregation of samples from the same tumour into unrelated clusters; 25% of multi-region samples appeared more similar to unrelated samples than to any other sample originating from the same tumour. We found that the majority of recurrent DNA copy number driver aberrations in single biopsies were not present ubiquitously in late-stage ccRCCs and were likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumour progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumours may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumours reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumour sampling bias and impact upon tumour progression and clinical outcome. PMID:23716380

  6. Primary retroperitoneal tumours and cysts.

    PubMed

    Bors, G; Polyák, L; Frang, D

    1986-01-01

    The authors give a summarizing report on retroperitoneal tumours and cysts. They review the origin and classification of tumours and cysts, their diagnostic and differential diagnostic possibilities as well as the therapeutic measures. Finally, their own 3 cases are reported.

  7. Tumour Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Laura; Baker, Ann-Marie; Graham, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    The population of cells that make up a cancer are manifestly heterogeneous at the genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic levels. In this mini-review, we summarise the extent of intra-tumour heterogeneity (ITH) across human malignancies, review the mechanisms that are responsible for generating and maintaining ITH, and discuss the ramifications and opportunities that ITH presents for cancer prognostication and treatment. PMID:26973786

  8. Elastosis in malignant tumours.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, C; Greeff, H; Murray, J F; Posen, J; Schmaman, A

    1985-07-01

    Elastosis is common in infiltrating ductal and lobular carcinomas of the breast, occurring in approximately 90% of cases. It is also well described in some benign lesions of the breast and tumours of the salivary gland. Reports of venous elastosis in association with large-bowel carcinomas are rare. We describe elastosis in single cases of prostatic, gastric, bronchiolar-alveolar and cervical carcinoma.

  9. Tumour response and morphological changes of acoustic neurinomas after radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Valentino, V; Raimondi, A J

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-seven of the 1560 patients treated by radiosurgery during the period 1984-1993 had acoustic neurinomas. Four cases were excluded from this study because they had a follow-up of less than 2 years. There were 24 neurinomas treated in 23 patients as one patient had a bilateral tumour. Seven patients underwent radiosurgery for a recurrent tumour (already operated on once or twice), while it was the first treatment for 16 patients. The tumour volume ranged from 1.99 cm3 to 18.30 cm3, and the patient follow-up was from 2 to 8 years. To determine the target on CT/NMR for linear accelerator stereotactic irradiation, the Greitz-Bergström non-invasive head fixation device was used. It was again adopted for subsequent serial imaging, and for repeat radiosurgery when necessary. The total peripheral tumour dose ranged from 12 to 45 Gy. In 9 patients there was a reduction in tumour volume varying from 39 to 100%, while 14 of the neurinomas appeared stable after an average follow-up of 3 years. In one patient there was an increase in size of the tumour. Variable morphological changes were present in 66% of the neurinomas treated. Radiosurgery is indicated as an alternative to microsurgery for inoperable patients and for those who refuse surgery, for recurrent tumours, and as a post-operative complementary treatment for partially removed tumours. A gradual approach to radiosurgery, depending on tumour response, allows a greater efficacy with minimal risk. In the present series no complications were observed. Hearing was preserved at almost the same level as that prior to radiosurgery in all patients.

  10. Delayed expression of hpS2 and prolonged expression of CIP1/WAF1/SDI1 in human tumour cells irradiated with X-rays, fission neutrons or 1 GeV/nucleon Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcer-Kubiczek, E. K.; Zhang, X. F.; Harrison, G. H.; Zhou, X. J.; Vigneulle, R. M.; Ove, R.; McCready, W. A.; Xu, J. F.

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Differences in gene expression underlie the phenotypic differences between irradiated and unirradiated cells. The goal was to identify late-transcribed genes following irradiations differing in quality, and to determine the RBE of 1 GeV/n Fe ions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clonogenic assay was used to determine the RBE of Fe ions. Differential hybridization to cDNA target clones was used to detect differences in expression of corresponding genes in mRNA samples isolated from MCF7 cells irradiated with iso-survival doses of Fe ions (0 or 2.5 Gy) or fission neutrons (0 or 1.2 Gy) 7 days earlier. Northern analysis was used to confirm differential expression of cDNA-specific mRNA and to examine expression kinetics up to 2 weeks after irradiation. RESULTS: Fe ion RBE values were between 2.2 and 2.6 in the lines examined. Two of 17 differentially expressed cDNA clones were characterized. hpS2 mRNA was elevated from 1 to 14 days after irradiation, whereas CIP1/WAF1/SDI1 remained elevated from 3 h to 14 days after irradiation. Induction of hpS2 mRNA by irradiation was independent of p53, whereas induction of CIP1/WAF1/SDI1 was observed only in wild-type p53 lines. CONCLUSIONS: A set of coordinately regulated genes, some of which are independent of p53, is associated with change in gene expression during the first 2 weeks post-irradiation.

  11. Laryngeal solitary fibrous tumour.

    PubMed

    Stomeo, Francesco; Padovani, Davide; Bozzo, Corrado; Pastore, Antonio

    2007-09-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFT) are rare neoplasms, with an uncommon laryngeal involvement. Only five cases of laryngeal localization have been described in literature. The following is a case of a 75-year-old man with a supraglottic neoplasm of the larynx; after the biopsy immunohistochemical study demonstrated a strong positivity for vimentin, CD34 and Bcl-2. The neoplasm was consequently classified as a SFT. CO(2) laser surgery of the supraglottic larynx, with a wide excision of the neoplasm, was performed. Twenty-four months on, the patient is alive, well and free of disease. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for laryngeal SFT, but tumour-free resection margins must be achieved to prevent the possibility of local recurrence. Endoscopic resection by means of the CO(2) laser must be accurately planned with MRI or CT imaging to confirm of this kind of surgery.

  12. Electrochemotherapy of Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sersa, Gregor; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2008-01-01

    Electrochemotherapy is a combined use of certain chemotherapeutic drugs and electric pulses applied to the treated tumour nodule. Local application of electric pulses to the tumour increases drug delivery into cells, specifically at the site of electric pulse application. Drug uptake by delivery of electric pulses is increased for only those chemotherapeutic drugs whose transport through the plasma membrane is impeded. Among many drugs that have been tested so far, bleomycin and cisplatin found their way from preclinical testing to clinical use. Clinical data collected within a number of clinical studies indicate that approximately 80% of the treated cutaneous and subcutaneous tumour nodules of different malignancies are in an objective response, from these, approximately 70% in complete response after a single application of electrochemotherapy. Usually only one treatment is needed, however, electrochemotherapy can be repeated several times every few weeks with equal effectiveness each time. The treatment results in an effective eradication of the treated nodules, with a good cosmetic effect without tissue scarring. PMID:19229171

  13. Clinical features of gastroenteropancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) endocrine tumours (carcinoids and pancreatic islet cell tumours) are composed of multipotent neuroendocrine cells that exhibit a unique ability to produce, store, and secrete biologically active substances and cause distinct clinical syndromes. The classification of GEP tumours as functioning or non-functioning is based on the presence of symptoms that accompany these syndromes secondary to the secretion of hormones, neuropeptides and/or neurotransmitters (functioning tumours). Non-functioning tumours are considered to be neoplasms of neuroendocrine differentiation that are not associated with obvious symptoms attributed to the hypersecretion of metabolically active substances. However, a number of these tumours are either capable of producing low levels of such substances, which can be detected by immunohistochemistry but are insufficient to cause symptoms related to a clinical syndrome, or alternatively, they may secrete substances that are either metabolically inactive or inappropriately processed. In some cases, GEP tumours are not associated with the production of any hormone or neurotransmitter. Both functioning and non-functioning tumours can also produce symptoms due to mass effects compressing vital surrounding structures. Gastroenteropancreatic tumours are usually classified further according to the anatomic site of origin: foregut (including respiratory tract, thymus, stomach, duodenum, and pancreas), midgut (including small intestine, appendix, and right colon), and hindgut (including transverse colon, sigmoid, and rectum). Within these subgroups the biological and clinical characteristics of the tumours vary considerably, but this classification is still in use because a significant number of previous studies, mainly observational, have used it extensively. PMID:26516377

  14. Therapeutic inhibition of TRF1 impairs the growth of p53-deficient K-RasG12V-induced lung cancer by induction of telomeric DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    García-Beccaria, María; Martínez, Paula; Méndez-Pertuz, Marinela; Martínez, Sonia; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Cañamero, Marta; Mulero, Francisca; Ambrogio, Chiara; Flores, Juana M; Megias, Diego; Barbacid, Mariano; Pastor, Joaquín; Blasco, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are considered anti-cancer targets, as telomere maintenance above a minimum length is necessary for cancer growth. Telomerase abrogation in cancer-prone mouse models, however, only decreased tumor growth after several mouse generations when telomeres reach a critically short length, and this effect was lost upon p53 mutation. Here, we address whether induction of telomere uncapping by inhibition of the TRF1 shelterin protein can effectively block cancer growth independently of telomere length. We show that genetic Trf1 ablation impairs the growth of p53-null K-RasG12V-induced lung carcinomas and increases mouse survival independently of telomere length. This is accompanied by induction of telomeric DNA damage, apoptosis, decreased proliferation, and G2 arrest. Long-term whole-body Trf1 deletion in adult mice did not impact on mouse survival and viability, although some mice showed a moderately decreased cellularity in bone marrow and blood. Importantly, inhibition of TRF1 binding to telomeres by small molecules blocks the growth of already established lung carcinomas without affecting mouse survival or tissue function. Thus, induction of acute telomere uncapping emerges as a potential new therapeutic target for lung cancer. PMID:25971796

  15. Maslinic Acid, a Natural Triterpene, Induces a Death Receptor-Mediated Apoptotic Mechanism in Caco-2 p53-Deficient Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Zurita, Fernando J.; Rufino-Palomares, Eva E.; García-Salguero, Leticia; Peragón, Juan; Medina, Pedro P.; Parra, Andrés; Cascante, Marta; Lupiáñez, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Maslinic acid (MA) is a natural triterpene present in high concentrations in the waxy skin of olives. We have previously reported that MA induces apoptotic cell death via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in HT29 colon cancer cells. Here, we show that MA induces apoptosis in Caco-2 colon cancer cells via the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in a dose-dependent manner. MA triggered a series of effects associated with apoptosis, including the cleavage of caspases -8 and -3, and increased the levels of t-Bid within a few hours of its addition to the culture medium. MA had no effect on the expression of the Bax protein, release of cytochrome-c or on the mitochondrial membrane potential. This suggests that MA triggered the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in this cell type, as opposed to the intrinsic pathway found in the HT29 colon-cancer cell line. Our results suggest that the apoptotic mechanism induced in Caco-2 may be different from that found in HT29 colon-cancer cells, and that in Caco-2 cells MA seems to work independently of p53. Natural antitumoral agents capable of activating both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways could be of great use in treating colon-cancer of whatever origin. PMID:26751572

  16. Therapeutic inhibition of TRF1 impairs the growth of p53-deficient K-RasG12V-induced lung cancer by induction of telomeric DNA damage.

    PubMed

    García-Beccaria, María; Martínez, Paula; Méndez-Pertuz, Marinela; Martínez, Sonia; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Cañamero, Marta; Mulero, Francisca; Ambrogio, Chiara; Flores, Juana M; Megias, Diego; Barbacid, Mariano; Pastor, Joaquín; Blasco, Maria A

    2015-05-13

    Telomeres are considered anti-cancer targets, as telomere maintenance above a minimum length is necessary for cancer growth. Telomerase abrogation in cancer-prone mouse models, however, only decreased tumor growth after several mouse generations when telomeres reach a critically short length, and this effect was lost upon p53 mutation. Here, we address whether induction of telomere uncapping by inhibition of the TRF1 shelterin protein can effectively block cancer growth independently of telomere length. We show that genetic Trf1 ablation impairs the growth of p53-null K-Ras(G12V)-induced lung carcinomas and increases mouse survival independently of telomere length. This is accompanied by induction of telomeric DNA damage, apoptosis, decreased proliferation, and G2 arrest. Long-term whole-body Trf1 deletion in adult mice did not impact on mouse survival and viability, although some mice showed a moderately decreased cellularity in bone marrow and blood. Importantly, inhibition of TRF1 binding to telomeres by small molecules blocks the growth of already established lung carcinomas without affecting mouse survival or tissue function. Thus, induction of acute telomere uncapping emerges as a potential new therapeutic target for lung cancer.

  17. JNK confers 5-fluorouracil resistance in p53-deficient and mutant p53-expressing colon cancer cells by inducing survival autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Xinbing; Kong, Na; Wang, Xian; Fang, Yong; Hu, Xiaotong; Xu, Yinghua; Chen, Wei; Wang, Kaifeng; Li, Da; Jin, Wei; Lou, Fang; Zheng, Yu; Hu, Hong; Gong, Liu; Zhou, Xiaoyun; Pan, Hongming; Han, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    Deficiency or mutation in the p53 tumor suppressor gene commonly occurs in human cancer and can contribute to disease progression and chemotherapy resistance. Currently, although the pro-survival or pro-death effect of autophagy remains a controversial issue, increasing data seem to support the idea that autophagy facilitates cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy treatment. Here we report that 5-FU treatment causes aberrant autophagosome accumulation in HCT116 p53−/− and HT-29 cancer cells. Specific inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA, CQ or small interfering RNA treatment targeting Atg5 or Beclin 1 can potentiate the re-sensitization of these resistant cancer cells to 5-FU. In further analysis, we show that JNK activation and phosphorylation of Bcl-2 are key determinants in 5-FU-induced autophagy. Inhibition of JNK by the compound SP600125 or JNK siRNA suppressed autophagy and phosphorylation of c-Jun and Bcl-2 but increased 5-FU-induced apoptosis in both HCT116 p53−/− and HT29 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that JNK activation confers 5-FU resistance in HCT116 p53−/− and HT29 cells by promoting autophagy as a pro-survival effect, likely via inducing Bcl-2 phosphorylation. These results provide a promising strategy to improve the efficacy of 5-FU-based chemotherapy for colorectal cancer patients harboring a p53 gene mutation. PMID:24733045

  18. Endocrine disorders following treatment of childhood brain tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Livesey, E. A.; Hindmarsh, P. C.; Brook, C. G.; Whitton, A. C.; Bloom, H. J.; Tobias, J. S.; Godlee, J. N.; Britton, J.

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the long-term endocrine effects of treatment on 144 children treated for brain tumours. All received cranial irradiation, 86 also received spinal irradiation and 34 chemotherapy. Almost all patients (140 of 144) had evidence of growth hormone insufficiency. Treatment with growth hormone was effective in maintaining normal growth but could not restore a deficit incurred by delay in instituting treatment. The effect of spinal irradiation on spinal growth was not corrected by growth hormone. As spinal growth makes the major contribution to the pubertal growth spurt and limb length the major contribution to childhood growth, treatment with GH will have maximal effect on leg length if instituted before the onset of puberty. Primary thyroid dysfunction was found in 11 of 47 children (23%) treated with craniospinal irradiation but in none treated with cranial irradiation alone. The incidence rose to 69% of 29 children treated with spinal irradiation and chemotherapy and to 50% of four children treated with cranial irradiation and chemotherapy. This effect of chemotherapy has not previously been reported and was detected by us through measurement of serum TSH concentration. Primary thyroid dysfunction requires treatment with thyroxine to prevent increasing the risk of secondary thyroid tumours. Seven of 20 girls (35%) treated with spinal irradiation had primary ovarian dysfunction as determined by raised gonadotrophin levels. Chemotherapy increased this, but not significantly. Three of 15 boys (20%) treated with chemotherapy had primary testicular dysfunction. Gonadotrophin deficiency occurred in seven boys. Four of 90 children had deficiency of cortisol secretion in response to hypoglycaemia. These results confirm the requirement for long-term follow-up of children treated for brain tumours from the endocrine point of view. Anticipation of hormone deficiencies and replacement treatment can improve the quality of life of survivors. PMID:2109998

  19. Maspin as a Tumour Suppressor in Salivary Gland Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Ashok, Nipun; Sheirawan, Mohammad Kinan; Altamimi, Mohammed Alsakran; Alenzi, Faris; Azzeghaiby, Saleh Nasser; Baroudi, Kusai; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2014-01-01

    Maspin is a protein that belongs to serin protease inhibitor (serpin) superfamily. The purpose of this study was to review the literature concerning the expression of maspin in salivary gland tumours. A literature search was done using MEDLINE, accessed via the National Library of Medicine PubMed interface. Statistical analysis was not done because only seven studies were available in literature, the collected data were different and the results could not be compared. Expression of maspin was down regulated in more aggressive salivary gland tumours. Maspin may function as a tumour suppressor in salivary gland tumours. PMID:25654053

  20. Analysis of tumour cell composition in tumours composed of paired mixtures of mammary tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, B. E.; Miller, F. R.; Wilburn, D. J.; Heppner, G. H.

    1987-01-01

    In order to quantitate the effects of tumour subpopulation interactions, we have devised a method to determine the subpopulation composition of tumours by using paired tumour cell lines able to grow in different selective media. Line 4T07 forms colonies in thioguanine but not in HAT and line 168 forms colonies in HAT but not in thioguanine. An independent technique of determining tumour cell content was used to validate this method: line 168 and 4T07 cells are distinguishable by flow cytometry after staining with propidium iodide for DNA content. Mixtures of cell suspensions prepared from each unmixed tumour, as well as from tumours arising from mixtures of these lines, were analysed by both the colony formation assay and by the DNA content assay. The colony formation assay yielded values in good agreement with the DNA content assay, but was considerably more sensitive in that it was able to quantitate minority subpopulations that constituted less than 10% of the tumour. Both methods revealed that in tumours arising from mixtures, the tumour cells were almost entirely line 4T07, even when the inoculum had contained a high proportion of 168 cells. Since line 168 cells are very tumorigenic per se, these results suggest that line 4T07 cells are capable of interfering with 168 proliferation in mixed tumours, either directly or through a host-mediated mechanism. PMID:3426919

  1. LET-painting increases tumour control probability in hypoxic tumours.

    PubMed

    Bassler, Niels; Toftegaard, Jakob; Lühr, Armin; Sørensen, Brita Singers; Scifoni, Emanuele; Krämer, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver; Mortensen, Lise Saksø; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B

    2014-01-01

    LET-painting was suggested as a method to overcome tumour hypoxia. In vitro experiments have demonstrated a well-established relationship between the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and linear energy transfer (LET), where OER approaches unity for high-LET values. However, high-LET radiation also increases the risk for side effects in normal tissue. LET-painting attempts to restrict high-LET radiation to compartments that are found to be hypoxic, while applying lower LET radiation to normoxic tissues. Methods. Carbon-12 and oxygen-16 ion treatment plans with four fields and with homogeneous dose in the target volume, are applied on an oropharyngeal cancer case with an identified hypoxic entity within the tumour. The target dose is optimised to achieve a tumour control probability (TCP) of 95% when assuming a fully normoxic tissue. Using the same primary particle energy fluence needed for this plan, TCP is recalculated for three cases assuming hypoxia: first, redistributing LET to match the hypoxic structure (LET-painting). Second, plans are recalculated for varying hypoxic tumour volume in order to investigate the threshold volume where TCP can be established. Finally, a slight dose boost (5-20%) is additionally allowed in the hypoxic subvolume to assess its impact on TCP. Results. LET-painting with carbon-12 ions can only achieve tumour control for hypoxic subvolumes smaller than 0.5 cm(3). Using oxygen-16 ions, tumour control can be achieved for tumours with hypoxic subvolumes of up to 1 or 2 cm(3). Tumour control can be achieved for tumours with even larger hypoxic subvolumes, if a slight dose boost is allowed in combination with LET-painting. Conclusion. Our findings clearly indicate that a substantial increase in tumour control can be achieved when applying the LET-painting concept using oxygen-16 ions on hypoxic tumours, ideally with a slight dose boost.

  2. VEGF targets the tumour cell.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2013-12-01

    The function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cancer is not limited to angiogenesis and vascular permeability. VEGF-mediated signalling occurs in tumour cells, and this signalling contributes to key aspects of tumorigenesis, including the function of cancer stem cells and tumour initiation. In addition to VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases, the neuropilins are crucial for mediating the effects of VEGF on tumour cells, primarily because of their ability to regulate the function and the trafficking of growth factor receptors and integrins. This has important implications for our understanding of tumour biology and for the development of more effective therapeutic approaches.

  3. Brain Tumours Simulating Psychiatric Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, G. E.

    1963-01-01

    Brain tumours may present with symptoms indistinguishable from psychiatric disease. The impression of most psychiatrists is that individuals suffering from brain tumour rarely appear among their patients. A priori reasoning based on evidence from neurological, neurosurgical and pathological sources suggests the contrary. The present study is a frequency analysis of cases of previously undiagnosed brain tumours admitted to either an open psychoneurotic ward or a mental hospital over a period of 15 years. The results support the impression held by psychiatrists that brain tumours are uncommon among psychiatric patients. PMID:13954870

  4. Investigation on nanoparticle distribution for thermal ablation of a tumour subjected to nanoparticle assisted thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Soni, Sanjeev; Tyagi, Himanshu; Taylor, Robert A; Kumar, Amod

    2014-07-01

    This study investigates the effect of the distribution of nanoparticles delivered to a skin tumour for the thermal ablation conditions attained during thermal therapy. Ultimate aim is to define a distribution of nanoparticles as well as a combination of other therapeutic parameters to attain thermal ablation temperatures (50-60 °C) within whole of the tumour region. Three different cases of nanoparticle distributions are analysed under controlled conditions for all other parameters viz. irradiation intensity and duration, and volume fraction of nanoparticles. Results show that distribution of nanoparticles into only the periphery of tumour resulted in desired thermal ablation temperature in whole of tumour. For the tumour size considered in this study, an irradiation intensity of 1.25 W/cm(2) for duration of 300 s and a nanoparticle volume fraction of 0.001% was optimal to attain a temperature of ≥53 °C within the whole tumour region. It is concluded that distribution of nanoparticles in peripheral region of tumour, along with a controlled combination of other parameters, seems favourable and provides a promising pathway for thermal ablation of a tumour subjected to nanoparticle assisted thermal therapy.

  5. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  6. Dural invasion by pituitary tumours.

    PubMed

    Shaffi, O M; Wrightson, P

    1975-04-23

    In 12 cases of pituitary tumour the dura mater of the sella turcica or diaphragma sellae in contact with the tumour was examined histologically. In nine cases tumour cells were found lying deep in the substance of the dura. Dura from the sella of seven subjects without pituitary disease, obtianed at autopsy, showed no inclusions of pituitary tissue. Four of the cases studied were known before death to suffer from an invasive pituitary adenoma. Of eight surviving cases operated upon in the last two years, five showed dural invasion by tumour. The present report suggests that the condition may be more frequent than expected and that with more study it may provide an index of prognosis. It also defines a requirement for the surgeon aiming to prevent recurrence of tumour after operation or to achieve a complete endocrine ablation.

  7. In vivo photothermal tumour ablation using gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas, L. F.; Zanelatto, L. C.; Mantovani, M. S.; Silva, P. B. G.; Ceccini, R.; Grecco, C.; Moriyama, L. T.; Kurachi, C.; Martins, V. C. A.; Plepis, A. M. G.

    2013-06-01

    Less invasive and more effective cancer treatments have been the aim of research in recent decades, e.g. photothermal tumour ablation using gold nanorods. In this study we investigate the cell death pathways activated, and confirm the possibility of CTAB-coated nanoparticle use in vivo. Nanorods were synthesized by the seeding method; some of them were centrifuged and washed to eliminate soluble CTAB. The MTT cytotoxicity test was performed to evaluate cytotoxicity, and the particles’ viability after their synthesis was assessed. Once it had been observed that centrifuged and washed nanorods are harmless, and that nanoparticles must be used within 48 h after their synthesis, in vivo hyperthermic treatment was performed. After irradiation, a tumour biopsy was subjected to a chemiluminescence assay to evaluate membrane lipoperoxidation, and to a TRAP assay to evaluate total antioxidant capacity. There was a 47 ° C rise in temperature observed at the tumour site. Animals irradiated with a laser (with or without nanorods) showed similar membrane lipoperoxidation, more intense than in control animals. The antioxidant capacity of experimental animal tumours was elevated. Our results indicate that necrosis is possibly the cell death pathway activated in this case, and that nanorod treatment is worthwhile.

  8. Growth and hormonal status of children treated for brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Shalet, S M

    1982-01-01

    The adult survivors of the treatment of brain tumours in childhood are often short. Several adverse factors contribute to the impaired growth of these children including growth hormone (GH) deficiency, impaired spinal growth following spinal irradiation, chemotherapy, poor nutritional intake and recurrent tumour. The GH deficiency is due to radiation-induced damage to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. GH is always the first pituitary hormone to be affected by such radiation damage but panhypopituitarism may occur if the radiation dose is sufficiently great. Preliminary results suggest that GH therapy will improve the growth rate of children with radiation-induced GH deficiency. Additional endocrine complications, which may occur following spinal irradiation, include thyroid dysfunction and ovarian failure due to direct radiation damage to the thyroid and the ovary.

  9. Heavy ion tumour therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, M.

    2000-03-01

    Ion beams represent a promising radiotherapy modality for the treatment of deep seated tumours. Compared to conventional photon beams, in particular beams of heavier ions like e.g. carbon show several advantages which are related to their different physical and radiobiological properties: The dose increases with penetration depth and shows a sharp distal fall off at the end of the particle range, i.e., the depth dose profile is inverted compared to photon beams. They exhibit an increased biological effectiveness in particular at the end of their range and thus in the target volume. The spatial distribution of stopping particles can be monitored by means of PET-techniques making use of the small amount of radioactive projectile fragments. Ion beams were first used for medical applications in 1954 in Berkeley. Since then, several treatment facilities for tumour therapy have been established worldwide, and approximately 25 000 patients have been treated with protons and 3000 patients with heavier ions successfully. As an example, the specific advantages of the heavy ion therapy facility at GSI Darmstadt established in cooperation with the Radiological Clinics and DKFZ Heidelberg and FZ Rossendorf will be described. In contrast to most existing facilities, it is based on an active beam delivery system, using magnetic deflection of a pencil beam (raster scan) and accelerator energy variation to adjust the penetration depth. Thus, an optimal conformation of the dose to the target volume is achieved. PET-measurements allow for a quasi on-line monitoring of the 3D distribution of stopping particles and in particular of the position of the distal edge of the dose distribution. Furthermore, in the treatment planning procedure the radiobiological properties of ion beams are taken into account in great detail. In December 1997, patient treatments started at GSI, and up to now 42 patients were treated with carbon ions alone or in a mixed carbon/photon beam regime.

  10. Benign cardiac tumours, malignant arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kimberley A; Wong, Kenny K; Tipple, Marion; Sanatani, Shubhayan

    2010-01-01

    Four cases of pediatric cardiac tumours (PCTs) associated with ventricular arrhythmias are reported. Sudden cardiac death attributable to the tumour occurred in two children. A third child received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator and the fourth had persistent ventricular arrhythmia despite medical therapy. Most PCTs are considered benign; however, the development of malignant arrhythmias may complicate the management of these tumours in some patients. The literature regarding the arrhythmogenic potential of PCTs and the use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in these patients is reviewed. The series highlights the deficiency of prognostic information for this cohort. PMID:20151061

  11. Malignant tumours of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Ryska, M; Hrabal, P

    2015-12-01

    No comprehensive knowledge of duodenal tumours exists in the current literature; individual types of malignant tumours may be described within malignancies of the small bowel, sets of case reports, or individual cases. Ampullary carcinomas are the exception and they are detailed in the current WHO histological classification of tumours of digestive system. Neither national nor international literature sources provide a comprehensive review of their therapy. The situation is similar when searching for surgical procedures. Resection procedures on the duodenum should thus be performed in specialized centres with sufficient experience with hepato-pancreato-biliary surgery. PMID:26767899

  12. Intra-tumoural microvessel density in human solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, J; Byers, R; Jayson, G C

    2002-01-01

    Over the last decade assessment of angiogenesis has emerged as a potentially useful biological prognostic and predictive factor in human solid tumours. With the development of highly specific endothelial markers that can be assessed in histological archival specimens, several quantitative studies have been performed in various solid tumours. The majority of published studies have shown a positive correlation between intra-tumoural microvessel density, a measure of tumour angiogenesis, and prognosis in solid tumours. A minority of studies have not demonstrated an association and this may be attributed to significant differences in the methodologies employed for sample selection, immunostaining techniques, vessel counting and statistical analysis, although a number of biological differences may account for the discrepancy. In this review we evaluate the quantification of angiogenesis by immunohistochemistry, the relationship between tumour vascularity and metastasis, and the clinicopathological studies correlating intra-tumoral microvessel density with prognosis and response to anti-cancer therapy. In view of the extensive nature of this retrospective body of data, comparative studies are needed to identify the optimum technique and endothelial antigens (activated or pan-endothelial antigens) but subsequently prospective studies that allocate treatment on the basis of microvessel density are required. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1566–1577. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600315 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12085206

  13. Rewiring macrophages for anti-tumour immunity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yunqin; Biswas, Subhra K

    2016-06-28

    Tumour-associated macrophages facilitate cancer progression, but whether they can be reprogrammed to elicit an anti-tumour response remains unclear. Deletion of the microRNA-processing enzyme Dicer is now shown to rewire macrophages to an anti-tumour mode, leading to an enhanced response to immunotherapy and inhibition of tumour progression. PMID:27350442

  14. Embryonic Medaka Model of Microglia in the Developing CNS Allowing In Vivo Analysis of Their Spatiotemporal Recruitment in Response to Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Takako; Oda, Shoji; Hibi, Yusuke; Satoh, Satomi; Nagata, Kento; Hirakawa, Kei; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Sagara, Hiroshi; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is pivotal in the treatment of many central nervous system (CNS) pathologies; however, exposure to RT in children is associated with a higher risk of secondary CNS tumors. Although recent research interest has focused on the reparative and therapeutic role of microglia, their recruitment following RT has not been elucidated, especially in the developing CNS. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal dynamics of microglia during tissue repair in the irradiated embryonic medaka brain by whole-mount in situ hybridization using a probe for Apolipoprotein E (ApoE), a marker for activated microglia in teleosts. Three-dimensional imaging of the distribution of ApoE-expressing microglia in the irradiated embryonic brain clearly showed that ApoE-expressing microglia were abundant only in the late phase of phagocytosis during tissue repair induced by irradiation, while few microglia expressed ApoE in the initial phase of phagocytosis. This strongly suggests that ApoE has a significant function in the late phase of phagocytosis by microglia in the medaka brain. In addition, the distribution of microglia in p53-deficient embryos at the late phase of phagocytosis was almost the same as in wild-type embryos, despite the low numbers of irradiation-induced apoptotic neurons, suggesting that constant numbers of activated microglia were recruited at the late phase of phagocytosis irrespective of the extent of neuronal injury. This medaka model of microglia demonstrated specific recruitment after irradiation in the developing CNS and could provide a useful potential therapeutic strategy to counteract the detrimental effects of RT. PMID:26061282

  15. Leydig cell tumours in childhood.

    PubMed

    Mengel, W; Knorr, D

    1983-01-01

    Two cases of Leydig cell tumours in childhood are presented. In one case, delayed diagnosis and operation led to pubertas praecox vera whereas in the other case normal growth and development occurred after early diagnosis and operation. PMID:6878724

  16. A rare benign ovarian tumour.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro, Marta Morna; Cunha, Teresa Margarida; Loureiro, Ana Luisa; Esteves, Gonçalo

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumour (SST) of the ovary is an extremely rare and benign ovarian neoplasm, accounting for 6% of the sex cord stromal ovarian tumours subtype. Usually, it is found during the second and third decades of life. Patients commonly present with pelvic pain, a palpable pelvic mass or menstrual irregularity. We report a case of a 20-year-old woman reporting of mild pelvic pain, with normal laboratory data. On imaging examinations, a large right adnexal tumour was found, with features suggesting an ovarian sex cord tumour. The patient underwent right salpingo-oophorectomy, diagnosing a SST of the ovary. This paper also reviews the literature, and emphasises the typical pathological and imaging characteristics of these rare benign ovarian lesions, and their impact, in a conservative surgery. PMID:26933186

  17. Multicellular Streaming in Solid Tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kas, Josef

    As early as 400 BCE, the Roman medical encyclopaedist Celsus recognized that solid tumours are stiffer than surrounding tissue. However, cancer cell lines are softer, and softer cells facilitate invasion. This paradox raises several questions: Does softness emerge from adaptation to mechanical and chemical cues in the external microenvironment, or are soft cells already present inside a primary solid tumour? If the latter, how can a more rigid tissue contain more soft cells? Here we show that in primary tumour samples from patients with mammary and cervix carcinomas, cells do exhibit a broad distribution of rigidities, with a higher fraction of softer and more contractile cells compared to normal tissue. Mechanical modelling based on patient data reveals that, surprisingly, tumours with a significant fraction of very soft cells can still remain rigid. Moreover, in tissues with the observed distributions of cell stiffnesses, softer cells spontaneously self-organize into lines or streams, possibly facilitating cancer metastasis.

  18. Tumour of the juxtaoral organ.

    PubMed

    Bénateau, H; Rigau, V; Comoz, F; Benchemam, Y; Galateau, F; Compère, J F

    2003-02-01

    The juxtaoral organ is a normal and constant structure of the oral cavity. It consists of benign epithelial nests. We describe an intraoral tumour of the juxtaoral organ in a child. The tumour was not diagnosed after clinical and radiological examinations because it is extremely rare. A histological examination revealed a tumour of the juxtaoral organ, presumed to be neuroid hamartoma. This is only the second time that a tumour of the juxtaoral organ has been described in a child. We also describe the location, the embryology, the histology and the function of this organ. This is important because this structure can be confused with carcinomas of the oral cavity when examining frozen sections.

  19. Pituitary tumours: acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Chanson, Philippe; Salenave, Sylvie; Kamenicky, Peter; Cazabat, Laure; Young, Jacques

    2009-10-01

    Excessive production of the growth hormone (GH) is responsible for acromegaly. It is related to a pituitary GH-secreting adenoma in most cases. Prevalence is estimated 40-130 per million inhabitants. It is characterised by slowly progressive acquired somatic disfigurement (mainly involving the face and extremities) and systemic manifestations. The rheumatologic, cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic consequences determine its prognosis. The diagnosis is confirmed by an increased serum GH concentration, unsuppressible by an oral glucose load and by detection of increased levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Treatment is aimed at correcting (or preventing) tumour compression by excising the disease-causing lesion, and at reducing GH and IGF-I levels to normal values. When surgery, the usual first-line treatment, fails to correct GH/IGF-I hypersecretion, medical treatment with somatostatin analogues and/or radiotherapy can be used. The GH-receptor antagonist (pegvisomant) is helpful in patients who are resistant to somatostatin analogues. Thanks to this multistep therapeutic strategy, adequate hormonal disease control is achieved in most cases, allowing a normal life expectancy. PMID:19945023

  20. Imaging of skull base tumours.

    PubMed

    Thust, Stefanie Catherine; Yousry, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    The skull base is a highly complex and difficult to access anatomical region, which constitutes a relatively common site for neoplasms. Imaging plays a central role in establishing the differential diagnosis, to determine the anatomic tumour spread and for operative planning. All skull base imaging should be performed using thin-section multiplanar imaging, whereby CT and MRI can be considered complimentary. An interdisciplinary team approach is central to improve the outcome of these challenging tumours.

  1. MRI characteristics of midbrain tumours.

    PubMed

    Sun, B; Wang, C C; Wang, J

    1999-03-01

    We diagnosed 60 cases of midbrain tumours by MRI between 1993 to 1997. There were 39 males and 21 females, aged 2-64 years, mean 25.6 years. We found 38 patients with true intramedullary mid-brain tumours, 11 predominantly in the tectum, 20 in the tegmentum and 7 with a downward extension to the pons; there were 7 within the cerebral aqueduct. There were 22 patients with infiltrating midbrain tumours extending from adjacent structures, 11 cases each from the thalamus and pineal region. All patients received surgical treatment. Gross total resection was achieved in 42 cases, subtotal (> 75 %) resection in 18. Pathological diagnoses included 16 low-grade and 15 high-grade astrocytomas; 5 oligodendroastrocytomas; 2 ependymomas; 11 glioblastomas; and 11 pineal parenchymal or germ-cell tumours. Midbrain tumours are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, with wide variation in clinical and MRI features, related to the site and type of tumour. MRI not only allows precise analysis of their growth pattern, but also can lead to a correct preoperative diagnosis in the majority of cases.

  2. Therapy-induced tumour secretomes promote resistance and tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Obenauf, Anna C.; Zou, Yilong; Ji, Andrew L.; Vanharanta, Sakari; Shu, Weiping; Shi, Hubing; Kong, Xiangju; Bosenberg, Marcus C.; Wiesner, Thomas; Rosen, Neal; Lo, Roger S.; Massagué, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance invariably limits the clinical efficacy of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors against cancer1,2. Here we show that targeted therapy with BRAF, ALK, or EGFR kinase inhibitors induces a complex network of secreted signals in drug-stressed melanoma and lung adenocarcinoma cells. This therapy-induced secretome (TIS) stimulates the outgrowth, dissemination, and metastasis of drug-resistant cancer cell clones and supports the survival of drug-sensitive cancer cells, contributing to incomplete tumour regression. The vemurafenib reactive secretome in melanoma is driven by down-regulation of the transcription factor FRA1. In situ transcriptome analysis of drug-resistant melanoma cells responding to the regressing tumour microenvironment revealed hyperactivation of multiple signalling pathways, most prominently the AKT pathway. Dual inhibition of RAF and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways blunted the outgrowth of the drug-resistant cell population in BRAF mutant melanoma tumours, suggesting this combination therapy as a strategy against tumour relapse. Thus, therapeutic inhibition of oncogenic drivers induces vast secretome changes in drug-sensitive cancer cells, paradoxically establishing a tumour microenvironment that supports the expansion of drug-resistant clones, but is susceptible to combination therapy. PMID:25807485

  3. Multiple tumours in survival estimates.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Stefano; De Angelis, Roberta; Ciccolallo, Laura; Carrani, Eugenio; Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Grande, Enrico; Zigon, Giulia; Brenner, Hermann

    2009-04-01

    In international comparisons of cancer registry based survival it is common practice to restrict the analysis to first primary tumours and exclude multiple cancers. The probability of correctly detecting subsequent cancers depends on the registry's running time, which results in different proportions of excluded patients and may lead to biased comparisons. We evaluated the impact on the age-standardised relative survival estimates of also including multiple primary tumours. Data from 2,919,023 malignant cancers from 69 European cancer registries participating in the EUROCARE-4 collaborative study were used. A total of 183,683 multiple primary tumours were found, with an overall proportion of 6.3% over all the considered cancers, ranging from 0.4% (Naples, Italy) to 12.9% (Iceland). The proportion of multiple tumours varied greatly by type of tumour, being higher for those with high incidence and long survival (breast, prostate and colon-rectum). Five-year relative survival was lower when including patients with multiple cancers. For all cancers combined the average difference was -0.4 percentage points in women and -0.7 percentage points in men, and was greater for older registries. Inclusion of multiple tumours led to lower survival in 44 out of 45 cancer sites analysed, with the greatest differences found for larynx (-1.9%), oropharynx (-1.5%), and penis (-1.3%). Including multiple primary tumours in survival estimates for international comparison is advisable because it reduces the bias due to different observation periods, age, registration quality and completeness of registration. The general effect of inclusion is to reduce survival estimates by a variable amount depending on the proportion of multiple primaries and cancer site.

  4. Tenascin in salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Soini, Y; Pääkkö, P; Virtanen, I; Lehto, V P

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of tenascin immunoreactivity was analysed in salivary gland tissue and in various benign and malignant tumours of the salivary gland. In the non-neoplastic tissue, tenascin was seen in the areas of basement membranes of the ductal epithelium. No immunoreactivity could be observed in the serous or mucous glands. In pleomorphic adenomas, tenascin immunoreactivity could be seen in the stromal compartment. It was more pronounced in the dense stromal areas and chondroid elements than in the myxoid area. In Warthin's tumours, strong tenascin immunoreactivity could be observed in the basement membrane zone of the epithelial component. In the lymphatic component, faint reticular staining could be seen. In adenoid cystic carcinomas, acinic cell tumours and mucoepidermoid carcinomas, tenascin showed a linear stromal distribution. No intracytoplasmic immunoreactivity could be seen in any of the cases. The widespread tenascin positivity in salivary gland tumours suggests that tenascin may play a role in the induction and progression of salivary gland tumours, presumably by interfering with the normal parenchymal-mesenchymal interaction.

  5. Tuberculosis simulating brain tumour.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, U R; Farooq, M; Rauf, F; Bhatti, S K

    2011-06-30

    The purpose of the study is to highlight the varied presentation of tuberculosis (TB) simulating a brain tumour. Headache and seizures are becoming frequent presenting complaints without any history of tuberculosis. The study comprises 1200 patients of both sexes with ages ranging from ten to sixty years. CT scan and MRI brain control with and without contrast medium were the investigations performed in these cases. In some patients Electroencephalography (EEG), cerebral angiography (DSA) and spectroscopy were also performed. The final diagnosis of tuberculosis was made on the basis of craniotomy, stereotactic and burr hole biopsies with histopathology in most of the cases. Forty per cent of the patients were followed up for eight months. They were put on anti-tuberculosis treatment with symptomatic and anti-epileptic drugs. The incidence was 544 and 757 per 100,000 in Africa and Indo Pakistan respectively. The male to female ratio was 1:1. Tuberculosis, especially with CNS involvement, is not only common in immunosuppressed patients in our setting, but TB has been and remains an important public health problem. TB may involve the CNS either as meningitis or as parenchymal granulomas or abscesses. Patients with brain TB usually present with fever, multiple cranial nerve involvement and occasional behavioural changes. CSF findings remain non specific in most cases. The most common sites are the cerebral hemisphere and basal ganglion in adults and the cerebellum in children. Tuberculosis has unique findings on brain CT and MRI. Cortical and subcortical locations are typical whereas the brain stem is a less common site. Tuberculosis lesions are usually solitary but multiple in 10% to 35% of cases. In spite of all these facts some cases of brain TB still need aggressive neurointervention to reach the final diagnosis of brain TB. Tuberculosis in the CNS may manifest in many different ways. So one should always include tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis in the

  6. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-01-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown. PMID:23238442

  7. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    PubMed

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  8. Tumour-targeted delivery of TRAIL using Salmonella typhimurium enhances breast cancer survival in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ganai, S; Arenas, R B; Forbes, N S

    2009-01-01

    Background: An effective cancer therapeutic must selectively target tumours with minimal systemic toxicity. Expression of a cytotoxic protein using Salmonella typhimurium would enable spatial and temporal control of delivery because these bacteria preferentially target tumours over normal tissue. Methods: We engineered non-pathogenic S. typhimurium to secrete murine TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) under the control of the prokaryotic radiation-inducible RecA promoter. The response of the RecA promoter to radiation was measured using fluorometry and immunoblotting. TRAIL toxicity was determined using flow cytometry and by measuring caspase-3 activation. A syngeneic murine tumour model was used to determine bacterial accumulation and the response to expressed TRAIL. Results: After irradiation, engineered S. typhimurium secreted TRAIL, which caused caspase-3-mediated apoptosis and death in 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells in culture. Systemic injection of Salmonella and induction of TRAIL expression using 2 Gy γ-irradiation caused a significant delay in mammary tumour growth and reduced the risk of death by 76% when compared with irradiated controls. Repeated dosing with TRAIL-bearing Salmonella in conjunction with radiation improved the 30-day survival from 0 to 100%. Conclusion: These results show the pre-clinical utility of S. typhimurium as a TRAIL expression vector that effectively reduces tumour growth and extends host survival. PMID:19861961

  9. Tumour endothelial cells in high metastatic tumours promote metastasis via epigenetic dysregulation of biglycan

    PubMed Central

    Maishi, Nako; Ohba, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Alam, Mohammad Towfik; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Inoue, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels are gateways for distant metastasis. Recent studies have revealed that tumour endothelial cells (TECs) demonstrate distinct phenotypes from their normal counterparts. We have demonstrated that features of TECs are different depending on tumour malignancy, suggesting that TECs communicate with surrounding tumour cells. However, the contribution of TECs to metastasis has not been elucidated. Here, we show that TECs actively promote tumour metastasis through a bidirectional interaction between tumour cells and TECs. Co-implantation of TECs isolated from highly metastatic tumours accelerated lung metastases of low metastatic tumours. Biglycan, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan secreted from TECs, activated tumour cell migration via nuclear factor-κB and extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2. Biglycan expression was upregulated by DNA demethylation in TECs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that TECs are altered in their microenvironment and, in turn, instigate tumour cells to metastasize, which is a novel mechanism for tumour metastasis. PMID:27295191

  10. Photodynamic therapy effect in an intraocular retinoblastoma-like tumour assessed by an in vivo to in vitro colony forming assay.

    PubMed Central

    Winther, J.

    1989-01-01

    Cell survival was investigated in an intraocular retinoblastoma-like tumour 30 min to 48 h after photodynamic therapy. The survival of the cells was assessed by an in vivo to in vitro colony forming assay, estimated by either the plating efficiency of the treated tumour cells compared to non-treated cells or the number of clonogenic cells per mg excised tumour. Curves showing cell survival as a function of the time between light irradiation and excision of the intraocular tumours were biphasic. This suggests more than one PDT tissue destruction mechanism in vivo (i.e. an early direct cell damage plus a subsequent late damage occurring in the tumour tissue left in situ after treatment). The delayed mechanism may be due to changes in the environment of the tumours probably caused by vascular damage. Tumour cells sensitised by Photofrin II in vivo and excised from the eyes were damaged by light when irradiated in vitro and this was dependent on the light energy dose. This showed that cellular Photofrin II uptake in the eye tumours was sufficient for direct cell damage and thus supports the suggestion that direct and indirect tumour destruction occurs in this eye tumour after photodynamic therapy. PMID:2525401

  11. Tailored nanoparticles for tumour therapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pei-Shin; Drake, Philip; Cho, Hui-Ju; Kao, Chao-Hung; Lee, Kun-Feng; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Lin, Xi-Zhang; Lin, Yuh-Jiuan

    2012-06-01

    Gd doped iron-oxide nanoparticles were developed for use in tumour therapy via magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). The effect of the Gd3+ dopant on the particle size and magnetic properties was investigated. The final particle composition varied from Gd0.01Fe2.99O4 to Gd0.04Fe2.96O4 as determined by Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). TEM image analysis showed the average magnetic core diameters to be 12 nm and 33 nm for the lowest and highest Gd levels respectively. The specific power adsorption rate (SAR) determined with a field strength of 246 Oe and 52 kHz had a maximum of 38Wg(-1) [Fe] for the Gd0.03Fe2.97O4 sample. This value is about 4 times higher than the reported SAR values for Fe3O4. The potential for in vivo tumour therapy was investigated using a mouse model. The mouse models treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 displayed much slower tumour growth after the first treatment cycle, the tumour had increased its mass by 25% after 7 days post treatment compared to a 79% mass increase over the same period for those models treated with standard iron-oxide or saline solution. After a second treatment cycle the mouse treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 showed complete tumour regression with no tumour found for at least 5 days post treatment. PMID:22905580

  12. A photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome for tumour control and simultaneous inhibition of treatment escape pathways

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Sears, R. Bryan; Zheng, Lei Zak; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles can facilitate multimodal therapies of cancer by promoting tumour-selective drug release. However, few are effective because cancer cells develop ways to resist and evade treatment. Here, we introduce a photoactivatable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome (PMIL) that imparts light-induced cytotoxicity in synchrony with photo-initiated and sustained release of inhibitors that suppress tumour regrowth and treatment escape signalling pathways. The PMIL consists of a nanoliposome doped with a photoactivatable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD) in the lipid bilayer, and a nanoparticle containing cabozantinib (XL184)—a multikinase inhibitor—encapsulated inside. Near infrared tumour irradiation, following intravenous PMIL administration, triggers photodynamic damage of tumour cells and microvessels, and simultaneously initiates release of XL184 inside the tumour. A single PMIL treatment achieves prolonged tumour reduction in two mouse models and suppresses metastatic escape in an orthotopic pancreatic tumour model. The PMIL offers new prospects for cancer therapy by enabling spatiotemporal control of drug release whilst reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities. PMID:26780659

  13. A photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome for tumour control and simultaneous inhibition of treatment escape pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Bryan Sears, R.; Zheng, Lei Zak; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles can facilitate multimodal therapies of cancer by promoting tumour-selective drug release. However, few are effective because cancer cells develop ways to resist and evade treatment. Here, we introduce a photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome (PMIL) that imparts light-induced cytotoxicity in synchrony with a photoinitiated and sustained release of inhibitors that suppress tumour regrowth and treatment escape signalling pathways. The PMIL consists of a nanoliposome doped with a photoactivable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD) in the lipid bilayer, and a nanoparticle containing cabozantinib (XL184)—a multikinase inhibitor—encapsulated inside. Near-infrared tumour irradiation, following intravenous PMIL administration, triggers photodynamic damage of tumour cells and microvessels, and simultaneously initiates release of XL184 inside the tumour. A single PMIL treatment achieves prolonged tumour reduction in two mouse models and suppresses metastatic escape in an orthotopic pancreatic tumour model. The PMIL offers new prospects for cancer therapy by enabling spatiotemporal control of drug release while reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities.

  14. Phyllodes tumour in pregnancy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Way, Jeffrey C.; Culham, Beverley A.

    1998-01-01

    Phyllodes tumour (cystosarcoma phyllodes) is a rare breast tumour that grows rapidly and to a relatively large size, especially during pregnancy. These tumours may be classified as benign, borderline or malignant. They have a high incidence of local recurrence but little tendency to metastasize to distant organs. The question of whether the tumour is hormone dependent remains unresolved. This report describes the case of a patient who had a phyllodes tumour that first became apparent in her 31st week of pregnancy. After enucleation and subsequent wide excision she remained tumour free through a second pregnancy. Although the follow-up period is short, it appears that subsequent pregnancy is not necessarily associated with recurrent or new disease for patients who have had their initial tumour completely excised. The goal for the management of these tumours is complete surgical excision. PMID:9793511

  15. The treatment of sublingual gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Sun, G; Yang, X; Tang, E; Wen, J; Lu, M; Hu, Q

    2010-09-01

    This study assessed the clinical and histological features and therapeutic efficacy of 25 cases of sublingual gland tumours from 1998 to 2008. There were 17 female patients and 8 male, the ratio of females to males was 2.1:1. The mean age was 48.6 years. 4 cases were benign tumours (16%). 21 cases were malignant sublingual gland tumours (84%) and of these, 18 were adenoid cystic carcinoma (86%). Adenoid cystic carcinoma was mainly of the histological type, and the other histological classifications included mucoepidermoid carcinoma, pleomorphic adenoma, myoepithelioma, oncocytoma and polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma. Sublingual gland tumours are rare and most are malignant. For malignant sublingual gland tumours, early diagnosis and aggressive surgical treatment, especially for tumours with nerve involvement, is the key to improving prognosis. Free radial forearm flap or pectoralis major myocutaneous flap are appropriate methods for mouth floor reconstruction. For benign sublingual gland tumours, the resection of tumour and sublingual gland is the preferred treatment.

  16. Multiple cilia suppress tumour formation.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Primary cilia are cellular structures that have important functions in development and disease. The suppression of multiciliate differentiation of choroid plexus precursors, and maintenance of a single primary cilium by Notch1, is now shown to be involved in choroid plexus tumour formation. PMID:27027488

  17. Mixed tumour of the vagina.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, M; Endo, Y; Ishikawa, E; Ushigome, S

    1996-05-01

    A 33-year-old Japanese woman presented with a polypoid 2.5 x 2.5 x 1.9 cm mass located in the posterior wall of the lower vagina. Microscopically, the tumour was composed of benign epithelial and stromal-type elements. Predominant epithelial elements were mucinous glands with squamous metaplasia and islands of mature squamous epithelium. The stromal-type cells showed reticular or short fascicular patterns with a transition to the epithelial elements. There was no dual epithelial-myoepithelial combination in the glands as seen in so-called mixed tumours (pleomorphic adenomas) of the salivary gland. Immunohistochemically, the epithelial elements were strongly positive for cytokeratin, PKK1 and epithelial membrane antigen, while the stromal-type cells co-expressed PKK1 and vimentin. Staining for S-100 protein, muscle actin, alpha-smooth muscle actin, desmin, and CD34 was uniformly negative in the tumour cells. The DNA pattern was diploid. The patient is alive and well without recurrence for 50 months after excision. These results indicate that an epithelial cell proliferation, probably of the remnant vestibular gland, plays a major role in the development of mixed tumours of the vagina.

  18. Tumour vasculature--a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, C. T.; Winslet, M. C.; Bradley, N. J.

    1995-01-01

    The tumour vasculature is vital for the establishment, growth and metastasis of solid tumours. Its physiological properties limit the effectiveness of conventional anti-cancer strategies. Therapeutic approaches directed at the tumour vasculature are reviewed, suggesting the potential of anti-angiogenesis and the targeting of vascular proliferation antigens as cancer treatments. PMID:7543770

  19. Neurosurgical experience with tumours of the pineal region at Clinica Puerta de Hierro.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, J; Ramiro, J; Martínez, R; Bravo, G

    1992-01-01

    The clinicopathological experience with 50 cases of pineal region tumours at Clinica Puerta de Hierro is presented. In this series, 88% of the patients were evaluated by CT-scan. Pineal region tumours make up approximately 0.7% of the intracranial expansive processes in the Spanish population. The largest group of lesions appearing in this localization is that of the germinomas (38%), followed by nontumoural lesions (20%) and tumours generally considered to be of the vicinity, such as meningiomas, gliomas and metastases (18%), tumours of the pineal parenchyma (14%), and non-germinoma germinal tumours (10%). In our series, in addition to an intracranial hypertension syndrome, an ophthalmological and, to a minor degree, an endocrinological syndrome predominate in germ-cell tumours, with a cerebellar syndrome appearing in gliomas of the pineal region. All the patients in the series diagnosed as having a germinoma and treated by irradiation are alive, and free of disease, after follow-up ranging from 2 to 20 years (mean: 8 years). The experience obtained with the present series supports the opinion that, in radiosensitive tumours, surgical resection adds no therapeutic benefit to treatment with radiotherapy alone. We suggest that when dealing with a tumour of the pineal region, CT-scan and clinical assessment now permit an initial selection of patients susceptible to surgery as a first therapeutic option, indicating those patients who, because they are considered to have either a "probable germinoma" or a "tumour of uncertain diagnosis", should undergo stereotaxic biopsy or trial radiotherapy and, only when this has proved a failure, should be subjected to open surgery.

  20. Effect of VEGF receptor inhibitor PTK787/ZK222548 combined with ionizing radiation on endothelial cells and tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Hess, C; Vuong, V; Hegyi, I; Riesterer, O; Wood, J; Fabbro, D; Glanzmann, C; Bodis, S; Pruschy, M

    2001-01-01

    The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor is a major target for anti-angiogenesis-based cancer treatment. Here we report the treatment effect of ionizing radiation in combination with the novel orally bioavailable VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 on endothelial cell proliferation in vitro and with tumour xenografts in vivo. Combined treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with increasing doses of PTK787/ZK222584 and ionizing radiation abrogated VEGF-dependent proliferation in a dose-dependent way, but inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation was not due to apoptosis induction. In vivo, a combined treatment regimen of PTK787/ZK222584 (4 × 100 mg/kg) during 4 consecutive days in combination with ionizing radiation (4 × 3 Gy) exerted a substantial tumour growth delay for radiation-resistant p53-disfunctional tumour xenografts derived from SW480 colon adenocarcinoma cells while each treatment modality alone had only a minimal effect on tumour size and neovascularization. SW480 tumours from animals that received a combined treatment regimen, displayed not only an extended tumour growth delay but also a significant decrease in the number of microvessels in the tumour xenograft. These results support the model of a cooperative antitumoural effect of angiogenesis inhibitor and irradiation and show that the orally bioavailable VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 is suitable for combination therapy with irradiation. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11747347

  1. Kill-painting of hypoxic tumours in charged particle therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tinganelli, Walter; Durante, Marco; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Krämer, Michael; Maier, Andreas; Kraft-Weyrather, Wilma; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Friedrich, Thomas; Scifoni, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    Solid tumours often present regions with severe oxygen deprivation (hypoxia), which are resistant to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Increased radiosensitivity as a function of the oxygen concentration is well described for X-rays. It has also been demonstrated that radioresistance in anoxia is reduced using high-LET radiation rather than conventional X-rays. However, the dependence of the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) on radiation quality in the regions of intermediate oxygen concentrations, those normally found in tumours, had never been measured and biophysical models were based on extrapolations. Here we present a complete survival dataset of mammalian cells exposed to different ions in oxygen concentration ranging from normoxia (21%) to anoxia (0%). The data were used to generate a model of the dependence of the OER on oxygen concentration and particle energy. The model was implemented in the ion beam treatment planning system to prescribe uniform cell killing across volumes with heterogeneous radiosensitivity. The adaptive treatment plans have been validated in two different accelerator facilities, using a biological phantom where cells can be irradiated simultaneously at three different oxygen concentrations. We thus realized a hypoxia-adapted treatment plan, which will be used for painting by voxel of hypoxic tumours visualized by functional imaging. PMID:26596243

  2. Histochemical Phosphatases and Metachromasia in Murine Tumours Induced by Bone Seeking Radionuclides

    PubMed Central

    Bland, M. R.; Loutit, J. F.; Sansom, Janet M.

    1974-01-01

    Tumours induced in mice, either CBA normal and chimaerical, or C3H, by 90Sr or 226Ra or plutonium have been examined histochemically with (1) diazotate fast red violet LB salt in naphthol AS-MX phosphate buffer at pH 8·6 and 5·2, (2) 1: 9 dimethyl methylene blue (Taylor). It is concluded: (a) The diagnosis of osteosarcoma is facilitated with Taylor's Blue which stains osteoid metachromatically. Cells of osteosarcoma, like normal osteoblasts, contain alkaline phosphatase but this may be lost by mutation either in the original tumour or subsequently on passage of the tumour serially to compatible hosts. (b) Osteosarcomata may contain giant-cells of two forms, bizarre tumour cells and osteoclasts; the latter contain acid phosphatase. Osteosarcomata which retain their osteoid on serial passage have few cells containing acid phosphatases. (c) Primitive mesenchymal cell tumours of angiomatous form may occur, if the bone marrow is irradiated, e.g. by 90Sr-90Y and Pu. These tumours lack osteoid and cells interpretable as osteoblasts or osteoclasts (though they destroy bone). (d) Tumours classifiable as fibrosarcomata occur rarely, and may be truly of fibroblastic origin or be mutated osteosarcomata. (e) Lymphomata also occur when the marrow is irradiated (90Sr-90Y and Pu). They may be generalized, when their cells may contain alkaline phosphatase or lack it. They may be localized to abdominal viscera, the reticulo-sarcomatous form, in which case the cells lack alkaline phosphatase. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 3Fig. 5Fig. 8Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 2Fig. 4Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 9Fig. 12 PMID:4133784

  3. Tumours of Oddi: Diagnosis and Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jeppsson, B.; El-Khoury, W.; Hannoun, L.; Frileux, P.; Huguet, C.; Malafosse, M.; Parc, R.

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective review of 56 patients operated upon for tumours of Oddi was performed in order to determine optimal diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Common presenting symptoms were jaundice (86%) and anemia (21%). Mean size of the tumour was 2.3 cm. Five tumours were benign and 51 were malignant. According to the classification of Martin, five were grade I: 10 grade II; 18 grade III; and 18 grade IV. Forty-seven patients underwent resection of the tumour: three local excisions for small benign tumors, six ampullectomies (followed in three by a Whipples’ procedure for recurrence) and 41 Whipples’ procedures. The hospital mortality was 5.3%, minor complications appeared in 21%. The overall five years survival was 41%. It was 75% in grade I, 50% in grade II, 40% in grade III and 10% in grade IV. The patients who received ampullectomies were alive with a follow-up of one, two and three years. All patients operated upon for a benign tumour were alive except one who died of cardiac failure. Ultrasonography and duodenoscopy are the most useful tests for the diagnosis of tumours of Oddi. Prognosis depends on the degree of infiltration of the duodenal wall and the presence of positive lymph nodes. Whipples’ procedure is best but ampullectomy can be used in elderly or poor risk patients. Malignant tumours of the ampullary region are infrequent and reported to constitute betwee 0.02 and five percent of all cancers of the digestive tract. With wider application of endoscopic techniques, there has been an increasing interest in this group of tumours during recent years. In the literature tumours of Oddi are usually reported in the group of periampullary tumours, including tumours of the ampulla itself, duodenal wall surrounding the ampulla, the distal part of the common bile duct and head of the pancreas. We have wanted to distinguish specifically the tumours of the ampulla of Vater and have adopted the term tumour of Oddi introduced by Marchal and Hureau

  4. Caffeic acid-coated multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles for the treatment and bimodal imaging of tumours.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun; Kim, Kyoung Sub; Na, Kun

    2016-07-01

    Accurate theragnosis of tumour is essential for improving the life rate of tumour patients. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have been used as both diagnostic and therapeutic agents. However, their application is often limited because of a lack of water solubility, lack of cancer treatment efficacy, and ineffective targeting of tumour cells. In this report, a double ligand (caffeic acid-polyethylene glycol-folic acid; FA-PEG-CA, caffeic acid-polyethylene glycol-pheophorbide-a; PheoA-PEG-CA) coated iron oxide nanoparticle has been fabricated that overcomes the limitations of conventional SPION. Photosensitizer and tumour targeting ligands were coated on SPION using a ligand-substitution method. We confirmed the successful substitution of oleic acid ligands with FA-PEG-CA and PheoA-PEG-CA ligands by FT-IR spectroscopy. The caffeic acid coated iron oxide nanoparticles (CAMNPs) also demonstrated high water solubility in an aqueous environment and folate-mediated active tumour targeting. The water solubility of CAMNPs was evaluated by DLS measurement and TEM images. The cytotoxicity of CAMNPs increased two-fold in MDA-MB-231 cells at a laser irradiation condition. The fabricated CAMNPs retained their ability to function as both MRI diagnostic and tumour-selective therapeutic agents. These results suggest that these efficient characteristics of CAMNPs can be incorporated into applications, thus enhancing the efficacy of clinical cancer treatment. PMID:27107705

  5. Intraocular inflammation after proton beam irradiation for uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Lumbroso, L.; Desjardins, L.; Levy, C.; Plancher, C.; Frau, E.; D'Hermies, F.; Schlienger, P.; Mammar, H.; Delacroix, S.; Nauraye, C.; Ferrand, R.; Desblancs, C.; Mazal, A.; Asselain, B.

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To describe the inflammatory reaction that can occur following proton beam irradiation of uveal melanomas based on a large series of patients and to try to determine the risk factors for this reaction.
METHODS—Data from a cohort of patients with uveal melanoma treated by proton beam irradiation between 1991 and 1994 were analysed. The presence of inflammation was recorded and evaluated. Kaplan-Meier estimates and statistical analysis of general and tumour related risk factors were performed.
RESULTS—28% of patients treated during this period presented with ocular inflammation (median follow up 62 months). Risks factors were essentially tumour related and were correlated with larger lesions (height > 5 mm, diameter > 12 mm, volume > 0.4 cm3). Multivariate analysis identified initial tumour height and irradiation of a large volume of the eye as the two most important risk factors. Ocular inflammation usually consisted of mild anterior uveitis, resolving rapidly after topical steroids and cycloplegics. The incidence of inflammation after proton beam irradiation of melanomas seems higher than previously reported and is related to larger lesions. Evidence of inflammation associated with uveal melanoma has been described and seems to be associated with tumour necrosis (spontaneous or after irradiation). The appearance of transient inflammation during the follow up of these patients may be related to the release of inflammatory cytokines during tumour necrosis.
CONCLUSION—Inflammation following proton beam irradiation is not unusual. It is correlated with larger initial tumours and may be related to tumour necrosis.

 PMID:11673294

  6. Benign tumours of the bone: A review☆

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, David N.; Pelly, Theo; Kulendran, Myutan; Caris, Jochem A.

    2015-01-01

    Benign tumours of the bone are not cancerous and would not metastasise to other regions of the body. However, they can occur in any part of the skeleton, and can still be dangerous as they may grow and compress healthy bone tissue. There are several types of benign tumours that can be classified by the type of matrix that the tumour cells produce; such as bone, cartilage, fibrous tissue, fat or blood vessel. Overall, 8 different types can be distinguished: osteochondroma, osteoma, osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, giant cell tumour, aneurysmal bone cyst, fibrous dysplasia and enchondroma. The incidence of benign bone tumours varies depending on the type. However, they most commonly arise in people less than 30 years old, often triggered by the hormones that stimulate normal growth. The most common type is osteochondroma. This review discusses the different types of common benign tumours of the bone based on information accumulated from published literature. PMID:26579486

  7. Solitary fibrous tumour: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sharmila; Shet, Tanuja M; Chinoy, R F; Kane, S V

    2007-07-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is a rare spindle cell neoplasm arising at pleural and extrapleural sites. Five cases of SFT diagnosed at our institution over a five year period were reviewed. Haematoxylin and eosin stained histological sections, immuno-histochemical markers including CD34 and electron microscopy were the different methods used to study these tumours. Three histological features were consistently observed in all the tumours: the tumours were composed of short spindle cells separated by dense collagen bands and arranged in alternate hypocellular and hypercellular areas. CD34 positivity was seen in all the cases. SFT's have been reported to behave in an unpredictable fashion and hence prolonged follow up is essential. Histology, CD34 positivity and electron microscopy are useful tools in diagnosing SFT. While the pleural tumours can be diagnosed based on histology, this must be substantiated by ancillary techniques in case of extrapleural tumours.

  8. [Solitary fibrous tumours of the kidney].

    PubMed

    Gres, Pascal; Avances, Christophe; Ben Naoum, Kamel; Chapuis, Héliette; Costa, Pierre

    2004-02-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFT) are mesenchymal tumours that usually arise from the pleura. Renal SFT are exceptional (9 cases reported in the literature). The authors report a new case discovered during assessment of HT and treated by radical right nephrectomy. The histological appearance is characteristic: a tumour with a fibrous centre, composed of a monomorphic proliferation of spindle cells, with positive CD 34, CD 99, and bcl 2 labelling. The prognosis after complete resection is generally favourable.

  9. Solitary fibrous tumour of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Piattelli, A; Fioroni, M; Rubini, C

    1998-09-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is a neoplasm most often localised in the pleura and peritoneum. The tumour is composed of spindled fibroblastic cells arranged in a haphazard way. Recently SFT has been described in many locations. Only one case of oral SFT has been described in the cheek: this is the second case of an oral SFT located in the tongue. The differential diagnosis must be made from many soft tissue tumours. SFTs stain strongly, in almost all cases, for CD34.

  10. [Adenomatoid tumour of the adrenal gland].

    PubMed

    Bandier, Philippe Claus; Hansen, Alastair; Thorelius, Lars

    2009-01-26

    An adenomatoid tumour in the right suprarenal gland was discovered during clinical cancer staging of a 73-year-old woman. Adenomatoid tumours in the suprarenal glands are rare and are most often found incidentally. A definitive diagnosis is made on the basis of histology since imaging methods are non-specific. Differential diagnoses comprise malignant vascular neoplasm or adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry or electron microscopy allows uncomplicated distinction between these tumours. In general, it is recommended to obtain biopsies from suprarenal processes.

  11. Gastric stromal tumours: a practical approach.

    PubMed Central

    Mihssin, N.; Moorthy, K.; Sengupta, A.; Houghton, P. W.

    2000-01-01

    Recent findings on the pathological diversity of gastric stromal tumours and their unpredictable behaviour prompted us to review our series of 16 patients who had undergone surgery for these tumours from 1991 to 1998. There were 13 benign and 3 malignant lesions. The majority of patients presented with either upper gastrointestinal bleeding or anaemia alone (12 of 16). Endoscopy was an extremely useful diagnostic tool, revealing the lesion as an intraluminal protuberant tumour with or without ulcer in 10 cases and as an ulcer alone in 4 cases, and in 1 case features suggesting an extrinsic mass. All the patients in the series underwent surgery. We used staplers (AutosutureR TA 55) to excise the tumours in 7 cases, all of which on histological examination were benign with clear resection margins. Gastric resections were performed in 5 cases for either large tumours or those situated at the fundus or antrum and local excision of the remaining 4. The mean follow-up of these patients was 24 months. Two patients with malignant lesions died of irresectable recurrences, one 2 months and one 18 months after surgery. There have been no recurrences in the tumours diagnosed as benign on histology. Tumour size, position and the ability to apply the stapler leaving adequate margin below the tumour should be the determinants of extent and type of excision. Reliable determinants of behaviour are tumour size, grade and mitotic index. Images Figure 1 PMID:11103152

  12. Solitary fibrous tumour of the pleura.

    PubMed

    Sikri, V; Chawla, R

    2013-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) of the pleura is a rare, usually benign primary tumour of the pleura. Spectrum of presentation can vary from an incidental finding on chest radiograph done for some other purpose, features of compression of surrounding structures to symptoms resulting from the tumour per se. We report a case of a female who presented with complaints of cough and chest pain in whom a diagnosis of SFT was confirmed on tru-cut biopsy and immunohistochemistry studies. The patient underwent thoracotomy and successful removal of the tumour.

  13. Oncogenic osteomalacia: strange tumours in strange places.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, D.; Bar, R. S.; Weidner, N.; Wener, M.; Lee, F.

    1985-01-01

    Two patients presented with hypophosphataemic osteomalacia and were subsequently found to have small tumours unusual histopathology and location causing the osteomalacia. Each tumour was found after an intensive search for occult masses. Studies of vitamin D metabolism and renal tubular function before and after surgery yielded further insight into the pathophysiology of oncogenic osteomalacia. These cases demonstrate that microscopic quantities of tumour are capable of causing the syndrome and further illustrate the high index of suspicion often necessary to locate causative tumours in patients with hypophosphataemic osteomalacia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:4022870

  14. [Pancreatic tumour in a child].

    PubMed

    Schouenborg Schultz, Thea; Thyssen Vestergaard, Esben

    2014-07-28

    Abdominal pain is a common symptom in children and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) has a prevalence of 8.4% in childhood. In 90-95% of RAPs no organic disease is identified. Thus, it is important that the few of somatic origin are diagnosed. We describe a case concerning a 12-year-old girl, diagnosed with a solid pseudopapillary tumour of the pancreas. The symptoms were RAP and postprandial vomiting. The purpose of this article is to increase the knowledge of "alarm findings" indicating an organic disease in children with RAP. PMID:25292323

  15. Radiofrequency ablation of lung tumours

    PubMed Central

    Goh, PYT

    2006-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established local therapy for hepatic malignancies. It is rapidly emerging as an effective treatment modality for small lesions elsewhere in the body, in particular, the kidney and the lung. It is a relatively safe and minimally invasive treatment for small lung malignancies, both primary and secondary. In particular, it is the preferred form of treatment for non-surgical candidates. This paper describes the technique employed for radiofrequency ablation of lung tumours, as well as the protocol established, at the Mount Elizabeth Hospital, Singapore. PMID:21614247

  16. A review of bovine urothelial tumours and tumour-like lesions of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Roperto, S; Borzacchiello, G; Brun, R; Leonardi, L; Maiolino, P; Martano, M; Paciello, O; Papparella, S; Restucci, B; Russo, V; Salvatore, G; Urraro, C; Roperto, F

    2010-01-01

    Four hundred bovine urothelial tumours and tumour-like lesions were classified in accordance with the 2004 World Health Organization (WHO) morphological classification for human urothelial tumours. The spectrum of neoplastic lesions of the urinary bladder of cattle is becoming wider and bovine urothelial tumours share striking morphological features with their human counterparts. A classification system based on the WHO scheme would also be appropriate for the classification of bovine bladder tumours. Bovine urothelial tumours are most often multiple. Four distinct growth patterns of bovine urothelial tumours and tumour-like lesions are recognized: flat, exophytic or papillary, endophytic and invasive. Carcinoma in situ (CIS) is the most common flat urothelial lesion, accounting for approximately 4% of urothelial tumours. CIS is detected adjacent to papillary and invasive tumours in 80-90% of cases. Approximately 3% of papillary lesions are papillomas and approximately 5% are 'papillary urothelial neoplasms of low malignant potential' (PUNLMP). Low-grade carcinoma is the most common urothelial tumour of cattle. High-grade carcinomas, and low and high-grade invasive tumours, are less commonly seen. Bovine papillomavirus (BPV) infection and ingestion of bracken fern both play a central role in carcinogenesis of these lesions.

  17. Transillumination imaging of intraocular tumours.

    PubMed

    Kjersem, Bård; Krohn, Jørgen

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss a recently described modification of a standard photo slit lamp system for ocular transillumination, with special emphasis on the light transmission through the eye wall and the photographic technique. Transillumination photography was carried out with the Haag-Streit Photo-Slit Lamp BX 900 (Haag-Streit AG, Koeniz, Switzerland). After having released the background lighting optic fibre cable from its holder, the patient was positioned at the slit lamp, and the fibre tip was gently pressed against the sclera or the cornea of the patient's eye. During about 1/1000 of a second, the eye was illuminated by the flash and the scleral shadow of the tumour was exposed to the camera sensor. The images were of good diagnostic quality, making it easy to outline the tumours and to evaluate the involvement of intraocular structures. None of the examined patients experienced discomfort or negative side effects. The method is recommended in cases where photographic transillumination documentation of intraocular pathologies is considered important. PMID:23641762

  18. In vivo covalent cross-linking of photon-converted rare-earth nanostructures for tumour localization and theranostics.

    PubMed

    Ai, Xiangzhao; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Aw, Junxin; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Mu, Jing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaogang; Chen, Huabing; Gao, Mingyuan; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Yeow, Edwin K L; Liu, Gang; Olivo, Malini; Xing, Bengang

    2016-01-01

    The development of precision nanomedicines to direct nanostructure-based reagents into tumour-targeted areas remains a critical challenge in clinics. Chemical reaction-mediated localization in response to tumour environmental perturbations offers promising opportunities for rational design of effective nano-theranostics. Here, we present a unique microenvironment-sensitive strategy for localization of peptide-premodified upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) within tumour areas. Upon tumour-specific cathepsin protease reactions, the cleavage of peptides induces covalent cross-linking between the exposed cysteine and 2-cyanobenzothiazole on neighbouring particles, thus triggering the accumulation of UCNs into tumour site. Such enzyme-triggered cross-linking of UCNs leads to enhanced upconversion emission upon 808 nm laser irradiation, and in turn amplifies the singlet oxygen generation from the photosensitizers attached on UCNs. Importantly, this design enables remarkable tumour inhibition through either intratumoral UCNs injection or intravenous injection of nanoparticles modified with the targeting ligand. Our strategy may provide a multimodality solution for effective molecular sensing and site-specific tumour treatment. PMID:26786559

  19. In vivo covalent cross-linking of photon-converted rare-earth nanostructures for tumour localization and theranostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Xiangzhao; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Aw, Junxin; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Mu, Jing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaogang; Chen, Huabing; Gao, Mingyuan; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Yeow, Edwin K. L.; Liu, Gang; Olivo, Malini; Xing, Bengang

    2016-01-01

    The development of precision nanomedicines to direct nanostructure-based reagents into tumour-targeted areas remains a critical challenge in clinics. Chemical reaction-mediated localization in response to tumour environmental perturbations offers promising opportunities for rational design of effective nano-theranostics. Here, we present a unique microenvironment-sensitive strategy for localization of peptide-premodified upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) within tumour areas. Upon tumour-specific cathepsin protease reactions, the cleavage of peptides induces covalent cross-linking between the exposed cysteine and 2-cyanobenzothiazole on neighbouring particles, thus triggering the accumulation of UCNs into tumour site. Such enzyme-triggered cross-linking of UCNs leads to enhanced upconversion emission upon 808 nm laser irradiation, and in turn amplifies the singlet oxygen generation from the photosensitizers attached on UCNs. Importantly, this design enables remarkable tumour inhibition through either intratumoral UCNs injection or intravenous injection of nanoparticles modified with the targeting ligand. Our strategy may provide a multimodality solution for effective molecular sensing and site-specific tumour treatment.

  20. In vivo covalent cross-linking of photon-converted rare-earth nanostructures for tumour localization and theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Xiangzhao; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Aw, Junxin; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Mu, Jing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaogang; Chen, Huabing; Gao, Mingyuan; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Yeow, Edwin K.L.; Liu, Gang; Olivo, Malini; Xing, Bengang

    2016-01-01

    The development of precision nanomedicines to direct nanostructure-based reagents into tumour-targeted areas remains a critical challenge in clinics. Chemical reaction-mediated localization in response to tumour environmental perturbations offers promising opportunities for rational design of effective nano-theranostics. Here, we present a unique microenvironment-sensitive strategy for localization of peptide-premodified upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) within tumour areas. Upon tumour-specific cathepsin protease reactions, the cleavage of peptides induces covalent cross-linking between the exposed cysteine and 2-cyanobenzothiazole on neighbouring particles, thus triggering the accumulation of UCNs into tumour site. Such enzyme-triggered cross-linking of UCNs leads to enhanced upconversion emission upon 808 nm laser irradiation, and in turn amplifies the singlet oxygen generation from the photosensitizers attached on UCNs. Importantly, this design enables remarkable tumour inhibition through either intratumoral UCNs injection or intravenous injection of nanoparticles modified with the targeting ligand. Our strategy may provide a multimodality solution for effective molecular sensing and site-specific tumour treatment. PMID:26786559

  1. In vivo covalent cross-linking of photon-converted rare-earth nanostructures for tumour localization and theranostics.

    PubMed

    Ai, Xiangzhao; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Aw, Junxin; Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Mu, Jing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaogang; Chen, Huabing; Gao, Mingyuan; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Yeow, Edwin K L; Liu, Gang; Olivo, Malini; Xing, Bengang

    2016-01-20

    The development of precision nanomedicines to direct nanostructure-based reagents into tumour-targeted areas remains a critical challenge in clinics. Chemical reaction-mediated localization in response to tumour environmental perturbations offers promising opportunities for rational design of effective nano-theranostics. Here, we present a unique microenvironment-sensitive strategy for localization of peptide-premodified upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) within tumour areas. Upon tumour-specific cathepsin protease reactions, the cleavage of peptides induces covalent cross-linking between the exposed cysteine and 2-cyanobenzothiazole on neighbouring particles, thus triggering the accumulation of UCNs into tumour site. Such enzyme-triggered cross-linking of UCNs leads to enhanced upconversion emission upon 808 nm laser irradiation, and in turn amplifies the singlet oxygen generation from the photosensitizers attached on UCNs. Importantly, this design enables remarkable tumour inhibition through either intratumoral UCNs injection or intravenous injection of nanoparticles modified with the targeting ligand. Our strategy may provide a multimodality solution for effective molecular sensing and site-specific tumour treatment.

  2. In vivo electrical conductivity of hepatic tumours.

    PubMed

    Haemmerich, Dieter; Staelin, S T; Tsai, J Z; Tungjitkusolmun, S; Mahvi, D M; Webster, J G

    2003-05-01

    Knowledge of electrical tissue conductivity is necessary to determine deposition of electromagnetic energy and can further be used to diagnostically differentiate between normal and neoplastic tissue. We measured 17 rats with a total of 24 tumours of the K12/TRb rat colon cancer cell line. In each animal we measured in vivo hepatic tumour and normal tissue conductivity at seven frequencies from 10 Hz to 1 MHz, at different tumour stages between 6 and 12 weeks after induction. Conductivity of normal liver tissue was 1.26 +/- 0.15 mS cm(-1) at 10 Hz, and 4.61 +/- 0.42 mS cm(-1) at 1 MHz. Conductivity of tumour was 2.69 +/- 0.91 mS cm(-1) at 10 Hz, and 5.23 +/- 0.82 mS cm(-1) at 1 MHz. Conductivity was significantly different between normal and tumour tissue (p < 0.05). We determined the percentage of necrosis and fibrosis at the measurement site. We fitted the conductivity data to the Cole-Cole model. For the tumour data we determined Spearman's correlation coefficients between the Cole-Cole parameters and age, necrosis, fibrosis and tumour volume and found significant correlation between necrosis and the Cole-Cole parameters (p < 0.05). We conclude that necrosis within the tumour and the associated membrane breakdown is likely responsible for the observed change in conductivity.

  3. Cartilage-containing tumours of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Bateson, Eric M.

    1967-01-01

    An unusual case is reported of a woman aged 27 years who presented with four intrapulmonary cartilage-containing tumours which were resected from the left lung. The appearance of two new shadows in the chest several years later suggested that two of the resected tumours had recurred. Three of the four resected tumours consisted entirely of cartilage and bone and other connective tissues. The fourth tumour, although consisting almost entirely of cartilage and connective tissue, also contained epithelial tissue in the form of two small clefts, one in the periphery and the other in a connective tissue septum between the lobules of cartilage of the tumour. These tumours are regarded as a variation of the more typical cartilage-containing tumour of the lung which contains many spaces lined by respiratory epithelium and is regarded as a neoplasm arising in the connective tissue beneath the mucosa of a small bronchus with subsequent expansion into its lumen and enclosing spaces lined by the mucosal epithelium during its eccentric growth. The tumours consisting almost entirely of cartilage without spaces lined by epithelial cells are thought to expand into the adjacent lung tissue and not into the bronchial lumen. Therefore there is no inclusion of respiratory epithelium from the mucosa of the bronchus of origin. Images PMID:6033393

  4. FDG uptake, a surrogate of tumour hypoxia?

    PubMed Central

    Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tumour hyperglycolysis is driven by activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) through tumour hypoxia. Accordingly, the degree of 2-fluro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) uptake by tumours might indirectly reflect the level of hypoxia, obviating the need for more specific radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. Discussion In this paper, available data on the relationship between hypoxia and FDG uptake by tumour tissue in vitro and in vivo are reviewed. In pre-clinical in vitro studies, acute hypoxia was consistently shown to increase FDG uptake by normal and tumour cells within a couple of hours after onset with mobilisation or modification of glucose transporters optimising glucose uptake, followed by a delayed response with increased rates of transcription of GLUT mRNA. In pre-clinical imaging studies on chronic hypoxia that compared FDG uptake by tumours grown in rat or mice to uptake by FMISO, the pattern of normoxic and hypoxic regions within the human tumour xenografts, as imaged by FMISO, largely correlated with glucose metabolism although minor locoregional differences could not be excluded. In the clinical setting, data are limited and discordant. Conclusion Further evaluation of FDG uptake by various tumour types in relation to intrinsic and bioreductive markers of hypoxia and response to radiotherapy or hypoxia-dependent drugs is needed to fully assess its application as a marker of hypoxia in the clinical setting. PMID:18509637

  5. CT/MRI of neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Reznek, Rodney H

    2006-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are often thought to be rare and rather recherché cancers which are of little concern to the general physician, surgeon or radiologist because of their rarity and esoteric nature. In fact, while relatively uncommon, the total group of gastro-entero-pancreatic (GEP) tumours incorporates the spectrum of all types of carcinoids, incuding bronchial carcinoids, and the whole gamut of islet-cell tumours. Some of these may present as functioning tumours, with a plethora of hormonal secretions and concomitant clinical syndromes, and GEPs in general have an incidence around 30 per million population per year. This means that in the whole European Union, for example, there will be in the region of 12000 new patients every year presenting with one or another manifestation of these tumours. Furthermore, the comparatively long survival of many of these patients, compared to more common adenocarcinomas or epithelial tumours, implies that the point prevalence is also not inconsiderable. However, it is undoubtedly true that these tumours can be difficult to identify, especially in their early stages, and it is then that radiological investigation becomes of paramount importance. Having taken into account all these considerations, most investigators would initiate investigation of a suspected or biochemically proven islet-cell tumour with cross-sectional imaging—either CT or MRI. This will clearly identify the larger lesions, allow assessment of the entire abdomen, and provide valuable information on the presence of hepatic metastates. PMID:17114072

  6. Küttner's tumour: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tagnon, B; Weynand, B; Reychler, H

    2008-01-01

    Küttner's tumour (chronic sclerosing sialadenitis) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the salivary glands. It is a totally benign lesion. However, because of its clinical features, the clinical diagnosis is often that of a salivary gland neoplasm. We present a case of unilateral Küttner's tumour in the left submandibular salivary gland and discuss clinical, imaging and histological features.

  7. Strain elastography features of epidermoid tumours in superficial soft tissue: differences from other benign soft-tissue tumours and malignant tumours

    PubMed Central

    Park, H J; Lee, S M; Kim, W T; Lee, S; Ahn, K S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated ultrasonographic features of superficial epidermoid tumour with a focus on strain elastography (SE) features that will help in the differential diagnosis of epidermoid tumour from other benign and malignant soft-tissue tumours. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated ultrasonographic and SE data of 103 surgically confirmed superficial soft-tissue tumours and tumour-like lesions: 29 cases of epidermoid tumour, 46 cases of other benign tumours and 28 cases of malignant tumour. SE and B-mode imaging were performed at the same time. SE characteristics were assigned into four grades (1–4) according to their elasticity. Interobserver agreement for the four SE scores between the two radiologists was analysed using kappa statistics. We classified each SE finding as a hard lesion (SE Score 3–4) or soft lesion (SE Score 1–2) and compared these findings using the χ2 test to identify whether a significant difference in mass hardness existed among epidermoid tumour, other benign tumour and malignant tumour. Results: Overall interobserver agreement according to the four SE scores was moderate (κ = 0.540), and overall agreement for the hardness [soft (Score 1–2) or hard (Score 3–4)] was almost perfect (κ = 0.825). Malignant tumours showed higher SE scores (3–4, hard nature) than did epidermoid tumour or other benign soft-tissue tumours. There were no differences in SE score between epidermoid tumour and other benign tumours. Conclusion: Superficial epidermoid tumour exhibits a softer nature than does malignant tumour but does not have a different SE pattern from other benign tumours. Advances in knowledge: SE features of epidermoid tumour might be helpful in differentiating from other benign and malignant tumours. PMID:25827206

  8. Optimization of tumour control probability in hypoxic tumours by radiation dose redistribution: a modelling study.

    PubMed

    Søvik, Aste; Malinen, Eirik; Bruland, Øyvind S; Bentzen, Søren M; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2007-01-21

    Tumour hypoxia is a known cause of clinical resistance to radiation therapy. The purpose of this work was to model the effects on tumour control probability (TCP) of selectively boosting the dose to hypoxic regions in a tumour, while keeping the mean tumour dose constant. A tumour model with a continuous oxygen distribution, incorporating pO(2) histograms published for head and neck patients, was developed. Temporal and spatial variations in the oxygen distribution, non-uniform cell density and cell proliferation during treatment were included in the tumour modelling. Non-uniform dose prescriptions were made based on a segmentation of the tumours into four compartments. The main findings were: (1) Dose redistribution considerably improved TCP for all tumours. (2) The effect on TCP depended on the degree of reoxygenation during treatment, with a maximum relative increase in TCP for tumours with poor or no reoxygenation. (3) Acute hypoxia reduced TCP moderately, while underdosing chronic hypoxic cells gave large reductions in TCP. (4) Restricted dose redistribution still gave a substantial increase in TCP as compared to uniform dose boosts. In conclusion, redistributing dose according to tumour oxygenation status might increase TCP when the tumour response to radiotherapy is limited by chronic hypoxia. This could potentially improve treatment outcome in a subpopulation of patients who respond poorly to conventional radiotherapy. PMID:17202629

  9. p53 tumour suppressor gene expression in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, C; Ziske, C; Wiedenmann, B; Moelling, K

    1996-01-01

    Neuroendocrine pancreatic tumours grow slower and metastasise later than ductal and acinar carcinomas. The expression of the p53 tumour suppressor gene in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells is unknown. Pancreatic neuroendocrine cell lines (n = 5) and human tumour tissues (n = 19) were studied for changed p53 coding sequence, transcription, and translation. Proliferative activity of tumour cells was determined analysing Ki-67 expression. No mutation in the p53 nucleotide sequence of neuroendocrine tumour cell was found. However, an overexpression of p53 could be detected in neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines at a protein level. As no p53 mutations were seen, it is suggested that post-translational events can also lead to an overexpression of p53. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8675094

  10. Characterization of twenty-five ovarian tumour cell lines that phenocopy primary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Ince, Tan A.; Sousa, Aurea D.; Jones, Michelle A.; Harrell, J. Chuck; Agoston, Elin S.; Krohn, Marit; Selfors, Laura M.; Liu, Wenbin; Chen, Ken; Yong, Mao; Buchwald, Peter; Wang, Bin; Hale, Katherine S.; Cohick, Evan; Sergent, Petra; Witt, Abigail; Kozhekbaeva, Zhanna; Gao, Sizhen; Agoston, Agoston T.; Merritt, Melissa A.; Foster, Rosemary; Rueda, Bo R.; Crum, Christopher P.; Brugge, Joan S.; Mills, Gordon B.

    2015-01-01

    Currently available human tumour cell line panels consist of a small number of lines in each lineage that generally fail to retain the phenotype of the original patient tumour. Here we develop a cell culture medium that enables us to routinely establish cell lines from diverse subtypes of human ovarian cancers with >95% efficiency. Importantly, the 25 new ovarian tumour cell lines described here retain the genomic landscape, histopathology and molecular features of the original tumours. Furthermore, the molecular profile and drug response of these cell lines correlate with distinct groups of primary tumours with different outcomes. Thus, tumour cell lines derived using this methodology represent a significantly improved platform to study human tumour pathophysiology and response to therapy. PMID:26080861

  11. Solitary fibrous tumour of the renal peripelvis.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, M; Nikaido, T

    1997-05-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are rare spindle cell neoplasms generally associated with the serosal surface, especially the pleura. This report describes two SFTs arising in the renal peripelvis, occurring in 33- and 36-year-old females. The lesions lacked the characteristic features of other recognized neoplasms that occur in the kidney. Immunohistochemically, the tumour cells were diffusely and strongly positive for vimentin and CD34, and some tumour cells expressed alpha-smooth muscle actin. Both tumours were diploid by flow cytometry. Both patients have had benign clinical courses with 7.5- and 1-year follow-up. The findings suggest that the SFTs may originate from peripelvic mesenchymal cells, a new location for SFT. SFT should be included in the differential diagnosis of spindle cell tumours arising in the renal pelvis and peripelvis.

  12. In Silico Analysis of Cell Cycle Synchronisation Effects in Radiotherapy of Tumour Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Harald; Hatzikirou, Haralampos; Bleicher, Marcus; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Tumour cells show a varying susceptibility to radiation damage as a function of the current cell cycle phase. While this sensitivity is averaged out in an unperturbed tumour due to unsynchronised cell cycle progression, external stimuli such as radiation or drug doses can induce a resynchronisation of the cell cycle and consequently induce a collective development of radiosensitivity in tumours. Although this effect has been regularly described in experiments it is currently not exploited in clinical practice and thus a large potential for optimisation is missed. We present an agent-based model for three-dimensional tumour spheroid growth which has been combined with an irradiation damage and kinetics model. We predict the dynamic response of the overall tumour radiosensitivity to delivered radiation doses and describe corresponding time windows of increased or decreased radiation sensitivity. The degree of cell cycle resynchronisation in response to radiation delivery was identified as a main determinant of the transient periods of low and high radiosensitivity enhancement. A range of selected clinical fractionation schemes is examined and new triggered schedules are tested which aim to maximise the effect of the radiation-induced sensitivity enhancement. We find that the cell cycle resynchronisation can yield a strong increase in therapy effectiveness, if employed correctly. While the individual timing of sensitive periods will depend on the exact cell and radiation types, enhancement is a universal effect which is present in every tumour and accordingly should be the target of experimental investigation. Experimental observables which can be assessed non-invasively and with high spatio-temporal resolution have to be connected to the radiosensitivity enhancement in order to allow for a possible tumour-specific design of highly efficient treatment schedules based on induced cell cycle synchronisation. PMID:24244120

  13. In silico analysis of cell cycle synchronisation effects in radiotherapy of tumour spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Harald; Hatzikirou, Haralampos; Bleicher, Marcus; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Tumour cells show a varying susceptibility to radiation damage as a function of the current cell cycle phase. While this sensitivity is averaged out in an unperturbed tumour due to unsynchronised cell cycle progression, external stimuli such as radiation or drug doses can induce a resynchronisation of the cell cycle and consequently induce a collective development of radiosensitivity in tumours. Although this effect has been regularly described in experiments it is currently not exploited in clinical practice and thus a large potential for optimisation is missed. We present an agent-based model for three-dimensional tumour spheroid growth which has been combined with an irradiation damage and kinetics model. We predict the dynamic response of the overall tumour radiosensitivity to delivered radiation doses and describe corresponding time windows of increased or decreased radiation sensitivity. The degree of cell cycle resynchronisation in response to radiation delivery was identified as a main determinant of the transient periods of low and high radiosensitivity enhancement. A range of selected clinical fractionation schemes is examined and new triggered schedules are tested which aim to maximise the effect of the radiation-induced sensitivity enhancement. We find that the cell cycle resynchronisation can yield a strong increase in therapy effectiveness, if employed correctly. While the individual timing of sensitive periods will depend on the exact cell and radiation types, enhancement is a universal effect which is present in every tumour and accordingly should be the target of experimental investigation. Experimental observables which can be assessed non-invasively and with high spatio-temporal resolution have to be connected to the radiosensitivity enhancement in order to allow for a possible tumour-specific design of highly efficient treatment schedules based on induced cell cycle synchronisation.

  14. Cinnarizine and flunarizine improve the tumour radiosensitisation induced by erythrocyte transfusion in anaemic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, P. J.; Hirst, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    The ability of the calcium antagonists, cinnarizine and flunarizine, to enhance the radiosensitisation produced by the administration of an erythrocyte transfusion to anaemic, RIF-1 or SCCVII/St tumour bearing mice was determined. Erythrocyte transfusion alone increased radiation cell killing 10-fold in the RIF-1 tumour when given 0-4 h before X-rays. In contrast, the SCCVII/St showed only a 4-fold increase in sensitivity, apparent when erythrocytes were given 2-6 h before irradiation. The administration of 50 mg kg-1 cinnarizine or flunarizine to anaemic mice followed by erythrocyte transfusion 0 h before X-rays produced the same level of cell survival for both tumours, a 20-fold increase in cell killing for cinnarizine, and a 30-40-fold effect for flunarizine, even though at this time interval, the erythrocyte transfusion alone did not sensitise the SCCVII/St tumour to X-rays. Further investigations indicated, however, that the erythrocyte transfusion was necessary to achieve the sensitisation with the calcium antagonists, since giving flunarizine to anaemic mice alone only achieved a 4-fold increase in radiation cell killing. In addition, flunarizine given with erythrocyte transfusion 4 h before X-rays, in SCCVII/St, the optimal time for radiosensitisation in this tumour, did not further increase the level of cell killing achieved by flunarizine plus erythrocyte transfusion 0 h before X-rays. PMID:2803913

  15. Neuroendocrine tumours - Medical therapy: Biological.

    PubMed

    Rinke, Anja; Krug, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin analogues (SSA) are well established antisecretory drugs that have been used as first line treatment for symptomatic control in hormonally active neuroendocrine tumours (NET) for three decades. Both available depot formulations of SSA, long-acting repeatable (LAR) octreotide and lanreotide autogel, seem similarly effective and well tolerated, although comparative trials in NET have not been performed. The importance of SSA as antiproliferative treatment has been increasingly recognized during recent years. Two placebo-controlled trials demonstrated significant prolongation of progression free survival under SSA treatment. However, objective response as assessed by imaging is rare. Interferon-α (IFNα) also has antisecretory and antiproliferative efficacy in NET. Due to the less favourable toxicity profile it mainly has a role as add-on option in the refractory setting, especially in carcinoid syndrome patients. Further studies are needed to evaluate the antiproliferative efficacy of the multiligand SSA pasireotide and the role of pegylated IFNα. PMID:26971845

  16. Transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Massoud, A; Powell, M; Williams, R; Hindmarsh, P; Brook, C

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 29 January 1997
 OBJECTIVES—Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is the preferred method for the excision of pituitary microadenomas in adults. This study was carried out to establish the long term efficacy and safety of TSS in children.
STUDY DESIGN—A 14 year retrospective analysis was carried out on 23 children (16 boys and seven girls), all less than 18 years of age, who had undergone TSS at our centre.
RESULTS—Twenty nine transsphenoidal surgical procedures were carried out. The most common diagnosis was an adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) secreting adenoma (14 (61%) patients). The median length of follow up was 8.0 years (range 0.3-14.0 years). Eighteen (78%) patients were cured after the first procedure. No death was related to the operation. The most common postoperative complication was diabetes insipidus, which was transient in most patients. Other complications were headaches in two patients and cerebrospinal fluid leaks in two patients. De novo endocrine deficiencies after TSS in children were as follows: three (14%) patients developed panhypopituitarism, eight (73%) developed growth hormone insufficiency, three (14%) developed secondary hypothyroidism, and four (21%) developed gonadotrophin deficiency. Permanent ACTH deficiency occurred in five (24%) patients, though all patients received postoperative glucocorticoid treatment until dynamic pituitary tests were performed three months after TSS.
CONCLUSIONS—TSS in children is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary tumours, provided it is performed by surgeons with considerable experience and expertise. Surgical complications are minimal. Postoperative endocrine deficit is considerable, but is only permanent in a small proportion of patients.

 • Transsphenoidal surgery is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary tumours in children • Transsphenoidal surgery should be performed by surgeons with considerable experience and expertise • Surgical complications of

  17. [Split-course neutron and photon irradiation of experimental tumors: the importance of the sequence and interval lengths].

    PubMed

    Carl, U M; Bahnsen, J

    1989-09-01

    In a split course mixed beam experiment we have investigated the influence of the interval and beam-quality on tumour growth delay. Fast growing sarcomas (SaF) in grey CBA-mice were irradiated with different sequences of neutrons (N) and photons (X) varying the length of time interval from 0 up to 300 minutes between two doses. The tumours were treated with isoeffective doses of X-rays and/or neutrons (XX, NN, NX, XN). In order to achieve a homogeneous radiosensitive cell population, tumours were reversibly made hypoxic by clamping ten minutes prior and during irradiation. Tumour growth delay is dependent on the sequence and on the interval. As expected the growth delay in tumours treated with neutrons only was less dependent on the interval than after pure photon irradiation. Beyond an interval of 30 minutes in the mixed beam schedules the one giving neutrons first was more effective than the one giving photons first.

  18. Solitary fibrous tumour of the pancreas: a new member of the small group of mesenchymal pancreatic tumours.

    PubMed

    Lüttges, J; Mentzel, T; Hübner, G; Klöppel, G

    1999-07-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours usually occur in the pleura, but occasionally they appear in extraserosal soft tissues or parenchymatous organs, where their diagnosis often causes problems. This report describes a solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) of the pancreas in a 50-year-old woman treated by left-side pancreatectomy. The tumour showed immunocytochemical reactivity for CD34, CD99 and bcl-2. Because of its favourable prognosis, SFT must be clearly distinguished from leiomyosarcoma, the most frequent nonepithelial tumour of the pancreas. Other mesenchymal tumours that may occur in the pancreas include tumours of the peripheral nerve sheath, fibrous histiocytic tumours and rare vascular tumours.

  19. Functional polarization of tumour-associated macrophages by tumour-derived lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Colegio, Oscar R; Chu, Ngoc-Quynh; Szabo, Alison L; Chu, Thach; Rhebergen, Anne Marie; Jairam, Vikram; Cyrus, Nika; Brokowski, Carolyn E; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C; Phillips, Gillian M; Cline, Gary W; Phillips, Andrew J; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-09-25

    Macrophages have an important role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. To perform this function, macrophages must have the capacity to monitor the functional states of their 'client cells': namely, the parenchymal cells in the various tissues in which macrophages reside. Tumours exhibit many features of abnormally developed organs, including tissue architecture and cellular composition. Similarly to macrophages in normal tissues and organs, macrophages in tumours (tumour-associated macrophages) perform some key homeostatic functions that allow tumour maintenance and growth. However, the signals involved in communication between tumours and macrophages are poorly defined. Here we show that lactic acid produced by tumour cells, as a by-product of aerobic or anaerobic glycolysis, has a critical function in signalling, through inducing the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and the M2-like polarization of tumour-associated macrophages. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this effect of lactic acid is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α). Finally, we show that the lactate-induced expression of arginase 1 by macrophages has an important role in tumour growth. Collectively, these findings identify a mechanism of communication between macrophages and their client cells, including tumour cells. This communication most probably evolved to promote homeostasis in normal tissues but can also be engaged in tumours to promote their growth.

  20. Paediatric extracranial germ-cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Furqan; Murray, Matthew J; Amatruda, James F; Coleman, Nicholas; Nicholson, James C; Hale, Juliet P; Pashankar, Farzana; Stoneham, Sara J; Poynter, Jenny N; Olson, Thomas A; Billmire, Deborah F; Stark, Daniel; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Frazier, A Lindsay

    2016-04-01

    Management of paediatric extracranial germ-cell tumours carries a unique set of challenges. Germ-cell tumours are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that present across a wide age range and vary in site, histology, and clinical behaviour. Patients with germ-cell tumours are managed by a diverse array of specialists. Thus, staging, risk stratification, and treatment approaches for germ-cell tumours have evolved disparately along several trajectories. Paediatric germ-cell tumours differ from the adolescent and adult disease in many ways, leading to complexities in applying age-appropriate, evidence-based care. Suboptimal outcomes remain for several groups of patients, including adolescents, and patients with extragonadal tumours, high tumour markers at diagnosis, or platinum-resistant disease. Survivors have significant long-term toxicities. The challenge moving forward will be to translate new insights from molecular studies and collaborative clinical data into improved patient outcomes. Future trials will be characterised by improved risk-stratification systems, biomarkers for response and toxic effects, rational reduction of therapy for low-risk patients and novel approaches for poor-risk patients, and improved international collaboration across paediatric and adult cooperative research groups. PMID:27300675

  1. The Laser Treatment of Experimental Malignant Tumours

    PubMed Central

    McGuff, Paul E.; Deterling, Ralph A.; Gottlieb, Leonard S.; Fahimi, H. Dariush; Bushnell, David; Roeber, Fred

    1964-01-01

    Some of the results of experiments performed during the past two years to assess effects of laser energy on experimental malignant tumours are reviewed. Twenty types of malignant tumours (most in the cheek pouch and 11 of human origin) were treated in over 700 Syrian hamsters. Results of laser treatment of malignant melanomas and thyroidal carcinomas are presented. A human patient with malignant melanoma treated by laser energy is described. Investigation of thermal effect revealed that the laser-treated tumour remained warm for about one minute, while the cautery-treated tumour cooled to normal temperature in five seconds. Direct action of laser on superficial tumours is possible; deeper lesions must be exposed surgically. Laser energy has a selective effect on certain malignant tumours, resulting in their progressive regression and ultimate dissolution. All hamsters with implanted malignant melanomas and carcinomas of human origin, after completion of a course of laser treatment, showed no gross or histologic evidence of tumour up to the date of last observation. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2aFig. 2bFig. 2cFig. 2dFig. 2eFig. 2fFig. 3Fig. 4aFig. 4bFig. 4cFig. 4dFig. 4eFig. 4fFig. 4gFig. 6 PMID:14229757

  2. Irradiation Decreases the Neuroendocrine Biomarker Pro-Opiomelanocortin in Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Suzanne L.; Bryant, Jennifer L.; Babur, Muhammad; Riddell, Philip W.; Behrouzi, Roya; Williams, Kaye J.; White, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an extremely aggressive disease, commonly displaying therapy-resistant relapse. We have previously identified neuroendocrine and epithelial phenotypes in SCLC tumours and the neuroendocrine marker, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), correlated with worse overall survival in patients. However, the effect of treatment on these phenotypes is not understood. The current study aimed to determine the effect of repeated irradiation treatment on SCLC cell phenotype, focussing on the neuroendocrine marker, POMC. Results Human SCLC cells (DMS 79) were established as subcutaneous xenograft tumours in CBA nude mice and then exposed to repeated 2Gy irradiation. In untreated animals, POMC in the blood closely mirrored tumour growth; an ideal characteristic for a circulating biomarker. Following repeated localised irradiation in vivo, circulating POMC decreased (p< 0.01), in parallel with a decrease in tumour size, but remained low even when the tumours re-established. The excised tumours displayed reduced and distinctly heterogeneous expression of POMC compared to untreated tumours. There was no difference in the epithelial marker, cytokeratin. However, there were significantly more N-cadherin positive cells in the irradiated tumours. To investigate the tumour response to irradiation, DMS79 cells were repeatedly irradiated in vitro and the surviving cells selected. POMC expression was reduced, while mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, β1-integrin, fibroblast-specific protein 1, β-catenin and Zeb1 expression were amplified in the more irradiation-primed cells. There were no consistent changes in epithelial marker expression. Cell morphology changed dramatically with repeatedly irradiated cells displaying a more elongated shape, suggesting a switch to a more mesenchymal phenotype. Conclusions In summary, POMC biomarker expression and secretion were reduced in SCLC tumours which regrew after irradiation and in repeatedly irradiation (irradiation

  3. MRI appearances of borderline ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Bent, C L; Sahdev, A; Rockall, A G; Singh, N; Sohaib, S A; Reznek, R H

    2009-04-01

    This review was performed to describe the range of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of borderline ovarian tumours. The MRI findings in 26 patients with 31 borderline ovarian tumours (mean age: 40.1 years, range: 14-85 years) were retrospectively reviewed. For each tumour, site, size, MRI characteristics, and enhancement following gadolinium administration were recorded. There were 20 serous and 11 mucinous borderline ovarian subtypes. Nine of 26 patients demonstrated bilateral disease on MRI; synchronous contralateral ovarian disease included three benign, five serous borderline, and one serous invasive tumour. A history of a metachronous mucinous borderline tumour was identified in one patient. MRI appearances were classified into four morphological categories: group 1 (6/31, 19%), unilocular cysts; group 2 (6/31, 19%), minimally septate cysts with papillary projections; group 3 (14/31, 45%), markedly septate lesions with plaque-like excrescences; and group 4 (5/31, 16%), predominantly solid with exophytic papillary projections, all of serous subtype. There was a significant difference in mean volume between serous (841.5 cm(3)) and mucinous (6358.2 cm(3)) subtypes (p=0.009). All tumours demonstrated at least one MRI feature suggestive of malignancy. The present review demonstrates the variable MRI appearances of borderline ovarian tumours along with imaging features suggestive of tumour subtype. In patients in whom the clinical features are suggestive of a borderline ovarian tumour (young age and normal or minimally elevated CA125), the ability to predict a borderline disease using morphological features observed on MRI would be extremely helpful in surgical planning, with the potential to offer fertility or ovary-preserving surgery. Future studies are required to further this aim.

  4. Primary Axillary Porocarcinoma: A Rare Cutaneous Tumour.

    PubMed

    Devi, Nalli R Sumitra; Valarmathi, K; Lilly, Mary; Satish, Selvi; Mishra, Nidhi

    2016-02-01

    Eccrine porocarcinoma, a rare cutaneous malignant tumour accounts for a fraction of sweat gland tumours. This tumour is found to originate from the intraepithelial parts of the sweat glands. It commonly involves the lower extremities in elderly patients and carries an aggressive behaviour. Cutaneous and visceral metastasis can occur and hence prompt treatment is mandatory. Surgical excision is the mainstay of treatment modality. We hereby present a case of eccrine porocarcinoma in a 50-year-old male in the right axillary region presenting as a verrucous lesion. PMID:27042472

  5. The combined epithelial odontogenic tumour in Malaysians.

    PubMed

    Siar, C H; Ng, K H

    1991-04-01

    The combined epithelial odontogenic tumour represents a hybrid lesion comprising primarily areas of adenomatoid odontogenic tumour intermixed with foci of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour. Five such cases retrieved from the files of the Division of Stomatology, Institute for Medical Research, Kuala Lumpur, and four others from the existing literature were analysed. A mean age of 18.8 years, a female preponderance (66.7%) with a male to female ratio of 1:2 and predilection for the mandible (55.6%) were observed. All cases were treated by conservative surgery and the lack of recurrence confirmed the innocuous nature of this lesion.

  6. The prophylaxis of nonindustrial urothelial tumours

    PubMed Central

    Mount, Balfour M.

    1973-01-01

    Present knowledge concerning carcinogenesis and the natural history of urothelial tumours precludes firm conclusions relative to nonindustrial prophylaxis. However, a number of measures are consistent with current data and may be instituted for those patients with a demonstrated propensity to urothelial tumours. Their acceptability is based on the lack of associated toxicity for the patient. These measures include the elimination of significant infection, cigarettes, artificial sweeteners, analgesic abuse and coffee, the administration of vitamins C and B6, and in selected cases, the use of thiotepa. It is emphasized that the merit of these steps in altering the natural history of urothelial tumours is uncertain. PMID:4197537

  7. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of the gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Behranwala, Kasim A; Straker, Peter; Wan, Andrew; Fisher, Cyril; Thompson, Jeremy N

    2005-01-01

    Background Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (IMT) is a benign, nonmetastasizing proliferation of myofibroblasts with a potential for local infiltration, recurrence and persistent local growth. Case report We report a case of a 51 year-old female, who had excision of a gallbladder tumour. Histopathology showed it to be IMT of the gallbladder. Conclusion The approach to these tumours should be primarily surgical resection to obtain a definitive diagnosis and relieve symptoms. IMT has a potential for local infiltration, recurrence and persistent local growth. PMID:15862123

  8. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of the gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Behranwala, Kasim A; Straker, Peter; Wan, Andrew; Fisher, Cyril; Thompson, Jeremy N

    2005-04-29

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (IMT) is a benign, nonmetastasizing proliferation of myofibroblasts with a potential for local infiltration, recurrence and persistent local growth. CASE REPORT: We report a case of a 51 year-old female, who had excision of a gallbladder tumour. Histopathology showed it to be IMT of the gallbladder. CONCLUSION: The approach to these tumours should be primarily surgical resection to obtain a definitive diagnosis and relieve symptoms. IMT has a potential for local infiltration, recurrence and persistent local growth. PMID:15862123

  9. Warthin's tumour: a retrospective case series.

    PubMed

    Taylor, T R; Cozens, N J A; Robinson, I

    2009-11-01

    Warthin's tumour (benign cystadenolymphoma) is the second most common salivary gland tumour after pleomorphic salivary adenoma, and it is commonly encountered in routine head and neck ultrasonography. Tissue diagnosis can be achieved by fine-needle aspiration. Infarction and inflammatory response following fine-needle aspiration is previously described in excision specimens. We describe 7 cases of radiologically infarcting Warthin's tumours in situ in a retrospective analysis of 76 patients, and demonstrate an approximate incidence of at least 9% of infarction following fine-needle aspiration in lesions left in situ. We recommend the possibility of infarction and associated clinical symptoms being incorporated into pre-fine-needle aspiration patient counselling.

  10. Synchronous extra-parotid Warthin's tumour.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, H; Kirkham, N; Hogbin, B M

    1989-08-01

    Warthin's tumour (also known as adenolymphoma or papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum) is benign and accounts for 12 per cent of all neoplasms of the parotid gland. A case of extra-parotid Warthin's tumour occurring synchronously in a peri-parotid lymph node is described. This is not a metastatic phenomenon and occurs as a result of salivary gland inclusions of local lymph nodes during the embryological development of the parotid. Extra-parotid Warthin's tumour should be regarded as a benign incidental finding and the prognosis is excellent.

  11. Regional tumour glutamine supply affects chromatin and cell identity.

    PubMed

    Højfeldt, Jonas W; Helin, Kristian

    2016-09-28

    Limited perfusion of solid tumours produces a nutrient-deprived tumour core microenvironment. Low glutamine levels in the tumour core are now shown to lead to reduced levels of α-ketoglutarate and decreased histone demethylase activity, thereby promoting a less differentiated and more therapy-resistant state of the tumour cells.

  12. Regional tumour glutamine supply affects chromatin and cell identity.

    PubMed

    Højfeldt, Jonas W; Helin, Kristian

    2016-09-28

    Limited perfusion of solid tumours produces a nutrient-deprived tumour core microenvironment. Low glutamine levels in the tumour core are now shown to lead to reduced levels of α-ketoglutarate and decreased histone demethylase activity, thereby promoting a less differentiated and more therapy-resistant state of the tumour cells. PMID:27684506

  13. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour in a 20-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Virupakshappa, Deepti; Rajashekhara, Bhari Sharanesha; Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha; Das, Nagarajappa

    2014-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour is a relatively rare and distinct odontogenic tumour that is exclusively odontogenic epithelium in origin. It comprises 3% of all odontogenic tumours. This report describes the surgical therapy, clinical course and morphological characteristics of an adenomatoid odontogenic tumour that developed in the left maxilla of a 20-year-old patient. PMID:24810436

  14. Ovarian tumours in pregnancy: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Pakhee; Kehoe, Sean

    2011-04-01

    Ovarian tumours in pregnancy are a diagnostic and management challenge that is increasingly being faced by the clinician. While most masses are benign and resolve spontaneously, there are others that persist and indicate the need for surgical management. Ultrasound not only detects asymptomatic masses but also helps to guide their management based on presence or absence of features suspicious of malignancy. The role of tumour markers in pregnancy is limited due to their non-specific nature. Most masses treated in pregnancy are benign (most commonly dermoids), and most malignancies are either of low malignant potential or germ cell tumours, usually early stage disease. Surgical management is indicated for symptomatic masses or those with increasing size or complexity indicating possible malignancy. Both laparoscopy and laparotomy have similar results with regard to obstetric outcome. Conservative management is preferred in the remainder. MRI may help in better characterization of doubtful masses. National tumour registries can help to establish guidelines.

  15. A rare solitary fibrous tumour of kidney.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Tilak Bahadur; Nepal, Umesh

    2013-01-01

    A solitary fibrous tumour is an unusual spindle cell neoplasm. It frequently arises from the serosal surface of pleural cavity but has recently been described in diverse extrapleural sites. Urogenital localization is rare and only 36 cases of solitary fibrous tumours of the kidney have been described on published report. We report a case of a large solitary fibrous tumour clinically and radiologically thought to be renal cell carcinoma arising in the kidney of a 30 year old female. The radical nephrectomy was performed. The tumour was a well- circumscribed, solid mass attached to the renal pelvis without necrosis and haemorrhage. Histopathologically, a spindle cell neoplasia with alternating hypo and hypercellular areas, storiform, fascicular and hemangipericytoma like growth pattern and less cellular dense collagen deposits were observed. Immunohistochemical studies revealed reactivity for CD34, CD99 and Bcl-2 protein. PMID:24362666

  16. Tumour marker detection in oesophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mealy, K; Feely, J; Reid, I; McSweeney, J; Walsh, T; Hennessy, T P

    1996-10-01

    Levels of the tumour markers CEA, CA 19-9, CA 125 and SCC were measured in 58 patients presenting with oesophageal carcinoma and compared with levels in patients with benign oesophageal disease and levels in normal volunteers. CEA and CA 19-9 were significantly increased in the patients with oesophageal cancer, however, individual sensitivity for CEA, CA 19-9, CA 125 and SCC was only 28, 34, 10, and 32%, respectively. The combined sensitivity of all markers was 64% and specificity was 80%. There was no difference in combined tumour marker sensitivity between squamous or adenocarcinomas of the oesophagus. No consistent change in marker levels occurred with treatment, and tumour marker levels could not be significantly correlated with stage of disease or short-term survival. These results indicate that tumour marker sensitivity is too low for oesophageal cancer screening and has poor prognostic significance in those undergoing treatment.

  17. Dentigerous Cyst Associated with Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sumit; Uppala, Divya; Talasila, Sunil; Babu, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT), a tumour composed of odontogenic epithelium, is an uncommon tumour of odontogenic origin that accounts for only 2.2- 7.1% of all odontogenic tumours. Very few cases of AOT associated with Dentigerous cyst (DC) have been reported till date, most cases are in females and have a striking tendency to occur in the anterior maxilla. The present case is that of a 14-year-old female who revealed a large radiolucent lesion associated with the crown of an unerupted canine located in the left maxillary anterior region. The microscopic examination revealed the presence of AOT in the fibrous capsule of a DC. In this paper, we describe the importance of grossing, sectioning and complete examination of the slide to diagnose such hybrid lesions. PMID:26155575

  18. Mesenchymal phosphaturic tumour: early detection of recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Allevi, Fabiana; Rabbiosi, Dimitri; Mandalà, Marco; Colletti, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    The case of a recurrent phosphaturic mesenchymal tumour of the maxillary sinus 10 years after the first surgical excision is reported. The neoplasm first presented with paraneoplastic osteomalacia causing a pathological femur fracture. A right maxillary sinus tumour was identified and treated thereafter. The patient had no local symptoms and serum electrolytes returned to normal after surgical removal of the tumour. However, 10 years later, the patient's urine Ca and P levels increased and an octreoscan detected a new tumour in the right maxillary sinus. Early diagnosis prevented the effects of the paraneoplastic activity of the neoplasm. This case emphasises the importance of specific, close follow-up, because the neoplasm rarely produces local signs indicating its position. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a late relapse presenting without relevant symptoms (local pain or swelling or pathological fractures). PMID:24827649

  19. Systemic Effects of Non-Endocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, James D.; Rona, George

    1964-01-01

    Tumours of non-endocrine origin may exert deleterious effects by elaborating active principles which disturb body regulation. Systemic manifestations are fairly common with neoplasms of the lung, kidney, gastro-intestinal tract and thymus. The secretion of these tumours may have a known chemical structure (serotonin), may present hormone-like action (parathormone, antidiuretic hormone, insulinoid), or have well-defined biological properties (erythropoietin, gastrin-like principle). Tumours may stimulate endocrine glands by an unknown mechanism, producing disorders such as Cushing's syndrome, hypercalcemia, gynecomastia and hypoglycemia. Thymomas may be associated with autoimmune diseases. Tumours may extensively utilize or excrete some metabolite (glucose) or electrolyte (Na or K). Awareness of the systemic effects of various neoplasms may lead to an early diagnosis and proper treatment of these manifestations. PMID:14204555

  20. Suppression of tumour growth by orally administered osteopontin is accompanied by alterations in tumour blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Rittling, S R; Wejse, P L; Yagiz, K; Warot, G A; Hui, T

    2014-01-01

    Background: The integrin-binding protein osteopontin is strongly associated with tumour development, yet is an abundant dietary component as a constituent of human and bovine milk. Therefore, we tested the effect of orally administered osteopontin (o-OPN) on the development of subcutaneous tumours in mice. Methods: Bovine milk osteopontin was administered in drinking water to tumour-bearing immune-competent mice. Tumour growth, proliferation, necrosis, apoptosis and blood vessel size and number were measured. Expression of the α9 integrin was determined. Results: o-OPN suppressed tumour growth, increased the extent of necrosis, and induced formation of abnormally large blood vessels. Anti-OPN reactivity detected in the plasma of OPN-null mice fed OPN suggested that tumour-blocking peptides were absorbed during digestion, but the o-OPN effect was likely distinct from that of an RGD peptide. Expression of the α9 integrin was detected on both tumour cells and blood vessels. Potential active peptides from the α9 binding site of OPN were identified by mass spectrometry following in vitro digestion, and injection of these peptides suppressed tumour growth. Conclusions: These results suggest that peptides derived from o-OPN are absorbed and interfere with tumour growth and normal vessel development. o-OPN-derived peptides that target the α9 integrin are likely involved. PMID:24473400

  1. Unusual mass in the parapharyngeal space: a Warthin's tumour.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C-K Leslie; Sood, Sanjai; Bradley, Patrick J; Krishnan, Suren

    2006-03-01

    Parapharyngeal space (PPS) tumours are uncommon and can be a diagnostic challenge as the presenting symptoms are often vague and non-specific. Most of the PPS tumours are salivary tumours (pleomorphic adenoma being the most frequent diagnosis), and are thought to originate from minor salivary glands or the deep lobe of the parotid gland. Warthin's tumour, another benign salivary tumour involving the PPS has been rarely reported. A case of bilateral, metachronous Warthin's tumour involving the PPS is reported here. PPS Warthin's tumour is a very rare condition that if undiagnosed may result in considerable morbidity.

  2. Pineal anlage tumour - a rare entity with divergent histology.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Arvind; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Suri, Vaishali; Sarkar, Chitra; Sharma, B S; Garg, Ajay

    2011-06-01

    Pineal anlage tumour is a rare tumour of the pineal gland that is not listed in the 2007 World Health Organization classification of tumours of the central nervous system. Pineal anlage has been defined as a primary pineal tumour with both neuroepithelial and ectomesenchymal differentiation but without endodermal differentiation. We report a pineal anlage tumour in a 4-month-old boy, the youngest patient reported with this rare tumour, with a brief review of the literature. Clinicians and neuropathologists should be aware of this entity as it is likely to be misdiagnosed as a teratoma or a melanocytic tumour of the central nervous system.

  3. Cervical intra-/extramedullary solitary fibrous tumour.

    PubMed

    Ogungbo, B; Prakash, S; Kulkarni, G; Bradey, N; Marks, S M; Scoones, D

    2005-06-01

    A 53-year-old man presented with a 9-month history of symptoms of right-sided weakness, tingling and hypersentivity to clothes on both sides of the body. MRI revealed a large intraspinal intradural tumour at the level of C3-C4 in the cervical cord. The final histology was a solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) of the cervical spinal cord. The radiological diagnosis, surgical management and histology are reviewed.

  4. Consensus on biomarkers for neuroendocrine tumour disease

    PubMed Central

    Oberg, Kjell; Modlin, Irvin M; De Herder, Wouter; Pavel, Marianne; Klimstra, David; Frilling, Andrea; Metz, David C; Heaney, Anthony; Kwekkeboom, Dik; Strosberg, Jonathan; Meyer, Timothy; Moss, Steven F; Washington, Kay; Wolin, Edward; Liu, Eric; Goldenring, James

    2016-01-01

    Management of neuroendocrine neoplasia represents a clinical challenge because of its late presentation, lack of treatment options, and limitations in present imaging modalities and biomarkers to guide management. Monoanalyte biomarkers have poor sensitivity, specificity, and predictive ability. A National Cancer Institute summit, held in 2007, on neuroendocrine tumours noted biomarker limitations to be a crucial unmet need in the management of neuroendocrine tumours. A multinational consensus meeting of multidisciplinary experts in neuroendocrine tumours assessed the use of current biomarkers and defined the perquisites for novel biomarkers via the Delphi method. Consensus (at >75%) was achieved for 88 (82%) of 107 assessment questions. The panel concluded that circulating multianalyte biomarkers provide the highest sensitivity and specificity necessary for minimum disease detection and that this type of biomarker had sufficient information to predict treatment effectiveness and prognosis. The panel also concluded that no monoanalyte biomarker of neuroendocrine tumours has yet fulfilled these criteria and there is insufficient information to support the clinical use of miRNA or circulating tumour cells as useful prognostic markers for this disease. The panel considered that trials measuring multianalytes (eg, neuroendocrine gene transcripts) should also identify how such information can optimise the management of patients with neuroendocrine tumours. PMID:26370353

  5. Brain tumour-associated status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Goonawardena, Janindu; Marshman, Laurence A G; Drummond, Katharine J

    2015-01-01

    We have reviewed the scant literature on status epilepticus in patients with brain tumours. Patients with brain tumour-associated epilepsy (TAE) appear less likely to develop status epilepticus (TASE) than patients with epilepsy in the general population (EGP) are to develop status epilepticus (SEGP). TASE is associated with lesions in similar locations as TAE; in particular, the frontal lobes. However, in contrast to TAE, where seizures commence early in the course of the disease or at presentation, TASE is more likely to occur later in the disease course and herald tumour progression. In marked contrast to TAE, where epilepsy risk is inversely proportional to Word Health Organization tumour grade, TASE risk appears to be directly proportional to tumour grade (high grade gliomas appear singularly predisposed). Whilst anti-epileptic drug (AED) resistance is more common in TAE than EGP (with resistance directly proportional to tumour grade and frontal location), TASE appears paradoxically more responsive to simple AED regimes than either TAE or SEGP. Although some results suggest that mortality may be higher with TASE than with SEGP, it is likely that (as with SEGP) the major determinant of mortality is the underlying disease process. Because all such data have been derived from retrospective studies, because TASE and SEGP are less common than TAE and EGP, and because TASE and SEGP classification has often been inconsistent, findings can only be considered preliminary: multi-centre, prospective studies are required. Whilst preliminary, our review suggests that TASE has a distinct clinical profile compared to TAE and SEGP.

  6. Solitary fibrous tumour of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Mohtarrudin, N; Nor Hanipah, Z; Mohd Dusa, N

    2016-04-01

    Extrapleural solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are rare tumours characterized by patternless spindle cells with haemangiopericytoma-like vascular spaces. Previously the tumours have been classified as haemangiopericytoma, an entity that is now considered obsolete. We report a case of extrapleural SFT arising in the soft tissue of the chest wall. The patient was a 31-year-old Malay lady presenting with a mobile swelling of the right chest wall for more than five years. During excision the tumour was noted to be well-circumscribed and yellowish in colour, giving an impression of lipoma. Microscopically, the tumour had patternless architecture, characterized by hypocellular and hypercellular areas. It was composed of uniform, spindle-shaped cells displaying oval nuclei, inconspicuous nucleoli, pale cytoplasm and indistinct cell borders. The mitotic count was 2 per 10 HPF. Branching, medium-sized thin-walled blood vessels in a haemangiopericytomatous growth pattern, some with hyalinised wall were identified. The neoplastic cells were immunoreactive to CD99 and CD34 and were non-immunoreactive to Desmin, Smooth Muscle Actin, S100 protein and EMA. We elucidate the challenges in diagnosing this tumour in this unusual location.

  7. Solitary fibrous tumour of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Mohtarrudin, N; Nor Hanipah, Z; Mohd Dusa, N

    2016-04-01

    Extrapleural solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are rare tumours characterized by patternless spindle cells with haemangiopericytoma-like vascular spaces. Previously the tumours have been classified as haemangiopericytoma, an entity that is now considered obsolete. We report a case of extrapleural SFT arising in the soft tissue of the chest wall. The patient was a 31-year-old Malay lady presenting with a mobile swelling of the right chest wall for more than five years. During excision the tumour was noted to be well-circumscribed and yellowish in colour, giving an impression of lipoma. Microscopically, the tumour had patternless architecture, characterized by hypocellular and hypercellular areas. It was composed of uniform, spindle-shaped cells displaying oval nuclei, inconspicuous nucleoli, pale cytoplasm and indistinct cell borders. The mitotic count was 2 per 10 HPF. Branching, medium-sized thin-walled blood vessels in a haemangiopericytomatous growth pattern, some with hyalinised wall were identified. The neoplastic cells were immunoreactive to CD99 and CD34 and were non-immunoreactive to Desmin, Smooth Muscle Actin, S100 protein and EMA. We elucidate the challenges in diagnosing this tumour in this unusual location. PMID:27126667

  8. Smooth muscle tumours of the alimentary tract.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, T.; Danton, M. H.; Parks, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    Neoplasms arising from smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are uncommon, comprising only 1% of gastrointestinal tumours. A total of 51 cases of smooth muscle tumour of the GI tract were analysed; 44 leiomyomas and 7 leiomyosarcomas. Lesions occurred in all areas from the oesophagus to the rectum, the stomach being the commonest site. Thirty-six patients had clinical features referable to the tumour. The tumour was detected during investigation or management of an unrelated disease process in 15 patients. The clinical presentation varied depending on tumour location, but abdominal pain and GI bleeding were the commonest presenting symptoms. The lesion was demonstrated preoperatively, mainly by endoscopy and barium studies, in 27 patients. Surgical excision was the treatment of choice, where possible. There was no recurrence in the leiomyoma group but four patients died in the leiomyosarcoma group. Although rare, smooth muscle tumours should be considered in situations where clinical presentation and investigations are not suggestive of any common GI disorder. The preoperative assessment and diagnosis is difficult because of the variability in clinical features and their inaccessibility to routine GI investigation. It is recommended that, where possible, the lesion, whether symptomatic or discovered incidentally, should be excised completely to achieve a cure and prevent future complications. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2221768

  9. Myeloid cells in tumour-immune interactions.

    PubMed

    Kareva, Irina; Berezovskaya, Faina; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2010-07-01

    Despite highly developed specific immune responses, tumour cells often manage to escape recognition by the immune system, continuing to grow uncontrollably. Experimental work suggests that mature myeloid cells may be central to the activation of the specific immune response. Recognition and subsequent control of tumour growth by the cells of the specific immune response depend on the balance between immature (ImC) and mature (MmC) myeloid cells in the body. However, tumour cells produce cytokines that inhibit ImC maturation, altering the balance between ImC and MmC. Hence, the focus of this manuscript is on the study of the potential role of this inhibiting mechanism on tumour growth dynamics. A conceptual predator-prey type model that incorporates the dynamics and interactions of tumour cells, CD8(+) T cells, ImC and MmC is proposed in order to address the role of this mechanism. The prey (tumour) has a defence mechanism (blocking the maturation of ImC) that prevents the predator (immune system) from recognizing it. The model, a four-dimensional nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations, is reduced to a two-dimensional system using time-scale arguments that are tied to the maturation rate of ImC. Analysis shows that the model is capable of supporting biologically reasonable patterns of behaviour depending on the initial conditions. A range of parameters, where healing without external influences can occur, is identified both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  10. Therapeutic effect of interleukin 12 on mouse haemangiosarcomas is not associated with an increased anti-tumour cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity.

    PubMed Central

    Vizler, C.; Rosato, A.; Calderazzo, F.; Quintieri, L.; Fruscella, P.; Wainstok de Calmanovici, R.; Mantovani, A.; Vecchi, A.; Zanovello, P.; Collavo, D.

    1998-01-01

    In syngeneic mice, the H5V polyoma middle-T oncogene-transformed endothelioma cell line induces Kaposi's sarcoma-like cavernous haemangiomas that regress transiently, probably because of an anti-tumour immune response, but eventually grow progressively and kill the host. To evaluate the generation of tumour-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), spleen cells of tumour-bearing mice were restimulated with irradiated H5V cells in mixed leucocyte-tumour cell cultures. Tumour-specific CTLs were demonstrable only when low numbers of H5V stimulator cells were used (<1 H5V cell per 50 splenocytes). We found that H5V cells secrete immunosuppressive mediators because CTL generation was blocked when H5V cells culture supernatants were added to allogeneic mixed leucocyte cultures. As numerous tumour-derived immunosuppressive mediators may interfere with interleukin 12 (IL-12) production, we tested whether IL-12 treatment of the tumour-bearing mice would augment their immune response and thus suppress tumour growth. Indeed, IL-12 inhibited tumour growth and prevented mortality, but did not increase anti-H5V CTL generation either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, the anti-tumour activity in IL-12-treated mice was abrogated by anti-interferon (IFN)-gamma monoclonal antibody (MAb) co-administration. These results strongly suggest that the anti-tumour effect of IL-12 is principally mediated by IFN-gamma release that in turn blocks H5V cell proliferation and induces the release of factors that suppress angiogenesis. PMID:9484826

  11. Growth hormone receptor antagonism suppresses tumour regrowth after radiotherapy in an endometrial cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Evans, Angharad; Jamieson, Stephen M F; Liu, Dong-Xu; Wilson, William R; Perry, Jo K

    2016-08-28

    Human GH expression is associated with poor survival outcomes for endometrial cancer patients, enhanced oncogenicity of endometrial cancer cells and reduced sensitivity to ionising radiation in vitro, suggesting that GH is a potential target for anticancer therapy. However, whether GH receptor inhibition sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo has not been tested. In the current study, we evaluated whether the GH receptor antagonist, pegvisomant (Pfizer), sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo in an endometrial tumour xenograft model. Subcutaneous administration of pegvisomant (20 or 100 mg/kg/day, s.c.) reduced serum IGF1 levels by 23% and 68%, respectively, compared to vehicle treated controls. RL95-2 xenografts grown in immunodeficient NIH-III mice were treated with vehicle or pegvisomant (100 mg/kg/day), with or without fractionated gamma radiation (10 × 2.5 Gy over 5 days). When combined with radiation, pegvisomant significantly increased the median time tumours took to reach 3× the pre-radiation treatment volume (49 days versus 72 days; p = 0.001). Immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated that 100 mg/kg pegvisomant every second day was sufficient to abrogate MAP Kinase signalling throughout the tumour. In addition, treatment with pegvisomant increased hypoxic regions in irradiated tumours, as determined by immunohistochemical detection of pimonidazole adducts, and decreased the area of CD31 labelling in unirradiated tumours, suggesting an anti-vascular effect. Pegvisomant did not affect intratumoral staining for HIF1α, VEGF-A, CD11b, or phospho-EGFR. Our results suggest that blockade of the human GH receptor may improve the response of GH and/or IGF1-responsive endometrial tumours to radiation.

  12. Establishment of a small animal tumour model for in vivo studies with low energy laser accelerated particles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The long-term aim of developing a laser based acceleration of protons and ions towards clinical application requires not only substantial technological progress, but also the radiobiological characterization of the resulting ultra-short pulsed particle beams. Recent in vitro data showed similar effects of laser-accelerated versus "conventional" protons on clonogenic cell survival. As the proton energies currently achieved by laser driven acceleration are too low to penetrate standard tumour models on mouse legs, the aim of the present work was to establish a tumour model allowing for the penetration of low energy protons (~ 20 MeV) to further verify their effects in vivo. Methods KHT mouse sarcoma cells were injected subcutaneously in the right ear of NMRI (nu/nu) mice and the growing tumours were characterized with respect to growth parameters, histology and radiation response. In parallel, the laser system JETI was prepared for animal experimentation, i.e. a new irradiation setup was implemented and the laser parameters were carefully adjusted. Finally, a proof-of-principle experiment with laser accelerated electrons was performed to validate the tumour model under realistic conditions, i.e. altered environment and horizontal beam delivery. Results KHT sarcoma on mice ears showed a high take rate and continuous tumour growth after reaching a volume of ~ 5 mm3. The first irradiation experiment using laser accelerated electrons versus 200 kV X-rays was successfully performed and tumour growth delay was evaluated. Comparable tumour growth delay was found between X-ray and laser accelerated electron irradiation. Moreover, experimental influences, like anaesthesia and positioning at JETI, were found to be negligible. Conclusion A small animal tumour model suitable for the irradiation with low energy particles was established and validated at a laser based particle accelerator. Thus, the translation from in vitro to in vivo experimentation was for the

  13. Tumour nuclear oestrogen receptor beta 1 correlates inversely with parathyroid tumour weight

    PubMed Central

    Haglund, Felix; Rosin, Gustaf; Nilsson, Inga-Lena; Juhlin, C Christofer; Pernow, Ylva; Norenstedt, Sophie; Dinets, Andrii; Larsson, Catharina; Hartman, Johan; Höög, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common endocrinopathy, frequently caused by a parathyroid adenoma, rarely by a parathyroid carcinoma that lacks effective oncological treatment. As the majority of cases are present in postmenopausal women, oestrogen signalling has been implicated in the tumourigenesis. Oestrogen receptor beta 1 (ERB1) and ERB2 have been recently identified in parathyroid adenomas, the former inducing genes coupled to tumour apoptosis. We applied immunohistochemistry and slide digitalisation to quantify nuclear ERB1 and ERB2 in 172 parathyroid adenomas, atypical adenomas and carcinomas, and ten normal parathyroid glands. All the normal parathyroid glands expressed ERB1 and ERB2. The majority of tumours expressed ERB1 (70.6%) at varying intensities, and ERB2 (96.5%) at strong intensities. Parathyroid carcinomas expressed ERB1 in three out of six cases and ERB2 in five out of six cases. The intensity of tumour nuclear ERB1 staining significantly correlated inversely with tumour weight (P=0.011), and patients whose tumours were classified as ERB1-negative had significantly greater tumour weight as well as higher serum calcium (P=0.002) and parathyroid hormone levels (P=0.003). Additionally, tumour nuclear ERB1 was not expressed differentially with respect to sex or age of the patient. Levels of tumour nuclear ERB2 did not correlate with clinical characteristics. In conclusion, decreased ERB1 immunoreactivity is associated with increased tumour weight in parathyroid adenomas. Given the previously reported correlation with tumour-suppressive signalling, selective oestrogen receptor modulation (SERMs) may play a role in the treatment of parathyroid carcinomas. Future studies of SERMs and oestrogen treatment in PHPT should consider tumour weight as a potential factor in pharmacological responsiveness. PMID:25648860

  14. Tumour nuclear oestrogen receptor beta 1 correlates inversely with parathyroid tumour weight.

    PubMed

    Haglund, Felix; Rosin, Gustaf; Nilsson, Inga-Lena; Juhlin, C Christofer; Pernow, Ylva; Norenstedt, Sophie; Dinets, Andrii; Larsson, Catharina; Hartman, Johan; Höög, Anders

    2015-03-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common endocrinopathy, frequently caused by a parathyroid adenoma, rarely by a parathyroid carcinoma that lacks effective oncological treatment. As the majority of cases are present in postmenopausal women, oestrogen signalling has been implicated in the tumourigenesis. Oestrogen receptor beta 1 (ERB1) and ERB2 have been recently identified in parathyroid adenomas, the former inducing genes coupled to tumour apoptosis. We applied immunohistochemistry and slide digitalisation to quantify nuclear ERB1 and ERB2 in 172 parathyroid adenomas, atypical adenomas and carcinomas, and ten normal parathyroid glands. All the normal parathyroid glands expressed ERB1 and ERB2. The majority of tumours expressed ERB1 (70.6%) at varying intensities, and ERB2 (96.5%) at strong intensities. Parathyroid carcinomas expressed ERB1 in three out of six cases and ERB2 in five out of six cases. The intensity of tumour nuclear ERB1 staining significantly correlated inversely with tumour weight (P=0.011), and patients whose tumours were classified as ERB1-negative had significantly greater tumour weight as well as higher serum calcium (P=0.002) and parathyroid hormone levels (P=0.003). Additionally, tumour nuclear ERB1 was not expressed differentially with respect to sex or age of the patient. Levels of tumour nuclear ERB2 did not correlate with clinical characteristics. In conclusion, decreased ERB1 immunoreactivity is associated with increased tumour weight in parathyroid adenomas. Given the previously reported correlation with tumour-suppressive signalling, selective oestrogen receptor modulation (SERMs) may play a role in the treatment of parathyroid carcinomas. Future studies of SERMs and oestrogen treatment in PHPT should consider tumour weight as a potential factor in pharmacological responsiveness. PMID:25648860

  15. The treatment of cranial germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Brandes, A A; Pasetto, L M; Monfardini, S

    2000-08-01

    Germ cell tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) include many subtypes whose response to treatment varies, even though the symptoms and radiological appearances are similar. Five-year survival rates are 96% for germinomas, 100% for mature teratomas, 67% for immature teratomas and 69% for immature teratomas mixed with germinomas; for beta-HCG secreting germinomas the rate is only 38%. Patients with choriocarcinoma, embryonal carcinoma, or yolk sac tumour have the lowest survival rates; patients with germinoma or mature teratoma have longer survival rates. Although a wider resection is associated with a higher rate of survival for patients with non-germinomatous germ cell (NGGC) tumours, to date an aggressive surgical approach has been advocated only for pineal region tumours, but not for hypothalamic/neurohypophyseal tumours. Beside the delayed injury induced by radiotherapy, the late injury induced by chemotherapy is becoming increasingly evident. Cisplatin is considered an indispensable drug, but it may cause renal damage, ototoxicity, peripheral neuropathy and sterility, while etoposide is associated with an excess frequency of second neoplasms. Taking into account all of the published literature, the following therapeutic options are suggested: in pure germinoma tumours (GT) radiotherapy alone will usually ensure adequate control of the disease, and the long-term sequelae may be limited by reducing the dose delivered, as was proposed for germ cell testicular tumours, to 30 Gy to limited fields plus 25-30 Gy to the spinal axis if there is disseminated disease. In cases of recurrence, which should be uncommon, patients may be rescued with both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In NGGC tumours, the prognosis is more unfavourable and there is often dissemination to the spine at diagnosis; however, the tumour's high chemosensitivity suggests neoadjuvant treatment chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide for three cycles followed by consolidation radiotherapy with

  16. Tumour-induced neoneurogenesis and perineural tumour growth: a mathematical approach

    PubMed Central

    Lolas, Georgios; Bianchi, Arianna; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that tumours induce the formation of a lymphatic and a blood vasculature around themselves. A similar but far less studied process occurs in relation to the nervous system and is referred to as neoneurogenesis. The relationship between tumour progression and the nervous system is still poorly understood and is likely to involve a multitude of factors. It is therefore relevant to study tumour-nerve interactions through mathematical modelling: this may reveal the most significant factors of the plethora of interacting elements regulating neoneurogenesis. The present work is a first attempt to model the neurobiological aspect of cancer development through a system of differential equations. The model confirms the experimental observations that a tumour is able to promote nerve formation/elongation around itself, and that high levels of nerve growth factor and axon guidance molecules are recorded in the presence of a tumour. Our results also reflect the observation that high stress levels (represented by higher norepinephrine release by sympathetic nerves) contribute to tumour development and spread, indicating a mutually beneficial relationship between tumour cells and neurons. The model predictions suggest novel therapeutic strategies, aimed at blocking the stress effects on tumour growth and dissemination. PMID:26861829

  17. Tumour-induced neoneurogenesis and perineural tumour growth: a mathematical approach.

    PubMed

    Lolas, Georgios; Bianchi, Arianna; Syrigos, Konstantinos N

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that tumours induce the formation of a lymphatic and a blood vasculature around themselves. A similar but far less studied process occurs in relation to the nervous system and is referred to as neoneurogenesis. The relationship between tumour progression and the nervous system is still poorly understood and is likely to involve a multitude of factors. It is therefore relevant to study tumour-nerve interactions through mathematical modelling: this may reveal the most significant factors of the plethora of interacting elements regulating neoneurogenesis. The present work is a first attempt to model the neurobiological aspect of cancer development through a system of differential equations. The model confirms the experimental observations that a tumour is able to promote nerve formation/elongation around itself, and that high levels of nerve growth factor and axon guidance molecules are recorded in the presence of a tumour. Our results also reflect the observation that high stress levels (represented by higher norepinephrine release by sympathetic nerves) contribute to tumour development and spread, indicating a mutually beneficial relationship between tumour cells and neurons. The model predictions suggest novel therapeutic strategies, aimed at blocking the stress effects on tumour growth and dissemination. PMID:26861829

  18. Tumour-induced neoneurogenesis and perineural tumour growth: a mathematical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolas, Georgios; Bianchi, Arianna; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.

    2016-02-01

    It is well-known that tumours induce the formation of a lymphatic and a blood vasculature around themselves. A similar but far less studied process occurs in relation to the nervous system and is referred to as neoneurogenesis. The relationship between tumour progression and the nervous system is still poorly understood and is likely to involve a multitude of factors. It is therefore relevant to study tumour-nerve interactions through mathematical modelling: this may reveal the most significant factors of the plethora of interacting elements regulating neoneurogenesis. The present work is a first attempt to model the neurobiological aspect of cancer development through a system of differential equations. The model confirms the experimental observations that a tumour is able to promote nerve formation/elongation around itself, and that high levels of nerve growth factor and axon guidance molecules are recorded in the presence of a tumour. Our results also reflect the observation that high stress levels (represented by higher norepinephrine release by sympathetic nerves) contribute to tumour development and spread, indicating a mutually beneficial relationship between tumour cells and neurons. The model predictions suggest novel therapeutic strategies, aimed at blocking the stress effects on tumour growth and dissemination.

  19. MicroRNA Regulation of Brain Tumour Initiating Cells in Central Nervous System Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Thusyanth; Bakhshinyan, David; Venugopal, Chitra; Singh, Sheila K.

    2015-01-01

    CNS tumours occur in both pediatric and adult patients and many of these tumours are associated with poor clinical outcome. Due to a paradigm shift in thinking for the last several years, these tumours are now considered to originate from a small population of stem-like cells within the bulk tumour tissue. These cells, termed as brain tumour initiating cells (BTICs), are perceived to be regulated by microRNAs at the posttranscriptional/translational levels. Proliferation, stemness, differentiation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, apoptosis, and cell cycle constitute some of the significant processes modulated by microRNAs in cancer initiation and progression. Characterization and functional studies on oncogenic or tumour suppressive microRNAs are made possible because of developments in sequencing and microarray techniques. In the current review, we bring recent knowledge of the role of microRNAs in BTIC formation and therapy. Special attention is paid to two highly aggressive and well-characterized brain tumours: gliomas and medulloblastoma. As microRNA seems to be altered in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, “microRNA therapy” may now have potential to improve outcomes for brain tumour patients. In this rapidly evolving field, further understanding of miRNA biology and its contribution towards cancer can be mined for new therapeutic tools. PMID:26064134

  20. Vascular tumours in infants. Part I: benign vascular tumours other than infantile haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Hoeger, P H; Colmenero, I

    2014-09-01

    Vascular anomalies can be subdivided into vascular tumours and vascular malformations (VMs). While most VMs are present at birth and do not exhibit significant postnatal growth, vascular tumours are characterized by their dynamics of growth and (sometimes) spontaneous regression. This review focuses on benign vascular tumours other than infantile haemangiomas (IHs), namely pyogenic granuloma, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, glomangioma, rapidly involuting and noninvoluting congenital haemangioma, verrucous haemangioma and spindle cell haemangioma. While some of them bear clinical resemblance to IH, they can be separated by age of appearance, growth characteristics and/or negative staining for glucose transporter 1. Separation of these tumours from IH is necessary because their outcome and therapeutic options are different. Semimalignant and malignant vascular tumours will be addressed in a separate review.

  1. Synchronous gastric inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour with gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the stomach and hepatic syringious haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, D; Chatziralli, IP; Papadopoulos, V; Filitantzi, C; Demertzidis, C

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of the stomach is a very rare lesion. A case of a gastric inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the stomach and hepatic syringious haemangioma is described. We report an 80-year-old male who had an exophytic mass in the area of the pylorus and the duodenum, where hepatic cysts were found in the magnetic resonance (MRI) scan on examination of hypochromic microcytic anaemia, and prolapsus and torsion of the bulb of the stomach found during gastroscopy. During surgical excision of the exophytic mass, a gastrointestinal stromal tumour from the gastric fundus and a syringious haemangioma from the superior hepatic surface were resected. All tumours were treated successfully by surgical excision. The patient had an uneventful recovery. Neither recurrence nor metastasis was found after a 12-month follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such an association is reported in the literature. PMID:24960722

  2. Desmoplastic nested spindle cell tumours and nested stromal epithelial tumours of the liver.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sunayana; Bihari, Chhagan

    2016-04-01

    Desmoplastic nested spindle cell tumour of liver (DNSTL), nested stromal-epithelial tumour (NSET) and calcifying nested stromal-epithelial tumour (CNSET) are recently described entities with similar morphology, immunohistochemistry and molecular genetics. These are rare entities with only three large case series described till date. These tumours commonly present in the paediatric age group. NSETs, in addition have been described to be associated with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) production and Cushingoid features. It is important to discuss this rare group of tumours with a low malignant potential as the most common radiological differential diagnosis is hepatoblastoma, which has a relatively poorer prognosis. Thus, a pathologist needs to keep this entity in mind, so as to offer a correct histological diagnosis.

  3. Glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes in human tumours and tumour derived cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, A. D.; Forrester, L. M.; Hayes, J. D.; Wareing, C. J.; Carmichael, J.; Harris, A. L.; Mooghen, M.; Wolf, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that glutathione S-transferases play a role in the intrinsic and acquired resistance of tumours to anticancer drugs. In view of the wide use of tumour cell lines to understand the factors which confer either sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapeutic agents we have determined glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and isozyme composition in nine human cell lines. These data have been compared with the values obtained in solid tumours. In most cases overall GST activity was higher in the tumours than in the cell lines. This was most pronounced for the breast tumour samples relative to MCF7 cell line. The pi class GST subunit was present at similar concentration in the cell lines and the tumours, and in most cases was the most abundant subunit present. The alpha and mu class GST were expressed in most of the cell lines but at much lower concentration than the pi class subunit. Also considerable variability particularly in the expression of the mu subunits was observed. This was also the case for the expression of these subunits in the solid tumour samples. The levels of these GSTs (when expressed) in the solid tumours was invariably higher than that observed in the cell lines. There are therefore several similarities but also some significant differences in GST expression in solid tumours and cell lines. Whether the differences are because expression is lost during the generation of the cell lines or whether it reflects the individuality of human tumours remains to be clearly established. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:2789940

  4. Targeting ALCAM in the cryo-treated tumour microenvironment successfully induces systemic anti-tumour immunity.

    PubMed

    Kudo-Saito, Chie; Fuwa, Takafumi; Kawakami, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Cryoablative treatment has been widely used for treating cancer. However, the therapeutic efficacies are still controversial. The molecular mechanisms of the cryo-induced immune responses, particularly underlying the ineffectiveness, remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we identified a new molecular mechanism involved in the cryo failure. We used cryo-ineffective metastatic tumour models that murine melanoma B16-F10 cells were subcutaneously and intravenously implanted into C57BL/6 mice. When the subcutaneous tumours were treated cryoablation on day 7 after tumour implantation, cells expressing activated leucocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166) were significantly expanded not only locally in the treated tumours but also systemically in spleen and bone marrow of the mice. The cryo-induced ALCAM(+) cells including CD45(-) mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells significantly suppressed interferon γ production and cytotoxicity of tumour-specific CD8(+) T cells via ALCAM expressed in these cells. This suggests that systemic expansion of the ALCAM(+) cells negatively switches host-immune directivity to the tumour-supportive mode. Intratumoural injection with anti-ALCAM blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) following the cryo treatment systemically induced tumour-specific CD8(+) T cells with higher cytotoxic activities, resulting in suppression of tumour growth and metastasis in the cryo-resistant tumour models. These suggest that expansion of ALCAM(+) cells is a determinant of limiting the cryo efficacy. Further combination with an immune checkpoint inhibitor anti-CTLA4 mAb optimized the anti-tumour efficacy of the dual-combination therapy. Targeting ALCAM may be a promising strategy for overcoming the cryo ineffectiveness leading to the better practical use of cryoablation in clinical treatment of cancer.

  5. Influence of femtosecond laser radiation on cells of the transplantable tumour Krebs-2

    SciTech Connect

    Meshalkin, Yu P; Popova, N A; Nikolin, V P; Kaledin, V I; Kirpichnikov, A V; Pestryakov, Efim V

    2012-06-30

    The influence of femtosecond radiation of a titaniumsapphire laser on cells of the transplantable ascitic tumour Krebs-2 was studied. After in vitro irradiation by the pulsed fundamentalharmonic radiation with the wavelength 800 nm, pulse duration 30 fs, repetition rate 1 kHz, mean power 100 and 300 mW and exposure time 3 min, as well as by the second-harmonic radiation (40 nm, 50 fs, 120 mW), all cells were diffusely stained by the vital stain trypan blue, which may be an evidence of their death or abnormalities of membrane permeability. However, implantation of such cells to experimental animals led to formation of tumours at the transplantation site with the kinetics slightly different from the control one. In the group of mice to which the cells were inoculated after irradiation with second harmonic pulses of titanium-sapphire laser the inhibition of tumour growth was observed due to partial death of cells under the action of UV spectral components. To explain the mechanism of the observed phenomenon the possibility of pore formation (photoporation) in the cell membrane, described earlier in the papers on foreign DNA transfection into cells, is considered.

  6. Improving tumour heterogeneity MRI assessment with histograms

    PubMed Central

    Just, N

    2014-01-01

    By definition, tumours are heterogeneous. They are defined by marked differences in cells, microenvironmental factors (oxygenation levels, pH, VEGF, VPF and TGF-α) metabolism, vasculature, structure and function that in turn translate into heterogeneous drug delivery and therapeutic outcome. Ways to estimate quantitatively tumour heterogeneity can improve drug discovery, treatment planning and therapeutic responses. It is therefore of paramount importance to have reliable and reproducible biomarkers of cancerous lesions' heterogeneity. During the past decade, the number of studies using histogram approaches increased drastically with various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques (DCE-MRI, DWI, SWI etc.) although information on tumour heterogeneity remains poorly exploited. This fact can be attributed to a poor knowledge of the available metrics and of their specific meaning as well as to the lack of literature references to standardised histogram methods with which surrogate markers of heterogeneity can be compared. This review highlights the current knowledge and critical advances needed to investigate and quantify tumour heterogeneity. The key role of imaging techniques and in particular the key role of MRI for an accurate investigation of tumour heterogeneity is reviewed with a particular emphasis on histogram approaches and derived methods. PMID:25268373

  7. Mast cells, angiogenesis, and tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of mast cells (MCs) in tumours was described by Ehrlich in his doctoral thesis. Since this early account, ample evidence has been provided highlighting participation of MCs to the inflammatory reaction that occurs in many clinical and experimental tumour settings. MCs are bone marrow-derived tissue-homing leukocytes that are endowed with a panoply of releasable mediators and surface receptors. These cells actively take part to innate and acquired immune reactions as well as to a series of fundamental functions such as angiogenesis, tissue repair, and tissue remodelling. The involvement of MCs in tumour development is debated. Although some evidence suggests that MCs can promote tumourigenesis and tumour progression, there are some clinical sets as well as experimental tumour models in which MCs seem to have functions that favour the host. One of the major issues linking MCs to cancer is the ability of these cells to release potent pro-angiogenic factors. This review will focus on the most recent acquisitions about this intriguing field of research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mast cells in inflammation.

  8. Targeting the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jean M; Coleman, Robert L; Sood, Anil K

    2016-03-01

    The study of cancer initiation, growth, and metastasis has traditionally been focused on cancer cells, and the view that they proliferate due to uncontrolled growth signalling owing to genetic derangements. However, uncontrolled growth in tumours cannot be explained solely by aberrations in cancer cells themselves. To fully understand the biological behaviour of tumours, it is essential to understand the microenvironment in which cancer cells exist, and how they manipulate the surrounding stroma to promote the malignant phenotype. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecologic cancer worldwide. The majority of patients will have objective responses to standard tumour debulking surgery and platinum-taxane doublet chemotherapy, but most will experience disease recurrence and chemotherapy resistance. As such, a great deal of effort has been put forth to develop therapies that target the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer. Herein, we review the key components of the tumour microenvironment as they pertain to this disease, outline targeting opportunities and supporting evidence thus far, and discuss resistance to therapy.

  9. Giant malignant phyllodes tumour of breast.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Ramakrishnan; Savasere, Thejas; Prabhuswamy, Vinod Kumar; Babu, Rajashekhara; Shivaswamy, Sadashivaiah

    2014-01-01

    The term phyllodes tumour includes lesions ranging from completely benign tumours to malignant sarcomas. Clinically phyllodes tumours are smooth, rounded, and usually painless multinodular lesions indistinguishable from fibroadenomas. Percentage of phyllodes tumour classified as malignant ranges from 23% to 50%. We report a case of second largest phyllodes tumour in a 35-year-old lady who presented with swelling of right breast since 6 months, initially small in size, that progressed gradually to present size. Examination revealed mass in the right breast measuring 36×32 cms with lobulated firm surface and weighing 10 kgs. Fine needle aspiration cytology was reported as borderline phyllodes; however core biopsy examination showed biphasic neoplasm with malignant stromal component. Simple mastectomy was done and specimen was sent for histopathological examination which confirmed the core biopsy report. Postoperatively the patient received chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The patient is on follow-up for a year and has not shown any evidence of metastasis or recurrence. PMID:25548696

  10. Neuroendoscopic management of pineal region tumours.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, E; Santamarta, D; Garcia-Fructuoso, G; Caral, L; Rumià, J

    1997-01-01

    The management of pineal tumours remains controversial. During 1994 we treated four consecutive adults (16-44 yrs) harbouring a pineal tumour with a neuroendoscopic procedure. All of them presented with hydrocephalus. Pre-operative workup included cranial computerized tomography (CT), craniospinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and serum levels of biological tumour markers. The endoscopic procedure consisted of a third ventriculostomy followed by biopsy with a flexible, steerable neuroendoscope. Histological diagnosis was achieved in three patients who no longer required a shunt device. Recorded complications were: bleeding during ventriculostomy that prevented us from obtaining a good sample for biopsy, short-term memory loss that cleared over a two-week period, and transient increase of pre-operative hemiparesis. Complications and morbidity are emphasized so as to be avoided with further technical experience. Neuroendoscopy affords a minimally invasive way of reaching three objectives by one-step surgery in the management of pineal region lesions: 1) CSF sample for analysis of tumour markers. 2) Treatment of hydrocephalus by third ventriculostomy. 3) Several biopsy specimens can be obtained identifying tumours which will require further open surgery or adjuvant radiation and/or chemotherapy. PMID:9059706

  11. Epidemiological study of salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Frade Gonzalez, C; Lozano Ramirez, A; Garcia Caballero, T; Labella Caballero, T

    1999-01-01

    Tumours located in the salivary glands form the most heterogeneous group in all human oncological pathology. They show various epidemiological, clinical and evolutionary characteristics which separate them from other neoplasms of the head and neck. In this paper, we have carried out a study on their epidemiological aspects, collecting 80 cases diagnosed in the ENT Service of the University Hospital Complex of Santiago over 17 years. The incidence was 1.22 cases per 100,000 inhabitants per year. The frequency was higher in males (58.75%) and in the 7th decade of age. A predominance was noticed in females under 40 years of age and in males over this age, but the differences were not statistically significant. The most frequent site was the parotid gland, and we could not find any case in the sublingual gland. In 52.5% of cases the tumour was benign, pleomorphic adenoma being the most prevalent. Among malignant tumours, the epidermoid carcinoma stood out in our series. The prevalence of benign tumours in females and of malignant tumours in males was clear, with significant differences. We compare our results with the data published in the literature.

  12. Pedunculated solitary fibrous tumours arising from the pleura.

    PubMed

    Poyraz, A; Kilic, D; Hatipoglu, A; Bakirci, T; Bilezikci, B

    2006-09-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is one of the rare tumours which arise from visceral pleura. Klemperer and Rabin first described SFT as a distinct clinical entity among primary pleural tumoUrs in 1931. Approximately 820 cases have been reported in literature to date. The management of patients with SFT is complete resection of the tumour and follow up of the patient to detect any possible late recurrence. In the present paper, we report two cases of pedunculated solitary fibrous tumours of the pleura that appeared as a wandering chest nodule to which surgical resection undertaken at our hospital. The aim is to summarise our experience in the management of solitary fibrous tumour.

  13. Salivary gland tumours in Zimbabwe: report of 282 cases.

    PubMed

    Chidzonga, M M; Lopez Perez, V M; Portilla-Alvarez, A L

    1995-08-01

    Tumours of the salivary glands are relatively uncommon. In a review of 282 black patients seen at Harare Central Hospital, Zimbabwe, the relative incidence of various tumour types and the age and sex distribution were similar to those reported in other series. There were more tumours of the minor salivary glands than in reported Western series. There were more tumours of the minor salivary glands than in reported Western series. Pain and rapid growth were significant in distinguishing malignant from benign tumours. Malignant tumours were more common in elderly than in young patients.

  14. [Parotid tumours. Only 31% of mixed tumours. In one hundred and seventy-five parotidectomies (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Massoud, E; Tarabay, F

    1982-06-10

    This article reports on an analytical study into the etiological aspects of 175 parotidectomies carried out in the Lebanon. In comparing our results with the classical data, we reached a certain number of interesting conclusions. Our study confirms classical breakdown of parotid tumours with 80% benign and 20% malignant. We also confirm the rise in the incidence of malignancy in line with age, and its classical predominance in male patients. Classically, the benign tumours can be divided into 80% mixed tumours, 8% warthin, and 6 to 7% other rare tumours. Our data concerning this breakdown of benign tumours is very different. We found 31% of mixed tumours, which is in line with the figure given by A. Palva. We can therefore conclude that mixed tumours are not the most common form of benign parotid tumours and that the so-called rare tumours account for 69% benign tumours. They include hemangiomas, tubercles, salivary cysts, chronic parotidits and Warthin's tumours. Another difference between the conclusions of our study and classical data concern warthin tumours, which account fort 18% of cases as compared to only 6% in the classical data. We can therefore conclude that the so-called "rare benign tumours of the parotid" show a far higher incidence in our country than the classical 6%, and in fact come far closer to 50% of all cases of benign tumours.

  15. Rationale of hyperthermia for radio(chemo)therapy and immune responses in patients with bladder cancer: Biological concepts, clinical data, interdisciplinary treatment decisions and biological tumour imaging.

    PubMed

    Multhoff, Gabriele; Habl, Gregor; Combs, Stephanie E

    2016-06-01

    Bladder cancer, the most common tumour of the urinary tract, ranks fifth among all tumour entities. While local treatment or intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) provides a treatment option for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer of low grade, surgery or radio(chemo)therapy (RT) are frequently applied in high grade tumours. It remains a matter of debate whether surgery or RT is superior with respect to clinical outcome and quality of life. Surgical resection of bladder cancer can be limited by acute side effects, whereas, RT, which offers a non-invasive treatment option with organ- and functional conservation, can cause long-term side effects. Bladder toxicity by RT mainly depends on the total irradiation dose, fraction size and tumour volume. Therefore, novel approaches are needed to improve clinical outcome. Local tumour hyperthermia is currently used either as an ablation therapy or in combination with RT to enhance anti-tumour effects. In combination with RT an increase of the temperature in the bladder stimulates the local blood flow and as a result can improve the oxygenation state of the tumour, which in turn enhances radiation-induced DNA damage and drug toxicity. Hyperthermia at high temperatures can also directly kill cells, particularly in tumour areas which are poorly perfused, hypoxic or have a low tissue pH. This review summarises current knowledge relating to the role of hyperthermia in RT to treat bladder cancer, the induction and manifestation of immunological responses induced by hyperthermia, and the utilisation of the stress proteins as tumour-specific targets for tumour detection and monitoring of therapeutic outcome.

  16. Rationale of hyperthermia for radio(chemo)therapy and immune responses in patients with bladder cancer: Biological concepts, clinical data, interdisciplinary treatment decisions and biological tumour imaging.

    PubMed

    Multhoff, Gabriele; Habl, Gregor; Combs, Stephanie E

    2016-06-01

    Bladder cancer, the most common tumour of the urinary tract, ranks fifth among all tumour entities. While local treatment or intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) provides a treatment option for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer of low grade, surgery or radio(chemo)therapy (RT) are frequently applied in high grade tumours. It remains a matter of debate whether surgery or RT is superior with respect to clinical outcome and quality of life. Surgical resection of bladder cancer can be limited by acute side effects, whereas, RT, which offers a non-invasive treatment option with organ- and functional conservation, can cause long-term side effects. Bladder toxicity by RT mainly depends on the total irradiation dose, fraction size and tumour volume. Therefore, novel approaches are needed to improve clinical outcome. Local tumour hyperthermia is currently used either as an ablation therapy or in combination with RT to enhance anti-tumour effects. In combination with RT an increase of the temperature in the bladder stimulates the local blood flow and as a result can improve the oxygenation state of the tumour, which in turn enhances radiation-induced DNA damage and drug toxicity. Hyperthermia at high temperatures can also directly kill cells, particularly in tumour areas which are poorly perfused, hypoxic or have a low tissue pH. This review summarises current knowledge relating to the role of hyperthermia in RT to treat bladder cancer, the induction and manifestation of immunological responses induced by hyperthermia, and the utilisation of the stress proteins as tumour-specific targets for tumour detection and monitoring of therapeutic outcome. PMID:27050781

  17. A spatio-temporal simulation model of the response of solid tumours to radiotherapy in vivo: parametric validation concerning oxygen enhancement ratio and cell cycle duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipas, Vassilis P.; Stamatakos, Georgios S.; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos K.; Dionysiou, Dimitra D.; Dale, Roger G.

    2004-04-01

    Advanced bio-simulation methods are expected to substantially improve radiotherapy treatment planning. To this end a novel spatio-temporal patient-specific simulation model of the in vivo response of malignant tumours to radiotherapy schemes has been recently developed by our group. This paper discusses recent improvements to the model: an optimized algorithm leading to conformal shrinkage of the tumour as a response to radiotherapy, the introduction of the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), a realistic initial cell phase distribution and finally an advanced imaging-based algorithm simulating the neovascularization field. A parametric study of the influence of the cell cycle duration Tc, OER, OERbgr for the beta LQ parameter on tumour growth, shrinkage and response to irradiation under two different fractionation schemes has been made. The model has been applied to two glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cases, one with wild type (wt) and another one with mutated (mt) p53 gene. Furthermore, the model has been applied to a hypothetical GBM tumour with agr and bgr values corresponding to those of generic radiosensitive tumours. According to the model predictions, a whole tumour with shorter Tc tends to repopulate faster, as is to be expected. Furthermore, a higher OER value for the dormant cells leads to a more radioresistant whole tumour. A small variation of the OERbgr value does not seem to play a major role in the tumour response. Accelerated fractionation proved to be superior to the standard scheme for the whole range of the OER values considered. Finally, the tumour with mt p53 was shown to be more radioresistant compared to the tumour with wt p53. Although all simulation predictions agree at least qualitatively with the clinical experience and literature, a long-term clinical adaptation and quantitative validation procedure is in progress.

  18. Unusual presentation of a scrotal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Debashis; Parr, Nijel J

    2014-01-01

    A 59-year-old man had a wide excision of the right-sided scrotal cancer in the neck of the scrotum. On dissection it became apparent that the tumour had developed a blood supply from the right spermatic cord. Histology revealed G2T2 squamous cell carcinoma. A biopsy from an abnormal skin area from the opposite groin reported chronic folliculitis. He underwent an ultrasound scanning of the groin and fine-needle aspiration, which did not show any suspicious features. Follow-up CT of the abdomen and pelvis after 6 weeks did not show any evidence of intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy. Another CT has been arranged within the next 3 months to confirm that the spread of the tumour does not follow the pattern of a testicular tumour. PMID:24879734

  19. Insulin receptor activation in solitary fibrous tumours.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Chang, Q; Rubin, B P; Fletcher, C D M; Morgan, T W; Mentzer, S J; Sugarbaker, D J; Fletcher, J A; Xiao, S

    2007-04-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are known to overexpress insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2). The down-stream oncogenic pathways of IGF-2, however, are not clear. Here we report uniform activation of the insulin receptor (IR) pathway in SFTs, which are mesenchymal tumours frequently associated with hypoglycaemia. Whereas the IR and its downstream signalling pathways were constitutively activated in SFTs, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) was not expressed in these tumours. We also find that SFT cells secrete IGF-2 and proliferate in serum-free medium, consistent with an IGF-2/IR autocrine loop. The aetiological relevance of IGF-2 is supported by expression of IR-A, the IR isoform with high affinity for IGF-2, in all SFTs. Our studies suggest that IR activation plays an oncogenic role in SFTs.

  20. Surgery for locally aggressive bone tumours.

    PubMed

    Devitt, A; O'Sullivan, T; Kavanagh, M; Hurson, B J

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of 16 patients with aggressive benign bone tumours and one patient with a low grade malignancy with a combined regimen of cryosurgery, phenolization and acrylic cementation is reported. Patients were aged between 9 and 51 years and were treated by this method between the years 1986 and 1993. Minimal follow up was 13 months. The commonest histological diagnosis was giant cell tumour (7), followed by aneurysmal bone cyst (6), chondromyxoidfibroma (3) and low grade chondrosarcoma (1). Patients were assessed for functional outcome and local recurrence. On average 86 per cent of premorbid function was restored at follow up and there was one local recurrence (6.29 per cent). We conclude that this is a satisfactory method of gaining local control of these tumours. PMID:8990655

  1. Unusual presentation of a scrotal tumour.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debashis; Parr, Nijel J

    2014-05-30

    A 59-year-old man had a wide excision of the right-sided scrotal cancer in the neck of the scrotum. On dissection it became apparent that the tumour had developed a blood supply from the right spermatic cord. Histology revealed G2T2 squamous cell carcinoma. A biopsy from an abnormal skin area from the opposite groin reported chronic folliculitis. He underwent an ultrasound scanning of the groin and fine-needle aspiration, which did not show any suspicious features. Follow-up CT of the abdomen and pelvis after 6 weeks did not show any evidence of intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy. Another CT has been arranged within the next 3 months to confirm that the spread of the tumour does not follow the pattern of a testicular tumour.

  2. Tumours of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zeeshan; Hussain, Shakir; Carter, Simon R

    2015-09-01

    Sarcomas are rare tumours and particularly rarer in the foot and ankle region. The complex anatomy of the foot and ankle makes it unique and hence poses a challenge to the surgeon for limb salvage surgery. Other lesions found in the foot and ankle region are benign bone and soft tissue tumours, metastasis and infection. The purpose of this article is to discuss the relevance of the complex anatomy of the foot and ankle in relation to tumours, clinical features, their general management principles and further discussion about some of the more common bone and soft tissue lesions. Discussion of every single bone and soft tissue lesion in the foot and ankle region is beyond the scope of this article.

  3. Tumour Angiogenesis and Angiogenic Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Lalita; Puri, Naveen; Satpute, Pranali; Sharma, Vandana

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a complex process depending on the coordination of many regulators and there by activating angiogenic switch. Recent advances in understanding of angiogenic mechanism have lead to the development of several anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic agents that use the strategy of regulation of angiogenic switch. Antiangiogenic therapy is a form of treatment not cure for cancer and represents a highly effective strategy for destroying tumour because vascular supply is the fundamental requirement for growth of tumour. Because of the quiescent nature of normal adult vasculature, angiogenic inhibitors are expected to confer a degree of specificity when compared to nonspecific modalities of chemo and radiotherapy, so it has the advantage of less toxicities, does not induce drug resistance and deliver a relatively non toxic, long term treatment of tumour. PMID:26266204

  4. Brain tumour-associated status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Goonawardena, Janindu; Marshman, Laurence A G; Drummond, Katharine J

    2015-01-01

    We have reviewed the scant literature on status epilepticus in patients with brain tumours. Patients with brain tumour-associated epilepsy (TAE) appear less likely to develop status epilepticus (TASE) than patients with epilepsy in the general population (EGP) are to develop status epilepticus (SEGP). TASE is associated with lesions in similar locations as TAE; in particular, the frontal lobes. However, in contrast to TAE, where seizures commence early in the course of the disease or at presentation, TASE is more likely to occur later in the disease course and herald tumour progression. In marked contrast to TAE, where epilepsy risk is inversely proportional to Word Health Organization tumour grade, TASE risk appears to be directly proportional to tumour grade (high grade gliomas appear singularly predisposed). Whilst anti-epileptic drug (AED) resistance is more common in TAE than EGP (with resistance directly proportional to tumour grade and frontal location), TASE appears paradoxically more responsive to simple AED regimes than either TAE or SEGP. Although some results suggest that mortality may be higher with TASE than with SEGP, it is likely that (as with SEGP) the major determinant of mortality is the underlying disease process. Because all such data have been derived from retrospective studies, because TASE and SEGP are less common than TAE and EGP, and because TASE and SEGP classification has often been inconsistent, findings can only be considered preliminary: multi-centre, prospective studies are required. Whilst preliminary, our review suggests that TASE has a distinct clinical profile compared to TAE and SEGP. PMID:25150762

  5. Tissue irradiator

    DOEpatents

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-12-16

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in- vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood- carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170.

  6. Incidence, histopathologic analysis and distribution of tumours of the hand

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this large collective and meticulous study of primary bone tumours and tumourous lesions of the hand was to enhance the knowledge about findings of traumatological radiographs and improve differential diagnosis. Methods This retrospective study reviewed data collected from 1976 until 2006 in our Bone Tumour Registry. The following data was documented: age, sex, radiological investigations, tumour location, histopathological features including type and dignity of the tumour, and diagnosis. Results The retrospective analysis yielded 631 patients with a mean age of 35.9 ± 19.2 years. The majority of primary hand tumours were found in the phalanges (69.7%) followed by 24.7% in metacarpals and 5.6% in the carpals. Only 10.6% of all cases were malignant. The major lesion type was cartilage derived at 69.1%, followed by bone cysts 11.3% and osteogenic tumours 8.7%. The dominant tissue type found in phalanges and metacarpals was of cartilage origin. Osteogenic tumours were predominant in carpal bones. Enchondroma was the most commonly detected tumour in the hand (47.1%). Conclusions All primary skeletal tumours can be found in the hand and are most often of cartilage origin followed by bone cysts and osteogenic tumours. This study furthermore raises awareness about uncommon or rare tumours and helps clinicians to establish proper differential diagnosis, as the majority of detected tumours of the hand are asymptomatic and accidental findings on radiographs. PMID:24885007

  7. Sertoliform cystadenoma: a rare benign tumour of the rete testis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Sertoliform cystadenoma of the rete testis represents an uncommon benign tumour. They appear in patients from 26 to 62 years of age. We describe a case of a 66-year-old man with a tumour in the area of the epididymal head. The tumour markers were not increased. Under the assumption of a malignant testicular tumour an inguinal orchiectomy was performed. The cut surface of this tumour was of grey/white color and showed small cysts. The tumour consisted of two compartments. The epithelial like tumour cells showed a sertoliform growth pattern and cystic dilatations. In between the tumour cells repeatedly actin expressing sclerotic areas could be recognized as the second tumour component. Proliferative activity was not increased. Immunohistochemically the tumour cells were positiv for inhibin, S-100, and CD 99. Alpha feto protein (AFP), human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-HCG) and placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) as well as synaptophysin, epithelial membrane antigene (EMA), and BCL-2 were not expressed. As far as we know this is the sixth reported case of this tumour. Because of the benign nature of this tumour the correct diagnosis is important for the intra- and postoperative management. Here we present a case of this rare tumour and discuss potential differential diagnosis. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1956026143857335 PMID:23406299

  8. Possible Role of Hormones in Treatment of Metastatic Testicular Teratomas: Tumour Regression with Medroxyprogesterone Acetate

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, H. J. G.; Hendry, W. F.

    1973-01-01

    Three patients in a consecutive series of 16 cases of metastatic mallgnant teratoma testis have shown well-marked tumour regression during hormone treatment. In two cases multiple lung metastases had previously failed to respond to actinomycin D therapy, and following treatment with medroxyprogesterone acetate one patient had well-marked selective tumour regression for nine months while the other is alive, well, and free from disease at seven years. The third case was treated with a combination of actinomycin D and medroxyprogesterone acetate and is alive and disease-free at two years. Attention is drawn to this preliminary study in the hope of stimulating interest in the possible value of hormones, either alone or combined with chemotherapy and irradiation, in the treatment of metastatic testicular teratoma. Multicentre prospective clinical trials are now needed if knowledge is to be advanced in this field. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8 PMID:4726928

  9. Treatment of primary brain tumours in adults.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Shanne

    This article considers the complexities of caring for patients with primary brain tumours. The incidence, classification and clinical signs and symptoms are outlined. Adult patients experience disabling effects as a result of a brain tumour, which is often accompanied by high morbidity and mortality rates. The various treatment options available are summarised. However, for many patients, there are limited curative treatment options and the main focus is palliative care. The nurse's contribution to care and support of these patients and their families is discussed, with the aim of improving their quality of life.

  10. Stochastic Gompertz model of tumour cell growth.

    PubMed

    Lo, C F

    2007-09-21

    In this communication, based upon the deterministic Gompertz law of cell growth, a stochastic model in tumour growth is proposed. This model takes account of both cell fission and mortality too. The corresponding density function of the size of the tumour cells obeys a functional Fokker--Planck equation which can be solved analytically. It is found that the density function exhibits an interesting "multi-peak" structure generated by cell fission as time evolves. Within this framework the action of therapy is also examined by simply incorporating a therapy term into the deterministic cell growth term.

  11. Metastatic colonization by circulating tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C

    2016-01-21

    Metastasis is the main cause of death in people with cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating tumour cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are only now starting to understand. These include infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue. They make metastasis a highly inefficient process. However, once metastases have been established, current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. An improved understanding of the mechanistic determinants of such colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer.

  12. Coordinated regulation of myeloid cells by tumours.

    PubMed

    Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2012-03-22

    Myeloid cells are the most abundant nucleated haematopoietic cells in the human body and are a collection of distinct cell populations with many diverse functions. The three groups of terminally differentiated myeloid cells - macrophages, dendritic cells and granulocytes - are essential for the normal function of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Mounting evidence indicates that the tumour microenvironment alters myeloid cells and can convert them into potent immunosuppressive cells. Here, we consider myeloid cells as an intricately connected, complex, single system and we focus on how tumours manipulate the myeloid system to evade the host immune response.

  13. A Large Extragnathic Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika M.; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Narasimhamurthy, Srinath

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are developmental cysts which occur typically in the jawbones. They present more commonly in the posterior mandible of young adults than the maxilla. OKCs have been reclassified under odontogenic tumours in 2005 by the WHO and have since been termed as keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOTs). Here we report a case of a recurrent buccal lesion in a 62-year-old man which was provisionally diagnosed as a space infection (buccal abscess) but surprisingly turned out to be a soft tissue KCOT in an unusual location on histopathologic examination. PMID:26770859

  14. Volume increase and spatial shifts of chromosome territories in nuclei of radiation-induced polyploidizing tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Schwarz-Finsterle, Jutta; Scherthan, Harry; Huna, Anda; González, Paula; Mueller, Patrick; Schmitt, Eberhard; Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Hausmann, Michael

    2013-08-30

    The exposure of tumour cells to high doses of ionizing radiation can induce endopolyploidization as an escape route from cell death. This strategy generally results in mitotic catastrophe during the first few days after irradiation. However, some cells escape mitotic catastrophe, polyploidize and attempt to undergo genome reduction and de-polyploidization in order to create new, viable para-diploid tumour cell sub-clones. In search for the consequences of ionizing radiation induced endopolyploidization, genome and chromosome architecture in nuclei of polyploid tumour cells, and sub-nuclei after division of bi- or multi-nucleated cells were investigated during 7 days following irradiation. Polyploidization was induced in p53-function deficient HeLa cells by exposure to 10Gy of X-irradiation. Chromosome territories #1, #4, #12 and centromeres of chromosomes #6, #10, #X were labelled by FISH and analysed for chromosome numbers, volumes and spatial distribution during 7 days post irradiation. The numbers of interphase chromosome territories or centromeres, respectively, the positions of the most peripherally and centrally located chromosome territories, and the territory volumes were compared to non-irradiated controls over this time course. Nuclei with three copies of several chromosomes (#1, #6, #10, #12, #X) were found in the irradiated as well as non-irradiated specimens. From day 2 to day 5 post irradiation, chromosome territories (#1, #4, #12) shifted towards the nuclear periphery and their volumes increased 16- to 25-fold. Consequently, chromosome territories returned towards the nuclear centre during day 6 and 7 post irradiation. In comparison to non-irradiated cells (∼500μm(3)), the nuclear volume of irradiated cells was increased 8-fold (to ∼4000μm(3)) at day 7 post irradiation. Additionally, smaller cell nuclei with an average volume of about ∼255μm(3) were detected on day 7. The data suggest a radiation-induced generation of large intra

  15. Ovarian hilus-cell tumour: a case report.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, T N; Valkov, I M; Dokumov, S I

    1980-01-01

    A case of hilus-cell tumour of the ovary, associated with polycystic ovarian disease is reported. The authors discuss the data from hormonal investigations, the morphological picture and the genesis of the tumour.

  16. Intraoperative intravital microscopy permits the study of human tumour vessels

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Daniel T.; Muhitch, Jason B.; Kim, Minhyung; Doyen, Kurt C.; Bogner, Paul N.; Evans, Sharon S.; Skitzki, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour vessels have been studied extensively as they are critical sites for drug delivery, anti-angiogenic therapies and immunotherapy. As a preclinical tool, intravital microscopy (IVM) allows for in vivo real-time direct observation of vessels at the cellular level. However, to date there are no reports of intravital high-resolution imaging of human tumours in the clinical setting. Here we report the feasibility of IVM examinations of human malignant disease with an emphasis on tumour vasculature as the major site of tumour-host interactions. Consistent with preclinical observations, we show that patient tumour vessels are disorganized, tortuous and ∼50% do not support blood flow. Human tumour vessel diameters are larger than predicted from immunohistochemistry or preclinical IVM, and thereby have lower wall shear stress, which influences delivery of drugs and cellular immunotherapies. Thus, real-time clinical imaging of living human tumours is feasible and allows for detection of characteristics within the tumour microenvironment. PMID:26883450

  17. Brain tumour cells interconnect to a functional and resistant network.

    PubMed

    Osswald, Matthias; Jung, Erik; Sahm, Felix; Solecki, Gergely; Venkataramani, Varun; Blaes, Jonas; Weil, Sophie; Horstmann, Heinz; Wiestler, Benedikt; Syed, Mustafa; Huang, Lulu; Ratliff, Miriam; Karimian Jazi, Kianush; Kurz, Felix T; Schmenger, Torsten; Lemke, Dieter; Gömmel, Miriam; Pauli, Martin; Liao, Yunxiang; Häring, Peter; Pusch, Stefan; Herl, Verena; Steinhäuser, Christian; Krunic, Damir; Jarahian, Mostafa; Miletic, Hrvoje; Berghoff, Anna S; Griesbeck, Oliver; Kalamakis, Georgios; Garaschuk, Olga; Preusser, Matthias; Weiss, Samuel; Liu, Haikun; Heiland, Sabine; Platten, Michael; Huber, Peter E; Kuner, Thomas; von Deimling, Andreas; Wick, Wolfgang; Winkler, Frank

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytic brain tumours, including glioblastomas, are incurable neoplasms characterized by diffusely infiltrative growth. Here we show that many tumour cells in astrocytomas extend ultra-long membrane protrusions, and use these distinct tumour microtubes as routes for brain invasion, proliferation, and to interconnect over long distances. The resulting network allows multicellular communication through microtube-associated gap junctions. When damage to the network occurred, tumour microtubes were used for repair. Moreover, the microtube-connected astrocytoma cells, but not those remaining unconnected throughout tumour progression, were protected from cell death inflicted by radiotherapy. The neuronal growth-associated protein 43 was important for microtube formation and function, and drove microtube-dependent tumour cell invasion, proliferation, interconnection, and radioresistance. Oligodendroglial brain tumours were deficient in this mechanism. In summary, astrocytomas can develop functional multicellular network structures. Disconnection of astrocytoma cells by targeting their tumour microtubes emerges as a new principle to reduce the treatment resistance of this disease.

  18. Cutaneous location of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour.

    PubMed

    Bellon, Nathalia; Fraitag, Sylvie; Miquel, Catherine; Salomon, Laurent J; Bourdeaut, Franck; Bodemer, Christine; Roujeau, Thomas; Zerah, Michel; Hadj-Rabia, Smail

    2014-07-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour is a rare and highly malignant tumour of the posterior fossae nervous system that occurs in children especially in the first few years of life. Cutaneous location is not previously reported. A newborn boy was referred for both aqueductal stenosis detected antenatally and skin tags mimicking hamartoma. The cerebral tumour increased in size during a few months leading to both skin and cerebral biopsies. Integrase Interactor-1 (INI-1) immunostaining and tumoural and leukocytes INI-1 gene sequencing confirmed the atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour nature of the cerebral tumour. INI-1 immunostaining in skin biopsy confirmed the dermal location of rhabdoid tumour. Thus, unusual cutaneous lesions may be part of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour. The loss of Integrase INI-1 on immunohistochemical staining is characteristic.

  19. Intraoperative intravital microscopy permits the study of human tumour vessels.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Daniel T; Muhitch, Jason B; Kim, Minhyung; Doyen, Kurt C; Bogner, Paul N; Evans, Sharon S; Skitzki, Joseph J

    2016-02-17

    Tumour vessels have been studied extensively as they are critical sites for drug delivery, anti-angiogenic therapies and immunotherapy. As a preclinical tool, intravital microscopy (IVM) allows for in vivo real-time direct observation of vessels at the cellular level. However, to date there are no reports of intravital high-resolution imaging of human tumours in the clinical setting. Here we report the feasibility of IVM examinations of human malignant disease with an emphasis on tumour vasculature as the major site of tumour-host interactions. Consistent with preclinical observations, we show that patient tumour vessels are disorganized, tortuous and ∼50% do not support blood flow. Human tumour vessel diameters are larger than predicted from immunohistochemistry or preclinical IVM, and thereby have lower wall shear stress, which influences delivery of drugs and cellular immunotherapies. Thus, real-time clinical imaging of living human tumours is feasible and allows for detection of characteristics within the tumour microenvironment.

  20. Benign metastatic mixed tumours or unrecognized salivary carcinomas?

    PubMed

    el-Naggar, A; Batsakis, J G; Kessler, S

    1988-09-01

    'Benign metastasizing mixed tumours' are enigmatic lesions of the parotid gland. The authors, through the illustrations of a case and review of the literature, conclude that the tumours are unrecognized and currently unclassified malignancies.

  1. Induction of haem oxygenase-1 by nitric oxide and ischaemia in experimental solid tumours and implications for tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Doi, K; Akaike, T; Fujii, S; Tanaka, S; Ikebe, N; Beppu, T; Shibahara, S; Ogawa, M; Maeda, H

    1999-01-01

    Induction of haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) as well as nitric oxide (NO) biosynthesis during tumour growth was investigated in an experimental solid tumour model (AH136B hepatoma) in rats. An immunohistochemical study showed that the inducible isoform of NO synthase (iNOS) was localized in monocyte-derived macrophages, which infiltrated interstitial spaces of solid tumour, but not in the tumour cells. Excessive production of NO in the tumour tissue was unequivocally verified by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Tumour growth was moderately suppressed by treatment with either Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or S-methylisothiourea sulphate (SMT). In contrast, HO-1 was found only in tumour cells, not in macrophages, by in situ hybridization for HO-1 mRNA. HO-1 expression in AH136B cells in culture was strongly enhanced by an NO (NO+) donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl penicillamine. HO-1 mRNA expression in the solid tumour in vivo decreased significantly after treatment with low doses of NOS inhibitors such as L-NAME and SMT (6–20 mg kg−1). However, the level of HO-1 mRNA in the solid tumour treated with higher doses of NOS inhibitor was similar to that of the solid tumour without NOS inhibitor treatment. Strong induction of HO-1 was also observed in solid tumours after occlusion or embolization of the tumour-feeding artery, indicating that ischaemic stress which may involve oxidative stress triggers HO-1 induction in the solid tumour. Lastly, it is of great importance that an HO inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin IX injected intra-arterially to the solid tumour suppressed the tumour growth to a great extent. In conclusion, HO-1 expression in the solid tumour may confer resistance of tumour cells to hypoxic stress as well as to NO-mediated cytotoxicity. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10471043

  2. A soft agar colony assay for Lewis lung tumour and B16 melanoma taken directly from the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Courtenay, V. D.

    1976-01-01

    A soft agar colony assay has been developed for the B16 mouse melanoma and the Lewis lung tumour. The special features of the technique are the use of a gas phase with 5% O2 instead of air and the addition of rat red blood cells. Single cell suspensions are prepared by trypsinization from the solid tumour and the cells are plated out in 0-3% agar over a layer of 0-5% agar in 30-mm Petri dishes. After 8 to 15 days' incubation in 5% O2, colonies of more than 50 cells are produced. Plating efficiencies of between 30 and 50% are usually obtained. The addition of up to 10(4) heavily irradiated tumour cells gives some further improvement in plating efficiency for the B16 melanoma but not for the Lewis lung tumour. Applications of the technique to measure cell survival in the two tumours after treatment with cytotoxic drugs and radiation are reported. The scatter of experimental points is relatively small, and in comparative experiments good agreement has been obtained with results using in vivo assay techniques. PMID:782495

  3. Büschke-Lowenstein tumour in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Garozzo, G; Nuciforo, G; Rocchi, C M; Bonanno, N M; Sampugnaro, E G; Piccione, S; Di Stefano, A; Acquaviva, G; Barberi, A L; Panella, M

    2003-11-10

    During pregnancy a localised human papillomavirus (HPV) lesion may, in rare cases, develop into a Büschke-Lowenstein tumour. The choice of treatment is crucial as standard systemic treatment is teratogenic. We performed laser CO2 microsurgery because it has a low incidence of complications. PMID:14557019

  4. Molecular mechanisms for tumour resistance to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Li, Zhi-Ling; He, Zhi-Xu; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the prevailing methods used to treat malignant tumours, but the outcome and prognosis of tumour patients are not optimistic. Cancer cells gradually generate resistance to almost all chemotherapeutic drugs via a variety of distinct mechanisms and pathways. Chemotherapeutic resistance, either intrinsic or acquired, is caused and sustained by reduced drug accumulation and increased drug export, alterations in drug targets and signalling transduction molecules, increased repair of drug-induced DNA damage, and evasion of apoptosis. In order to better understand the mechanisms of chemoresistance, this review highlights our current knowledge of the role of altered drug metabolism and transport and deregulation of apoptosis and autophagy in the development of tumour chemoresistance. Reduced intracellular activation of prodrugs (e.g. thiotepa and tegafur) or enhanced drug inactivation by Phase I and II enzymes contributes to the development of chemoresistance. Both primary and acquired resistance can be caused by alterations in the transport of anticancer drugs which is mediated by a variety of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance associated proteins, and breast cancer resistance protein. Presently there is a line of evidence indicating that deregulation of programmed cell death including apoptosis and autophagy is also an important mechanism for tumour resistance to anticancer drugs. Reversal of chemoresistance is likely via pharmacological and biological approaches. Further studies are warranted to grasp the full picture of how each type of cancer cells develop resistance to anticancer drugs and to identify novel strategies to overcome it.

  5. Solitary fibrous tumour of the vagus nerve.

    PubMed

    Scholsem, Martin; Scholtes, Felix

    2012-04-01

    We describe the complete removal of a foramen magnum solitary fibrous tumour in a 36-year-old woman. It originated on a caudal vagus nerve rootlet, classically described as the 'cranial' accessory nerve root. This ninth case of immunohistologically confirmed cranial or spinal nerve SFT is the first of the vagus nerve.

  6. Karyotypic abnormalities in tumours of the pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Bardi, G.; Johansson, B.; Pandis, N.; Mandahl, N.; Bak-Jensen, E.; Andrén-Sandberg, A.; Mitelman, F.; Heim, S.

    1993-01-01

    Short-term cultures from 20 pancreatic tumours, three endocrine and 17 exocrine, were cytogenetically analysed. All three endocrine tumours had a normal chromosome complement. Clonal chromosome aberrations were detected in 13 of the 17 exocrine tumours: simple karyotypic changes were found in five carcinomas and numerous numerical and/or structural changes in eight. When the present findings and those previously reported by our group were viewed in conjunction, the most common numerical imbalances among the 22 karyotypically abnormal pancreatic carcinomas thus available for evaluation turned out to be, in order of falling frequency, -18, -Y, +20, +7, +11 and -12. Imbalances brought about by structural changes most frequently affected chromosomes 1 (losses in 1p but especially gains of 1q), 8 (in particular 8q gains but also 8p losses), and 17 (mostly 17q gain but also loss of 17p). Chromosomal bands 1p32, 1q10, 6q21, 7p22, 8p21, 8q11, 14p11, 15q10-11, and 17q11 were the most common breakpoint sites affected by the structural rearrangements. Abnormal karyotypes were detected more frequently in poorly differentiated and anaplastic carcinomas than in moderately and well differentiated tumours. Images Figure 1 PMID:8494707

  7. Malignant peripheral nerve sheet tumour of cervix.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Ali; Moghimi, Mansour; Karimi-Zarchi, Mojgan; Navabii, Hossein

    2012-05-30

    Sarcomas account for less than 1% of malignancies of the uterine cervix. Among them, rhabdomyosarcomas are the ones most frequently reported. Malignant peripheral nerve sheet tumour (MPNST) is very rare. In this paper we present a 53-year-old woman with MPNST of the uterine cervix.

  8. Analysis of nanoparticle delivery to tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Stefan; Tavares, Anthony J.; Dai, Qin; Ohta, Seiichi; Audet, Julie; Dvorak, Harold F.; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-05-01

    Targeting nanoparticles to malignant tissues for improved diagnosis and therapy is a popular concept. However, after surveying the literature from the past 10 years, only 0.7% (median) of the administered nanoparticle dose is found to be delivered to a solid tumour. This has negative consequences on the translation of nanotechnology for human use with respect to manufacturing, cost, toxicity, and imaging and therapeutic efficacy. In this article, we conduct a multivariate analysis on the compiled data to reveal the contributions of nanoparticle physicochemical parameters, tumour models and cancer types on the low delivery efficiency. We explore the potential causes of the poor delivery efficiency from the perspectives of tumour biology (intercellular versus transcellular transport, enhanced permeability and retention effect, and physicochemical-dependent nanoparticle transport through the tumour stroma) as well as competing organs (mononuclear phagocytic and renal systems) and present a 30-year research strategy to overcome this fundamental limitation. Solving the nanoparticle delivery problem will accelerate the clinical translation of nanomedicine.

  9. Molecular mechanisms for tumour resistance to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Li, Zhi-Ling; He, Zhi-Xu; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the prevailing methods used to treat malignant tumours, but the outcome and prognosis of tumour patients are not optimistic. Cancer cells gradually generate resistance to almost all chemotherapeutic drugs via a variety of distinct mechanisms and pathways. Chemotherapeutic resistance, either intrinsic or acquired, is caused and sustained by reduced drug accumulation and increased drug export, alterations in drug targets and signalling transduction molecules, increased repair of drug-induced DNA damage, and evasion of apoptosis. In order to better understand the mechanisms of chemoresistance, this review highlights our current knowledge of the role of altered drug metabolism and transport and deregulation of apoptosis and autophagy in the development of tumour chemoresistance. Reduced intracellular activation of prodrugs (e.g. thiotepa and tegafur) or enhanced drug inactivation by Phase I and II enzymes contributes to the development of chemoresistance. Both primary and acquired resistance can be caused by alterations in the transport of anticancer drugs which is mediated by a variety of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance associated proteins, and breast cancer resistance protein. Presently there is a line of evidence indicating that deregulation of programmed cell death including apoptosis and autophagy is also an important mechanism for tumour resistance to anticancer drugs. Reversal of chemoresistance is likely via pharmacological and biological approaches. Further studies are warranted to grasp the full picture of how each type of cancer cells develop resistance to anticancer drugs and to identify novel strategies to overcome it. PMID:27097837

  10. A mucoepidermoid tumour of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Hume, W J; Lowry, J C

    1985-10-01

    A case of mucoepidermoid tumour arising in minor salivary glands of the tongue and assessed histologically to be of high-grade malignancy is described. The diagnostic difficulties involved in distinguishing the neoplasm from a squamous cell carcinoma are considered. From published figures it would appear that salivary gland neoplasms in the tongue are much more likely to be malignant than benign.

  11. Predictive and prognostic value of metabolic tumour volume and total lesion glycolysis in solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Van de Wiele, Christophe; Kruse, Vibeke; Smeets, Peter; Sathekge, Mike; Maes, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Data available in patients suffering from squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, lung carcinoma, oesophageal carcinoma and gynaecological malignancies suggest that metabolic tumour volume and to a lesser extent total lesion glycolysis have the potential to become valuable in the imaging of human solid tumours as prognostic biomarkers for short- to intermediate-term survival outcomes, adding value to clinical staging, for assessment of response to treatment with neoadjuvant and concurrent chemotherapy, and for treatment optimization; for example, based on early treatment response assessment using changes in metabolic tumour volume over time, it might be possible to select patients who require a more aggressive treatment to improve their outcome. Prospective studies enrolling consecutive patients, adopting standardized protocols for FDG PET acquisition and processing, adjusting for potential confounders in the analysis (tumour size and origin) and determining the optimal methodology for determination of these novel markers are mandatory.

  12. Neuropsychological Differences between Survivors of Supratentorial and Infratentorial Brain Tumours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, S. K.; Mullins, W. A.; O'Neil, S. H.; Wilson, K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between brain tumour location and core areas of cognitive and behavioural functioning for paediatric brain tumour survivors. The extant literature both supports and refutes an association between paediatric brain tumour location and neurocognitive outcomes. We examined…

  13. The mechanical microenvironment in cancer: How physics affects tumours.

    PubMed

    Nagelkerke, Anika; Bussink, Johan; Rowan, Alan E; Span, Paul N

    2015-12-01

    The tumour microenvironment contributes greatly to the response of tumour cells. It consists of chemical gradients, for example of oxygen and nutrients. However, a physical environment is also present. Apart from chemical input, cells also receive physical signals. Tumours display unique mechanical properties: they are a lot stiffer than normal tissue. This may be either a cause or a consequence of cancer, but literature suggests it has a major impact on tumour cells as will be described in this review. The mechanical microenvironment may cause malignant transformation, possibly through activation of oncogenic pathways and inhibition of tumour suppressor genes. In addition, the mechanical microenvironment may promote tumour progression by influencing processes such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, enhancing cell survival through autophagy, but also affects sensitivity of tumour cells to therapeutics. Furthermore, multiple intracellular signalling pathways prove sensitive to the mechanical properties of the microenvironment. It appears the increased stiffness is unlikely to be caused by increased stiffness of the tumour cells themselves. However, there are indications that tumours display a higher cell density, making them more rigid. In addition, increased matrix deposition in the tumour, as well as increased interstitial fluid pressure may account for the increased stiffness of tumours. Overall, tumour mechanics are significantly different from normal tissue. Therefore, this feature should be further explored for use in cancer prevention, detection and treatment.

  14. Extracellular matrix glycoproteins and diffusion barriers in human astrocytic tumours.

    PubMed

    Zámecník, J; Vargová, L; Homola, A; Kodet, R; Syková, E

    2004-08-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) and changes in the size and geometry of the extracellular space (ECS) in tumour tissue are thought to be of critical importance in influencing the migratory abilities of tumour cells as well as the delivery of therapeutic agents into the tumour. In 21 astrocytic neoplasms, the ECM composition was investigated in situ by the immunohistochemical detection of ECM glycoproteins (tenascin, laminin, vitronectin, fibronectin, collagen types I-VI). To explain the changes in ECS size and to detect barriers to diffusion in the tumour tissue, the ECM composition, the cellularity, the density of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive tumour cell processes and the proliferative activity of the tumours were compared with the size and geometry of the ECS. The ECS volume fraction and the complex of hindrances to diffusion in the ECS (i.e. the tortuosity) were revealed by the real-time iontophoretic tetramethylammonium method. Increased proliferative activity of the tumours correlated with increased ECS volume fraction and tortuosity. The tortuosity of the tumour tissue was not significantly influenced by tumour cell density. Higher tortuosity was found in low-grade astrocytomas associated with the presence of a dense net of GFAP-positive fibrillary processes of the tumour cells. The increase in tortuosity in high-grade tumours correlated with an increased accumulation of ECM molecules, particularly of tenascin. We conclude that the increased malignancy of astrocytic tumours correlates with increases in both ECS volume and ECM deposition.

  15. Cerebrospinal fluid-derived circulating tumour DNA better represents the genomic alterations of brain tumours than plasma.

    PubMed

    De Mattos-Arruda, Leticia; Mayor, Regina; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Weigelt, Britta; Martínez-Ricarte, Francisco; Torrejon, Davis; Oliveira, Mafalda; Arias, Alexandra; Raventos, Carolina; Tang, Jiabin; Guerini-Rocco, Elena; Martínez-Sáez, Elena; Lois, Sergio; Marín, Oscar; de la Cruz, Xavier; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Towers, Russel; Vivancos, Ana; Peg, Vicente; Ramon y Cajal, Santiago; Carles, Joan; Rodon, Jordi; González-Cao, María; Tabernero, Josep; Felip, Enriqueta; Sahuquillo, Joan; Berger, Michael F; Cortes, Javier; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Seoane, Joan

    2015-11-10

    Cell-free circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) in plasma has been shown to be informative of the genomic alterations present in tumours and has been used to monitor tumour progression and response to treatments. However, patients with brain tumours do not present with or present with low amounts of ctDNA in plasma precluding the genomic characterization of brain cancer through plasma ctDNA. Here we show that ctDNA derived from central nervous system tumours is more abundantly present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) than in plasma. Massively parallel sequencing of CSF ctDNA more comprehensively characterizes the genomic alterations of brain tumours than plasma, allowing the identification of actionable brain tumour somatic mutations. We show that CSF ctDNA levels longitudinally fluctuate in time and follow the changes in brain tumour burden providing biomarkers to monitor brain malignancies. Moreover, CSF ctDNA is shown to facilitate and complement the diagnosis of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis.

  16. Orbital tumours and tumour-like lesions: exploring the armamentarium of multiparametric imaging.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Bela S; Vargas, Maria Isabel; Ailianou, Angeliki; Merlini, Laura; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra; Delattre, Bénédicte M; Rager, Olivier; Burkhardt, Karim; Becker, Minerva

    2016-02-01

    Although the orbit is a small anatomical space, the wide range of structures present within it are often the site of origin of various tumours and tumour-like conditions, both in adults and children. Cross-sectional imaging is mandatory for the detection, characterization, and mapping of these lesions. This review focuses on multiparametric imaging of orbital tumours. Each tumour is reviewed in relation to its clinical presentation, compartmental location, imaging characteristics, and its histological features. We herein describe orbital tumours as lesions of the globe (retinoblastoma, uveal melanoma), optic nerve sheath complex (meningioma, optic nerve glioma), conal-intraconal compartment (hemangioma), extraconal compartment (dermoid/epidermoid, lacrimal gland tumours, lymphoma, rhabdomysarcoma), and bone and sinus compartment (fibrous dysplasia). Lesions without any typical compartmental localization and those with multi-compartment involvement (veno-lymphatic malformation, plexiform neurofibroma, idiopathic orbital pseudotumour, IgG4 related disease, metastases) are also reviewed. We discuss the role of advanced imaging techniques, such as MR diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography CT (FDG-PET CT), and positron emission tomography MRI (MRI PET) as problem-solving tools in the evaluation of those orbital masses that present with non-specific morphologic imaging findings. Main messages/Teaching points • A compartment-based approach is essential for the diagnosis of orbital tumours. • CT and MRI play a key role in the work-up of orbital tumours. • DWI, PET CT, and MRI PET are complementary tools to solve diagnostic dilemmas. • Awareness of salient imaging pearls and diagnostic pitfalls avoids interpretation errors.

  17. Orbital tumours and tumour-like lesions: exploring the armamentarium of multiparametric imaging.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Bela S; Vargas, Maria Isabel; Ailianou, Angeliki; Merlini, Laura; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra; Delattre, Bénédicte M; Rager, Olivier; Burkhardt, Karim; Becker, Minerva

    2016-02-01

    Although the orbit is a small anatomical space, the wide range of structures present within it are often the site of origin of various tumours and tumour-like conditions, both in adults and children. Cross-sectional imaging is mandatory for the detection, characterization, and mapping of these lesions. This review focuses on multiparametric imaging of orbital tumours. Each tumour is reviewed in relation to its clinical presentation, compartmental location, imaging characteristics, and its histological features. We herein describe orbital tumours as lesions of the globe (retinoblastoma, uveal melanoma), optic nerve sheath complex (meningioma, optic nerve glioma), conal-intraconal compartment (hemangioma), extraconal compartment (dermoid/epidermoid, lacrimal gland tumours, lymphoma, rhabdomysarcoma), and bone and sinus compartment (fibrous dysplasia). Lesions without any typical compartmental localization and those with multi-compartment involvement (veno-lymphatic malformation, plexiform neurofibroma, idiopathic orbital pseudotumour, IgG4 related disease, metastases) are also reviewed. We discuss the role of advanced imaging techniques, such as MR diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography CT (FDG-PET CT), and positron emission tomography MRI (MRI PET) as problem-solving tools in the evaluation of those orbital masses that present with non-specific morphologic imaging findings. Main messages/Teaching points • A compartment-based approach is essential for the diagnosis of orbital tumours. • CT and MRI play a key role in the work-up of orbital tumours. • DWI, PET CT, and MRI PET are complementary tools to solve diagnostic dilemmas. • Awareness of salient imaging pearls and diagnostic pitfalls avoids interpretation errors. PMID:26518678

  18. Haematogenous tumour growth in the inferior vena cava in a patient with a nonseminomatous testicular tumour.

    PubMed

    Ham, S J; Schraffordt Koops, H; Sleijfer, D T; Freling, N M; Molenaar, W M

    1991-08-01

    The case history is reported of a patient with an invasion of the inferior vena cava by metastases of a non-seminomatous testicular tumour. He was treated with combination chemotherapy, followed by laparotomy and resection of residual tumour tissue. Fourteen months after this operation he is in good health. For every retroperitoneal lymph node dissection it is necessary to be on the look-out for invasion of the vena cava, because of the risk of a sudden pulmonary embolism.

  19. Irradiation subassembly

    DOEpatents

    Seim, O.S.; Filewicz, E.C.; Hutter, E.

    1973-10-23

    An irradiation subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which includes a bundle of slender elongated irradiation -capsules or fuel elements enclosed by a coolant tube and having yieldable retaining liner between the irradiation capsules and the coolant tube. For a hexagonal bundle surrounded by a hexagonal tube the yieldable retaining liner may consist either of six segments corresponding to the six sides of the tube or three angular segments each corresponding in two adjacent sides of the tube. The sides of adjacent segments abut and are so cut that metal-tometal contact is retained when the volume enclosed by the retaining liner is varied and Springs are provided for urging the segments toward the center of the tube to hold the capsules in a closely packed configuration. (Official Gazette)

  20. [Phyllodes tumour of the seminal vesicle - case report of a rare tumour entity].

    PubMed

    Rau, D; Alt, W; Kälble, T

    2010-11-01

    Neoplasms of the seminal vesicles are rare. Here we report on a patient with a low-grade phyllodes tumour of the seminal vesicle. The patient was admitted to our hospital with a tumour in the excavatio rectovesicalis diagnosed by CT scan. He had no symptoms. For further diagnosis we took transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies, the histopathological examination showed no malignant features. One month later a follow-up CT scan demonstrated a significant enlargement of the tumour. Therefore we decided to perform a surgical exploration. During surgery we found a partially necrotic mass involving the prostate, the urinary bladder and the rectum. Both radical cystoprostatectomy with ileal conduit and anterior resection of the rectum with colostomy were necessary. Histologically the specimen showed a low-grade phyllodes tumour of the left seminal vesicle. One year after surgery the follow-up was completely normal without any residual or recurrent tumour. Frequency, histology, diagnostic investigations, therapy and prognosis of this rare tumour entity are discussed with respect to the actual literature.

  1. Anticancer activity of cationic porphyrins in melanoma tumour-bearing mice and mechanistic in vitro studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Porphyrin TMPyP4 (P4) and its C14H28-alkyl derivative (C14) are G-quadruplex binders and singlet oxygen (1O2) generators. In contrast, TMPyP2 (P2) produces 1O2 but it is not a G-quadruplex binder. As their photosensitizing activity is currently undefined, we report in this study their efficacy against a melanoma skin tumour and describe an in vitro mechanistic study which gives insights into their anticancer activity. Methods Uptake and antiproliferative activity of photoactivated P2, P4 and C14 have been investigated in murine melanoma B78-H1 cells by FACS, clonogenic and migration assays. Apoptosis was investigated by PARP-1 cleavage and annexin-propidium iodide assays. Biodistribution and in vivo anticancer activity were tested in melanoma tumour-bearing mice. Porphyrin binding and photocleavage of G-rich mRNA regions were investigated by electrophoresis and RT-PCR. Porphyrin effect on ERK pathway was explored by Western blots. Results Thanks to its higher lipophylicity C14 was taken up by murine melanoma B78-H1 cells up to 30-fold more efficiently than P4. When photoactivated (7.2 J/cm2) in B78-H1 melanoma cells, P4 and C14, but not control P2, caused a strong inhibition of metabolic activity, clonogenic growth and cell migration. Biodistribution studies on melanoma tumour-bearing mice showed that P4 and C14 localize in the tumour. Upon irradiation (660 nm, 193 J/cm2), P4 and C14 retarded tumour growth and increased the median survival time of the treated mice by ~50% (P <0.01 by ANOVA), whereas porphyrin P2 did not. The light-dependent mechanism mediated by P4 and C14 is likely due to the binding to and photocleavage of G-rich quadruplex-forming sequences within the 5′-untranslated regions of the mitogenic ras genes. This causes a decrease of RAS protein and inhibition of downstream ERK pathway, which stimulates proliferation. Annexin V/propidium iodide and PARP-1 cleavage assays showed that the porphyrins arrested tumour growth by apoptosis

  2. Tumours and tumour-like lesions of the hip in the paediatric age: a review of the Rizzoli experience.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, P; Angelini, A; Montalti, M; Pala, E; Calabrò, T; Ussia, G; Abati, C N; Mercuri, M

    2009-01-01

    Bone tumours and tumour-like lesions of the hip in children are rare. Signs and symptoms of these tumours are generally nonspecific. Delay of diagnosis is not uncommon. A high index of suspicion in young patients presenting with persistent pain and without history of trauma, that is unresolved with conservative therapy should prompt further investigation, including radiographs or computed tomography scan of the pelvis. In the experience of the Istituto Rizzoli, in patients less than 14 years (mean 9 years, ranged from 6 months to 14 years), 752 tumours and tumours-like lesions occurred in the pelvis or proximal femur, involving the hip. Tumour-like lesions accounted for 322 cases (simple bone cyst in 255, eosinophilic granuloma in 43, aneurismal bone cyst in 34), benign tumours for 340 cases (osteoid osteoma in 229, fibrous dysplasia in 63, exostosis in 48) and malignant tumours for 80 cases (Ewing's sarcoma in 53 and osteosarcoma in 27). The epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, and radiograph findings are discussed for each of these tumours.Treatment of these tumours differs from observation or minimally invasive treatment for most pseudotumoural lesions, intralesional excision or termoablation for benign bone tumours and wide resection for malignant bone tumours. In this latter group, chemotherapy is required and often administered pre- and postoperatively.

  3. Technetium-99m labelling of the anti-tumour antibody PR1A3 by photoactivation.

    PubMed

    Stalteri, M A; Mather, S J

    1996-02-01

    Irradiation of antibody with ultraviolet light leads to reduction of disulphide bonds. Thus irradiation can be used to generate free thiols prior to direct labelling of antibody with technetium-99m, and has a potential advantage over methods using chemical reducing agents such as mercaptoethanol or tin, in that no purification step is needed to remove excess reducing agent. We have used the photoactivation method developed by Sykes et al. to label the anti-tumour antibody PR1A3 with 99mTc. The antibody was irradiated at 300 nm using a Rayonet photochemical reactor with eight RMR3000 lamps. In a typical experiment, the antibody solution was injected into a nitrogen-filled borosilicate glass vial and purged with nitrogen. A degassed solution containing stannous fluoride and methylene diphosphonate was then added to the antibody and the vial was irradiated. Following the irradiation, [99mTc]pertechnetate was injected into the vial and the reaction mixture was incubated for 30 min at room temperature before being analysed by size-exclusion high-pressure liquid chromatography and instant thin-layer chromatography. Labelling yields greater than 95% were obtained using antibody concentrations ranging from 0.5mg/ml to 5mg/ml. Irradiation times as short as 5 min and tin to antibody ratios in the range between 11 and 32 microg tin per mg antibody gave high labelling yields. Labelling yields greater than 95% were obtained after storage of the photoactivated antibody at -70 degrees C for several weeks. The stability of the 99mTc-labelled photoactivated PR1A3 was similar to that of 99mTc-labelled mercaptoethanol-reduced PR1A3. The mean immunoreactive fraction was 77% for the photoactivation-labelled PR1A3, compared to 93% for PR1A3 labelled by mercaptoethanol reduction. Biodistribution studies were carried out using 99mTc-photoactivation-labelled PR1A3 or PR1A3 labelled by mercaptoethanol reduction in Balb/c mice and in nude mice with MKN-45 human tumour xenografts. There was

  4. [Radiotherapy after testicular-sparing surgery for bilateral or monorchide testicular tumours: an innovative approach].

    PubMed

    Sargos, P; Ferretti, L; Henriques de Figueiredo, B; Cornelis, F; Belhomme, S; Dallaudière, B; Richaud, P

    2013-01-01

    Testicular-sparing surgery may avoid definitive testosterone supplementation and preserve fertility in selected cases of men presenting with bilateral testicular tumours or in case of monorchidia. Testicular-sparing surgery may enable the conservation of both endocrine function and spermatogenesis in selected young men in order to preserve natural fatherhood, avoid definitive androgen replacement therapy and probably improve quality of life by reducing psychosexual consequences of anorchia. The tumorectomy must be followed by an external irradiation of the remaining testicle to eradicate testicular intratubular neoplasia revealed in 82% of cases after per-surgery biopsy. This approach concerns some rare indications. Dose level and technical consideration are still debated. PMID:23810303

  5. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha) in leishmaniasis. I. TNF alpha mediates host protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    Liew, F Y; Parkinson, C; Millott, S; Severn, A; Carrier, M

    1990-01-01

    Genetically resistant CBA mice developed significantly larger lesions to Leishmania major infection when they were injected with rabbit anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-specific antibodies compared to control mice injected with normal rabbit immunoglobulin. BALB/c mice recovered from a previous infection following prophylactic sublethal irradiation also developed exacerbated lesions when treated with the anti-TNF antibody. Injection of TNF into the lesion of infected CBA mice significantly reduced the lesion development. Furthermore, TNF activates macrophages to kill Leishmania in vitro. These data demonstrate that TNF plays an important role in mediating host-protection against cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:2335376

  6. Cancer Cell Death-Inducing Radiotherapy: Impact on Local Tumour Control, Tumour Cell Proliferation and Induction of Systemic Anti-tumour Immunity.

    PubMed

    Frey, Benjamin; Derer, Anja; Scheithauer, Heike; Wunderlich, Roland; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) predominantly is aimed to induce DNA damage in tumour cells that results in reduction of their clonogenicity and finally in tumour cell death. Adaptation of RT with higher single doses has become necessary and led to a more detailed view on what kind of tumour cell death is induced and which immunological consequences result from it. RT is capable of rendering tumour cells immunogenic by modifying the tumour cell phenotype and the microenvironment. Danger signals are released as well as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. This results in maturation of dendritic cells and priming of cytotoxic T cells as well as in activation of natural killer cells. However, RT on the other hand can also result in immune suppressive events including apoptosis induction and foster tumour cell proliferation. That's why RT is nowadays increasingly combined with selected immunotherapies. PMID:27558821

  7. Skull base tumours Part II. Central skull base tumours and intrinsic tumours of the bony skull base.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alexandra

    2008-06-01

    With the advances of cross-sectional imaging radiologists gained an increasing responsibility in the management of patients with skull base pathology. As this anatomic area is hidden to clinical exam, surgeons and radiation oncologists have to rely on imaging studies to plan the most adequate treatment. To fulfil these endeavour radiologists need to be knowledgeable about skull base anatomy, about the main treatment options available, their indications and contra-indications and needs to be aware of the wide gamut of pathologies seen in this anatomic region. This article will provide a radiologists' friendly approach to the central skull base and will review the most common central skull base tumours and tumours intrinsic to the bony skull base.

  8. Irradiated foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... it reduces the risk of food poisoning . Food irradiation is used in many countries. It was first approved in the U.S. to prevent sprouts on white potatoes, and to control insects on wheat and in certain spices and seasonings.

  9. Oral and maxillofacial tumours in children: a review.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Tanaka, N; Sato, T; Amagasa, T

    1997-04-01

    This retrospective review presents our experience of oral and maxillofacial tumours in children. The subjects were 250 children under the age of 15 years (out of a total of 2747 patients with oral and maxillofacial tumours), who were treated after histopathological confirmation of their diagnoses during the 28 years 1965-92. Diagnosis, incidence, and age at presentation were the main outcome measures and the results showed that 232 patients (93%) had benign tumours and 18 (7%) were malignant. The most common benign tumour was haemangioma (n = 69) and the most common malignant tumour sarcoma (n = 14). The most common odontogenic tumour was odontoma (n = 47) and non-odontogenic tumour ossifying fibroma (n = 5). The most common site of soft tissue tumours was the tongue (n = 65) and of bony tumours the mandible (n = 62). About a third of the tumours developed in patients between the ages of 6 and 11 years. Most of the angiomas developed in patients less than 6 years old, and most of the ameloblastomas in those over 12 years of age. Children accounted for 55% of patients with lymphangoma, 41% of those with odontoma, and 22% of those with haemangioma. It is concluded that most of these lesions were probably developmental malformations rather than neoplasms, and that the definition of oral and maxillofacial tumours in children should be reconsidered.

  10. Incidence and prevalence of salivary gland tumours in Valparaiso, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Juan; Martinez, René; Niklander, Sven; Marshall, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Background To determine the incidence and prevalence of salivary gland tumours in the province of Valparaíso, Chile. Material and Methods Retrospective review of salivary gland tumours diagnosed between the years 2000 and 2011 from four local pathology services. Information on demographics and histopathology were retrieved from the medical records. Results The study sample consisted of 279 salivary gland tumours. Prevalence and incidence rates per 100.000 persons were 15.4 and 2.51, respectively. Most of the neoplasms corresponded to benign tumours (70.3%). The most affected gland was the parotid gland. Pleomorphic adenoma was the most common benign tumour (53.8%) and mucoepidermoid carcinoma was the most common malignant tumour (7.2%). Conclusions Salivary gland tumours are uncommon neoplasms that usually arise in the parotid gland. Pleomorphic adenoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma were the most common benign and malignant tumours reported in this series. Key words:Salivary gland tumours, benign tumours, malignant tumours, salivary glands neoplasms, cancer, neoplasia. PMID:26034925

  11. Isolated, disseminated and circulating tumour cells in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schilling, David; Todenhöfer, Tilman; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Schwentner, Christian; Fehm, Tanja; Stenzl, Arnulf

    2012-08-01

    The loss of single cells from a tumour cell cluster marks an early event in the metastatic process of cancer progression. Although the metastatic cascade in prostate cancer is yet to be fully understood, monitoring circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and quantifying the load of tumour cell dissemination is currently being implemented into routine clinical practice for diagnosing minimal residual disease (MRD), estimating prognosis and monitoring treatment success. Current methods for enrichment of CTCs or disseminated tumour cells (DTCs) and detection of MRD rely on the expression of specific marker genes or proteins that might be altered during the process of tumour cell dissemination, therefore disrupting tumour cell detection. The tumour origin and malignant potential for metastasis of marker-positive cells is not yet clear. Some studies have demonstrated the potential of CTCs or DTCs as prognostic or predictive markers, leading to the increasing implementation of CTC measurement as an end point in clinical trials.

  12. Giant Mediastinal Germ Cell Tumour: An Enigma of Surgical Consideration

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Nurayub Mohd; Azizan, Nornazirah; Zakaria, Andee Dzulkarnaen; Rahman, Mohd Ramzisham Abdul

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of 16-year-old male, who was referred from private centre for dyspnoea, fatigue, and orthopnea. The chest radiograph revealed complete opacification of left chest which was confirmed by computed tomography as a large left mediastinal mass measuring 14 × 15 × 18 cm. The diagnostic needle core biopsy revealed mixed germ cell tumour with possible combination of embryonal carcinoma, yolk sac, and teratoma. After 4 cycles of neoadjuvant BEP regime, there was initial response of tumour markers but not tumour bulk. Instead of classic median sternotomy or clamshell incision, posterolateral approach with piecemeal manner was chosen. Histology confirmed mixed germ cell tumour with residual teratomatous component without yolk sac or embryonal carcinoma component. Weighing 3.5 kg, it is one of the largest mediastinal germ cell tumours ever reported. We describe this rare and gigantic intrathoracic tumour and discuss the spectrum of surgical approach and treatment of this exceptional tumour. PMID:27807495

  13. Expression and mutations of p53 in salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Kärjä, V J; Syrjänen, K J; Kurvinen, A K; Syrjänen, S M

    1997-05-01

    A series of 219 salivary gland tumours (103 carcinomas and 116 benign tumours) were analysed for p53 protein expression using immunohistochemistry, and for mutations in p53 gene using non-radioactive single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). p53 expression was present in 36% (42/116) of the benign tumours and in 54% (56/103) of the carcinomas. The highest prevalence of p53 expression was found in adenoid cystic carcinomas (69%), followed by mucoepidermoid carcinomas (67%). Of the benign tumours, pleomorphic adenomas showed the highest prevalence of p53 positivity (41%). In malignant tumours, expression of p53 bore no correlation to local recurrence, metastatic disease or survival of the patients. Exons 5 through 9 were analysed and four mutations were found in 20 cases of p53-immunopositive tumours and two in 20 p53-negative tumours. Each of the exons 5, 6 and 8/9 had two mutations, whereas no mutations were detected in exon 7.

  14. The protein kinase IKKepsilon contributes to tumour growth and tumour pain in a melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Möser, Christine V; Meissner, Markus; Laarmann, Kathrin; Olbrich, Katrin; King-Himmelreich, Tanya S; Wolters, Miriam C; Geisslinger, Gerd; Niederberger, Ellen

    2016-03-01

    Inhibitor-kappaB kinase epsilon (IKKε) constitutes a non-canonical I-κB kinase, which amongst others modulates NF-κB activity. IKKε and NF-κB have both been described for their role in cell proliferation and their dysregulation has been associated with tumourigenesis and metastasis in multiple cancer types. Accordingly, overexpression and constitutive activation of NF-κB have also been shown in melanoma, however, the role of IKKε in this cancer type has not been investigated so far. Thus, we determined IKKε expression in malignant melanoma cells and we were able to show a significant overexpression of IKKε in tumour cells in comparison to melanocytes. Inhibition of IKKε either by shRNA or the pharmacological inhibitor amlexanox resulted in reduced cell proliferation associated with a cell cycle block in the G1-phase. Functional analysis indicated that NF-κB, Akt1 and MAPK pathways might be involved in the IKKε-mediated effects. In vivo, we applied a mouse melanoma skin cancer model to assess tumour growth and melanoma-associated pain in IKKε knockout mice as well as C57BL/6 mice after inoculation with IKKε-negative cells. In IKKε knockout mice, tumour growth was not altered as compared to IKKε wild type mice. However, melanoma associated pain was strongly suppressed accompanied by a reduced mRNA expression of a number of pain-relevant genes. In contrast, after inoculation of IKKε-depleted tumour cells, the development of melanoma was almost completely prevented. In conclusion, our data suggest that IKKε in the tumour plays an essential role in tumour initiation and progression while IKKε expression in tumour surrounding tissues contributes to melanoma-associated pain.

  15. The promoting effect of tumour necrosis factor alpha in radiation-induced cell transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, R. F.; Gong, Y. F.

    1998-01-01

    The ability of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), a potent endogenous inflammatory agent, to promote malignant transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells (SHE) initiated by a 0.5-Gy dose of alpha-particles was investigated. Opsonized zymosan particles, which were phagocytosed by a human macrophage-like cell line, triggered TNF-alpha production from U937 cells. This cell supernatant could significantly increase the transformation frequency (TF) of primary SHE cells previously irradiated by a 0.5-Gy dose of alpha-particles. The TF decreased significantly if monoclonal antibody against TNF-alpha was added to the supernatant. Similarly, recombinant human TNF-alpha (rhTNF-alpha) increased the TF of alpha-irradiated primary SHE cells to an even greater extent. Addition of TNF-alpha to subcultures of irradiated SHE cells permitted the continuous propagation of these primary cells. In contrast, both TNF-alpha-treated control and alpha-irradiated cells without subsequent TNF-alpha treatment senesced after 7-15 passages. Irradiated SHE cells treated continuously with TNF-alpha could be subcultured over 40 passages and produced fibrosarcomas upon inoculation into nude mice. Our results provide the first evidence that TNF-alpha released by activated macrophages may contribute to the process of malignant transformation initiated by low-dose alpha-particles. PMID:9579824

  16. LKB1, the multitasking tumour suppressor kinase.

    PubMed

    Marignani, P A

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the lkb1 gene are found in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), with loss of heterozygosity or somatic mutations at the lkb1 locus, suggesting the gene product, the serine/threonine kinase LKB1, may function as a tumour suppressor. Patients with PJS are at a greater risk of developing cancers of epithelial tissue origin. It is widely accepted that the presence of hamartomatous polyps in PJS does not in itself lead to the development of malignancy. The signalling mechanisms that lead to these PJS related malignancies are not well understood. However, it is evident from the recent literature that LKB1 is a multitasking kinase, with unlimited potential in orchestrating cell activity. Thus far, LKB1 has been found to play a role in chromatin remodelling, cell cycle arrest, Wnt signalling, cell polarity, and energy metabolism, all of which may require the tumour suppressor function of this kinase and/or its catalytic activity.

  17. Caspase-2 as a tumour suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Puccini, J; Dorstyn, L; Kumar, S

    2013-01-01

    Ever since its discovery 20 years ago, caspase-2 has been enigmatic and its function somewhat controversial. Although many in vitro studies suggested that caspase-2 was important for apoptosis, demonstrating an in vivo cell death role for this caspase has been more problematic, with caspase-2-deficient mice showing limited, tissue-specific cell death defects. Recent results from different laboratories suggest that at least one of its physiological roles in animals is to protect against cellular stress and transformation. As such, loss of caspase-2 augments tumorigenesis in some mouse models of cancer, assigning a tumour suppressor function to this enigmatic caspase. This review focuses on this seemingly non-apoptotic function of caspase-2 as a tumour suppressor and reconciles some of the recent findings in the field. PMID:23811850

  18. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Brabander, Tessa; Teunissen, Jaap J M; Van Eijck, Casper H J; Franssen, Gaston J H; Feelders, Richard A; de Herder, Wouter W; Kwekkeboom, Dik J

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, the number of neuroendocrine tumours that are detected is increasing. A relative new and promising therapy for patients with metastasised or inoperable disease is peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). This therapy involves an infusion of somatostatin analogues linked to radionuclides like Yttrium-90 or Lutetium-177. Objective response rates are reported in 15-35%. Response rates may vary between type of tumour and radionuclide. Besides the objective response rate, overall survival and progression free survival increase significantly. Also, the quality of life improves as well. Serious side-affects are rare. PRRT is usually well tolerated, also in patients with extensive metastasised disease. Recent studies combined PRRT with other types of therapies. Unfortunately no randomised trials comparing these strategies are available. In the future, more research is needed to evaluate the best therapy combinations or sequence of therapies. PMID:26971847

  19. Coexistent dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour and pilocytic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Nasit, Jitendra G.; Shah, Payal; Zalawadia, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour (DNET) is an uncommon mixed glioneuronal tumour. DNET is classified as Grade I neoplasm in revised World Health Organization classification of tumors of the nervous system. DNET is commonly seen in the temporal lobe of children and young adults with features of pharmacoresistant complex partial seizures. Tumors arising in association with DNETs are rare. Only two cases of pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) arising in DNETs are reported. Surgical excision is the only successful management with favourable prognosis. The development of recurrence and malignancy after subtotal or even after complete excision challenges the premise of stability and highlights the importance of close clinical follow up. Here, a case of DNET with area of PA is described which helps in understanding the pathogenesis and biological behavior of DNET.

  20. Coexistent dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour and pilocytic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Nasit, Jitendra G.; Shah, Payal; Zalawadia, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour (DNET) is an uncommon mixed glioneuronal tumour. DNET is classified as Grade I neoplasm in revised World Health Organization classification of tumors of the nervous system. DNET is commonly seen in the temporal lobe of children and young adults with features of pharmacoresistant complex partial seizures. Tumors arising in association with DNETs are rare. Only two cases of pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) arising in DNETs are reported. Surgical excision is the only successful management with favourable prognosis. The development of recurrence and malignancy after subtotal or even after complete excision challenges the premise of stability and highlights the importance of close clinical follow up. Here, a case of DNET with area of PA is described which helps in understanding the pathogenesis and biological behavior of DNET. PMID:27695565

  1. [Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours of the bladder].

    PubMed

    Dakir, Mohamed; Taha, Abdellatif; Attar, Hicham; Sarf, Ismail; Aboutaib, Rachid; Moussaoui, Ali; Meziane, Fathi

    2004-12-01

    The inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of the bladder is a rare benign affection that interests mainly young adults. Its etiopathogeny remains unknown, but its tumoral origin was evocated recently by Griffin (1999), incriminating a chromosomic abnormality involving the ALK gene. We will discuss the etiopathogenic, anatopathological and therapeutical aspects of this lesion for which the diagnosis is histological and the treatment remains conservative with a good prognosis.

  2. Genetics of neuroendocrine and carcinoid tumours.

    PubMed

    Leotlela, P D; Jauch, A; Holtgreve-Grez, H; Thakker, R V

    2003-12-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) originate in tissues that contain cells derived from the embryonic neural crest, neuroectoderm and endoderm. Thus, NETs occur at many sites in the body, although the majority occur within the gastro-entero-pancreatic axis and can be subdivided into those of foregut, midgut and hindgut origin. Amongst these, only those of midgut origin are generally argentaffin positive and secrete serotonin, and hence only these should be referred to as carcinoid tumours. NETs may occur as part of complex familial endocrine cancer syndromes, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), although the majority occur as non-familial (i.e. sporadic) isolated tumours. Molecular genetic studies have revealed that the development of NETs may involve different genes, each of which may be associated with several different abnormalities that include point mutations, gene deletions, DNA methylation, chromosomal losses and chromosomal gains. Indeed, the foregut, midgut and hindgut NETs develop via different molecular pathways. For example, foregut NETs have frequent deletions and mutations of the MEN1 gene, whereas midgut NETs have losses of chromosome 18, 11q and 16q and hindgut NETs express transforming growth factor-alpha and the epidermal growth factor receptor. Furthermore, in lung NETs, a loss of chromosome 3p is the most frequent change and p53 mutations and chromosomal loss of 5q21 are associated with more aggressive tumours and poor survival. In addition, methylation frequencies of retinoic acid receptor-beta, E-cadherin and RAS-associated domain family genes increase with the severity of lung NETs. Thus the development and progression of NETs is associated with specific genetic abnormalities that indicate the likely involvement of different molecular pathways.

  3. A benign maxillary tumour with malignant features.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, Rosario R; Lim, Aimee Caroline E; Lopa, Ramon Antonio B; Carnate, Jose M

    2010-06-01

    Non-specific biopsy results such as chronic inflammation, hemorrhage, necrosis can be frustrating to the clinician. This is especially true if the patient presents with clinical features suggestive of an aggressive tumour. This is a review of the clinical features, diagnostic dilemmas and surgical management of a benign maxillary mass with malignant features - a disease called hematoma-like mass of the maxillary sinus (HLMMS). Our experience with five cases will also be cited. PMID:20502750

  4. Malignant testicular tumour incidence and mortality trends

    PubMed Central

    Wojtyła-Buciora, Paulina; Więckowska, Barbara; Krzywinska-Wiewiorowska, Małgorzata; Gromadecka-Sutkiewicz, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study In Poland testicular tumours are the most frequent cancer among men aged 20–44 years. Testicular tumour incidence since the 1980s and 1990s has been diversified geographically, with an increased risk of mortality in Wielkopolska Province, which was highlighted at the turn of the 1980s and 1990s. The aim of the study was the comparative analysis of the tendencies in incidence and death rates due to malignant testicular tumours observed among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province. Material and methods Data from the National Cancer Registry were used for calculations. The incidence/mortality rates among men due to malignant testicular cancer as well as the tendencies in incidence/death ratio observed in Poland and Wielkopolska were established based on regression equation. The analysis was deepened by adopting the multiple linear regression model. A p-value < 0.05 was arbitrarily adopted as the criterion of statistical significance, and for multiple comparisons it was modified according to the Bonferroni adjustment to a value of p < 0.0028. Calculations were performed with the use of PQStat v1.4.8 package. Results The incidence of malignant testicular neoplasms observed among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province indicated a significant rising tendency. The multiple linear regression model confirmed that the year variable is a strong incidence forecast factor only within the territory of Poland. A corresponding analysis of mortality rates among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province did not show any statistically significant correlations. Conclusions Late diagnosis of Polish patients calls for undertaking appropriate educational activities that would facilitate earlier reporting of the patients, thus increasing their chances for recovery. Introducing preventive examinations in the regions of increased risk of testicular tumour may allow earlier diagnosis. PMID:27095941

  5. ABCB1 in children's brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Beth; Kessler, Maya; Sabnis, Durgagauri H; Kerr, Ian D

    2015-10-01

    Tumours of the central nervous system are the most common solid tumour, accounting for a quarter of the 1500 cases of childhood cancer diagnosed each year in the U.K. They are the most common cause of cancer-related death in children. Treatment consists of surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Survival rates have generally increased, but many survivors suffer from radiotherapy-related neurocognitive and endocrine side effects as well as an increased risk of secondary cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy is normally given in combination to circumvent chemoresistance, but several studies have demonstrated it to be ineffective in the absence of radiotherapy. The identification of children with drug-resistant disease at the outset could allow stratification of those that are potentially curable by chemotherapy alone. Ultimately, however, what is required is a means to overcome this drug resistance and restore the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Medulloblastomas and ependymomas account for over 30% of paediatric brain tumours. Advances in neurosurgery, adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy have led to improvements in 5-year overall survival rates. There remain, however, significant numbers of medulloblastoma patients that have intrinsically drug-resistant tumours and/or present with disseminated disease. Local relapse in ependymoma is also common and has an extremely poor prognosis with only 25% of children surviving first relapse. Each of these is consistent with the acquisition of drug and radiotherapy resistance. Since the majority of chemotherapy drugs currently used to treat these patients are transport substrates for ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 1 (ABCB1) we will address the hypothesis that ABCB1 expression underlies this drug resistance. PMID:26517917

  6. Papillary tumours of the minor salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, J S; Turner, E P

    1976-09-01

    The clinical and histological features of oncocytic adenomatous hyperplasia, papillary adenoma, and papillary adenocarcinoma of the oral cavity are described, and the literature is reviewed. Histological features which may be of value in distinguishing between benign and malignant variants are described, and in view of the slow growth rate of most of these tumours, the importance of long-term follow-up is stressed.

  7. Verification of genes differentially expressed in neuroblastoma tumours: a study of potential tumour suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Thorell, Kaisa; Bergman, Annika; Carén, Helena; Nilsson, Staffan; Kogner, Per; Martinsson, Tommy; Abel, Frida

    2009-01-01

    Background One of the most striking features of the childhood malignancy neuroblastoma (NB) is its clinical heterogeneity. Although there is a great need for better clinical and biological markers to distinguish between tumours with different severity and to improve treatment, no clear-cut prognostic factors have been found. Also, no major NB tumour suppressor genes have been identified. Methods In this study we performed expression analysis by quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR) on primary NB tumours divided into two groups, of favourable and unfavourable outcome respectively. Candidate genes were selected on basis of lower expression in unfavourable tumour types compared to favourables in our microarray expression analysis. Selected genes were studied in two steps: (1) using TaqMan Low Density Arrays (TLDA) targeting 89 genes on a set of 12 NB tumour samples, and (2) 12 genes were selected from the TLDA analysis for verification using individual TaqMan assays in a new set of 13 NB tumour samples. Results By TLDA analysis, 81 out of 87 genes were found to be significantly differentially expressed between groups, of which 14 have previously been reported as having an altered gene expression in NB. In the second verification round, seven out of 12 transcripts showed significantly lower expression in unfavourable NB tumours, ATBF1, CACNA2D3, CNTNAP2, FUSIP1, GNB1, SLC35E2, and TFAP2B. The gene that showed the highest fold change in the TLDA analysis, POU4F2, was investigated for epigenetic changes (CpG methylation) and mutations in order to explore the cause of the differential expression. Moreover, the fragile site gene CNTNAP2 that showed the largest fold change in verification group 2 was investigated for structural aberrations by copy number analysis. However, the analyses of POU4F2 and CNTNAP2 showed no genetic alterations that could explain a lower expression in unfavourable NB tumours. Conclusion Through two steps of verification, seven transcripts were found to

  8. The role of macrophages in the cytotoxic killing of tumour cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zembala, M.; Ptak, W.; Hanczakowska, Maria

    1973-01-01

    Lymph node and spleen cells from normal mice were cultured for 3 days with polyoma virus-induced tumour, Ehrlich's ascites tumour or leukaemia L 1210 cells. This resulted in in vitro immunization of the lymphocytes, which were then transferred to irradiated target cells labelled with 51Cr. Normal, i.e. non-immune thioglycollate-stimulated peritoneal macrophages were also added to some tubes. Non-immune macrophages mixed with immunized lymphocytes showed a significantly increased ability to destroy tumour cells as compared with macrophages in the absence of immunized lymphocytes. The immunized lymphocytes were almost entirely inactive alone. When the number of macrophages was kept constant the cytotoxicity was dependent on the number of viable immunized lymphocytes placed on the target cells. Immunized lymphocytes, in the presence of macrophages, only exhibited strong killing of the target cells against which they had been immunized; some lysis of `bystander' cells was, however, seen provided specific target cells were present. Macrophage monolayers exposed to immunized lymphocytes upon contact with specific antigen became `armed' and showed a significant cytotoxicity for specific target cells. When immunized lymphocytes and normal macrophages were treated with actinomycin D and puromycin, cytotoxicity was inhibited in the immunized lymphocytes but not in the macrophages. The possible mechanism of normal macrophage cooperation with immunized lymphocytes in the cytotoxic killing reaction is discussed. Results presented in this paper favour the view that immunologically specific cytophilic factor (presumptive cytophilic antibody) is involved in the macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity in the system studied. PMID:4356674

  9. A study of the mechanism of hydralazine enhancement of thermal damage in the KHT tumour.

    PubMed

    Honess, D J; Hu, D E; Bleehen, N M

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism of the potentiation of thermal damage by hydralazine (HDZ) has been investigated. Using the KHT sarcoma in the leg of C3H mice, it was shown that 5 mg/kg of HDZ given i.v. 15-20 min before irradiation or heat exposure: (i) increased the radiobiological hypoxic fraction from 1 to 32%; (ii) produced a greater than additive growth delay when combined with heating for 30 min at either 43 or 43.5 degrees C, or 60 min at 43 degrees C; (iii) produced only additive cell killing when combined with 30 min heating at 43, 43.5, or 44 degrees C, assayed by clonogenic cell survival immediately or 24 h after treatment; and (iv) produced a prolonged (greater than 72 h) reduction in relative tissue perfusion (RTP) in the tumour when combined with heating for 30 min at 43.5 degrees C. The effects of HDZ or heat alone lasted for less than 24 and 48 h, respectively. The RTP in skin was unaffected by either agent or combination of agents at the times assayed. The results show that this 30-fold increase in hypoxia does not increase the intrinsic thermosensitivity of KHT tumour cells, and that the prolonged reduction in RTP caused by the combined treatment is probably responsible, at least in part, for the greater than additive component of the measured growth delay in this system. The data suggest that non-perfused tumour vessels are more heat sensitive than perfused vessels.

  10. Multimodality treatment using AK-2123, hydralazine, radiation & hyperthermia on a transplantable mouse tumour.

    PubMed

    Rao, B S; Devi, P U

    1996-08-01

    The in vivo response of a transplantable mouse tumour, Sarcoma 180 to AK-2123 (AK), local irradiation (RT) and local hyperthermia, as influenced by a vasoactive drug, hydralazine (HDZ), was assessed on the basis of tumour cure (complete response CR), volume doubling time (VDT), regrowth delay (RD) and animal survival up to 120 days. A single ip injection of 200 mg/kg b.wt. AK produced more than 15 per cent CR. Combination of any two agents resulted in a better response than the single agent treatments. AK in combination with 43 degrees C, 30 min (HT) was more effective than HT combination with 10 Gy. The presence of 5 mg/kg HDZ, injected immediately after 5 Gy, in combination with AK increased the therapeutic effect over that produced by AK+10Gy. Combination of all the three agents (AK+10Gy+HT) produced 100 per cent CR and prolonged disease free animal survival. A similar response could be obtained by the presence of HDZ with a lower radiation dose of 5 Gy in combination with AK and HT (AK+5Gy+HDZ+HT). This multimodality treatment offers the possibility of further reduction in the doses of individual agents, and in the possible side effects on normal tissues without compromising the tumour cure effect.

  11. Hyperbaric oxygen as an adjunctive therapy in treatment of malignancies, including brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Stępień, Katarzyna; Ostrowski, Robert P; Matyja, Ewa

    2016-09-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy is widely used as an adjunctive treatment for various pathological states, predominantly related to hypoxic and/or ischaemic conditions. It also holds promise as an approach to overcoming the problem of oxygen deficiency in the poorly oxygenated regions of the neoplastic tissue. Occurrence of local hypoxia within the central areas of solid tumours is one of the major issues contributing to ineffective medical treatment. However, in anti-cancer therapy, HBO alone gives a limited curative effect and is typically not applied by itself. More often, HBO is used as an adjuvant treatment along with other therapeutic modalities, such as radio- and chemotherapy. This review outlines the existing data regarding the medical use of HBO in cancer treatment, with a particular focus on the use of HBO in the treatment of brain tumours. We conclude that the administration of HBO can provide many clinical benefits in the treatment of tumours, including management of highly malignant gliomas. Applied immediately before irradiation, it is safe and well tolerated by patients, causing rare and limited side effects. The results obtained with a combination of HBO/radiotherapy protocol proved to be especially favourable compared to radiation treatment alone. HBO can also increase the cytostatic effect of certain drugs, which may render standard chemotherapy more effective. The currently available data support the legitimacy of conducting further research on the use of HBO in the treatment of malignancies. PMID:27485098

  12. [Guideline 'Leptomeningeal metastases of solid tumours'].

    PubMed

    Boogerd, W; du Bois, W F J; Teepen, J L J M; Rosenbrand, C J G M

    2007-01-13

    In view of recent progressive insight in the diagnosis and treatment of leptomeningeal metastases of solid tumours, a new guideline has been designed on the initiative of the Dutch Association of NeuroOncology and the Netherlands Society of Neurology, with methodological support from the Dutch Institute for Healthcare Improvement (CBO). - There are no neurological symptoms or signs, nor MRI characteristics that are unique to leptomeningeal metastasis. However, clinical suspicion of leptomeningeal metastasis in a patient known to have cancer, in combination with specific MRI characteristics is sufficient to make the diagnosis. If MRI or CT results are negative or inconclusive cerebrospinal-fluid assessment should be conducted. - Management of care of patients with leptomeningeal metastasis without brain metastases can be based on a series of categories that have been developed using prognostic factors such as Karnofsky performance status, serious encephalopathy or neurological dysfunction, systemic disease, sensitivity of the tumour for chemotherapy or hormonal treatment - In the context of meaningful palliation, systemic treatment, if necessary in combination with radiotherapy to clinically relevant sites, is preferable to intrathecal chemotherapy. - Intrathecal chemotherapy combined with local radiotherapy is recommended if effective systemic treatment is not available, and if the tumour is potentially sensitive to methotrexate, cytarabine or thiotepa. The combination of intrathecal methotrexate and whole-brain radiotherapy should be avoided.

  13. [Epidemiology and risk factors of testicular tumours].

    PubMed

    Kozłowski, Piotr; Starosławska, Elżbieta; Szumiło, Justyna; Jankiewicz, Małgorzata; Kozłowska, Magdalena; Burdan, Franciszek

    2016-04-01

    Testicular tumours are rare neoplasms, which most commonly affects men aged 25 to 35 years. Among young adult males it is the most common cause of testicular swelling. In recent decades, the number of cases of testicular tumours has greatly increased. The most significant predisposing factors are cryptorchidism and some endocrine disorders, especially increased levels of gonadotropins and female sex hormones. Testicular trauma, inguinal hernia, extreme values of body mass index (BMI), high-calorie diet rich in dairy products as well as high social status are also regarded as risk factors. Furthermore, some chromosomal abnormalities like increased number of chromosomes 7, 8. 12, 21 and X, loss of chromosomes 4, 5, 11, 13, 18, or Y, mutation in the gene Xq27; as well as multiplied copy of the gene i(12p) are associated with tumor development. It has been proven that high testosterone levels and regular physical activity may prevent testicular tumours. Since one of the first sign the lesion is often a lump or swelling of the testis and the appearance of abnormal structure in the scrotum routine testicular self-examination seems to be important in early detection. In all suspected cases an immediate ultrasound examination of both testicles is highly recommended. It is also advised to conduct a computerized tomography (CT) and a positron emission tomography (PET) scan for staging of the tumor to select the best mode of treatment. PMID:27137819

  14. Cell metabolism, tumour diagnosis and multispectral FLIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rück, A.; Hauser, C.; Lorenz, S.; Mosch, S.; Rotte, S.; Kessler, M.; Kalinina, S.

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescence guided diagnosis of tumour tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results are interfering with the outcome. Discrimination between tumour and inflammation could be therefore difficult. Improvement of fluorescence diagnosis through observation of cell metabolism could be the solution, which needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. However, a complex combination of fluorophores give rise to the emission signal. Also in PDD (photodynamic diagnosis) different photosensitizer metabolites contribute to the fluorescence signal. Therefore, the fluorescence decay in many cases does not show a simple monoexponential profile. In those cases a considerable improvement could be achieved when time-resolved and spectral-resolved techniques are simultaneously incorporated. The discussion will focus on the detection of NADH, FAD and 5-ALA induced porphyrins. With respect to NADH and FAD the discrimination between protein bound and free coenzyme was investigated with multispectral FLIM in normal oral keratinocytes and squamous carcinoma cells from different origin. The redox ratio, which can be correlated with the fluorescence lifetimes of NADH and FAD changed depending on the state of the cells. Most of the investigations were done in monolayer cell cultures. However, in order to get information from a more realistic in vivo situation additionally the chorioallantoismembrane (CAM) of fertilized eggs was used where tumour cells or biopsies were allowed to grow. The results of theses measurements will be discussed as well.

  15. Tumour exosome integrins determine organotropic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Ayuko; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Shen, Tang-Long; Rodrigues, Goncalo; Hashimoto, Ayako; Tesic Mark, Milica; Molina, Henrik; Kohsaka, Shinji; Di Giannatale, Angela; Ceder, Sophia; Singh, Swarnima; Williams, Caitlin; Soplop, Nadine; Uryu, Kunihiro; Pharmer, Lindsay; King, Tari; Bojmar, Linda; Davies, Alexander E; Ararso, Yonathan; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Haiying; Hernandez, Jonathan; Weiss, Joshua M; Dumont-Cole, Vanessa D; Kramer, Kimberly; Wexler, Leonard H; Narendran, Aru; Schwartz, Gary K; Healey, John H; Sandstrom, Per; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Kure, Elin H; Grandgenett, Paul M; Hollingsworth, Michael A; de Sousa, Maria; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Mallya, Kavita; Batra, Surinder K; Jarnagin, William R; Brady, Mary S; Fodstad, Oystein; Muller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Minn, Andy J; Bissell, Mina J; Garcia, Benjamin A; Kang, Yibin; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K; Ghajar, Cyrus M; Matei, Irina; Peinado, Hector; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2015-11-19

    Ever since Stephen Paget's 1889 hypothesis, metastatic organotropism has remained one of cancer's greatest mysteries. Here we demonstrate that exosomes from mouse and human lung-, liver- and brain-tropic tumour cells fuse preferentially with resident cells at their predicted destination, namely lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells, liver Kupffer cells and brain endothelial cells. We show that tumour-derived exosomes uptaken by organ-specific cells prepare the pre-metastatic niche. Treatment with exosomes from lung-tropic models redirected the metastasis of bone-tropic tumour cells. Exosome proteomics revealed distinct integrin expression patterns, in which the exosomal integrins α6β4 and α6β1 were associated with lung metastasis, while exosomal integrin αvβ5 was linked to liver metastasis. Targeting the integrins α6β4 and αvβ5 decreased exosome uptake, as well as lung and liver metastasis, respectively. We demonstrate that exosome integrin uptake by resident cells activates Src phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory S100 gene expression. Finally, our clinical data indicate that exosomal integrins could be used to predict organ-specific metastasis.

  16. Genomic landscape of paediatric adrenocortical tumours.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Emilia M; Chen, Xiang; Easton, John; Finkelstein, David; Liu, Zhifa; Pounds, Stanley; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Lund, Troy C; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Boggs, Kristy; Yergeau, Donald; Cheng, Jinjun; Mulder, Heather L; Manne, Jayanthi; Jenkins, Jesse; Mastellaro, Maria J; Figueiredo, Bonald C; Dyer, Michael A; Pappo, Alberto; Zhang, Jinghui; Downing, James R; Ribeiro, Raul C; Zambetti, Gerard P

    2015-01-01

    Paediatric adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare malignancy with poor prognosis. Here we analyse 37 adrenocortical tumours (ACTs) by whole-genome, whole-exome and/or transcriptome sequencing. Most cases (91%) show loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosome 11p, with uniform selection against the maternal chromosome. IGF2 on chromosome 11p is overexpressed in 100% of the tumours. TP53 mutations and chromosome 17 LOH with selection against wild-type TP53 are observed in 28 ACTs (76%). Chromosomes 11p and 17 undergo copy-neutral LOH early during tumorigenesis, suggesting tumour-driver events. Additional genetic alterations include recurrent somatic mutations in ATRX and CTNNB1 and integration of human herpesvirus-6 in chromosome 11p. A dismal outcome is predicted by concomitant TP53 and ATRX mutations and associated genomic abnormalities, including massive structural variations and frequent background mutations. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the nature, timing and potential prognostic significance of key genetic alterations in paediatric ACT and outline a hypothetical model of paediatric adrenocortical tumorigenesis. PMID:25743702

  17. Imatinib treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs are believed to originate from intersticial cells of Cajal (the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract) or related stem cells, and are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. The use of imatinib has revolutionized the management of GIST and altered its natural history, substantially improving survival time and delaying disease progression in many patients. The success of imatinib in controlling advanced GIST led to interest in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant use of the drug. The neoadjuvant (preoperative) use of imatinib is recommended to facilitate resection and avoid mutilating surgery by decreasing tumour size, and adjuvant therapy is indicated for patients at high risk of recurrence. The molecular characterization (genotyping) of GISTs has become an essential part of the routine management of the disease as KIT and PDGFRA mutation status predicts the likelihood of achieving response to imatinib. However, the vast majority of patients who initially responded to imatinib will develop tumour progression (secondary resistance). Secondary resistance is often related to secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations that interfere with drug binding. Multiple novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be potentially useful for the treatment of imatinib-resistant GISTs as they interfere with KIT and PDGFRA receptors or with the downstream-signalling proteins.

  18. Familial syndromes associated with neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Komarowska, Hanna; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Waligórska-Stachura, Joanna; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours may be associated with familial syndromes. At least eight inherited syndromes predisposing to endocrine neoplasia have been identified. Two of these are considered to be major factors predisposing to benign and malignant endocrine tumours, designated multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and type 2 (MEN1 and MEN2). Five other autosomal dominant diseases show more heterogeneous clinical patterns, such as the Carney complex, hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome, Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL), neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and tuberous sclerosis. The molecular and cellular interactions underlying the development of most endocrine cells and related organs represent one of the more complex pathways not yet to be deciphered. Almost all endocrine cells are derived from the endoderm and neuroectoderm. It is suggested that within the first few weeks of human development there are complex interactions between, firstly, the major genes involved in the initiation of progenitor-cell differentiation, secondly, factors secreted by the surrounding mesenchyme, and thirdly, a series of genes controlling cell differentiation, proliferation and migration. Together these represent a formula for the harmonious development of endocrine glands and tissue. PMID:26557756

  19. Tumour exosome integrins determine organotropic metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Ayuko; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Shen, Tang-Long; Rodrigues, Goncalo; Hashimoto, Ayako; Mark, Milica Tesic; Molina, Henrik; Kohsaka, Shinji; Di Giannatale, Angela; Ceder, Sophia; Singh, Swarnima; Williams, Caitlin; Soplop, Nadine; Uryu, Kunihiro; Pharmer, Lindsay; King, Tari; Bojmar, Linda; Davies, Alexander E.; Ararso, Yonathan; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Haiying; Hernandez, Jonathan; Weiss, Joshua M.; Dumont-Cole, Vanessa D.; Kramer, Kimberly; Wexler, Leonard H.; Narendran, Aru; Schwartz, Gary K.; Healey, John H.; Sandstrom, Per; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Kure, Elin H.; Grandgenett, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; de Sousa, Maria; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Mallya, Kavita; Batra, Surinder K.; Jarnagin, William R.; Brady, Mary S.; Fodstad, Oystein; Muller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Minn, Andy J.; Bissell, Mina J.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Kang, Yibin; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Matei, Irina; Peinado, Hector; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2015-01-01

    Ever since Stephen Paget’s 1889 hypothesis, metastatic organotropism has remained one of cancer’s greatest mysteries. Here we demonstrate that exosomes from mouse and human lung-, liver- and brain-tropic tumour cells fuse preferentially with resident cells at their predicted destination, namely lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells, liver Kupffer cells and brain endothelial cells. We show that tumour-derived exosomes uptaken by organ-specific cells prepare the pre-metastatic niche. Treatment with exosomes from lung-tropic models redirected the metastasis of bone-tropic tumour cells. Exosome proteomics revealed distinct integrin expression patterns, in which the exosomal integrins α6β4 and α6β1 were associated with lung metastasis, while exosomal integrin αvβ5 was linked to liver metastasis. Targeting the integrins α6β4 and αvβ5 decreased exosome uptake, as well as lung and liver metastasis, respectively. We demonstrate that exosome integrin uptake by resident cells activates Src phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory S100 gene expression. Finally, our clinical data indicate that exosomal integrins could be used to predict organ-specific metastasis. PMID:26524530

  20. The natural history of disappearing bone tumours and tumour-like conditions.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, T; Watanabe, H; Shinozaki, T; Ahmed, A R; Shirakura, K; Takagishi, K

    2001-11-01

    We describe 27 cases of bone tumours or tumour-like lesions where there was spontaneous regression. The follow-up period was 2.8-16.7 years (average, 7.0 years). Fourteen of these cases were no longer visible on plain radiographs. Histological diagnosis included exostosis, eosinophilic granuloma, fibrous dysplasia, fibrous cortical defect, non-ossifying fibroma, osteoid osteoma and bone island. Most cases began to reduce in adolescence or earlier, although sclerotic type lesions showed their regression in older patients. All lesions thought to be eosinophilic granuloma began to regress after periods of less than 3 months, while the duration of the other lesions showed wide variation (1-74 months). As resolution of the lesions took between 2 and 79 months (mean, 25.0 +/- 20.3 months) we consider that the most likely mechanism was recovery of normal skeletal growth control. In exostosis with fracture, alteration of vascular supply may contribute to growth arrest, but not to subsequent remodelling stage. In inflammatory-related lesions such as eosinophilic granuloma, cessation of inflammation may be the mechanism of growth arrest, whilst temporary inflammation may stimulate osteogenic cells engaged in remodeling. In the sclerotic type, growth arrest is a less probable mechanism. Necrosis within the tumour and/or local changes in hormonal control, plus remodelling of the sclerotic area takes longer. Knowledge of the potential for spontaneous resolution may help in management of these tumour and tumour-like lesions of bone.

  1. Induction of IL-25 secretion from tumour-associated fibroblasts suppresses mammary tumour metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shu-Yi; Jian, Feng-Yin; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Shih-Chang; Hsieh, Mao-Chih; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Lee, Wen-Hwa; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Tumour-associated fibroblasts (TAFs), as a functionally supportive microenvironment, play an essential role in tumour progression. Here we investigate the role of IL-25, an endogenous anticancer factor secreted from TAFs, in suppression of mouse 4T1 mammary tumour metastasis. We show that a synthetic dihydrobenzofuran lignan (Q2-3), the dimerization product of plant caffeic acid methyl ester, suppresses 4T1 metastasis by increasing fibroblastic IL-25 activity. The secretion of IL-25 from treated human or mouse fibroblasts is enhanced in vitro, and this activity confers a strong suppressive effect on growth activity of test carcinoma cells. Subsequent in vivo experiments showed that the anti-metastatic effects of Q2-3 on 4T1 and human MDA-MD-231 tumour cells are additive when employed in combination with the clinically used drug, docetaxel. Altogether, our findings reveal that the release of IL-25 from TAFs may serve as a check point for control of mammary tumour metastasis and that phytochemical Q2-3 can efficiently promote such anticancer activities. PMID:27089063

  2. Local tumour hyperthermia as immunotherapy for metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Fiering, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Local tumour hyperthermia for cancer treatment is currently used either for ablation purposes as an alternative to surgery or less frequently, in combination with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy to enhance the effects of those traditional therapies. As it has become apparent that activating the immune system is crucial to successfully treat metastatic cancer, the potential of boosting anti-tumour immunity by heating tumours has become a growing area of cancer research. After reviewing the history of hyperthermia therapy for cancer and introducing methods for inducing local hyperthermia, this review describes different mechanisms by which heating tumours can elicit anti-tumour immune responses, including tumour cell damage, tumour surface molecule changes, heat shock proteins, exosomes, direct effects on immune cells, and changes in the tumour vasculature. We then go over in vivo studies that provide promising results showing that local hyperthermia therapy indeed activates various systemic anti-tumour immune responses that slow growth of untreated tumours. Finally, future research questions that will help bring the use of local hyperthermia as systemic immunotherapy closer to clinical application are discussed. PMID:25430985

  3. Activation of blood coagulation in cancer: implications for tumour progression.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luize G; Monteiro, Robson Q

    2013-09-04

    Several studies have suggested a role for blood coagulation proteins in tumour progression. Herein, we discuss (1) the activation of the blood clotting cascade in the tumour microenvironment and its impact on primary tumour growth; (2) the intravascular activation of blood coagulation and its impact on tumour metastasis and cancer-associated thrombosis; and (3) antitumour therapies that target blood-coagulation-associated proteins. Expression levels of the clotting initiator protein TF (tissue factor) have been correlated with tumour cell aggressiveness. Simultaneous TF expression and PS (phosphatidylserine) exposure by tumour cells promote the extravascular activation of blood coagulation. The generation of blood coagulation enzymes in the tumour microenvironment may trigger the activation of PARs (protease-activated receptors). In particular, PAR1 and PAR2 have been associated with many aspects of tumour biology. The procoagulant activity of circulating tumour cells favours metastasis, whereas the release of TF-bearing MVs (microvesicles) into the circulation has been correlated with cancer-associated thrombosis. Given the role of coagulation proteins in tumour progression, it has been proposed that they could be targets for the development of new antitumour therapies.

  4. Activation of blood coagulation in cancer: implications for tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Luize G.; Monteiro, Robson Q.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have suggested a role for blood coagulation proteins in tumour progression. Herein, we discuss (1) the activation of the blood clotting cascade in the tumour microenvironment and its impact on primary tumour growth; (2) the intravascular activation of blood coagulation and its impact on tumour metastasis and cancer-associated thrombosis; and (3) antitumour therapies that target blood-coagulation-associated proteins. Expression levels of the clotting initiator protein TF (tissue factor) have been correlated with tumour cell aggressiveness. Simultaneous TF expression and PS (phosphatidylserine) exposure by tumour cells promote the extravascular activation of blood coagulation. The generation of blood coagulation enzymes in the tumour microenvironment may trigger the activation of PARs (protease-activated receptors). In particular, PAR1 and PAR2 have been associated with many aspects of tumour biology. The procoagulant activity of circulating tumour cells favours metastasis, whereas the release of TF-bearing MVs (microvesicles) into the circulation has been correlated with cancer-associated thrombosis. Given the role of coagulation proteins in tumour progression, it has been proposed that they could be targets for the development of new antitumour therapies. PMID:23889169

  5. Nanoparticle-blood interactions: the implications on solid tumour targeting.

    PubMed

    Lazarovits, James; Chen, Yih Yang; Sykes, Edward A; Chan, Warren C W

    2015-02-18

    Nanoparticles are suitable platforms for cancer targeting and diagnostic applications. Typically, less than 10% of all systemically administered nanoparticles accumulate in the tumour. Here we explore the interactions of blood components with nanoparticles and describe how these interactions influence solid tumour targeting. In the blood, serum proteins adsorb onto nanoparticles to form a protein corona in a manner dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties. These serum proteins can block nanoparticle tumour targeting ligands from binding to tumour cell receptors. Additionally, serum proteins can also encourage nanoparticle uptake by macrophages, which decreases nanoparticle availability in the blood and limits tumour accumulation. The formation of this protein corona will also increase the nanoparticle hydrodynamic size or induce aggregation, which makes nanoparticles too large to enter into the tumour through pores of the leaky vessels, and prevents their deep penetration into tumours for cell targeting. Recent studies have focused on developing new chemical strategies to reduce or eliminate serum protein adsorption, and rescue the targeting potential of nanoparticles to tumour cells. An in-depth and complete understanding of nanoparticle-blood interactions is key to designing nanoparticles with optimal physicochemical properties with high tumour accumulation. The purpose of this review article is to describe how the protein corona alters the targeting of nanoparticles to solid tumours and explains current solutions to solve this problem.

  6. Flow cytometric DNA ploidy in salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Driemel, Oliver; Maier, Heinz; Kraft, Klaus; Haase, Stephan; Hemmer, Joerg

    2005-01-01

    This study on 279 tumours of the salivary glands was conducted to analyse whether the assessment of DNA ploidy by flow cytometry may assist histopathology in discriminating benign from malignant types of tumours. The group of benign tumours included 164 pleomorphic adenomas, 51 Warthin's tumours, 7 basal cell adenomas, 2 lipomas as well as 5 other different tumours. All of the 229 benign tumours were diploid. The malignant tumours consisted of 18 adenoid cystic adenomas, 10 mucoepidermoid carcinomas, 5 acinic cell carcinomas, 5 carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma as well as of 12 other malignancies belonging to 7 different tumour entities. Twelve of 50 malignant salivary gland tumours were aneuploid. There was no significant relationship between the DNA ploidy status and histopathological grading, lymph node metastasis and local recurrence development, respectively. In three cases which initially were taken for pleomorphic adenomas by routine histological examination, aneuploid cell populations exposed by DNA flow cytometric analysis gave rise to a closer inspection of the suspect lesions. Examination of consecutive slides actually revealed small assemblies of carcinoma cells that required a final diagnosis as non-invasive carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma. The most obvious value of DNA flow cytometry in salivary gland tumours is thus its contribution to assist histopathology in identifying potentially malignant lesions.

  7. Tumour cells engineered to secrete interleukin-15 augment anti-tumour immune responses in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hazama, S; Noma, T; Wang, F; Iizuka, N; Ogura, Y; Yoshimura, K; Inoguchi, E; Hakozaki, M; Hirose, K; Suzuki, T; Oka, M

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effect of interleukin-15 (IL-15) gene transfer into tumour cells on the host's anti-tumour response. In BALB/c mice IL-15 producing Meth-A cells (Meth-A/IL-15) underwent complete rejection, in a response characterized by massive infiltration of CD4+ T-cells and neutrophils. In contrast, Meth-A cells transfected with vector alone (Meth-A/Neo) grew rapidly. Moreover, rechallenged parental cells also were rejected in association with CD8+ T-cell infiltration. However, in nude mice there was no drastic difference between Meth-A/IL-15 and Meth-A/Neo cells. These results demonstrate that IL-15-secreting tumour cells can stimulate local and systemic T-cell-dependent immunity and therefore may have a potential role in cancer therapy. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10424745

  8. Somatic CRISPR/Cas9-mediated tumour suppressor disruption enables versatile brain tumour modelling.

    PubMed

    Zuckermann, Marc; Hovestadt, Volker; Knobbe-Thomsen, Christiane B; Zapatka, Marc; Northcott, Paul A; Schramm, Kathrin; Belic, Jelena; Jones, David T W; Tschida, Barbara; Moriarity, Branden; Largaespada, David; Roussel, Martine F; Korshunov, Andrey; Reifenberger, Guido; Pfister, Stefan M; Lichter, Peter; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Gronych, Jan

    2015-06-11

    In vivo functional investigation of oncogenes using somatic gene transfer has been successfully exploited to validate their role in tumorigenesis. For tumour suppressor genes this has proven more challenging due to technical aspects. To provide a flexible and effective method for investigating somatic loss-of-function alterations and their influence on tumorigenesis, we have established CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic gene disruption, allowing for in vivo targeting of TSGs. Here we demonstrate the utility of this approach by deleting single (Ptch1) or multiple genes (Trp53, Pten, Nf1) in the mouse brain, resulting in the development of medulloblastoma and glioblastoma, respectively. Using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) we characterized the medulloblastoma-driving Ptch1 deletions in detail and show that no off-targets were detected in these tumours. This method provides a fast and convenient system for validating the emerging wealth of novel candidate tumour suppressor genes and the generation of faithful animal models of human cancer.

  9. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour: tumour or a cyst, a histopathological support for the controversy.

    PubMed

    Gadewar, Dilip R; Srikant, N

    2010-04-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT) is a well-established odontogenic tumour with various clinicopathological variants. AOT quite frequently mimics an odontogenic cyst commonly a dentigerous cyst. Histologically a cystic component of AOT has been described in the literature. In the present paper we review the literature for the AOTs arising in an odontogenic cyst and add to the literature a case of cystic AOT. The present review is aimed to provide an insight to the varied demographic profile, clinical behavior and prognosis of cystic variant of AOT.

  10. Lysyl oxidase-like-2 promotes tumour angiogenesis and is a potential therapeutic target in angiogenic tumours.

    PubMed

    Zaffryar-Eilot, Shelly; Marshall, Derek; Voloshin, Tali; Bar-Zion, Avinoam; Spangler, Rhyannon; Kessler, Ofra; Ghermazien, Haben; Brekhman, Vera; Suss-Toby, Edith; Adam, Dan; Shaked, Yuval; Smith, Victoria; Neufeld, Gera

    2013-10-01

    Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2), a secreted enzyme that catalyzes the cross-linking of collagen, plays an essential role in developmental angiogenesis. We found that administration of the LOXL2-neutralizing antibody AB0023 inhibited bFGF-induced angiogenesis in Matrigel plug assays and suppressed recruitment of angiogenesis promoting bone marrow cells. Small hairpin RNA-mediated inhibition of LOXL2 expression or inhibition of LOXL2 using AB0023 reduced the migration and network-forming ability of endothelial cells, suggesting that the inhibition of angiogenesis results from a direct effect on endothelial cells. To examine the effects of AB0023 on tumour angiogenesis, AB0023 was administered to mice bearing tumours derived from SKOV-3 ovarian carcinoma or Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. AB0023 treatment significantly reduced the microvascular density in these tumours but did not inhibit tumour growth. However, treatment of mice bearing SKOV-3-derived tumours with AB0023 also promoted increased coverage of tumour vessels with pericytes and reduced tumour hypoxia, providing evidence that anti-LOXL2 therapy results in the normalization of tumour blood vessels. In agreement with these data, treatment of mice bearing LLC-derived tumours with AB0023 improved the perfusion of the tumour-associated vessels as determined by ultrasonography. Improved perfusion and normalization of tumour vessels after treatment with anti-angiogenic agents were previously found to improve the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents into tumours and to result in an enhancement of chemotherapeutic efficiency. Indeed, treatment with AB0023 significantly enhanced the anti-tumourigenic effects of taxol. Our results suggest that inhibition of LOXL2 may prove beneficial for the treatment of angiogenic tumours.

  11. Improvement effect on the depth-dose distribution by CSF drainage and air infusion of a tumour-removed cavity in boron neutron capture therapy for malignant brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Ono, Koji; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Maruhashi, Akira

    2006-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) without craniotomy for malignant brain tumours was started using an epi-thermal neutron beam at the Kyoto University Reactor in June 2002. We have tried some techniques to overcome the treatable-depth limit in BNCT. One of the effective techniques is void formation utilizing a tumour-removed cavity. The tumorous part is removed by craniotomy about 1 week before a BNCT treatment in our protocol. Just before the BNCT irradiation, the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) in the tumour-removed cavity is drained out, air is infused to the cavity and then the void is made. This void improves the neutron penetration, and the thermal neutron flux at depth increases. The phantom experiments and survey simulations modelling the CSF drainage and air infusion of the tumour-removed cavity were performed for the size and shape of the void. The advantage of the CSF drainage and air infusion is confirmed for the improvement in the depth-dose distribution. From the parametric surveys, it was confirmed that the cavity volume had good correlation with the improvement effect, and the larger effect was expected as the cavity volume was larger.

  12. Tumour-induced osteomalacia: An emergent paraneoplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Guillermo; Varsavsky, Mariela

    2016-04-01

    Endocrine paraneoplastic syndromes are distant manifestations of some tumours. An uncommon but increasingly reported form is tumour-induced osteomalacia, a hypophosphatemic disorder associated to fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) secretion by tumours. The main biochemical manifestations of this disorder include hypophosphatemia, inappropriately low or normal tubular reabsorption of phosphate, low serum calcitriol levels, increased serum alkaline phosphatase levels, and elevated or normal serum FGF-23 levels. These tumours, usually small, benign, slow growing and difficult to discover, are mainly localized in soft tissues of the limbs. Histologically, phosphaturic mesenchymal tumours of the mixed connective tissue type are most common. Various imaging techniques have been suggested with variable results. Treatment of choice is total surgical resection of the tumour. Medical treatment includes oral phosphorus and calcitriol supplements, octreotide, cinacalcet, and monoclonal antibodies.

  13. Synchronous abdominal and thoracic solitary fibrous tumour: a case report.

    PubMed

    Maassarani, F; Leroy, C; Dekeuleneer, R

    2010-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFT), described for the first time by Klemperer and Rabin in 1931, are uncommon mesenchymal tumours that have been known to mainly affect the pleura and mediastinum. More recently, solitary fibrous tumours affecting other anatomical sites are being increasingly reported. Clinically, these tumours are asymptomatic and are discovered incidentally. Diagnosis is established at pathology by positive staining for CD34. Their prognosis depends on complete surgical resection and lack of histological signs of malignancy. We report here the case of a 63-year-old woman with double localisation of malignant solitary fibrous tumour who underwent complete removal of her lesions. To the best of our knowledge, this observation is the first description of a primary solitary fibrous tumour totally asymptomatic but already metastatic.

  14. Endobronchial Carcinoid Tumour with Extensive Ossification: An Unusual Case Presentation.

    PubMed

    Osmond, Allison; Filter, Emily; Joseph, Mariamma; Inculet, Richard; Kwan, Keith; McCormack, David

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumour is a well-known primary endobronchial lung neoplasm. Although calcifications may be seen in up to 30% of pulmonary carcinoid tumours, near complete ossification of these tumours is an unusual finding. Such lesions can prove diagnostically challenging at the time of intraoperative frozen section as the latter technique requires thin sectioning of the lesion for microscopic assessment. We present an unusual case of endobronchial carcinoid tumour with extensive ossification in a 45-year-old male. Preliminary intraoperative diagnosis was achieved through the alternative use of cytology scrape smears. The final diagnosis was confirmed after decalcification of the tumour. The prognostic implications of heavily ossified carcinoid tumours remain elusive. Long-term clinical follow-up of these patients is recommended. PMID:27610135

  15. Proliferating tricholemmal tumour: clinicopathological aspects of a case.

    PubMed

    Khoja, A A; Yan, B; Lee, S J; Cheong, E C; Tan, K B

    2011-12-01

    We report the case of a 49-year-old man who presented with an enlarging mass over his occipital scalp. The clinical impression was either a squamous cell carcinoma or an unusual adnexal tumour. A wide excision was performed with skin grafting. Gross examination revealed a large exophytic tumour mass measuring 10 cm. Histopathological examination showed a circumscribed, well-differentiated squamoproliferative lesion with a lobulated architecture. Clear cell features, pilar-type keratinisation, microcalcifications and the presence of mucinous degeneration were noted. A diagnosis of proliferating tricholemmal tumour was made. This entity incorporates a spectrum of lesions, ranging from the mostly benign proliferating tricholemmal cyst to tumours having more atypical cellular and invasive features, the latter features correlating with an increased capacity for aggressive behaviour. Management-wise, such tumours require complete excision with follow-up. As the tumours are often large in size at presentation, reconstruction is required. PMID:22159947

  16. Endobronchial Carcinoid Tumour with Extensive Ossification: An Unusual Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Filter, Emily; Joseph, Mariamma; Inculet, Richard; Kwan, Keith; McCormack, David

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumour is a well-known primary endobronchial lung neoplasm. Although calcifications may be seen in up to 30% of pulmonary carcinoid tumours, near complete ossification of these tumours is an unusual finding. Such lesions can prove diagnostically challenging at the time of intraoperative frozen section as the latter technique requires thin sectioning of the lesion for microscopic assessment. We present an unusual case of endobronchial carcinoid tumour with extensive ossification in a 45-year-old male. Preliminary intraoperative diagnosis was achieved through the alternative use of cytology scrape smears. The final diagnosis was confirmed after decalcification of the tumour. The prognostic implications of heavily ossified carcinoid tumours remain elusive. Long-term clinical follow-up of these patients is recommended.

  17. Endobronchial Carcinoid Tumour with Extensive Ossification: An Unusual Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Filter, Emily; Joseph, Mariamma; Inculet, Richard; Kwan, Keith; McCormack, David

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumour is a well-known primary endobronchial lung neoplasm. Although calcifications may be seen in up to 30% of pulmonary carcinoid tumours, near complete ossification of these tumours is an unusual finding. Such lesions can prove diagnostically challenging at the time of intraoperative frozen section as the latter technique requires thin sectioning of the lesion for microscopic assessment. We present an unusual case of endobronchial carcinoid tumour with extensive ossification in a 45-year-old male. Preliminary intraoperative diagnosis was achieved through the alternative use of cytology scrape smears. The final diagnosis was confirmed after decalcification of the tumour. The prognostic implications of heavily ossified carcinoid tumours remain elusive. Long-term clinical follow-up of these patients is recommended. PMID:27610135

  18. Kinase fusions are frequent in Spitz tumours and spitzoid melanomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesner, Thomas; He, Jie; Yelensky, Roman; Esteve-Puig, Rosaura; Botton, Thomas; Yeh, Iwei; Lipson, Doron; Otto, Geoff; Brennan, Kristina; Murali, Rajmohan; Garrido, Maria; Miller, Vincent A.; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Berger, Michael F.; Sparatta, Alyssa; Palmedo, Gabriele; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Busam, Klaus J.; Kutzner, Heinz; Cronin, Maureen T.; Stephens, Philip J.; Bastian, Boris C.

    2014-01-01

    Spitzoid neoplasms are a group of melanocytic tumours with distinctive histopathological features. They include benign tumours (Spitz naevi), malignant tumours (spitzoid melanomas) and tumours with borderline histopathological features and uncertain clinical outcome (atypical Spitz tumours). Their genetic underpinnings are poorly understood, and alterations in common melanoma-associated oncogenes are typically absent. Here we show that spitzoid neoplasms harbour kinase fusions of ROS1 (17%), NTRK1 (16%), ALK (10%), BRAF (5%) and RET (3%) in a mutually exclusive pattern. The chimeric proteins are constitutively active, stimulate oncogenic signalling pathways, are tumourigenic and are found in the entire biologic spectrum of spitzoid neoplasms, including 55% of Spitz naevi, 56% of atypical Spitz tumours and 39% of spitzoid melanomas. Kinase inhibitors suppress the oncogenic signalling of the fusion proteins in vitro. In summary, kinase fusions account for the majority of oncogenic aberrations in spitzoid neoplasms and may serve as therapeutic targets for metastatic spitzoid melanomas.

  19. Imaging of rare medullary adrenal tumours in adults.

    PubMed

    Maciel, C A; Tang, Y Z; Coniglio, G; Sahdev, A

    2016-05-01

    Although adrenal medullary tumours are rare, they have important clinical implications. They form a heterogeneous group of tumours, ranging from benign, non-secretory, incidental masses to hormonally active tumours presenting acutely, or malignant tumours with disseminated disease and a poor prognosis. Increasingly, benign masses are incidentally detected due to the widespread use of imaging and routine medical check-ups. This review aims to illustrate the multimodality imaging appearances of rare adrenal medullary tumours, excluding the more common phaeochromocytomas, with clues to the diagnosis and to summarise relevant epidemiological and clinical data. Careful correlation of clinical presentation, hormone profile, and various imaging techniques narrow the differential diagnosis. Image-guided percutaneous adrenal biopsy can provide a definitive diagnosis, allowing for conservative management in selected cases. A close collaboration between the radiologist, endocrinologist, and surgeon is of the utmost importance in the management of these tumours. PMID:26944698

  20. Extra gonadal sclerosing stromal tumour in the transverse mesocolon.

    PubMed

    Mensah, Samuel; Kyei, Ishmael; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Adjei, Ernest

    2016-03-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumour (SST) is a rare benign sex cord stromal tumour of the ovary. We report a case of sclerosing stromal tumour of the mesentery in a 32-year-old Para one who presented with intra abdominal mass, menstrual irregularity and secondary infertility. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry of the completely excised tumour was consistent with sclerosing stromal tumour, immunoreactive only to vimentin. No ovarian tissue was found in the sectioned tumour. Her menses became regular and she conceived 3 months after complete excision and delivered after 9 months. Hormonal assay was not done because SST was least suspected. From literature this is the first case of SST in the transverse mesocolon reported in the West African subregion, and may probably be one of the rare cases of hormonally active SST. PMID:27605726

  1. [Fourth edition of WHO classification tumours of soft tissue].

    PubMed

    Karanian, Marie; Coindre, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    The new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of soft tissue tumours was published in 2013, 11years after the previous edition. This new classification includes several changes: newly included sections (gastrointestinal stromal tumors…), newly recognized entities (pseudomiogenic haemangioendothelioma, haemosiderotic fibrolipomatous tumour…), and new genetic and molecular data leading to better understanding and definition of tumours, and are useful as diagnostic tools. This brief review summarizes changes in this new edition of the WHO classification of tumours of soft tissue.

  2. Glomus tumour of the elbow: an unusual complication of surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Jeremy; Arya, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Glomus tumours of the elbow remain a challenge to diagnose correctly and efficiently. We present a case of a glomus tumour as a complication of elbow surgery. This has not been described previously. This case highlights the possibility of injury as a causative factor in these tumours and the difficulty in differentiating them from postoperative neuromas by clinical presentation and ultrasound imaging alone. PMID:27583019

  3. Chondromyxoid Fibroma: An Unusual Tumour at An Atypical Location

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Mallikarjuna Devaredappa; Govindarajan, Abhay Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Rib tumours are mostly secondaries arising from breast or prostrate malignancies. Among primary rib tumours, osteochondromas are reported as the commonest cause. Chondromyxoid fibromas are primary benign rib tumours that are seldom seen, occurring almost exclusively at the metaphyseal ends of large tubular bones. Here a case of chondromyxoid fibroma of rib, its clinical and radiological features, management and prognosis, is discussed which has only an occasional mention in literature. PMID:26393192

  4. Metastatic colonization potential of primary tumour cells in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tarin, D.; Price, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    A model has been developed for studying the capability of cells from primary murine mammary tumours to establish colonies in distant organs. The model involves the i.v. inoculation of disaggregated tumour cells into autologous and syngeneic recipients. The results show that the metastatic colonization potential of cells from a given tumour is consistent within the animals of an inoculated batch. Also, the findings are uniform in the autologous host and the syngeneic recipients. Tumours vary in their colonization potential and can be classified in 2 main groups designated high and low. These findings indicate that: (i) cells from 37% of mammary tumours can heavily colonize the lungs when inoculated i.v., even though the incidence of metastatic spread of these tumours in the undisturbed animal is almost zero. Thus, the relative infrequency of spontaneous metastasis from murine mammary tumours is not due to inability of the tumour cells to survive and colonize once free in the blood stream; and (ii) the colonization potential of the tumours is an intrinsic property of the tumour cells rather than of the host, whose prior acquaintance with the cells does not seem to confer resistance to colonization. The model presents opportunities for identification of possible differences between tumours of high and low colonization potential, and is being used to study cellular properties which favour colonization of distant organs by comparison of observations in vitro with the behaviour of cells from the same tumour in vivo. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 PMID:444412

  5. Localisation and expression of aquaporin subtypes in epithelial ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian-Hua; Yu, Yu-Qun; Yan, Chun-xiao

    2011-09-01

    To characterise AQP subtype localisation and expression in epithelial ovarian tumours, immunohistochemistry was used to assess the localisation and expression of AQP1-9 in 30 benign tumour cases, 30 borderline tumour cases, 50 malignant tumour cases and 20 normal ovarian tissue cases. Multiple AQP subtypes were expressed in epithelial ovarian tumours, with each AQP subtype displaying a different pattern of localisation and expression. AQP1 was mainly expressed in the microvascular endothelium, and AQP 2-9 were mainly expressed in tumour cells. Most AQP subtypes co-localised in the basolateral membranes of the epithelia of benign tumours and plasma membranes of malignant tumour cells. The positive rates for AQP1, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 were over 50%, but those for AQP2, 3 and 4 were only 10-40%. The expression of AQP1, 5 and 9 in malignant and borderline tumours was significantly higher than that in benign tumours (P<0.05) and normal ovarian tissue (P<0.05). However, AQP6 expression in ovarian malignant and borderline tumours was significantly lower than that in benign tumours (P<0.01) or normal ovarian tissue (P<0.01). AQP1 expression was increased in cases with ascites volumes greater than 1000 mL (P<0.05), AQP5 expression was greater in cases with lymph node metastasis (P<0.05), and more AQP9 expression was observed in G3 cases versus G1 and G2 cases (P<0.01). These results suggest that changes in the distribution and expression of AQP subtypes may be involved in ovarian carcinogenesis. This study presents a novel avenue of research that could illuminate the mechanism of ovarian carcinogenesis and treatment.

  6. [Perioperative management of intracranial tumours: the neurosurgeon's role].

    PubMed

    Polo-Torres, C; Moscote-Salazar, L R; Alvis-Miranda, H R; Villa-Delgado, R

    2013-01-01

    The perioperative management of patients with brain tumours is a challenge for the neurosurgeon and the entire surgical team. The treating physician should consider factors such as the type of tumour, extent of disease, treatment received, the presence of comorbidities and prognosis of the disease itself. The successful execution of all aspects involved in perioperative management in patients with brain tumours will help prolong the life and improve the quality of life of patients. PMID:24008533

  7. Mixed tumour of salivary gland type of the male breast.

    PubMed

    Simha, M R; Doctor, V M; Udwadia, T E

    1992-03-01

    Benign breast tumours with a mixed cartilaginous and epithelial component are distinctly rare as evident from the literature. A case of Mixed Tumour of the breast presenting pre-operatively as a hard mass in a 65 year old male is reported. Histologically, it was composed of a mixture of benign cartilage, myoepithelial cells, tubules and a myxoid stroma in fat. A brief review of cartilage bearing lesions and mixed tumour in the mammary region is discussed.

  8. Metastatic breast cancer presenting as a primary hindgut neuroendocrine tumour.

    PubMed

    Okines, Alicia F C; Hawkes, Eliza A; Rao, Sheela; VAN As, Nicholas; Marsh, Henry; Riddell, Angela; Wilson, Philip O G; Osin, Peter; Wotherspoon, Andrew C; Wetherspoon, Andrew C

    2010-07-01

    The examination of limited, potentially non-representative fragments of tumour tissue from a core biopsy can be misleading and misdirect subsequent treatment, especially in cases where a primary tumour has not been identified. This case report is of a 65-year-old woman presenting with a destructive sacral mass, diagnosed on radiological imaging and core biopsy as a hindgut neuroendocrine tumour, which on histopathological review of the subsequently resected tumour was found instead to represent a metastasis from an occult hormone-positive breast cancer with neuroendocrine features.

  9. Endobronchial Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumour-A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gochhait, Debasis; Kumar, Balla Nagamalli; Narayanasami, Suryakala

    2016-01-01

    Lung malignancies are on the rise and sadly present at an advanced stage. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy is used for staging as well as in diagnosis of lung malignancies. However, not all endobronchial growth are malignant. Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumour (IMT) is one of the rare tumours of the lung. A controversy regarding the benign versus malignant nature of the tumour is still ongoing. The management of these tumours can be challenging because there are no established treatment protocols. Although IMT most commonly arises from lung, endobronchial presentation is very rare. We report a case of endobronchial presentation of IMT and discuss about its aetiology and treatment options. PMID:27656490

  10. Endobronchial Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumour-A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Govindaraj, Vishnukanth; Gochhait, Debasis; Kumar, Balla Nagamalli; Narayanasami, Suryakala

    2016-08-01

    Lung malignancies are on the rise and sadly present at an advanced stage. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy is used for staging as well as in diagnosis of lung malignancies. However, not all endobronchial growth are malignant. Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumour (IMT) is one of the rare tumours of the lung. A controversy regarding the benign versus malignant nature of the tumour is still ongoing. The management of these tumours can be challenging because there are no established treatment protocols. Although IMT most commonly arises from lung, endobronchial presentation is very rare. We report a case of endobronchial presentation of IMT and discuss about its aetiology and treatment options. PMID:27656490

  11. Recurrent solitary fibrous tumour in the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Bikmaz, Kerem; Cosar, Murat; Kurtkaya-Yapicier, Ozlem; Iplikcioglu, A Celal; Gokduman, Cem A

    2005-09-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFT) of the central nervous system are rare. They resemble meningioma in clinical presentation, imaging features and appearance at surgery. Schwannoma, hemangiopericytoma and other spindle cell mesenchymal neoplasms should also be considered in the differential diagnosis. Although the histogenesis of this tumour is still debated, strong CD34 reactivity of the tumour cells suggests that SFT is mesenchymal. We present the clinical, radiological, and pathological features of an SFT located in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA). A 55-year-old female presented with 6 months of headache. The MRI scan showed a contrast enhancing ovoid mass in the left CPA. At craniotomy, the tumour was completely resected. Histolopathological diagnosis was of meningioma. Three years later, the symptoms recurred and an MRI scan demonstrated tumour recurrence. A repeat craniotomy was performed and the lesion was again completely excised. Tumour morphology on histopathology and immunoreactivity for CD34 of the tumour cells supported the diagnosis of SFT. Review of the original tumour also disclosed immunoreactivity for CD34. Ki67 labeling indices were less than 1% in both tumours.

  12. Hypoxia signalling in cancer and approaches to enforce tumour regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouysségur, Jacques; Dayan, Frédéric; Mazure, Nathalie M.

    2006-05-01

    Tumour cells emerge as a result of genetic alteration of signal circuitries promoting cell growth and survival, whereas their expansion relies on nutrient supply. Oxygen limitation is central in controlling neovascularization, glucose metabolism, survival and tumour spread. This pleiotropic action is orchestrated by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), which is a master transcriptional factor in nutrient stress signalling. Understanding the role of HIF in intracellular pH (pHi) regulation, metabolism, cell invasion, autophagy and cell death is crucial for developing novel anticancer therapies. There are new approaches to enforce necrotic cell death and tumour regression by targeting tumour metabolism and pHi-control systems.

  13. Transseptal fine needle aspiration of a large left atrial tumour.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi Wing; Ruygrok, Peter; Sutton, Timothy; Ding, Patricia; van Vliet, Chris; Occleshaw, Christopher; Smith, Warren

    2010-07-01

    The diagnosis of cardiac tumours is often based on images without tissue diagnosis or tissue obtained at surgery. Percutaneous myocardial biopsy via a transvenous approach has been described in literatures but this technique is not feasible with left atrial tumours. We report a patient presenting with heart failure and left atrial tumour. The diagnosis of spindle cell neoplasm was established pre-operatively via successful transseptal fine needle aspiration of cells from a left atrial tumour. We believe this technique worth consideration to aid pre-surgery diagnosis.

  14. Multifocal peritoneal calcifying fibrous tumour: incidental finding at cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gatt, Noel; Falzon, Sharon; Ratynska, Marzena

    2011-01-01

    Calcifying fibrous tumour (CFT) is a benign tumour of elusive aetiology and a potential for local recurrence. Despite its peculiar histological characteristics it can still be confused with interrelated differential diagnosis like inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (IMT) or solitary fibrous tumours. The clinical differential diagnosis is however much wider. To date seven cases of multiple peritoneal CFTs are on record. The authors present a case discovered incidentally during laparoscopic cholecystectomy, with no previous history and no radiological diagnosis achieved despite having undergone magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) and normal routine perioperative investigation. The patient is disease-free 12 months after diagnosis. The case report is followed by a detailed literature review. PMID:22689663

  15. Malignant Extra Renal Rhabdoid Tumour Presenting as Central Airway Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Amanjit; Agarwal, Ritesh; Das, Ashim

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdoid tumours are one of the most aggressive childhood neoplasms associated with high mortality. The commonest age group affected is children less than five years of age. Rhabdoid tumour presenting as an endoluminal tracheal mass leading to central airway obstruction has not been previously reported. We describe the case of a 17-year-old male patient where malignant rhabdoid tumour masqueraded as bronchial asthma leading to a delayed diagnosis of upper airway obstruction by tracheal growth. Histopathological examination and immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis of malignant rhabdoid tumour. PMID:25243090

  16. Salivary gland tumours in a Mexican sample. A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Montes, C; Garces-Ortiz, M

    2002-01-01

    Salivary gland tumours are an important part of the Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, unfortunately, only few studies on these tumours have been done in Latin-American population. The aim of this study was to compare demographic data on salivary gland tumours in a Mexican sample with those previously published from Latin American and non-Latin American countries. All cases of salivary gland tumours or lesions diagnosed in our service were reviewed. Of the reviewed cases,67 were confirmed as salivary gland tumours. Out of these 64.2% were benign neoplasms, 35.8% were malignant and a slight female predominance (56.7%) was found. The most common location was palate followed by lips and floor of the mouth. Mean age for benign tumours was 40.6 years with female predominance (60.5%). Mean age for malignant tumours was 41 years and female predominance was found again. Palate followed by retromolar area were the usual locations. Pleomorphic adenoma (58.2%), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (17.9%) and adenoid cystic carcinoma (11.9%) were the more frequent neoplasms. All retromolar cases were malignant and all submandibular gland tumours were benign. We found a high proportion of salivary gland neoplasms in children. Our results showed that differences of the studied tumours among our sample and previously reported series exist. These differences can be related to race and geographical location.

  17. [DNA ploidy and proliferative activity in salivary gland tumours].

    PubMed

    Driemel, Oliver; Kraft, Klaus; Hemmer, Jörg

    2007-08-01

    DNA ploidy and S-Phase fraction (SPF) of 279 salivary gland tumours were analysed using high-resolution DNA flow cytometry. All 229 benign neoplasms were diploid while 12 of 50 malignant tumours showed cell populations with aneuploid DNA content. The SPF values of diploid malignancies were significantly higher if compared with pleomorphic adenomas but did not differ from that of the zystadenolymphoma (Warthin tumour) group. While aneuploidy represents a distinct indicator of malignancy SPF values are of minor relevance for dignity assessment in salivary gland tumours.

  18. [Mixed tumour of submandibular salivary gland. Case report].

    PubMed

    Trandafirescu, Mioara-Florentina; Miron, Ingrith; Mihăilă, Doina

    2004-01-01

    The authors present the case of 14 years male child with tumour located on submandibular salivary glands. It was proceeded the biopsy and tumour excision, the tissue fragments being further processed at paraffin, sectioned and than stained HE, PAS, Alcian-Blue, Van Gieson and Gordon-Sweet. The first biopsy performed from the latero-cervical ganglion revealed the presence of an benign tumour of salivary gland. Totally excision of the tumour emphasized the presence of a salivary gland encapsulated tumour, sized 2.5/2.5/2 cm, nodule shaped, white colored, hard consistency. Histopathologic examination revealed the existence of a proliferating encapsulated tumor, well separated from the normal adjacent tissue. The small sized tumour cells with moderate cytoplasm induce formation of glandular lumens, some of them with cystic dilatation, with mucous content. Other tumour cells form small cords or nests. The tumour stroma forms mucoid areas, some with osteoid appearance. We have presented a case of a 14 years aged child with pleomorphic adenoma with rare location within the submandibular salivary gland. The post biopsy rapid increase of the tumour imposed the totally surgical gland excision.

  19. Malignant oncocytic tumour of the parotid salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Leventon, G; Katz, D R; Bell, C D

    1976-03-01

    A 49-year-old man developed a tumour mass in his right parotid salivary gland nine years after a histologically proven benign mixed tumour of the same salivary gland had been surgically removed. Radical resection of the right parotid salivary gland and associated lymph nodes and soft tissues of the neck was performed. The parotid tumour was composed of oncocytic cells which infiltrated the surviving salivary gland tissue. Most of the excised lymph nodes contained metastatic deposits of oncocytic cells identical to the tumour seen in the parotid. There are no previous reports of the occurrence of both pleomorphic adenoma and malignant oncocytoma in the same salivary gland.

  20. Extrapericardial solitary fibrous tumour of the pericardium.

    PubMed

    Andreani, S M; Tavecchio, L; Giardini, R; Bedini, A V

    1998-07-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) occurs most commonly in the pleura and is extremely rare in the pericardium. The authors report a case of a 60-year-old man in whom a large mediastinal mass was accidentally discovered. Computed tomography showed involvement of the left anterosuperior mediastinum with displacement of the trachea, large vessels and oesophagus; histopathological findings after complete resection of the neoplasia demonstrated an SFT of the pericardium, the first reported case with extrapericardial pattern of growth. A review of the literature on SFTs of the pericardium is provided.

  1. Solitary fibrous tumour of the forearm. A rare tumour in an atypical site.

    PubMed

    Harrington, P; Merchant, W J; Walsh, M E

    1999-06-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is a rare spindle cell neoplasm that usually arises from serosal surfaces. Although it is now increasingly recognized in extra-serosal locations, only two previous cases of SFT arising in an extremity have been reported. We describe another such case and review the literature regarding extra-serosal SFT.

  2. Tumour-associated macrophages are associated with vascular endothelial growth factor expression in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Raposo, T P; Pires, I; Carvalho, M I; Prada, J; Argyle, D J; Queiroga, F L

    2015-12-01

    Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) have been implicated in carcinogenesis including an important role in angiogenesis. In this study, we describe the relationship between TAMs and angiogenesis in canine mammary tumours (CMT). Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded CMT samples [(n = 128: malignant (n = 97) and benign (n = 31)] were submitted to immunohistochemical staining to detect MAC387, vascular endothelial growth factor VEGF and CD31 expression. A statistical analysis was carried out to assess possible associations with clinicopathological variables and biological markers of tumour angiogenesis. TAMs, detected by MAC387 expression, were significantly associated with malignant CMT (P < 0.001) and VEGF positive tumours (P = 0.002) and also associated with VEGF expression within malignant CMT (P = 0.043). Associations with clinicopathological variables were found between TAMs and the presence of infiltrative growth (P = 0.031), low tubule formation (P = 0.040) and lymph node metastasis (P = 0.016). The results support the hypothesis that TAMs influence angiogenesis in CMT suggesting TAMs may represent a therapeutic target in this disease. PMID:24119241

  3. MHC class II antigen presentation pathway in murine tumours: tumour evasion from immunosurveillance?

    PubMed Central

    Walter, W; Lingnau, K; Schmitt, E; Loos, M; Maeurer, M J

    2000-01-01

    Qualitative differences in the MHC class II antigen processing and presentation pathway may be instrumental in shaping the CD4+ T cell response directed against tumour cells. Efficient loading of many MHC class II alleles with peptides requires the assistance of H2-M, a heterodimeric MHC class II-like molecule. In contrast to the HLA-DM region in humans, the β-chain locus is duplicated in mouse, with the H2-Mb1 (Mb1β-chain distal to H2-Mb2 (Mb2) and the H2-Ma (Ma) α-chain gene). Here, we show that murine MHC class II and H2-M genes are coordinately regulated in murine tumour cell lines by T helper cell 1 (IFN-γ) and T helper cell 2 (IL-4 or IL-10) cytokines in the presence of the MHC class II-specific transactivator CIITA as determined by mRNA expression and Western blot analysis. Furthermore, Mαβ1 and Mαβ2 heterodimers are differentially expressed in murine tumour cell lines of different histology. Both H2-M isoforms promote equally processing and presentation of native protein antigens to H2-Ad- and H2-Ed-restricted CD4+ T cells. Murine tumour cell lines could be divided into three groups: constitutive MHC class II and CIITA expression; inducible MHC class II and CIITA expression upon IFN-γ-treatment; and lack of constitutive and IFN-γ-inducible MHC class II and CIITA expression. These differences may impact on CD4+ T cell recognition of cancer cells in murine tumour models. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11027433

  4. Anti-tumour effect of metformin in canine mammary gland tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Saeki, K; Watanabe, M; Tsuboi, M; Sugano, S; Yoshitake, R; Tanaka, Y; Ong, S M; Saito, T; Matsumoto, K; Fujita, N; Nishimura, R; Nakagawa, T

    2015-08-01

    Metformin is an oral hypoglycaemic drug used in type 2 diabetes. Its pharmacological activity reportedly involves mitochondrial respiratory complex I, and mitochondrial respiratory complex inhibitors have a strong inhibitory effect on the growth of metastatic canine mammary gland tumour (CMGT) cell lines. It is hypothesised that metformin has selective anti-tumour effects on metastatic CMGT cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro effect of metformin on cell growth, production of ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in two CMGT clonal cell lines with different metastatic potential. In addition, transcriptome analysis was used to determine cellular processes disrupted by metformin and in vivo anti-tumour effects were examined in a mouse xenograft model. Metformin inhibited CMGT cell growth in vitro, with the metastatic clone (CHMp-5b) displaying greater sensitivity. ATP depletion and ROS elevation were observed to a similar extent in the metastatic and non-metastatic (CHMp-13a) cell lines after metformin exposure. However, subsequent AMPK activation and mTOR pathway inhibition were prominent only in metformin-insensitive non-metastatic cells. Microarray analysis revealed inhibition of cell cycle progression by metformin treatment in CHMp-5b cells, which was further confirmed by Western blotting and cell cycle analysis. Additionally, metformin significantly suppressed tumour growth in xenografted metastatic CMGT cells. In conclusion, metformin exhibited an anti-tumour effect in metastatic CMGT cells through AMPK-independent cell cycle arrest. Its mechanism of action differed in the non-metastatic clone, where AMPK activation and mTOR inhibition were observed. PMID:25981932

  5. Circulating tumour cells and circulating nucleic acids as a measure of tumour dissemination in non-metastatic colorectal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Lim, S H; Spring, K J; de Souza, P; MacKenzie, S; Bokey, L

    2015-03-01

    There is accumulating evidence for circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and circulating tumour nucleic acids (ctNAs) as prognostic and predictive biomarkers in colorectal cancer. Their role in the perioperative setting is evolving. These blood-borne biomarkers can potentially demonstrate tumour dissemination at time of colorectal cancer surgery and estimate the completeness of a surgical resection. CTCs and circulating ctNA levels at time of surgery, and persistent levels post-surgery, may correlate with poorer patient outcomes. These biomarkers can be utilised to refine surgical techniques to minimise tumour dissemination and determine the need for adjuvant therapy.

  6. L-Phenylalanine preloading reduces the (10)B(n, α)(7)Li dose to the normal brain by inhibiting the uptake of boronophenylalanine in boron neutron capture therapy for brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tsubasa; Tanaka, Hiroki; Fukutani, Satoshi; Suzuki, Minoru; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ono, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cellular-level particle radiation therapy that combines the selective delivery of boron compounds to tumour tissue with neutron irradiation. Previously, high doses of one of the boron compounds used for BNCT, L-BPA, were found to reduce the boron-derived irradiation dose to the central nervous system. However, injection with a high dose of L-BPA is not feasible in clinical settings. We aimed to find an alternative method to improve the therapeutic efficacy of this therapy. We examined the effects of oral preloading with various analogues of L-BPA in a xenograft tumour model and found that high-dose L-phenylalanine reduced the accumulation of L-BPA in the normal brain relative to tumour tissue. As a result, the maximum irradiation dose in the normal brain was 19.2% lower in the L-phenylalanine group relative to the control group. This study provides a simple strategy to improve the therapeutic efficacy of conventional boron compounds for BNCT for brain tumours and the possibility to widen the indication of BNCT to various kinds of other tumours. PMID:26455769

  7. L-Phenylalanine preloading reduces the (10)B(n, α)(7)Li dose to the normal brain by inhibiting the uptake of boronophenylalanine in boron neutron capture therapy for brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tsubasa; Tanaka, Hiroki; Fukutani, Satoshi; Suzuki, Minoru; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ono, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cellular-level particle radiation therapy that combines the selective delivery of boron compounds to tumour tissue with neutron irradiation. Previously, high doses of one of the boron compounds used for BNCT, L-BPA, were found to reduce the boron-derived irradiation dose to the central nervous system. However, injection with a high dose of L-BPA is not feasible in clinical settings. We aimed to find an alternative method to improve the therapeutic efficacy of this therapy. We examined the effects of oral preloading with various analogues of L-BPA in a xenograft tumour model and found that high-dose L-phenylalanine reduced the accumulation of L-BPA in the normal brain relative to tumour tissue. As a result, the maximum irradiation dose in the normal brain was 19.2% lower in the L-phenylalanine group relative to the control group. This study provides a simple strategy to improve the therapeutic efficacy of conventional boron compounds for BNCT for brain tumours and the possibility to widen the indication of BNCT to various kinds of other tumours.

  8. Ochratoxin A is not detectable in renal and testicular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Fahmy, Nader; Woo, Mark; Alameldin, Mona; MacDonald, Kyle; Goneau, Lee W.; Cadieux, Peter; Pautler, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Ochratoxin-A (OTA) is one of the most abundant food-contaminating mycotoxins, known for its nephrotoxicity, neurotoxicity, gonadotoxicity, teratogenicity, immunosuppression and carcinogenesis. OTA has been linked to several genitourinary pathologies, including Balkan nephropathy and genitourinary malignancies. We examine OTA levels in serum samples and tumour specimens collected from patients with renal and testicular tumours. Methods: Frozen samples were obtained from the Ontario Tumour Bank. Serum specimens, along with renal and testicular tumour biopsies, were included in this study. Normal tissue from the negative surgical margins of each tumour served as a control. OTA levels in serum was measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), while OTA detection in tissue specimens was determined using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results: We included specimens collected from 56 patients (36 men and 20 women). Histopathology of the 52 renal tumours included 31 (60%) conventional type renal cell carcinomas (RCC), 5 (10%) chromophobe RCC, 5 (10%) papillary RCC, 1 (2%) oncocytoma and 10 (19%) upper tract urothelial carcinoma (UC). The 4 testicular tumours included 1 seminomatous (25%) germ cell tumour and 3 (75%) non-seminomatous germ cell tumours. OTA was detected in the serum of renal tumour patients, with a range from 0.004 to 0.25 ng/mL (mean: 0.07 and median 0.06 ng/mL). There was no OTA signal detected by IHC staining in all tested renal and testicular tumours. Conclusions: The OTA levels detected in the serum of patients were highly variable and relatively low. No OTA was detected in the tissue samples. PMID:24578744

  9. Modelling and Detecting Tumour Oxygenation Levels

    PubMed Central

    Skeldon, Anne C.; Chaffey, Gary; Lloyd, David J. B.; Mohan, Vineet; Bradley, David A.; Nisbet, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Tumours that are low in oxygen (hypoxic) tend to be more aggressive and respond less well to treatment. Knowing the spatial distribution of oxygen within a tumour could therefore play an important role in treatment planning, enabling treatment to be targeted in such a way that higher doses of radiation are given to the more radioresistant tissue. Mapping the spatial distribution of oxygen in vivo is difficult. Radioactive tracers that are sensitive to different levels of oxygen are under development and in the early stages of clinical use. The concentration of these tracer chemicals can be detected via positron emission tomography resulting in a time dependent concentration profile known as a tissue activity curve (TAC). Pharmaco-kinetic models have then been used to deduce oxygen concentration from TACs. Some such models have included the fact that the spatial distribution of oxygen is often highly inhomogeneous and some have not. We show that the oxygen distribution has little impact on the form of a TAC; it is only the mean oxygen concentration that matters. This has significant consequences both in terms of the computational power needed, and in the amount of information that can be deduced from TACs. PMID:22761687

  10. Endothelial FAK is required for tumour angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tavora, Bernardo; Batista, Silvia; Reynolds, Louise E; Jadeja, Shalini; Robinson, Stephen; Kostourou, Vassiliki; Hart, Ian; Fruttiger, Marcus; Parsons, Maddy; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan M

    2010-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that plays a fundamental role in integrin and growth factor mediated signalling and is an important player in cell migration and proliferation, processes vital for angiogenesis. However, the role of FAK in adult pathological angiogenesis is unknown. We have generated endothelial-specific tamoxifen-inducible FAK knockout mice by crossing FAK-floxed (FAKfl/fl) mice with the platelet derived growth factor b (Pdgfb)-iCreER mice. Tamoxifen-treatment of Pdgfb-iCreER;FAKfl/fl mice results in FAK deletion in adult endothelial cells (ECs) without any adverse effects. Importantly however, endothelial FAK-deletion in adult mice inhibited tumour growth and reduced tumour angiogenesis. Furthermore, in in vivo angiogenic assays FAK deletion impairs vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced neovascularization. In addition, in vitro deletion of FAK in ECs resulted in reduced VEGF-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and correlating reduced cellular proliferation as well as increased cell death. Our data suggest that FAK is required for adult pathological angiogenesis and validates FAK as a possible target for anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:21154724

  11. Tumour dose estimation using automated TLD techniques.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, H M; Lambert, G D; Gustard, D; Harrison, R M

    1998-01-01

    Lithium fluoride (TLD-700) dosimeters were used to measure exit surface absorbed doses in external beam radiotherapy using an automated TLD reader. Delivered tumour absorbed doses were derived from these measurements for head and neck, pelvis and breast treatments. For the head and neck treatments (first fraction only), the mean percentage difference between prescribed and delivered tumour absorbed doses was -0.15 +/- 3.0% (+/- 1 SD), for the pelvic treatments -0.83 +/- 2.8% and for the breast treatments +0.26 +/- 2.9%. The spread of results is approximately +/- 3% (+/- 1 SD). This is comparable with the estimated uncertainty in a single TLD absorbed dose measurement in phantom (+/- 2%; +/- 1 SD). Thus, ICRU recommended tolerances for absorbed dose delivery of +/- 5% may not be unequivocally detectable using this method. An action level of +/- 10% is suggested, allowing investigation of possible gross errors in treatment delivery at an early stage, before the course of treatment has progressed to a point at which absorbed dose compensation is impossible.

  12. Solitary fibrous tumour of the supraglottic larynx.

    PubMed

    Grammatica, A; Bolzoni Villaret, A; Ravanelli, M; Nicolai, P

    2016-06-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is a rare, benign, mesenchymal neoplasm that usually arises in the pleura, but rarely involves other sites outside the serosal space (mediastinum, lung, liver, thyroid gland); larynx involvement is very rare with only sporadic cases reported in the literature. We report a case of SFT in a 41-year-old woman with supraglottic laryngeal invovlement; symptoms included dysphonia and mild odynophagia lasting 2 years, and fibre-optic laryngeal evaluation showed a sub-mucosal mass involving the left supraglottis and medial wall of the pyriform sinus. MRI represents the gold standard tool for differential diagnosis (with schwannoma, paraganglioma and haemangioma) and correct staging, while immunohistochemical and cytomorphologic analysis (bcl-2 and CD34 positivity in 90% of cases) is needed for definitive diagnosis. Surgery is the main treatment (endoscopic and open conservative technique), and its goal is a balance between safe oncological resection and good preservation of laryngeal functions; in this particular case an open laryngeal approach was scheduled due to the size of the tumour. Prognosis is good and in only a few cases (especially in pleural SFT) does the biological behaviour take a malignant course. PMID:27070539

  13. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumours.

    PubMed

    2012-10-01

    We analysed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, messenger RNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse-phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at >10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein-expression-defined subgroups, possibly produced by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signalling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/phosphorylated HER2/EGFR/phosphorylated EGFR signature within the HER2-enriched expression subtype. Comparison of basal-like breast tumours with high-grade serous ovarian tumours showed many molecular commonalities, indicating a related aetiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biological finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biological subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:23000897

  14. Solitary fibrous tumour of the supraglottic larynx.

    PubMed

    Grammatica, A; Bolzoni Villaret, A; Ravanelli, M; Nicolai, P

    2016-06-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is a rare, benign, mesenchymal neoplasm that usually arises in the pleura, but rarely involves other sites outside the serosal space (mediastinum, lung, liver, thyroid gland); larynx involvement is very rare with only sporadic cases reported in the literature. We report a case of SFT in a 41-year-old woman with supraglottic laryngeal invovlement; symptoms included dysphonia and mild odynophagia lasting 2 years, and fibre-optic laryngeal evaluation showed a sub-mucosal mass involving the left supraglottis and medial wall of the pyriform sinus. MRI represents the gold standard tool for differential diagnosis (with schwannoma, paraganglioma and haemangioma) and correct staging, while immunohistochemical and cytomorphologic analysis (bcl-2 and CD34 positivity in 90% of cases) is needed for definitive diagnosis. Surgery is the main treatment (endoscopic and open conservative technique), and its goal is a balance between safe oncological resection and good preservation of laryngeal functions; in this particular case an open laryngeal approach was scheduled due to the size of the tumour. Prognosis is good and in only a few cases (especially in pleural SFT) does the biological behaviour take a malignant course.

  15. Targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jakhetiya, Ashish; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Sharma, Jyoti; Pandey, Rambha; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms originating in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine, and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. The malignant potential of GISTs is variable ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. The majority of the tumours stain positively for the CD-117 (KIT) and discovered on GIST-1 (DOG-1 or anoctamin 1) expression, and they are characterized by the presence of a driver kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. Although surgery is the primary modality of treatment, almost half of the patients have disease recurrence following surgery, which highlights the need for an effective adjuvant therapy. Traditionally, GISTs are considered chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant. With the advent of targeted therapy (tyrosine kinase inhibitors), there has been a paradigm shift in the management of GISTs in the last decade. We present a comprehensive review of targeted therapy in the management of GISTs. PMID:27231512

  16. Endoluminal stenting of obstructed colorectal tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Boorman, P.; Soonawalla, Z.; Sathananthan, N.; MacFarlane, P.; Parker, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    A series of patients were selected to evaluate the clinical efficacy of a new self expanding metallic endoprosthesis in the management of left-sided colonic obstruction. The aim was to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with the surgical management of patients with distal colonic obstruction. Six patients with complete sigmoid colon obstruction were managed with the Wallstent Enteral Endoprosthesis [Schneider (USA) Inc.]. Four underwent subsequent elective colonic resection, while two were placed for palliation. Stent placement was successful in all cases with resulting bowel decompression and there were no procedural complications. All four patients with resectable tumours avoided emergency surgery. Stenting allowed time for medical improvement and staging investigations in this group. Two patients with advanced metastatic colonic carcinoma were successfully palliated. We found the Wallstent Enteral Endoprosthesis to be safe and effective in relieving obstruction in patients with resectable colonic tumours, permitting elective surgery and avoiding a temporary stoma. It can also be used to palliate those patients with advanced disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:10615192

  17. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumours.

    PubMed

    2012-10-01

    We analysed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, messenger RNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse-phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at >10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein-expression-defined subgroups, possibly produced by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signalling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/phosphorylated HER2/EGFR/phosphorylated EGFR signature within the HER2-enriched expression subtype. Comparison of basal-like breast tumours with high-grade serous ovarian tumours showed many molecular commonalities, indicating a related aetiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biological finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biological subtypes of breast cancer.

  18. Endothelial FAK is required for tumour angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tavora, Bernardo; Batista, Silvia; Reynolds, Louise E; Jadeja, Shalini; Robinson, Stephen; Kostourou, Vassiliki; Hart, Ian; Fruttiger, Marcus; Parsons, Maddy; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan M

    2010-12-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase that plays a fundamental role in integrin and growth factor mediated signalling and is an important player in cell migration and proliferation, processes vital for angiogenesis. However, the role of FAK in adult pathological angiogenesis is unknown. We have generated endothelial-specific tamoxifen-inducible FAK knockout mice by crossing FAK-floxed (FAKfl/fl) mice with the platelet derived growth factor b (Pdgfb)-iCreER mice. Tamoxifen-treatment of Pdgfb-iCreER;FAKfl/fl mice results in FAK deletion in adult endothelial cells (ECs) without any adverse effects. Importantly however, endothelial FAK-deletion in adult mice inhibited tumour growth and reduced tumour angiogenesis. Furthermore, in in vivo angiogenic assays FAK deletion impairs vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced neovascularization. In addition, in vitro deletion of FAK in ECs resulted in reduced VEGF-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and correlating reduced cellular proliferation as well as increased cell death. Our data suggest that FAK is required for adult pathological angiogenesis and validates FAK as a possible target for anti-angiogenic therapies.

  19. Concentrations of parabens in human breast tumours.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D; Aljarrah, A; Miller, W R; Coldham, N G; Sauer, M J; Pope, G S

    2004-01-01

    Parabens are used as preservatives in many thousands of cosmetic, food and pharmaceutical products to which the human population is exposed. Although recent reports of the oestrogenic properties of parabens have challenged current concepts of their toxicity in these consumer products, the question remains as to whether any of the parabens can accumulate intact in the body from the long-term, low-dose levels to which humans are exposed. Initial studies reported here show that parabens can be extracted from human breast tissue and detected by thin-layer chromatography. More detailed studies enabled identification and measurement of mean concentrations of individual parabens in samples of 20 human breast tumours by high-pressure liquid chromatography followed by tandem mass spectrometry. The mean concentration of parabens in these 20 human breast tumours was found to be 20.6 +/- 4.2 ng x g(-1) tissue. Comparison of individual parabens showed that methylparaben was present at the highest level (with a mean value of 12.8 +/- 2.2 ng x g(-1) tissue) and represents 62% of the total paraben recovered in the extractions. These studies demonstrate that parabens can be found intact in the human breast and this should open the way technically for more detailed information to be obtained on body burdens of parabens and in particular whether body burdens are different in cancer from those in normal tissues.

  20. [Modalities of breast cancer irradiation in 2016: Aims and indications of intensity modulated radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Bourgier, C; Fenoglietto, P; Lemanski, C; Ducteil, A; Charissoux, M; Draghici, R; Azria, D

    2016-10-01

    Irradiation techniques for breast cancer (arctherapy, tomotherapy) are evolving and intensity-modulated radiation therapy is being increasingly considered for the management of these tumours. Here, we propose a review of intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning issues, clinical toxicities and indications for breast cancer. PMID:27614497

  1. The treatment of metastatic germ-cell testicular tumours with bleomycin, etoposide and cis-platin (BEP).

    PubMed Central

    Peckham, M. J.; Barrett, A.; Liew, K. H.; Horwich, A.; Robinson, B.; Dobbs, H. J.; McElwain, T. J.; Hendry, W. F.

    1983-01-01

    Between July 1979 and December 1981, 43 patients with metastatic germ-cell tumours (36 testicular non-seminomas and 7 testicular seminomas) were treated with 2-6 cycles of bleomycin, etoposide and cis-platin (BEP). Forty (93%) are alive, 37 (86%) with no evidence of disease. Of 36 men with testicular non-seminoma 30 (83.3%) are alive and disease-free at 8-38 months (median 17.0 months). In the latter group 25/28 (89.3%) who had had no prior irradiation are alive and disease-free. Fourteen non-seminoma patients had small volume metastases and 13 are in complete remission, as are 12/14 patients with bulky disease. All 7 patients with advanced seminoma are alive and disease-free. It is concluded that BEP is a well tolerated and effective first line treatment for patients with metastatic germ-cell tumours. PMID:6189504

  2. Quantification of longitudinal tissue pO2 gradients in window chamber tumours: impact on tumour hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Dewhirst, M W; Ong, E T; Braun, R D; Smith, B; Klitzman, B; Evans, S M; Wilson, D

    1999-01-01

    We previously reported that the arteriolar input in window chamber tumours is limited in number and is constrained to enter the tumour from one surface, and that the pO2 of tumour arterioles is lower than in comparable arterioles of normal tissues. On average, the vascular pO2 in vessels of the upper surface of these tumours is lower than the pO2 of vessels on the fascial side, suggesting that there may be steep vascular longitudinal gradients (defined as the decline in vascular pO2 along the afferent path of blood flow) that contribute to vascular hypoxia on the upper surface of the tumours. However, we have not previously measured tissue pO2 on both surfaces of these chambers in the same tumour. In this report, we investigated the hypothesis that the anatomical constraint of arteriolar supply from one side of the tumour results in longitudinal gradients in pO2 sufficient in magnitude to create vascular hypoxia in tumours grown in dorsal flap window chambers. Fischer-344 rats had dorsal flap window chambers implanted in the skin fold with simultaneous transplantation of the R3230AC tumour. Tumours were studied at 9–11 days after transplantation, at a diameter of 3–4 mm; the tissue thickness was 200 μm. For magnetic resonance microscopic imaging, gadolinium DTPA bovine serum albumin (BSA-DTPA-Gd) complex was injected i.v., followed by fixation in 10% formalin and removal from the animal. The sample was imaged at 9.4 T, yielding voxel sizes of 40 μm. Intravital microscopy was used to visualize the position and number of arterioles entering window chamber tumour preparations. Phosphorescence life time imaging (PLI) was used to measure vascular pO2. Blue and green light excitations of the upper and lower surfaces of window chambers were made (penetration depth of light ~50 vs >200 μm respectively). Arteriolar input into window chamber tumours was limited to 1 or 2 vessels, and appeared to be constrained to the fascial surface upon which the tumour grows. PLI of

  3. Bacterial targeted tumour therapy-dawn of a new era.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ming Q; Mengesha, Asferd; Good, David; Anné, Jozef

    2008-01-18

    Original observation of patients' spontaneous recovery from advanced tumours after an infection or a "fever" inspired extensive research. As a result, Coley's toxin for the therapy of sarcomas and live Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) for bladder cancer were born. In addition, three genera of anaerobic bacteria have been shown to specifically and preferentially target solid tumours and cause significant tumour lyses. Initial research had focused on determining the best tumour colonizing bacteria, and assessing the therapeutic efficacy of different strategies either as a single or combination treatment modalities. However, although clinical trials were carried out as early as the 1960s, lack of complete tumour lyses with injection of Clostridial spores had limited their further use. Recent progress in the field has highlighted the rapid development of new tools for genetic manipulation of Clostridia which have otherwise been a hurdle for a long time, such as plasmid transformation using electroporation that bore the problems of inefficiency, instability and plasmid loss. A new Clostridium strain, C. novyi-NT made apathogenic by genetic modification, is under clinical trials. New genetic engineering tools, such as the group II intron has shown promise for genetic manipulation of bacteria and forecast the dawn of a new era for a tumour-targeted bacterial vector system for gene therapy of solid tumours. In this review we will discuss the potential of genetically manipulated bacteria that will usher in the new era of bacterial therapy for solid tumours, and highlight strategies and tools used to improve the bacterial oncolytic capability.

  4. Granular cell tumour of the brain and its cellular identity.

    PubMed

    Sakurama, N; Matsukado, Y; Marubayashi, T; Kodama, T

    1981-01-01

    Two cases of cerebral granular cell tumour are reported. In Case 1 the tumour arose from the genu of the corpus callosum, and in Case 2 it was found in the frontotemporoparietal lobes. Biopsy and autopsy specimens were examined with light and electron microscopy, and histochemical characteristics of the granule were analysed. Tumour cells from these two cases showed pleomorphism, but abundant granules in the cytoplasm were the most characteristic feature in these tumours. The granules were not stained by Sudan III and Sudan black, but were eosinophilic. They were PAS positive and not digested by diastase. Okamoto's reaction for glycolipid was positive after treatment by pyridine. They were also positive in Hotchkiss' method for glycolipid modified by Morrison and Hack, following immersion in chloroform and methanol solution. Histochemically, it was thought that granules consisted of glycoprotein. In the electron microscopic study dense bodies, multivesicular bodies, and vacoules were seen in tumour cells, especially in the neoplastic granular cells. It was assumed that the tumour cells originated from astrocytes, because of the cytoplasmic processes of the tumour cells were stained blue with PTAH, and contained microfibres of 80 A width. Gemistocytic astrocytes seen in the periphery of the tumour were also evidence indicating the neoplastic cell origin.

  5. Medullary thyroid carcinoma: a rare presentation as a hypervascular tumour.

    PubMed

    Li, W Y; Tomlinson, M A; Bryson, J M; Hopkins, N F G

    2002-08-01

    Sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) usually presents with a thyroid mass, cervical lymphadenopathy or other local cervical symptoms. Often the diagnosis is unsuspected pre-operatively. We report a unique case of a mixed follicular medullary thyroid carcinoma presenting as a tumour with extreme vascularity. The management of hypervascular thyroid tumours is discussed together with current controversies regarding persistent hypercalcitoninaemia. PMID:12389699

  6. Disseminated solitary fibrous tumour of the lung and pleura.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ranjit Kumar; Thangakunam, Balamugesh; Isaac, Barney Thomas Jesudason; Gupta, Ashumi

    2013-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are a heterogeneous group of rare spindle-cell tumours. Classically they presented as a solitary pleural-based mass. Pulmonary parenchymal SFT is rare and multiple bilateral lesions are extremely rare. We present the clinical, imaging and histological features of SFT which are presented as multiple nodular lesions of the lung and pleura with probable distant metastasis.

  7. Mouse Models of Brain Metastasis for Unravelling Tumour Progression.

    PubMed

    Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Sibson, Nicola R

    2016-01-01

    Secondary tumours in the brain account for 40 % of triple negative breast cancer patients, and the percentage may be higher at the time of autopsy. The use of in vivo models allow us to recapitulate the molecular mechanisms potentially used by circulating breast tumour cells to proliferate within the brain.Metastasis is a multistep process that depends on the success of several stages including cell evasion from the primary tumour, distribution and survival within the blood stream and cerebral microvasculature, penetration of the blood-brain barrier and proliferation within the brain microenvironment. Cellular adhesion molecules are key proteins involved in all of the steps in the metastatic process. Our group has developed two different in vivo models to encompass both seeding and colonisation stages of the metastatic process: (1) haematogenous dissemination of tumour cells by direct injection into the left ventricle of the heart, and (2) direct implantation of the tumour cells into the mouse brain.This chapter describes, in detail, the practical implementation of the intracerebral model, which can be used to analyse tumour proliferation within a specific area of the central nervous system and tumour-host cell interactions. We also describe the use of immunohistochemistry techniques to identify, at the molecular scale, tumour-host cell interactions, which may open new windows for brain metastasis therapy.

  8. Signet ring cell carcinoma of the eyelid - the monocle tumour.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Anouck Leuba; Heegaard, Steffen; Clemmensen, Ole; Prause, Jan Ulrik

    2008-04-01

    We report the clinical and histopathological characteristics of two cases of signet ring cell carcinoma of the eye lids, and discuss the histogenesis of this neoplasm. Two 72-year-old Caucasian males both presented with slowly growing tumours of the eyelids. The tumours were excised and specimens were examined using light- and transmission electron microscopic techniques. Clinically, the tumours infiltrated both eyelids on one side of the face with swelling and periocular inflammation, creating a monocle-like appearance. Extensive clinical work-up excluded periocular metastases. Histopathologically, the tumours were composed of rather bland cells with mainly histiocytoid morphology. A minor proportion had a signet ring cell appearance. The cytoplasmic inclusions giving the signet ring morphology were PAS- and colloidal iron positive. The tumour cells reacted with antibodies against cytokeratins, carcinoembryonic antigen, epithelial membrane antigen, gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 and lysozyme. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated tumour cells containing intracytoplasmic vacuoles lined by microvilli. The tumour cells aggregated in duct-like clusters. A diagnosis of primary signet ring cell carcinoma was made in both cases. Histopathological, immunohistological and ultrastructural findings indicated that the tumours were of sweat gland origin.

  9. Melanosomes foster a tumour niche by activating CAFs.

    PubMed

    García-Silva, Susana; Peinado, Héctor

    2016-08-30

    Extracellular vesicles, such as exosomes, are important effectors in the formation of tumour-fostering niches. Pigmented melanosomes are now shown to have a relevant role in establishing a tumour niche in primary melanoma by reprogramming dermal fibroblasts into cancer-associated fibroblasts through the transfer of miR-211. PMID:27571736

  10. Anthropogenic selection enhances cancer evolution in Tasmanian devil tumours

    PubMed Central

    Ujvari, Beata; Pearse, Anne-Maree; Swift, Kate; Hodson, Pamela; Hua, Bobby; Pyecroft, Stephen; Taylor, Robyn; Hamede, Rodrigo; Jones, Menna; Belov, Katherine; Madsen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The Tasmanian Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD) provides a unique opportunity to elucidate the long-term effects of natural and anthropogenic selection on cancer evolution. Since first observed in 1996, this transmissible cancer has caused local population declines by >90%. So far, four chromosomal DFTD variants (strains) have been described and karyotypic analyses of 253 tumours showed higher levels of tetraploidy in the oldest strain. We propose that increased ploidy in the oldest strain may have evolved in response to effects of genomic decay observed in asexually reproducing organisms. In this study, we focus on the evolutionary response of DFTD to a disease suppression trial. Tumours collected from devils subjected to the removal programme showed accelerated temporal evolution of tetraploidy compared with tumours from other populations where no increase in tetraploid tumours were observed. As ploidy significantly reduces tumour growth rate, we suggest that the disease suppression trial resulted in selection favouring slower growing tumours mediated by an increased level of tetraploidy. Our study reveals that DFTD has the capacity to rapidly respond to novel selective regimes and that disease eradication may result in novel tumour adaptations, which may further imperil the long-term survival of the world's largest carnivorous marsupial. PMID:24567746

  11. Reimplantation of autoclaved tumour bone in limb salvage surgery.

    PubMed

    Sanjay, B K; Moreau, P G; Younge, D A

    1997-01-01

    This is a prospective clinical study of 7 patients with malignant bone tumours who were treated by resection of the tumour, followed with reconstruction by reimplantation of the resected autoclaved tumour bone. There were 3 male and 4 female patients between 10 and 36 years of age. All the tumours were Stage IIB. Five of the 7 were in the region of the knee joint. Histologically, 5 were osteosarcomas, 1 a recurrent chondrosarcoma and 1 a recurrent Ewing's sarcoma. All the patients were treated by en bloc resection of the tumour with wide margins. The resected length ranged from 13 cm to 28 cm. After removal of soft tissue and cartilage, the resected bone segment was autoclaved for 5 min at 132 degrees C and 29 pounds per square inch pressure (0.2 mega Pascal). This autoclaved segment of bone was then reimplanted and fixed with an appropriate implant. The average follow-up was 20 months with a range of 14 to 27 months. None of the tumours recurred and, at the most recent follow-up, all the patients were alive, 6 with no evidence of disease and one with a lung metastasis. Six of the 7 patients were available for radiological assessment. Solid bone union was seen in 4 patients, delayed union in 1 and nonunion in 1. This method of reconstruction using an autoclaved tumour bone graft is useful in countries where facilities for allograft or tumour prostheses are not available owing to financial, technical or sociocultural reasons.

  12. In vivo isolated kidney perfusion with tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) in tumour-bearing rats

    PubMed Central

    Veen, A H van der; Seynhaeve, A L B; Breurs, J; Nooijen, P T G A; Marquet, R L; Eggermont, A M M

    1999-01-01

    Isolated perfusion of the extremities with high-dose tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) plus melphalan leads to dramatic tumour response in patients with irresectable soft tissue sarcoma or multiple melanoma in transit metastases. We developed in vivo isolated organ perfusion models to determine whether similar tumour responses in solid organ tumours can be obtained with this regimen. Here, we describe the technique of isolated kidney perfusion. We studied the feasibility of a perfusion with TNF-α and assessed its anti-tumour effects in tumour models differing in tumour vasculature. The maximal tolerated dose (MTD) proved to be only 1 μg TNF-α. Higher doses appeared to induce renal failure and a secondary cytokine release with fatal respiratory and septic shock-like symptoms. In vitro, the combination of TNF-α and melphalan did not result in a synergistic growth-inhibiting effect on CC 531 colon adenocarcinoma cells, whereas an additive effect was observed on osteosarcoma ROS-1 cells. In vivo isolated kidney perfusion, with TNF-α alone or in combination with melphalan, did not result in a significant anti-tumour response in either tumour model in a subrenal capsule assay. We conclude that, because of the susceptibility of the kidney to perfusion with TNF-α, the minimal threshold concentration of TNF-α to exert its anti-tumour effects was not reached. The applicability of TNF-α in isolated kidney perfusion for human tumours seems, therefore, questionable. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10027309

  13. Defining the clonal dynamics leading to mouse skin tumour initiation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Danés, Adriana; Hannezo, Edouard; Larsimont, Jean-Christophe; Liagre, Mélanie; Youssef, Khalil Kass; Simons, Benjamin D; Blanpain, Cédric

    2016-08-18

    The changes in cell dynamics after oncogenic mutation that lead to the development of tumours are currently unknown. Here, using skin epidermis as a model, we assessed the effect of oncogenic hedgehog signalling in distinct cell populations and their capacity to induce basal cell carcinoma, the most frequent cancer in humans. We found that only stem cells, and not progenitors, initiated tumour formation upon oncogenic hedgehog signalling. This difference was due to the hierarchical organization of tumour growth in oncogene-targeted stem cells, characterized by an increase in symmetric self-renewing divisions and a higher p53-dependent resistance to apoptosis, leading to rapid clonal expansion and progression into invasive tumours. Our work reveals that the capacity of oncogene-targeted cells to induce tumour formation is dependent not only on their long-term survival and expansion, but also on the specific clonal dynamics of the cancer cell of origin. PMID:27459053

  14. PERIVASCULAR EPITHELIOID TUMOURS (PEComas) OF THE GYNAECOLOGICAL TRACT

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Niamh; Soslow, Robert A.; Murali, Rajmohan

    2016-01-01

    Perivascular epithelioid tumour (PEComas) of the gynaecological tract are rare tumours which were first recognised and diagnosed within the last twenty years. They represent a unique diagnostic challenge with regard to their accurate and reproducible distinction from more common entities such as smooth muscle tumours of the uterine corpus. In this review article we trace the development of the concept of the PEComa tumour family, highlight what is known about extra-gynaecological tract PEComa at an immunohistochemical, molecular and therapeutic level and then present a summary of all reported cases of gynaecological tract PEComa to date. In the summary, we highlight rare subtypes of gynaecological tract PEComa, and compare the performances of extant prognostic classification systems for malignancy in these tumours. PMID:25750268

  15. Paratesticular liposarcoma-masquerading as a testicular tumour.

    PubMed

    Vinayagam, Kalaivani; Hosamath, Vijayakumar; Honnappa, Sridhar; Rau, Aarathi Ranga

    2014-02-01

    Paratesticular liposarcomas are rare tumours which account for 12% of all liposarcomas. Probably there are about 186 cases which have been reported till date. They must be differentiated from tumours of testicular origin which have extension to the spermatic cord. We are reporting a case of a 50-year-old male who had presented with a painless swelling in the right hemiscrotum, which was of 20 years' duration. Inititally, a clinical diagnosis of testicular tumour was made; however, CT of the scrotum revealed paratesticular tumour? liposarcoma and testis being normal and displaced postero-inferiorly. Metastatic work-up, which included CT of the abdomen and pelvis, thorax and whole body scan, did not reveal any distant metastasis. Patient underwent high orchidectomy, hemiscrotectomy. Histopathological studies confirmed the diagnosis of well-differentiated liposarcoma (atypical lipomatous tumour of sclerosing type). PMID:24701520

  16. Tumour Markers and Kidney Function: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Rivoli, Laura; Mazza, Giuseppe; Presta, Piera

    2014-01-01

    Tumour markers represent useful tools in diagnosis and clinical management of patients with cancer, because they are easy to use, minimally invasive, and easily measured in either blood or urine. Unfortunately, such an ideal marker, as yet, does not exist. Different pathological states may increase the level of a tumour marker in the absence of any neoplasia. Alternatively, low levels of tumour markers could be also found in the presence of neoplasias. We aimed at reviewing studies currently available in the literature examining the association between tumour markers and different renal impairment conditions. Each tumour marker was found to be differently influenced by these criteria; additionally we revealed in many cases a lack of available published data. PMID:24689048

  17. Anti-tumour activity of Ruta graveolens extract.

    PubMed

    Preethi, K C; Kuttan, Girija; Kuttan, Ramadasan

    2006-01-01

    An extract of Ruta graveolens was found to be cytotoxic to Dalton's lymphoma ascites (DLA), Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) and L929 cells in culture (IC100=16 mg/ml) and also to increase the lifespan of tumour bearing animals. The extract further decreased solid tumours developing from DLA and EAC cells when given simultaneously with elongation of the lifespan of tumour-bearing animals. A homeopathic preparation of Ruta graveolens (200 c) was equally effective. Neither was effective for reducing already developed tumours. The Ruta graveolens extract was found to scavenge hydroxyl radicals and inhibit lipid peroxidation at low concentrations. However, at higher concentrations the extract acted as a prooxidant as inhibition of lipid peroxidation and scavenging of hydroxyl radical was minimal. These data indicates that the prooxidant activity of Ruta graveolens may be responsible for the cytocidal action of the extract and its ability to produce tumour reduction.

  18. Uncommon perineal tumours: caution with aggressive surgical management

    PubMed Central

    Duchalais, Emilie; Cassagnau, Elisabeth; Regenet, Nicolas; Meurette, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    An asymptomatic 66-year-old woman showed a large perineal mass extending close to pelvic organs on MRI. CT-guided needle biopsies revealed a desmoid tumour (DT). The patient refused radical surgery. Four years later, the tumour had marginally increased in size and was still asymptomatic. The revision of earlier biopsies then revealed typical aspects of aggressive angiomyxoma (AA). AA and DT are rare mesenchymal tumours of low-grade malignancy, usually of large size, that occurs in female pelvi-perineal region. Radical resection with wide margins is classically advocated in such tumours in order to prevent the high risk of recurrences. However, due to a slow growth, rare infiltration of adjacent organs and a very low metastatic potential, a watchful waiting policy can be proposed when high postoperative morbidity is expected. In order to propose the accurate treatment, frontline biopsies of the tumour are essential. PMID:24243505

  19. Anti-tumour activity of Ruta graveolens extract.

    PubMed

    Preethi, K C; Kuttan, Girija; Kuttan, Ramadasan

    2006-01-01

    An extract of Ruta graveolens was found to be cytotoxic to Dalton's lymphoma ascites (DLA), Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) and L929 cells in culture (IC100=16 mg/ml) and also to increase the lifespan of tumour bearing animals. The extract further decreased solid tumours developing from DLA and EAC cells when given simultaneously with elongation of the lifespan of tumour-bearing animals. A homeopathic preparation of Ruta graveolens (200 c) was equally effective. Neither was effective for reducing already developed tumours. The Ruta graveolens extract was found to scavenge hydroxyl radicals and inhibit lipid peroxidation at low concentrations. However, at higher concentrations the extract acted as a prooxidant as inhibition of lipid peroxidation and scavenging of hydroxyl radical was minimal. These data indicates that the prooxidant activity of Ruta graveolens may be responsible for the cytocidal action of the extract and its ability to produce tumour reduction. PMID:17059340

  20. Fine needle aspiration biopsy in salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Lau, T; Balle, V H; Bretlau, P

    1986-04-01

    Of 105 tumours of the major salivary glands, 90 were benign and 15 malignant. In benign tumours a correct preoperative diagnosis was made by fine needle aspiration biopsy in 84%, and none were falsely classed as malignant. In the malignant tumours, only 8 out of 15 (53%) were correctly diagnosed as malignant while 7 were misdiagnosed as benign. It is concluded that in benign salivary gland tumours there is good accordance between fine needle aspiration biopsy and the final histological report, in contrast to the malignant tumours where this is less convincing. Fine needle aspiration biopsy is a valuable diagnostic tool, but the result should be carefully evaluated, regarded as only part of the clinical picture and not solely relied on.

  1. Surgical treatment of benign tumours of the salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Van Hee, R; Misset, M; Ysebaert, D; Van de Heyning, P; Koekelkoren, E; Claes, L; Van Laer, C; Peeters, L; Hintjens, J; Van Elst, F; Van Marck, E; Bultinck, J

    1996-01-01

    In this multicentre retrospective study 30 patients with benign salivary gland tumours are reviewed. Initial operation consisted of total parotidectomy in 6 patients, superficial lobectomy in 13 and tumour enucleation in 11. There were 5 recurrences, treated by enucleation in 1, superficial lobectomy in 2 and extensive total resection in 2 patients. In 18 cases a typical facial nerve dissection was performed. The resected specimens showed a pleiomorph adenoma in 24 cases and monomorph adenoma's in 6 cases. Complications were haematoma formation, Frey syndrome and facial nerve paresis. Recurrences were related to incomplete resection or fragmentation during operation. In this study benign tumours of the salivary glands proved to have a good prognosis, provided a total tumour excision with nerve dissection is performed; the excision should consist of a superficial lobectomy or total parotidectomy depending on the location of the tumour in the lateral or medial part of the gland.

  2. Squamous carcinoma arising in a parotid Warthin's tumour.

    PubMed

    Allevi, Fabiana; Biglioli, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Warthin's tumour is the second most common benign neoplasm to affect the salivary glands. It virtually affects the sole parotid gland. A sudden increase in a tumour's size is usually due to a malignant transformation of the tumour. The transformation of the lymphoid stroma into malignant lymphoma is relatively common, while an epithelial malignancy is extremely rare. In this paper, the authors present a case of squamous cell carcinoma arising in Warthin's tumour. The patient underwent enucleoresection of the tumour. Intraoperative frozen section revealed the presence of a cystic component associated with the squamous cell carcinoma areas. In consideration of the result of the intraoperative consultation, the surgeons decided to enlarge the previous resection by removal of a 30×25 mm cuff from the surrounding parotid tissue. Close follow-up was carried out and 12 months after surgery there was no evidence of recurrence or metastatic neoplasm.

  3. Induction of hepatic metallothionein I in tumour-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Kloth, D M; Chin, J L; Cherian, M G

    1995-04-01

    Metallothionein (MT) is an intracellular metal-binding protein which has been implicated in various biological roles, including heavy-metal detoxification and zinc and copper homeostasis, and has putative antioxidant properties. High levels of MT have been detected in certain human tumours, but its functions are unclear. The presence of tumour may cause stress conditions along with alterations in host metabolism, such as the redistribution of metals and, subsequently, in changes in hepatic MT isoforms. The distribution of basal levels of MT-1 and MT-11 isoforms in livers of different strains of mice and their induction in mice inoculated with tumour cells are investigated. While Balb-c, C57/BL and CD1 mice strains had an equal distribution of both hepatic MT isoforms, MT-I and MT-II. In addition, MT-I was the predominant isoform synthesised (> 88%) in the livers of all strains of mice at 24 h after injection with either cadmium or zinc salts. After inoculation with human testicular T7800 or T7799 tumour cells, the major form of MT induced in the livers of nude (nu/nu) mice was Zn-MT-I, and its concentration was positively correlated with the size of the inoculated tumours (r2 = 0.85). A similar positive relation was found in the livers of Balb-c mice inoculated with MM45T mouse bladder tumour cells (r2 = 0.96). Following surgical removal of T7800 tumour, hepatic MT concentrations returned to basal values. There was an increase in plasma MT levels in tumour-bearing mice and it was positively correlated with the increase in hepatic MT levels. These results demonstrate a specific increase in hepatic MT-I isoform in tumour-bearing mice, and this may be due to a generalised stress during tumour growth. PMID:7710933

  4. Systemic therapy for selected skull base sarcomas: Chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour and solitary fibrous tumour/hemangiopericytoma.

    PubMed

    Colia, Vittoria; Provenzano, Salvatore; Hindi, Nadia; Casali, Paolo G; Stacchiotti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the data currently available on the activity of systemic therapy in chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour of the bone (GCTB) and solitary fibrous tumour, i.e., four rare sarcomas amongst mesenchymal malignancy arising from the skull base.

  5. Interleukin-6 suppression reduces tumour self-seeding by circulating tumour cells in a human osteosarcoma nude mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinglong; Ma, Qiong; Liu, Tao; Guan, Guofeng; Zhang, Kailiang; Chen, Jiayan; Jia, Nan; Yan, Shiju; Chen, Guanyin; Liu, Shiluan; Jiang, Kuo; Lu, Yao; Wen, Yanhua; Zhao, Haien; Zhou, Yong; Fan, Qingyu; Qiu, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Tumour self-seeding by circulating tumour cells (CTCs) enhances tumour progression and recurrence. Previously, we demonstrated that tumour self-seeding by CTCs occurs in osteosarcoma and revealed that interleukin-6 (IL-6) may promote CTC attraction. Here, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of IL-6 in tumour self-seeding by CTCs. IL-6 suppression inhibited in vitro cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. In addition, rhIL-6 activated the Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (JAK/STAT3) and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-signal regulated kinase1/2 (MAPK/ERK1/2) pathways in vitro. Both pathways increased cell proliferation, but only the JAK/STAT3 pathway promoted migration. Suppressing IL-6 inhibited in vivo tumour growth and metastasis. IL-6 suppression or JAK/STAT3 pathway inhibition reduced CTC seeding in primary tumours. Collectively, IL-6 promotes tumour self-seeding by CTCs in a nude mouse model. This finding may provide a novel strategy for future therapeutic interventions to prevent osteosarcoma progression and recurrence.

  6. Systemic therapy for selected skull base sarcomas: Chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour and solitary fibrous tumour/hemangiopericytoma.

    PubMed

    Colia, Vittoria; Provenzano, Salvatore; Hindi, Nadia; Casali, Paolo G; Stacchiotti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the data currently available on the activity of systemic therapy in chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour of the bone (GCTB) and solitary fibrous tumour, i.e., four rare sarcomas amongst mesenchymal malignancy arising from the skull base. PMID:27330421

  7. Interfering with stem cell-specific gatekeeper functions controls tumour initiation and malignant progression of skin tumours

    PubMed Central

    Petersson, Monika; Reuter, Karen; Brylka, Heike; Kraus, Andreas; Schettina, Peter; Niemann, Catherin

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cancer constitutes a major clinical challenge and molecular mechanisms underlying the process of tumour initiation are not well understood. Here we demonstrate that hair follicle bulge stem cells (SCs) give rise to well-differentiated sebaceous tumours and show that SCs are not only crucial in tumour initiation, but are also involved in tumour plasticity and heterogeneity. Our findings reveal that SC-specific expression of mutant Lef1, which mimics mutations found in human sebaceous tumours, drives sebaceous tumour formation. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that mutant Lef1 abolishes p53 activity in SCs. Intriguingly, mutant Lef1 induces DNA damage and interferes with SC-specific gatekeeper functions normally protecting against accumulations of DNA lesions and cell loss. Thus, normal control of SC proliferation is disrupted by mutant Lef1, thereby allowing uncontrolled propagation of tumour-initiating SCs. Collectively, these findings identify underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of tumour-initiating events in tissue SCs providing a potential target for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25608467

  8. Skull base tumours part I: imaging technique, anatomy and anterior skull base tumours.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alexandra

    2008-06-01

    Advances in cross-sectional imaging, surgical technique and adjuvant treatment have largely contributed to ameliorate the prognosis, lessen the morbidity and mortality of patients with skull base tumours and to the growing medical investment in the management of these patients. Because clinical assessment of the skull base is limited, cross-sectional imaging became indispensable in the diagnosis, treatment planning and follow-up of patients with suspected skull base pathology and the radiologist is increasingly responsible for the fate of these patients. This review will focus on the advances in imaging technique; contribution to patient's management and on the imaging features of the most common tumours affecting the anterior skull base. Emphasis is given to a systematic approach to skull base pathology based upon an anatomic division taking into account the major tissue constituents in each skull base compartment. The most relevant information that should be conveyed to surgeons and radiation oncologists involved in patient's management will be discussed.

  9. Circulating tumour cells as tumour biomarkers in melanoma: detection methods and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Khoja, L; Lorigan, P; Dive, C; Keilholz, U; Fusi, A

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are cells of solid tumour origin detectable in the peripheral blood. Their occurrence is considered a prerequisite step for establishing distant metastases. Metastatic melanoma was the first malignancy in which CTCs were detected and numerous studies have been published on CTC detection in melanoma at various stages of disease. In spite of this, there is no general consensus as to the clinical utility of CTCs in melanoma, largely due to conflicting results from heterogeneous studies and discrepancies in methods of detection between studies. In this review, we examine the possible clinical significance of CTCs in cutaneous, mucosal and ocular melanoma, focusing on detection methods and prognostic value of CTC detection.

  10. Phthalocyanine-mediated Photodynamic Treatment of Tumoural and Non-tumoural cell lines.

    PubMed

    Manisova, Barbora; Binder, Svatopluk; Malina, Lukas; Jiravova, Jana; Langova, Katerina; Kolarova, Hana

    2015-07-01

    This study deals with the use of cationic far-red absorbing photosensitizers (λ(max) ~740 nm) from the group of the phthalocyanines, in photodynamic therapy. The photosensitizers differed in their central atom, bearing either hydrogen, zinc or magnesium. These photosensitizers were tested in vitro on the tumour cell line HeLa (cervical cancer) and non-tumour cell line NIH3T3 (mouse fibroblast). The following tests were performed: measurement of reactive oxygen species production, viability testing, Comet assay and cell type detection (apoptotic, necrotic and living cells). The best results were achieved with zinc derivative at relatively low half-maximum inhibitory concentration (0.04 μM) and a total radiation dose of 15 J cm(-2).

  11. Circulating tumour cells as tumour biomarkers in melanoma: detection methods and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Khoja, L; Lorigan, P; Dive, C; Keilholz, U; Fusi, A

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are cells of solid tumour origin detectable in the peripheral blood. Their occurrence is considered a prerequisite step for establishing distant metastases. Metastatic melanoma was the first malignancy in which CTCs were detected and numerous studies have been published on CTC detection in melanoma at various stages of disease. In spite of this, there is no general consensus as to the clinical utility of CTCs in melanoma, largely due to conflicting results from heterogeneous studies and discrepancies in methods of detection between studies. In this review, we examine the possible clinical significance of CTCs in cutaneous, mucosal and ocular melanoma, focusing on detection methods and prognostic value of CTC detection. PMID:24907634

  12. Tumour necrosis factor in synovial exudates.

    PubMed Central

    Di Giovine, F S; Nuki, G; Duff, G W

    1988-01-01

    The actions of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) include resorption of bone and cartilage, suggesting a potential role in the pathogenesis of arthritis. TNF activity was looked for in synovial fluids from 137 patients with different rheumatic diseases. Unfractionated samples were tested in the L929 bioassay. Significant TNF activity that was neutralised by monoclonal antibody to TNF alpha occurred in 13 (30%) of 44 samples. Raised TNF levels were not associated with any particular disease type or routine laboratory markers of inflammation but were related to disease duration in osteoarthritis. The finding of biologically active TNF in symptomatic joints of arthritic patients supports the idea that it may contribute to the pathogenesis of joint damage in chronic rheumatic diseases. PMID:3263088

  13. The complex management of atypical Spitz tumours.

    PubMed

    Massi, Daniela; De Giorgi, Vincenzo; Mandalà, Mario

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, advances in molecular genetic characterisation have revealed that atypical Spitz tumours (ASTs) are basically heterogeneous diseases, although the clinical relevance of these findings is yet to be determined. Evidence of molecularly-defined diverse groups of lesions continues to accumulate; however, conflicting, confusing, and overlapping terminology has fostered ambiguity and lack of clarity in the field in general. The lack of fundamental diagnostic (morphological) unambiguous classification framework results in a number of challenges in the interpretation of the molecular genetic data. In this review, we discuss the main difficulties for pathologists and clinicians in the complex management of ASTs, with particular emphasis on the different genetic and biological features of recently-described entities, and offer our view of what could be medically reasonable to guide a rational approach in light of current data.

  14. Endocrine tumours in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Künzel, Frank; Mayer, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Functional endocrine tumours have long been thought to be rare in guinea pigs, although conditions such as hyperthyroidism and hyperadrenocorticism have been documented with increasing frequency so the prevalence of hormonal disorders may have been underestimated. Both the clinical signs and diagnosis of hyperthyroidism in guinea pigs appear to be very similar to those described in feline hyperthyroidism, and methimazole has been proven to be a practical therapy option. Hyperadrenocorticism has been confirmed in several guinea pigs with an adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test using saliva as a non-invasive sample matrix; trilostane has been successfully used to treat a guinea pig with hyperadrenocorticism. Insulinomas have only rarely been documented in guinea pigs and one animal was effectively treated with diazoxide. PMID:26542368

  15. Design considerations for tumour-targeted nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hak Soo; Liu, Wenhao; Liu, Fangbing; Nasr, Khaled; Misra, Preeti; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Frangioni, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Inorganic/organic hybrid nanoparticles are potentially useful in biomedicine, but to avoid non-specific background fluorescence and long-term toxicity, they need to be cleared from the body within a reasonable timescale. Previously, we have shown that rigid spherical nanoparticles such as quantum dots can be cleared by the kidneys if they have a hydrodynamic diameter of approximately 5.5 nm and a zwitterionic surface charge. Here, we show that quantum dots functionalized with high-affinity small-molecule ligands that target tumours can also be cleared by the kidneys if their hydrodynamic diameter is less than this value, which sets an upper limit of 5-10 ligands per quantum dot for renal clearance. Animal models of prostate cancer and melanoma show receptor-specific imaging and renal clearance within 4 h post-injection. This study suggests a set of design rules for the clinical translation of targeted nanoparticles that can be eliminated through the kidneys.

  16. Gold nanoparticles for tumour detection and treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartsuiker, L.; Petersen, W.; Jose, J.; van Es, P.; Lenferink, A.; Poot, A. A.; Terstappen, L. W. M. M.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Manohar, S.; Otto, C.

    2011-07-01

    The use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications is emerging rapidly. Recent developments have led to numerous studies of noble metal nanoparticles, down to the level of single molecule detection in living cells. The application of noble metal nanoparticles in diagnostics and treatment of early stage carcinomas is the subject of many present studies. Gold nanoparticles are particularly interesting for optical biomedical applications due to their biocompatibility and moreover, their enhanced absorption cross-sections. The latter is a result of surface plasmon resonance, which can be tuned by altering the shape of the nanoparticles enabling usage of the near infrared tissue transparent optical window. This paper presents a brief overview of the variety of shapes, size and surface chemistries of the gold nanoparticles used for cancer detection and treatment, as well as their effects in different tumour models that have recently been investigated, both in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Endocrine tumours in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Künzel, Frank; Mayer, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Functional endocrine tumours have long been thought to be rare in guinea pigs, although conditions such as hyperthyroidism and hyperadrenocorticism have been documented with increasing frequency so the prevalence of hormonal disorders may have been underestimated. Both the clinical signs and diagnosis of hyperthyroidism in guinea pigs appear to be very similar to those described in feline hyperthyroidism, and methimazole has been proven to be a practical therapy option. Hyperadrenocorticism has been confirmed in several guinea pigs with an adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test using saliva as a non-invasive sample matrix; trilostane has been successfully used to treat a guinea pig with hyperadrenocorticism. Insulinomas have only rarely been documented in guinea pigs and one animal was effectively treated with diazoxide.

  18. Cushing syndrome associated with an adrenal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Helena; Brain, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS) in children is a rare disorder that is most frequently caused by an adrenal tumour or a pituitary corticotrophin-secreting adenoma. The management is challenging and requires an individualised approach and multidisciplinary care. We present the case of a 23-month-old female child with a history of excessive weight gain, growth failure, hirsutism, acne and behavioural difficulties. Investigations revealed elevated serum midnight cortisol and 24 h urinary free cortisol. Overnight dexamethasone suppression testing showed no suppression of cortisol levels. Abdominal imaging revealed a right-sided suprarenal mass. She underwent right adrenalectomy and the histology showed an adrenal cortical carcinoma. There was clinical improvement with catch-up growth and weight normalisation. Despite being rare in clinical practice, in a child with weight gain, hirsuitism and growth failure the diagnosis must be considered. The overall prognosis of CS in childhood is good, but challenges remain to ensure normal growth and body composition. PMID:22927284

  19. Checkpoint Blockade Cancer Immunotherapy Targets Tumour-Specific Mutant Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Gubin, Matthew M.; Zhang, Xiuli; Schuster, Heiko; Caron, Etienne; Ward, Jeffrey P.; Noguchi, Takuro; Ivanova, Yulia; Hundal, Jasreet; Arthur, Cora D.; Krebber, Willem-Jan; Mulder, Gwenn E.; Toebes, Mireille; Vesely, Matthew D.; Lam, Samuel S.K.; Korman, Alan J.; Allison, James P.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Pearce, Erika L.; Schumacher, Ton N.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Gillanders, William E.; Artyomov, Maxim N.; Schreiber, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    The immune system plays key roles in determining the fate of developing cancers by not only functioning as a tumour promoter facilitating cellular transformation, promoting tumour growth and sculpting tumour cell immunogenicity1–6, but also as an extrinsic tumour suppressor that either destroys developing tumours or restrains their expansion1,2,7. Yet clinically apparent cancers still arise in immunocompetent individuals in part as a consequence of cancer induced immunosuppression. In many individuals, immunosuppression is mediated by Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Associated Antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and Programmed Death-1 (PD-1), two immunomodulatory receptors expressed on T cells8,9. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) based therapies targeting CTLA-4 and/or PD-1 (checkpoint blockade) have yielded significant clinical benefits—including durable responses—to patients with different malignancies10–13. However, little is known about the identity of the tumour antigens that function as the targets of T cells activated by checkpoint blockade immunotherapy and whether these antigens can be used to generate vaccines that are highly tumour-specific. Herein, we use genomics and bioinformatics approaches to identify tumour-specific mutant proteins as a major class of T cell rejection antigens following αPD-1 and/or αCTLA-4 therapy of mice bearing progressively growing sarcomas and show that therapeutic synthetic long peptide (SLP) vaccines incorporating these mutant epitopes induce tumour rejection comparably to checkpoint blockade immunotherapy. Whereas, mutant tumour antigen-specific T cells are present in progressively growing tumours, they are reactivated following treatment with αPD-1- and/or αCTLA-4 and display some overlapping but mostly treatment-specific transcriptional profiles rendering them capable of mediating tumour rejection. These results reveal that tumour-specific mutant antigens (TSMA) are not only important targets of checkpoint blockade therapy but also can be

  20. Somatic CRISPR/Cas9-mediated tumour suppressor disruption enables versatile brain tumour modelling.

    PubMed

    Zuckermann, Marc; Hovestadt, Volker; Knobbe-Thomsen, Christiane B; Zapatka, Marc; Northcott, Paul A; Schramm, Kathrin; Belic, Jelena; Jones, David T W; Tschida, Barbara; Moriarity, Branden; Largaespada, David; Roussel, Martine F; Korshunov, Andrey; Reifenberger, Guido; Pfister, Stefan M; Lichter, Peter; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Gronych, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In vivo functional investigation of oncogenes using somatic gene transfer has been successfully exploited to validate their role in tumorigenesis. For tumour suppressor genes this has proven more challenging due to technical aspects. To provide a flexible and effective method for investigating somatic loss-of-function alterations and their influence on tumorigenesis, we have established CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic gene disruption, allowing for in vivo targeting of TSGs. Here we demonstrate the utility of this approach by deleting single (Ptch1) or multiple genes (Trp53, Pten, Nf1) in the mouse brain, resulting in the development of medulloblastoma and glioblastoma, respectively. Using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) we characterized the medulloblastoma-driving Ptch1 deletions in detail and show that no off-targets were detected in these tumours. This method provides a fast and convenient system for validating the emerging wealth of novel candidate tumour suppressor genes and the generation of faithful animal models of human cancer. PMID:26067104

  1. Anti-tumour activity in RAS-driven tumours by blocking AKT and MEK

    PubMed Central

    Tolcher, Anthony W.; Khan, Khurum; Ong, Michael; Banerji, Udai; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki; Gandara, David R.; Patnaik, Amita; Baird, Richard D.; Olmos, David; Garrett, Christopher R.; Skolnik, Jeffrey M.; Rubin, Eric H.; Smith, Paul D.; Huang, Pearl; Learoyd, Maria; Shannon, Keith A.; Morosky, Anne; Tetteh, Ernestina; Jou, Ying-Ming; Papadopoulos, Kyriakos P.; Moreno, Victor; Kaiser, Brianne; Yap, Timothy A.; Yan, Li; de Bono, Johann S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose KRAS is the most commonly mutated oncogene in human tumours. KRAS-mutant cells may exhibit resistance to the allosteric MEK1/2 inhibitor selumetinib (AZD6244; ARRY-142886) and allosteric AKT inhibitors (such as MK-2206), the combination of which may overcome resistance to both monotherapies. Experimental Design We conducted a dose/schedule-finding study evaluating MK-2206 and selumetinib in patients with advanced treatment-refractory solid tumours. Recommended dosing schedules were defined as MK-2206 135 mg weekly and selumetinib 100 mg once-daily. Results Grade 3 rash was the most common dose-limiting toxicity (DLT); other DLTs included grade 4 lipase increase, grade 3 stomatitis, diarrhoea, and fatigue, and grade 3 and grade 2 retinal pigment epithelium detachment. There were no meaningful pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. Clinical anti-tumour activity included RECIST 1.0-confirmed partial responses in non-small cell lung cancer and low-grade ovarian carcinoma. Conclusion Responses in KRAS-mutant cancers were generally durable. Clinical co-targeting of MEK and AKT signalling may be an important therapeutic strategy in KRAS-driven human malignancies (Trial NCT number NCT01021748). PMID:25516890

  2. Use of Irradiated Foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brynjolfsson, A.

    1985-01-01

    The safety of irradiated foods is reviewed. Guidelines and regulations for processing irradiated foods are considered. The radiolytic products formed in food when it is irradiated and its wholesomeness is discussed. It is concluded that food irradiation processing is not a panacea for all problems in food processing but when properly used will serve the space station well.

  3. Phyllodes tumours of the breast: a consensus review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Benjamin Y; Acs, Geza; Apple, Sophia K; Badve, Sunil; Bleiweiss, Ira J; Brogi, Edi; Calvo, José P; Dabbs, David J; Ellis, Ian O; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Farshid, Gelareh; Fox, Stephen B; Ichihara, Shu; Lakhani, Sunil R; Rakha, Emad A; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Richardson, Andrea L; Sahin, Aysegul; Schmitt, Fernando C; Schnitt, Stuart J; Siziopikou, Kalliopi P; Soares, Fernando A; Tse, Gary M; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumours constitute an uncommon but complex group of mammary fibroepithelial lesions. Accurate and reproducible grading of these tumours has long been challenging, owing to the need to assess multiple stratified histological parameters, which may be weighted differently by individual pathologists. Distinction of benign phyllodes tumours from cellular fibroadenomas is fraught with difficulty, due to overlapping microscopic features. Similarly, separation of the malignant phyllodes tumour from spindle cell metaplastic carcinoma and primary breast sarcoma can be problematic. Phyllodes tumours are treated by surgical excision. However, there is no consensus on the definition of an appropriate surgical margin to ensure completeness of excision and reduction of recurrence risk. Interpretive subjectivity, overlapping histological diagnostic criteria, suboptimal correlation between histological classification and clinical behaviour and the lack of robust molecular predictors of outcome make further investigation of the pathogenesis of these fascinating tumours a matter of active research. This review consolidates the current understanding of their pathobiology and clinical behaviour, and includes proposals for a rational approach to the classification and management of phyllodes tumours.

  4. Phyllodes tumours of the breast: a consensus review

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Benjamin Y; Acs, Geza; Apple, Sophia K; Badve, Sunil; Bleiweiss, Ira J; Brogi, Edi; Calvo, José P; Dabbs, David J; Ellis, Ian O; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Farshid, Gelareh; Fox, Stephen B; Ichihara, Shu; Lakhani, Sunil R; Rakha, Emad A; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Richardson, Andrea L; Sahin, Aysegul; Schmitt, Fernando C; Schnitt, Stuart J; Siziopikou, Kalliopi P; Soares, Fernando A; Tse, Gary M; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumours constitute an uncommon but complex group of mammary fibroepithelial lesions. Accurate and reproducible grading of these tumours has long been challenging, owing to the need to assess multiple stratified histological parameters, which may be weighted differently by individual pathologists. Distinction of benign phyllodes tumours from cellular fibroadenomas is fraught with difficulty, due to overlapping microscopic features. Similarly, separation of the malignant phyllodes tumour from spindle cell metaplastic carcinoma and primary breast sarcoma can be problematic. Phyllodes tumours are treated by surgical excision. However, there is no consensus on the definition of an appropriate surgical margin to ensure completeness of excision and reduction of recurrence risk. Interpretive subjectivity, overlapping histological diagnostic criteria, suboptimal correlation between histological classification and clinical behaviour and the lack of robust molecular predictors of outcome make further investigation of the pathogenesis of these fascinating tumours a matter of active research. This review consolidates the current understanding of their pathobiology and clinical behaviour, and includes proposals for a rational approach to the classification and management of phyllodes tumours. PMID:26768026

  5. Resected tumours of the sublingual gland: 15 years' experience.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tung-Tsun; Chou, Yu-Fu; Wen, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Peir-Rong

    2016-07-01

    Sublingual gland tumours are rare, and we have evaluated the clinical features and prognosis of patients treated at a tertiary medical centre in eastern Taiwan. We retrospectively reviewed the cases of nine patients with sublingual gland tumours that were resected from December 1993 to November 2008, four of whom were men and five women. The median (range) age at diagnosis was 52 (39-63) years. Seven had malignant tumours, of which adenoid cystic carcinoma was the most common. All patients with malignant tumours had neck dissections, and four had cervical lymph node metastases. The incidence of lymph node metastases was much higher in patients with advanced primary tumours (T1/2 compared with T3/4: one out of three compared with three out of four). All patients with malignant tumours were given adjuvant radiotherapy. There were no local failures. One patient had regional recurrence in the neck and had a successful further resection. Three patients developed distant metastases, and two died during the follow-up period. Our results suggest that radical resection with postoperative radiotherapy offers adequate local and regional control for malignant sublingual gland tumours. Neck dissection is beneficial, especially for T3/4 disease.

  6. Phyllodes tumours of the breast: a consensus review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Benjamin Y; Acs, Geza; Apple, Sophia K; Badve, Sunil; Bleiweiss, Ira J; Brogi, Edi; Calvo, José P; Dabbs, David J; Ellis, Ian O; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Farshid, Gelareh; Fox, Stephen B; Ichihara, Shu; Lakhani, Sunil R; Rakha, Emad A; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Richardson, Andrea L; Sahin, Aysegul; Schmitt, Fernando C; Schnitt, Stuart J; Siziopikou, Kalliopi P; Soares, Fernando A; Tse, Gary M; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumours constitute an uncommon but complex group of mammary fibroepithelial lesions. Accurate and reproducible grading of these tumours has long been challenging, owing to the need to assess multiple stratified histological parameters, which may be weighted differently by individual pathologists. Distinction of benign phyllodes tumours from cellular fibroadenomas is fraught with difficulty, due to overlapping microscopic features. Similarly, separation of the malignant phyllodes tumour from spindle cell metaplastic carcinoma and primary breast sarcoma can be problematic. Phyllodes tumours are treated by surgical excision. However, there is no consensus on the definition of an appropriate surgical margin to ensure completeness of excision and reduction of recurrence risk. Interpretive subjectivity, overlapping histological diagnostic criteria, suboptimal correlation between histological classification and clinical behaviour and the lack of robust molecular predictors of outcome make further investigation of the pathogenesis of these fascinating tumours a matter of active research. This review consolidates the current understanding of their pathobiology and clinical behaviour, and includes proposals for a rational approach to the classification and management of phyllodes tumours. PMID:26768026

  7. An Evolutionary Hybrid Cellular Automaton Model of Solid Tumour Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gerlee, P.; Anderson, A.R.A.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a cellular automaton model of solid tumour growth, in which each cell is equipped with a micro-environment response network. This network is modelled using a feed-forward artificial neural network, that takes environmental variables as an input and from these determines the cellular behaviour as the output. The response of the network is determined by connection weights and thresholds in the network, which are subject to mutations when the cells divide. As both available space and nutrients are limited resources for the tumour this gives rise to clonal evolution where only the fittest cells survive. Using this approach we have investigated the impact of the tissue oxygen concentration on the growth and evolutionary dynamics of the tumour. The results show that the oxygen concentration affects the selection pressure, cell population diversity and morphology of the tumour. A low oxygen concentration in the tissue gives rise to a tumour with a fingered morphology that contains aggressive phenotypes with a small apoptotic potential, while a high oxygen concentration in the tissue gives rise to a tumour with a round morphology containing less evolved phenotypes. The tissue oxygen concentration thus affects the tumour at both the morphological level and on the phenotype level. PMID:17374383

  8. A clinicopathologic study of 196 intraoral minor salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Lopes, M A; Kowalski, L P; da Cunha Santos, G; Paes de Almeida, O

    1999-07-01

    We present a retrospective study of 196 patients with intraoral minor salivary gland tumours, 128 malignant and 68 benign, diagnosed from 1954 to 1993 in the A. C. Camargo Hospital, São Paulo, Brazil. Sixty-five percent of the cases occurred in the palate, followed by tongue (9.7%) and retromolar area (6.1%). Pleomorphic adenoma was the most common benign tumour, and mucoepidermoid carcinoma was predominant among the malignant tumours. Surgery was the main treatment method and postoperative radiotherapy and radiotherapy alone were used in 40 and 15 patients, respectively. Local recurrence was observed in two patients with pleomorphic adenoma and in eight patients with malignant tumours. Regional lymph node metastases occurred in four cases and distant metastases in five. Forty-six of 47 patients with benign tumours who were followed up from 1 to 7 years were alive without disease. Twenty-four of 79 patients with malignant tumours who were followed up for at least 5 years died due the tumour and 47 were alive without disease.

  9. Requirements regarding dose rate and exposure time for killing of tumour cells in beta particle radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Veronika; Stenerlöw, Bo; Lundqvist, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify combinations of dose rate and exposure time that have the potential to provide curative treatment with targeted radionuclide therapy applying low dose rate beta irradiation. Methods Five tumour cell lines, U-373MG and U-118MG gliomas, HT-29 colon carcinoma, A-431 cervical squamous carcinoma and SKBR-3 breast cancer, were used. An experimental model with 105 tumour cells in each sample was irradiated with low dose rate beta particles. The criterion for successful treatment was absence of recovery of cells during a follow-up period of 3 months. The initial dose rates were in the range 0.1–0.8 Gy/h, and the cells were continuously exposed for 1, 3 or 7 days. These combinations covered dose rates and doses achievable in targeted radionuclide therapy. Results Continuous irradiation with dose rates of 0.2–0.3 and 0.4–0.6 Gy/h for 7 and 3 days, respectively, could kill all cells in each tumour cell sample. These treatments gave total radiation doses of 30–40 Gy. However, when exposed for just 24 h with about 0.8 Gy/h, only the SKBR-3 cells were successfully treated; all the other cell types recovered. There were large cell type-dependent variations in the growth delay patterns for the cultures that recovered. The U-118MG cells were most resistant and the U-373MG and SKBR-3 cells most sensitive to the treatments. The HT-29 and A-431 cells were intermediate. Conclusion The results serve as a guideline for the combinations of dose rate and exposure time necessary to kill tumour cells when applying low dose rate beta irradiation. The shift from recovery to “cure” fell within a narrow range of dose rate and exposure time combinations. PMID:16718515

  10. A novel charged trinuclear platinum complex effective against cisplatin-resistant tumours: hypersensitivity of p53-mutant human tumour xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Pratesi, G; Perego, P; Polizzi, D; Righetti, S C; Supino, R; Caserini, C; Manzotti, C; Giuliani, F C; Pezzoni, G; Tognella, S; Spinelli, S; Farrell, N; Zunino, F

    1999-01-01

    Multinuclear platinum compounds were rationally designed to bind to DNA in a different manner from that of cisplatin and its mononuclear analogues. A triplatinum compound of the series (BBR 3464) was selected for preclinical development, since, in spite of its charged nature, it was very potent as cytotoxic agent and effective against cisplatin-resistant tumour cells. Anti-tumour efficacy studies were performed in a panel of human tumour xenografts refractory or poorly responsive to cisplatin. The novel platinum compound exhibited efficacy in all tested tumours and an impressive efficacy (including complete tumour regressions) was displayed in two lung carcinoma models, CaLu-3 and POCS. Surprisingly, BBR 3464 showed a superior activity against p53-mutant tumours as compared to those carrying the wild-type gene. The involvement of p53 in tumour response was investigated in an osteosarcoma cell line, SAOS, which is null for p53 and is highly sensitive to BBR 3464, and in the same cells following introduction of the wild-type p53 gene. Thus the pattern of cellular response was investigated in a panel of human tumour cells with a different p53 gene status. The results showed that the transfer of functional p53 resulted in a marked (tenfold) reduction of cellular chemosensitivity to the multinuclear platinum complex but in a moderate sensitization to cisplatin. In addition, in contrast to cisplatin, the triplatinum complex was very effective as an inducer of apoptosis in a lung carcinoma cell line carrying mutant p53. The peculiar pattern of anti-tumour activity of the triplatinum complex and its ability to induce p53-independent cell death may have relevant pharmacological implications, since p53, a critical protein involved in DNA repair and induction of apoptosis by conventional DNA-damaging agents, is defective in several human tumours. We suggest that the peculiar DNA binding properties of the triplatinum complex may contribute to the striking profile of anti-tumour

  11. Rapid recruitment of macrophages in interleukin-12-mediated tumour regression.

    PubMed Central

    Ha, S J; Lee, S B; Kim, C M; Shin, H S; Sung, Y C

    1998-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of interleukin-12 (IL-12) antitumour activity, RH7777 rat hepatoma cells were engineered to express mouse IL-12 (mIL-12) (RH7777/mIL-12) under the tight control of doxycycline (dox). The production of the mIL-12 protein was regulated by the concentration of dox that was present in the culture medium. RH7777/mIL-12 cells appeared to have the same tumorigenic activity as did parental RH7777 cells, when subcutaneously injected into syngeneic rat (BUF/N) in the absence of dox. However, the tumorigenicity of RH7777/mIL-12, but not RH7777, cells were significantly decreased when dox was administrated to the animals. In addition, established tumours of RH7777/mIL-12 cells gradually disappeared upon the induction of mIL-12 by dox. To elucidate the kinetic profile of immune cells involved in the mIL-12-induced tumour regression, both histological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed 1, 3 and 14 days after the dox treatment on rats bearing tumours that were approximately 0. 5 cm in diameter. Tumour-infiltrating macrophages began to appear at the tumour site one day after dox treatment. As time elapsed, the number of tumour infiltrates including CD4+, CD8+, natural killer (NK) cells and macrophages gradually increased. In particular, CD8+ and NK cells constituted the major population of the tumour-infiltrated cells. Furthermore, it was found that resting peritoneal macrophages (PM) from rats were chemoattracted in response to mIL-12. The effects of mIL-12 on PM chemotaxis were reproducibly observed in concentrations as low as 0.1 ng/ml. These findings suggest that IL-12 can directly recruit macrophages into tumour sites which, in turn, leads to a broad and intense immunological response against tumour. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9767471

  12. Gelatinase B/MMP-9 in Tumour Pathogenesis and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Antonietta Rosella; Mackay, Andrew Reay

    2014-01-01

    Since its original identification as a leukocyte gelatinase/type V collagenase and tumour type IV collagenase, gelatinase B/matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 is now recognised as playing a central role in many aspects of tumour progression. In this review, we relate current concepts concerning the many ways in which gelatinase B/MMP-9 influences tumour biology. Following a brief outline of the gelatinase B/MMP-9 gene and protein, we analyse the role(s) of gelatinase B/MMP-9 in different phases of the tumorigenic process, and compare the importance of gelatinase B/MMP-9 source in the carcinogenic process. What becomes apparent is the importance of inflammatory cell-derived gelatinase B/MMP-9 in tumour promotion, early progression and triggering of the “angiogenic switch”, the integral relationship between inflammatory, stromal and tumour components with respect to gelatinase B/MMP-9 production and activation, and the fundamental role for gelatinase B/MMP-9 in the formation and maintenance of tumour stem cell and metastatic niches. It is also apparent that gelatinase B/MMP-9 plays important tumour suppressing functions, producing endogenous angiogenesis inhibitors, promoting inflammatory anti-tumour activity, and inducing apoptosis. The fundamental roles of gelatinase B/MMP-9 in cancer biology underpins the need for specific therapeutic inhibitors of gelatinase B/MMP-9 function, the use of which must take into account and substitute for tumour-suppressing gelatinase B/MMP-9 activity and also limit inhibition of physiological gelatinase B/MMP-9 function. PMID:24473089

  13. Inhibition of Lysyl Oxidase and Lysyl Oxidase-Like Enzymes Has Tumour-Promoting and Tumour-Suppressing Roles in Experimental Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Maria; Adamo, Hanibal; Bergh, Anders; Halin Bergström, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) and LOX-like (LOXL) enzymes are key players in extracellular matrix deposition and maturation. LOX promote tumour progression and metastasis, but it may also have tumour-inhibitory effects. Here we show that orthotopic implantation of rat prostate AT-1 tumour cells increased LOX and LOXLs mRNA expressions in the tumour and in the surrounding non-malignant prostate tissue. Inhibition of LOX enzymes, using Beta-aminopropionitrile (BAPN), initiated before implantation of AT-1 cells, reduced tumour growth. Conversely, treatment that was started after the tumours were established resulted in unaffected or increased tumour growth. Moreover, treatment with BAPN did not suppress the formation of spontaneous lymph node metastases, or lung tumour burden, when tumour cells were injected intravenously. A temporal decrease in collagen fibre content, which is a target for LOX, was observed in tumours and in the tumour-adjacent prostate tissue. This may explain why early BAPN treatment is more effective in inhibiting tumour growth compared to treatment initiated later. Our data suggest that the enzymatic function of the LOX family is context-dependent, with both tumour-suppressing and tumour-promoting properties in prostate cancer. Further investigations are needed to understand the circumstances under which LOX inhibition may be used as a therapeutic target for cancer patients. PMID:26804196

  14. Detection of irradiated liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shengchu, Qi; Jilan, Wu; Rongyao, Yuan

    D-2,3-butanediol is formed by irradiation processes in irradiated liquors. This radiolytic product is not formed in unirradiated liquors and its presence can therefore be used to identify whether a liquor has been irradiated or not. The relation meso/dl≈1 for 2,3-butanediol and the amount present in irradiated liquors may therefore be used as an indication of the dose used in the irradiation.

  15. Sympathetic nervous system regulation of the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.; Nagaraja, Archana S.; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Green, Paige A.; Sood, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral autonomic nervous system (ANS) is known to regulate gene expression in primary tumours and their surrounding microenvironment. Activation of the sympathetic division of the ANS in particular modulates gene expression programs that promote metastasis of solid tumours by stimulating macrophage infiltration, inflammation, angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and tumour invasion, and by inhibiting cellular immune responses and programmed cell death. Haematological cancers are modulated by sympathetic nervous system (SNS) regulation of stem cell biology and hematopoietic differentiation programs. In addition to identifying a molecular basis for physiologic stress effects on cancer, these findings have also identified new pharmacologic strategies to inhibit cancer progression in vivo. PMID:26299593

  16. Candidate genes and potential targets for therapeutics in Wilms' tumour.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Christopher; Coppes, Max J; Narendran, Aru

    2010-09-01

    Wilms' tumour (WT) is the most common malignant renal tumour of childhood. During the past two decades or so, molecular studies carried out on biopsy specimens and tumour-derived cell lines have identified a multitude of chromosomal and epigenetic alterations in WT. In addition, a significant amount of evidence has been gathered to identify the genes and signalling pathways that play a defining role in its genesis, growth, survival and treatment responsiveness. As such, these molecules and mechanisms constitute potential targets for novel therapeutic strategies for refractory WT. In this report we aim to review some of the many candidate genes and intersecting pathways that underlie the complexities of WT biology.

  17. Spectral and lifetime domain measurements of rat brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi Haidar, D.; Leh, B.; Allaoua, K.; Genoux, A.; Siebert, R.; Steffenhagen, M.; Peyrot, D.; Sandeau, N.; Vever-Bizet, C.; Bourg-Heckly, G.; Chebbi, I.; Collado-Hilly, M.

    2012-02-01

    During glioblastoma surgery, delineation of the brain tumour margins remains difficult especially since infiltrated and normal tissues have the same visual appearance. This problematic constitutes our research interest. We developed a fibre-optical fluorescence probe for spectroscopic and time domain measurements. First measurements of endogenous tissue fluorescence were performed on fresh and fixed rat tumour brain slices. Spectral characteristics, fluorescence redox ratios and fluorescence lifetime measurements were analysed. Fluorescence information collected from both, lifetime and spectroscopic experiments, appeared promising for tumour tissue discrimination. Two photon measurements were performed on the same fixed tissue. Different wavelengths are used to acquire two-photon excitation-fluorescence of tumorous and healthy sites.

  18. Benign mixed salivary-type tumour of the breast.

    PubMed

    Betta, P G; Spinoglio, G

    1992-06-01

    A case of benign mixed salivary-type tumour of the breast is described. This is a rare neoplasm, only 20 cases having been reported to date, characterized by a mixture of epithelial and mesenchymal components, as in similar tumours occurring in the salivary glands and skin. Because this tumour frequently simulates carcinoma clinically, mammographically and histologically, familiarity of both the surgeon and pathologist with this lesion is essential, to avoid the overdiagnosis of malignancy, unfortunately initially made in nearly 50% of previously reported cases.

  19. [Quantitative study on nucleolar organizer regions in salivary gland tumours].

    PubMed

    Wang, S Z

    1992-03-01

    The argyrophil staining technique for nucleolar organizer regions (NOR) had been applied to a series of benign and malignant salivary gland tumours. We have studied 38 salivary gland tumours, 16 benign and 22 malignant. In all specimens clearly defined silver-stained intranuclear AgNOR dots were visible. The differences between the numbers of AgNORs in the benign and malignant groups, notably pleomorphic adenomas, adenoid cystic carcinoma, mucoepidermoid carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, were highly significant. This result suggested that the AgNOR technique is of diagnostic help in distinguishing between these salivary gland tumours.

  20. Long term follow up of 69 patients treated for optic pathway tumours before the chemotherapy era

    PubMed Central

    Cappelli, C; Grill, J; Raquin, M; Pierre-Kahn, A; Lellouch-Tubiana, A; Terrier-Lacombe, M; Habrand, J; Couanet, D; Brauner, R; Rodriguez, D; Hartmann, O; Kalifa, C

    1998-01-01

    AIM—To analyse the long term results of conservative management with radiotherapy in patients with optic pathway tumours.
DESIGN—All 69 patients were symptomatic at diagnosis and most neoplasms involved the optic chiasm and hypothalamus.
RESULTS—At 10 years, overall survival and progression free survival were 83% and 65.5%, respectively. After radiotherapy, vision improved in 18 patients and remained stable in 29 other patients. Cerebrovascular complications occurred in nine of 53 patients treated with radiotherapy after a median interval of two and a half years. These complications were five times more frequent in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Severe intellectual disabilities were present in 18 children, most of whom underwent irradiation at a very young age (median age, 4years).
IMPLICATIONS—Radiotherapy is a valuable treatment in terms of tumour response, visual outcome, and progression free survival. However, in young children and in patients with NF1, major sequelae are encountered and new treatment strategies should be proposed for these patients.

 PMID:9875044

  1. Precise image-guided irradiation of small animals: a flexible non-profit platform.

    PubMed

    Tillner, Falk; Thute, Prasad; Löck, Steffen; Dietrich, Antje; Fursov, Andriy; Haase, Robert; Lukas, Mathias; Rimarzig, Bernd; Sobiella, Manfred; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael; Bütof, Rebecca; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2016-04-21

    Preclinical in vivo studies using small animals are essential to develop new therapeutic options in radiation oncology. Of particular interest are orthotopic tumour models, which better reflect the clinical situation in terms of growth patterns and microenvironmental parameters of the tumour as well as the interplay of tumours with the surrounding normal tissues. Such orthotopic models increase the technical demands and the complexity of preclinical studies as local irradiation with therapeutically relevant doses requires image-guided target localisation and accurate beam application. Moreover, advanced imaging techniques are needed for monitoring treatment outcome. We present a novel small animal image-guided radiation therapy (SAIGRT) system, which allows for precise and accurate, conformal irradiation and x-ray imaging of small animals. High accuracy is achieved by its robust construction, the precise movement of its components and a fast high-resolution flat-panel detector. Field forming and x-ray imaging is accomplished close to the animal resulting in a small penumbra and a high image quality. Feasibility for irradiating orthotopic models has been proven using lung tumour and glioblastoma models in mice. The SAIGRT system provides a flexible, non-profit academic research platform which can be adapted to specific experimental needs and therefore enables systematic preclinical trials in multicentre research networks.

  2. Precise image-guided irradiation of small animals: a flexible non-profit platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillner, Falk; Thute, Prasad; Löck, Steffen; Dietrich, Antje; Fursov, Andriy; Haase, Robert; Lukas, Mathias; Rimarzig, Bernd; Sobiella, Manfred; Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael; Bütof, Rebecca; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Preclinical in vivo studies using small animals are essential to develop new therapeutic options in radiation oncology. Of particular interest are orthotopic tumour models, which better reflect the clinical situation in terms of growth patterns and microenvironmental parameters of the tumour as well as the interplay of tumours with the surrounding normal tissues. Such orthotopic models increase the technical demands and the complexity of preclinical studies as local irradiation with therapeutically relevant doses requires image-guided target localisation and accurate beam application. Moreover, advanced imaging techniques are needed for monitoring treatment outcome. We present a novel small animal image-guided radiation therapy (SAIGRT) system, which allows for precise and accurate, conformal irradiation and x-ray imaging of small animals. High accuracy is achieved by its robust construction, the precise movement of its components and a fast high-resolution flat-panel detector. Field forming and x-ray imaging is accomplished close to the animal resulting in a small penumbra and a high image quality. Feasibility for irradiating orthotopic models has been proven using lung tumour and glioblastoma models in mice. The SAIGRT system provides a flexible, non-profit academic research platform which can be adapted to specific experimental needs and therefore enables systematic preclinical trials in multicentre research networks.

  3. A usual cause of tumoural mass of the index finger

    PubMed Central

    Atik, Aziz; Ozyurek, Selahattin; Meric, Gokhan

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of an unusual appearance of a tumoural mass on the right index finger. A 52-year-old farmer was administered to our outpatient clinic due to a large tumoural mass in his right index finger. He has been reporting of the mass for 32 years. Upon examination there was a rubbery soft, fixed, painless tumoural mass on the right index finger, covering all proximal phalanx volar and dorsal causing no surface skin reaction. The entire mass was excised and sent for pathological examination. The pathological result was a fatty degenerated fibroma. This kind of tumour may easily be misinterpreted as a lipoma even radiologically. So it is believed that any surgeon should always be suspicious of the diagnosis of long-term masses of any kind. PMID:24842364

  4. Augmenting drug–carrier compatibility improves tumour nanotherapy efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yiming; Fay, François; Hak, Sjoerd; Manuel Perez-Aguilar, Jose; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Goode, Brandon; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Bjørkøy, Astrid; Weinstein, Harel; Fayad, Zahi A.; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of cancer nanotherapy is to use nanoparticles as carriers for targeted delivery of anti-tumour agents. The drug–carrier association after intravenous administration is essential for efficient drug delivery to the tumour. However, a large number of currently available nanocarriers are self-assembled nanoparticles whose drug-loading stability is critically affected by the in vivo environment. Here we used in vivo FRET imaging to systematically investigate how drug–carrier compatibility affects drug release in a tumour mouse model. We found the drug's hydrophobicity and miscibility with the nanoparticles are two independent key parameters that determine its accumulation in the tumour. Next, we applied these findings to improve chemotherapeutic delivery by augmenting the parent drug's compatibility; as a result, we achieved better antitumour efficacy. Our results help elucidate nanomedicines' in vivo fate and provide guidelines for efficient drug delivery. PMID:27071376

  5. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  6. Tumours with cancer stem cells: A PDE model.

    PubMed

    Fasano, A; Mancini, A; Primicerio, M

    2016-02-01

    The role of cancer stem cells (CSC) in tumour growth has received increasing attention in the recent literature. Here we stem from an integro-differential system describing the evolution of a population of CSC and of ordinary (non-stem) tumour cells formulated and studied in a previous paper, and we investigate an approximation in which the system reduces to a pair of nonlinear coupled parabolic equation. We prove that the new system is well posed and we examine some general properties. Numerical simulations show more on the qualitative behaviour of the solutions, concerning in particular the so-called tumour paradox, according to which an increase of the mortality rate of ordinary (non-stem) tumour cells results asymptotically in a faster growth.

  7. Solitary fibrous tumour extending both supratentorially and infratentorially.

    PubMed

    Secer, Halil Ibrahim; Gonul, Engin; Onguru, Onder; Izci, Yusuf

    2008-07-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFT) of the central nervous system are rare. Such lesions are mesenchymal neoplasms that resemble meningioma. To date, 73 cases of SFT have been reported in the literature, but there is no reported case of an SFT that extends into both the supratentorial and infratentorial spaces. A 76-year-old man presented with headache, dysarthria and ataxia of 2 months' duration. MRI revealed a right cerebellar tumour, extending superiorly to the occipital lobe. During surgery, a huge, solid and well-capsulated tumour was observed. The tentorium cerebelli was also damaged by the tumour. Histological and immunohistochemical studies confirmed the diagnosis of SFT. This is the first reported case of SFT located in both the infratentorial and supratentorial spaces. SFT are spindle cell neoplasms with a characteristic immunohistochemical profile of CD34, vimentin and bcl-2 positivity.

  8. Augmenting drug-carrier compatibility improves tumour nanotherapy efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yiming; Fay, François; Hak, Sjoerd; Manuel Perez-Aguilar, Jose; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Goode, Brandon; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Bjørkøy, Astrid; Weinstein, Harel; Fayad, Zahi A.; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2016-04-01

    A major goal of cancer nanotherapy is to use nanoparticles as carriers for targeted delivery of anti-tumour agents. The drug-carrier association after intravenous administration is essential for efficient drug delivery to the tumour. However, a large number of currently available nanocarriers are self-assembled nanoparticles whose drug-loading stability is critically affected by the in vivo environment. Here we used in vivo FRET imaging to systematically investigate how drug-carrier compatibility affects drug release in a tumour mouse model. We found the drug's hydrophobicity and miscibility with the nanoparticles are two independent key parameters that determine its accumulation in the tumour. Next, we applied these findings to improve chemotherapeutic delivery by augmenting the parent drug's compatibility; as a result, we achieved better antitumour efficacy. Our results help elucidate nanomedicines' in vivo fate and provide guidelines for efficient drug delivery.

  9. Multiple synchronous primary tumours in a single lobe

    PubMed Central

    Sepehripour, Amir H.; Nasir, Abdul; Shah, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    We present the case of a 70-year-old man with three synchronous histologically different primary tumours in the same lobe. He initially presented with an intermittent productive cough, dyspnoea and non-specific abdominal pains. Radiological investigation revealed three areas of high-intensity fludeoxyglucose uptake of varying size within the right upper lobe. He underwent thoracoscopic right upper lobectomy. Histological analysis confirmed the three lesions to be undifferentiated squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and atypical adenomatous hyperplasia. The reclassification of the T descriptors of the tumour–node–metastasis staging of a lung cancer has lead to the transition of classification of tumour nodules in the ipsilateral primary tumour lobe from T4 to T3. In the case of our patient, this has lead to the downstaging of the tumour allowing consideration for surgical management. PMID:22159234

  10. Comparing nodal versus bony metastatic spread using tumour phylogenies

    PubMed Central

    Mangiola, Stefano; Hong, Matthew K. H.; Cmero, Marek; Kurganovs, Natalie; Ryan, Andrew; Costello, Anthony J.; Corcoran, Niall M.; Macintyre, Geoff; Hovens, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    The role of lymph node metastases in distant prostate cancer dissemination and lethality is ill defined. Patients with metastases restricted to lymph nodes have a better prognosis than those with distant metastatic spread, suggesting the possibility of distinct aetiologies. To explore this, we traced patterns of cancer dissemination using tumour phylogenies inferred from genome-wide copy-number profiling of 48 samples across 3 patients with lymph node metastatic disease and 3 patients with osseous metastatic disease. Our results show that metastatic cells in regional lymph nodes originate from evolutionary advanced extraprostatic tumour cells rather than less advanced central tumour cell populations. In contrast, osseous metastases do not exhibit such a constrained developmental lineage, arising from either intra or extraprostatic tumour cell populations, at early and late stages in the evolution of the primary. Collectively, this comparison suggests that lymph node metastases may not be an intermediate developmental step for distant osseous metastases, but rather represent a distinct metastatic lineage. PMID:27653089

  11. Loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 16 in sporadic Wilms' tumour.

    PubMed Central

    Grundy, R. G.; Pritchard, J.; Scambler, P.; Cowell, J. K.

    1998-01-01

    To establish whether loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for chromosome 16q in Wilms' tumours confers an adverse prognosis, DNA from 40 Wilms' tumour/normal pairs were analysed using highly polymorphic microsatellite markers along the length of 16q. Fifteen per cent of tumours showed LOH for 16q. Although the common region of allele loss spanned the 16q24-qter region, a second distinct region of LOH was identified in 16q21. Five out of six tumours showing LOH were either (1) high stage or (2) low stage with unfavourable histology. In addition, there was a higher mortality rate in patients showing LOH for 16q than those that did not. These data strongly support the suggestion that LOH for 16q is associated with an adverse prognosis. Images Figure 1 PMID:9820177

  12. Benign Multicystic Peritoneal Mesothelioma: A Rare Tumour of the Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, Soundappan; Khajanchi, Monty; Vaja, Tejas; Jajoo, Bhushan; Dey, Amit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Benign multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma: a rare tumor of the abdomen, is a diagnostic dilemma. This report emphasizes the importance of diagnostic laparoscopy in the diagnosis of the tumour. PMID:25866695

  13. Accounting for treatment delays when treating highly proliferative tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Lois; Metcalfe, Peter; Hoban, Peter

    1999-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the possibility of increasing the dose per fraction or increasing the number of fractions to account for treatment delays occurring during radiotheraphy treatments for highly proliferative tumours. The linear quadratic model with time was used to determine the difference in biological effective dose (BED) for the original schedule and the schedule including a treatment delay. Tables of extra fractions and extra dose per fraction required to account for a number of possible delays have been determined. It has been shown that for tumours with very short potential doubling times it is best to deliver the extra dose as an increase in dose per fraction rather than an increase in the number of fractions, while for tumours with moderately short potential doubling times (above 7 days) the reverse is true. The equivalent uninterrupted schedules, which would have delivered the same effects to the tumour, have also been determined.

  14. Functional properties of ion channels and transporters in tumour vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Fiorio Pla, Alessandra; Munaron, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Vascularization is crucial for solid tumour growth and invasion, providing metabolic support and sustaining metastatic dissemination. It is now accepted that ion channels and transporters play a significant role in driving the cancer growth at all stages. They may represent novel therapeutic, diagnostic and prognostic targets for anti-cancer therapies. On the other hand, although the expression and role of ion channels and transporters in the vascular endothelium is well recognized and subject of recent reviews, only recently has their involvement in tumour vascularization been recognized. Here, we review the current literature on ion channels and transporters directly involved in the angiogenic process. Particular interest will be focused on tumour angiogenesis in vivo as well as in the different steps that drive this process in vitro, such as endothelial cell proliferation, migration, adhesion and tubulogenesis. Moreover, we compare the ‘transportome’ system of tumour vascular network with the physiological one. PMID:24493751

  15. Natural cytotoxicity of haemopoietic cell populations against murine lymphoid tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Burton, R. C.; Grail, D.; Warner, N. L.

    1978-01-01

    Homozygous nude and normal mice of 3 strains, BALB/c, CBA and C57BL, were used as sources of nucleated haemopoietic "natural killer" (NK) cells. These killer cells could lyse a wide range of syngeneic and allogeneic lymphoid tumour cell lines in vitro, and it was found that cell suspensions from nude mice were always significantly more active than those from normal mice, and that the most active effector population was a polymorph-enriched peritoneal-exudate cell suspension. Eosinophils did not appear to be involved in the phenomenon, and mononuclear peritoneal-exudate cell suspensions were actually highly inhibitory. Three non-lymphoid tumours, a carcinoma, a fibrosarcoma and a mastocytoma, were totally resistant to in vitro lysis. Although all susceptible tumour cell lines were C-type virus-associated, not all of these tumours were killed by all strain sources of spleen cells, indicating a specificity of killing. PMID:656308

  16. Symptomatic syringomyelia secondary to clinically obscure infratentorial tumour.

    PubMed

    Bouras, T I; Kouyialis, A T; Boviatsis, E J; Sakas, D E

    2006-02-01

    The formation of a cervical spinal cord syrinx as a result of an infratentorial mass, even though uncommon, has been reported in international literature. In such cases, syringomyelia is usually asymptomatic, while the tumour-related symptoms and signs predominate. We report a patient with a posterior fossa tumour and secondary syringomyelia. In this patient, syringomyelia symptoms and signs were present, and a cervical spine Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) showed a large cervical syrinx. A more careful clinical examination though, revealed a sub-clinical posterior fossa syndrome and brain MRI revealed a large infratentorial meningioma. A posterior fossa craniotomy was performed, followed by complete tumour resection and almost complete remission of the syrinx and its related symptoms. The authors discuss the role of posterior fossa tumour induced tonsillar herniation in the development of secondary syringomyelia, the mechanisms leading to syrinx formation and the conditions that must be fulfilled for that to happen.

  17. Augmenting drug-carrier compatibility improves tumour nanotherapy efficacy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yiming; Fay, François; Hak, Sjoerd; Manuel Perez-Aguilar, Jose; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L; Goode, Brandon; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Bjørkøy, Astrid; Weinstein, Harel; Fayad, Zahi A; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Mulder, Willem J M

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of cancer nanotherapy is to use nanoparticles as carriers for targeted delivery of anti-tumour agents. The drug-carrier association after intravenous administration is essential for efficient drug delivery to the tumour. However, a large number of currently available nanocarriers are self-assembled nanoparticles whose drug-loading stability is critically affected by the in vivo environment. Here we used in vivo FRET imaging to systematically investigate how drug-carrier compatibility affects drug release in a tumour mouse model. We found the drug's hydrophobicity and miscibility with the nanoparticles are two independent key parameters that determine its accumulation in the tumour. Next, we applied these findings to improve chemotherapeutic delivery by augmenting the parent drug's compatibility; as a result, we achieved better antitumour efficacy. Our results help elucidate nanomedicines' in vivo fate and provide guidelines for efficient drug delivery. PMID:27071376

  18. Augmenting drug–carrier compatibility improves tumour nanotherapy efficacy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhao, Yiming; Fay, Francois; Hak, Sjoerd; Manuel Perez-Aguilar, Jose; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Goode, Brandon; Duivenvoorden, Raphael; de Lange Davies, Catharina; Bjorkoy, Astrid; Weinstein, Harel; et al

    2016-04-13

    A major goal of cancer nanotherapy is to use nanoparticles as carriers for targeted delivery of anti-tumour agents. The drug–carrier association after intravenous administration is essential for efficient drug delivery to the tumour. However, a large number of currently available nanocarriers are self-assembled nanoparticles whose drug-loading stability is critically affected by the in vivo environment. Here we used in vivo FRET imaging to systematically investigate how drug–carrier compatibility affects drug release in a tumour mouse model. We found the drug’s hydrophobicity and miscibility with the nanoparticles are two independent key parameters that determine its accumulation in the tumour. Next, wemore » applied these findings to improve chemotherapeutic delivery by augmenting the parent drug’s compatibility; as a result, we achieved better antitumour efficacy. Lastly, our results help elucidate nanomedicines’ in vivo fate and provide guidelines for efficient drug delivery.« less

  19. [An ovarian mucinous borderline tumour with mixed mural nodules].

    PubMed

    Dhouibi, A; Denoux, Y; Touil, N; Devouassoux Shisheboran, M; Carbonnel, M; Baglin, A C

    2011-09-01

    The occurrence of mural nodules in serous or mucinous ovarian tumours is not frequent. Mural nodule can be developed in benign, borderline or malignant tumours. They can be benign, malignant or mixed type. Thus the prognosis of the ovarian tumour can be dramatically modified by the presence if these nodules. Eighty-two cases of mural nodules were reported in the literature, among which we account four cases of mixed nodules type. We report an additional case of mixed type mural nodules of anaplastic carcinoma and sarcoma-like developed in an ovarian mucinous borderline tumour at a 60-year-old woman.We give details about the classification, the differential diagnosis and prognosis of theses nodules.

  20. Albumin Metabolism in Rabbits and Rats with Transplanted Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Wraight, E. P.

    1971-01-01

    Albumin distributions and turnover rates have been studied using 131I labelled tracer material in rabbits with Vx2 carcinoma and rats bearing SP7 fibrosarcoma in comparison with control animals. Albumin concentrations were reduced in the tumour bearing animals but plasma volumes increased as the tumours developed. Relative increases were seen in the extravascular distribution of albumin, due partly to albumin pooling in and around the tumours and possibly also to general increases in capillary permeability. In the rats there was a considerable increase in the catabolic rate of albumin which was not related to urinary protein loss. The tumour bearing rabbits showed evidence both of increased catabolism and of decreased synthesis and the combination of the two effects resulted in a greater lowering of albumin concentration than was seen in the rats. Possible mechanisms for these findings and their significance in human malignant disease are discussed. PMID:5115834

  1. A case report of an intracaval extrathoracic solitary fibrous tumour

    PubMed Central

    Tiong, HY; Wang, S; Madhavan, K

    2013-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours are infrequent neoplasms based in the pleura that are predominantly benign with malignant pathology and behaviour described in 10–36% of cases. Extrathoracic solitary fibrous tumours (ESFTs) have been considered separately to their intrathoracic counterparts and comprise a third of all solitary fibrous tumours. The extrathoracic location was identified as an adverse prognostic factor for local recurrence but not for metastatic disease. So far, there have not been any reports of solitary fibrous tumours demonstrating caval infiltration. We present a case of a benign ESFT infiltrating into the perirenal inferior vena cava. Together with extrauterine leiomyomas, ESFTs should also be considered as a differential diagnosis for the rare benign lesions invading the inferior vena cava. PMID:23676804

  2. Circulating tumour cells and circulating free nucleic acid as prognostic and predictive biomarkers in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, S H; Becker, T M; Chua, W; Caixeiro, N J; Ng, W L; Kienzle, N; Tognela, A; Lumba, S; Rasko, J E J; de Souza, P; Spring, K J

    2014-04-28

    The detection of circulating tumour cells or circulating free tumour nucleic acids can potentially guide treatment and inform prognosis in colorectal cancer using minimally invasive "liquid biopsies". Current literature supports the notion that high circulating tumour cell counts or presence of tumour nucleic acid correlate with inferior clinical outcomes for patients, but they are not yet part of routine clinical care. Future research evolves around the examination of the molecular phenotype of circulating tumour cells. The key unanswered areas include differentiating between circulating tumour cell presence and their proliferative capacity and dormancy, identifying tumour heterogeneity and understanding the epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  3. Tumour progression and the nature of cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, W. H.

    1991-01-01

    The nature of neoplasia and its sometime end result, cancer, has been studied by exposition and explanation of the sequential lesions of tumour progression. Neoplastic lesions were divided into four classes on the basis of growth characteristics and whether lesional growth is confined to one or more tissue compartments. Class IA, the initial lesion, an orderly, probably clonal growth, usually differentiates and disappears. Class IB: Failure to differentiate accompanied by disorderly growth. Class IC: Randomly dispersed atypical cells, constituting a precursor state. Class II, intermediate lesions, apparently arising from the atypical cells, show temporally unrestricted growth within the tissue compartment of origin. Class III lesions, primary invasive cancers, show temporally unrestricted growth in two or more tissue compartments and metastasise along different paths, a property associated with extracellular matrix interaction. The metastatic pathways may result from different subsets of cells in the primary cancer. Class IV lesions are the metastases. It was concluded that, all neoplasms develop in the same way, have the same general behavioural characteristics, and, when malignant, all interact with the extracellular matrix of the primary and the secondary sites. The origins and development of cancer are considered to be pluralistic and not due to a discrete change in a cell, whose progeny, as a result of that discrete change, carries all of the information required to explain the almost limitless events of a neoplastic system. Images Figure 4 PMID:1911211

  4. Multiple brown tumours from parathyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dagang, Daryl Jade Tardo; Gutierrez, Jerico Baliton; Sandoval, Mark Anthony Santiago; Lantion-Ang, Frances Lina

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 29-year-old woman who suffered from severe bilateral inguinal pain and left mandibular mass. CT scan showed innumerable expansile osteolytic bone masses on the iliac wings, femur, ribs and vertebral bodies, diffuse skeletal osteopaenia, calyceal lithiasis on the right kidney and a left thyroid mass. Ionised calcium and intact parathyroid hormone (PTH) were elevated. Parathyroid sestamibi scan showed a hyperfunctioning left inferior parathyroid gland. Biopsy of the left mandibular mass was consistent with brown tumour. The patient underwent parathyroidectomy of the enlarged parathyroid gland. Final histopathology, however, revealed parathyroid carcinoma, 4.7 cm in widest dimension, with capsular and vascular space invasion. The patient underwent repeat surgery, specifically, left thyroid lobectomy, isthmectomy and central node dissection. Intact PTH decreased from 681.3 to 74 pg/mL (normal range: 10-65) 24 hours postoperatively. Follow-up at 6 months showed normal serum calcium levels, size reduction of bone lesions and improvement of quality of life. PMID:27358103

  5. Tumour spectrum in the FAMMM syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, H. T.; Fusaro, R. M.; Pester, J.; Oosterhuis, J. A.; Went, L. N.; Rumke, P.; Neering, H.; Lynch, J. F.

    1981-01-01

    The Familial Atypical Multiple Mole-Melanoma Syndrome (FAMMM) is characterized by an autosomal dominantly inherited susceptibility to multiple atypical naevi. Patients with this hereditary phenotype show a strong susceptibility to cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). Our investigation of an extended Dutch kindred showing the FAMMM phenotype revealed a proband with bilateral intraocular malignant melanoma (IOM) and multiple CMM. The family revealed an array of tumours which included carcinoma of the lung, skin, larynx, and breast in addition to CMM and IOM, which were transmitted vertically through 3 generations. There was male-to-male transmission, and the number of affected males and females was about the same, which was consistent with an autosomal dominant inheritance. Thus the FAMMM syndrome not only indicates a potential for CMM, but a susceptibility to other systemic cancers as well. These observations, though limited to a single kindred, merit a painstaking evaluation of cancer of all anatomical sites in other kindreds showing the FAMMM syndrome. Such studies could yield clues to cancer aetiology, pathogenesis, and control. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7295511

  6. Melatonin Immunoreactivity in Malignant Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Söderquist, Fanny; Janson, Eva Tiensuu; Rasmusson, Annica J.; Ali, Abir; Stridsberg, Mats; Cunningham, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (SI-NETs) are derived from enterochromaffin cells. After demonstrating melatonin in enterochromaffin cells, we hypothesized that SI-NETs may express and secrete melatonin, which may have an impact on clinical factors and treatment response. Methods Tumour tissue from 26 patients with SI-NETs, representing paired sections of primary tumour and metastasis, were immunohistochemically stained for melatonin and its receptors, MT1 and MT2. Plasma melatonin and immunoreactivity (IR) for melatonin, MT1 and MT2 in tumour cells were compared to other tumour markers and clinical parameters. Melatonin was measured at two time points in fasting morning plasma from 43 patients with SI-NETs. Results Melatonin IR was found in all SI-NETS. Melatonin IR intensity in primary tumours correlated inversely to proliferation index (p = 0.022) and patients reported less diarrhoea when melatonin IR was high (p = 0.012). MT1 IR was low or absent in tumours. MT2 expression was medium to high in primary tumours and generally reduced in metastases (p = 0.007). Plasma-melatonin ranged from 4.5 to 220.0 pg/L. Higher levels were associated with nausea at both time points (p = 0.027 and p = 0.006) and flush at the second sampling. In cases with disease stabilization or remission (n = 34), circulating melatonin levels were reduced in the second sample (p = 0.038). Conclusion Immunoreactive melatonin is present in SI-NETs. Circulating levels of melatonin in patients with SI-NETs are reduced after treatment. Our results are congruent with recent understanding of melatonin’s endocrine and paracrine functions and SI-NETs may provide a model for further studies of melatonin function. PMID:27736994

  7. Regional bone change in intramuscular haemangioma mimicking primary bone tumour.

    PubMed

    Shikhare, Sumer; Chacko, Julio K; Chuah, Khoon L

    2015-04-01

    Intramuscular haemangiomas are benign soft-tissue tumours, commonly located in the extremities. We present a right-leg intramuscular haemangioma with florid periosteal reaction in adjacent tibia, mimicking a primary bone tumour. Plain radiograph and magnetic resonance imaging features are illustrated with the surgical and histopathological findings. Radiologists need to be familiar with reactive bone changes secondary to deep-seated intramuscular haemangiomas to avoid potential misdiagnosis.

  8. Clinicopathological Profile of Childhood Primary Abdominal Tumours in Kashmir.

    PubMed

    Khan, Parwez Sajad; Akhter, Zahida; Majeed, Showkat; Wani, Mohd Yousuf; Hayat, Humera

    2015-12-01

    Primary abdominal tumours attract considerable notice because of their serious prognosis, high cost of treatment and the emotional and psychological trauma. Abdominal tumours can present with pain, vomiting, constipation or less commonly intestinal obstruction. The presentation of cancer in children mimic those of childhood conditions like infections particularly viral infections, urinary tract infections, gastro-oesophageal reflux, malnutrition, constipation, lymphadnenitis, glomerulonephritis and congenital urinary tract anomalies. PMID:26730026

  9. Solitary fibrous tumour of the prostate identified on needle biopsy.

    PubMed

    Galosi, Andrea B; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Scarpelli, Marina; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Muzzonigro, Giovanni; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2009-09-01

    The clinical and radical prostatectomy features of a case of solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) of the prostate identified on needle biopsy are presented. The main differential diagnoses are discussed. SFTs involving the prostate are relatively uncommon, with only isolated cases reported in the literature. Owing to their relative rarity and lack of long-term follow-up, the clinical behaviour of prostatic SFTs is difficult to predict. Complete resection of the tumour is currently the single main prognostic factor.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging detected prostate evasive anterior tumours: Further insights

    PubMed Central

    Edwan, Ghazi Al; Ghai, Sangeet; Margel, David; Kulkarni, Girish; Hamilton, Rob; Toi, Ants; Haidar, Masoom A.; Finelli, Antonio; Fleshner, Neil E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Clinical confusion continues to exist regarding the underestimation of cancers among patients on active surveillance and among men with repeated negative prostate biopsies despite worrisome prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. We have previously described our initial experience with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based detection of tumours in the anterior prostate gland. In this report, we update and expand our experience with these tumours in terms of multiparametric-MRI findings, staging, and grading. Furthermore, we report early treatment outcomes with these unique cancers. Methods: We reviewed our prostate MRI dataset of 1117 cases from January 2006 until December 2012 and identified 189 patients who fulfilled criteria for prostate evasive anterior tumors (PEATS). Descriptive analyses were performed on multiple covariates. Kaplan-Meier actuarial technique was used to plot the treatment-related outcomes from PEATS tumours. Results: Among the 189 patients who had MRI-detectable anterior tumours, 148 had biopsy proven disease in the anterior zone. Among these tumours, the average PSA was 18.3 ng/mL and most cancers were Gleason 7. In total, 68 patients chose surgical therapy. Among these men, most of their cancers had extra prostatic extension and 46% had positive surgical margins. Interestingly, upgrading of tumours that were biopsy Gleason 6 in the anterior zone was common, with 59% exhibiting upgrading to Gleason 7 or higher. Biochemical-free survival among men who elected surgery was not ideal, with 20% failing by 20 months. Conclusion: PEATS tumours are found late and are disproportionally high grade tumours. Careful consideration to MRI testing should be given to men at risk for PEATS. PMID:26029293

  11. Image-Guided Predictions of Liposome Transport in Solid Tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapleton, Shawn

    Due to the ability to preferentially accumulate and deliver drug payloads to solid tumours, liposomes have emerged as an exciting therapeutic strategy for cancer therapy. Unfortunately, the initial excitement was dampened by limited clinical results, where only negligible increases in patient survival following liposome therapy have been observed. What are the reasons for the limited clinical efficacy? Is the nanoparticle formulation optimal? Is the enhanced permeability and retention effect overstated? What are the barriers limiting the delivery of drugs to cancer cells? What is the optimal dosing and treatment schedule? Addressing these questions requires developing quantitative tools to understand the behaviour of liposomes in vivo, such as pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, intra-tumoural accumulation, and drug release. Central to each of these questions is the concept of transport - the collection of biophysical processes responsible for the delivery of molecules to tissues. Understanding transport means understanding the crucial links between the spatio-temporal accumulation of liposomes, the physicochemical properties of liposomes, and properties of the tumour microenvironment. In this thesis, a biophysical mathematical transport model is developed that when used in combination with non-invasive imaging methods can predict liposome transport in solid tumours. The mathematical transport framework is validated in its ability to predict the bulk and intra-tumoural accumulation of liposomes based on biophysical transport properties of solid tumours. Furthermore, novel imaging methods are developed and used to elucidate the crucial links between transport barriers and spatial heterogeneity in liposome accumulation. Finally, methods are presented to integrate quantitative imaging and mathematical modelling such that an accurate prediction of liposome transport in solid tumours is possible. In summary, this thesis presents and validates an image-guided mathematical

  12. Engineered affinity proteins for tumour-targeting applications.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mikaela; Ståhl, Stefan

    2009-05-01

    Targeting of tumour-associated antigens is an expanding treatment modality in clinical oncology as an alternative to, or in combination with, conventional treatments, such as chemotherapy, external-radiation therapy and surgery. Targeting of antigens that are unique or more highly expressed in tumours than in normal tissues can be used to increase the specificity and reduce the cytotoxic effect on normal tissues. Several targeting agents have been studied for clinical use, where monoclonal antibodies have been the ones most widely used. More than 20 monoclonal antibodies are approved for therapy today and the largest field is oncology. Advances in genetic engineering and in vitro selection technology has enabled the feasible high-throughput generation of monoclonal antibodies, antibody derivatives [e.g. scFvs, Fab molecules, dAbs (single-domain antibodies), diabodies and minibodies] and more recently also non-immunoglobulin scaffold proteins. Several of these affinity proteins have been investigated for both in vivo diagnostics and therapy. Affinity proteins in tumour-targeted therapy can affect tumour progression by altering signal transduction or by delivering a payload of toxin, drug or radionuclide. The ErbB receptor family has been extensively studied as biomarkers in tumour targeting, primarily for therapy using monoclonal antibodies. Two receptors in the ErbB family, EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and HER2 (epidermal growth factor receptor 2), are overexpressed in various malignancies and associated with poor patient prognosis and are therefore interesting targets for solid tumours. In the present review, strategies are described for tumour targeting of solid tumours using affinity proteins to deliver radionuclides, either for molecular imaging or radiotherapy. Antibodies, antibody derivatives and non-immunoglobulin scaffold proteins are discussed with a certain focus on the affibody (Affibody) molecule. PMID:19341363

  13. Interobserver delineation variation in lung tumour stereotactic body radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Persson, G F; Nygaard, D E; Hollensen, C; Munck af Rosenschöld, P; Mouritsen, L S; Due, A K; Berthelsen, A K; Nyman, J; Markova, E; Roed, A P; Roed, H; Korreman, S; Specht, L

    2012-01-01

    Objectives In radiotherapy, delineation uncertainties are important as they contribute to systematic errors and can lead to geographical miss of the target. For margin computation, standard deviations (SDs) of all uncertainties must be included as SDs. The aim of this study was to quantify the interobserver delineation variation for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of peripheral lung tumours using a cross-sectional study design. Methods 22 consecutive patients with 26 tumours were included. Positron emission tomography/CT scans were acquired for planning of SBRT. Three oncologists and three radiologists independently delineated the gross tumour volume. The interobserver variation was calculated as a mean of multiple SDs of distances to a reference contour, and calculated for the transversal plane (SDtrans) and craniocaudal (CC) direction (SDcc) separately. Concordance indexes and volume deviations were also calculated. Results Median tumour volume was 13.0 cm3, ranging from 0.3 to 60.4 cm3. The mean SDtrans was 0.15 cm (SD 0.08 cm) and the overall mean SDcc was 0.26 cm (SD 0.15 cm). Tumours with pleural contact had a significantly larger SDtrans than tumours surrounded by lung tissue. Conclusions The interobserver delineation variation was very small in this systematic cross-sectional analysis, although significantly larger in the CC direction than in the transversal plane, stressing that anisotropic margins should be applied. This study is the first to make a systematic cross-sectional analysis of delineation variation for peripheral lung tumours referred for SBRT, establishing the evidence that interobserver variation is very small for these tumours. PMID:22919015

  14. Amino acid metabolism in tumour-bearing mice.

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, S; Azcón-Bieto, J; López-Soriano, F J; Miralpeix, M; Argilés, J M

    1988-01-01

    Mice bearing the Lewis lung carcinoma showed a high tumour glutaminase activity and significantly higher concentrations of most amino acids than in both the liver and the skeletal muscle of the host. Tumour tissue slices showed a marked preference for glutamine, especially for oxidation of its skeleton to CO2. It is proposed that the metabolism of this particular carcinoma is focused on amino acid degradation, glutamine being its preferred substrate. PMID:3342022

  15. Biochemical signatures of in vitro radiation response in human lung, breast and prostate tumour cells observed with Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Q.; Jirasek, A.; Lum, J. J.; Brolo, A. G.

    2011-11-01

    This work applies noninvasive single-cell Raman spectroscopy (RS) and principal component analysis (PCA) to analyze and correlate radiation-induced biochemical changes in a panel of human tumour cell lines that vary by tissue of origin, p53 status and intrinsic radiosensitivity. Six human tumour cell lines, derived from prostate (DU145, PC3 and LNCaP), breast (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7) and lung (H460), were irradiated in vitro with single fractions (15, 30 or 50 Gy) of 6 MV photons. Remaining live cells were harvested for RS analysis at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h post-irradiation, along with unirradiated controls. Single-cell Raman spectra were acquired from 20 cells per sample utilizing a 785 nm excitation laser. All spectra (200 per cell line) were individually post-processed using established methods and the total data set for each cell line was analyzed with PCA using standard algorithms. One radiation-induced PCA component was detected for each cell line by identification of statistically significant changes in the PCA score distributions for irradiated samples, as compared to unirradiated samples, in the first 24-72 h post-irradiation. These RS response signatures arise from radiation-induced changes in cellular concentrations of aromatic amino acids, conformational protein structures and certain nucleic acid and lipid functional groups. Correlation analysis between the radiation-induced PCA components separates the cell lines into three distinct RS response categories: R1 (H460 and MCF7), R2 (MDA-MB-231 and PC3) and R3 (DU145 and LNCaP). These RS categories partially segregate according to radiosensitivity, as the R1 and R2 cell lines are radioresistant (SF2 > 0.6) and the R3 cell lines are radiosensitive (SF2 < 0.5). The R1 and R2 cell lines further segregate according to p53 gene status, corroborated by cell cycle analysis post-irradiation. Potential radiation-induced biochemical response mechanisms underlying our RS observations are proposed, such as (1) the regulated

  16. [Ovarian tumours--accuracy of frozen section diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, S; Ivanov, S; Khadzhiolov, N

    2005-01-01

    A retrospective study of 450 ovarian biopsy results were examined for the period of 1998 till 2004 to evaluate the accuracy of frozen section diagnosis. In addition to this we performed a review of the literature for all previous studies in this field in order to study the accuracy rates of the different clinics throughout the world. The histhopathological results of the frozen section diagnosis were equal with the diagnosis of the paraffin blocks in 90%. The sensitivity rates for benign, malignant and borderline tumours, were 96%, 84% and 60% respectively. We had 10 patients (2,1%) false-positive results (overdiagnosed) and 26 (5,2%) false-negative results (underdiagnosed) in frozen section examinations. Frozen section examination of mucinous tumours showed hogher underdiagnosis--18%. The review of the literature showed that there is no significant difference in accuracy rates of frozen section diagnosis for benign and malignant ovarian tumours in relation with time. We found low accuracy rates for borderline tumours which was similar with most of the foreign publications. However the accuracy of the frozen section diagnosis is bettering with the time. As a result of this we conclude that the accuracy rates of the frozen section diagnosis for evaluation of the malignant and benign tumours is quite enough for correct diagnosis. Since accuracy rates for borderline ovarian tumours are low we have to take care and attention of improvement in this field.

  17. Emotional and personality changes following brain tumour resection.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Lisanne M; Drummond, Katharine J; Andrewes, David G

    2016-07-01

    Psychological distress has a high prevalence in brain tumour patients, and understanding the emotional and personality changes that may follow neurosurgery is important for clinical management of these patients. We aimed to characterise these emotional and personality changes using subjective, observer-rated and clinical measures. We examined subjective changes in emotional experience and observer-rated changes to personality disturbances following neurosurgery for brain tumours (n=44), compared to a control group that had undergone spinal surgery (n=26). Participants completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and a Subjective Emotional Change Questionnaire. Observers who knew the patients well also completed the Iowa Rating Scale of Personality Change. Compared to controls, patients with tumours reported significantly more changes to their subjective experience of emotions following neurosurgery, particularly anger, disgust and sadness. For the observer-ratings, tumour patients were described as having significant changes in the personality disturbances of irritability, impulsivity, moodiness, inflexibility, and being easily overwhelmed. Anxiety and depression were not significantly different between groups. Neurosurgical resection of a brain tumour is a major life event that changes patients' subjective experiences of different emotions, and leads to observer-rated changes in personality. In this study, these changes were not accompanied by increases in anxiety or depression. We conclude with a discussion of biological and psychosocial mechanisms that can impact emotional functioning and personality in patients with brain tumours. PMID:26898575

  18. Progression of alachlor-induced olfactory mucosal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Genter, Mary Beth; Burman, Dawn M; Bolon, Brad

    2002-01-01

    Alachlor is an herbicide used primarily in the production of corn (maize), peanuts, and soybeans and is associated with cancer of the nasal cavity, thyroid, and stomach in rats. Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated that the nasal cavity tumours originate from the olfactory mucosa, and that neoplasms were present following 6 months of exposure (126 mg/kg/day in the diet). The studies presented herein were conducted to determine more precisely the earliest time point at which alachlor-induced tumours were present, and to describe the histological changes that occur en route to tumour formation. We determined that dramatic histological changes, including respiratory metaplasia of the olfactory mucosa, were present following 3 months of exposure, and the earliest alachlor-induced olfactory mucosal tumours were detected following 5 months of treatment. Because alachlor is positive in short-term mutagenicity assays with olfactory mucosal activation, and because of the relatively short time-to-tumour formation observed with alachlor, we also conducted a ‘stop’ study in which rats were treated with alachlor for 1 month and then held without further treatment for an additional 5 months. This study demonstrated that abbreviated alachlor exposure did not result in subsequent tumour formation within the 6-month observation period. PMID:12657139

  19. Molecular analysis of circulating tumour cells-biology and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Matthew G; Metcalf, Robert L; Carter, Louise; Brady, Ged; Blackhall, Fiona H; Dive, Caroline

    2014-03-01

    Growing evidence for intratumour heterogeneity informs us that single-site biopsies fall short of revealing the complete genomic landscape of a tumour. With an expanding repertoire of targeted agents entering the clinic, screening tumours for genomic aberrations is increasingly important, as is interrogating the tumours for resistance mechanisms upon disease progression. Multiple biopsies separated spatially and temporally are impractical, uncomfortable for the patient and not without risk. Here, we describe how circulating tumour cells (CTCs), captured from a minimally invasive blood test-and readily amenable to serial sampling-have the potential to inform intratumour heterogeneity and tumour evolution, although it remains to be determined how useful this will be in the clinic. Technologies for detecting and isolating CTCs include the validated CellSearch(®) system, but other technologies are gaining prominence. We also discuss how recent CTC discoveries map to mechanisms of haematological spread, previously described in preclinical models, including evidence for epithelial-mesenchymal transition, collective cell migration and cells with tumour-initiating capacity within the circulation. Advances in single-cell molecular analysis are enhancing our ability to explore mechanisms of metastasis, and the combination of CTC and cell-free DNA assays are anticipated to provide invaluable blood-borne biomarkers for real-time patient monitoring and treatment stratification.

  20. Emotional and personality changes following brain tumour resection.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Lisanne M; Drummond, Katharine J; Andrewes, David G

    2016-07-01

    Psychological distress has a high prevalence in brain tumour patients, and understanding the emotional and personality changes that may follow neurosurgery is important for clinical management of these patients. We aimed to characterise these emotional and personality changes using subjective, observer-rated and clinical measures. We examined subjective changes in emotional experience and observer-rated changes to personality disturbances following neurosurgery for brain tumours (n=44), compared to a control group that had undergone spinal surgery (n=26). Participants completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and a Subjective Emotional Change Questionnaire. Observers who knew the patients well also completed the Iowa Rating Scale of Personality Change. Compared to controls, patients with tumours reported significantly more changes to their subjective experience of emotions following neurosurgery, particularly anger, disgust and sadness. For the observer-ratings, tumour patients were described as having significant changes in the personality disturbances of irritability, impulsivity, moodiness, inflexibility, and being easily overwhelmed. Anxiety and depression were not significantly different between groups. Neurosurgical resection of a brain tumour is a major life event that changes patients' subjective experiences of different emotions, and leads to observer-rated changes in personality. In this study, these changes were not accompanied by increases in anxiety or depression. We conclude with a discussion of biological and psychosocial mechanisms that can impact emotional functioning and personality in patients with brain tumours.

  1. Brain tumour stem cells: possibilities of new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Piccirillo, Sara G M; Vescovi, Angelo L

    2007-08-01

    Cancers are composed of heterogeneous cell populations, including highly proliferative immature precursors and differentiated cells, which may belong to different lineages. Recent advances in stem cell research have demonstrated the existence of tumour-initiating, cancer stem cells (CSCs) in non-solid and solid tumours. These cells are defined as CSCs because they show functional properties that resemble those of their normal counterpart to a significant extent. This concept applies to CSCs from brain tumours and, particularly, to glioblastoma stem-like cells, which self-renew under clonal conditions and differentiate into neuron- and glia-like cells, and into aberrant cells, with mixed neuronal/astroglia phenotypes. Notably, across serial transplantation into immunodeficient mice, glioblastoma stem-like cells are able to form secondary tumours which are a phenocopy of the human disease. A significant effort is underway to identify both CSC-specific markers and the molecular mechanism that underpin the tumorigenic potential of these cells, for this will have a critical impact on the understanding of the origin of malignant brain tumour and the discovery of new and more specific therapeutic approaches. Lately, the authors have shown that some of the bone morphogenetic proteins can reduce the tumorigenic ability of CSCs in GBMs. This suggests that mechanisms regulating the physiology of normal brain stem cells may be still in place in their cancerous siblings and that this may lead to the development of cures that selectively target the population CSCs found in the patients' tumour mass.

  2. Early recognition and management of brain tumours in children.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Eleanor Katie; Cannon, Anna; Zaborowski, Krzysztof; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2016-08-31

    Brain tumours comprise over one quarter of all childhood cancers in the UK and are the most common cause of cancer-related deaths in children. The presentation of brain tumours can vary substantially in children. The presenting symptoms are often similar to less serious conditions, and are often managed as such initially. Therefore, it can be difficult to diagnose brain tumours in children. An early diagnosis is usually associated with more effective treatment and improved health outcomes. The diagnostic interval between first presentation to a health professional and diagnosis for brain tumours in children has been shown to be three times longer in the UK than in other developed countries. As a result, the HeadSmart campaign launched a symptom card in 2011 to increase awareness of brain tumours in children among the general population and healthcare professionals, with the aim of reducing the diagnostic interval to 5 weeks. Nurses have an essential role in early recognition of brain tumours in children, and in providing care and support to the child and their family following a diagnosis. PMID:27577312

  3. An update on irreversible electroporation of liver tumours.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Enoch S L; Chung, Max W Y; Wong, Keedon; Wong, Clement Y K; So, Enoch C T; Chan, Albert C Y

    2014-08-01

    OBJECTIVE. To investigate the clinical efficacy and safety of irreversible electroporation for ablation of liver tumour in humans. DATA SOURCES. The PubMed and MEDLINE databases were systematically searched. STUDY SELECTION. Clinical research published in English in the last 10 years until October 2013 that address clinical issues related to irreversible electroporation of human liver tumours were selected. "Liver tumor", "local ablative therapy", and "irreversible electroporation" were used as the search terms. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS. The data extracted for this review was analysed by the authors, with a focus on the clinical efficacy and the safety of irreversible electroporation. The complete response rates look promising, ranging from 72% to 100%, except in one study in a subgroup of liver tumours in which the complete response rate was only 50% that was likely due to the inclusion of larger-size tumours. In one study, the local recurrence rate at 12 months was approximately 40%. As for the safety of irreversible electroporation, there were only a few reported complications (cardiac arrhythmia, pneumothorax, and electrolyte disturbance) that were mostly transient and not serious. There was no reported mortality related to the use of irreversible electroporation. CONCLUSION. Irreversible electroporation is a potentially effective liver tumour ablative therapy that gives rise to only mild and transient side-effects. Further studies with better patient selection criteria and longer follow-up are needed to clarify its role as a first-line liver tumour treatment modality.

  4. Medical management of secretory syndromes related to gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadis, Georgios K; Weickert, Martin O; Randeva, Harpal S; Kaltsas, Gregory; Grossman, Ashley

    2016-09-01

    Although recent epidemiological evidence indicates that the prevalence of non-functioning gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) is rising, a significant number of GEP-NETs still present with symptoms related to the secretion of biologically active substances leading to the development of distinct clinical syndromes. In the past, these syndromes were associated with substantial morbidity and mortality due to the lack of specific therapies; however, since the introduction of long-acting somatostatin analogues and medications such as proton pump inhibitors, their control has been greatly improved. As a result, nowadays, the main cause of morbidity and mortality in GEP-NETs is mostly directly related to tumour growth and the extent of metastatic disease. However, in some patients with functioning tumours and extensive disease, control of the secretory syndrome still remains problematic, necessitating the employment of several cytoreductive techniques, which may not always be sufficient. Recently, new agents directed against tumour growth, or exerting increased binding activity to receptors expressed in these tumours, or interfering with the synthetic pathway of some of the compounds secreted by these tumours, have been developed. Since there are no specific guidelines addressing the totality of the management of the secretory syndromes related to GEP-NETs, this review aims at critically analysing the medical management of previously recognised secretory syndromes; it also addresses areas of uncertainty, assesses the newer therapeutic developments and also addresses recently described but poorly characterised secretory syndromes related to GEP-NETs. PMID:27461388

  5. PET-Specific Parameters and Radiotracers in Theoretical Tumour Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Loredana G.; Bezak, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The innovation of computational techniques serves as an important step toward optimized, patient-specific management of cancer. In particular, in silico simulation of tumour growth and treatment response may eventually yield accurate information on disease progression, enhance the quality of cancer treatment, and explain why certain therapies are effective where others are not. In silico modelling is demonstrated to considerably benefit from information obtainable with PET and PET/CT. In particular, models have successfully integrated tumour glucose metabolism, cell proliferation, and cell oxygenation from multiple tracers in order to simulate tumour behaviour. With the development of novel radiotracers to image additional tumour phenomena, such as pH and gene expression, the value of PET and PET/CT data for use in tumour models will continue to grow. In this work, the use of PET and PET/CT information in in silico tumour models is reviewed. The various parameters that can be obtained using PET and PET/CT are detailed, as well as the radiotracers that may be used for this purpose, their utility, and limitations. The biophysical measures used to quantify PET and PET/CT data are also described. Finally, a list of in silico models that incorporate PET and/or PET/CT data is provided and reviewed. PMID:25788973

  6. Warthin's tumour in Jamaica. Incidence, electron microscopy and immunoenzyme studies.

    PubMed

    Shah, D; Williams, E; Brooks, S E

    1990-12-01

    Warthin's tumour has traditionally had a strong male association, and has been said to be rare in Blacks. Current studies describe a new trend; a rise in females, strongly linked to cigarette smoking. The tumour has eosinophilic epithelial cells packed with distinctive mitochondria, and a lymphoid stroma. Immunological investigations have demonstrated polyclonal B cells, T cells and macrophages. Views differ as to whether B or T cells predominate. Between 1958 and 1989, the Jamaica Cancer Registry recorded 491 benign and malignant salivary gland tumours. There were 18 cases of Warthin's tumour (3.7%), with a male: female ratio of 5:1. The low proportion of females is similar to the trend for female lung cancer in Kingston & St. Andrew. A case of Warthin's tumour was studied by light and electron microscopy and immunoenzyme methods. The epithelial cells contained numerous mitochondria with stacked cristae, as previously described. Similar morphology occurs in oncocytic tumours; riboflavin-deficient rats and mice; rats given non-lethal doses of hypoglycin; dogs treated with annatto extracts; and hibernating or starving frogs. The mitochondrial changes may be an adaptive response. The immunoenzyme studies utilized newly available monoclonal antibodies: UCHL1, L26, 4KB5, MT1 and LN2. The reaction patterns indicate a distribution of B and T cells in a manner expected in a lymph node. The interaction between mitochondrial changes, adaptive metabolic pathways, the immune cells and tobacco raises some interesting questions.

  7. Trans-oral resection of large parapharyngeal space tumours.

    PubMed

    Hussain, A; Ah-See, K W; Shakeel, M

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to describe minimally invasive trans-oral approach for resection of parapharyngeal space (PPS) tumours and to demonstrate surgical technique, resection, repair and outcomes. Five cases were prospectively included in the study. The data collected include age, sex, site, size, pathology, radiological investigations, surgical excision, complications and outcomes. Three females and two male patients underwent trans-oral resection of PPS tumours sized 4-8 cm. The pathology included two deep lobe parotid tumours, one schwannoma, one hibernoma and one primary adenocarcinoma arising form the minor salivary gland. All tumours were resected completely without any technical difficulty. The healing was quick and by primary intention. Patients resumed oral feeding on recovery from general anaesthesia and did not require any significant analgesia beyond the first 2 days. Patient with adenocarcinoma received postoperative radiotherapy and remained disease-free during 4 years post-treatment. No recurrences were observed in patients with benign tumours. No neurovascular injury occurred during surgery and no secondary bleeding was observed. We have demonstrated successful and safe execution of trans-oral resection of large PPS tumours. There were no intra and post-operative complications and there has been no recurrence during the follow-up period. In our experience, it appears to be efficient, safe and minimally invasive compared to the established techniques.

  8. Long-term follow-up of proton irradiated malignant melanoma by glucose-fructose enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Thuomas, K A; Naeser, P

    1997-02-01

    MR imaging is frequently used to diagnose uveal melanomas due to the characteristic short T2 relaxation time. T2 may be significantly prolonged within 2 h after ingestion of glucose and fructose due to changed water distribution in the melanoma. This method is used to follow melanomas for up to 6 years after proton beam irradiation. In the tumours, T2 was shortened in parallel in all the lesions during the first 9 months. After this, T2 increased only in tumours which showed recurrence. T2 determination and histopathological examination revealed no signs of recurrence in eyes which were enucleated due to neovascular glaucoma. It is concluded that MR imaging performed with carbohydrate loading, registers metabolic changes induced in the tumour, giving this method great validity in the follow-up of choroidal malignant melanoma after irradiation. Eighteen patients treated with proton beam for uveal melanoma at the cyclotron in Uppsala, Sweden, were followed.

  9. Hypertrophic pulmonary osteoarthropathy in association with pulmonary metastases from extrathoracic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Yacoub, M. H.; Simon, G.; Ohnsorge, J.

    1967-01-01

    Three cases of pulmonary osteoarthropathy secondary to pulmonary metastases from extrathoracic tumours are described. Analysis of the reported cases shows that most of them were secondary to osteosarcoma, nasopharyngeal tumour, fibrosarcoma, and uterine tumour. Fibrous tumours and tumours with a predominantly fibrous stroma tend to be associated with osteoarthropathy more than others. This suggests that the fibrous stroma may be a factor in the stimulation of the reflex mechanism responsible for osteoarthropathy. Images PMID:6033389

  10. Animal tumour registry of two provinces in northern Italy: incidence of spontaneous tumours in dogs and cats

    PubMed Central

    Vascellari, Marta; Baioni, Elisa; Ru, Giuseppe; Carminato, Antonio; Mutinelli, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Background Cancer is a major cause of death in domestic animals. Furthermore, many forms of pet neoplasm resemble that of their human counterparts in biologic behaviour, pathologic expression, and recognised risk factors. In April 2005, a pilot project was activated so as to establish a dog and cat tumour registry living in the Venice and Vicenza provinces (Veneto Region, north-eastern Italy), with the aim of estimating the incidence of spontaneous tumours. Results Through a telephone survey, the estimates of canine and feline populations of the catchment area turned out to be of 296,318 (CI +/- 30,201) and 214,683 (CI +/- 21,755) subjects, respectively. During the first three years, overall 2,509 canine and 494 feline cases of neoplasia were diagnosed. In dogs, the estimated annual incidence rate (IR) per 100,000 dogs for all tumours was 282 in all the catchment area, whereas in cats the IR was much lower (IR = 77). Malignant and benign tumours were equally distributed in male and female dogs, whereas cats had a 4.6-fold higher incidence of malignant tumours than benign. In both dogs and cats, purebreds had an almost 2-fold higher incidence of malignant tumours than mixed breeds. Tumour incidence increased with age in both dog and cat populations. Conclusion This study has provided estimates of incidence of spontaneous neoplasm in companion animals. Further attempts will be made to increase the accuracy in the population size assessment and to ascertain the real gap with the official regional canine demographic registry. Veterinary practitioners may also benefit from the tumour registry insofar they may obtain data for specific breeds, age groups or geographical areas. PMID:19825169

  11. [Tissue bank of the National Centre for Tumour Disease. An innovative platform for translational tumour].

    PubMed

    Herpel, E; Koleganova, N; Schirmacher, P

    2008-11-01

    The tissue bank of the National Centre for Tumour Diseases (NCT) in Heidelberg, Germany, was founded in 2005 by the University Hospital of Heidelberg and the German Cancer Research Centre as a section of the NCT. It is a nonprofit organization with a completely evaluated legal and ethical framework and supports the Comprehensive Cancer Centre concept. Its main aim is the acquisition and characterization of fresh-frozen and paraffin-embedded human tissues according to the standards of good scientific practice and the promotion of interdisciplinary tumour research of the comprehensive cancer centre and its cooperating partners. It also offers expert project assistance: a project leader can submit a short proposal, and the tissue collecting/preparing process will be performed in cooperation with a specialised pathologist and, if applicable, an experienced clinical researcher. The tissue bank is also a central platform for further developing of innovative technologies for tissue handling, e.g. multi-tissue-array and virtual microscopy, with links to digital image analysis and bioinformatics. Thus, the NCT tissue bank represents a model for innovative biobanking and for institutions with active interdisciplinary cancer research.

  12. Commercial food irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Black, E.F.; Libby, L.M.

    1983-06-01

    Food irradiation is discussed. Irradiation exposes food to gamma rays from a cobalt-60 or a cesium-137 source, or to high-energy electrons emitted by an electron accelerator. A major advantage is that food can be packaged either before or after treatment. FDA regulations with regard to irradiation are discussed. Comments on an 'Advance Notice' on irradiation, published by the FDA in 1981 are summarized.

  13. Prophylactic antibiotic regimens in tumour surgery (PARITY)

    PubMed Central

    Investigators, The PARITY

    2015-01-01

    Objective Clinical studies of patients with bone sarcomas have been challenged by insufficient numbers at individual centres to draw valid conclusions. Our objective was to assess the feasibility of conducting a definitive multi-centre randomised controlled trial (RCT) to determine whether a five-day regimen of post-operative antibiotics, in comparison to a 24-hour regimen, decreases surgical site infections in patients undergoing endoprosthetic reconstruction for lower extremity primary bone tumours. Methods We performed a pilot international multi-centre RCT. We used central randomisation to conceal treatment allocation and sham antibiotics to blind participants, surgeons, and data collectors. We determined feasibility by measuring patient enrolment, completeness of follow-up, and protocol deviations for the antibiotic regimens. Results We screened 96 patients and enrolled 60 participants (44 men and 16 women) across 21 sites from four countries over 24 months (mean 2.13 participants per site per year, standard deviation 2.14). One participant was lost to follow-up and one withdrew consent. Complete data were obtained for 98% of eligible patients at two weeks, 83% at six months, and 73% at one year (the remainder with partial data or pending queries). In total, 18 participants missed at least one dose of antibiotics or placebo post-operatively, but 93% of all post-operative doses were administered per protocol. Conclusions It is feasible to conduct a definitive multi-centre RCT of post-operative antibiotic regimens in patients with bone sarcomas, but further expansion of our collaborative network will be critical. We have demonstrated an ability to coordinate in multiple countries, enrol participants, maintain protocol adherence, and minimise losses to follow-up. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res;4:154–162 PMID:26423584

  14. Residential Radon and Brain Tumour Incidence in a Danish Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Bräuner, Elvira V.; Andersen, Zorana J.; Andersen, Claus E.; Pedersen, Camilla; Gravesen, Peter; Ulbak, Kaare; Hertel, Ole; Loft, Steffen; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased brain tumour incidence over recent decades may reflect improved diagnostic methods and clinical practice, but remain unexplained. Although estimated doses are low a relationship between radon and brain tumours may exist. Objective To investigate the long-term effect of exposure to residential radon on the risk of primary brain tumour in a prospective Danish cohort. Methods During 1993–1997 we recruited 57,053 persons. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence from enrolment until 31 December 2009, identifying 121 primary brain tumour cases. We traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 31 December 2009 and calculated radon concentrations at each address using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate-ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the risk of primary brain tumours associated with residential radon exposure with adjustment for age, sex, occupation, fruit and vegetable consumption and traffic-related air pollution. Effect modification by air pollution was assessed. Results Median estimated radon was 40.5 Bq/m3. The adjusted IRR for primary brain tumour associated with each 100 Bq/m3 increment in average residential radon levels was 1.96 (95% CI: 1.07; 3.58) and this was exposure-dependently higher over the four radon exposure quartiles. This association was not modified by air pollution. Conclusions We found significant associations and exposure-response patterns between long-term residential radon exposure radon in a general population and risk of primary brain tumours, adding new knowledge to this field. This finding could be chance and needs to be challenged in future studies. PMID:24066143

  15. Fibroblasts contribute to melanoma tumour growth and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Flach, Edward H.; Rebecca, Vito W.; Herlyn, Meenhard; Smalley, Keiran S. M.; Anderson, Alexander R. A.

    2011-01-01

    The role of tumour-stromal interactions in progression is generally well accepted but their role in initiation or treatment is less well understood. It is now generally agreed that rather than consisting solely of malignant cells, tumours consist of a complex dynamic mixture of cancer cells, host fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and immune cells that interact with each other and micro-environmental factors to drive tumour progression. We are particularly interested in stromal cells (for example fibroblasts) and stromal factors (for example fibronectin) as important players in tumour progression since they have also been implicated in drug resistance. Here we develop an integrated approach to understand the role of such stromal cells and factors in the growth and maintenance of tumours as well as their potential impact on treatment resistance, specifically in application to melanoma. Using a suite of experimental assays we show that melanoma cells can stimulate the recruitment of fibroblasts and activate them, resulting in melanoma cell growth by providing both structural (extra-cellular matrix proteins) and chemical support (growth factors). Motivated by these experimental results we construct a compartment model and use it to investigate the roles of both stromal activation and tumour aggressiveness in melanoma growth and progression. We utilise this model to investigate the role fibroblasts might play in melanoma treatment resistance and the clinically observed flare phenomena that is seen when a patient, who appears resistant to a targeted drug, is removed from that treatment. Our model makes the unexpected prediction that targeted therapies may actually hasten tumour progression once resistance has occurred. If confirmed experimentally, this provocative prediction may bring important new insights into how drug resistance could be managed clinically. PMID:22067046

  16. Limited neuropeptide Y precursor processing in unfavourable metastatic neuroblastoma tumours.

    PubMed

    Bjellerup, P; Theodorsson, E; Jörnvall, H; Kogner, P

    2000-07-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is found at high concentrations in neural crest-derived tumours and has been implicated as a regulatory peptide in tumour growth and differentiation. Neuroblastomas, ganglioneuromas and phaeochromocytomas with significant concentrations of NPY-like immunoreactivity were investigated for different molecular forms of NPY and for significance of proNPY processing. Gel-permeation chromatography identified intact NPY (1-36) in all tumours, whereas proNPY (69 amino acids) was detected only in control adrenal tissue and malignant neuroblastomas. Purification of NPY-like immunoreactivity in tumour extracts and structural characterization revealed that both NPY (1-36) and the truncated form NPY (3-36) was present. The degree of processing of proNPY to NPY in tumour tissue was lower in advanced neuroblastomas with regional or metastatic spread (stage 3 and 4) (n = 6), (41%, 12-100%, median, range), compared to the less aggressive stage 1, 2 and 4S tumours (n = 12), (93%; 69-100%), (P= 0.012). ProNPY processing of less than 50% was correlated with poor clinical outcome (P = 0.004). MYCN oncogene amplification was also correlated to a low degree of proNPY processing (P = 0.025). In summary, a low degree of proNPY processing was correlated to clinical advanced stage and poor outcome in neuroblastomas. ProNPY/NPY processing generated molecular forms of NPY with known differences in NPY-receptor selectivity, implicating a potential for in vivo modulation of NPY-like effects in tumour tissue.

  17. Promotion of Growth of Tumour Cells in Acutely Inflamed Tissues

    PubMed Central

    van den Brenk, H. A. S.; Stone, M.; Kelly, H.; Orton, C.; Sharpington, C.

    1974-01-01

    Acute inflammatory reactions were induced in rats by the intravenous injection of cellulose sulphate (CS) or an extract of normal rat lung homogenate (LH), or by intraperitoneal injections of Compound 48/80. These treatments greatly increased survival and clonogenic growth in the lungs of rats of intravenously injected allogeneic W-256 and Y-P388 tumour cells. Increase in the dose of intravenously injected CS caused a logarithmic increase in colony forming efficiency (CFE) of tumour cells in the lungs. CFE was not stimulated by the intravenous injection of rats with pharmacological mediators of inflammation (histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, bradykinin and prostaglandins PGE1 and PGF2α) which are released from tissues by agents which induce inflammation. Stimulation of CFE by CS occurred in adrenalectomized rats but was inhibited by treatment of rats with an anti-inflammatory steroid, dexamethasone. CFE was stimulated by CS in tumour immunized rats; the inflammatory state did not prevent the expression of immunity but “rescued” a proportion (approximately 20%) of the injected tumour cells from immunodestruction in the lungs. A higher proportion of tumours grew in the paws of rats when a small number of W-256 cells were injected interdigitally into the acute inflammatory swellings produced by the local injection of paws with LH or CS. CS is a “synthetic heparin” which causes marked prolongation of blood clotting time and also increases fibrinolytic activity of the blood. Anticoagulant treatment of rats with heparin did not affect CFE. Thus, there was no direct correlation between blood clotting time and CFE of blood borne tumour cells in the rat. The mechanisms which may be responsible for the nonspecific growth promoting effects of inflammatory reactions induced by various types of tissue injury on tumour induction and growth are discussed. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:4451630

  18. Sonic Hedgehog promotes proliferation of Notch-dependent monociliated choroid plexus tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Grausam, Katie B; Wang, Jun; Lun, Melody P; Ohli, Jasmin; Lidov, Hart G W; Calicchio, Monica L; Zeng, Erliang; Salisbury, Jeffrey L; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Lehtinen, Maria K; Schüller, Ulrich; Zhao, Haotian

    2016-04-01

    Aberrant Notch signalling has been linked to many cancers including choroid plexus (CP) tumours, a group of rare and predominantly paediatric brain neoplasms. We developed animal models of CP tumours, by inducing sustained expression of Notch1, that recapitulate properties of human CP tumours with aberrant NOTCH signalling. Whole-transcriptome and functional analyses showed that tumour cell proliferation is associated with Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) in the tumour microenvironment. Unlike CP epithelial cells, which have multiple primary cilia, tumour cells possess a solitary primary cilium as a result of Notch-mediated suppression of multiciliate differentiation. A Shh-driven signalling cascade in the primary cilium occurs in tumour cells but not in epithelial cells. Lineage studies show that CP tumours arise from monociliated progenitors in the roof plate characterized by elevated Notch signalling. Abnormal SHH signalling and distinct ciliogenesis are detected in human CP tumours, suggesting the SHH pathway and cilia differentiation as potential therapeutic avenues.

  19. Sonic Hedgehog promotes proliferation of Notch-dependent monociliated choroid plexus tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Grausam, Katie B.; Wang, Jun; Lun, Melody P.; Ohli, Jasmin; Lidov, Hart G. W.; Calicchio, Monica L.; Zeng, Erliang; Salisbury, Jeffrey L.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Lehtinen, Maria K.; Schüller, Ulrich; Zhao, Haotian

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant Notch signaling has been linked to many cancers including choroid plexus (CP) tumours, a group of rare and predominantly pediatric brain neoplasms. We developed animal models of CP tumours by inducing sustained expression of Notch1 that recapitulate properties of human CP tumours with aberrant NOTCH signaling. Whole transcriptome and functional analyses showed that tumour cell proliferation is associated with Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) in the tumour microenvironment. Unlike CP epithelial cells, which have multiple primary cilia, tumour cells possess a solitary primary cilium as a result of Notch-mediated suppression of multiciliate diffferentiation. A Shh-driven signaling cascade in the primary cilium occurs in tumour cells but not in epithelial cells. Lineage studies show that CP tumours arise from mono-ciliated progenitors in the roof plate characterized by elevated Notch signaling. Abnormal SHH signaling and distinct ciliogenesis are detected in human CP tumours, suggesting SHH pathway and cilia differentiation as potential therapeutic avenues. PMID:26999738

  20. Sonic Hedgehog promotes proliferation of Notch-dependent monociliated choroid plexus tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Grausam, Katie B; Wang, Jun; Lun, Melody P; Ohli, Jasmin; Lidov, Hart G W; Calicchio, Monica L; Zeng, Erliang; Salisbury, Jeffrey L; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Lehtinen, Maria K; Schüller, Ulrich; Zhao, Haotian

    2016-04-01

    Aberrant Notch signalling has been linked to many cancers including choroid plexus (CP) tumours, a group of rare and predominantly paediatric brain neoplasms. We developed animal models of CP tumours, by inducing sustained expression of Notch1, that recapitulate properties of human CP tumours with aberrant NOTCH signalling. Whole-transcriptome and functional analyses showed that tumour cell proliferation is associated with Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) in the tumour microenvironment. Unlike CP epithelial cells, which have multiple primary cilia, tumour cells possess a solitary primary cilium as a result of Notch-mediated suppression of multiciliate differentiation. A Shh-driven signalling cascade in the primary cilium occurs in tumour cells but not in epithelial cells. Lineage studies show that CP tumours arise from monociliated progenitors in the roof plate characterized by elevated Notch signalling. Abnormal SHH signalling and distinct ciliogenesis are detected in human CP tumours, suggesting the SHH pathway and cilia differentiation as potential therapeutic avenues. PMID:26999738

  1. Correlation between size and external temperature in four rat tumours after treatment with cytostatic agents.

    PubMed

    Nickers, P; Oosters, L; Brasseur, F; Kunkler, I; Maisin, H; Deckers, C

    1988-01-01

    The reduction in size of four experimental tumours (ISIS 130 and ISIS 208 immunocytomas, S 437 mammary adenocarcinoma, S 447 colon adenocarcinoma) was investigated in LOU rats under the influence of cytostatic agents belonging to different classes (5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, vinblastine, cisplatin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide). External tumour and rectal temperatures were measured at the same time, twice daily, during the whole experiment. With the rectal temperature of the rats kept constant, the reduction in tumour dimensions following chemotherapy correlated via a linear relationship with the duration and degree of tumour hypothermia for the three tumours S 437, ISIS 208, ISIS 130. However, for the same reduction in tumour volume following chemotherapy, the duration and degree of transient tumour hypothermia varied according to the type of tumour and cytostatic agent studied. There was not correlation between the decrease in size of S 447 and external tumour hypothermia. Even when the reduction in tumour size was statistically significant, the hypothermic tumour phase after drug administration was not sufficient to be significant, except for vinblastine. However, the temperature of this slowly growing tumour before chemotherapy was particularly low. The measurement of the degree and duration of external tumour hypothermia of tumours following chemotherapy would represent a new physiological technique for measuring the efficacy and duration of action of cytostatic agents.

  2. Nanoparticle distribution and temperature elevations in prostatic tumours in mice during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Attaluri, Anilchandra; Ma, Ronghui; Qiu, Yun; Li, Wei; Zhu, Liang

    2011-01-01

    Among a variety of hyperthermia methods, magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia is a highly promising approach for its confined heating within the tumour. In this study we perform in vivo animal experiments on implanted prostatic tumours in mice to measure temperature distribution in the tumour during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia. Temperature elevations are induced by a commercially available ferrofluid injected via a single injection to the centre of the tumour, when the tumour is subject to an alternating magnetic field. Temperature mapping in the tumours during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia has demonstrated the feasibility of elevating tumour temperatures higher than 50°C using only 0.1 cm(3) ferrofluid injected in the tumour under a relatively low magnetic field (3 kA/m). Detailed 3-D nanoparticle concentration distribution is quantified using a high-resolution microCT imaging system. The calculated nanoparticle distribution volume based on the microCT scans is useful to analyse nanoparticle deposition in the tumours. Slower ferrofluid infusion rates result in smaller nanoparticle distribution volumes in the tumours. Nanoparticles are more confined in the vicinity of the injection site with slower infusion rates, causing higher temperature elevations in the tumours. The increase in the nanoparticle distribution volume in the tumour group after the heating from that in the tumour group without heating suggests possible nanoparticle re-distribution in the tumours during the heating. PMID:21756046

  3. Decomposition of spontaneous fluctuations in tumour oxygenation using BOLD MRI and independent component analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Miguel R; Johnson, S Peter; Ramasawmy, Rajiv; Pedley, R Barbara; Lythgoe, Mark F; Walker-Samuel, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Solid tumours can undergo cycles of hypoxia, followed by reoxygenation, which can have significant implications for the success of anticancer therapies. A need therefore exists to develop methods to aid its detection and to further characterise its biological basis. We present here a novel method for decomposing systemic and tumour-specific contributions to fluctuations in tumour deoxyhaemoglobin concentration, based on magnetic resonance imaging measurements. Methods: Fluctuations in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration in two tumour xenograft models of colorectal carcinoma were decomposed into distinct contributions using independent component analysis. These components were then correlated with systemic pulse oximetry measurements to assess the influence of systemic variations in blood oxygenation in tumours, compared with those that arise within the tumour itself (tumour-specific). Immunohistochemical staining was used to assess the physiological basis of each source of fluctuation. Results: Systemic fluctuations in blood oxygenation were found to contribute to cycling hypoxia in tumours, but tumour-specific fluctuations were also evident. Moreover, the size of the tumours was found to influence the degree of systemic, but not tumour-specific, oscillations. The degree of vessel maturation was related to the amplitude of tumour-specific, but not systemic, oscillations. Conclusions: Our results provide further insights into the complexity of spontaneous fluctuations in tumour oxygenation and its relationship with tumour pathophysiology. These observations could be used to develop improved drug delivery strategies. PMID:26484634

  4. Evidence that platelet and tumour heparanases are similar enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, C; Browne, A M; Parish, C R

    1999-01-01

    In order to enter tissues, blood-borne metastatic tumour cells and leucocytes need to extravasate through the vascular basal lamina (BL), a process which involves a battery of degradative enzymes. A key degradative enzyme is the endoglycosidase heparanase, which cleaves heparan sulphate (HS), an important structural component of the vascular BL. Previously, tumour-derived heparanase activity (which has been shown to be related to the metastatic potential of murine and human melanoma cell lines) was reported to cleave HS and be inhibited by heparin, as distinct from human platelet heparanase, which cleaved both substrates [Nakajima, Irimura and Nicolson (1988) J. Cell Biochem. 36, 157-167]. We recently reported the purification of human platelet heparanase and showed that the enzyme is a 50-kDa endoglucuronidase [Freeman and Parish (1998) Biochem. J. 330, 1341-1350]. We now report the purification and characterization of heparanase activity from highly metastatic rat 13762 MAT mammary adenocarcinoma and human HCT 116 colonic carcinoma cells and from rat liver using essentially the same procedure that was reported for purification of the human platelet enzyme. The rat 13762 MAT tumour enzyme, which has a native M(r) of 45 kDa when analysed by gel-filtration chromatography and by SDS/PAGE, was observed to be an endoglucuronidase that degraded heparin and HS to fragments of the same sizes as the human platelet enzyme does. N-deglycosylation of both the human platelet and rat 13762 MAT tumour enzymes gave, in each case, a 41-kDa band by SDS/PAGE analysis, demonstrating that the observed difference in M(r) between the platelet and tumour enzymes may have been due largely to differences in the relative amounts of N-glycosylation. Two peptides were isolated following Endoproteinase Lys-C digestion of both the human platelet and rat 13762 MAT tumour heparanases and were shown to be highly similar. Both the rat liver and human colonic carcinoma heparanases also degraded both

  5. MEK inhibition prevents tumour-shed transforming growth factor-β-induced T-regulatory cell augmentation in tumour milieu

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Dewan M S; Panda, Abir K; Chakrabarty, Sreeparna; Bhattacharjee, Pushpak; Kajal, Kirti; Mohanty, Suchismita; Sarkar, Irene; Sarkar, Diptendra K; Kar, Santosh K; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2015-01-01

    Tumour progression is associated with immune-suppressive conditions that facilitate the escape of tumour cells from the regimen of immune cells, subsequently paralysing the host defence mechanisms. Induction of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells has been implicated in the tumour immune escape mechanism, although the novel anti-cancer treatment strategies targeting Treg cells remain unknown. The focus of this study is to define the interaction between tumour and immune system, i.e. how immune tolerance starts and gradually leads to the induction of adaptive Treg cells in the tumour microenvironment. Our study identified hyperactivated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) -signalling as a potential target for reversing Treg cell augmentation in breast cancer patients. In more mechanistic detail, pharmacological inhibitors of MEK/ERK signalling inhibited transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in tumour cells that essentially blocked TGF-β-SMAD3/SMAD4-mediated induction of CD25/interleukin-2 receptor α on CD4+ T-cell surface. As a result high-affinity binding of interleukin-2 on those cells was prohibited, causing lack of Janus kinase 1 (JAK1)/JAK3-mediated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)/STAT5 activation required for FoxP3 expression. Finally, for a more radical approach towards a safe MEK inhibitor, we validate the potential of multi-kinase inhibitor curcumin, especially the nano-curcumin made out of pure curcumin with greater bioavailability; in repealing tumour-shed TGF-β-induced Treg cell augmentation. PMID:25284464

  6. Oxygen carrying microbubbles for enhanced sonodynamic therapy of hypoxic tumours.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Conor; Owen, Joshua; Stride, Eleanor; Fowley, Colin; Nesbitt, Heather; Cochrane, David; Coussios, Constantin C; Borden, M; Nomikou, Nikolitsa; McHale, Anthony P; Callan, John F

    2015-04-10

    Tumour hypoxia represents a major challenge in the effective treatment of solid cancerous tumours using conventional approaches. As oxygen is a key substrate for Photo-/Sono-dynamic Therapy (PDT/SDT), hypoxia is also problematic for the treatment of solid tumours using these techniques. The ability to deliver oxygen to the vicinity of the tumour increases its local partial pressure improving the possibility of ROS generation in PDT/SDT. In this manuscript, we investigate the use of oxygen-loaded, lipid-stabilised microbubbles (MBs), decorated with a Rose Bengal sensitiser, for SDT-based treatment of a pancreatic cancer model (BxPc-3) in vitro and in vivo. We directly compare the effectiveness of the oxygen-loaded MBs with sulphur hexafluoride (SF6)-loaded MBs and reveal a significant improvement in therapeutic efficacy. The combination of oxygen-carrying, ultrasound-responsive MBs, with an ultrasound-responsive therapeutic sensitiser, offers the possibility of delivering and activating the MB-sensitiser conjugate at the tumour site in a non-invasive manner, providing enhanced sonodynamic activation at that site.

  7. The penetration of misonidazole into spontaneous canine tumours.

    PubMed Central

    White, R. A.; Workman, P.; Owen, L. N.; Bleehen, N. M.

    1979-01-01

    The hypoxic cell-radiosensitizing drug misonidazole (1-(2-nitroimidazol-1-yl)-3-methoxypropan -2 -ol, Ro 07-0582, MIS) was administered at a dose of 150 mg/kg i.v. to 6 dogs bearing spontaneous tumours, and the resulting tumour concentrations were measured to HPLC analysis. In 4 dogs it was possible to obtain serial biopsy specimens up to 5 h. With the exception of a brain tumour, the tumour concentrations ranged between 47% and 95% of the plasma concentration, most of the values falling within the range 50--70%. Concentrations in the brain tumour were markedly lower. Barbiturate anaesthesia was necessary for the removal of the serial biopsy specimens, and the effects of sodium pentobarbitone anaesthesia on the pharmacokinetics of MIS were investigated in 2 dogs. After barbiturate anaesthesia peak plasma concontrations were raised and the availability of MIS was increased, although the biological half-life remained unaltered. The metabolism of MIS to the O-demethylated metabolite, Ro 05-9963, was delayed initially. The concentrations of MIS AND Ro 05-9963 in cerebrospinal fluid were also recorded in these dogs; MIS concentrations were found to approach those of the plasma, whereas the metabolite concentrations were considerably lower (0--58% of the plasma concentration). PMID:289406

  8. Necrosis and apoptosis in Trichinella spiralis-mediated tumour reduction

    PubMed Central

    Vasilev, Sasa; Ilic, Natasa; Gruden-Movsesijan, Alisa; Vasilijic, Sasa; Bosic, Martina

    2015-01-01

    It is known that infection with different pathogens, including helminths, can alter the progression of malignant or other diseases. We studied the effect of chronic Trichinella spiralis infection or muscle larvae excretory-secretory (ES L1) antigens on the malignant tumour growth in the mouse melanoma model system in vivo and in vitro. Our results confirmed that chronic infection with T. spiralis possesses the capacity to slow down the progression of tumour growth, resulting in an impressive reduction in tumour size. We found that the phenomenon could, at least partially, be related to a lower level of tumour necrosis compared to necrosis present in control animals with progressive malignancy course. An increased apoptotic potential among the low percentage of cells within the total tumour cell number in vivo was also observed. ES L1 antigen, as a parasitic product that is released during the chronic phase of infection, reduced the survival and slightly, but significantly increased the apoptosis level of melanoma cells in vitro. Our results imply that powerful Trichinella anti-malignance capacity does not rely only on necrosis and apoptosis but other mechanisms through which infection or parasite products manipulate the tumor establishment and expansion should be considered. PMID:26155183

  9. bcl-2 expression in pleural and extrapleural solitary fibrous tumours.

    PubMed

    Chilosi, M; Facchettti, F; Dei Tos, A P; Lestani, M; Morassi, M L; Martignoni, G; Sorio, C; Benedetti, A; Morelli, L; Doglioni, C; Barberis, M; Menestrina, F; Viale, G

    1997-04-01

    This study evaluated the immunoreactivity for bcl-2, a molecule involved in the control of programmed cell death, in cases of pleural (14) and extrapleural (2) solitary fibrous tumour (SFT), malignant mesotheliomas of different histological types, and a variety of extrapleural CD34-positive and CD34-negative spindle-cell tumours. In all SFTs, strong and diffuse immunostaining was demonstrated with anti-bel-2 antibody, sharply contrasting with the complete lack of staining observed in all mesotheliomas. The specificity of immunodetection of bcl-2 in SFT was confirmed by immunoblot analysis, showing a band consistent with the bcl-2 protein. At extrapleural locations, strong bcl-2 immunoreactivity was observed in Schwannoma (2/3 cases), synovial sarcoma (4/4 cases), and all cases of CD34-positive gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST; 10/10 cases). Most sarcomas were bcl-2-negative. Lack of bcl-2 expression was demonstrated in tumours which can pose problems in the differential diagnosis of SFT and can exhibit haemangiopericytoma-like features, including haemangiopericytoma (3 cases), dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (16 cases), and deep-seated fibrous histiocytoma (3 cases). The constitutive expression of bcl-2 in SFT widens the spectrum of available markers for these tumours, providing a useful adjunct to their differential diagnosis in difficult cases at pleural and extrapleural sites, and contributing to the understanding of their histogenesis and molecular pathogenesis.

  10. Renal solitary fibrous tumour: A rare pathological entity.

    PubMed

    Dong, Biao; Zhang, Jianjian; Wang, Gang; Zhai, Xiuyu; Fu, Yaowen; Zhou, Honglan; Wang, Yuantao

    2014-09-01

    A solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is a rare mesenchymal cell neoplasm that can develop at any site. SFT of the kidney is extremely rare. Recently, we had a case of solitary fibrous tumour involving the left kidney in a 71-year-old female patient. The SFT was incidentally found by imaging modalities at the time of a physical workup. Computed tomography and retrograde pyelography showed a 4 × 3.5 × 4-cm nodular mass in the middle poles of the left kidney adjacent to the renal pelvis. A laparoscopic radical resection of the left kidney was performed. The tumour was well-circumscribed and composed of a mixture of spindle cells; microscopically, we found dense collagenous bands. Immunohistochemical studies showed strong reactions with CD34, bcl-2 and CD99. A nuclear positivity with Ki-67 was observed in less than 1% of cells. The tumour was negative for desmin, SMA and CD117. Histopathological and immunohistochemical studies confirmed the diagnosis of a solitary fibrous tumour.

  11. Pituitary-tumour-transforming-gene 1 expression in testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Pierconti, F; Milardi, D; Martini, M; Grande, G; Cenci, T; Gulino, G; Larocca, L M; Rindi, G; Pontecorvi, A; De Marinis, L

    2015-05-01

    Genomic instability is a feature of germ cell tumours. The pituitary-tumour-transforming-gene 1 (PTTG1) is the major effector of chromosome segregation during mitosis, protecting the cell from aneuploidy. The protein expression of this gene has been evaluated in testicular tumours by immunohistochemistry. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded specimens of testicular tissues from 83 patients undergoing therapeutic orchidectomy for seminomas (n = 53), embryonal carcinoma (n = 10), yolk sac tumour (n = 10) and teratoma (n = 10) were examined. Seminoma was associated with in situ carcinoma (CIS) in 23 samples. PTTG1 immunostaining was performed using rabbit anti-PTTG1 as a primary antibody. In CIS, only isolated cells showed nuclear staining for PTTG1. In the peripheral area of seminoma, PTTG1 was mostly detected as localised in the nucleus; in the central area of seminoma, PTTG1 staining was more intense in cytoplasm. PTTG1-positive cells were also present in the areas of seminoma infiltration. On the other hand, in embryonal carcinoma, cells had a diffuse positive immunostaining, mainly cytoplasmatic, while we did not observe an expression of PTTG1 in yolk sac tumour and mature teratoma. We firstly identified the PTTG1 expression pattern in normal testis, CIS and testicular cancer. Further investigation is needed to clarify the functional activity of PTTG1 in testicular oncogenesis. PMID:24754453

  12. On a nonlinear model for tumour growth with drug application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donatelli, Donatella; Trivisa, Konstantina

    2015-05-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a nonlinear system modelling tumour growth with drug application. The tumour is viewed as a mixture consisting of proliferating, quiescent and dead cells as well as a nutrient in the presence of a drug. The system is given by a multi-phase flow model: the densities of the different cells are governed by a set of transport equations, the density of the nutrient and the density of the drug are governed by rather general diffusion equations, while the velocity of the tumour is given by Brinkman's equation. The domain occupied by the tumour in this setting is a growing continuum Ω with boundary ∂Ω both of which evolve in time. Global-in-time weak solutions are obtained using an approach based on penalization of the boundary behaviour, diffusion and viscosity in the weak formulation. Both the solutions and the domain are rather general, no symmetry assumption is required and the result holds for large initial data. This article is part of a research programme whose aim is the investigation of the effect of drug application in tumour growth.

  13. Metastatic liver tumour segmentation from discriminant Grassmannian manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadoury, Samuel; Vorontsov, Eugene; Tang, An

    2015-08-01

    The early detection, diagnosis and monitoring of liver cancer progression can be achieved with the precise delineation of metastatic tumours. However, accurate automated segmentation remains challenging due to the presence of noise, inhomogeneity and the high appearance variability of malignant tissue. In this paper, we propose an unsupervised metastatic liver tumour segmentation framework using a machine learning approach based on discriminant Grassmannian manifolds which learns the appearance of tumours with respect to normal tissue. First, the framework learns within-class and between-class similarity distributions from a training set of images to discover the optimal manifold discrimination between normal and pathological tissue in the liver. Second, a conditional optimisation scheme computes non-local pairwise as well as pattern-based clique potentials from the manifold subspace to recognise regions with similar labelings and to incorporate global consistency in the segmentation process. The proposed framework was validated on a clinical database of 43 CT images from patients with metastatic liver cancer. Compared to state-of-the-art methods, our method achieves a better performance on two separate datasets of metastatic liver tumours from different clinical sites, yielding an overall mean Dice similarity coefficient of 90.7+/- 2.4 in over 50 tumours with an average volume of 27.3 mm3.

  14. Tumours of minor salivary glands--a clinicopathologic study.

    PubMed

    Nag, Dipanwita; Biswas, Pranab Kumar; Mandal, Palash Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Nirmal Kumar; Gautam, Dibyendu; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata

    2012-08-01

    The salivary gland system comprises 3 pairs of major glands ie, parotid, submandibular and sublingual and also thousands of lobules of minor salivary glands dispersed in oral cavity, nasal cavity, maxillary sinuses and upper airways. Most of the studies on salivary gland tumours included both major and minor salivary glands. Objectives of this study were to see the age, sex and site distribution of minor salivary gland tumours as well as cytohistologic correlation during their diagnosis. The study is a retrospective one and done in the pathology department of Medical College, Kolkata taking the cases referred from ENT and Surgery departments in the period from April 2008 to March 2011. There were 123 cases of salivary gland tumours including both major and minor salivary glands in this study. Out of these, 21 cases of minor salivary gland tumours were selected and further analysed. There were 9 cases of benign and 12 cases of malignant tumours. Most benign cases were pleomorphic adenoma and most of malignant were adenoid cystic carcinoma affecting maximally males above 40 years of age. For malignant cases the cytohistologic correlation was 100% whereas in benign it was 70%. We had no need of using immunohistochemistry as histologic diagnosis were clear-cut. Pathologic staging were done in most of malignant cases thus helping the clinicians to adopt better treatment protocol.

  15. Classification of salivary gland tumours--a brief histopathological review.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R H

    1995-07-01

    Tumours of the salivary glands display a wide variety of histological appearances, and vary in behaviour from totally benign to high grade and usually fatal malignancies. Over the past 40 years several classification schemes have been proposed, of which the most comprehensive and accurate are those of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) and the World Health Organization (WHO) which were both revised in 1991. They are readily applicable by practising surgical pathologists, and encompass most of the range of tumours likely to be encountered. If I have a slight preference, it is for the WHO classification which is more concise. This paper briefly discusses each tumour, and highlights the changes from previous classifications, including the proper recognition of several newly described tumours which are distinct clinico-pathological entities. Neither of the new schemes solves every problem, and brief attention is drawn to defects. These are minor, and do not significantly detract from the advantages of both new classifications, which represent a major advance in our ability to understand these often perplexing tumours.

  16. Necrosis and apoptosis in Trichinella spiralis-mediated tumour reduction.

    PubMed

    Vasilev, Sasa; Ilic, Natasa; Gruden-Movsesijan, Alisa; Vasilijic, Sasa; Bosic, Martina; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Ljiljana

    2015-01-01

    It is known that infection with different pathogens, including helminths, can alter the progression of malignant or other diseases. We studied the effect of chronic Trichinella spiralis infection or muscle larvae excretory-secretory (ES L1) antigens on the malignant tumour growth in the mouse melanoma model system in vivo and in vitro. Our results confirmed that chronic infection with T. spiralis possesses the capacity to slow down the progression of tumour growth, resulting in an impressive reduction in tumour size. We found that the phenomenon could, at least partially, be related to a lower level of tumour necrosis compared to necrosis present in control animals with progressive malignancy course. An increased apoptotic potential among the low percentage of cells within the total tumour cell number in vivo was also observed. ES L1 antigen, as a parasitic product that is released during the chronic phase of infection, reduced the survival and slightly, but significantly increased the apoptosis level of melanoma cells in vitro. Our results imply that powerful Trichinella anti-malignance capacity does not rely only on necrosis and apoptosis but other mechanisms through which infection or parasite products manipulate the tumor establishment and expansion should be considered. PMID:26155183

  17. Tumour necrosis factors in childhood asthma.

    PubMed

    Najam, F I; Giasuddin, A S; Shembesh, A H

    2001-03-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) and TNF beta levels in serum were measured by enzyme immunoassays in 64 Libyan children (age: 1-12 years, sex: 39 males, 25 females) with mild to moderately severe asthma (Group A). Among these patients, 35 had active disease (AA) and 29 had inactive disease (NA). According to age range, 20, 21 and 23 patients were between 1-3 years (A1), > 3-5 years (A2) and > 5-12 years (A3) respectively. A1 had 9 and 11 patients with active (AA1) and inactive (NA1) disease; A2 had 10 and 11 patients with active (AA2) and inactive (NA2) disease; A3 had 16 and 7 patients with active (AA3) and inactive (NA3) disease respectively. Age-matched comparisons was made with 57 healthy children (age: 1-12 years; sex: 30 males, 27 females) (Group B). Among the controls, 15, 19 and 23 children were between 1-3 years (B1), > 3-5 years (B2) and > 5-12 years (B3) respectively. It was observed that serum mean TNF alpha level was significantly higher in patients, while TNF beta levels was normal (A vs B-TNF alpha P < 0.001, TNF beta: P > 0.1). The TNF alpha level was elevated significantly in active disease, while it was normal in inactive disease (AA, NA, B: P = 0.0001; AA vs NA; P < 0.0001; NA vs B: P > 0.05) and TNF beta levels were normal in both groups (AA, NA, B: P = 0.25). Further, TNF alpha levels were significantly higher in all age ranges but in patients with active disease only (AA1, NA1, B: P = 0.0008; AA2, NA2, B: P = 0.0003; AA3, NA3, B: P = 0.0396). TNF alpha may therefore be involved in the pathophysiology of asthma possibly through various proinflammatory mechanisms.

  18. Endogenous pacemaker activity of rat tumour somatotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecien, Renata; Robert, Christophe; Cannon, Robert; Vigues, Stephan; Arnoux, Annie; Kordon, Claude; Hammond, Constance

    1998-01-01

    Cells derived from a rat pituitary tumour (GC cell line) that continuously release growth hormone behave as endogenous pacemakers. In simultaneous patch clamp recordings and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) imaging, they displayed rhythmic action potentials (44.7 ± 2.7 mV, 178 ± 40 ms, 0.30 ± 0.04 Hz) and concomitant [Ca2+]i transients (374 ± 57 nM, 1.0 ± 0.2 s, 0.27 ± 0.03 Hz). Action potentials and [Ca2+]i transients were reversibly blocked by removal of external Ca2+, addition of nifedipine (1 μM) or Ni2+ (40 μM), but were insensitive to TTX (1 μM). An L-type Ca2+ current activated at -33.6 ± 0.4 mV (holding potential (Vh), −40 mV), peaked at -1.8 ± 1.3 mV, was reduced by nifedipine and enhanced by S-(+)-SDZ 202 791. A T/R-type Ca2+ current activated at -41.7 ± 2.7 mV (Vh, -80 or -60 mV), peaked at -9.2 ± 3.0 mV, was reduced by low concentrations of Ni2+ (40 μM) or Cd2+ (10 μM) and was toxin resistant. Parallel experiments revealed the expression of the class E calcium channel α1-subunit mRNA. The K+ channel blockers TEA (25 mM) and charybdotoxin (10–100 nM) enhanced spike amplitude and/or duration. Apamin (100 nM) also strongly reduced the after-spike hyperpolarization. The outward K+ tail current evoked by a depolarizing step that mimicked an action potential reversed at −69.8 ± 0.3 mV, presented two components, lasted 2–3 s and was totally blocked by Cd2+ (400 μM). The slow pacemaker depolarization (3.5 ± 0.4 s) that separated consecutive spikes corresponded to a 2- to 3-fold increase in membrane resistance, was strongly Na+ sensitive but TTX insensitive. Computer simulations showed that pacemaker activity can be reproduced by a minimum of six currents: an L-type Ca2+ current underlies the rising phase of action potentials that are repolarized by a delayed rectifier and Ca2+-activated K+ currents. In between spikes, the decay of Ca2+-activated K+ currents and a persistent inward cationic current depolarize the membrane

  19. Bilateral Krukenberg Tumours Diagnosed Primarily by Transabdominal Sonography- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Padala, Krishna Prasanthi; Mahesh; Gowda, Gautham; Pailoor, Aruna

    2015-01-01

    Krukenberg tumour, also known as carcinoma mucocellulare, is a metastatic adenocarcinoma of ovaries from different primary tumour sites. Gastric carcinoma is most common primary tumour responsible for approximately 50% of Krukenberg tumours. Discrimination between primary ovarian cancer and metastatic tumours in the ovary is important, because their management is different. Here we present a case of female suffering from gastric carcinoma with bilateral Krukenberg tumours, diagnosed primarily by transabdominal sonography. The patient was referred to higher centre for further treatment and followed up. PMID:26816967

  20. No Epstein Barr and cytomegalovirus DNA found in salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Kärjä, V; Syrjänen, K; Syrjänen, S

    1997-01-01

    A series of 219 (106 malignant and 113 benign) salivary gland tumours was investigated by in situ hybridisation (ISH) to detect Epstein-Barr-virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA. Normal salivary gland did not show hybridisation signals for these viruses. Tumours presenting hybridisation signals in ductal and myoepithelial cells and 17 Warthin's tumours were further studied by PCR, but none of these tumours contained EBV or CMV DNA. Our series did not contain lymphoepithelial carcinomas, which are EBV-associated tumours. The results suggest that factors other than EBV or CMV are involved in carcinogenesis of primary salivary gland tumours.